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Sample records for alk kinase domain

  1. The neuroblastoma associated F1174L ALK mutation causes resistance to an ALK kinase inhibitor in ALK translocated cancers

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Butrynski, James; Capelletti, Marzia; Wang, Liping; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Demetri, George; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.; Rodig, Scott J.; Eck, Michael J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    The ALK kinase inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066) is clinically effective in patients with ALK-translocated cancers, but its efficacy will ultimately be limited by acquired drug resistance. Here we report the identification of a secondary mutation in ALK, F1174L, as one cause of crizotinib resistance in a patient with an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) harbouring a RANBP2-ALK translocation who progressed while crizotinib therapy. When present in cis with an ALK translocation, this mutation (also detected in neuroblastomas) causes an increase in ALK phosphorylation, cell growth and downstream signaling. Furthermore, the F1174L mutation inhibits crizotinib mediated downregulation of ALK signaling and blocks apoptosis in RANBP2-ALK Ba/F3 cells. A chemically distinct ALK inhibitor, TAE684, or the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG are both effective in models harbouring the F1174L ALK mutation. Our findings highlight the importance of studying drug resistance mechanisms in order to develop effective clinical treatments for patients with ALK-translocated cancers. PMID:21030459

  2. A novel ALK secondary mutation and EGFR signaling cause resistance to ALK kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takaaki; Koivunen, Jussi; Ogino, Atsuko; Yanagita, Masahiko; Nikiforow, Sarah; Zheng, Wei; Lathan, Christopher; Marcoux, J. Paul; Du, Jinyan; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Capelletti, Marzia; Shimamura, Takeshi; Ercan, Dalia; Stumpfova, Magda; Xiao, Yun; Weremowicz, Stanislawa; Butaney, Mohit; Heon, Stephanie; Wilner, Keith; Christensen, James G.; Eck, Michel J.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Lindeman, Neal; Gray, Nathanael S.; Rodig, Scott J.; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, are effective treatments in preclinical models and in cancer patients with ALK-translocated cancers. However, their efficacy will ultimately be limited by the development of acquired drug resistance. Here we report two mechanisms of ALK TKI resistance identified from, a crizotinib treated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient and in a cell line generated from the resistant tumor (DFCI076), and from studying a resistant version of the ALK TKI (TAE684) sensitive H3122 cell line. The crizotinib resistant DFCI076 cell line, harboured a unique L1152R ALK secondary mutation, and was also resistant to the structurally unrelated ALK TKI TAE684. Although the DFCI076 cell line was still partially dependent on ALK for survival, it also contained concurrent co-activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling. In contrast, the TAE684 resistant (TR3) H3122 cell line did not contain an ALK secondary mutation but instead harboured co-activation of EGFR signalling. Dual inhibition of both ALK and EGFR was the most effective therapeutic strategy for the DFCI076 and H3122 TR3 cell lines. We further identified a subset (3/50; 6%) of treatment naïve NSCLC patients with ALK rearrangements that also had concurrent EGFR activating mutations. Our studies identify resistance mechanisms to ALK TKIs mediated by both ALK and by a bypass signalling pathway mediated by EGFR. These mechanisms can occur independently, or in the same cancer, suggesting that the combination of both ALK and EGFR inhibitors may represent an effective therapy for these subsets of NSCLC patients. PMID:21791641

  3. EML4-ALK fusion gene and efficacy of an ALK kinase inhibitor in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koivunen, Jussi P.; Mermel, Craig; Zejnullahu, Kreshnik; Murphy, Carly; Lifshits, Eugene; Holmes, Alison J.; Choi, Hwan Geun; Kim, Jhingook; Chiang, Derek; Thomas, Roman; Lee, Jinseon; Richards, William G.; Sugarbaker, David J.; Ducko, Christopher; Lindeman, Neal; Marcoux, J. Paul; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Lee, Charles; Meyerson, Matthew; Jänne, Pasi A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The EML4-ALK fusion gene has been detected in ~7% of Japanese non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We determined the frequency of EML4-ALK in Caucasian NSCLCs and in NSCLC cell lines. We also determined whether TAE684, a specific ALK kinase inhibitor, would inhibit the growth of EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design We screened 305 primary NSCLCs (both US (n=138) and Korean (n=167) patients) and 83 NSCLC cell lines using RT-PCR and by exon array analyses. We evaluated the efficacy of TAE684 against NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Results We detected 4 different variants, including two novel variants, of EML4-ALK using RT-PCR in 8/305 tumors (3%) and in 3/83 (3.6%) NSCLC cell lines. All EML4-ALK containing tumors and cell lines were adenocarcinomas. EML4-ALK was detected more frequently in NSCLC patients who were never or light (< 10 pack years) cigarette smokers compared to current/former smokers (6% vs. 1%; p=0.049). TAE684 inhibited the growth of 1 of 3 (H3122) EML4-ALK containing cell lines in vitro and in vivo, inhibited Akt phosphorylation and caused apoptosis. In another EML4-ALK cell line, DFCI032, TAE684 was ineffective due to co-activation of EGFR and ERBB2. The combination of TAE684 and CL-387,785 (EGFR/ERBB2 kinase inhibitor), inhibited growth and Akt phosphorylation and led to apoptosis in the DFCI032 cell line. Conclusions EML4-ALK is found in the minority of NSCLCs. ALK kinase inhibitors alone or in combination may nevertheless be clinically effective treatments for NSCLC patients whose tumors contain EML4-ALK. PMID:18594010

  4. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Signaling in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Shirai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene was identified as an oncogenic driver in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007. A multi-targeted ALK/ROS1/MET inhibitor, crizotinib, targeting this activated tyrosine kinase has led to significant clinical benefit including tumor shrinkage and prolonged survival without disease progression and has been approved by US FDA since 2011 for the treatment of advanced ALK-rearranged NSCLC (Ou et al. Oncologist 17:1351-1375, 2012). Knowledge gained from treating ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients including the presenting clinicopathologic characteristics, methods of detecting ALK-rearranged NSCLC, pattern of relapse and acquired resistance mechanisms while on crizotinib, and the clinical activities of more potent ALK inhibitors has led us to a detailed and ever expanding knowledge of the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer but also raising many more questions that remained to be answered in the future. This book chapter will provide a concise summary of the importance of ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer. Understanding the ALK signaling pathway in lung cancer will likely provide the roadmap to the management of major epithelial malignancies driven by receptor tyrosine kinase rearrangement. PMID:26667344

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) downstream signaling pathways identifies signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 as a functional target of activated ALK in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattu, Kamaraj; Hochgräfe, Falko; Wu, Jianmin; Umapathy, Ganesh; Schönherr, Christina; Ruuth, Kristina; Chand, Damini; Witek, Barbara; Fuchs, James; Li, Pui-Kai; Hugosson, Fredrik; Daly, Roger J; Palmer, Ruth H; Hallberg, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase is a key oncogenic mechanism in a growing number of tumor types. In the majority of cases, ALK is activated by fusion with a dimerizing partner protein as a result of chromosomal translocation events, most studied in the case of the nucleophosmin–ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–ALK oncoproteins. It is now also appreciated that the full-length ALK receptor can be activated by point mutations and by deletions within the extracellular domain, such as those observed in neuroblastoma. Several studies have employed phosphoproteomics approaches to find substrates of ALK fusion proteins. In this study, we used MS-based phosphotyrosine profiling to characterize phosphotyrosine signaling events associated with the full-length ALK receptor. A number of previously identified and novel targets were identified. One of these, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), has previously been observed to be activated in response to oncogenic ALK signaling, but the significance of this in signaling from the full-length ALK receptor has not been explored further. We show here that activated ALK robustly activates STAT3 on Tyr705 in a number of independent neuroblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, knockdown of STAT3 by RNA interference resulted in a reduction in myelocytomatosis neuroblastom (MYCN) protein levels downstream of ALK signaling. These observations, together with a decreased level of MYCN and inhibition of neuroblastoma cell growth in the presence of STAT3 inhibitors, suggest that activation of STAT3 is important for ALK signaling activity in neuroblastoma. PMID:23889739

  6. Targeting tumour vasculature by inhibiting activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 function.

    PubMed

    de Vinuesa, Amaya García; Bocci, Matteo; Pietras, Kristian; Ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-08-15

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer and is now a validated therapeutic target in the clinical setting. Despite the initial success, anti-angiogenic compounds impinging on the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway display limited survival benefits in patients and resistance often develops due to activation of alternative pathways. Thus, finding and validating new targets is highly warranted. Activin receptor-like kinase (ALK)1 is a transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) type I receptor predominantly expressed in actively proliferating endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1 has been shown to play a pivotal role in regulating angiogenesis by binding to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and 10. Two main pharmacological inhibitors, an ALK1-Fc fusion protein (Dalantercept/ACE-041) and a fully human antibody against the extracellular domain of ALK1 (PF-03446962) are currently under clinical development. Herein, we briefly recapitulate the role of ALK1 in blood vessel formation and the current status of the preclinical and clinical studies on inhibition of ALK1 signalling as an anti-angiogenic strategy. Future directions in terms of new combination regimens will also be presented. PMID:27528762

  7. A Rare Case of Pleomorphic Carcinoma of the Lung Harboring an Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Tanaka, Ayako; Tamiya, Motohiro; Hamaguchi, Masanari; Osa, Akio; Takeoka, Sawa; Tani, Eriko; Azuma, Yuichiro; Morishita, Naoko; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Norio; Kimura, Kenji; Kadota, Yoshihisa; Kawahara, Kunimitsu; Hirashima, Tomonori; Kawase, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Molecular testing for anomalies, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement, is part of the current standard of care for non-small cell lung cancer, particularly adenocarcinoma. ALK rearrangement occurs most frequently in adenocarcinoma cells and rarely in non-adenocarcinoma cells. We herein report a rare case of pleomorphic lung carcinoma with ALK rearrangement in both its adenocarcinoma and spindle cell components. This case suggests the possibility of ALK rearrangement in pleomorphic carcinoma. PMID:26521903

  8. The role of the ALK receptor in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, B; Palmer, R H

    2016-09-01

    A vast array of oncogenic variants has been identified for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Therefore, there is a need to better understand the role of ALK in cancer biology in order to optimise treatment strategies. This review summarises the latest research on the receptor tyrosine kinase ALK, and how this information can guide the management of patients with cancer that is ALK-positive. A variety of ALK gene alterations have been described across a range of tumour types, including point mutations, deletions and rearrangements. A wide variety of ALK fusions, in which the kinase domain of ALK and the amino-terminal portion of various protein partners are fused, occur in cancer, with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK being the most prevalent in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Different ALK fusion proteins can mediate different signalling outputs, depending on properties such as subcellular localisation and protein stability. The ALK fusions found in tumours lack spatial and temporal regulation, which can also affect dimerisation and substrate specificity. Two ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), crizotinib and ceritinib, are currently approved in Europe for use in ALK-positive NSCLC and several others are in development. These ALK TKIs bind slightly differently within the ATP-binding pocket of the ALK kinase domain and are associated with the emergence of different resistance mutation patterns during therapy. This emphasises the need to tailor the sequence of ALK TKIs according to the ALK signature of each patient. Research into the oncogenic functions of ALK, and fast paced development of ALK inhibitors, has substantially improved outcomes for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. Limited data are available surrounding the physiological ligand-stimulated activation of ALK signalling and further research is needed. Understanding the role of ALK in tumour biology is key to further optimising therapeutic strategies for ALK

  9. Alectinib: a novel second generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor for overcoming clinically-acquired resistance

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilan; Wang, Meining; Zhang, Ao

    2015-01-01

    The development of inhibitors for the tyrosine anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has advanced rapidly, driven by biology and medicinal chemistry. The first generation ALK inhibitor crizotinib was granted US FDA approval with only four years of preclinical and clinical testing. Although this drug offers significant clinical benefit to the ALK-positive patients, resistance has been developed through a variety of mechanisms. In addition to ceritinib, alectinib is another second-generation ALK inhibitor launched in 2014 in Japan. This drug has a unique chemical structure bearing a 5H-benzo[b]carbazol-11(6H)-one structural scaffold with an IC50 value of 1.9 nmol/L, and is highly potent against ALK bearing the gatekeeper mutation L1196M with an IC50 of 1.56 nmol/L. In the clinic, alectinib is highly efficacious in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and retains potency to combat crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations L1196M, F1174L, R1275Q and C1156Y. PMID:26579422

  10. Detection of novel and potentially actionable anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement in colorectal adenocarcinoma by immunohistochemistry screening

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Kim, Sun Young; Jang, Jiryeon; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Park, Young Suk; Lee, Jiyun; Lee, Woo Yong; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Seok Hyung; Balasubramanian, Sohail; Stephens, Philip J.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Li, Gang Gary; Hornby, Zachary; Ali, Siraj M.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been detected in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) using advanced molecular diagnostics tests including exon scanning, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and next generation sequencing (NGS). We investigated if immunohistochemistry (IHC) can be used to detect ALK rearrangement in gastrointestinal malignancies. Experimental designs Tissue microarrays (TMAs) from consecutive gastric carcinoma (GC) and CRC patients who underwent surgical resection at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea were screened by IHC using ALK monoclonal antibody 5A4. IHC positive cases were confirmed by FISH, nCounter assays, and NGS-based comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP). ALK IHC was further applied to CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial. Results Four hundred thirty-two GC and 172 CRC cases were screened by IHC. No GC sample was ALK IHC positive. One CRC (0.6%) was ALK IHC positive (3+) that was confirmed by ALK FISH and a novel CAD-ALK (C35; A20) fusion variant that resulted from a paracentric inversion event inv(2)(p22–21p23) was identified by CGP. One out of 50 CRC patients enrolled in a pathway-directed therapeutic trial was ALK IHC positive (3+) confirmed by ALK FISH and found to harbor the EML4-ALK (E21, A20) fusion variant by CGP. Growth of a tumor cell line derived from this EML4-ALK CRC patient was inhibited by ALK inhibitors crizotinib and entrectinib. Conclusions ALK IHC is a viable screening strategy for identifying ALK rearrangement in CRC. ALK rearrangement is a potential actionable driver mutation in CRC based on survival inhibition of patient tumor-derived cell line by potent ALK inhibitors. PMID:26172300

  11. New therapeutic strategies in neuroblastoma: combined targeting of a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor and liposomal siRNAs against ALK

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, Daniela; Yang, D.; Pastorino, Fabio; Emionite, Laura; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Destefanis, Elisa; Di Fiore, Annarita; Piaggio, Francesca; Brignole, Chiara; Xu, Xiaobao; Liang, Chris; Gibbons, James

    2015-01-01

    Many different aberrations in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) were found to be oncogenic drivers in several cancers including neuroblastoma (NB), therefore ALK is now considered a critical player in NB oncogenesis and a promising therapeutic target. The ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has a limited activity against the various ALK mutations identified in NB patients. We tested: the activity of the novel ALK-inhibitor X-396 administered alone or in combination with Targeted Liposomes carrying ALK-siRNAs (TL[ALK-siRNA]) that are active irrespective of ALK gene mutational status; the pharmacokinetic profiles and the biodistribution of X-396; the efficacy of X-396 versus crizotinib treatment in NB xenografts; whether the combination of X-396 with the TL[ALK-siRNA] could promote long-term survival in NB mouse models. X-396 revealed good bioavailability, moderate half-life, high mean plasma and tumor concentrations. X-396 was more effective than crizotinib in inhibiting in vitro cell proliferation of NB cells and in reducing tumor volume in subcutaneous NB models in a dose-dependent manner. In orthotopic NB xenografts, X-396 significantly increased life span independently of the ALK mutation status. In combination studies, all effects were significantly improved in the mice treated with TL[ALK-siRNA] and X-396 compared to mice receiving the single agents. Our findings provide a rational basis to design innovative molecular-based treatment combinations for clinical application in ALK-driven NB tumors. PMID:26299615

  12. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10-12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  13. Overcoming resistance to first/second generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and ALK inhibitors in oncogene-addicted advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Romanidou, Ourania; Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico; Califano, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activating mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represent the two oncogenic events with an impact on current clinical practice. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and crizotinib are the standard of care for the treatment of EGFR mutant and ALK gene rearranged advanced NSCLC patients. Unfortunately, despite initial clinical benefit, acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs or crizotinib usually develops after an average of 10–12 months of treatment. The aim of this review is to describe the mechanisms of resistance to first/second generation EGFR-TKIs and crizotinib. In particular, we focus on strategies to overcome resistance due to secondary EGFR T790M mutation and mutations of the ALK domain. PMID:27239236

  14. Discovery of Clinical Candidate CEP-37440, a Selective Inhibitor of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK).

    PubMed

    Ott, Gregory R; Cheng, Mangeng; Learn, Keith S; Wagner, Jason; Gingrich, Diane E; Lisko, Joseph G; Curry, Matthew; Mesaros, Eugen F; Ghose, Arup K; Quail, Matthew R; Wan, Weihua; Lu, Lihui; Dobrzanski, Pawel; Albom, Mark S; Angeles, Thelma S; Wells-Knecht, Kevin; Huang, Zeqi; Aimone, Lisa D; Bruckheimer, Elizabeth; Anderson, Nathan; Friedman, Jay; Fernandez, Sandra V; Ator, Mark A; Ruggeri, Bruce A; Dorsey, Bruce D

    2016-08-25

    Analogues structurally related to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor 1 were optimized for metabolic stability. The results from this endeavor not only led to improved metabolic stability, pharmacokinetic parameters, and in vitro activity against clinically derived resistance mutations but also led to the incorporation of activity for focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK activation, via amplification and/or overexpression, is characteristic of multiple invasive solid tumors and metastasis. The discovery of the clinical stage, dual FAK/ALK inhibitor 27b, including details surrounding SAR, in vitro/in vivo pharmacology, and pharmacokinetics, is reported herein. PMID:27527804

  15. Activin Receptor-Like Kinase Receptors ALK5 and ALK1 Are Both Required for TGFβ-Induced Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Kroon, Laurie M. G.; Narcisi, Roberto; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N.; Cleary, Mairéad A.; van Beuningen, Henk M.; Koevoet, Wendy J. L. M.; van Osch, Gerjo J. V. M.; van der Kraan, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are promising for cartilage regeneration because BMSCs can differentiate into cartilage tissue-producing chondrocytes. Transforming Growth Factor β (TGFβ) is crucial for inducing chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs and is known to signal via Activin receptor-Like Kinase (ALK) receptors ALK5 and ALK1. Since the specific role of these two TGFβ receptors in chondrogenesis is unknown, we investigated whether ALK5 and ALK1 are expressed in BMSCs and whether both receptors are required for chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs. Materials & Methods ALK5 and ALK1 gene expression in human BMSCs was determined with RT-qPCR. To induce chondrogenesis, human BMSCs were pellet-cultured in serum-free chondrogenic medium containing TGFβ1. Chondrogenesis was evaluated by aggrecan and collagen type IIα1 RT-qPCR analysis, and histological stainings of proteoglycans and collagen type II. To overexpress constitutively active (ca) receptors, BMSCs were transduced either with caALK5 or caALK1. Expression of ALK5 and ALK1 was downregulated by transducing BMSCs with shRNA against ALK5 or ALK1. Results ALK5 and ALK1 were expressed in in vitro-expanded as well as in pellet-cultured BMSCs from five donors, but mRNA levels of both TGFβ receptors did not clearly associate with chondrogenic induction. TGFβ increased ALK5 and decreased ALK1 gene expression in chondrogenically differentiating BMSC pellets. Neither caALK5 nor caALK1 overexpression induced cartilage matrix formation as efficient as that induced by TGFβ. Moreover, short hairpin-mediated downregulation of either ALK5 or ALK1 resulted in a strong inhibition of TGFβ-induced chondrogenesis. Conclusion ALK5 as well as ALK1 are required for TGFβ-induced chondrogenic differentiation of BMSCs, and TGFβ not only directly induces chondrogenesis, but also modulates ALK5 and ALK1 receptor signaling in BMSCs. These results imply that optimizing cartilage formation by

  16. An orally available tyrosine kinase ALK and RET dual inhibitor bearing the tetracyclic benzo[b]carbazolone core.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilan; Xia, Zongjun; Ji, Yinchun; Xing, Li; Gao, Yinglei; Ai, Jing; Geng, Meiyu; Zhang, Ao

    2016-08-01

    Our early structure-activity relationship study has identified benzo[b]carbazolone 6 as a high potency orally bioavailable ALK inhibitor. Further lead profiling disclosed that 6 is active against both ALK resistant and hot spot-activating mutants, and is also highly potent against RET kinase. Tumor stasis and partial tumor regression were achieved with 6 in both NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK and NIH/3T3-EML4-ALK L1196M xenograft models. Based on the optimal in vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy, compound 6 is now being profiled further in our preclinical settings as a new orally available ALK/RET dual inhibitor. PMID:27131066

  17. Ceritinib for the treatment of patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Landi, Lorenza; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2016-02-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the paradigm of personalized treatment of human cancer. Several oncogenic druggable alterations have been so far identified, with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements representing one of the newest and most appealing. Crizotinib is now recognized as the standard of care in ALK-positive NSCLC due to the positive results of recently published trials. Unfortunately, resistance inevitably occurs within the first year of treatment. Overcoming resistance is the major challenge in clinical oncology, and novel potent ALK inhibitors are currently under evaluation, including ceritinib. Ceritinib is an oral, potent, second-generation ALK inhibitor demonstrating activity in patients who develop resistance to crizotinib. Recent data also suggested efficacy in ALK-inhibitor-naive population, thus supporting investigation of the drug in front-line setting. PMID:26582431

  18. Structure Based Drug Design of Crizotinib (PF-02341066), a Potent and Selective Dual Inhibitor of Mesenchymal-Epithelial Transition Factor (c-MET) Kinase and Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK)

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, J Jean; Tran-Dube,; #769; Michelle,; Shen, Hong; Nambu, Mitchell; Kung, Pei-Pei; Pairish, Mason; Jia, Lei; Meng, Jerry; Funk, Lee; Botrous, Iriny; McTigue, Michele; Grodsky, Neil; Ryan, Kevin; Padrique, Ellen; Alton, Gordon; Timofeevski, Sergei; Yamazaki, Shinji; Li, Qiuhua; Zou, Helen; Christensen, James; Mroczkowski, Barbara; Bender, Steve; Kania, Robert S; Edwards, Martin P

    2011-08-03

    Because of the critical roles of aberrant signaling in cancer, both c-MET and ALK receptor tyrosine kinases are attractive oncology targets for therapeutic intervention. The cocrystal structure of 3 (PHA-665752), bound to c-MET kinase domain, revealed a novel ATP site environment, which served as the target to guide parallel, multiattribute drug design. A novel 2-amino-5-aryl-3-benzyloxypyridine series was created to more effectively make the key interactions achieved with 3. In the novel series, the 2-aminopyridine core allowed a 3-benzyloxy group to reach into the same pocket as the 2,6-dichlorophenyl group of 3 via a more direct vector and thus with a better ligand efficiency (LE). Further optimization of the lead series generated the clinical candidate crizotinib (PF-02341066), which demonstrated potent in vitro and in vivo c-MET kinase and ALK inhibition, effective tumor growth inhibition, and good pharmaceutical properties.

  19. Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells Acquire Resistance to the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib by Activating Alternative Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Ichihara, Eiki; Takigawa, Nagio; Ohashi, Kadoaki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Yasugi, Masayuki; Ninomiya, Takashi; Yamane, Hiromichi; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sakai, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Kunio; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Bessho, Akihiro; Sendo, Toshiaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-15

    Crizotinib is the standard of care for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene, but resistance invariably develops. Unlike crizotinib, alectinib is a selective ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with more potent antitumor effects and a favorable toxicity profile, even in crizotinib-resistant cases. However, acquired resistance to alectinib, as for other TKIs, remains a limitation of its efficacy. Therefore, we investigated the mechanisms by which human NSCLC cells acquire resistance to alectinib. We established two alectinib-resistant cell lines that did not harbor the secondary ALK mutations frequently occurring in crizotinib-resistant cells. One cell line lost the EML4-ALK fusion gene, but exhibited increased activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), and overexpressed the HER3 ligand neuregulin 1. Accordingly, pharmacologic inhibition of IGF1R and HER3 signaling overcame resistance to alectinib in this cell line. The second alectinib-resistant cell line displayed stimulated HGF autocrine signaling that promoted MET activation and remained sensitive to crizotinib treatment. Taken together, our findings reveal two novel mechanisms underlying alectinib resistance that are caused by the activation of alternative tyrosine kinase receptors rather than by secondary ALK mutations. These studies may guide the development of comprehensive treatment strategies that take into consideration the various approaches ALK-positive lung tumors use to withstand therapeutic insult. PMID:26719536

  20. Augmentor α and β (FAM150) are ligands of the receptor tyrosine kinases ALK and LTK: Hierarchy and specificity of ligand–receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Andrey V.; Murray, Phillip B.; Shi, Xiarong; Mo, Elizabeth S.; Mohanty, Jyotidarsini; Tome, Francisco; Bai, Hanwen; Gunel, Murat; Lax, Irit; Schlessinger, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are a class of cell surface receptors that, upon ligand binding, stimulate a variety of critical cellular functions. The orphan receptor anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is one of very few RTKs that remain without a firmly established protein ligand. Here we present a novel cytokine, FAM150B, which we propose naming augmentor-α (AUG-α), as a ligand for ALK. AUG-α binds ALK with high affinity and activates ALK in cells with subnanomolar potency. Detailed binding experiments using cells expressing ALK or the related receptor leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK) demonstrate that AUG-α binds and robustly activates both ALK and LTK. We show that the previously established LTK ligand FAM150A (AUG-β) is specific for LTK and only weakly binds to ALK. Furthermore, expression of AUG-α stimulates transformation of NIH/3T3 cells expressing ALK, induces IL-3 independent growth of Ba/F3 cells expressing ALK, and is expressed in neuroblastoma, a cancer partly driven by ALK. These experiments reveal the hierarchy and specificity of two cytokines as ligands for ALK and LTK and set the stage for elucidating their roles in development and disease states. PMID:26630010

  1. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert

  2. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed

  3. Overcoming acquired resistance to kinase inhibition: the cases of EGFR, ALK and BRAF.

    PubMed

    Giroux, Simon

    2013-01-15

    In the past decade, several kinase inhibitors have been approved based on their clinical benefit for cancer patients. Unfortunately, in many cases, patients develop resistance to these agents via secondary mutations and alternative mechanisms. This review will focus on the cases of acquired resistance to EGFR and ALK inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer patients and BRAF inhibitors for melanoma patients. I will overview the main causes of acquired resistance, and explore the chemical scaffolds as well as combination of drugs, used to tackle these major causes of resistance. PMID:23245516

  4. The ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is effective as a single agent in neuroblastoma driven by expression of ALK and MYCN.

    PubMed

    Guan, J; Tucker, E R; Wan, H; Chand, D; Danielson, L S; Ruuth, K; El Wakil, A; Witek, B; Jamin, Y; Umapathy, G; Robinson, S P; Johnson, T W; Smeal, T; Martinsson, T; Chesler, L; Palmer, R H; Hallberg, B

    2016-09-01

    The first-in-class inhibitor of ALK, c-MET and ROS1, crizotinib (Xalkori), has shown remarkable clinical efficacy in treatment of ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer. However, in neuroblastoma, activating mutations in the ALK kinase domain are typically refractory to crizotinib treatment, highlighting the need for more potent inhibitors. The next-generation ALK inhibitor PF-06463922 is predicted to exhibit increased affinity for ALK mutants prevalent in neuroblastoma. We examined PF-06463922 activity in ALK-driven neuroblastoma models in vitro and in vivo In vitro kinase assays and cell-based experiments examining ALK mutations of increasing potency show that PF-06463922 is an effective inhibitor of ALK with greater activity towards ALK neuroblastoma mutants. In contrast to crizotinib, single agent administration of PF-06463922 caused dramatic tumor inhibition in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenografts as well as a mouse model of high-risk neuroblastoma driven by Th-ALK(F1174L)/MYCN Taken together, our results suggest PF-06463922 is a potent inhibitor of crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, and highlights an important new treatment option for neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27483357

  5. SUMOylation Confers Posttranslational Stability on NPM-ALK Oncogenic Protein.

    PubMed

    Vishwamitra, Deeksha; Curry, Choladda V; Shi, Ping; Alkan, Serhan; Amin, Hesham M

    2015-09-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase-expressing (NPM-ALK+) T-cell lymphoma is an aggressive form of cancer that commonly affects children and adolescents. The expression of NPM-ALK chimeric oncogene results from the chromosomal translocation t(2;5)(p23;q35) that causes the fusion of the ALK and NPM genes. This translocation generates the NPM-ALK protein tyrosine kinase that forms the constitutively activated NPM-ALK/NPM-ALK homodimers. In addition, NPM-ALK is structurally associated with wild-type NPM to form NPM/NPM-ALK heterodimers, which can translocate to the nucleus. The mechanisms that sustain the stability of NPM-ALK are not fully understood. SUMOylation is a posttranslational modification that is characterized by the reversible conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs) with target proteins. SUMO competes with ubiquitin for substrate binding and therefore, SUMOylation is believed to protect target proteins from proteasomal degradation. Moreover, SUMOylation contributes to the subcellular distribution of target proteins. Herein, we found that the SUMOylation pathway is deregulated in NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary lymphoma tumors from patients. We also identified Lys24 and Lys32 within the NPM domain as the sites where NPM-ALK conjugates with SUMO-1 and SUMO-3. Importantly, antagonizing SUMOylation by the SENP1 protease decreased the accumulation of NPM-ALK and suppressed lymphoma cell viability, proliferation, and anchorage-independent colony formation. One possible mechanism for the SENP1-mediated decrease in NPM-ALK levels was the increase in NPM-ALK association with ubiquitin, which facilitates its degradation. Our findings propose a model in which aberrancies in SUMOylation contribute to the pathogenesis of NPM-ALK+ T-cell lymphoma. Unraveling such pathogenic mechanisms may lead to devising novel strategies to eliminate this aggressive neoplasm. PMID:26476082

  6. Peptides derived from the dependence receptor ALK are proapoptotic for ALK-positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, A; Galiacy, S; Ceccato, L; Marchand, C; Tricoire, C; Lopez, F; Bremner, R; Racaud-Sultan, C; Monsarrat, B; Malecaze, F; Allouche, M

    2015-01-01

    ALK is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an oncogenic role in various types of human malignancies. Despite constitutive activation of the kinase through gene alterations, such as chromosomal translocation, gene amplification or mutation, treatments with kinase inhibitors invariably lead to the development of resistance. Aiming to develop new tools for ALK targeting, we took advantage of our previous demonstration identifying ALK as a dependence receptor, implying that in the absence of ligand the kinase-inactive ALK triggers or enhances apoptosis. Here, we synthesized peptides mimicking the proapoptotic domain of ALK and investigated their biological effects on tumor cells. We found that an ALK-derived peptide of 36 amino acids (P36) was cytotoxic for ALK-positive anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast, ALK-negative tumor cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells were insensitive to P36. The cytotoxic effect was due to caspase-dependent apoptosis and required N-myristoylation of the peptide. Two P36-derived shorter peptides as well as a cyclic peptide also induced apoptosis. Surface plasmon resonance and mass spectrometry analysis of P36-interacting proteins from two responsive cell lines, Cost lymphoma and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma, uncovered partners that could involve p53-dependent signaling and pre-mRNA splicing. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 rescued these cells from P36-induced apoptosis. Finally, we observed that a treatment combining P36 with the ALK-specific inhibitor crizotinib resulted in additive cytotoxicity. Therefore, ALK-derived peptides could represent a novel targeted therapy for ALK-positive tumors. PMID:25950466

  7. Primary and Metastatic Cutaneous Melanomas Express ALK Through Alternative Transcriptional Initiation.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Vilain, Ricardo E; Lum, Trina; Busam, Jonathan A; Hollmann, Travis J; Saw, Robyn P M; Coit, Daniel C; Scolyer, Richard A; Wiesner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    A number of common driver mutations have been identified in melanoma, but other genetic or epigenetic aberrations are also likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of melanoma and present potential therapeutic targets. Translocations of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), for example, have been reported in spitzoid melanocytic neoplasms leading to kinase-fusion proteins that result in immunohistochemically detectable ALK expression. In this study, we sought to determine whether ALK was also expressed in nonspitzoid primary and metastatic cutaneous melanomas. ALK immunohistochemistry was performed on 603 melanomas (303 primary and 300 metastatic tumors) from 600 patients. ALK immunohistochemistry expression was identified in 7 primary and 9 metastatic tumors. In 5 of 7 primary tumors and in 6 of 9 metastatic lesions, the majority of tumor cells were immunoreactive for ALK. In the other 2 primary and 3 metastatic lesions, positive staining was identified in less than half of the tumor cells. ALK positivity was found in the presence or absence of BRAF or NRAS mutations. In contrast to prior observations with ALK-positive Spitz tumors, none of the ALK-positive melanomas harbored a translocation. Instead, the ALK-positive melanomas predominantly expressed the recently described ALK isoform, ALK, which lacks the extracellular and transmembrane domains of wild-type ALK, consists primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, and originates from an alternative transcriptional initiation site within the ALK gene. The findings are clinically relevant as patients with metastatic melanoma who have ALK expression may potentially benefit from treatment with ALK kinase inhibitors. PMID:26872010

  8. Anti-ALK Antibodies in Patients with ALK-Positive Malignancies Not Expressing NPM-ALK

    PubMed Central

    Damm-Welk, Christine; Siddiqi, Faraz; Fischer, Matthias; Hero, Barbara; Narayanan, Vignesh; Camidge, David Ross; Harris, Michael; Burke, Amos; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Pulford, Karen; Oschlies, Ilske; Siebert, Reiner; Turner, Suzanne; Woessmann, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Nucleophosmin (NPM)- Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) fusion positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma produce autoantibodies against ALK indicative of an immune response against epitopes of the chimeric fusion protein. We asked whether ALK-expression in other malignancies induces specific antibodies. Antibodies against ALK were detected in sera of one of 50 analysed ALK-expressing neuroblastoma patients, 13 of 21 ALK positive non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients, 13 of 22 ALK translocation-positive, but NPM-ALK-negative lymphoma patients and one of one ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcoma patient, but not in 20 healthy adults. These data suggest that boosting a pre-existent anti-ALK immune response may be more feasible for patients with ALK-positive NSCLC, lymphomas and rhabdomyosarcomas than for tumours expressing wild-type ALK. PMID:27471553

  9. Rearranged Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Gene in Adult-Onset Papillary Thyroid Cancer Amongst Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Mayumi; Takahashi, Keiko; Hayashi, Yuzo; Nakachi, Kei; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2012-01-01

    Background We previously noted that among atomic bomb survivors (ABS), the relative frequency of cases of adult papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) with chromosomal rearrangements (mainly RET/PTC) was significantly greater in those with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. In contrast, the frequency of PTC cases with point mutations (mainly BRAFV600E) was significantly lower in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. We also found that among ABS, the frequency of PTC cases with no detectable gene alterations in RET, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 (NTRK1), BRAF, or RAS was significantly higher in patients with relatively higher radiation exposure than those with lower radiation exposure. However, in ABS with PTC, the relationship between the presence of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fused with other gene partners and radiation exposure has received little study. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the relative frequency of rearranged ALK in ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, would be greater in those having relatively higher radiation exposures. Methods The 105 subjects in the study were drawn from the Life Span Study cohort of ABS of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who were diagnosed with PTC between 1956 and 1993. Seventy-nine were exposed (>0 mGy), and 26 were not exposed to A-bomb radiation. In the 25 ABS with PTC, and with no detectable gene alterations in RET, NTRK1, BRAF, or RAS, we examined archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded PTC specimens for rearrangement of ALK using reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5′ RACE). Results We found rearranged ALK in 10 of 19 radiation-exposed PTC cases, but none among 6 patients with PTC with no radiation exposure. In addition, solid/trabecular-like architecture in PTC was closely associated with ALK

  10. Functional Characterization of the Kinase Activation Loop in Nucleophosmin (NPM)-Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) Using Tandem Affinity Purification and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Ma, Yupo; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond; Young, Leah C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the kinase activation loop (KAL) of the oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK regulates its overall tyrosine phosphorylation status and tumorigenicity. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we assessed how the KAL of NPM-ALK regulates the phosphorylation status of its individual tyrosines. Using the lysates of GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, our highly reproducible results showed evidence of phosphorylation in all 3 tyrosines in KAL and 8 tyrosines outside KAL. We created 7 KAL mutants, each of which carried a Tyr-to-Phe mutation of ≥1 of the 3 tyrosines in KAL. A complete loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL was found in 3 KAL mutants, and their oncogenicity (assessed by cell viability, colony formation, and the ability to phosphorylate effector proteins) was abrogated. A partial loss of the 8 phosphotyrosines was found in 4 KAL mutants, but their oncogenicity did not show simple correlation with the number of residual phosphotyrosines. Tyr-to-Phe mutations of each of the 8 phosphotyrosines outside KAL did not result in a significant decrease in the oncogenicity. In conclusion, we have provided details of how the KAL in NPM-ALK regulates its tyrosine phosphorylation pattern. Our results challenge some of the current concepts regarding the relationship between the tyrosine phosphorylation and oncogenicity of NPM-ALK. PMID:19887368

  11. Crystal structure of EML1 reveals the basis for Hsp90 dependence of oncogenic EML4-ALK by disruption of an atypical β-propeller domain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Mark W.; Law, Edward W. P.; Rennalls, La’Verne P.; Busacca, Sara; O’Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M.; Fennell, Dean A.; Bayliss, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Proteins of the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein (EMAP)-like (EML) family contribute to formation of the mitotic spindle and interphase microtubule network. They contain a unique hydrophobic EML protein (HELP) motif and a variable number of WD40 repeats. Recurrent gene rearrangements in nonsmall cell lung cancer fuse EML4 to anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), causing expression of several fusion oncoprotein variants. We have determined a 2.6-Å crystal structure of the representative ∼70-kDa core of EML1, revealing an intimately associated pair of β-propellers, which we term a TAPE (tandem atypical propeller in EMLs) domain. One propeller is highly atypical, having a discontinuous subdomain unrelated to a WD40 motif in place of one of its blades. This unexpected feature shows how a propeller structure can be assembled from subdomains with distinct folds. The HELP motif is not an independent domain but forms part of the hydrophobic core that joins the two β-propellers. The TAPE domain binds α/β-tubulin via its conserved, concave surface, including part of the atypical blade. Mapping the characteristic breakpoints of each EML4-ALK variant onto our structure indicates that the EML4 TAPE domain is truncated in many variants in a manner likely to make the fusion protein structurally unstable. We found that the heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor ganetespib induced degradation of these variants whereas others lacking a partial TAPE domain were resistant in both overexpression models and patient-derived cell lines. The Hsp90-sensitive EML4-ALK variants are exceptions to the rule that oncogenic fusion proteins involve breakpoints in disordered regions of both partners. PMID:24706829

  12. PF-06463922, an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, overcomes resistance to 1st and 2nd generation ALK inhibitors in pre-clinical models

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Helen Y.; Friboulet, Luc; Kodack, David P.; Engstrom, Lars D.; Li, Qiuhua; West, Melissa; Tang, Ruth W.; Wang, Hui; Tsaparikos, Konstantinos; Wang, Jinwei; Timofeevski, Sergei; Katayama, Ryohei; Dinh, Dac M.; Lam, Hieu; Lam, Justine L.; Yamazaki, Shinji; Hu, Wenyue; Patel, Bhushankumar; Bezwada, Divya; Frias, Rosa L.; Lifshits, Eugene; Mahmood, Sidra; Gainor, Justin F.; Affolter, Timothy; Lappin, Patrick B.; Gukasyan, Hovhannes; Lee, Nathan; Deng, Shibing; Jain, Rakesh K; Johnson, Ted W.; Shaw, Alice T.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Smeal, Tod

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the preclinical evaluation of PF-06463922, a potent and brain penetrant ALK/ROS1 inhibitor. Compared to other clinically available ALK inhibitors, PF-06463922 displayed superior potency against all known clinically acquired ALK mutations, including the highly resistant G1202R mutant. Furthermore, PF-06463922 treatment led to regression of EML4-ALK driven brain metastases, leading to prolonged mouse survival, in a superior manner. Finally, PF-06463922 demonstrated high selectivity and safety margins in a variety of preclinical studies. These results suggest that PF-06463922 will be highly effective for the treatment of patients with ALK-driven lung cancers, including those who relapsed on clinically available ALK inhibitors due to secondary ALK kinase domain mutations and/or due to the failed control of brain metastases. PMID:26144315

  13. SEC31A-ALK Fusion Gene in Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryong Nam; Choi, Yoon-La; Lee, Mi-Sook; Lira, Maruja E; Mao, Mao; Mann, Derrick; Stahl, Joshua; Licon, Abel; Choi, So Jung; Van Vrancken, Michael; Han, Joungho; Wlodarska, Iwona; Kim, Jhingook

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion is a common mechanism underlying pathogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) where these rearrangements represent important diagnostic and therapeutic targets. In this study, we found a new ALK fusion gene, SEC31A-ALK, in lung carcinoma from a 53-year-old Korean man. The conjoined region in the fusion transcript was generated by the fusion of SEC31A exon 21 and ALK exon 20 by genomic rearrangement, which contributed to generation of an intact, in-frame open reading frame. SEC31A-ALK encodes a predicted fusion protein of 1,438 amino acids comprising the WD40 domain of SEC31A at the N-terminus and ALK kinase domain at the C-terminus. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies suggested that SEC31A-ALK was generated by an unbalanced genomic rearrangement associated with loss of the 3'-end of SEC31A. This is the first report of SEC31A-ALK fusion transcript in clinical NSCLC, which could be a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for patients with NSCLC. PMID:25715771

  14. Novel ALK inhibitor AZD3463 inhibits neuroblastoma growth by overcoming crizotinib resistance and inducing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfeng; Wang, Long; Guan, Shan; Cao, Wenming; Wang, Hao; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Huiyuan; Pang, Jonathan C.; Huang, Sophia L.; Akiyama, Yo; Yang, Yifan; Sun, Wenjing; Xu, Xin; Shi, Yan; Zhang, Hong; Kim, Eugene S.; Muscal, Jodi A.; Lu, Fengmin; Yang, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    ALK receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to be a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Germline ALK activating mutations are responsible for the majority of hereditary neuroblastoma and somatic ALK activating mutations are also frequently observed in sporadic cases of advanced NB. Crizotinib, a first-line therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring ALK rearrangements, demonstrates striking efficacy against ALK-rearranged NB. However, crizotinib fails to effectively inhibit the activity of ALK when activating mutations are present within its kinase domain, as with the F1174L mutation. Here we show that a new ALK inhibitor AZD3463 effectively suppressed the proliferation of NB cell lines with wild type ALK (WT) as well as ALK activating mutations (F1174L and D1091N) by blocking the ALK-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and ultimately induced apoptosis and autophagy. In addition, AZD3463 enhanced the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin on NB cells. AZD3463 also exhibited significant therapeutic efficacy on the growth of the NB tumors with WT and F1174L activating mutation ALK in orthotopic xenograft mouse models. These results indicate that AZD3463 is a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of NB. PMID:26786851

  15. Identification of the transforming STRN-ALK fusion as a potential therapeutic target in the aggressive forms of thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Lindsey M.; Barila, Guillermo; Liu, Pengyuan; Evdokimova, Viktoria N.; Trivedi, Sumita; Panebianco, Federica; Gandhi, Manoj; Carty, Sally E.; Hodak, Steven P.; Luo, Jianhua; Dacic, Sanja; Yu, Yan P.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Ferris, Robert L.; Altschuler, Daniel L.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is a common endocrine malignancy that encompasses well-differentiated as well as dedifferentiated cancer types. The latter tumors have high mortality and lack effective therapies. Using a paired-end RNA-sequencing approach, we report the discovery of rearrangements involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene in thyroid cancer. The most common of these involves a fusion between ALK and the striatin (STRN) gene, which is the result of a complex rearrangement involving the short arm of chromosome 2. STRN-ALK leads to constitutive activation of ALK kinase via dimerization mediated by the coiled-coil domain of STRN and to a kinase-dependent, thyroid-stimulating hormone–independent proliferation of thyroid cells. Moreover, expression of STRN-ALK transforms cells in vitro and induces tumor formation in nude mice. The kinase activity of STRN-ALK and the ALK-induced cell growth can be blocked by the ALK inhibitors crizotinib and TAE684. In addition to well-differentiated papillary cancer, STRN-ALK was found with a higher prevalence in poorly differentiated and anaplastic thyroid cancers, and it did not overlap with other known driver mutations in these tumors. Our data demonstrate that STRN-ALK fusion occurs in a subset of patients with highly aggressive types of thyroid cancer and provide initial evidence suggesting that it may represent a therapeutic target for these patients. PMID:24613930

  16. Identification of ALK as the Major Familial Neuroblastoma Predisposition Gene

    PubMed Central

    Mossë, Yalë P; Laudenslager, Marci; Longo, Luca; Cole, Kristina A; Wood, Andrew; Attiyeh, Edward F; Laquaglia, Michael J; Sennett, Rachel; Lynch, Jill E; Perri, Patrizia; Laureys, Geneviève; Speleman, Frank; Hakonarson, Hakon; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J; Brodeur, Garrett M; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Rappaport, Eric; Devoto, Marcella; Maris, John M

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Survival rates for the childhood cancer neuroblastoma have not substantively improved despite dramatic escalation in chemotherapy intensity. Like most human cancers, this embryonal malignancy can be inherited, but the genetic etiology of familial and sporadically occurring neuroblastoma was largely unknown. Here we show that germline mutations in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene (ALK) explain the majority of hereditary neuroblastomas, and that activating mutations can also be somatically acquired. We first identified a significant linkage signal at the short arm of chromosome 2 (maximum nonparametric LOD=4.23 at rs1344063) using a whole-genome scan in neuroblastoma pedigrees. Resequencing of regional candidate genes identified three separate missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain of ALK (G1128A, R1192P and R1275Q) that segregated with the disease in eight separate families. Examination of 491 sporadically occurring human neuroblastoma samples showed that the ALK locus was gained in 22.8%, and highly amplified in an additional 3.3%, and that these aberrations were highly associated with death from disease (P=0.0003). Resequencing of 194 high-risk neuroblastoma samples showed somatically acquired mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain in 12.4%. Nine of the ten mutations map to critical regions of the kinase domain and were predicted to be oncogenic drivers with high probability. Mutations resulted in constitutive phosphorylation consistent with activation, and targeted knockdown of ALK mRNA resulted in profound growth inhibition of 4 of 4 cell lines harboring mutant or amplified ALK, as well as 2 of 6 wild type for ALK. Our results demonstrate that heritable mutations of ALK are the major cause of familial neuroblastoma, and that germline or acquired activation of this cell surface kinase is a tractable therapeutic target for this lethal pediatric malignancy. PMID:18724359

  17. Design of novel quinazoline derivatives and related analogues as potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gellibert, F.; Fouchet, M.-H.; Nguyen, V.-L.; Wang, R.; Krysa, G.; de Gouville, A.-C.; Huet, S.; Dodic, N.

    2009-07-23

    Starting from quinazoline 3a, we designed potent and selective ALK5 inhibitors over p38MAP kinase from a rational drug design approach based on co-crystal structures in the human ALK5 kinase domain. The quinazoline 3d exhibited also in vivo activity in an acute rat model of DMN-induced liver fibrosis when administered orally at 5 mg/kg (bid).

  18. Detection of rearrangement of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Lin, Yongbin; Cai, Qingqing; Long, Hao; Zhang, Yu; Rong, Tiehua

    2015-01-01

    Background Primary pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC) is a distinct rare subtype of lung cancer. The prevalence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in primary pulmonary LELC had not been thoroughly investigated. Methods We investigated a cohort of 42 patients with primary pulmonary LELC and genotyped for ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). EGFR mutational analysis of exons 18 through 21 was analyzed by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs) showed positive signals in all 42 patients. By immunohistochemistry staining, all patients demonstrated positive expression of CK5/6 and P63, but almost all patients were negative for TTF-1 (34/34, 100%) or CK7 (34/35, 97.1%). None of the 42 patients had ALK rearrangement. Of 42 patients tested, only one patient (2.4%) harbored L858R mutation and gefitinib was applied to this case, however no objective response was observed and the progression free survival (PFS) time was only 1 month. Conclusions Primary pulmonary LELC is a unique histological subtype of lung cancer. ALK rearrangement and EGFR mutation are lack and they may not be the oncogenic driver gene in pulmonary LELC. Future efforts should be made to explore other oncogenic driver gene to guide targeted therapy in this rare disease to determine the optimal treatment. Keywords Pulmonary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC); anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); targeted therapy; Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) PMID:26543602

  19. Alternative transcription initiation leads to expression of a novel ALK isoform in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Thomas; Lee, William; Obenauf, Anna C.; Ran, Leili; Murali, Rajmohan; Zhang, Qi Fan; Wong, Elissa W. P.; Hu, Wenhuo; Scott, Sasinya N.; Shah, Ronak H.; Landa, Iñigo; Button, Julia; Lailler, Nathalie; Sboner, Andrea; Gao, Dong; Murphy, Devan A.; Cao, Zhen; Shukla, Shipra; Hollmann, Travis J.; Wang, Lu; Borsu, Laetitia; Merghoub, Taha; Schwartz, Gary K.; Postow, Michael A.; Ariyan, Charlotte E.; Fagin, James A.; Zheng, Deyou; Ladanyi, Marc; Busam, Klaus J.; Berger, Michael F.; Chen, Yu; Chi, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes by mechanisms other than genetic aberrations such as mutations, translocations, or amplifications is largely undefined. Here we report a novel isoform of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) that is expressed in ~ 11% of melanomas and sporadically in other human cancer types, but not in normal tissues. The novel ALK transcript initiates from a de novo alternative transcription initiation (ATI) site in ALK intron 19, and was termed ALKATI. In ALKATI-expressing tumours, the ATI site is enriched for H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II, chromatin marks characteristic of active transcription initiation sites1. ALKATI is expressed from both ALK alleles, and no recurrent genetic aberrations are found at the ALK locus, indicating that the transcriptional activation is independent of genetic aberrations at the ALK locus. The ALKATI transcript encodes three proteins with molecular weights of 61.1, 60.8 and 58.7 kilodaltons, consisting primarily of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. ALKATI stimulates multiple oncogenic signalling pathways, drives growth-factor-independent cell proliferation in vitro, and promotes tumorigenesis in vivo in mouse models. ALK inhibitors can suppress the kinase activity of ALKATI, suggesting that patients with ALKATI-expressing tumours may benefit from ALK inhibitors. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of oncogene activation in cancer through de novo alternative transcription initiation. PMID:26444240

  20. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-11-24

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  1. Targeting stemness is an effective strategy to control EML4-ALK+ non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se Jin; Noh, Kyung Hee; Lee, Young-Ho; Hong, Soon-Oh; Song, Kwon-Ho; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Tae Min; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae Woo

    2015-01-01

    The fusion between anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) is a causative factor in a unique subset of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Although the inhibitor crizotinib, as it blocks the kinase activity of the resulting EML4-ALK fusion protein, displays remarkable initial responses, a fraction of NSCLC cases eventually become resistant to crizotinib by acquiring mutations in the ALK domain or activating bypass pathways via EGFR, KIT, or KRAS. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory provides a plausible explanation for acquisition of tumorigenesis and resistance. However, the question as to whether EML4-ALK-driven tumorigenesis is linked with the stem-like property and whether the stemness is an effective target in controlling EML4-ALK+ NSCLC including crizotinib-resistant NSCLC cells has not been addressed. Here, we report that stem-like properties stem from ALK activity in EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells. Notably, treatment with rapamycin, a CSC targeting agent, attenuates stem-like phenotypes of the EML4-ALK+ cells, which increased capability of tumor formation and higher expression of stemness-associated molecules such as ALDH, NANOG, and OCT4. Importantly, combinational treatment with rapamycin and crizotinib leads to synergistic anti-tumor effects on EML4-ALK+ NSCLC cells as well as on those resistant to crizotinib. Thus, we provide a proof of principle that targeting stemness would be a novel strategy to control intractable EML4-ALK+ NSCLC. PMID:26517679

  2. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with Intracellular Pseudokinase Domains

    PubMed Central

    Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Shi, Fumin; Park, Jin H.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    As with other groups of protein kinases, approximately 10% of the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in the human proteome contain intracellular pseudokinases that lack one or more conserved catalytically important residues. These include ErbB3, a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family, and a series of unconventional Wnt receptors. We recently showed that, despite its reputation as a pseudokinase, the ErbB3 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) does retain significant – albeit weak – kinase activity. This led us to suggest that a subgroup of RTKs may be able to signal even with very inefficient kinases. Recent work suggests that this is not the case, however. Other pseudokinase RTKs have not revealed significant kinase activity, and mutations that impair ErbB3’s weak kinase activity have not so far been found to exhibit signaling defects. These findings therefore point to models in which the TKDs of pseudokinase RTKs participate in receptor signaling by allosterically regulating associated kinases (such as ErbB3 regulation of ErbB2) and/or function as regulated ‘scaffolds’ for other intermolecular interactions central to signal propagation. Further structural and functional studies – particularly of the pseudokinase RTKs involved in Wnt signaling – are required to shed new light on these intriguing signaling mechanisms. PMID:23863174

  3. Anterograde Jelly belly ligand to Alk receptor signaling at developing synapses is regulated by Mind the gap

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Broadie, Kendal

    2010-01-01

    Bidirectional trans-synaptic signals induce synaptogenesis and regulate subsequent synaptic maturation. Presynaptically secreted Mind the gap (Mtg) molds the synaptic cleft extracellular matrix, leading us to hypothesize that Mtg functions to generate the intercellular environment required for efficient signaling. We show in Drosophila that secreted Jelly belly (Jeb) and its receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) are localized to developing synapses. Jeb localizes to punctate aggregates in central synaptic neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) presynaptic terminals. Secreted Jeb and Mtg accumulate and colocalize extracellularly in surrounding synaptic boutons. Alk concentrates in postsynaptic domains, consistent with an anterograde, trans-synaptic Jeb-Alk signaling pathway at developing synapses. Jeb synaptic expression is increased in Alk mutants, consistent with a requirement for Alk receptor function in Jeb uptake. In mtg null mutants, Alk NMJ synaptic levels are reduced and Jeb expression is dramatically increased. NMJ synapse morphology and molecular assembly appear largely normal in jeb and Alk mutants, but larvae exhibit greatly reduced movement, suggesting impaired functional synaptic development. jeb mutant movement is significantly rescued by neuronal Jeb expression. jeb and Alk mutants display normal NMJ postsynaptic responses, but a near loss of patterned, activity-dependent NMJ transmission driven by central excitatory output. We conclude that Jeb-Alk expression and anterograde trans-synaptic signaling are modulated by Mtg and play a key role in establishing functional synaptic connectivity in the developing motor circuit. PMID:20876658

  4. Prospective screening for ALK: clinical features and outcome according to ALK status.

    PubMed

    Fallet, Vincent; Cadranel, Jacques; Doubre, Hélène; Toper, Cécile; Monnet, Isabelle; Chinet, Thierry; Oliviero, Gérard; Foulon, Guillaume; De Cremoux, Hubert; Vieira, Thibault; Antoine, Martine; Wislez, Marie

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the clinico-pathological characteristics and outcomes of a cohort of French patients who were prospectively screened for Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) rearrangement. One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients screened for ALK rearrangement to be recruited into a crizotinib registration trial were included from eight French centres. ALK rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Seventeen patients (14.6%) were positive for ALK. ALK+ patients were younger (p = 0.049) and more likely to be males (p=0.032), non- or light-smokers (p = 0.048) and without underlying respiratory disease (p=0.025) compared to ALK- patients. Thyroid-transcription factor-1 expression was present in all ALK+ tumours. ALK+ tumours tended to have lymph node and brain metastases. In multivariate analyses, gender, smoking history and N stage were independently associated with ALK status. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached for ALK+ patients and was significantly longer than for ALK- patients (hazard ratio for death for ALK- patients 2.98; 95% CI [1.29-6.90], p=0.01). French ALK+ patients present a specific phenotype. ALK rearrangement should be determined to improve OS with an effective targeted therapy. PMID:24589437

  5. Alk Is a Transcriptional Target of LMO4 and ERα that Promotes Cocaine Sensitization and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, Amy W.; Gesch, Julie; Giorgetti, Francesco; Kharazia, Viktor; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we showed that the mouse LIM-domain only 4 (Lmo4) gene, which encodes a protein containing two zinc-finger LIM domains that interact with various DNA-binding transcription factors, attenuates behavioral sensitivity to repeated cocaine administration. Here we show that transcription of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) is repressed by LMO4 in the striatum and that Alk promotes the development of cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference, a measure of cocaine reward. Since LMO4 is known to interact with estrogen receptor α (ERα) at the promoters of target genes, we investigated whether Alk expression might be controlled by a similar mechanism. We found that LMO4 and ERα are associated with the Alk promoter by chromatin immunoprecipitation and that Alk is an estrogen-responsive gene in the striatum. Moreover, we show that ERα knockout mice exhibit enhanced cocaine sensitization and conditioned place preference and an increase in Alk expression in the nucleus accumbens. These data define a novel regulatory network involved in behavioral responses to cocaine. Interestingly, sex differences in several behavioral responses to cocaine in humans and rodents have been described and estrogen is thought to mediate some of these differences. Our data suggest that estrogen regulation of Alk may be one mechanism responsible for sexually dimorphic responses to cocaine. PMID:21976498

  6. Elucidation of Resistance Mechanisms to Second-Generation ALK Inhibitors Alectinib and Ceritinib in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xuyuan; Fernandez-Salas, Ester; Li, Enxiao; Wang, Shaomeng

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is the first anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor to have been approved for the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring an ALK fusion gene, but it has been found that, in the clinic, patients develop resistance to it. Alectinib and ceritinib are second-generation ALK inhibitors which show remarkable clinical responses in both crizotinib-naive and crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients harboring an ALK fusion gene. Despite their impressive activity, clinical resistance to alectinib and ceritinib has also emerged. In the current study, we elucidated the resistance mechanisms to these second-generation ALK inhibitors in the H3122 NSCLC cell line harboring the EML4-ALK variant 1 fusion in vitro. Prolonged treatment of the parental H3122 cells with alectinib and ceritinib led to two cell lines which are 10 times less sensitive to alectinib and ceritinib than the parental H3122 cell line. Although mutations of ALK in its kinase domain are a common resistance mechanism for crizotinib, we did not detect any ALK mutation in these resistant cell lines. Rather, overexpression of phospho-ALK and alternative receptor tyrosine kinases such as phospho-EGFR, phospho-HER3, and phospho-IGFR-1R was observed in both resistant cell lines. Additionally, NRG1, a ligand for HER3, is upregulated and responsible for resistance by activating the EGFR family pathways through the NRG1-HER3-EGFR axis. Combination treatment with EGFR inhibitors, in particular afatinib, was shown to be effective at overcoming resistance. Our study provides new mechanistic insights into adaptive resistance to second-generation ALK inhibitors and suggests a potential clinical strategy to combat resistance to these second-generation ALK inhibitors in NSCLC. PMID:26992917

  7. Modelling the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase on adenylate kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Depiereux, E; Hue, L; Rider, M H; Feytmans, E

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple alignment of available sequences of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase revealed several segments of conserved residues in the 2-kinase domain. The sequence of the kinase domain was also compared with proteins of known three-dimensional structure. No similarity was found between the kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase. This questions the modelling of the 2-kinase domain on bacterial 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase that has previously been proposed [Bazan, Fletterick and Pilkis (1989) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 86, 9642-9646]. However, sequence similarities were found between the 2-kinase domain and several nucleotide-binding proteins, the most similar being adenylate kinase. A structural model of the 2-kinase domain based on adenylate kinase is proposed. It accommodates all the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies carried out to date on residues in the 2-kinase domain. It also allows residues potentially involved in catalysis and/or substrate binding to be predicted. PMID:9032445

  8. ALK-positive large B-cell lymphoma: identification of EML4-ALK and a review of the literature focusing on the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kana; Nakasone, Hideki; Togashi, Yuki; Sakata, Seiji; Tsuyama, Naoko; Baba, Satoko; Dobashi, Akito; Asaka, Reimi; Tsai, Chien-Chen; Chuang, Shih-Sung; Izutsu, Koji; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Takeuchi, Kengo

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive large B-cell lymphoma (ALK+LBCL) is a rare, aggressive B-cell lymphoma with ALK fusion genes. Histopathologically, the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is suggestive of the fusion partner of ALK. Here, we examined an ALK+LBCL case showing a unique diffuse cytoplasmic ALK staining pattern and identified EML4-ALK, which has not previously been reported in ALK+LBCL. Furthermore, to clarify whether the prognosis differs depending on the staining pattern, we reviewed 112 previously reported cases, and analyzed immunohistochemical markers and clinical data stratified by the staining pattern. We found that ALK staining can be classified into a granular cytoplasmic staining (GCS) or a non-GCS patterns. Sixty-four adult cases for which both the ALK staining pattern and survival time were reported were further analyzed for survival trends. The non-GCS pattern was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (P = 0.031). This difference remained significant after adjusting for age and clinical stage (hazard ratio 5.08, 95 % CI 1.88-13.7, P = 0.0013). Given that the ALK immunohistochemical staining pattern is associated with the ALK fusion partner, the present results suggest that the prognosis for ALK+LBCL differs depending on the ALK fusion partner. PMID:26781614

  9. Native and rearranged ALK copy number and rearranged cell count in NSCLC: Implications for ALK inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Camidge, D. Ross; Skokan, Margaret; Kiatsimkul, Porntip; Helfrich, Barbara; Lu, Xian; Barón, Anna E.; Schulte, Nathan; Maxson, DeLee; Aisner, Dara L.; Franklin, Wilbur A.; Doebele, Robert C.; Varella-Garcia, Marileila

    2013-01-01

    Background Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) responds to ALK inhibitors. Clinically, ≥ 15% cells showing rearrangements by break-apart FISH classify tumors as positive. Increases in native and rearranged ALK copy number also occur. Methods 1426 NSCLC clinical specimens (174 ALK+ and 1252 ALK negative), and 24 ALK negative NSCLC cell lines were investigated. ALK copy number and genomic status were assessed by FISH. Results Clinical specimens with 0–9%, 10–15%, 16–30%, 31–50% and >50% of ALK+ cells were found in 79.3%, 8.5%, 1.4%, 2.7% and 8.1% of cases, respectively. Increased native ALK copy number (≥3 copies/cell in ≥40% cells) was detected in 19% of ALK+ and 62% of ALK negative tumors. In ALK negative tumors, abundant focal amplification of native ALK was rare (0.8%). Other atypical patterns occurred in ~6% of tumors. Mean native ALK copy number ranged from 2.1–6.9 in cell lines and was not correlated with crizotinib sensitivity (IC50s 0.34–2.8 uM) (r=0.279, p=0.1764). Neither native, nor rearranged ALK copy number, nor percentage cells positive correlated with extra-central nervous system progression free survivalin ALK+ patients on crizotinib. Conclusions 8.5% of cases are below the established positivity threshold by ≤5%. Further investigation of ALK by other diagnostic techniques in such cases may be warranted. Native ALK copy number increases alone are not associated with sensitivity to ALK inhibition in vitro. However, rare complex patterns of increased native ALK in patients should be studied further as atypical rearrangements contained within these may otherwise be missed. PMID:24022839

  10. Structural insight into selectivity and resistance profiles of ROS1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Davare, Monika A.; Vellore, Nadeem A.; Wagner, Jacob P.; Eide, Christopher A.; Goodman, James R.; Drilon, Alexander; Deininger, Michael W.; O’Hare, Thomas; Druker, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic ROS1 fusion proteins are molecular drivers in multiple malignancies, including a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The phylogenetic proximity of the ROS1 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) catalytic domains led to the clinical repurposing of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor crizotinib as a ROS1 inhibitor. Despite the antitumor activity of crizotinib observed in both ROS1- and ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, resistance due to acquisition of ROS1 or ALK kinase domain mutations has been observed clinically, spurring the development of second-generation inhibitors. Here, we profile the sensitivity and selectivity of seven ROS1 and/or ALK inhibitors at various levels of clinical development. In contrast to crizotinib’s dual ROS1/ALK activity, cabozantinib (XL-184) and its structural analog foretinib (XL-880) demonstrate a striking selectivity for ROS1 over ALK. Molecular dynamics simulation studies reveal structural features that distinguish the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains and contribute to differences in binding site and kinase selectivity of the inhibitors tested. Cell-based resistance profiling studies demonstrate that the ROS1-selective inhibitors retain efficacy against the recently reported CD74-ROS1G2032R mutant whereas the dual ROS1/ALK inhibitors are ineffective. Taken together, inhibitor profiling and stringent characterization of the structure–function differences between the ROS1 and ALK kinase domains will facilitate future rational drug design for ROS1- and ALK-driven NSCLC and other malignancies. PMID:26372962

  11. Jelly Belly Trans-Synaptic Signaling to Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Regulates Neurotransmission Strength and Synapse Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Kent, Karla S.; Broadie, Kendal; Weiss, Joseph B.

    2012-01-01

    In Drosophila the secreted signaling molecule Jelly Belly (Jeb) activates Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (Alk), a receptor tyrosine kinase, in multiple developmental and adult contexts. We have shown previously that Jeb and Alk are highly enriched at Drosophila synapses within the CNS neuropil and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and postulated a conserved intercellular signaling function. At the embryonic and larval NMJ Jeb is localized in the motor neuron presynaptic terminal whereas Alk is concentrated in the muscle postsynaptic domain surrounding boutons, consistent with anterograde trans-synaptic signaling. Here, we show by functional inhibition of Jeb-Alk signaling that neurotransmission is regulated by Jeb secretion. Jeb is a novel negative regulator of neuromuscular transmission. Reduction or inhibtion of Alk function results in enhanced synaptic transmission. Activation of Alk conversely inhibits synaptic transmission. Restoration of wildtype postsynaptic Alk expression in Alk partial loss-of-function mutants rescues NMJ transmission phenotypes and confirms that postsynaptic Alk regulates NMJ transmission. The effects of impaired Alk signaling on neurotransmission are observed in the absence of associated changes in NMJ structure. Complete removal of Jeb in motor neurons, however, disrupts both presynaptic bouton architecture and postsynaptic differentiation. Non-physiologic activation of Alk signaling also negatively regulates NMJ growth. Activation of Jeb-Alk signaling triggers the Ras-MAP kinase cascade in both pre- and postsynaptic compartments. These novel roles for Jeb-Alk signaling in the modulation of synaptic function and structure have potential implications for recently reported Alk functions in human addiction, retention of spatial memory, cognitive dysfunction in neurofibromatosis and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:22949158

  12. Two novel ALK mutations mediate acquired resistance to the next generation ALK inhibitor alectinib

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Friboulet, Luc; Koike, Sumie; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Khan, Tahsin M.; Gainor, Justin F.; Iafrate, A. John; Takeuchi, Kengo; Taiji, Makoto; Okuno, Yasushi; Fujita, Naoya; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The first-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib is a standard therapy for patients with ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Several next-generation ALK-TKIs have entered the clinic and have shown promising activity in crizotinib-resistant patients. As patients still relapse even on these next-generation ALK-TKIs, we examined mechanisms of resistance to the next-generation ALK-TKI alectinib and potential strategies to overcome this resistance. Experimental Design We established a cell line model of alectinib resistance, and analyzed a resistant tumor specimen from a patient who had relapsed on alectinib. We developed Ba/F3 models harboring alectinib-resistant ALK mutations and evaluated the potency of other next-generation ALK-TKIs in these models. We tested the antitumor activity of the next-generation ALK-TKI ceritinib in the patient with acquired resistance to alectinib. To elucidate structure-activity-relationships of ALK mutations, we performed computational thermodynamic simulation with MP-CAFEE. Results We identified a novel V1180L gatekeeper mutation from the cell line model and a second novel I1171T mutation from the patient who developed resistance to alectinib. Both ALK mutations conferred resistance to alectinib as well as to crizotinib, but were sensitive to ceritinib and other next-generation ALK-TKIs. Treatment of the patient with ceritinib led to a marked response. Thermodynamics simulation suggests that both mutations lead to distinct structural alterations that decrease the binding affinity with alectinib. Conclusions We have identified two novel ALK mutations arising after alectinib exposure which are sensitive to other next generation ALK-TKIs. The ability of ceritinib to overcome alectinib-resistance mutations suggests a potential role for sequential therapy with multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs. PMID:25228534

  13. Design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles as inhibitors of transforming growth factor-β type-I receptor kinase (ALK5).

    PubMed

    Patel, Harun M; Sing, Baljeet; Bhardwaj, Varun; Palkar, Mahesh; Shaikh, Mahamadhanif S; Rane, Rajesh; Alwan, Wesam S; Gadad, Andanappa K; Noolvi, Malleshappa N; Karpoormath, Rajshekhar

    2015-03-26

    A new series of imidazo[2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazoles 5(a-g), 6(a-g), 9(a-i) and 12(a-h) were synthesized as transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) type I receptor (also known as activin receptor-like kinase 5 or ALK5) inhibitors. These compounds were evaluated for their ALK5 inhibitory activity in an enzyme assay and their TGF-β -induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation inhibitory activity in a cell-based assay. Compound 6d, 2-(5-((2-cyclopropyl-6-(4-fluorophenyl) imidazo [2,1-b][1,3,4]thiadiazol-5-yl)methylene)-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidin-3-yl) acetic acid, shows prominent ALK5 inhibition (IC50 = 0.0012 μM) and elective inhibition (91%) against the P38αkinase at10 μM. The binding mode of compound 6d by XP docking studies shows that it fits well into the active site cavity of ALK5 by forming broad and tight interactions. Lipinski's rule and in silico ADME pharmacokinetic parameters are within the acceptable range defined for human use thereby indicating their potential as a drug-like molecules. PMID:25234355

  14. Rationale for co-targeting IGF-1R and ALK in ALK fusion positive lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lovly, Christine M.; McDonald, Nerina T.; Chen, Heidi; Ortiz-Cuaran, Sandra; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Yan, Yingjun; Florin, Alexandra; Ozretić, Luka; Lim, Diana; Wang, Lu; Chen, Zhao; Chen, Xi; Lu, Pengcheng; Paik, Paul K.; Shen, Ronglai; Jin, Hailing; Buettner, Reinhard; Ansén, Sascha; Perner, Sven; Brockmann, Michael; Bos, Marc; Wolf, Jürgen; Gardizi, Masyar; Wright, Gavin M.; Solomon, Benjamin; Russell, Prudence A.; Rogers, Toni-Maree; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Red-Brewer, Monica; Tieu, Rudy; de Stanchina, Elisa; Wang, Qingguo; Zhao, Zhongming; Johnson, David H.; Horn, Leora; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Thomas, Roman K.; Ladanyi, Marc; Pao, William

    2014-01-01

    The ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), crizotinib, shows significant activity in patients whose lung cancers harbor ALK fusions but its efficacy is limited by variable primary responses and acquired resistance. In work arising from the intriguing clinical observation of a patient with ALK fusion+ lung cancer who had an ‘exceptional response’ to an IGF-1R antibody, we define a therapeutic synergism between ALK and IGF-1R inhibitors. Similar to IGF-1R, ALK fusion proteins bind to the adaptor, IRS-1, and IRS-1 knockdown enhances the anti-tumor effects of ALK inhibitors. In models of ALK TKI resistance, the IGF-1R pathway is activated, and combined ALK/IGF-1R inhibition improves therapeutic efficacy. Consistent with this finding, IGF-1R/IRS-1 levels are increased in biopsy samples from patients progressing on crizotinib therapy. Collectively, these data support a role for the IGF-1R/IRS-1 pathway in both ALK TKI-sensitive and TKI-resistant states and provide biological rationale for further clinical development of dual ALK/IGF-1R inhibitors. PMID:25173427

  15. Activation Domain-dependent Degradation of Somatic Wee1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Laura; Simanski, Scott; Squire, Christopher; Smith, Anthony; Cartzendafner, Jeff; Cavett, Valerie; Caldwell Busby, Jennifer; Sato, Trey; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2010-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is dependent upon coordinate regulation of kinase and proteolytic pathways. Inhibitors of cell cycle transitions are degraded to allow progression into the subsequent cell cycle phase. For example, the tyrosine kinase and Cdk1 inhibitor Wee1 is degraded during G2 and mitosis to allow mitotic progression. Previous studies suggested that the N terminus of Wee1 directs Wee1 destruction. Using a chemical mutagenesis strategy, we report that multiple regions of Wee1 control its destruction. Most notably, we find that the activation domain of the Wee1 kinase is also required for its degradation. Mutations in this domain inhibit Wee1 degradation in somatic cell extracts and in cells without affecting the overall Wee1 structure or kinase activity. More broadly, these findings suggest that kinase activation domains may be previously unappreciated sites of recognition by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway. PMID:20038582

  16. Design and synthesis of novel selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Bei; Jiang, Tao; Jin, Yunho; Lu, Wenshuo; Marsilje, Thomas H; Pei, Wei; Uno, Tetsuo; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wu, Baogen; Nguyen, Truc Ngoc; Bursulaya, Badry; Lee, Christian; Li, Nanxin; Kim, Sungjoon; Tuntland, Tove; Liu, Bo; Sun, Frank; Steffy, Auzon; Hood, Tami

    2016-02-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the insulin receptor superfamily. Expression of ALK in normal human tissues is only found in a subset of neural cells, however it is involved in the genesis of several cancers through genetic aberrations involving translocation of the kinase domain with multiple fusion partners (e.g., NPM-ALK in anaplastic large cell lymphoma ALCL or EML4-ALK in non-small cell lung cancer) or activating mutations in the full-length receptor resulting in ligand-independent constitutive activation (e.g., neuroblastoma). Here we are reporting the discovery of novel and selective anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors from specific modifications of the 2,4-diaminopyridine core present in TAE684 and LDK378. Synthesis, structure activity relationships (SAR), absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) profile, and in vivo efficacy in a mouse xenograft model of anaplastic large cell lymphoma are described. PMID:26750252

  17. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  18. Mechanisms of Acquired Resistance to ALK Inhibitors and the Rationale for Treating ALK-positive Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isozaki, Hideko; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene led to improved clinical outcomes in patients with lung cancer after the development of the first ALK-targeting agent, crizotinib. Some second-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which might be more potent than crizotinib or effective on crizotinib-resistant patients, have been developed. Although these ALK-TKIs show an excellent response initially, most patients eventually acquire resistance. Therefore, careful consideration of the resistance mechanisms might lead to superior therapeutic strategies. Here, we summarize the history of ALK-TKIs and their underlying resistance mechanisms in both the preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, we discuss potential future treatment strategies in ALK-TKI-naïve and -resistant patients with lung cancer harboring the EML4-ALK fusion gene. PMID:25941796

  19. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  20. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  1. Crystal structure of domain-swapped STE20 OSR1 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-09-15

    OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive-1) and SPAK (Ste20/Sps1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) belong to the GCK-VI subfamily of Ste20 group kinases. OSR1 and SPAK are key regulators of NKCCs (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporters) and activated by WNK family members (with-no-lysine kinase), mutations of which are known to cause Gordon syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of inherited hypertension. The crystal structure of OSR1 kinase domain has been solved at 2.25 {angstrom}. OSR1 forms a domain-swapped dimer in an inactive conformation, in which P+1 loop and {alpha}EF helix are swapped between dimer-related monomers. Structural alignment with nonswapped Ste20 TAO2 kinase indicates that the integrity of chemical interactions in the kinase domain is well preserved in the domain-swapped interfaces. The OSR1 kinase domain has now been added to a growing list of domain-swapped protein kinases recently reported, suggesting that the domain-swapping event provides an additional layer of complexity in regulating protein kinase activity.

  2. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    PubMed

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  3. Phosphorylation of ΔNp63α via a Novel TGFβ/ALK5 Signaling Mechanism Mediates the Anti-Clonogenic Effects of TGFβ

    PubMed Central

    Cherukuri, Pratima; DeCastro, Andrew J.; Balboni, Amanda L.; Downey, Sondra L.; Liu, Jennifer Y.; Hutchinson, Justine A.; DiRenzo, James

    2012-01-01

    Genetic analysis of TP63 implicates ΔNp63 isoforms in preservation of replicative capacity and cellular lifespan within adult stem cells. ΔNp63α is also an oncogene and survival factor that mediates therapeutic resistance in squamous carcinomas. These diverse activities are the result of genetic and functional interactions between TP63 and an array of morphogenic and morphostatic signals that govern tissue and tumor stasis, mitotic polarity, and cell fate; however the cellular signals that account for specific functions of TP63 are incompletely understood. To address this we sought to identify signaling pathways that regulate expression, stability or activity of ΔNp63α. An siRNA-based screen of the human kinome identified the Type 1 TGFβ receptor, ALK5, as the kinase required for phosphorylation of ΔNp63α at Serine 66/68 (S66/68). This activity is TGFβ-dependent and sensitive to either ALK5-directed siRNA or the ALK5 kinase inhibitor A83-01. Mechanistic studies support a model in which ALK5 is proteolytically cleaved at the internal juxtamembrane region resulting in the translocation of the C-terminal ALK5-intracellular kinase domain (ALK5IKD). In this study, we demonstrate that ALK5-mediated phosphorylation of ΔNp63α is required for the anti-clonogenic effects of TGFΒ and ectopic expression of ALK5IKD mimics these effects. Finally, we present evidence that ultraviolet irradiation-mediated phosphorylation of ΔNp63α is sensitive to ALK5 inhibitors. These findings identify a non-canonical TGFβ-signaling pathway that mediates the anti-clonogenic effects of TGFβ and the effects of cellular stress via ΔNp63α phosphorylation. PMID:23166821

  4. ALK F1174V mutation confers sensitivity while ALK I1171 mutation confers resistance to alectinib. The importance of serial biopsy post progression.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong; Milliken, Jeffrey C; Azada, Michele C; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-01-01

    Many acquired resistant mutations to the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene have been identified during treatment of ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. These various acquired resistant ALK mutations confer differential sensitivities to various ALK inhibitors and may provide guidance on how to sequence the use of many of the second generation ALK inhibitors. We described a patient who developed an acquired ALK F1174V resistant mutation on progression from crizotinib that responded to alectinib for 18 months but then developed an acquired ALK I1171S mutation to alectinib. Both tumor samples had essentially the same genomic profile by comprehensive genomic profiling otherwise. This is the first patient report that demonstrates ALK F1174V mutation is sensitive to alectinib and further confirms missense acquired ALK I1171 mutation is resistant to alectinib. Sequential tumor re-biopsy for comprehensive genomic profiling (CGP) is important to appreciate the selective pressure during treatment with various ALK inhibitors underpinning the evolution of the disease course of ALK+NSCLC patients while on treatment with the various ALK inhibitors. This approach will likely help inform the optimal sequencing strategy as more ALK inhibitors become available. This case report also validates the importance of developing structurally distinct ALK inhibitors for clinical use to overcome non-cross resistant ALK mutations. PMID:26464158

  5. Structural and biochemical studies of the PDGFRA kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ling; Yan, Xiao-E; Yin, Yuxin; Yun, Cai-Hong

    2016-09-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase, and this kinase is a target for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) as it is frequently mutated in these cancers. Most of the mutations that cause constitutive activation of PDGFRA occur in either the activation loop (A-loop) or in the juxtamembrane (JM) domain, such as the mutations D842V or V561D respectively. Treatment of PDGFRA-mutated GIST with imatinib is successful in some cases, but the D842V mutation is imatinib-resistant. To better understand the mechanism of PDGFRA drug-resistance, we have determined the crystal structure of the PDGFRA kinase domain in the auto-inhibited form, and studied the kinetics of the D842V mutation. Auto-inhibited PDGFRA is stabilized by the JM domain, which inserts into the active site of the kinase. The conserved residue Asp842 makes extensive contacts with several A-loop residues to maintain PDGFRA in the "DFG out" conformation, which stabilizes the kinase in the inactive state and facilitates the binding of imatinib. The D842V mutation would therefore be expected to activate the kinase and hinder the binding of drug through destabilizing the "DFG out" conformation. Furthermore, our kinetic data show that drug resistance in the D842V mutation may also in part result from its increased affinity for ATP. The PDGFRA kinase domain structure we report in this study has potential to facilitate development of new agents which can inhibit this kinase, including both its activating and drug-resistant mutations. PMID:27349873

  6. Activated type I TGFbeta receptor (Alk5) kinase confers enhancedsurvival to mammary epithelial cells and accelerates mammary tumorprogression

    SciTech Connect

    Muraoka-Cook, Rebecca S.; Shin, Incheol; Yi, Jae Youn; Easterly,Evangeline; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Zent, Roy; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2005-01-02

    The transforming growth factor-betas (TGF{beta}s) are members of a large superfamily of pleiotropic cytokines that also includes the activins and the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Members of the TGF{beta} family regulate complex physiological processes such cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, motility, and cell death, among others (Massague, 1998). Dysregulation of TGF{beta} signaling contributes to several pathological processes including cancer, fibrosis, and auto-immune disorders (Massague et al., 2000). The TGF{beta}s elicit their biological effects by binding to type II and type I transmembrane receptor serine-threonine kinases (T{beta}RII and T{beta}RI) which, in turn, phosphorylated Smad 2 and Smad 3. Phosphorylated Smad 2/3 associate with Smad 4 and, as a heteromeric complex, translocate to the nucleus where they regulate gene transcription. The inhibitory Smad7 down regulates TGF{beta} signaling by binding to activated T{beta}RI and interfering with its ability to phosphorylate Smad 2/3 (Derynck and Zhang, 2003; Shi and Massague, 2003). Signaling is also regulated by Smad proteolysis. TGF{beta} receptor-mediated activation results in multi-ubiquitination of Smad 2 in the nucleus and subsequent degradation of Smad 2 by the proteasome (Lo and Massague, 1999). Activation of TGF{beta} receptors also induces mobilization of a Smad 7-Smurf complex from the nucleus to the cytoplasm; this complex recognizes the activated receptors and mediates their ubiquitination and internalization via caveolin-rich vesicles, leading to termination of TGF{beta} signaling (Di Guglielmo et al., 2003). Other signal transducers/pathways have been implicated in TGF{beta} actions. These include the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (Jnk), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein phosphatase PP2A, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), and the family of Rho GTPases [reviewed in

  7. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  8. ALK is a MYCN target gene and regulates cell migration and invasion in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Kamrul; Nafady, Asmaa; Takatori, Atsushi; Kishida, Satoshi; Ohira, Miki; Suenaga, Yusuke; Hossain, Shamim; Akter, Jesmin; Ogura, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Nakagawara, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Human anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified as an oncogene that is mutated or amplified in NBLs. To obtain a better understanding of the molecular events associated with ALK in the pathogenesis of NBL, it is necessary to clarify how ALK gene contributes to NBL progression. In the present study, we found that ALK expression was significantly high in NBL clinical samples with amplified MYCN (n = 126, P < 0.01) and in developing tumors of MYCN-transgenic mice. Indeed, promoter analysis revealed that ALK is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN. Overexpression and knockdown of ALK demonstrated its function in cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Moreover, treatment with an ALK inhibitor, TAE-684, efficiently suppressed such biological effects in MYCN amplified cells and tumor growth of the xenograft in mice. Our present findings explore the fundamental understanding of ALK in order to develop novel therapeutic tools by targeting ALK for aggressive NBL treatment. PMID:24356251

  9. Transformation to SCLC after Treatment with the ALK Inhibitor Alectinib.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Shiro; Masago, Katsuhiro; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    We report an anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase gene (ALK)-positive patient who showed a paradoxical response to the ALK inhibitor alectinib; the primary lesion increased in size, whereas other metastatic lesions decreased markedly. A biopsy of the primary lesion confirmed an ALK rearrangement; however, the tumor had transformed histologically into small cell lung cancer. The lack of reports of small cell lung cancer transformation in ALK-positive patients implies that this outcome was unusual; this patient was treated with alectinib, which is more selective and has a greater inhibitory effect than crizotinib. This case may reveal resistance mechanisms that differ according to the agent used for treatment. PMID:26751586

  10. Molecular mechanisms that underpin EML4-ALK driven cancers and their response to targeted drugs.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, Richard; Choi, Jene; Fennell, Dean A; Fry, Andrew M; Richards, Mark W

    2016-03-01

    A fusion between the EML4 (echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like) and ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) genes was identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in 2007 and there has been rapid progress in applying this knowledge to the benefit of patients. However, we have a poor understanding of EML4 and ALK biology and there are many challenges to devising the optimal strategy for treating EML4-ALK NSCLC patients. In this review, we describe the biology of EML4 and ALK, explain the main features of EML4-ALK fusion proteins and outline the therapies that target EML4-ALK. In particular, we highlight the recent advances in our understanding of the structures of EML proteins, describe the molecular mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibitors and assess current thinking about combinations of ALK drugs with inhibitors that target other kinases or Hsp90. PMID:26755435

  11. New treatment options for ALK+ advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: critical appraisal of ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements in ALK gene and EML4 gene were first described in 2007. This genomic aberration is found in about 2%–8% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Crizotinib was the first ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of metastatic ALK-positive NSCLC based on a randomized Phase III trial. Despite the initial treatment response of crizotinib, disease progression inevitably develops after approximately 10 months of therapy. Different resistance mechanisms have recently been described. One relevant mechanism of resistance is the development of mutations in ALK. Novel ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed to overcome these mutations. Ceritinib is an oral second-generation ALK inhibitor showing clinical activity not only in crizotinib-resistant ALK-positive NSCLC but also in treatment-naïve ALK-positive disease. In this paper, preclinical and clinical data of ceritinib are reviewed, and its role in the clinical setting is put into perspective. PMID:27217763

  12. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli,D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment.

  13. ALK-rearrangements and testing methods in non-small cell lung cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, Rodney E.; Vora, Moiz; Mayhall, Kim; Cotelingam, James

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene was first described as a driver mutation in anaplastic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Dysregulated ALK expression is now an identified driver mutation in nearly twenty different human malignancies, including 4-9% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). The tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib is more effective than standard chemotherapeutic agents in treating ALK positive NSCLC, making molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression a necessary step in identifying optimal treatment modalities. Here we review ALKmediated signal transduction pathways and compare the molecular protocols used to identify dysregulated ALK expression in NSCLC. We also discuss the use of crizotinib and second generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the treatment of ALK positive NSCLC, and the known mechanisms of crizotinib resistance in NSCLC. PMID:24955213

  14. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  15. The kinase domain of mitochondrial PINK1 faces the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chun; Huang, Yong; Shao, Yufang; May, Jessica; Prou, Delphine; Perier, Celine; Dauer, William; Schon, Eric A.; Przedborski, Serge

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) are a cause of autosomal recessive familial Parkinson's disease (PD). Efforts in deducing the PINK1 signaling pathway have been hindered by controversy around its subcellular and submitochondrial localization and the authenticity of its reported substrates. We show here that this mitochondrial protein exhibits a topology in which the kinase domain faces the cytoplasm and the N-terminal tail is inside the mitochondria. Although deletion of the transmembrane domain disrupts this topology, common PD-linked PINK1 mutations do not. These results are critical in rectifying the location and orientation of PINK1 in mitochondria, and they should help decipher its normal physiological function and potential pathogenic role in PD. PMID:18687899

  16. Wild-type ALK and activating ALK-R1275Q and ALK-F1174L mutations upregulate Myc and initiate tumor formation in murine neural crest progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Montavon, Gisèle; Jauquier, Nicolas; Coulon, Aurélie; Peuchmaur, Michel; Flahaut, Marjorie; Bourloud, Katia Balmas; Yan, Pu; Delattre, Olivier; Sommer, Lukas; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle; Gross, Nicole; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick

    2014-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene is overexpressed, mutated or amplified in most neuroblastoma (NB), a pediatric neural crest-derived embryonal tumor. The two most frequent mutations, ALK-F1174L and ALK-R1275Q, contribute to NB tumorigenesis in mouse models, and cooperate with MYCN in the oncogenic process. However, the precise role of activating ALK mutations or ALK-wt overexpression in NB tumor initiation needs further clarification. Human ALK-wt, ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q were stably expressed in murine neural crest progenitor cells (NCPC), MONC-1 or JoMa1, immortalized with v-Myc or Tamoxifen-inducible Myc-ERT, respectively. While orthotopic implantations of MONC-1 parental cells in nude mice generated various tumor types, such as NB, osteo/chondrosarcoma, and undifferentiated tumors, due to v-Myc oncogenic activity, MONC-1-ALK-F1174L cells only produced undifferentiated tumors. Furthermore, our data represent the first demonstration of ALK-wt transforming capacity, as ALK-wt expression in JoMa1 cells, likewise ALK-F1174L, or ALK-R1275Q, in absence of exogenous Myc-ERT activity, was sufficient to induce the formation of aggressive and undifferentiated neural crest cell-derived tumors, but not to drive NB development. Interestingly, JoMa1-ALK tumors and their derived cell lines upregulated Myc endogenous expression, resulting from ALK activation, and both ALK and Myc activities were necessary to confer tumorigenic properties on tumor-derived JoMa1 cells in vitro. PMID:24947326

  17. Activated Alk triggers prolonged neurogenesis and Ret upregulation providing a therapeutic target in ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Cazes, Alex; Lopez-Delisle, Lucille; Tsarovina, Konstantina; Pierre-Eugène, Cécile; De Preter, Katleen; Peuchmaur, Michel; Nicolas, André; Provost, Claire; Louis-Brennetot, Caroline; Daveau, Romain; Kumps, Candy; Cascone, Ilaria; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Prignon, Aurélie; Speleman, Frank; Rohrer, Hermann; Delattre, Olivier; Janoueix-Lerosey, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations of the ALK (Anaplastic lymphoma Kinase) gene have been identified in sporadic and familial cases of neuroblastoma, a cancer of early childhood arising from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). To decipher ALK function in neuroblastoma predisposition and oncogenesis, we have characterized knock-in (KI) mice bearing the two most frequent mutations observed in neuroblastoma patients. A dramatic enlargement of sympathetic ganglia is observed in AlkF1178L mice from embryonic to adult stages associated with an increased proliferation of sympathetic neuroblasts from E14.5 to birth. In a MYCN transgenic context, the F1178L mutation displays a higher oncogenic potential than the R1279Q mutation as evident from a shorter latency of tumor onset. We show that tumors expressing the R1279Q mutation are sensitive to ALK inhibition upon crizotinib treatment. Furthermore, our data provide evidence that activated ALK triggers RET upregulation in mouse sympathetic ganglia at birth as well as in murine and human neuroblastoma. Using vandetanib, we show that RET inhibition strongly impairs tumor growth in vivo in both MYCN/KI AlkR1279Q and MYCN/KI AlkF1178L mice. Altogether, our findings demonstrate the critical role of activated ALK in SNS development and pathogenesis and identify RET as a therapeutic target in ALK mutated neuroblastoma. PMID:24811913

  18. Rate-limiting domain and loop motions in arginine kinase.

    PubMed

    Davulcu, Omar; Skalicky, Jack J; Chapman, Michael S

    2011-05-17

    Arginine kinase catalyzes the reversible transfer of a phosphoryl group between ATP and arginine. It is the arthropod homologue of creatine kinase, buffering cellular ATP levels. Crystal structures of arginine kinase, in substrate-free and substrate-bound forms, have revealed large conformational changes associated with the catalytic cycle. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance identified movements of the N-terminal domain and a loop comprising residues I182--G209 with conformational exchange rates in the substrate-free enzyme similar to the turnover rate. Here, to understand whether these motions might be rate-limiting, we determined activation barriers for both the intrinsic dynamics and enzyme turnover using measurements over a temperature range of 15-30 °C. (15)N transverse relaxation dispersion yields activation barriers of 46 ± 8 and 34 ± 12 kJ/mol for the N-terminal domain and I182--G209 loop, respectively. An activation barrier of 34 ± 13 kJ/mol was obtained for enzyme turnover from steady-state kinetics. The similarity between the activation barriers is indeed consistent with turnover being limited by backbone conformational dynamics and pinpoints the locations of potentially rate-limiting motions. PMID:21425868

  19. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Fei; Li, Hongling; Sun, Yong

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  20. West Nile virus methyltransferase domain interacts with protein kinase G

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The flaviviral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is a phosphoprotein, though the precise identities and roles of many specific phosphorylations remain unknown. Protein kinase G (PKG), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, has previously been shown to phosphorylate dengue virus NS5. Methods We used mass spectrometry to specifically identify NS5 phosphosites. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to study protein-protein interactions. Effects on viral replication were measured via replicon system and plaque assay titering. Results We identified multiple sites in West Nile virus (WNV) NS5 that are phosphorylated during a WNV infection, and showed that the N-terminal methyltransferase domain of WNV NS5 can be specifically phosphorylated by PKG in vitro. Expressing PKG in cell culture led to an enhancement of WNV viral production. We hypothesized this effect on replication could be caused by factors beyond the specific phosphorylations of NS5. Here we show for the first time that PKG is also able to stably interact with a viral substrate, WNV NS5, in cell culture and in vitro. While the mosquito-borne WNV NS5 interacted with PKG, tick-borne Langat virus NS5 did not. The methyltransferase domain of NS5 is able to mediate the interaction between NS5 and PKG, and mutating positive residues in the αE region of the methyltransferase interrupts the interaction. These same mutations completely inhibited WNV replication. Conclusions PKG is not required for WNV replication, but does make a stable interaction with NS5. While the consequence of the NS5:PKG interaction when it occurs is unclear, mutational data demonstrates that this interaction occurs in a region of NS5 that is otherwise necessary for replication. Overall, the results identify an interaction between virus and a cellular kinase and suggest a role for a host kinase in enhancing flaviviral replication. PMID:23876037

  1. Akt1 binds focal adhesion kinase via the Akt1 kinase domain independently of the pleckstrin homology domain.

    PubMed

    Basson, M D; Zeng, B; Wang, S

    2015-10-01

    Akt1 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) are protein kinases that play key roles in normal cell signaling. Individually, aberrant expression of these kinases has been linked to a variety of cancers. Together, Akt1/FAK interactions facilitate cancer metastasis by increasing cell adhesion under conditions of increased extracellular pressure. Pathological and iatrogenic sources of pressure arise from tumor growth against constraining stroma or direct perioperative manipulation. We previously reported that 15 mmHg increased extracellular pressure causes Akt1 to both directly interact with FAK and to phosphorylate and activate it. We investigated the nature of the Akt1/FAK binding by creating truncations of recombinant FAK, conjugated to glutathione S-transferase (GST), to pull down full-length Akt1. Western blots probing for Akt1 showed that FAK/Akt1 binding persisted in FAK truncations consisting of only amino acids 1-126, FAK(NT1), which contains the F1 subdomain of its band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, and moesin (FERM) domain. Using FAK(NT1) as bait, we then pulled down truncated versions of recombinant Akt1 conjugated to HA (human influenza hemagglutinin). Probes for GST-FAK(NT1) showed Akt1-FAK binding to occur in the absence of the both the Akt1 (N)-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and its adjacent hinge region. The Akt1 (C)-terminal regulatory domain was equally unnecessary for Akt1/FAK co-immunoprecipitation. Truncations involving the Akt1 catalytic domain showed that the domain by itself was enough to pull down FAK. Additionally, a fragment spanning from the PH domain to half way through the catalytic domain demonstrated increased FAK binding compared to full length Akt1. These results begin to delineate the Akt1/FAK interaction and can be used to manipulate their force-activated signal interactions. Furthermore, the finding that the N-terminal half of the Akt1 catalytic domain binds so strongly to FAK when cleaved from the rest of the protein may suggest a means

  2. Inhibitors that stabilize a closed RAF kinase domain conformation induce dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Hugo; Thevakumaran, Neroshan; Gavory, Gwenaëlle; Li, John; Padeganeh, Abbas; Guiral, Sébastien; Duchaine, Jean; Mao, Daniel Y. L.; Bouvier, Michel; Sicheri, Frank; Therrien, Marc

    2016-01-01

    RAF kinases play a prominent role in cancer. Their mode of activation is complex, but critically requires dimerization of their kinase domains. Unexpectedly, several ATP-competitive RAF inhibitors were recently found to promote dimerization and transactivation of RAF kinases in a RAS-dependent manner and as a result undesirably stimulate RAS/ERK-mediated cell growth. The mechanism by which these inhibitors induce RAF kinase domain dimerization remains unclear. Here we describe BRET-based biosensors for the extended RAF family enabling the detection of RAF dimerization in living cells. Notably, we demonstrate the utility of these tools for profiling kinase inhibitors that selectively modulate RAF dimerization as well as for probing structural determinants of RAF dimerization in vivo. Our findings, which appear generalizable to other kinase families allosterically regulated by kinase domain dimerization, suggest a model whereby ATP-competitive inhibitors mediate RAF dimerization by stabilizing a rigid closed conformation of the kinase domain. PMID:23685672

  3. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    SciTech Connect

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  4. Treatment of ALK-Rearranged Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Recent Progress and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Laird; Solomon, Benjamin

    2015-07-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene originally discovered nearly 20 years ago in the context of anaplastic large cell lymphoma were identified as oncogenic drivers in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in 2007. These ALK gene rearrangements are present in 3-5 % of NSCLC patients, typically younger, never or light smokers with adenocarcinomas. Crizotinib is a first-in-class ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor with significant activity in ALK-positive NSCLC that received accelerated US Food and Drug Administration approval for treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC in 2011, just 4 years after identification of ALK rearrangements in this setting. Subsequently, two phase III trials have shown crizotinib to have a tolerable toxicity profile and to be superior to standard chemotherapy for the first- or second-line treatment of advanced ALK-positive lung cancer and numerous countries have approved its use. Despite initial responses, acquired resistance to crizotinib invariably leads to disease progression. Mechanisms of resistance have been described to include ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, activation of bypass signalling pathways and pharmacokinetic failure of crizotinib. Several next-generation ALK inhibitors, including ceritinib and alectinib, are in clinical development and show efficacy in both the crizotinib naïve and crizotinib refractory settings. Ongoing clinical trials will identify the optimal strategy to incorporate these novel agents in the treatment of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC. PMID:26076736

  5. The structures of the kinase domain and UBA domain of MPK38 suggest the activation mechanism for kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yong-Soon; Yoo, Jiho; Park, Soomin; Cho, Hyun-Soo

    2014-02-01

    Murine protein serine/threonine kinase 38 (MPK38) is the murine orthologue of human maternal embryonic leucine-zipper kinase (MELK), which belongs to the SNF1/AMPK family. MELK is considered to be a promising drug target for anticancer therapy because overexpression and hyperactivation of MELK is correlated with several human cancers. Activation of MPK38 requires the extended sequence (ExS) containing the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) linker and UBA domain and phosphorylation of the activation loop. However, the activation mechanism of MPK38 is unknown. This paper reports the crystal structure of MPK38 (T167E), which mimics a phosphorylated state of the activation loop, in complex with AMP-PNP. In the MPK38 structure, the UBA linker forces an inward movement of the αC helix. Phosphorylation of the activation loop then induces movement of the activation loop towards the C-lobe and results in interlobar cleft closure. These processes generate a fully active state of MPK38. This structure suggests that MPK38 has a similar molecular mechanism regulating activation as in other kinases of the SNF1/AMPK family. PMID:24531485

  6. Conformational instability of the MARK3 UBA domain compromises ubiquitin recognition and promotes interaction with the adjacent kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, James M.; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.; Ceccarelli, Derek F.; Briant, Douglas J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash; Sicheri, Frank; Kay, Lewis E.; Pawson, Tony

    2012-10-23

    The Par-1/MARK protein kinases play a pivotal role in establishing cellular polarity. This family of kinases contains a unique domain architecture, in which a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain is located C-terminal to the kinase domain. We have used a combination of x-ray crystallography and NMR dynamics experiments to understand the interaction of the human (h) MARK3 UBA domain with the adjacent kinase domain as compared with ubiquitin. The x-ray crystal structure of the linked hMARK3 kinase and UBA domains establishes that the UBA domain forms a stable intramolecular interaction with the N-terminal lobe of the kinase domain. However, solution-state NMR studies of the isolated UBA domain indicate that it is highly dynamic, undergoing conformational transitions that can be explained by a folding-unfolding equilibrium. NMR titration experiments indicated that the hMARK3 UBA domain has a detectable but extremely weak affinity for mono ubiquitin, which suggests that conformational instability of the isolated hMARK3 UBA domain attenuates binding to ubiquitin despite the presence of residues typically involved in ubiquitin recognition. Our data identify a molecular mechanism through which the hMARK3 UBA domain has evolved to bind the kinase domain, in a fashion that stabilizes an open conformation of the N- and C-terminal lobes, at the expense of its capacity to engage ubiquitin. These results may be relevant more generally to the 30% of UBA domains that lack significant ubiquitin-binding activity, and they suggest a unique mechanism by which interaction domains may evolve new binding properties.

  7. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase status in rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Wakai, Susumu; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Tsuta, Koji; Fukayama, Masashi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma that typically affects children, adolescents, and young adults. Despite treatment via a multidisciplinary approach, the prognosis of advance-stage rhabdomyosarcomas remains poor, and a new treatment strategy is needed. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a potential target for specific inhibitors. In this study, we investigated 116 rhabdomyosarcomas using a polymer-based ALK immunostaining method and correlated the results with clinicopathological parameters. In addition, we examined ALK status using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization, PCR, and sequencing. In immunohistochemical analysis, ALK was detected in 2 (6%) of 33 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas, 42 (69%) of 61 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, and 0 (0%) of 22 other subtypes, including pleomorphic, adult-spindle-cell/sclerosing, and epithelioid variants. Compared with ALK-negative alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas, ALK-positive ones are presented with metastatic spread more frequently and showed a greater extent of myogenin reactivity. Overall survival was not associated with ALK expression. FOXO1 rearrangement was significantly associated with ALK immunoreactivity. The median ALK copy number was greater in ALK-positive tumors than in ALK-negative tumors. Most (93%) cases tested showed no selective increase in the ALK gene dosage. ALK selective amplification and low-level selective gain were noted in one and three cases, respectively. Further, a high-polysomy pattern (≥4 ALK copies in ≥40% of cells) was observed in seven cases. A significant increase in the ALK copy number was exclusive to the ALK-immunopositive cohort, but it was uncommon, accounting for only 30% of the 37 ALK-positive rhabdomyosarcomas. ALK gene rearrangement was not observed in either cohort, while an ALK somatic mutation (I1277T) was found in one ALK-negative embryonal case. Although it remains controversial whether ALK expression without gene rearrangement

  8. Regulation of Endothelial Barrier Function by TGF-β type I Receptor ALK5: Potential Role of Contractile Mechanisms and Heat Shock Protein 90

    PubMed Central

    Antonov, Alexander S.; Antonova, Galina N.; Fujii, Makiko; Dijke, Peter ten; Handa, Vaishali; Catravas, John D.; Verin, Alexander D.

    2013-01-01

    Multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute lung inflammation by controlling endothelial monolayer permeability. TGF-β1 regulates endothelial cell (EC) functions via two distinct receptors, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) and activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5). The precise roles of ALK1 and ALK5 in the regulation of TGF-β1-induced lung endothelium dysfunction remain mostly unknown. We now report that adenoviral infection with constitutively active ALK5 (caALK5), but not caALK1, induces EC retraction and that this receptor predominantly controls EC permeability. We demonstrate that ubiquitinated ALK5 and phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 (phospho-Hsp27) specifically accumulate in the cytoskeleton fraction, which parallels with microtubule collapse, cortical actin disassembly and increased EC permeability. We have found that ALK1 and ALK5 interact with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). Moreover, the Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol (RA) prevents accumulation of ubiquitinated caALK5 and phospho-Hsp27 in the cytoskeletal fraction and restore the decreased EC permeability induced by caALK5. We hypothesize that specific translocation of ubiquitinated ALK5 receptor into the cytoskeleton compartment due to its lack of degradation is the mechanism that causes the divergence of caALK1 and caALK5 signaling. PMID:21465483

  9. A novel molecular variant of the chimeric NPM-ALK transcript in Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ladanyi, M.

    1994-09-01

    The breakpoints of the t(2;5)(p23;q35), reported to be present in 30-40% of Ki-1 positive large cell lymphoma (Ki-1 LCL), have recently been cloned. They involve a novel tyrosine kinase gene, ALK, at 2p23 and the nucleophosmin gene, NPM, at 5q35. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using NPM and ALK primers detects a consistent fusion product in Ki-1 cases with the translocation. We performed NPM-ALK RT-PCR on 16 cases of Ki-1 LCL, of which 13 had informative cytogenetics. Amplifiable template was confirmed in all samples by RT-PCR using {beta}-actin primers. Ten cases showed the expected 177 base pair (bp) RT-PCR product indicative of the translocation, including all 6 cases with cytogenetic evidence of the t(2;5) and 3 cases without 5q35 abnormalities. One additional case, which had uninformative cytogenetics, showed only a novel 144 bp RT-PCR product. Sequencing of this PCR product showed an in-frame junction of NPM to ALK, 20 bp distal to the usual NPM junction site and 53 bp distal to usual ALK junction site. The predicted chimeric protein is thus shorter by 11 amino acids, but the putative ALK catalytic domain remains intact. This case was a histologically typical anaplastic Ki-1 LCL which showed a clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor {beta} gene. The functional significance of this molecular variant and its relation to the exon structure of both genes require further study. The overall incidence of the translocation in this series, about 70%, is higher than suspected from cytogenetic analysis alone.

  10. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  11. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Agulnik, J.; Albadine, R.; Banerji, S.; Bebb, D.G.; Bethune, D.; Blais, N.; Butts, C.; Cheema, P.; Cheung, P.; Cohen, V.; Deschenes, J.; Ionescu, D.N.; Juergens, R.; Kamel-Reid, S.; Laurie, S.A.; Liu, G.; Morzycki, W.; Tsao, M.S.; Xu, Z.; Hirsh, V.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  12. Canadian consensus: inhibition of ALK-positive tumours in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Melosky, B; Agulnik, J; Albadine, R; Banerji, S; Bebb, D G; Bethune, D; Blais, N; Butts, C; Cheema, P; Cheung, P; Cohen, V; Deschenes, J; Ionescu, D N; Juergens, R; Kamel-Reid, S; Laurie, S A; Liu, G; Morzycki, W; Tsao, M S; Xu, Z; Hirsh, V

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (alk) is an oncogenic driver in non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). Chromosomal rearrangements involving the ALK gene occur in up to 4% of nonsquamous nsclc patients and lead to constitutive activation of the alk signalling pathway. ALK-positive nsclc is found in relatively young patients, with a median age of 50 years. Patients frequently have brain metastasis. Targeted inhibition of the alk pathway prolongs progression-free survival in patients with ALK-positive advanced nsclc. The results of several recent clinical trials confirm the efficacy and safety benefit of crizotinib and ceritinib in this population. Canadian oncologists support the following consensus statement: All patients with advanced nonsquamous nsclc (excluding pure neuroendocrine carcinoma) should be tested for the presence of an ALK rearrangement. If an ALK rearrangement is present, treatment with a targeted alk inhibitor in the first-line setting is recommended. As patients become resistant to first-generation alk inhibitors, other treatments, including second-generation alk inhibitors can be considered. PMID:27330348

  13. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. PMID:27001024

  14. The ALK/ROS1 inhibitor PF-06463922 overcomes primary resistance to crizotinib in ALK-driven neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Infarinato, Nicole R.; Park, Jin H.; Krytska, Kateryna; Ryles, Hannah T.; Sano, Renata; Szigety, Katherine M.; Li, Yimei; Zou, Helen Y.; Lee, Nathan V.; Smeal, Tod; Lemmon, Mark A.; Mossé, Yael P.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastomas (NBs) harboring activating point mutations in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) are differentially sensitive to the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, with certain mutations conferring intrinsic crizotinib resistance. To overcome this clinical obstacle, our goal was to identify inhibitors with improved potency that can target intractable ALK variants such as F1174L. We find that PF-06463922 has high potency across ALK variants, and inhibits ALK more effectively than crizotinib in vitro. Most importantly, PF-06463922 induces complete tumor regression in both crizotinib-resistant and sensitive xenograft mouse models of NB, as well as in PDXs harboring the crizotinib-resistant F1174L or F1245C mutations. These studies demonstrate that PF-06463922 has the potential to overcome crizotinib resistance, and exerts unprecedented activity as a single targeted agent against F1174L and F1245C ALK-mutated xenograft tumors, while also inducing responses in a R1275Q xenograft model. Taken together, these results provide the rationale to move PF-06463922 into clinical trials for treatment of patients with ALK-mutated NB. PMID:26554404

  15. Dependence-induced ethanol drinking and GABA neurotransmission are altered in Alk deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Paul; Cates-Gatto, Chelsea; Varodayan, Florence P; Nadav, Tali; Roberto, Marisa; Lasek, Amy W; Roberts, Amanda J

    2016-08-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in the brain and implicated in alcohol abuse in humans and behavioral responses to ethanol in mice. Previous studies have shown an association of human ALK with acute responses to alcohol and alcohol dependence. In addition, Alk knockout (Alk -/-) mice consume more ethanol in a binge-drinking test and show increased sensitivity to ethanol sedation. However, the function of ALK in excessive drinking following the establishment of ethanol dependence has not been examined. In this study, we tested Alk -/- mice for dependence-induced drinking using the chronic intermittent ethanol-two bottle choice drinking (CIE-2BC) protocol. We found that Alk -/- mice initially consume more ethanol prior to CIE exposure, but do not escalate ethanol consumption after exposure, suggesting that ALK may promote the escalation of drinking after ethanol dependence. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for this behavioral phenotype we used an electrophysiological approach to examine GABA neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a brain region that regulates alcohol consumption and shows increased GABA signaling after chronic ethanol exposure. GABA transmission in ethanol-naïve Alk -/- mice was enhanced at baseline and potentiated in response to acute ethanol application when compared to wild-type (Alk +/+) mice. Moreover, basal GABA transmission was not elevated by CIE exposure in Alk -/- mice as it was in Alk +/+ mice. These data suggest that ALK plays a role in dependence-induced drinking and the regulation of presynaptic GABA release in the CeA. PMID:26946429

  16. Epigenetic deregulation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase gene modulates mesenchymal characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tim Hui-Ming

    2013-01-01

    DNA hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands is associated with epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). We used a methyl-CpG-binding domain protein capture method coupled with next-generation sequencing (MBDCap-seq) to survey global DNA methylation patterns in OSCCs with and without nodal metastasis and normal mucosa (total n = 58). Of 1462 differentially methylated CpG islands identified in OSCCs relative to normal controls, MBDCap-seq profiling uncovered 359 loci linked to lymph node metastasis. Interactive network analysis revealed a subset of these loci (n = 23), including the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene, are potential regulators and effectors of invasiveness and metastatic progression. Promoter methylation of ALK was preferentially observed in OSCCs without node metastasis, whereas relatively lower methylation levels were present in metastatic tumors, implicating an active state of ALK transcription in the latter group. The OSCC cell line, SCC4, displayed reduced ALK expression that corresponded to extensive promoter CpG island methylation. SCC4 treatment with demethylating agents induced ALK expression and increased invasion and migration characteristics. Inhibition of ALK activity in OSCC cells with high ALK expression (CAL27, HSC3 and SCC25), decreased cell growth and resulted in changes in invasive potential and mesenchymal marker expression that were cell-line dependent. Although ALK is susceptible to epigenetic silencing during oral tumorigenesis, overwriting this default state may be necessary for modulating invasive processes involved in nodal metastases. Given the complex response of OSCC cells to ALK inhibition, future studies are required to assess the feasibility of targeting ALK to treat invasive OSCCs. PMID:23568951

  17. The insulin and IGF1 receptor kinase domains are functional dimers in the activated state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabail, M. Zulema; Li, Shiqing; Lemmon, Eric; Bowen, Mark E.; Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2015-03-01

    The insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) are highly related receptor tyrosine kinases with a disulfide-linked homodimeric architecture. Ligand binding to the receptor ectodomain triggers tyrosine autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domains, which stimulates catalytic activity and creates recruitment sites for downstream signalling proteins. Whether the two phosphorylated tyrosine kinase domains within the receptor dimer function independently or cooperatively to phosphorylate protein substrates is not known. Here we provide crystallographic, biophysical and biochemical evidence demonstrating that the phosphorylated kinase domains of IR and IGF1R form a specific dimeric arrangement involving an exchange of the juxtamembrane region proximal to the kinase domain. In this dimer, the active position of α-helix C in the kinase N lobe is stabilized, which promotes downstream substrate phosphorylation. These studies afford a novel strategy for the design of small-molecule IR agonists as potential therapeutic agents for type 2 diabetes.

  18. Viral Evolved Inhibition Mechanism of the RNA Dependent Protein Kinase PKR's Kinase Domain, a Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, K. Hari; Vadlamudi, Yallamandayya; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase PKR activated by viral dsRNA, phosphorylates the eIF2α, which inhibit the mechanism of translation initiation. Viral evolved proteins mimicking the eIF2α block its phosphorylation and help in the viral replication. To decipher the molecular basis for the PKR’s substrate and inhibitor interaction mechanisms, we carried the molecular dynamics studies on the catalytic domain of PKR in complex with substrate eIF2α, and inhibitors TAT and K3L. The studies conducted show the altered domain movements of N lobe, which confers open and close state to the substrate-binding cavity. In addition, PKR exhibits variations in the secondary structural transition of the activation loop residues, and inter molecular contacts with the substrate and the inhibitors. Phosphorylation of the P+1 loop at the Thr-451 increases the affinity of the binding proteins exhibiting its role in the phosphorylation events. The implications of structural mechanisms uncovered will help to understand the basis of the evolution of the host-viral and the viral replication mechanisms. PMID:27088597

  19. Crystal Structure of a Histidine Kinase Sensor Domain with Similarity to Periplasmic Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J.; Le-Khac, M; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors are elements of the two-component signal transduction systems commonly found in bacteria and lower eukaryotes, where they are crucial for environmental adaption through the coupling of extracellular changes to intracellular responses. The typical two-component system consists of a membrane-spanning histidine kinase sensor and a cytoplasmic response regulator. In the calssic system, extracellular signals such as small molecule ligands and ions are detected by the periplasmic sensor domain of the histidine kinase receptor, which modulates the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic histidine kinase domain and promotes ATP-dependent autophosphorylation of a conserved histidine residue. G. sulfurreducens genomic DNA was used.

  20. Regulation of the ALK1 ligands, BMP9 and BMP10.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Salmon, Richard M; Jiang, He; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2016-08-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)9 and BMP10 are high affinity ligands for activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), a type I BMP receptor mainly expressed on vascular endothelial cells (ECs). ALK1-mediated BMP9/BMP10 signalling pathways have emerged as essential in EC biology and in angiogenesis. Several genetic mutations in the genes encoding the ligands and receptors of this pathway have been reported in two cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Administration of recombinant BMP9 reverses experimental PAH in preclinical rodent models. Dalantercept, an Fc-fusion protein of the extracellular domain of ALK1 and a ligand trap for BMP9 and BMP10, is in phase II clinical trials for anti-tumour angiogenesis. Understanding the regulation of BMP9 and BMP10, at both gene and protein levels, under physiological and pathological conditions, will reveal essential information and potential novel prognostic markers for the BMP9/BMP10-targeted therapies. PMID:27528761

  1. Alk7 Depleted Mice Exhibit Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Are Predisposed to Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shaozhen; Cao, Hong; Hu, He; Wang, Xin; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the role of activin receptor-like kinase (ALK7) in regulating cardiac electrophysiology. Here, we showed that Alk7-/- mice exhibited prolonged QT intervals in telemetry ECG recordings. Furthermore, Langendorff-perfused Alk7-/- hearts had significantly longer action potential duration (APD) and greater incidence of ventricular arrhythmia (AV) induced by burst pacing. Using whole-cell patch clamp, we found that the densities of repolarizing K+ currents Ito and IK1 were profoundly reduced in Alk7-/- ventricular cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, the expression of Kv4.2 (a major subunit of Ito carrying channel) and KCHIP2 (a key accessory subunit of Ito carrying channel), was markedly decreased in Alk7-/- hearts. These findings suggest that endogenous expression of ALK7 is necessary to maintain repolarizing K+ currents in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and finally prevent action potential prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia. PMID:26882027

  2. The structure of the PERK kinase domain suggests the mechanism for its activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhi; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2011-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. The crystal structure of PERK’s kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 Å resolution. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is comprised of several intracellular signaling pathways that alleviate ER stress. The ER-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. Oligomerization of PERK’s N-terminal ER luminal domain by ER stress promotes PERK trans-autophosphorylation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase domain at multiple residues including Thr980 on the kinase activation loop. Activated PERK phosphorylates Ser51 of the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which inhibits initiation of protein synthesis and reduces the load of unfolded proteins entering the ER. The crystal structure of PERK’s kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 Å resolution. The structure resembles the back-to-back dimer observed in the related eIF2α kinase PKR. Phosphorylation of Thr980 stabilizes both the activation loop and helix αG in the C-terminal lobe, preparing the latter for eIF2α binding. The structure suggests conservation in the mode of activation of eIF2α kinases and is consistent with a ‘line-up’ model for PERK activation triggered by oligomerization of its luminal domain.

  3. Biochemical and Structural Insights into Doublecortin-like Kinase Domain 1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Onisha; Dai, Weiwen; Mentzel, Mareike; Griffin, Michael D W; Serindoux, Juliette; Gay, Yoann; Fischer, Stefanie; Sterle, Shoukat; Kropp, Ashleigh; Burns, Christopher J; Ernst, Matthias; Buchert, Michael; Lucet, Isabelle S

    2016-09-01

    Doublecortin-like kinase 1 (DCLK1) is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the family of microtubule-associated proteins. Originally identified for its role in neurogenesis, DCLK1 has recently been shown to regulate biological processes outside of the CNS. DCLK1 is among the 15 most common putative driver genes for gastric cancers and is highly mutated across various other human cancers. However, our present understanding of how DCLK1 dysfunction leads to tumorigenesis is limited. Here, we provide evidence that DCLK1 kinase activity negatively regulates microtubule polymerization. We present the crystal structure of the DCLK1 kinase domain at 1.7 Å resolution, providing detailed insight into the ATP-binding site that will serve as a framework for future drug design. This structure also allowed for the mapping of cancer-causing mutations within the kinase domain, suggesting that a loss of kinase function may contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:27545623

  4. ALK and ROS1 as targeted therapy paradigms and clinical implications to overcome crizotinib resistance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Pengyu; Chang, Ning; Wu, Jianxiong; Ren, Xinling; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, more than 10 targetable oncogenic driver genes have been validated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and ROS1 kinase are two new driver genes implicated in ALK- and ROS1-rearranged NSCLC. Inhibition of ALK and ROS1 by crizotinib has been reported to be highly effective and well tolerated in these patients. However, resistance to crizotinib emerges years after treatment, and increasing efforts have been made to overcome this issue. Here, we review the biology of ALK and ROS1 and their roles in cancer progression. We also summarize the ongoing and completed clinical trials validating ALK and ROS1 as targets for cancer treatment. In the last section of the review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of crizotinib resistance and focus approaches to overcome it. This review describes an exciting new area of research and may provide new insights for targeted cancer therapies. PMID:26802023

  5. Alk1 controls arterial endothelial cell migration in lumenized vessels.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Elizabeth R; Menon, Prahlad G; Roman, Beth L

    2016-07-15

    Heterozygous loss of the arterial-specific TGFβ type I receptor, activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1; ACVRL1), causes hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). HHT is characterized by development of fragile, direct connections between arteries and veins, or arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). However, how decreased ALK1 signaling leads to AVMs is unknown. To understand the cellular mis-steps that cause AVMs, we assessed endothelial cell behavior in alk1-deficient zebrafish embryos, which develop cranial AVMs. Our data demonstrate that alk1 loss has no effect on arterial endothelial cell proliferation but alters arterial endothelial cell migration within lumenized vessels. In wild-type embryos, alk1-positive cranial arterial endothelial cells generally migrate towards the heart, against the direction of blood flow, with some cells incorporating into endocardium. In alk1-deficient embryos, migration against flow is dampened and migration in the direction of flow is enhanced. Altered migration results in decreased endothelial cell number in arterial segments proximal to the heart and increased endothelial cell number in arterial segments distal to the heart. We speculate that the consequent increase in distal arterial caliber and hemodynamic load precipitates the flow-dependent development of downstream AVMs. PMID:27287800

  6. A Screening Method for the ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer research has recently made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer and in developing treatments for it. Such achievements are directly utilized in clinical practice. Indeed, the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was first described in non-small cell lung cancer in 2007, and a molecularly targeted drug against the fusion was approved in 2011. However, lung cancer with the ALK fusion constitutes only a small fraction of lung cancers; therefore, efficient patient selection is crucial for successful treatment using the ALK inhibitor. Currently, RT-PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry are commonly used to detect the ALK fusion. Although FISH is currently the gold standard technique, there are no perfect methods for detecting these genetic alterations. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and the possible criteria for selecting patients who are more likely to have the ALK fusion. If we can successfully screen patients, then ALK inhibitor treatment will be the best example of personalized therapy in terms of selecting patients with an uncommon genotype from a larger group with the same tumor phenotype. In other words, the personalized therapy may offer a new challenge for current clinical oncology. PMID:22655265

  7. A Screening Method for the ALK Fusion Gene in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Yoshiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer research has recently made significant progress in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of lung cancer and in developing treatments for it. Such achievements are directly utilized in clinical practice. Indeed, the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene was first described in non-small cell lung cancer in 2007, and a molecularly targeted drug against the fusion was approved in 2011. However, lung cancer with the ALK fusion constitutes only a small fraction of lung cancers; therefore, efficient patient selection is crucial for successful treatment using the ALK inhibitor. Currently, RT-PCR, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and immunohistochemistry are commonly used to detect the ALK fusion. Although FISH is currently the gold standard technique, there are no perfect methods for detecting these genetic alterations. In this article, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each method and the possible criteria for selecting patients who are more likely to have the ALK fusion. If we can successfully screen patients, then ALK inhibitor treatment will be the best example of personalized therapy in terms of selecting patients with an uncommon genotype from a larger group with the same tumor phenotype. In other words, the personalized therapy may offer a new challenge for current clinical oncology. PMID:22655265

  8. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  9. Viral AlkB proteins repair RNA damage by oxidative demethylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Born, Erwin; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Bekkelund, Anders; Leihne, Vibeke; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dolja, Valerian V.; Falnes, Pål Ø.

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian AlkB proteins are iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases that reverse methylation damage, such as 1-methyladenine and 3-methylcytosine, in RNA and DNA. An AlkB-domain is encoded by the genome of numerous single-stranded, plant-infecting RNA viruses, the majority of which belong to the Flexiviridae family. Our phylogenetic analysis of AlkB sequences suggests that a single plant virus might have acquired AlkB relatively recently, followed by horizontal dissemination among other viruses via recombination. Here, we describe the first functional characterization of AlkB proteins from three plant viruses. The viral AlkB proteins efficiently reactivated methylated bacteriophage genomes when expressed in Escherichia coli, and also displayed robust, iron(II)- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent demethylase activity in vitro. Viral AlkB proteins preferred RNA over DNA substrates, and thus represent the first AlkBs with such substrate specificity. Our results suggest a role for viral AlkBs in maintaining the integrity of the viral RNA genome through repair of deleterious methylation damage, and support the notion that AlkB-mediated RNA repair is biologically relevant. PMID:18718927

  10. Oncogenic TPM3-ALK activation requires dimerization through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Rie; Sakatani, Toshio; Ichinose, Junji; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Nakajima, Jun; Nagase, Takahide; Ohishi, Nobuya; Takai, Daiya

    2015-02-13

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a mesenchymal tumor that can arise from anywhere in the body. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements, most often resulting in the tropomyosin 3 (TPM3)-ALK fusion gene, are the main causes of IMT. However, the mechanism of malignant transformation in IMT has yet to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the TPM3 region in the transformation of IMT via TPM3-ALK. Lentivirus vectors containing a TPM3-ALK fusion gene lacking various lengths of TPM3 were constructed and expressed in HEK293T and NIH3T3 cell lines. Focus formation assay revealed loss of contact inhibition in NIH3T3 cells transfected with full-length TPM3-ALK, but not with ALK alone. Blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) revealed that TPM3-ALK dimerization increased in proportion to the length of TPM3. Western blot showed phosphorylation of ALK, ERK1/2, and STAT3 in HEK293T cells transfected with TPM3-ALK. Thus, the coiled-coil structure of TPM3 contributes to the transforming ability of the TPM3-ALK fusion protein, and longer TPM3 region leads to higher dimer formation. - Highlights: • TPM3-ALK fusion protein dimerizes through the coiled-coil structure of TPM3. • Longer coiled-coil structure of TPM3 leads to higher TPM3-ALK dimer formation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK dimer leads to ALK, STAT3, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. • Presence of TPM3-ALK leads to loss of contact inhibition. • BN-PAGE is a simple technique for visualizing oncogenic dimerization.

  11. Characterization of all possible single-nucleotide change caused amino acid substitutions in the kinase domain of Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Väliaho, Jouni; Faisal, Imrul; Ortutay, Csaba; Smith, C I Edvard; Vihinen, Mauno

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about features distinguishing deleterious and neutral variations is crucial for interpretation of novel variants. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) contains the highest number of unique disease-causing variations among the human protein kinases, still it is just 10% of all the possible single-nucleotide substitution-caused amino acid variations (SNAVs). In the BTK kinase domain (BTK-KD) can appear altogether 1,495 SNAVs. We investigated them all with bioinformatic and protein structure analysis methods. Most disease-causing variations affect conserved and buried residues disturbing protein stability. Minority of exposed residues is conserved, but strongly tied to pathogenicity. Sixty-seven percent of variations are predicted to be harmful. In 39% of the residues, all the variants are likely harmful, whereas in 10% of sites, all the substitutions are tolerated. Results indicate the importance of the entire kinase domain, involvement in numerous interactions, and intricate functional regulation by conformational change. These results can be extended to other protein kinases and organisms. PMID:25777788

  12. Prospective and clinical validation of ALK immunohistochemistry: results from the phase I/II study of alectinib for ALK-positive lung cancer (AF-001JP study)

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, K.; Togashi, Y.; Kamihara, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Yoshioka, H.; Inoue, A.; Katsuki, H.; Kiura, K.; Nakagawa, K.; Seto, T.; Maemondo, M.; Hida, T.; Harada, M.; Ohe, Y.; Nogami, N.; Yamamoto, N.; Nishio, M.; Tamura, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions need to be accurately and efficiently detected for ALK inhibitor therapy. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) remains the reference test. Although increasing data are supporting that ALK immunohistochemistry (IHC) is highly concordant with FISH, IHC screening needed to be clinically and prospectively validated. Patients and methods In the AF-001JP trial for alectinib, 436 patients were screened for ALK fusions through IHC (n = 384) confirmed with FISH (n = 181), multiplex RT-PCR (n = 68), or both (n = 16). IHC results were scored with iScore. Result ALK fusion was positive in 137 patients and negative in 250 patients. Since the presence of cancer cells in the samples for RT-PCR was not confirmed, ALK fusion negativity could not be ascertained in 49 patients. IHC interpreted with iScore showed a 99.4% (173/174) concordance with FISH. All 41 patients who had iScore 3 and were enrolled in phase II showed at least 30% tumor reduction with 92.7% overall response rate. Two IHC-positive patients with an atypical FISH pattern responded to ALK inhibitor therapy. The reduction rate was not correlated with IHC staining intensity. Conclusions Our study showed (i) that when sufficiently sensitive and appropriately interpreted, IHC can be a stand-alone diagnostic for ALK inhibitor therapies; (ii) that when atypical FISH patterns are accompanied by IHC positivity, the patients should be considered as candidates for ALK inhibitor therapies, and (iii) that the expression level of ALK fusion is not related to the level of response to ALK inhibitors and is thus not required for patient selection. Registration number JapicCTI-101264 (This study is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center). PMID:26487585

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor kinase domain mutations are rare in salivary gland carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Dahse, R; Driemel, O; Schwarz, S; Dahse, J; Kromeyer-Hauschild, K; Berndt, A; Kosmehl, H

    2009-01-01

    Activating mutations within the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase domain identify non-small cell lung cancer patients with improved clinical response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Recently, we identified two EGFR mutations in a cohort of 25 salivary gland carcinomas (SGCs) by screening the tumour samples for the both most common hotspot mutations in exons 19 and 21 by allele-specific PCR. Here, we present a comprehensive sequencing analysis of the entire critical EGFR tyrosine kinase domain in 65 SGC of the main histopathological types. We found EGFR mutations in the tyrosine kinase domain to be a rare event in SGCs. No additional mutations other than the two known exon 19 deletions (c.2235_2249del15) in a mucoepidermoid carcinoma and an adenoid cystic carcinoma have been detected. Other putative predictive markers for EGFR-targeted therapy in SGCs might be relevant and should be investigated. PMID:19174819

  14. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  15. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  16. The mobility of two kinase domains in the Escherichia coli chemoreceptor array varies with signaling state

    PubMed Central

    Briegel, Ariane; Ames, Peter; Gumbart, James C.; Oikonomou, Catherine M.; Parkinson, John S.; Jensen, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Motile bacteria sense their physical and chemical environment through highly cooperative, ordered arrays of chemoreceptors. These signaling complexes phosphorylate a response regulator which in turn governs flagellar motor reversals, driving cells towards favorable environments. The structural changes that translate chemoeffector binding into the appropriate kinase output are not known. Here, we apply high-resolution electron cryotomography to visualize mutant chemoreceptor signaling arrays in well-defined kinase activity states. The arrays were well ordered in all signaling states, with no discernible differences in receptor conformation at 2-3 nm resolution. Differences were observed, however, in a keel-like density that we identify here as CheA kinase domains P1 and P2, which are the phosphorylation site domain and the binding domain for response regulator target proteins, respectively. Mutant receptor arrays with high kinase activities all exhibited small keels and high proteolysis susceptibility, indicative of mobile P1 and P2 domains. In contrast, arrays in kinase-off signaling states exhibited a range of keel sizes. These findings confirm that chemoreceptor arrays do not undergo large structural changes during signaling, and suggest instead that kinase activity is modulated at least in part by changes in the mobility of key domains. PMID:23802570

  17. Is ALK-gene rearrangement overlooked in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas? About two cases.

    PubMed

    Mneimneh, Wadad S; Vyas, Shikhar Gautam; Cheng, Liang; Cummings, Oscar W; Czader, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    A 41-year-old male patient with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and Crohn disease, treated with immunomodulators and disease-modifying drugs, was diagnosed with a primary intestinal T-cell lymphoma that followed a 7.5-year-course. This transmural proliferation lacked cytological characteristics of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and was CD8-positive, and CD30- and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative by immunohistochemistry (IHC). However, ALK-gene rearrangement (ALK-gr) was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in both initial and persistent disease. The possibility of indolent T-cell lymphoproliferative disease of the gastrointestinal tract with atypical features (transmural involvement) related to ALK-gr was suggested. A previous case of aggressive 'enteropathy-associated ALCL' in the context of celiac disease was recently reported, which also lacked anaplastic morphology, and where CD30 and ALK expression was incidentally demonstrated by IHC, and ALK-gr subsequently confirmed by FISH. These two recent cases represent two distinct rare entities pertaining to the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas, and they both show unexpected ALK-gr. This suggests that ALK-gr has been overlooked in the group of primary intestinal T-cell lymphomas. Performing IHC and FISH tests for ALK-gr in primary gastrointestinal T-cell lymphomas might be of importance, particularly with the advancement of targeted therapy that could impact treatment and prognosis. PMID:26531107

  18. Novel CAD-ALK gene rearrangement is drugable by entrectinib in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amatu, Alessio; Somaschini, Alessio; Cerea, Giulio; Bosotti, Roberta; Valtorta, Emanuele; Buonandi, Pasquale; Marrapese, Giovanna; Veronese, Silvio; Luo, David; Hornby, Zachary; Multani, Pratik; Murphy, Danielle; Shoemaker, Robert; Lauricella, Calogero; Giannetta, Laura; Maiolani, Martina; Vanzulli, Angelo; Ardini, Elena; Galvani, Arturo; Isacchi, Antonella; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Siena, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Background: Activated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene fusions are recurrent events in a small fraction of colorectal cancers (CRCs), although these events have not yet been exploited as in other malignancies. Methods: We detected ALK protein expression by immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridisation in the ALKA-372-001 phase I study of the pan-Trk, ROS1, and ALK inhibitor entrectinib. One out of 487 CRCs showed ALK positivity with a peculiar pattern that prompted further characterisation by targeted sequencing using anchored multiplex PCR. Results: A novel ALK fusion with the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase 2, aspartate transcarbamylase, and dihydroorotase (CAD) gene (CAD-ALK fusion gene) was identified. It resulted from inversion within chromosome 2 and the fusion of exons 1–35 of CAD with exons 20–29 of ALK. After failure of previous standard therapies, treatment of this patient with the ALK inhibitor entrectinib resulted in a durable objective tumour response. Conclusions: We describe the novel CAD-ALK rearrangement as an oncogene and provide the first evidence of its drugability as a new molecular target in CRC. PMID:26633560

  19. Bioinformatic Analysis of Pathogenic Missense Mutations of Activin Receptor Like Kinase 1 Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Scotti, Claudia; Olivieri, Carla; Boeri, Laura; Canzonieri, Cecilia; Ornati, Federica; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Pagella, Fabio; Danesino, Cesare

    2011-01-01

    Activin A receptor, type II-like kinase 1 (also called ALK1), is a serine-threonine kinase predominantly expressed on endothelial cells surface. Mutations in its ACVRL1 encoding gene (12q11-14) cause type 2 Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT2), an autosomal dominant multisystem vascular dysplasia. The study of the structural effects of mutations is crucial to understand their pathogenic mechanism. However, while an X-ray structure of ALK1 intracellular domain has recently become available (PDB ID: 3MY0), structure determination of ALK1 ectodomain (ALK1EC) has been elusive so far. We here describe the building of a homology model for ALK1EC, followed by an extensive bioinformatic analysis, based on a set of 38 methods, of the effect of missense mutations at the sequence and structural level. ALK1EC potential interaction mode with its ligand BMP9 was then predicted combining modelling and docking data. The calculated model of the ALK1EC allowed mapping and a preliminary characterization of HHT2 associated mutations. Major structural changes and loss of stability of the protein were predicted for several mutations, while others were found to interfere mainly with binding to BMP9 or other interactors, like Endoglin (CD105), whose encoding ENG gene (9q34) mutations are known to cause type 1 HHT. This study gives a preliminary insight into the potential structure of ALK1EC and into the structural effects of HHT2 associated mutations, which can be useful to predict the potential effect of each single mutation, to devise new biological experiments and to interpret the biological significance of new mutations, private mutations, or non-synonymous polymorphisms. PMID:22028876

  20. Crystallization of the Focal Adhesion Kinase Targeting (FAT) Domain in a Primitive Orthorhombic Space Group

    SciTech Connect

    Magis,A.; Bailey, K.; Kurenova, E.; Hernandez Prada, J.; Cance, W.; Ostrov, D.

    2008-01-01

    X-ray diffraction data from the targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were collected from a single crystal that diffracted to 1.99 Angstroms resolution and reduced to the primitive orthorhombic lattice. A single molecule was predicted to be present in the asymmetric unit based on the Matthews coefficient. The data were phased using molecular-replacement methods using an existing model of the FAK FAT domain. All structures of human focal adhesion kinase FAT domains solved to date have been solved in a C-centered orthorhombic space group.

  1. Ponatinib overcomes FGF2-mediated resistance in CML patients without kinase domain mutations

    PubMed Central

    Traer, Elie; Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Agarwal, Anupriya; Dunlap, Jennifer; English, Isabel; Martinez, Jacqueline; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Wong, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Development of resistance to kinase inhibitors remains a clinical challenge. Kinase domain mutations are a common mechanism of resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), yet the mechanism of resistance in the absence of mutations remains unclear. We tested proteins from the bone marrow microenvironment and found that FGF2 promotes resistance to imatinib in vitro. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) was uniquely capable of promoting growth in both short- and long-term assays through the FGF receptor 3/RAS/c-RAF/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Resistance could be overcome with ponatinib, a multikinase inhibitor that targets BCR-ABL and FGF receptor. Clinically, we identified CML patients without kinase domain mutations who were resistant to multiple ABL kinase inhibitors and responded to ponatinib treatment. In comparison to CML patients with kinase domain mutations, these patients had increased FGF2 in their bone marrow when analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, FGF2 in the marrow decreased concurrently with response to ponatinib, further suggesting that FGF2-mediated resistance is interrupted by FGF receptor inhibition. These results illustrate the clinical importance of ligand-induced resistance to kinase inhibitors and support an approach of developing rational inhibitor combinations to circumvent resistance. PMID:24408322

  2. The structure of the PERK kinase domain suggests the mechanism for its activation

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhi; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2012-08-31

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is comprised of several intracellular signaling pathways that alleviate ER stress. The ER-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. Oligomerization of PERK's N-terminal ER luminal domain by ER stress promotes PERK trans-autophosphorylation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase domain at multiple residues including Thr980 on the kinase activation loop. Activated PERK phosphorylates Ser51 of the {alpha}-subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2{alpha}), which inhibits initiation of protein synthesis and reduces the load of unfolded proteins entering the ER. The crystal structure of PERK's kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 {angstrom} resolution. The structure resembles the back-to-back dimer observed in the related eIF2{alpha} kinase PKR. Phosphorylation of Thr980 stabilizes both the activation loop and helix {alpha}G in the C-terminal lobe, preparing the latter for eIF2{alpha} binding. The structure suggests conservation in the mode of activation of eIF2{alpha} kinases and is consistent with a 'line-up' model for PERK activation triggered by oligomerization of its luminal domain.

  3. The structure of the PERK kinase domain suggests the mechanism for its activation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenjun; Li, Jingzhi; Ron, David; Sha, Bingdong

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is comprised of several intracellular signaling pathways that alleviate ER stress. The ER-localized transmembrane kinase PERK is one of three major ER stress transducers. Oligomerization of PERK’s N-terminal ER luminal domain by ER stress promotes PERK trans-autophosphorylation of the C-terminal cytoplasmic kinase domain at multiple residues including Thr980 on the kinase activation loop. Activated PERK phosphorylates Ser51 of the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), which inhibits initiation of protein synthesis and reduces the load of unfolded proteins entering the ER. The crystal structure of PERK’s kinase domain has been determined to 2.8 Å resolution. The structure resembles the back-to-back dimer observed in the related eIF2α kinase PKR. Phosphorylation of Thr980 stabilizes both the activation loop and helix αG in the C-terminal lobe, preparing the latter for eIF2α binding. The structure suggests conservation in the mode of activation of eIF2α kinases and is consistent with a ‘line-up’ model for PERK activation triggered by oligomerization of its luminal domain. PMID:21543844

  4. Therapeutic Targeting of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Lung Cancer: A Paradigm for Precision Cancer Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Lovly, Christine M.; Shaw, Alice T.

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase was initially discovered as a component of the fusion protein nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK in anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL). Genomic alterations in ALK, including rearrangements, point mutations, and genomic amplification, have now been identified in several malignancies, including lymphoma, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), neuroblastoma, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, and others. Importantly, ALK serves as a validated therapeutic target in these diseases. Several ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including crizotinib, ceritinib and alectinib, have been developed, and some of them have already been approved for clinical use. These ALK inhibitors have all shown remarkable clinical outcomes in ALK-rearranged NSCLC. Unfortunately, as is the case for other kinase inhibitors in clinical use, sensitive tumors inevitably relapse due to acquired resistance. This review focuses on the discovery, function, and therapeutic targeting of ALK, with a particular focus on ALK-rearranged NSCLC. PMID:25979929

  5. Activated ALK Collaborates with MYCN in Neuroblastoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shizhen; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Guo, Feng; Shin, Jimann; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Kutok, Jeffery L.; Rodig, Scott J.; Neuberg, Donna S.; Helman, Daniel; Feng, Hui; Stewart, Rodney A.; Wang, Wenchao; George, Rani E.; Kanki, John P.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Amplification of the MYCN oncogene in childhood neuroblastoma is often accompanied by mutational activation of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), suggesting their pathogenic cooperation. We generated a transgenic zebrafish model of neuroblastoma in which MYCN-induced tumors arise from a subpopulation of neuroblasts that migrate into the adrenal medulla analogue following organogenesis. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN in this model triples the disease penetrance and markedly accelerates tumor onset. MYCN overexpression induces adrenal sympathetic neuroblast hyperplasia, blocks chromaffin cell differentiation, and ultimately triggers a developmentally-timed apoptotic response in the hyperplastic sympathoadrenal cells. Coexpression of activated ALK with MYCN provides prosurvival signals that block this apoptotic response and allow continued expansion and oncogenic transformation of hyperplastic neuroblasts, thus promoting progression to neuroblastoma. PMID:22439933

  6. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK. PMID:26851072

  7. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) kinase as target for structure-based drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Borza, Corina M; Lowe, Edward W; Pozzi, Ambra; Meiler, Jens

    2015-02-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 and 2 are transmembrane receptors that belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Upon collagen binding, DDRs transduce cellular signaling involved in various cell functions, including cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and matrix homeostasis. Altered DDR function resulting from either mutations or overexpression has been implicated in several types of disease, including atherosclerosis, inflammation, cancer, and tissue fibrosis. Several established inhibitors, such as imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, originally developed as Abelson murine leukemia (Abl) kinase inhibitors, have been found to inhibit DDR kinase activity. As we review here, recent discoveries of novel inhibitors and their co-crystal structure with the DDR1 kinase domain have made structure-based drug discovery for DDR1 amenable. PMID:25284748

  8. Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) kinase as target for structure-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kothiwale, Sandeepkumar; Borza, Corina M.; Lowe, Will; Pozzi, Ambra; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor (DDR) 1 and 2 are transmembrane receptors that belong to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). Upon collagen binding, DDRs transduce cellular signaling involved in various cell functions, including cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and matrix homeostasis. Altered DDR function resulting from either mutations or overexpression has been implicated in several types of disease, including atherosclerosis, inflammation, cancer, and tissue fibrosis. Several established inhibitors, such as imatinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib, originally developed as Abelson murine leukemia (Abl) kinase inhibitors, have been found to inhibit DDR kinase activity. As we review here, recent discoveries of novel inhibitors and their co-crystal structure with the DDR1 kinase domain have made structure-based drug discovery for DDR1 amenable. PMID:25284748

  9. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  10. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  11. A Functional Landscape of Resistance to ALK Inhibition in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Frederick H.; Johannessen, Cory M.; Piccioni, Federica; Tamayo, Pablo; Kim, Jong Wook; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Corsello, Steven M.; Capelletti, Marzia; Calles, Antonio; Butaney, Mohit; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Mesirov, Jill P.; Hahn, William C.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Meyerson, Matthew; Root, David E.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We conducted a large-scale functional genetic study to characterize mechanisms of resistance to ALK inhibition in ALK-dependent lung cancer cells. We identify members of known resistance pathways and additional putative resistance drivers. Among the latter were members of the P2Y purinergic receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors (P2Y1, P2Y2, and P2Y6). P2Y receptors mediated resistance in part through a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent mechanism. Moreover, PKC activation alone was sufficient to confer resistance to ALK inhibitors whereas combined ALK and PKC inhibition restored sensitivity. We observed enrichment of gene signatures associated with several resistance drivers (including P2Y receptors) in crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung tumors compared to treatment-naïve controls, supporting a role for identified resistance mechanisms in clinical resistance. PMID:25759024

  12. VCL-ALK Renal Cell Carcinoma in Children With Sickle-cell Trait

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathaniel E.; Deyrup, Andrea T.; Marinño-Enriquez, Adrian; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Bridge, Julia A.; Illei, Peter B.; Netto, George J.; Argani, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    We report the third case of a renal cell carcinoma bearing a fusion of the vinculin (VCL) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genes. Like the 2 other reported cases, this neoplasm occurred in a young patient (6 y old) with sickle-cell trait and demonstrated distinctive morphologic features including medullary epicenter, discohesive polygonal or spindle-shaped cells with prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles, and prominent lymphocytic infiltrate. The neoplastic cells demonstrated focal membranous labeling for ALK protein by immunohistochemistry, ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and a specific VCL-ALK gene fusion by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. VCL-ALK renal cell carcinoma may represent the eighth sickle-cell nephropathy. PMID:24698962

  13. USP15 targets ALK3/BMPR1A for deubiquitylation to enhance bone morphogenetic protein signalling

    PubMed Central

    Herhaus, Lina; Al-Salihi, Mazin A.; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Wasmus, Lize; Vogt, Janis; Ewan, Richard; Bruce, David; Macartney, Thomas; Weidlich, Simone; Smith, James C.; Sapkota, Gopal P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase ALK3/BMPR1A mediates bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling through phosphorylation and activation of SMADs 1/5/8. SMAD6, a transcriptional target of BMP, negatively regulates the BMP pathway by recruiting E3 ubiquitin ligases and targeting ALK3 for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Here, we identify a deubiquitylating enzyme USP15 as an interactor of SMAD6 and ALK3. We show that USP15 enhances BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 by interacting with and deubiquitylating ALK3. RNAi-mediated depletion of USP15 increases ALK3 K48-linked polyubiquitylation, and reduces both BMP-induced SMAD1 phosphorylation and transcription of BMP target genes. We also show that loss of USP15 expression from mouse myoblast cells inhibits BMP-induced osteoblast differentiation. Furthermore, USP15 modulates BMP-induced phosphorylation of SMAD1 and transcription during Xenopus embryogenesis. PMID:24850914

  14. FHA domain boundaries of the dun1p and rad53p cell cycle checkpoint kinases.

    PubMed

    Hammet, A; Pike, B L; Mitchelhill, K I; Teh, T; Kobe, B; House, C M; Kemp, B E; Heierhorst, J

    2000-04-14

    Dun1p and Rad53p of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are members of a conserved family of cell cycle checkpoint protein kinases that contain forkhead-associated (FHA) domains. Here, we demonstrate that these FHA domains contain 130-140 residues, and are thus considerably larger than previously predicted by sequence comparisons (55-75 residues). In vivo, expression of the proteolytically defined Dun1p FHA domain, but not a fragment containing only the predicted domain boundaries, inhibited the transcriptional induction of repair genes following replication blocks. This indicates that the non-catalytic FHA domain plays an important role in the transcriptional function of the Dun1p protein kinase. PMID:10767410

  15. Uterine ALK3 is essential during the window of implantation

    PubMed Central

    Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Peng, Jia; Titus, Mary M.; Barrish, James P.; Creighton, Chad J.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    The window of implantation is defined by the inhibition of uterine epithelial proliferation, structural epithelial cell remodeling, and attenuated estrogen (E2) response. These changes occur via paracrine signaling between the uterine epithelium and stroma. Because implantation defects are a major cause of infertility in women, identifying these signaling pathways will improve infertility interventions. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are TGF-β family members that regulate the postimplantation and midgestation stages of pregnancy. In this study, we discovered that signaling via activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3/BMPR1A), a BMP type 1 receptor, is necessary for blastocyst attachment. Conditional knockout (cKO) of ALK3 in the uterus was obtained by producing Alk3flox/flox-Pgr-cre–positive females. Alk3 cKO mice are sterile and have defects in the luminal uterine epithelium, including increased microvilli density and maintenance of apical cell polarity. Moreover, Alk3 cKO mice exhibit an elevated uterine E2 response and unopposed epithelial cell proliferation during the window of implantation. We determined that dual transcriptional regulation of Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15), by both the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) transcription factor SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and progesterone receptor (PR), is necessary to inhibit uterine epithelial cell proliferation, a key step for embryo implantation. Our findings present a convergence of BMP and steroid hormone signaling pathways in the regulation of uterine receptivity. PMID:26721398

  16. Uterine ALK3 is essential during the window of implantation.

    PubMed

    Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Peng, Jia; Titus, Mary M; Barrish, James P; Creighton, Chad J; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco J; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-01-19

    The window of implantation is defined by the inhibition of uterine epithelial proliferation, structural epithelial cell remodeling, and attenuated estrogen (E2) response. These changes occur via paracrine signaling between the uterine epithelium and stroma. Because implantation defects are a major cause of infertility in women, identifying these signaling pathways will improve infertility interventions. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are TGF-β family members that regulate the postimplantation and midgestation stages of pregnancy. In this study, we discovered that signaling via activin-like kinase 3 (ALK3/BMPR1A), a BMP type 1 receptor, is necessary for blastocyst attachment. Conditional knockout (cKO) of ALK3 in the uterus was obtained by producing Alk3(flox) (/flox)-Pgr-cre-positive females. Alk3 cKO mice are sterile and have defects in the luminal uterine epithelium, including increased microvilli density and maintenance of apical cell polarity. Moreover, Alk3 cKO mice exhibit an elevated uterine E2 response and unopposed epithelial cell proliferation during the window of implantation. We determined that dual transcriptional regulation of Kruppel-like factor 15 (Klf15), by both the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) transcription factor SMAD family member 4 (SMAD4) and progesterone receptor (PR), is necessary to inhibit uterine epithelial cell proliferation, a key step for embryo implantation. Our findings present a convergence of BMP and steroid hormone signaling pathways in the regulation of uterine receptivity. PMID:26721398

  17. Patterns of response to crizotinib in recurrent glioblastoma according to ALK and MET molecular profile in two patients.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Chamberlain, Marc C; Zairi, Fahed; Delmaire, Christine; Idbaih, Ahmed; Renaud, Florence; Maurage, Claude Alain; Grégoire, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Two patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter and IDH1 (R132H) wild-type recurrent glioblastoma were treated with crizotinib. Prolonged stabilization of the disease (17 months) was achieved in the first case. Interestingly, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) expression and c-MET protein overexpression was observed. Conversely, no response to crizotinib was obtained in the second case with MET protein overexpression and c-MET amplification but no ALK expression or ALK gene amplification. These case studies suggest that novel targeted ALK inhibitors may provide relevant clinical benefit in selected cases in which driver mutations are demonstrable. PMID:26498130

  18. Genetic identification of an autoinhibitor in CDPK, a protein kinase with a calmodulin-like domain.

    PubMed

    Harper, J F; Huang, J F; Lloyd, S J

    1994-06-14

    CDPKs are a family of calcium (Ca2+)-dependent protein kinases which are defined by a carboxyl-terminal calmodulin-like domain. Mutational analysis indicates that the junction domain, which joins the kinase and calmodulin-like domains, contains an autoinhibitor. CDPK isoform AK1 from Arabidopsis was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein sandwiched between glutathione S-transferase and six consecutive histidines at the N- and C-terminal ends, respectively. This fusion, called AK1-6H, was purified and displayed kinase activity which was stimulated up to 127-fold by Ca2+, with a typical specific activity of 2000 nmol min-1 mg-1, using syntide-2 as peptide substrate. A truncation which deletes the calmodulin-like domain, as in mutant delta C-6H, disrupts Ca2+ activation and leaves the enzyme with a basal level of activity. Delta C-6H could be activated 87-fold by preincubation with a purified polyclonal IgG which was raised against a junction domain fusion. A further deletion of the junction domain, as in mutant delta JC, results in a constitutively active enzyme. This indicates that the junction domain in delta C-6H can function as an autoinhibitor. Its function as an autoinhibitor in a full-length enzyme was confirmed by site-specific mutagenesis, as shown by mutant KJM23-6H, which had a six-residue substitution in the junction domain between A422 and A432. Both delta JC and KJM23-6H encoded Ca(2+)-independent enzymes which had specific activities greater than 70% that of a fully active AK1-6H and displayed equivalent Km values for ATP and syntide-2. Inhibition studies on delta JC, using peptides based on the autoinhibitory domains of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, are consistent with a model where the junction domain contains a similar pseudosubstrate-type autoinhibitor. PMID:8003490

  19. Precision medicine in NSCLC and pathology: how does ALK fit in the pathway?

    PubMed

    Kerr, K M; López-Ríos, F

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of personalised medicine in lung cancer has dramatically impacted diagnostic pathology. Current challenges centre on the growing demands placed on small tissue samples by molecular diagnostic techniques. In this review, expert recommendations are provided regarding successful identification of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Steps to correctly process and conserve tumour tissue during diagnostic testing are essential to ensure tissue availability. For example, storing extra tissue sections ready for molecular diagnostic steps allows faster testing and preserves tissue. Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is commonly used to detect ALK rearrangements, with most laboratories favouring screening by immunohistochemistry followed by a confirmatory FISH assay. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction can also identify ALK fusion gene mRNA transcripts but can be limited by the quality of RNA and the risk that rare fusion variants may not be captured. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has recently provided an alternative method for detecting ALK rearrangements. While current experience is limited, NGS is set to become the most efficient approach as an increasing number of genetic abnormalities is required to be tested. Upfront, reflex testing for ALK gene rearrangement should become routine as ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy moves into the first-line setting. Guidelines recommend that EGFR and ALK tests are carried out in parallel on all confirmed and potential adenocarcinomas, and this is more efficient in terms of tissue usage and testing turnaround time for both of these actionable gene alterations. The practice of sequential testing is not recommended. Identification of ALK rearrangements is now essential for the diagnosis of NSCLC, underpinned by the benefits of ALK inhibitors. As scientific understanding and diagnostic technology develops, ALK testing will continue to be an

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the kinase domain of human tousled-like kinase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Garrote, Ana M.; Redondo, Pilar; Montoya, Guillermo; Muñoz, Inés G.

    2014-02-19

    The C-terminal kinase domain of TLK2 (a human tousled-like kinase) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and chromosome segregation. The two members of the family reported in humans, namely TLK1 and TLK2, localize to the cell nucleus and are capable of forming homo- or hetero-oligomers by themselves. To characterize the role of TLK2, its C-terminal kinase domain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. The latter produced the best diffracting crystal (3.4 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation), with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 126.05 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 4.59 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 73.23%.

  1. Co-targeting ALK and EGFR parallel signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Cara B; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Saikumar, Pothana; Singha, Prajjal K; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Chavez, Jeffery; Horning, Aaron M; Parra, Jamie; Kirma, Nameer B

    2016-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises 90% of all head and neck cancers and has a poor survival rate due to late-stage disease that is refractive to traditional therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is over-expressed in greater than 80% of head and neck SCC (HNSCC). However, EGFR targeted therapies yielded little to no efficacy in clinical trials. This study investigated the efficacy of co-targeting EGFR and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) whose promoter is hypomethylated in late-stage oral SCC (OSCC). We observed increased ALK activity in late-stage human OSCC tumors and invasive OSCC cell lines. We also found that while ALK inhibition alone had little effect on proliferation, co-targeting ALK and EGFR significantly reduced OSCC cell proliferation in vitro. Further analysis showed significant efficacy of combined treatment in HSC3-derived xenografts resulting in a 30% decrease in tumor volumes by 14days (p<0.001). Western blot analysis showed that co-targeting ALK and EGFR significantly reduced EGFR phosphorylation (Y1148) in HSC3 cells but not Cal27 cells. ALK and EGFR downstream signaling interactions are also demonstrated by Western blot analysis in which lone EGFR and ALK inhibitors attenuated AKT activity whereas co-targeting ALK and EGFR completely abolished AKT activation. No effects were observed on ERK1/2 activation. STAT3 activity was significantly induced by lone ALK inhibition in HSC3 cells and to a lower extent in Cal27 cells. Together, these data illustrate that ALK inhibitors enhance anti-tumor activity of EGFR inhibitors in susceptible tumors that display increased ALK expression, most likely through abolition of AKT activation. PMID:27424178

  2. Tackling ALK in non-small cell lung cancer: the role of novel inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Facchinetti, Francesco; Di Maio, Massimo; Graziano, Paolo; Bria, Emilio; Rossi, Giulio; Novello, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is an oral inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) with remarkable clinical activity in patients suffering from ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting to its superiority compared to chemotherapy. Unfortunately, virtually all ALK-rearranged tumors acquire resistance to crizotinib, frequently within one year since the treatment initiation. To date, therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance have focused on the use of more potent and structurally different compounds. Second-generation ALK inhibitors such as ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (CH5424802/RO5424802) and brigatinib (AP26113) have shown relevant clinical activity, consequently fostering their rapid clinical development and their approval by health agencies. The third-generation inhibitor lorlatinib (PF-06463922), selectively active against ALK and ROS1, harbors impressive biological potency; its efficacy in reversing resistance to crizotinib and to other ALK inhibitors is being proven by early clinical trials. The NTRK1-3 and ROS1 inhibitor entrectinib (RXDX-101) has been reported to act against NSCLC harboring ALK fusion proteins too. Despite the quick development of these novel agents, several issues remain to be discussed in the treatment of patients suffering from ALK-rearranged NSCLC. This position paper will discuss the development, the current evidence and approvals, as long as the future perspectives of new ALK inhibitors beyond crizotinib. Clinical behaviors of ALK-rearranged NSCLC vary significantly among patients and differential molecular events responsible of crizotinib resistance account for the most important quote of this heterogeneity. The precious availability of a wide range of active anti-ALK compounds should be approached in a critical and careful perspective, in order to develop treatment strategies tailored on the disease evolution of every single patient. PMID:27413712

  3. Muscle specific kinase: organiser of synaptic membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Fernandez, Kristine J; Murata, Yui; Morsch, Marco; Ngo, Shyuan T; Reddel, Stephen W; Noakes, Peter G; Phillips, William D

    2011-03-01

    Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase vital for forming and maintaining the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ: the synapse between motor nerve and skeletal muscle). MuSK expression switches on during skeletal muscle differentiation. MuSK then becomes restricted to the postsynaptic membrane of the NMJ, where it functions to cluster acetylcholine receptors (AChRs). The expression, activation and turnover of MuSK are each regulated by signals from the motor nerve terminal. MuSK forms the core of an emerging signalling complex that can be acutely activated by neural agrin (N-agrin), a heparin sulfate proteoglycan secreted from the nerve terminal. MuSK activation initiates complex intracellular signalling events that coordinate the local synthesis and assembly of synaptic proteins. The importance of MuSK as a synapse organiser is highlighted by cases of autoimmune myasthenia gravis in which MuSK autoantibodies can deplete MuSK from the postsynaptic membrane, leading to complete disassembly of the adult NMJ. PMID:20974278

  4. Calcineurin B-like domains in the large regulatory alpha/beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase.

    PubMed

    Carrière, Cathelène; Mornon, Jean-Paul; Venien-Bryan, Catherine; Boisset, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle

    2008-06-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PhK) is a large hexadecameric complex that catalyzes the phosphorylation and activation of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). It consists in four copies each of a catalytic subunit (gamma) and three regulatory subunits (alpha beta delta). Delta corresponds to endogenous calmodulin, whereas little is known on the molecular architecture of the large alpha and beta subunits, which probably arose from gene duplication. Here, using sensitive methods of sequence analysis, we show that the C-terminal domain (named domain D) of these alpha and beta subunits can be significantly related to calcineurin B-like (CBL) proteins. CBL are members of the EF-hand family that are involved in the regulation of plant-specific kinases of the CIPK/PKS family, and relieve autoinhibition of their target kinases by binding to their regulatory region. The relationship highlighted here suggests that PhK alpha and/or beta domain D may be involved in a similar regulation mechanism, a hypothesis which is supported by the experimental observation of a direct interaction between domain D of PhKalpha and the regulatory region of the Gamma subunit. This finding, together the identification of significant similarities of domain D with the preceding domain C, may help to understand the molecular mechanism by which PhK alpha and/or beta domain D might regulate PhK activity. PMID:18320589

  5. Completing the structural family portrait of the human EphB tyrosine kinase domains

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Ross C; Debreczeni, Judit E; Truman, Caroline M; McAlister, Mark S; Attwood, Teresa K

    2014-01-01

    The EphB receptors have key roles in cell morphology, adhesion, migration and invasion, and their aberrant action has been linked with the development and progression of many different tumor types. Their conflicting expression patterns in cancer tissues, combined with their high sequence and structural identity, present interesting challenges to those seeking to develop selective therapeutic molecules targeting this large receptor family. Here, we present the first structure of the EphB1 tyrosine kinase domain determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.5Å. Our comparative crystalisation analysis of the human EphB family kinases has also yielded new crystal forms of the human EphB2 and EphB4 catalytic domains. Unable to crystallize the wild-type EphB3 kinase domain, we used rational engineering (based on our new structures of EphB1, EphB2, and EphB4) to identify a single point mutation which facilitated its crystallization and structure determination to 2.2 Å. This mutation also improved the soluble recombinant yield of this kinase within Escherichia coli, and increased both its intrinsic stability and catalytic turnover, without affecting its ligand-binding profile. The partial ordering of the activation loop in the EphB3 structure alludes to a potential cis-phosphorylation mechanism for the EphB kinases. With the kinase domain structures of all four catalytically competent human EphB receptors now determined, a picture begins to emerge of possible opportunities to produce EphB isozyme-selective kinase inhibitors for mechanistic studies and therapeutic applications. PMID:24677421

  6. ALK(R1275Q) perturbs extracellular matrix, enhances cell invasion and leads to the development of neuroblastoma in cooperation with MYCN.

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Nakata, Y; Yamasaki, N; Oda, H; Sentani, K; Kanai, A; Onishi, N; Ikeda, K; Sera, Y; Honda, Z-I; Tanaka, K; Sata, M; Ogawa, S; Yasui, W; Saya, H; Takita, J; Honda, H

    2016-08-25

    Overexpression of MYCN is a hallmark of neuroblastoma (NB). ALK(R1275Q), an activating mutation of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), has been found in sporadic and familial NB patients. In this report, we demonstrated that ALK(R1275Q) knock-in, MYCN transgenic compound mice developed NB with complete penetrance. Transcriptome analysis revealed that ALK(R1275Q) globally downregulated the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM)- and basement membrane (BM)-associated genes in both primary neuronal cells and NB tumors. Accordingly, ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN tumors exhibited reduced expression of ECM/BM-related proteins as compared with MYCN tumors. In addition, on MYCN transduction, ALK(R1275Q)-expressing neuronal cells exhibited increased migratory and invasive activities. Consistently, enhanced invasion and metastasis were demonstrated in ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN mice. These results collectively indicate that ALK(R1275Q) confers a malignant potential on neuronal cells that overexpress MYCN by impairing normal ECM/BM integrity and enhancing tumor growth and dissemination. Moreover, we found that crizotinib, an ALK inhibitor, almost completely inhibited the growth of ALK(R1275Q)/MYCN tumors in an allograft model. Our findings provided insights into the cooperative mechanism of the mutated ALK and overexpressed MYCN in the pathogenesis of NB and demonstrated the effectiveness of crizotinib on ALK(R1275Q)-positive tumors. PMID:26829053

  7. Spitz Tumors: Comparison of Histological Features in Relationship to Immunohistochemical Staining for ALK and NTRK1.

    PubMed

    Kiuru, Maija; Jungbluth, Achim; Kutzner, Heinz; Wiesner, Thomas; Busam, Klaus J

    2016-05-01

    Spitz tumors are a group of melanocytic neoplasms with distinct morphological features that tend to affect young individuals. Distinguishing benign from malignant Spitz tumors can be challenging, but cytogenetic and molecular tests have contributed to improvements in diagnostic accuracy. Spitz tumors harbor diverse genetic alterations, including mutations in HRAS, loss of BAP1, or kinase fusions in ROS1, NTRK1, ALK, BRAF, and RET genes. Limited data exist on the correlation between histopathological features and kinase fusions. Here, we describe the histopathological features of 105 Spitz tumors (Spitz nevi and atypical Spitz tumors), comparing lesions according to their immunoreactivity for ALK or NTRK1. Intersecting fascicular growth of fusiform melanocytes was seen in all but one ALK-positive tumor (27 of 28 or 96.4%), whereas it was infrequent in NTRK1-positive tumors (5 of 20 or 25.0%) and tumors negative for both ALK and NTRK1 (96.4% vs 25.0% vs 8.7%, P < .0027). There was a trend toward ALK-positive tumors being amelanotic compared with NTRK1-positive tumors and combined ALK-/NTRK1-negative tumors (89.3% vs 45% vs 47.4%, respectively, P = .1023) and lacking epithelioid cell morphology (0% vs 45.0% vs 41%, respectively, P = .6985). In conclusion, this study confirms that although not specific, the growth pattern of intersecting fascicles of amelanotic fusiform melanocytes is strongly associated with ALK expression. PMID:26873340

  8. The bHLH transcription factor Hand is regulated by Alk in the Drosophila embryonic gut

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, Gaurav K.; Palmer, Ruth H. . E-mail: Ruth.Palmer@ucmp.umu.se

    2006-12-29

    During embryonic development the midgut visceral muscle is formed by fusion of cells within the visceral mesoderm, a process initiated by the specification of a specialised cell type, the founder cell, within this tissue. Activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk) in the developing visceral muscle of Drosophila melanogaster initiates a signal transduction pathway required for muscle fusion. In this paper, we have investigated downstream components which are regulated by this novel signalling pathway. Here we show that Alk-mediated signal transduction drives the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Hand in vivo. Loss of Alk function results in a complete lack of Hand expression in this tissue, whereas Alk gain of function results in an expansion of Hand expression. Finally, we have investigated the process of muscle fusion in the gut of Hand mutant animals and can find no obvious defects in this process, suggesting that Hand is not critical for visceral muscle fusion per se.

  9. Targeting autophagy enhances the anti-tumoral action of crizotinib in ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Desquesnes, Aurore; Le Gonidec, Sophie; AlSaati, Talal; Beau, Isabelle; Lamant, Laurence; Meggetto, Fabienne; Espinos, Estelle; Codogno, Patrice; Brousset, Pierre; Giuriato, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-positive Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALK+ ALCL) occur predominantly in children and young adults. Their treatment, based on aggressive chemotherapy, is not optimal since ALCL patients can still expect a 30% 2-year relapse rate. Tumor relapses are very aggressive and their underlying mechanisms are unknown. Crizotinib is the most advanced ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor and is already used in clinics to treat ALK-associated cancers. However, crizotinib escape mechanisms have emerged, thus preventing its use in frontline ALCL therapy. The process of autophagy has been proposed as the next target for elimination of the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this study, we investigated whether autophagy is activated in ALCL cells submitted to ALK inactivation (using crizotinib or ALK-targeting siRNA). Classical autophagy read-outs such as autophagosome visualization/quantification by electron microscopy and LC3-B marker turn-over assays were used to demonstrate autophagy induction and flux activation upon ALK inactivation. This was demonstrated to have a cytoprotective role on cell viability and clonogenic assays following combined ALK and autophagy inhibition. Altogether, our results suggest that co-treatment with crizotinib and chloroquine (two drugs already used in clinics) could be beneficial for ALK-positive ALCL patients. PMID:26338968

  10. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  11. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain of FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.

  12. Crystal structure of the FLT3 kinase domain bound to the inhibitor quizartinib (AC220)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zorn, Julie A.; Wang, Qi; Fujimura, Eric; Barros, Tiago; Kuriyan, John; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-04-02

    More than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients possess activating mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 or FLT3. A small-molecule inhibitor of FLT3 (known as quizartinib or AC220) that is currently in clinical trials appears promising for the treatment of AML. Here, we report the co-crystal structure of the kinase domain of FLT3 in complex with quizartinib. FLT3 with quizartinib bound adopts an “Abl-like” inactive conformation with the activation loop stabilized in the “DFG-out” orientation and folded back onto the kinase domain. This conformation is similar to that observed for the uncomplexed intracellular domain ofmore » FLT3 as well as for related receptor tyrosine kinases, except for a localized induced fit in the activation loop. The co-crystal structure reveals the interactions between quizartinib and the active site of FLT3 that are key for achieving its high potency against both wild-type FLT3 as well as a FLT3 variant observed in many AML patients. This co-complex further provides a structural rationale for quizartinib-resistance mutations.« less

  13. Structural Characterization of the Predominant Family of Histidine Kinase Sensor Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hendrickson, W

    2010-01-01

    Histidine kinase (HK) receptors are used ubiquitously by bacteria to monitor environmental changes, and they are also prevalent in plants, fungi, and other protists. Typical HK receptors have an extracellular sensor portion that detects a signal, usually a chemical ligand, and an intracellular transmitter portion that includes both the kinase domain itself and the site for histidine phosphorylation. While kinase domains are highly conserved, sensor domains are diverse. HK receptors function as dimers, but the molecular mechanism for signal transduction across cell membranes remains obscure. In this study, eight crystal structures were determined from five sensor domains representative of the most populated family, family HK1, found in a bioinformatic analysis of predicted sensor domains from transmembrane HKs. Each structure contains an inserted repeat of PhoQ/DcuS/CitA (PDC) domains, and similarity between sequence and structure is correlated across these and other double-PDC sensor proteins. Three of the five sensors crystallize as dimers that appear to be physiologically relevant, and comparisons between ligated structures and apo-state structures provide insights into signal transmission. Some HK1 family proteins prove to be sensors for chemotaxis proteins or diguanylate cyclase receptors, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution.

  14. PAK5 is auto-activated by a central domain that promotes kinase oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Tabanifar, Bahareh; Zhao, Zhuoshen; Manser, Ed

    2016-06-15

    PAKs (p21 activated kinases) are an important class of Rho effectors. These contain a Cdc42-Rac1 interaction and binding (CRIB) domain and a flanking auto-inhibitory domain (AID) which binds the C-terminal catalytic domain. The group II kinases PAK4 and PAK5 are considered significant therapeutic targets in cancer. Among human cancer cell lines we tested, PAK5 protein levels are much lower than those of PAK4, even in NCI-H446 which has the highest PAK5 mRNA expression. Although these two kinases are evolutionarily and structurally related, it has never been established why PAK4 is inactive whereas PAK5 has high basal activity. The AID of PAK5 is functionally indistinguishable from that of PAK4, pointing to other regions being responsible for higher activity of PAK5. Gel filtration indicates PAK4 is a monomer but PAK5 is dimeric. The central region of PAK5 (residues 109-420) is shown here to promote self-association, and an elevated activity, but has no effect on activation loop Ser(602) phosphorylation. These residues allow PAK5 to form characteristic puncta in cells, and removing sequences involved in oligomerization suppresses kinase activity. Our model suggests PAK5 self-association interferes with AID binding to the catalytic domain, thus maintaining its high activity. Further, our model explains the observation that PAK5 (1-180) inhibits PAK5 in vitro. PMID:27095851

  15. Atomistic Insights into Regulatory Mechanisms of the HER2 Tyrosine Kinase Domain: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Telesco, Shannon E.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    HER2 (ErbB2/Neu) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB family and is overexpressed in 20–30% of human breast cancers. Although several crystal structures of ErbB kinases have been solved, the precise mechanism of HER2 activation remains unknown, and it has been suggested that HER2 is unique in its requirement for phosphorylation of Y877, a key tyrosine residue located in the activation loop. To elucidate mechanistic details of kinase domain regulation, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of a homology-modeled HER2 kinase structure in active and inactive conformations. Principal component analysis of the atomistic fluctuations reveals a tight coupling between the activation loop and catalytic loop that may contribute to alignment of residues required for catalysis in the active kinase. The free energy perturbation method is also employed to predict a role for phosphorylated Y877 in stabilizing the kinase conformations. Finally, simulation results are presented for a HER2/EGFR heterodimer and reveal that the dimeric interface induces a rearrangement of the αC helix toward the active conformation. Elucidation of the molecular regulatory mechanisms in HER2 will help establish structure-function relationships in the wild-type kinase, as well as predict mutations with a propensity for constitutive activation in HER2-mediated cancers. PMID:19289058

  16. The ubiquitin-associated domain of AMPK-related kinases regulates conformation and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Villa, Fabrizio; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Prescott, Alan R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Alessi, Dario R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase, which is mutated in Peutz–Jeghers cancer syndrome, phosphorylates and activates a group of protein kinases that are related to AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Ten of the 14 AMPK-related protein kinases activated by LKB1, including SIK (salt-induced kinase), MARK (microtubule-affinity-regulating kinase) and BRSK (brain-specific kinase) isoforms, possess a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain immediately C-terminal to the kinase catalytic domain. These are the only protein kinases in the human genome known to possess a UBA domain, but their roles in regulating AMPK-related kinases are unknown. We have investigated the roles that the UBA domain may play in regulating these enzymes. Limited proteolysis of MARK2 revealed that the kinase and UBA domains were contained within a fragment that was resistant to trypsin proteolysis. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) analysis of inactive and active LKB1-phosphorylated MARK2 revealed that activation of MARK2 is accompanied by a significant conformational change that alters the orientation of the UBA domain with respect to the catalytic domain. Our results indicate that none of the UBA domains found in AMPK-related kinases interact with polyubiquitin or other ubiquitin-like molecules. Instead, the UBA domains appear to play an essential conformational role and are required for the LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AMPK-related kinases. This is based on the findings that mutation or removal of the UBA domains of several AMPK-related kinases, including isoforms of MARK, SIK and BRSK, markedly impaired the catalytic activity and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of these enzymes. We also provide evidence that the UBA domains do not function as LKB1–STRAD (STE20-related adaptor)–MO25 (mouse protein 25) docking/interacting sites and that mutations in the UBA domain of SIK suppressed the ability of SIK to localize within punctate regions of the

  17. EML4-ALK translocation is associated with early onset of disease and other clinicopathological features in Chinese female never-smokers with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    REN, WEIHONG; ZHANG, BO; MA, JIE; LI, WENCAI; LAN, JIANYUN; MEN, HUI; ZHANG, QINXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) translocation is resistant to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), including gefitinib and erlotinib, but responds to the ALK-TKI crizotinib. Characterization of EML4-ALK translocation may provide invaluable information to facilitate disease diagnosis and improve the outcome of customized treatment. Although the occurrence of EML4-ALK translocation is likely to be affected by the smoking habits and gender of patients, the translocation has not been characterized extensively in female never-smokers with NSCLC. Therefore, 280 female never-smokers that were diagnosed with NSCLC were enrolled in the present study, and characteristics of EML4-ALK translocation, including the frequency, were determined in these NSCLC patients. EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected using Multiplex one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequently confirmed by DNA sequencing and Vysis ALK Break Apart fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The EML4-ALK fusion variants were detected in 21 carcinoma tissue specimens, accounting for 7.5% of the enrolled patients. Out of these patients with EML4-ALK fusion variants, EML4-ALK fusion variant 1 was identified in 12 patients, indicating that variant 1 is the most common type of EML4-ALK fusion gene in the present cohort of patients. ALK mRNA was aberrantly expressed in all the tissues with EML4-ALK translocation, but not in the carcinoma tissues without EML4-ALK translocation. In addition, the EML4-ALK translocation was more frequently found in younger patients. The median age of patients with EML4-ALK translocation was 50.95±2.29 years, which was significantly younger (P<0.01) than the median age of the patients without EML4-ALK translocation (57.15±0.56). The EML4-ALK translocation was detected exclusively in undifferentiated tumors that were graded as

  18. Mutations that bypass tRNA binding activate the intrinsically defective kinase domain in GCN2

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Hu, Cuihua; Dong, Jinsheng; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase GCN2 is activated in amino acid-starved cells on binding of uncharged tRNA to a histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS)-related domain. We isolated two point mutations in the protein kinase (PK) domain, R794G and F842L, that permit strong kinase activity in the absence of tRNA binding. These mutations also bypass the requirement for ribosome binding, dimerization, and association with the GCN1/GCN20 regulatory complex, suggesting that all of these functions facilitate tRNA binding to wild-type GCN2. While the isolated wild-type PK domain was completely inert, the mutant PK was highly active in vivo and in vitro. These results identify an inhibitory structure intrinsic to the PK domain that must be overcome on tRNA binding by interactions with a regulatory region, most likely the N terminus of the HisRS segment. As Arg 794 and Phe 842 are predicted to lie close to one another and to the active site, they may participate directly in misaligning active site residues. Autophosphorylation of the activation loop was stimulated by R794G and F842L, and the autophosphorylation sites remained critical for GCN2 function in the presence of these mutations. Our results imply a two-step activation mechanism involving distinct conformational changes in the PK domain. PMID:12023305

  19. Multiple Steps to Activate FAK’s Kinase Domain: Adaptation to Confined Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Florian A.; Vogel, Viola

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate cell signaling by phosphorylating their substrates in response to environment-specific stimuli. Using molecular dynamics, we studied the catalytically active and inactive conformations of the kinase domain of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which are distinguished by displaying a structured or unstructured activation loop, respectively. Upon removal of an ATP analog, we show that the nucleotide-binding pocket in the catalytically active conformation is structurally unstable and fluctuates between an open and closed configuration. In contrast, the pocket remains open in the catalytically inactive form upon removal of an inhibitor from the pocket. Because temporal pocket closures will slow the ATP on-rate, these simulations suggest a multistep process in which the kinase domain is more likely to bind ATP in the catalytically inactive than in the active form. Transient closures of the ATP-binding pocket might allow FAK to slow down its catalytic cycle. These short cat naps could be adaptions to crowded or confined environments by giving the substrate sufficient time to diffuse away. The simulations show further how either the phosphorylation of the activation loop or the activating mutations of the so-called SuperFAK influence the electrostatic switch that controls kinase activity. PMID:23746525

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the kinase domain of human tousled-like kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Garrote, Ana M; Redondo, Pilar; Montoya, Guillermo; Muñoz, Inés G

    2014-03-01

    Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and chromosome segregation. The two members of the family reported in humans, namely TLK1 and TLK2, localize to the cell nucleus and are capable of forming homo- or hetero-oligomers by themselves. To characterize the role of TLK2, its C-terminal kinase domain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4122 and cubic P213. The latter produced the best diffracting crystal (3.4 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation), with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 126.05 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 4.59 Å(3) Da(-1) and a solvent content of 73.23%. PMID:24598926

  1. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Thomas H.; Seth Childers, W.; Blair, Jimmy A.; Eckart, Michael R.; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  2. Twenty-One Novel EGFR Kinase Domain variants in Patients with Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hasenahuer, Marcia A; Parisi, Gustavo; Gautier, Marien; Lazarowski, Alberto; Bramuglia, Guillermo F; Fornasari, Maria Silvina

    2015-11-01

    Somatic sequence variants in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain are associated with sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients exhibiting sequence variants in this domain that produce kinase activity enhancement, are more likely to benefit from TKIs than patients with EGFR wild-type disease. Although most NSCLC EGFR-related alleles are concentrated in a few positions, established protocols recommend sequencing EGFR exons 18-21. In this study, 21 novel somatic variants belonging to such exons in adult Argentinean patients affected with NSCLC are reported. Of these, 18 were single amino acid substitutions (SASs), occurring alone or in combination with another genetic alteration (complex cases), one was a short deletion, one was a short deletion-short insertion combination, and one was a duplication. New variants and different combinations of previously reported variants were also found. Moreover, two of the reported SASs occurred in previously unreported positions of the EGFR kinase domain. In order to characterize the new sequence variants, physicochemical, sequence and conformational analyses were also performed. A better understanding of sequence variants in NSCLC may facilitate the most appropriate treatment choice for this complex disease. PMID:26420346

  3. A cell cycle kinase with tandem sensory PAS domains integrates cell fate cues.

    PubMed

    Mann, Thomas H; Seth Childers, W; Blair, Jimmy A; Eckart, Michael R; Shapiro, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    All cells must integrate sensory information to coordinate developmental events in space and time. The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus uses two-component phospho-signalling to regulate spatially distinct cell cycle events through the master regulator CtrA. Here, we report that CckA, the histidine kinase upstream of CtrA, employs a tandem-PAS domain sensor to integrate two distinct spatiotemporal signals. Using CckA reconstituted on liposomes, we show that one PAS domain modulates kinase activity in a CckA density-dependent manner, mimicking the stimulation of CckA kinase activity that occurs on its transition from diffuse to densely packed at the cell poles. The second PAS domain interacts with the asymmetrically partitioned second messenger cyclic-di-GMP, inhibiting kinase activity while stimulating phosphatase activity, consistent with the selective inactivation of CtrA in the incipient stalked cell compartment. The integration of these spatially and temporally regulated signalling events within a single signalling receptor enables robust orchestration of cell-type-specific gene regulation. PMID:27117914

  4. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Deregulation of MicroRNAs Involved in Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Response in ALK+ ALCL

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Julia; Bonin, Michael; Walter, Michael; Fend, Falko; Bonzheim, Irina; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is divided into two systemic diseases according to the expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). We investigated the differential expression of miRNAs between ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL cells and normal T-cells using next generation sequencing (NGS). In addition, a C/EBPβ-dependent miRNA profile was generated. The data were validated in primary ALCL cases. NGS identified 106 miRNAs significantly differentially expressed between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL and 228 between ALK+ ALCL and normal T-cells. We identified a signature of 56 miRNAs distinguishing ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL and T-cells. The top candidates significant differentially expressed between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL included 5 upregulated miRNAs: miR-340, miR-203, miR-135b, miR-182, miR-183; and 7 downregulated: miR-196b, miR-155, miR-146a, miR-424, miR-503, miR-424*, miR-542-3p. The miR-17-92 cluster was also upregulated in ALK+ cells. Additionally, we identified a signature of 3 miRNAs significantly regulated by the transcription factor C/EBPβ, which is specifically overexpressed in ALK+ ALCL, including the miR-181 family. Of interest, miR-181a, which regulates T-cell differentiation and modulates TCR signalling strength, was significantly downregulated in ALK+ ALCL cases. In summary, our data reveal a miRNA signature linking ALK+ ALCL to a deregulated immune response and may reflect the abnormal TCR antigen expression known in ALK+ ALCL. PMID:25688981

  5. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  6. ALK inhibitor resistance in ALK(F1174L)-driven neuroblastoma is associated with AXL activation and induction of EMT.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D N; Bhatnagar, N; Sharma, B; Luther, W; Moore, N F; Cheung, N-K; Gray, N S; George, R E

    2016-07-14

    The crizotinib-resistant ALK(F1174L) mutation arises de novo in neuroblastoma (NB) and is acquired in ALK translocation-driven cancers, lending impetus to the development of novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors with different modes of action. The diaminopyrimidine TAE684 and its derivative ceritinib (LDK378), which are structurally distinct from crizotinib, are active against NB cells expressing ALK(F1174L). Here we demonstrate acquired resistance to TAE684 and LDK378 in ALK(F1174L)-driven human NB cells that is linked to overexpression and activation of the AXL tyrosine kinase and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). AXL phosphorylation conferred TAE684 resistance to NB cells through upregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Inhibition of AXL partly rescued TAE684 resistance, resensitizing these cells to this compound. AXL activation in resistant cells was mediated through increased expression of the active form of its ligand, GAS6, that also served to stabilize the AXL protein. Although ectopic expression of AXL and TWIST2 individually in TAE684-sensitive parental cells led to the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers and invasive capacity, only AXL overexpression induced resistance to TAE684 as well. TAE684-resistant cells showed greater sensitivity to HSP90 inhibition than did their parental counterparts, with downregulation of AXL and AXL-mediated ERK signaling. Our studies indicate that aberrant AXL signaling and development of an EMT phenotype underlie resistance of ALK(F1174L)-driven NB cells to TAE684 and its derivatives. We suggest that the combination of ALK and AXL or HSP90 inhibitors be considered to delay the emergence of such resistance. PMID:26616860

  7. EML4-ALK induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition consistent with cancer stem cell properties in H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Fuchun; Liu, Xiaoke Qing, Qin Sang, Yaxiong Feng, Chengjun Li, Xiaoyu Jiang, Li Su, Pei Wang, Yongsheng

    2015-04-10

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4(EML4) – anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion gene has been identified as a driver mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the role of EML4-ALK in malignant transformation is not entirely clear. Here, for the first time, we showed that H1299 NSCLC cells stably expressing EML4-ALK acquire EMT phenotype, associated with enhanced invasive migration and increased expression of EMT-inducing transcription factors. H1299-EML4-ALK cells also displayed cancer stem cell-like properties with a concomitant up-regulation of CD133 and enhanced ability of mammospheres formation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of ERK1/2 reversed EMT induced by EML4-ALK in H1299 cells. Taken together, these results suggested that EML4-ALK induced ERK activation is mechanistically associated with EMT phenotype. Thus, inhibition of ERK signaling pathway could be a potential strategy in treatment of NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK translocation. - Highlights: • EML4-ALK induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition in H1299 cells. • Expression of EML4-ALK promotes invasion and migration in vitro. • EML4-ALK enhanced sphere formation and stem cell-like properties in H1299 cells. • Blockage of ERK1/2 reverse Epithelial–Mesenchymal transition induced by EML4-ALK.

  8. Baculovirus protein PK2 subverts eIF2α kinase function by mimicry of its kinase domain C-lobe

    PubMed Central

    Li, John J.; Cao, Chune; Fixsen, Sarah M.; Young, Janet M.; Bando, Hisanori; Elde, Nels C.; Katsuma, Susumu; Dever, Thomas E.; Sicheri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) by eIF2α family kinases is a conserved mechanism to limit protein synthesis under specific stress conditions. The baculovirus-encoded protein PK2 inhibits eIF2α family kinases in vivo, thereby increasing viral fitness. However, the precise mechanism by which PK2 inhibits eIF2α kinase function remains an enigma. Here, we probed the mechanism by which PK2 inhibits the model eIF2α kinase human RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) as well as native insect eIF2α kinases. Although PK2 structurally mimics the C-lobe of a protein kinase domain and possesses the required docking infrastructure to bind eIF2α, we show that PK2 directly binds the kinase domain of PKR (PKRKD) but not eIF2α. The PKRKD–PK2 interaction requires a 22-residue N-terminal extension preceding the globular PK2 body that we term the “eIF2α kinase C-lobe mimic” (EKCM) domain. The functional insufficiency of the N-terminal extension of PK2 implicates a role for the adjacent EKCM domain in binding and inhibiting PKR. Using a genetic screen in yeast, we isolated PK2-activating mutations that cluster to a surface of the EKCM domain that in bona fide protein kinases forms the catalytic cleft through sandwiching interactions with a kinase N-lobe. Interaction assays revealed that PK2 associates with the N- but not the C-lobe of PKRKD. We propose an inhibitory model whereby PK2 engages the N-lobe of an eIF2α kinase domain to create a nonfunctional pseudokinase domain complex, possibly through a lobe-swapping mechanism. Finally, we show that PK2 enhances baculovirus fitness in insect hosts by targeting the endogenous insect heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)–like eIF2α kinase. PMID:26216977

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Kinase Interacting Protein 1, a Pollen Protein That Interacts with the Kinase Domain of PRK1, a Receptor-Like Kinase of Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Skirpan, Andrea L.; McCubbin, Andrew G.; Ishimizu, Takeshi; Wang, Xi; Hu, Yi; Dowd, Peter E.; Ma, Hong; Kao, Teh-hui

    2001-01-01

    Many receptor-like kinases have been identified in plants and have been shown by genetic or transgenic knockouts to play diverse physiological roles; however, to date, the cytosolic interacting proteins of relatively few of these kinases have been identified. We have previously identified a predominantly pollen-expressed receptor-like kinase of petunia (Petunia inflata), named PRK1, and we have shown by the antisense RNA approach that it is required for microspores to progress from the unicellular to bicellular stage. To investigate the PRK1-mediated signal transduction pathway, PRK1-K cDNA, encoding most of the cytoplasmic domain of PRK1, was used as bait in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) two-hybrid screens of pollen/pollen tube cDNA libraries of petunia. A protein named kinase interacting protein 1 (KIP1) was found to interact very strongly with PRK1-K. This interaction was greatly reduced when lysine-462 of PRK1-K, believed to be essential for kinase activity, was replaced with arginine (the resulting protein is named PRK1-K462R). The amino acid sequence of KIP1 deduced from full-length cDNA contains an EF-hand Ca2+-binding motif and nine predicted coiled-coil regions. The yeast two-hybrid assay and affinity chromatography showed that KIP1 interacts with itself to form a dimer or higher multimer. KIP1 is present in a single copy in the genome, and is expressed predominantly in pollen with a similar temporal pattern to PRK1. In situ hybridization showed that PRK1 and KIP1 transcripts were localized in the cytoplasm of pollen. PRK1-K phosphorylated KIP1-NT (amino acids 1–716), whereas PRK1-K462R only weakly phosphorylated KIP1-NT in vitro. PMID:11500547

  10. Automation of ALK gene rearrangement testing with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH): a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zwaenepoel, Karen; Merkle, Dennis; Cabillic, Florian; Berg, Erica; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Grazioli, Vittorio; Herelle, Olga; Hummel, Michael; Le Calve, Michele; Lenze, Dido; Mende, Stefanie; Pauwels, Patrick; Quilichini, Benoit; Repetti, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In the past several years we have observed a significant increase in our understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive lung cancer. Specifically in the non-small cell lung cancer sub-types, ALK gene rearrangements represent a sub-group of tumors that are targetable by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Crizotinib, resulting in significant reductions in tumor burden. Phase II and III clinical trials were performed using an ALK break-apart FISH probe kit, making FISH the gold standard for identifying ALK rearrangements in patients. FISH is often considered a labor and cost intensive molecular technique, and in this study we aimed to demonstrate feasibility for automation of ALK FISH testing, to improve laboratory workflow and ease of testing. This involved automation of the pre-treatment steps of the ALK assay using various protocols on the VP 2000 instrument, and facilitating automated scanning of the fluorescent FISH specimens for simplified enumeration on various backend scanning and analysis systems. The results indicated that ALK FISH can be automated. Significantly, both the Ikoniscope and BioView system of automated FISH scanning and analysis systems provided a robust analysis algorithm to define ALK rearrangements. In addition, the BioView system facilitated consultation of difficult cases via the internet. PMID:25576649

  11. A novel Patient Derived Tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma translocation

    PubMed Central

    Abate, Francesco; Todaro, Maria; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Boi, Michela; Landra, Indira; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Tabbo’, Fabrizio; Messana, Katia; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Gaudiano, Marcello; Aliberti, Sabrina; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Tousseyn, Thomas; Lasorsa, Elena; Crescenzo, Ramona; Bessone, Luca; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Rinaldi, Andrea; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Longo, Dario Livio; Aime, Silvio; Cheng, Mangeng; Ruggeri, Bruce; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Tiacci, Enrico; Falini, Brunangelo; Pera-Gresely, Benet; Cerchietti, Leandro; Iqbal, Javeed; Chan, Wing C; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kwee, Ivo; Piva, Roberto; Wlodarska, Iwona; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Although Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphomas (ALCL) carrying Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human Patient Derived Tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and of NFkB pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells lacking PRDM1/Blimp-1 and with c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to down-regulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Moreover, a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, but the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and are helpful tools for the implementation of patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  12. Inactivation of Multiple Bacterial Histidine Kinases by Targeting the ATP-Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial agents that exploit new targets will be required to combat the perpetual rise of bacterial resistance to current antibiotics. We are exploring the inhibition of histidine kinases, constituents of two-component systems. Two-component systems are the primary signaling pathways that bacteria utilize to respond to their environment. They are ubiquitous in bacteria and trigger various pathogenic mechanisms. To attenuate these signaling pathways, we sought to broadly target the histidine kinase family by focusing on their highly conserved ATP-binding domain. Development of a fluorescence polarization displacement assay facilitated high-throughput screening of ∼53 000 diverse small molecules for binding to the ATP-binding pocket. Of these compounds, nine inhibited the catalytic activity of two or more histidine kinases. These scaffolds could provide valuable starting points for the design of broadly effective HK inhibitors, global reduction of bacterial signaling, and ultimately, a class of antibiotics that function by a new mechanism of action. PMID:25531939

  13. Dynamics of the Tec-family tyrosine kinase SH3 domains.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Justin M; Tarafdar, Sreya; Joseph, Raji E; Andreotti, Amy H; Smithgall, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Wales, Thomas E

    2016-04-01

    The Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain is an important regulatory domain found in many signaling proteins. X-ray crystallography and NMR structures of SH3 domains are generally conserved but other studies indicate that protein flexibility and dynamics are not. We previously reported that based on hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HX MS) studies, there is variable flexibility and dynamics among the SH3 domains of the Src-family tyrosine kinases and related proteins. Here we have extended our studies to the SH3 domains of the Tec family tyrosine kinases (Itk, Btk, Tec, Txk, Bmx). The SH3 domains of members of this family augment the variety in dynamics observed in previous SH3 domains. Txk and Bmx SH3 were found to be highly dynamic in solution by HX MS and Bmx was unstructured by NMR. Itk and Btk SH3 underwent a clear EX1 cooperative unfolding event, which was localized using pepsin digestion and mass spectrometry after hydrogen exchange labeling. The unfolding was localized to peptide regions that had been previously identified in the Src-family and related protein SH3 domains, yet the kinetics of unfolding were not. Sequence alignment does not provide an easy explanation for the observed dynamics behavior, yet the similarity of location of EX1 unfolding suggests that higher-order structural properties may play a role. While the exact reason for such dynamics is not clear, such motions can be exploited in intra- and intermolecular binding assays of proteins containing the domains. PMID:26808198

  14. Identification of Driving ALK Fusion Genes and Genomic Landscape of Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jae Won; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kim, DeokGeun; Ji, Yongick; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Park, Woong-Yang; Shin, Hyun-Tae; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Sun, Jong-Mu

    2015-01-01

    The genetic landscape of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is not yet fully understood, although some oncogenic mutations have been identified. To explore genetic profiles of MTCs, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissues from MTC patients were assayed on the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel v2. Eighty-four sporadic MTC samples and 36 paired normal thyroid tissues were successfully sequenced. We discovered 101 hotspot mutations in 18 genes in the 84 MTC tissue samples. The most common mutation was in the ret proto-oncogene, which occurred in 47 cases followed by mutations in genes encoding Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 14), serine/threonine kinase 11 (N = 11), v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 6), mutL homolog 1 (N = 4), Kiesten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (N = 3) and MET proto-oncogene (N = 3). We also evaluated anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement by immunohistochemistry and break-apart fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Two of 98 screened cases were positive for ALK FISH. To identify the genomic breakpoint and 5’ fusion partner of ALK, customized targeted cancer panel sequencing was performed using DNA from tumor samples of the two patients. Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate transaminase 1 (GFPT1)-ALK and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4)-ALK fusions were identified. Additional PCR analysis, followed by Sanger sequencing, confirmed the GFPT1-ALK fusion, indicating that the fusion is a result of intra-chromosomal translocation or deletion. Notably, a metastatic MTC case harboring the EML4-ALK fusion showed a dramatic response to an ALK inhibitor, crizotinib. In conclusion, we found several genetic mutations in MTC and are the first to identify ALK fusions in MTC. Our results suggest that the EML4-ALK fusion in MTC may be a potential driver mutation and a valid target of ALK inhibitors. Furthermore, the GFPT1-ALK fusion may be a potential candidate for molecular target

  15. The Structural Basis for Activation and Inhibition of ZAP-70 Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Roland G.; Fan, Hao; Bond, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    ZAP–70 (Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70) is a tyrosine kinase that interacts directly with the activated T-cell receptor to transduce downstream signals, and is hence a major player in the regulation of the adaptive immune response. Dysfunction of ZAP–70 causes selective T cell deficiency that in turn results in persistent infections. ZAP–70 is activated by a variety of signals including phosphorylation of the kinase domain (KD), and binding of its regulatory tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains to the T cell receptor. The present study investigates molecular mechanisms of activation and inhibition of ZAP–70 via atomically detailed molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We report microsecond timescale simulations of five distinct states of the ZAP–70 KD, comprising apo, inhibited and three phosphorylated variants. Extensive analysis of local flexibility and correlated motions reveal crucial transitions between the states, thus elucidating crucial steps in the activation mechanism of the ZAP–70 KD. Furthermore, we rationalize previously observed staurosporine-bound crystal structures, suggesting that whilst the KD superficially resembles an “active-like” conformation, the inhibitor modulates the underlying protein dynamics and restricts it in a compact, rigid state inaccessible to ligands or cofactors. Finally, our analysis reveals a novel, potentially druggable pocket in close proximity to the activation loop of the kinase, and we subsequently use its structure in fragment-based virtual screening to develop a pharmacophore model. The pocket is distinct from classical type I or type II kinase pockets, and its discovery offers promise in future design of specific kinase inhibitors, whilst mutations in residues associated with this pocket are implicated in immunodeficiency in humans. PMID:26473606

  16. The ALK inhibitor ceritinib overcomes crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christian C.; Gainor, Justin F.; Crystal, Adam S.; Michellys, Pierre-Yves; Awad, Mark M.; Yanagitani, Noriko; Kim, Sungjoon; Pferdekamper, AnneMarie C.; Li, Jie; Kasibhatla, Shailaja; Sun, Frank; Sun, Xiuying; Hua, Su; McNamara, Peter; Mahmood, Sidra; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Fujita, Naoya; Nishio, Makoto; Harris, Jennifer L.; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) harboring anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements invariably develop resistance to the ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) crizotinib. Herein, we report the first preclinical evaluation of the next-generation ALK TKI, ceritinib (LDK378) in the setting of crizotinib resistance. Interrogation of in vitro and in vivo models of acquired resistance to crizotinib, including cell lines established from biopsies of crizotinib-resistant NSCLC patients revealed that ceritinib potently overcomes crizotinib resistance mutations. In particular, ceritinib effectively inhibits ALK harboring L1196M, G1269A, I1171T and S1206Y mutations, and a co-crystal of ceritinib bound to ALK provides structural bases for this increased potency. However, we observed that ceritinib did not overcome two crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations, G1202R and F1174C, and one of these mutations were identified in 5 out of 11 biopsies from patients with acquired resistance to ceritinib. Altogether our results demonstrate that ceritinib can overcome crizotinib resistance, consistent with clinical data showing marked efficacy of ceritinib in patients with crizotinib-resistant disease. PMID:24675041

  17. Arabidopsis NPH1: a protein kinase with a putative redox-sensing domain.

    PubMed

    Huala, E; Oeller, P W; Liscum, E; Han, I S; Larsen, E; Briggs, W R

    1997-12-19

    The NPH1 (nonphototropic hypocotyl 1) gene encodes an essential component acting very early in the signal-transduction chain for phototropism. Arabidopsis NPH1 contains a serine-threonine kinase domain and LOV1 and LOV2 repeats that share similarity (36 to 56 percent) with Halobacterium salinarium Bat, Azotobacter vinelandii NIFL, Neurospora crassa White Collar-1, Escherichia coli Aer, and the Eag family of potassium-channel proteins from Drosophila and mammals. Sequence similarity with a known (NIFL) and a suspected (Aer) flavoprotein suggests that NPH1 LOV1 and LOV2 may be flavin-binding domains that regulate kinase activity in response to blue light-induced redox changes. PMID:9405347

  18. Anilinoquinazoline inhibitors of the RET kinase domain-Elaboration of the 7-position.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Allan M; Begum, Habiba; Fairweather, Emma; Fritzl, Samantha; Goldberg, Kristin; Hopkins, Gemma V; Hamilton, Niall M; Lyons, Amanda J; March, H Nikki; Newton, Rebecca; Small, Helen F; Vishwanath, Swamy; Waddell, Ian D; Waszkowycz, Bohdan; Watson, Amanda J; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-06-01

    We have previously reported a series of anilinoquinazoline derivatives as potent and selective biochemical inhibitors of the RET kinase domain. However, these derivatives displayed diminished cellular potency. Herein we describe further optimisation of the series through modification of their physicochemical properties, delivering improvements in cell potency. However, whilst cellular selectivity against key targets could be maintained, combining cell potency and acceptable pharmacokinetics proved challenging. PMID:27086121

  19. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys-174, Asp-179 and Asp-191 in the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Deprez, J; Vertommen, D; Di Pietro, A; Hue, L; Rider, M H

    1997-01-01

    In a structural model of the 2-kinase domain of the bifunctional enzyme 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase based on the analogy with adenylate kinase, Lys-174, Asp-179 and Asp-191 residues are located in the putative active site. Asp-179 and Asp-191 are conserved in all known 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase sequences. In contrast, Lys-174 is conserved except in a yeast isoenzyme, fbp26, where it is replaced by glycine. Yeast fbp26 possesses fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase activity, but is devoid of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity. Mutation of Asp-179 and Asp-191 of the rat liver isoenzyme to alanine increased the Km of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase for fructose 6-phosphate 2000- and 1000-fold respectively, whereas mutation of Lys-174 to glycine decreased the Vmax of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase more than 4000-fold. In contrast, none of the mutations affected the kinetic parameters of fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase. CD and fluorescence measurements indicated that the mutations had no effect on the structure and stability of the recombinant proteins. The results show that Asp-179 and Asp-191 participate in fructose 6-phosphate binding, whereas Lys-174 is important for catalysis. Therefore the natural mutation of Lys-174 to glycine in the fbp26 yeast isoenzyme could explain the lack of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase activity. These results support a novel 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase structure model based on adenylate kinase. PMID:9032446

  20. Kinase Domain Point Mutations in Ph+ Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Emerge Following Therapy with BCR-ABL Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dan; Thomas, Deborah; Yin, C. Cameron; O'Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge E.; Jabbour, Elias; Breeden, Megan; Giles, Francis J.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2008-01-01

    Background BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations are detected in approximately 45% of imatinib-resistant CML. Patterns of KD mutations in Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are less well-studied. Methods We assessed KD mutations in relapsed Ph+ ALL following treatments that included one or more kinase inhibitors (n = 24) or no prior KI therapy (n = 12). Results ABL KD mutations were detected by direct sequencing in 15 of 17 (88%) relapsed Ph+ ALL with prior imatinib (n = 16) or dasatinib (n = 1) treatment, and in 6 of 7 (86%) resistant/relapsed tumors treated with 2 or more KIs, compared with 0 of 12 relapsed Ph+ ALL never treated with KI. A restricted set of mutations was seen, mostly Y253H and T315I, detected on average 13 months following KI initiation, and mutations were not detected in the initial tumor samples prior to KI therapy in 12 patients assessed. Using a more sensitive pyrosequencing method, we did not detect mutations at codons 315 and 253 in the diagnostic samples from these 12 patients or in 30 Ph+ ALL patients who never relapsed. Conclusions ABL KD mutations, especially at codons 315 and 253, emerge upon relapse in the vast majority of patients with Ph+ ALL receiving maintenance KI therapy. Ongoing KI exposure may thus alter the patterns of relapse and favor outgrowth of clones with KI-resistant mutations. PMID:18615627

  1. Target of Rapamycin Regulates Development and Ribosomal RNA Expression through Kinase Domain in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Maozhi; Qiu, Shuqing; Venglat, Prakash; Xiang, Daoquan; Feng, Li; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) is a central regulator of cell growth, cell death, nutrition, starvation, hormone, and stress responses in diverse eukaryotes. However, very little is known about TOR signaling and the associated functional domains in plants. We have taken a genetic approach to dissect TOR functions in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and report here that the kinase domain is essential for the role of TOR in embryogenesis and 45S rRNA expression. Twelve new T-DNA insertion mutants, spanning 14.2 kb of TOR-encoding genomic region, have been characterized. Nine of these share expression of defective kinase domain and embryo arrest at 16 to 32 cell stage. However, three T-DNA insertion lines affecting FATC domain displayed normal embryo development, indicating that FATC domain was dispensable in Arabidopsis. Genetic complementation showed that the TOR kinase domain alone in tor-10/tor-10 mutant background can rescue early embryo lethality and restore normal development. Overexpression of full-length TOR or kinase domain in Arabidopsis displayed developmental abnormalities in meristem, leaf, root, stem, flowering time, and senescence. We further show that TOR, especially the kinase domain, plays a role in ribosome biogenesis by activating 45S rRNA production. Of the six putative nuclear localization sequences in the kinase domain, nuclear localization sequence 6 was identified to confer TOR nuclear targeting in transient expression assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies revealed that the HEAT repeat domain binds to 45S rRNA promoter and the 5′ external transcribed spacer elements motif. Together, these results show that TOR controls the embryogenesis, postembryonic development, and 45S rRNA production through its kinase domain in Arabidopsis. PMID:21266656

  2. Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 1 Involves Interactions between Its N-Terminal Region and Its Kinase Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chih-chin; Orban, Tivadar; Jastrzebska, Beata; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Tesmer, John J.G.

    2012-03-16

    G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) phosphorylate activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate receptor desensitization. In addition to the canonical phosphoacceptor site of the kinase domain, activated receptors bind to a distinct docking site that confers higher affinity and activates GRKs allosterically. Recent mutagenesis and structural studies support a model in which receptor docking activates a GRK by stabilizing the interaction of its 20-amino acid N-terminal region with the kinase domain. This interaction in turn stabilizes a closed, more active conformation of the enzyme. To investigate the importance of this interaction for the process of GRK activation, we first validated the functionality of the N-terminal region in rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by site-directed mutagenesis and then introduced a disulfide bond to cross-link the N-terminal region of GRK1 with its specific binding site on the kinase domain. Characterization of the kinetic and biophysical properties of the cross-linked protein showed that disulfide bond formation greatly enhances the catalytic efficiency of the peptide phosphorylation, but receptor-dependent phosphorylation, Meta II stabilization, and inhibition of transducin activation were unaffected. These data indicate that the interaction of the N-terminal region with the kinase domain is important for GRK activation but does not dictate the affinity of GRKs for activated receptors.

  3. Initial Diagnosis of ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Analysis of ALK Status Utilizing Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Lund, H Louise; Hughesman, Curtis B; Fakhfakh, Kareem; McNeil, Kelly; Clemens, Shahira; Hocken, Kimberly; Pettersson, Ryan; Karsan, Aly; Foster, Leonard J; Haynes, Charles

    2016-05-01

    We describe a novel droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay capable of detecting genomic alterations associated with inversion translocations. It is applied here to detection of rearrangements in the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene associated with ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). NSCLC patients may carry a nonreciprocal translocation on human chromosome 2, in which synchronized double stranded breaks (DSB) within the echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene and ALK lead to an inversion of genetic material that forms the non-natural gene fusion EML4-ALK encoding a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that is associated with 3 to 7% of all NSCLCs. Detection of ALK rearrangements is currently achieved in clinics through direct visualization via a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) assay, which can detect those rearrangements to a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 15%. We show that the ddPCR assay presented here provides a LOD of 0.25% at lower cost and with faster turnaround times. PMID:27043019

  4. Biomarkers that currently affect clinical practice: EGFR, ALK, MET, KRAS

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M.D.; Kuruvilla, M.S.; Leighl, N.B.; Kamel–Reid, S.

    2012-01-01

    New drugs such as pemetrexed, the epidermal growth factor receptor (egfr) tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and the Alk inhibitor crizotinib have recently enabled progress in the management of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc). More drugs, especially Met inhibitors, will follow. However, the benefits of these agents are not uniform across the spectrum of nsclc, and optimizing their utility requires some degree of subgrouping of nsclc by the presence or absence of certain biomarkers. The biomarkers of current or imminent value are EGFR and KRAS mutational status, ALK rearrangements, and MET immunohistochemistry. As a predictor of benefit for anti-egfr monoclonal antibodies, EGFR immunohistochemistry is also of potential interest. Some of the foregoing biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) are direct drivers of the malignant phenotype. As such, they are, quite rationally, the direct targets of inhibitory drugs. However, KRAS, while definitely a driver, has resisted attempts at direct pharmacologic manipulation, and its main value might lie in its role as part of an efficient testing algorithm, because KRAS mutations appear to exclude EGFR and ALK mutations. The indirect value of KRAS in determining sensitivity to other targeted agents or to pemetrexed remains controversial. The other biomarkers (EGFR, ALK, MET) may also have indirect value as predictors of sensitivity to chemotherapy in general, to pemetrexed specifically, and to radiotherapy and molecularly targeted agents. These biomarkers have all enabled the co-development of new drugs with companion diagnostics, and they illustrate the paradigm that will govern progress in oncology in the immediate future. However, in nsclc, the acquisition of sufficient biopsy material remains a stubborn obstacle to the evolution of novel targeted therapies. PMID:22787409

  5. Understanding the Interplay between Expression, Mutation and Activity of ALK Receptor in Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells for Clinical Application of Small-Molecule Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peron, Marica; Lovisa, Federica; Poli, Elena; Basso, Giuseppe; Bonvini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) have a central role in cancer initiation and progression, since changes in their expression and activity potentially results in cell transformation. This concept is essential from a therapeutic standpoint, as clinical evidence indicates that tumours carrying deregulated RTKs are particularly susceptible to their activity but also to their inhibition. Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is an aggressive childhood cancer where emerging therapies rely on the use kinase inhibitors, and among druggable kinases ALK represents a potential therapeutic target to commit efforts against. However, the functional relevance of ALK in RMS is not known, likewise the multi-component deregulated RTK profile to which ALK belongs. Methods In this study we used RMS cell lines representative of the alveolar and embrional histotype and looked at ALK intracellular localization, activity and cell signalling. Results We found that ALK was properly located at the plasma membrane of RMS cells, though in an unphosphorylated and inactive state due to intracellular tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) activity. Indeed, increase of ALK phosphorylation was observed upon PTPase inhibition, as well as after ligand binding or protein overexpression. In these conditions, ALK signalling proceeded through the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways, and it was susceptible to ATP-competitive inhibitors exposure. However, drug-induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis did not correlate with ALK expression only, but relied also on the expression of other RTKs with akin drug binding affinity. Indeed, analysis of baseline and inducible RTK phosphorylation confirmed that RMS cells were susceptible to ALK kinase inhibitors even in the absence of the primary intended target, due to the presence of compensatory RTKs signalling pathways. Conclusions These data, hence, provided evidences of a potentially active role of ALK in RMS cells, but also suggest caution in considering ALK

  6. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib

    PubMed Central

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E.; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy.

  7. Three Years Sustained Complete Remission Achieved in a Primary Refractory ALK-Positive Anaplastic T Large Cell Lymphoma Treated with Crizotinib.

    PubMed

    Mahuad, Carolina Valeria; Repáraz, María de Los Ángeles Vicente; Zerga, Marta E; Aizpurua, María Florencia; Casali, Claudia; Garate, Gonzalo

    2016-06-28

    The prognosis of the primary refractory anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK+) anaplastic T large cell lymphoma is ominous. The identification of molecular targets with potential to drive oncogenesis remains a cornerstone for the designing of new selective cancer therapies. Crizotinib is a selective ATP-competitive inhibitor for ALK, approved for its use in lung cancer with rearrangements on ALK gene. The reported cases describe the use of crizotinib as a bridging strategy prior to allotransplantation; there are no reported prolonged survivals under monotherapy with Crizotinib. We report a case of a primary refractory ALK+ anaplastic large-cell lymphoma that sustains complete response after 3 years of crizotinib monotherapy. PMID:27441079

  8. A Novel Protein Kinase-Like Domain in a Selenoprotein, Widespread in the Tree of Life

    PubMed Central

    Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Szczepińska, Teresa; Grynberg, Marcin; Pawłowski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Selenoproteins serve important functions in many organisms, usually providing essential oxidoreductase enzymatic activity, often for defense against toxic xenobiotic substances. Most eukaryotic genomes possess a small number of these proteins, usually not more than 20. Selenoproteins belong to various structural classes, often related to oxidoreductase function, yet a few of them are completely uncharacterised. Here, the structural and functional prediction for the uncharacterised selenoprotein O (SELO) is presented. Using bioinformatics tools, we predict that SELO protein adopts a three-dimensional fold similar to protein kinases. Furthermore, we argue that despite the lack of conservation of the “classic” catalytic aspartate residue of the archetypical His-Arg-Asp motif, SELO kinases might have retained catalytic phosphotransferase activity, albeit with an atypical active site. Lastly, the role of the selenocysteine residue is considered and the possibility of an oxidoreductase-regulated kinase function for SELO is discussed. The novel kinase prediction is discussed in the context of functional data on SELO orthologues in model organisms, FMP40 a.k.a.YPL222W (yeast), and ydiU (bacteria). Expression data from bacteria and yeast suggest a role in oxidative stress response. Analysis of genomic neighbourhoods of SELO homologues in the three domains of life points toward a role in regulation of ABC transport, in oxidative stress response, or in basic metabolism regulation. Among bacteria possessing SELO homologues, there is a significant over-representation of aquatic organisms, also of aerobic ones. The selenocysteine residue in SELO proteins occurs only in few members of this protein family, including proteins from Metazoa, and few small eukaryotes (Ostreococcus, stramenopiles). It is also demonstrated that enterobacterial mchC proteins involved in maturation of bactericidal antibiotics, microcins, form a distant subfamily of the SELO proteins. The new protein

  9. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  10. Novel Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the PH Domain of AKT for Preventing and Treating Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Medical Oncology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in licensing and co-development collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel kinase inhibitors targeting the PH domain of AKT.

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN CYTOPLASMIC DOMAIN SEQUENCE AND AUTOPHOSPHORYLATION AMONG ARABIDOPSIS LEUCINE-RICH REPEAT RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) are implicated in signaling roles during plant growth, development and defense. A paradigm for receptor kinase activation involves dimerization and auto- or trans-phosphorylation within the cytoplasmic domain. Our goals are to identify intrace...

  12. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  13. NMR structure of the forkhead-associated domain from the Arabidopsis receptor kinase-associated protein phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gui-in; Ding, Zhaofeng; Walker, John C.; Van Doren, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are phosphoprotein-binding modules found in diverse signaling proteins that bind partners phosphorylated on threonine or serine. Kinase-associated protein phosphatase from Arabidopsis employs its FHA domain for negative regulation of receptor-like kinase signaling pathways, which are important in plant development. The solution structure of the free state of kinase-interacting FHA domain (KI-FHA) of kinase-associated protein phosphatase has been determined with high precision and accuracy using residual dipolar couplings. KI-FHA is a sandwich of a five-stranded mixed β-sheet with a six-stranded antiparallel β-sheet. Despite homology only in the recognition loops, this fold is shared with FHA domains from checkpoint proteins from yeast and humans, as well as with nonhomologous MH2 domains of Smad tumor suppressors. A shared pattern of hydrophobicity throughout FHA domains and Smad MH2 domains may stabilize the core of the β-sandwich. Evolutionary trace analysis of FHA domains suggests class-specific residues in the recognition loops that could tune their phosphoprotein-binding specificity. This surface agrees with that of KI-FHA in contact with a phosphothreonine peptide ligand. Evolutionary trace analysis also predicts an unexpected swath of class-specific residues on another face of FHA domains. Protein interactions with these faces may affect assembly of transmembrane signaling complexes in plants, and in other FHA domain-containing assemblies. PMID:14500786

  14. Insight into drug resistance mechanisms and discovery of potential inhibitors against wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK from FDA-approved drugs.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzong; Liu, Wei; Luo, Hao; Bao, Jinku

    2016-09-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays a crucial role in multiple malignant cancers. It is known as a well-established target for the treatment of ALK-dependent cancers. Even though substantial efforts have been made to develop ALK inhibitors, only crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib had been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for patients with ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The secondary mutations with drug-resistance bring up difficulties to develop effective drugs for ALK-positive cancers. To give a comprehensive understanding of molecular mechanism underlying inhibitor response to ALK tyrosine kinase mutations, we established an accurate assessment for the extensive profile of drug against ALK mutations by means of computational approaches. The molecular mechanics-generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out to calculate relative binding free energies for receptor-drug systems. In addition, the structure-based virtual screening was utilized to screen effective inhibitors targeting wild-type ALK and the gatekeeper mutation L1196M from 3180 approved drugs. Finally, the mechanism of drug resistance was discussed, several novel potential wild-type and L1196M mutant ALK inhibitors were successfully identified. PMID:27585676

  15. Detection of EML4-ALK fusion gene and features associated with EGFR mutations in Chinese patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Miaomiao; Wang, Xuejiao; Sun, Ying; Xia, Jinghua; Fan, Liangbo; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Zhipei; Li, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4–anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) define specific molecular subsets of lung cancer with distinct clinical features. We aimed at revealing the clinical features of EML4-ALK fusion gene and EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We enrolled 694 Chinese patients with NSCLC for analysis. EML4-ALK fusion gene was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and EGFR mutations were analyzed by amplified refractory mutation system. Results Among the 694 patients, 60 (8.65%) patients had EML4-ALK fusions. In continuity correction χ2 test analysis, EML4-ALK fusion gene was correlated with sex, age, smoking status, and histology, but no significant association was observed between EML4-ALK fusion gene and clinical stage. A total of 147 (21.18%) patients had EGFR mutations. In concordance with previous reports, EGFR mutation was correlated with age, smoking status, histology, and clinical stage, whereas patient age was not significantly associated with EGFR mutation. Meanwhile, to our surprise, six (0.86%) patients had coexisting EML4-ALK fusions and EGFR mutations. Conclusion EML4-ALK fusion gene defines a new molecular subset in patients with NSCLC. Six patients who harbored both EML4-ALK fusion genes and EGFR mutations were identified in our study. The EGFR mutations and the EML4-ALK fusion genes are coexistent. PMID:27103824

  16. ALK Signaling and Target Therapy in Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tabbó, Fabrizio; Barreca, Antonella; Piva, Roberto; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Morris et al. (1994) of the genes contributing to the t(2;5)(p23;q35) translocation has laid the foundation for a molecular based recognition of anaplastic large cell lymphoma and highlighted the need for a further stratification of T-cell neoplasia. Likewise the detection of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) genetic lesions among many human cancers has defined unique subsets of cancer patients, providing new opportunities for innovative therapeutic interventions. The objective of this review is to appraise the molecular mechanisms driving ALK-mediated transformation, and to maintain the neoplastic phenotype. The understanding of these events will allow the design and implementation of novel tailored strategies for a well-defined subset of cancer patients. PMID:22649787

  17. HAMP Domain Rotation and Tilting Movements Associated with Signal Transduction in the PhoQ Sensor Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Matamouros, Susana; Hager, Kyle R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HAMP domains are α-helical coiled coils that often transduce signals from extracytoplasmic sensing domains to cytoplasmic domains. Limited structural information has resulted in hypotheses that specific HAMP helix movement changes downstream enzymatic activity. These hypotheses were tested by mutagenesis and cysteine cross-linking analysis of the PhoQ histidine kinase, essential for resistance to antimicrobial peptides in a variety of enteric pathogens. These results support a mechanistic model in which periplasmic signals which induce an activation state generate a rotational movement accompanied by a tilt in α-helix 1 which activates kinase activity. Biochemical data and a high-confidence model of the PhoQ cytoplasmic domain indicate a possible physical interaction of the HAMP domain with the catalytic domain as necessary for kinase repression. These results support a model of PhoQ activation in which changes in the periplasmic domain lead to conformational movements in the HAMP domain helices which disrupt interaction between the HAMP and the catalytic domains, thus promoting increased kinase activity. PMID:26015499

  18. Mutation-Independent Activation of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Regairaz, Marie; Munier, Fabienne; Sartelet, Hervé; Castaing, Marine; Marty, Virginie; Renauleaud, Céline; Doux, Camille; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Fabre, Monique; Ohta, Shigeru; Viehl, Philippe; Michiels, Stefan; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Activating mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as important players in neuroblastoma development. Our goal was to evaluate the significance of overall ALK activation in neuroblastoma. Expression of phosphorylated ALK, ALK, and its putative ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine, was screened in 289 neuroblastomas and 56 paired normal tissues. ALK was expressed in 99% of tumors and phosphorylated in 48% of cases. Pleiotrophin and midkine were expressed in 58% and 79% of tumors, respectively. ALK activation was significantly higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues, together with ALK and midkine expression. ALK activation was largely independent of mutations and correlated with midkine expression in tumors. ALK activation in tumors was associated with favorable features, including a younger age at diagnosis, hyperdiploidy, and detection by mass screening. Antitumor activity of the ALK inhibitor TAE684 was evaluated in wild-type or mutated ALK neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts. TAE684 was cytotoxic in vitro in all cell lines, especially those harboring an ALK mutation. TAE684 efficiently inhibited ALK phosphorylation in vivo in both F1174I and R1275Q xenografts but demonstrated antitumor activity only against the R1275Q xenograft. In conclusion, ALK activation occurs frequently during neuroblastoma oncogenesis, mainly through mutation-independent mechanisms. However, ALK activation is not associated with a poor outcome and is not always a driver of cell proliferation and/or survival in neuroblastoma. PMID:26687816

  19. Treatment for ALK-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer: a new miracle in the research race.

    PubMed

    de Castro-Carpeño, J; Perona, R; Belda-Iniesta, C

    2011-11-01

    The discovery of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements in a subset of patients with nonsmall- cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its potential blockage by specific inhibitors such as crizotinib has been one of the latest advances in the treatment of this disease. In this article, we will review the most important clinical aspects of ALK alterations in NSCLC patients and the pending questions to answer: the most effective means of diagnosing ALK-rearranged NSCLC, and efficacy, toxicity profile and potential mechanisms of resistance to crizotinib. PMID:22082640

  20. Structure–Activity Relationship of 3,5-Diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 Inhibitors Reveals Unaltered Binding Affinity for Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Causing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure–activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG. PMID:25101911

  1. Structural Analysis of Sensor Domains from the TMAO-Responsive Histidine Kinase Receptor TorS.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.; Hendrickson, W

    2009-01-01

    Histidine kinase receptors respond to diverse signals and mediate signal transduction across the plasma membrane in all prokaryotes and certain eukaryotes. Each receptor is part of a two-component system that regulates a particular cellular process. Organisms that use trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) as a terminal electron acceptor typically control their anaerobic respiration through the TMAO reductase (Tor) pathway, which the TorS histidine kinase activates when sensing TMAO in the environment. We have determined crystal structures for the periplasmic sensor domains of TorS receptors from Escherichia coli and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. TorS sensor domains have a novel fold consisting of a membrane-proximal right-handed four-helical bundle and a membrane-distal left-handed four-helical bundle, but conformational dispositions differ significantly in the two structures. Isolated TorS sensor domains dimerize in solution; and from comparisons with dimeric NarX and Tar sensors, we postulate that signaling through TorS dimers involves a piston-type displacement between helices.

  2. Intact or broken-apart RNA: an alternative concept for ALK fusion screening in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    PubMed

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Bobos, Mattheos; Vassilakopoulou, Maria; Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Chrisafi, Sofia; Psyrri, Amanda; Lazaridis, George; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Efstratiou, Ioannis; Michail-Strantzia, Catherine; Debelenko, Larisa V; Kosmidis, Paris; Fountzilas, George

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) break-apart fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is currently used in diagnostics for the selection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients to receive crizotinib. We evaluated ALK status in NSCLC with a novel ALK mRNA test based on the break-apart FISH concept, which we called break-apart transcript (BAT) test. ALK5' and ALK3' transcript patterns were established with qPCR for ALK-expressing controls including fusion-negative neuroblastomas, as well as fusion-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas and NSCLC. The BAT test was evaluated on 271 RNA samples from routinely processed paraffin NSCLC tissues. Test results were compared with ALK FISH (n=121), immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis (n=86), and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA, n=83). On the basis of the nonoverlapping ALK BAT patterns in ALK-expressing controls (P<0.0001), 8/174 adenocarcinomas (4.6%) among 259 informative NSCLC were predicted as fusion positive. Overall concordance for paired method results was high (94.1% to 98.8%) but mainly concerned negative prediction because of the limited availability of positive-matched cases. Tumors with 100% cytoplasmic IHC staining of any intensity (n=3) were positive for AQUA, FISH, and BAT test; tumors with lower IHC positivity and different staining patterns were AQUA-negative. Upon multiple reevaluations, ALK gene status was considered as originally misinterpreted by FISH in 3/121 cases (2.5%). Tumors with >4 ALK gene copies were associated with longer overall survival upon first-line chemotherapy. In conclusion, application of the ALK BAT test on routinely processed NSCLC tissues yields the same fusion partner independent information as ALK break-apart FISH but is more robust and cost-effective. The BAT concept may be considered for the development of further drug-predictive translocation tests. PMID:25153496

  3. Binding partners of the kinase domains in Drosophila obscurin and their effect on the structure of the flight muscle

    PubMed Central

    Katzemich, Anja; West, Ryan J. H.; Fukuzawa, Atsushi; Sweeney, Sean T.; Gautel, Mathias; Sparrow, John; Bullard, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drosophila obscurin (Unc-89) is a titin-like protein in the M-line of the muscle sarcomere. Obscurin has two kinase domains near the C-terminus, both of which are predicted to be inactive. We have identified proteins binding to the kinase domains. Kinase domain 1 bound Bällchen (Ball, an active kinase), and both kinase domains 1 and 2 bound MASK (a 400-kDa protein with ankyrin repeats). Ball was present in the Z-disc and M-line of the indirect flight muscle (IFM) and was diffusely distributed in the sarcomere. MASK was present in both the M-line and the Z-disc. Reducing expression of Ball or MASK by siRNA resulted in abnormalities in the IFM, including missing M-lines and multiple Z-discs. Obscurin was still present, suggesting that the kinase domains act as a scaffold binding Ball and MASK. Unlike obscurin in vertebrate skeletal muscle, Drosophila obscurin is necessary for the correct assembly of the IFM sarcomere. We show that Ball and MASK act downstream of obscurin, and both are needed for development of a well defined M-line and Z-disc. The proteins have not previously been identified in Drosophila muscle. PMID:26251439

  4. ALK inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer: the latest evidence and developments

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harbouring chromosomal rearrangements of ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) was revolutionized by crizotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of ALK, ROS1 and MET. Unfortunately, the disease progressed within the first 12 months in most of the patients because of the development of crizotinib resistance in the majority of patients and the emergence of acquired resistance mutations in most of them. Many of them had been reported even before its approval leading to the rapid development of second-generation ALK inhibitors for crizotinib-resistant NSCLC. In the last few years, novel potent ALK inhibitors with promising results and a good toxicity profile have become available: ceritinib (LDK378), alectinib (RG7853/AF-802/RO5424802/CH5424802), brigatinib (AP26113), entrectinib (RXDX-101, NMS-E628), PF-06463922, ASP3026, TSR-011, X-376/X-396 and CEP-28122/CEP-37440. Moreover, HSP90 (90 kDa heat shock protein) inhibitors have demonstrated clinical activity in patients with ALK+ NSCLC. This review focuses on the molecular and clinical properties of this new generation of ALK inhibitors under development in the clinic. PMID:26753004

  5. Endoglin and Alk5 regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transformation during cardiac valve formation

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Pimentel, Melania E.; Hubbard, Antony D.; Runyan, Raymond B.

    2007-01-01

    Endoglin is an accessory receptor for TGFß and can associate with Alk5 or Alk2. Although prior studies indicated that endoglin and Alk5 were not directly involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) in the heart, the expression pattern of endoglin prompted a re-examination. We here show that loss of endoglin expression mediated by either antisense DNA or siRNA results in a direct perturbation of EMT and reduced expression of EMT markers including slug, runx2, RhoA, and latrophilin-2. An examination of BrdU incorporation shows that, while endoglin regulates proliferation at an early stage, reduced endothelial cell proliferation does not account for the loss of mesenchyme. As Alk5 interacts with endoglin, we utilized siRNA and a specific inhibitor, HTS466284 (HTS), to perturb this receptor as well. Alk5 inhibition produced similar effects to inhibition of endoglin. There was a reduction in mesenchymal cell formation and loss of EMT marker expression similar to that seen with endoglin. Alk5 kinase inhibition produced a similar loss of EMT marker expression but showed a contrasting upregulation of the proliferation and remodeling markers, Cyclin B2 and ß-catenin. Alk5 and endoglin both mediate endothelial cell proliferation in younger explants but, by stage 16, loss of endoglin no longer alters proliferation rates. These data show that both Alk5 and endoglin are directly involved in the process of EMT, that they interact with both TGFß-regulated activation and invasion pathways and that the roles of these receptors change during cardiac development. PMID:17250821

  6. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  7. Structure of the Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A (MHCK-A) α-kinase domain apoenzyme reveals a novel autoinhibited conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qilu; Yang, Yidai; van Staalduinen, Laura; Crawley, Scott William; Liu, Linda; Brennan, Stephanie; Côté, Graham P.; Jia, Zongchao

    2016-01-01

    The α-kinases are a family of a typical protein kinases present in organisms ranging from protozoa to mammals. Here we report an autoinhibited conformation for the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase A (MHCK-A) in which nucleotide binding to the catalytic cleft, located at the interface between an N-terminal and C-terminal lobe, is sterically blocked by the side chain of a conserved arginine residue (Arg592). Previous α-kinase structures have shown that an invariant catalytic aspartic acid residue (Asp766) is phosphorylated. Unexpectedly, in the autoinhibited conformation the phosphoryl group is transferred to the adjacent Asp663, creating an interaction network that stabilizes the autoinhibited state. The results suggest that Asp766 phosphorylation may play both catalytic and regulatory roles. The autoinhibited structure also provides the first view of a phosphothreonine residue docked into the phospho-specific allosteric binding site (Pi-pocket) in the C-lobe of the α-kinase domain. PMID:27211275

  8. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation is correlated with anaplastic lymphoma kinase expression and mutually exclusive with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Chi; Hung, Tsai-Hsien; Wang, Chih-Wei; Ng, Kwai-Fong; Chen, Tse-Ching

    2015-05-01

    The echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) fusion gene is an important biomarker for target therapy. The aim of this study is to better understand the clinical and molecular features of the EML4-ALK fusion gene in lung cancer patients in Taiwan and therefore to generate an efficient algorithm for the detection of ALK translocation. In the first cohort, ALK translocation was identified in 1 adenocarcinoma from 100 lung cancer patients by using break apart fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Next, we detected 6 ALK translocations in another 40 EGFR wild type adenocarcinomas but not in 40 cases with EGFR mutation. Histological analysis revealed that solid growth with signet-ring cells or cribriform glands with extracellular mucin were noted in all the 7 ALK translocated cases. One ALK positive cancer with mucinous cribriform pattern had no ALK expression. ALK expression was correlated with ALK translocation (p < 0.001), but not with ALK gene copy number gain (CNG) (P = 0.838). ALK translocation was also mutually exclusive with EGFR mutation in Taiwanese non-small cell lung cancer (P = 0.033). These results indicate that screening tests for EGFR mutation status and/or ALK expression could help efficiently select ALK translocated patients for target therapy. PMID:25708242

  9. Janus kinases and focal adhesion kinases play in the 4.1 band: a superfamily of band 4.1 domains important for cell structure and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Girault, J. A.; Labesse, G.; Mornon, J. P.; Callebaut, I.

    1998-01-01

    The band 4.1 domain was first identified in the red blood cell protein band 4.1, and subsequently in ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM proteins) and other proteins, including tumor suppressor merlin/schwannomin, talin, unconventional myosins VIIa and X, and protein tyrosine phosphatases. Recently, the presence of a structurally related domain has been demonstrated in the N-terminal region of two groups of tyrosine kinases: the focal adhesion kinases (FAK) and the Janus kinases (JAK). Additional proteins containing the 4.1/JEF (JAK, ERM, FAK) domain include plant kinesin-like calmodulin-binding proteins (KCBP) and a number of uncharacterized open reading frames identified by systematic DNA sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis of amino acid sequences suggests that band 4.1/JEF domains can be grouped in several families that have probably diverged early during evolution. Hydrophobic cluster analysis indicates that the band 4.1/JEF domains might consist of a duplicated module of approximately 140 residues and a central hinge region. A conserved property of the domain is its capacity to bind to the membrane-proximal region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of proteins with a single transmembrane segment. Many proteins with band 4.1/JEF domains undergo regulated intra- or intermolecular homotypic interactions. Additional properties common to band 4.1/JEF domains of several proteins are binding of phosphoinositides and regulation by GTPases of the Rho family. Many proteins with band 4. 1/JEF domains are associated with the actin-based cytoskeleton and are enriched at points of contact with other cells or the extracellular matrix, from which they can exert control over cell growth. Thus, proteins with band 4.1/JEF domain are at the crossroads between cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction in multicellular organisms. Their importance is underlined by the variety of diseases that can result from their mutations. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:9990861

  10. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  11. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  12. TFIIH kinase places bivalent marks on the carboxyl-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Sohail; Heidemann, Martin; Tietjen, Joshua; Zhang, David; Chapman, Rob D.; Eick, Dirk; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-translational modifications of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) specify a molecular recognition code that is deciphered by proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. The CTD is comprised of a repeating heptapeptide (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7). Recently, phosphorylation of Serine7 was shown to be important for co-transcriptional processing of two snRNAs in mammalian cells. Here, we report that Kin28/Cdk7, a subunit of the evolutionarily conserved TFIIH complex, is a Ser7 kinase. The ability of Kin28/Cdk7 to phosphorylate Ser7 is particularly surprising because this kinase functions at promoters of protein-coding genes, rather than being restricted to promoter-distal regions of snRNA genes. Kin28/Cdk7 is also known to phosphorylate Ser5 residues of the CTD at gene promoters. Taken together, our results implicate the TFIIH kinase in placing bivalent Ser5 and Ser7 marks early in gene transcription. These bivalent CTD marks, in concert with cues within nascent transcripts, specify the co-transcriptional engagement of the relevant RNA processing machinery. PMID:19450536

  13. Personalized treatment options for ALK-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: potential role for Ceritinib

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Hazem; Shackelford, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    The fusion of echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) is found in 3%–7% of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and confers sensitivity to crizotinib, the first United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved ALK inhibitor drug. Although crizotinib has an excellent initial therapeutic effect, acquired resistance to this drug invariably develops within the first year of treatment. Resistance may involve secondary gatekeeper mutations within the ALK gene interfering with crizotinib–ALK interactions, or compensatory activation of aberrant bypass signaling pathways. New therapeutic strategies to overcome crizotinib resistance are needed. Ceritinib, a second-generation ALK inhibitor, overcomes several crizotinib-resistant ALK mutations and has demonstrated efficacy against tumor growth in several in vitro and in vivo preclinical models of crizotinib resistance. Notably, the dose-escalation Phase I ASCEND-1 trial has shown a marked activity of ceritinib in both crizotinib-naïve and crizotinib-resistant ALK-rearranged lung cancer. The overall response rate was 58% in a subgroup of patients with ALK-rearranged late-stage NSCLC. Drug discontinuation rate due to toxicity was 10%. The standard dose was established at 750 mg daily. This paper outlines the pathogenesis and treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer, focuses on the preclinical and clinical results surrounding the accelerated FDA approval of ceritinib for the treatment of ALK-positive metastatic NSCLC patients who have progressed on/or are crizotinib intolerant, and discusses the potential efforts seeking to maximize ceritinib efficacy and expand its usage to other indications in cancer therapy. PMID:26622190

  14. Atractylodin Inhibits Interleukin-6 by Blocking NPM-ALK Activation and MAPKs in HMC-1.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hee-Sung; Kim, Young-Mi; Chin, Young-Won

    2016-01-01

    Atractylodin is one of the major constituents of the rhizome of Atractylodes lancea, which is widely used in Korean traditional medicine as a remedy for the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcers. Despite of a major constituent of widely used botanical to treat inflammatory responses little is known about anti-inflammatory effect of atractylodin in the human mast cell (HMC-1). Hence, we evaluated the effect of atractylodin on the release of IL-6, the involvement of nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187-induced HMC-1. In addition, Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), phospholipase C (PLC) gamma 1, and AKT phosphorylation relevant to NPM-ALK signal pathway were assessed. IL-6 levels in the HMC-1 stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were apparently decreased by the treatment of atractylodin. Concurrently, atractylodin not only inhibited the phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, but also suppressed the phosphorylation of JAK2, STAT3, PLC gamma 1, and AKT. Furthermore, the activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and A23187 were inhibited by atractylodin. These results suggested that atractylodin might have a potential regulatory effect on inflammatory mediator expression through blockade of both the phosphorylation of MAPKs and the NPM-ALK signaling pathway. PMID:27598116

  15. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  16. Presence of anaplastic lymphoma kinase in inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Fredika M; Petricoin Iii, Emanuel F; Van Laere, Steven J; Bertucci, Francois; Chu, Khoi; Fernandez, Sandra V; Mu, Zhaomei; Alpaugh, Katherine; Pei, Jianming; Circo, Rita; Wulfkuhle, Julia; Ye, Zaiming; Boley, Kimberly M; Liu, Hui; Moraes, Ricardo; Zhang, Xuejun; Demaria, Ruggero; Barsky, Sanford H; Sun, Guoxian; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Although Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) is recognized as the most metastatic variant of locally advanced breast cancer, the molecular basis for the distinct clinical presentation and accelerated program of metastasis of IBC is unknown. Reverse phase protein arrays revealed activation of the receptor tyrosine kinase, anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and biochemically-linked downstream signaling molecules including JAK1/STAT3, AKT, mTor, PDK1, and AMPKβ in pre-clinical models of IBC. To evaluate the clinical relevance of ALK in IBC, analysis of 25 IBC patient tumors using the FDA approved diagnostic test for ALK genetic abnormalities was performed. These studies revealed that 20/25 (80%) had either increased ALK copy number, low level ALK gene amplification, or ALK gene expression, with a prevalence of ALK alterations in basal-like IBC. One of 25 patients was identified as having an EML4-ALK translocation. The generality of gains in ALK copy number in basal-like breast tumors with IBC characteristics was demonstrated by analysis of 479 breast tumors using the TGCA data-base and our newly developed 79 IBC-like gene signature. The small molecule dual tyrosine kinase cMET/ALK inhibitor, Crizotinib (PF-02341066/Xalkori®, Pfizer Inc), induced both cytotoxicity (IC50 = 0.89 μM) and apoptosis, with abrogation of pALK signaling in IBC tumor cells and in FC-IBC01 tumor xenograft model, a new IBC model derived from pleural effusion cells isolated from an ALK(+) IBC patient. Based on these studies, IBC patients are currently being evaluated for the presence of ALK genetic abnormalities and when eligible, are being enrolled into clinical trials evaluating ALK targeted therapeutics. PMID:24102046

  17. Crystal Structure and Oligomeric State of the RetS Signaling Kinase Sensory Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, X.; Jaw, J; Robinson, H; Schubot, F

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause both acute and chronic-persistent infections in predisposed individuals. Acute infections require the presence of a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), whereas chronic P. aeruginosa infections are characterized by the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The T3SS and biofilm formation are reciprocally regulated by the signaling kinases LadS, RetS, and GacS. RetS downregulates biofilm formation and upregulates expression of the T3SS through a unique mechanism. RetS forms a heterodimeric complex with GacS and thus prevents GacS autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. The signals that regulate RetS are not known but RetS possesses a distinctive periplasmic sensor domain that is believed to serve as receptor for the regulatory ligand. We have determined the crystal structure of the RetS sensory domain at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structure closely resembles those of carbohydrate binding modules of other proteins, suggesting that the elusive ligands are likely carbohydrate moieties. In addition to the conserved beta-sandwich structure, the sensory domain features two alpha helices which create a unique surface topology. Protein-protein crosslinking and fluorescence energy transfer experiments also revealed that the sensory domain dimerizes with a dissociation constant of K{sub d} = 580 {+-} 50 nM, a result with interesting implications for our understanding of the underlying signaling mechanism.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors with Frequent ALK and ROS1 Fusions and Rare Novel RET Gene Rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Antonescu, Cristina R; Suurmeijer, Albert JH; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Jungbluth, Achim A; Travis, William D; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Fletcher, Christopher DM; Alaggio, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 50% of conventional IMTs harbor ALK gene rearrangement and overexpress ALK. Recently gene fusions involving other kinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of IMT, including ROS1 and in one patient PDGFRB. However, it remains uncertain if the emerging genotypes correlate with clinicopathologic characteristics of IMT. In this study we expand the molecular investigation of IMT in a large cohort of different clinical presentations and analyze for potential genotype-phenotype associations. Criteria for inclusion in the study were typical morphology and tissue availability for molecular studies. The lack of ALK immunoreactivity was not an excluding factor. As overlapping gene fusions involving actionable kinases are emerging in both IMT and lung cancer, we set out to evaluate abnormalities in ALK, ROS1, PDGFRB, NTRK1 and RET by FISH. Additionally, next generation paired-end RNA sequencing and FusionSeq algorithm was applied in 4 cases, which identified EML4-ALK fusions in 2 cases. Of the 62 IMTs (25 children and 37 adults), 35 (56%) showed ALK gene rearrangement. Of note, EML4-ALK inversion was noted in 7 (20%) cases, seen mainly in the lung and soft tissue of young children including 2 lesions from newborns. There were 6 (10%) ROS1 rearranged IMTs, all except one presenting in children, mainly in the lung and intra-abdominal and showed a distinctive fascicular growth of spindle cells with long cell processes, often positive for ROS1 IHC. Two of the cases showed TFG-ROS1 fusions. Interestingly, one adult IMT revealed a RET gene rearrangement, a previously unreported finding. Our results show that 42/62 (68%) of IMTs are characterized by kinase fusions, offering a rationale for targeted therapeutic strategies. Interestingly 90% of fusion negative IMT were seen in adults, while >90% of pediatric IMT showed gene rearrangements.EML4-ALK inversion and ROS1 fusions emerge as common fusion abnormalities in IMT, closely recapitulating the pattern seen in

  19. Mouse ULK2, a novel member of the UNC-51-like protein kinases: unique features of functional domains.

    PubMed

    Yan, J; Kuroyanagi, H; Tomemori, T; Okazaki, N; Asato, K; Matsuda, Y; Suzuki, Y; Ohshima, Y; Mitani, S; Masuho, Y; Shirasawa, T; Muramatsu, M

    1999-10-21

    The UNC-51 serine/threonine kinase of C. elegans plays an essential role in axonal elongation, and unc-51 mutants exhibit uncoordinated movements. We have previously identified mouse and human cDNAs encoding UNC-51-like kinase (ULK1). Here we report the identification and characterization of the second murine member of this kinase family, ULK2. Mouse ULK2 cDNA encodes a putative polypeptide of 1033 aa which has an overall 52% and 33% amino acid identity to ULK1 and UNC-51, respectively. ULKs and UNC-51 share a typical domain structure of an amino-terminal kinase domain, a central proline/serine rich (PS) domain, and a carboxy-terminal (C) domain. Northern blot analysis showed that ULK2 mRNA is widely expressed in adult tissues. In situ hybridization analysis indicated that ULK2 mRNA is ubiquitously localized in premature as well as mature neurons in developing nervous system. ULK2 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 11B1.3 and rat chromosome 10q23 by FISH. HA-tagged ULK2 expressed in COS7 cells had an apparent molecular size of approximately 150 kDa and was autophosphorylated in vitro. Truncation mutants suggested that the autophosphorylation occurs in the PS domain. Although expression of ULK2 failed to rescue unc-51 mutant of C. elegans, a series of ULK2/UNC-51 chimeric kinases revealed that function of the kinase and PS domains are conserved among species, while the C domain acts in a species-specific manner. These results suggest that ULK2 is involved in a previously uncharacterized signaling pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:10557072

  20. Expression and characterization of the integral membrane domain of bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062 for structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Kwak, Su-Nam; Kim, Hyun Jung; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeon, Young Ho

    2008-11-14

    Bacterial histidine kinases play an important role in the response to external stimuli. Structural studies of the histidine kinase transmembrane domain are challenging due to difficulties in protein expression and sample preparation. After carrying out expression screening of a series of histidine kinases, we investigated sample preparation methods for obtaining high quality samples of the periplasmic and transmembrane domain (PTD) of the bacterial histidine kinase SCO3062. Various sample conditions were tested for their ability to give homogeneous NMR spectra of the SCO3062 PTD with well-resolved resonances. Circular dichroism and 3D {sup 15}N-edited NOESY spectrum results demonstrate that the SCO3062 PTD is predominantly {alpha}-helical. This method should be applicable to the NMR analysis of other transmembrane proteins.

  1. Identification of a Src kinase SH3 binding site in the C-terminal domain of the human ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Bornet, Olivier; Nouailler, Matthieu; Feracci, Michaël; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Byrne, Deborah; Halimi, Hubert; Morelli, Xavier; Badache, Ali; Guerlesquin, Françoise

    2014-06-01

    Overexpression of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase is associated with most aggressive tumors in breast cancer patients and is thus one of the main investigated therapeutic targets. Human ErbB2 C-terminal domain is an unstructured anchor that recruits specific adaptors for signaling cascades resulting in cell growth, differentiation and migration. Herein, we report the presence of a SH3 binding motif in the proline rich unfolded ErbB2 C-terminal region. NMR analysis of this motif supports a PPII helix conformation and the binding to Fyn-SH3 domain. The interaction of a kinase of the Src family with ErbB2 C-terminal domain could contribute to synergistic intracellular signaling and enhanced oncogenesis. PMID:24815698

  2. ALK-positive inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor harboring ALK gene rearrangement, occurring after allogeneic stem cell transplant in an adult male.

    PubMed

    Vroobel, Katherine; Judson, Ian; Dainton, Melissa; McCormick, Alison; Fisher, Cyril; Thway, Khin

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor arose as a defined neoplasm from the disparate group of tumors (both neoplastic and inflammatory) originally described as inflammatory pseudotumors. The morphologic features are well described, and 50-60% of cases are associated with fusions of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene. We describe an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor in the lower abdominal wall of an adult male, which occurred 88days after he received an allogeneic stem cell transplant for T-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and which was positive for ALK immunohistochemistry and showed ALK gene rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Two other cases are reported in the post-stem cell transplant setting, but both occurred in children and did not have molecular analysis performed. The etiology remains unclear, but may be due to immune dysregulation caused by any combination of prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy and immune suppression. These neoplasms should be considered as a rare consequence of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and referral to a specialist sarcoma center for further management may be required. PMID:27155927

  3. Downregulation of NPM-ALK by siRNA causes anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell growth inhibition and augments the anti cancer effects of chemotherapy in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Faye Yuan-yi; Zhao, Yi; Anderson, W French; Johnston, Patrick B

    2007-06-01

    The fusion protein, nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), results from the chromosome translocation t(2;5)(p23;q25) and is present in 50-70 percent of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). NPM-ALK is a constitutively activated kinase that transforms cells through stimulating several mitogenic signaling pathways. To examine if the NPM-ALK is a potential therapeutic target in ALCL, we used siRNA to specifically downregulate the expression of the NPM-ALK in ALCL cell lines. In this report, we demonstrated viability loss in t(2;5)-positive ALCL cell lines, SUDHL-1 and Karpas 299 cells, but not in lymphoma cell lines without the chromosome translocation, Jurkat and Granta 519 cells. Further study demonstrated that the downregulation of NPM-ALK resulted in decreased cell proliferation and increased cell apoptosis. When used in combination with chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, the inhibition of the NPM-ALK augments the chemosensitivity of the tumor cells. These results revealed the importance of continuous expression of NPM-ALK in maintaining the growth of ALCL cells. Our data also suggested that the repression of the fusion gene might be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for NPM-ALK positive ALCLs. PMID:17612934

  4. Separate domains of the insulin receptor contain sites of autophosphorylation and tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Goren, H.J.; White, M.F.; Khan, C.R.

    1987-04-21

    The authors have studied the structure and function of the solubilized insulin receptor before and after partial proteolytic digestion to define domains in the ..beta..-subunit that undergo autophosphorylation and contain the tyrosine kinase activity. Wheat germ agglutinin purified insulin receptor from Fao cells was digested briefly at 22/sup 0/C with low concentrations of trypsin, staphylococcal V8 protease, or elastase. Autophosphorylation of the ..beta..-subunit was carried out before and after digestion, and the (/sup 32/P)phosphoproteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, detected by autoradiography, and analyzed by tryptic peptide mapping by use of reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The 85-kDa fragment was not immunoprecipitated by an antibody directed against the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit (..cap alpha..Pep-1), indicating that this region of the receptor was lost. The 85-kDa fragment contained about half of the (/sup 32/P)phosphate originally found in the ..beta..-subunit, and tryptic peptide mapping showed that two major tryptic phosphopeptides (previously called pY2 and pY3) were removed. Three other tryptic phosphopeptides (pY1, pY1a, and pY4) were found in the 85- and 70-kDa fragments. To determined the structural requirements for kinase activity, the insulin receptor was subjected to tryptic digestion for 30 s-30 min, such that the receptor was composed exclusively of 85- and 70-kDa fragments of the ..beta..-subunit. The 85-kDa fragment exhibited autophosphorylation at pY1, pY1a, and pY4. Both the 85- and 70-kDa fragments phosphorylated tyrosine residues in a synthetic decapeptide that has the sequence of the C-terminal domain of the ..beta..-subunit of human insulin rare in the receptor.

  5. Identification of positive-acting domains in GCN2 protein kinase required for translational activation of GCN4 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Wek, R C; Ramirez, M; Jackson, B M; Hinnebusch, A G

    1990-01-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator of amino acid-biosynthetic genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GCN2, a translational activator of GCN4 expression, contains a domain homologous to the catalytic subunit of eucaryotic protein kinases. Substitution of a highly conserved lysine residue in the kinase domain abolished GCN2 regulatory function in vivo and its ability to autophosphorylate in vitro, indicating that GCN2 acts as a protein kinase in stimulating GCN4 expression. Elevated GCN2 gene dosage led to derepression of GCN4 under nonstarvation conditions; however, we found that GCN2 mRNA and protein levels did not increase in wild-type cells in response to amino acid starvation. Therefore, it appears that GCN2 protein kinase function is stimulated posttranslationally in amino acid-starved cells. Three dominant-constitutive GCN2 point mutations were isolated that led to derepressed GCN4 expression under nonstarvation conditions. Two of the GCN2(Con) mutations mapped in the kinase domain itself. The third mapped just downstream from a carboxyl-terminal segment homologous to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), which we suggested might function to detect uncharged tRNA in amino acid-starved cells and activate the adjacent protein kinase moiety. Deletions and substitutions in the HisRS-related sequences and in the carboxyl-terminal segment in which one of the GCN2(Con) mutation mapped abolished GCN2 positive regulatory function in vivo without lowering autophosphorylation activity in vitro. These results suggest that sequences flanking the GCN2 protein kinase moiety are positive-acting domains required to increase recognition of physiological substrates or lower the requirement for uncharged tRNA to activate kinase activity under conditions of amino acid starvation. Images PMID:2188100

  6. A novel patient-derived tumorgraft model with TRAF1-ALK anaplastic large-cell lymphoma translocation.

    PubMed

    Abate, F; Todaro, M; van der Krogt, J-A; Boi, M; Landra, I; Machiorlatti, R; Tabbò, F; Messana, K; Abele, C; Barreca, A; Novero, D; Gaudiano, M; Aliberti, S; Di Giacomo, F; Tousseyn, T; Lasorsa, E; Crescenzo, R; Bessone, L; Ficarra, E; Acquaviva, A; Rinaldi, A; Ponzoni, M; Longo, D L; Aime, S; Cheng, M; Ruggeri, B; Piccaluga, P P; Pileri, S; Tiacci, E; Falini, B; Pera-Gresely, B; Cerchietti, L; Iqbal, J; Chan, W C; Shultz, L D; Kwee, I; Piva, R; Wlodarska, I; Rabadan, R; Bertoni, F; Inghirami, G

    2015-06-01

    Although anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCL) carrying anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have a relatively good prognosis, aggressive forms exist. We have identified a novel translocation, causing the fusion of the TRAF1 and ALK genes, in one patient who presented with a leukemic ALK+ ALCL (ALCL-11). To uncover the mechanisms leading to high-grade ALCL, we developed a human patient-derived tumorgraft (hPDT) line. Molecular characterization of primary and PDT cells demonstrated the activation of ALK and nuclear factor kB (NFkB) pathways. Genomic studies of ALCL-11 showed the TP53 loss and the in vivo subclonal expansion of lymphoma cells, lacking PRDM1/Blimp1 and carrying c-MYC gene amplification. The treatment with proteasome inhibitors of TRAF1-ALK cells led to the downregulation of p50/p52 and lymphoma growth inhibition. Moreover, a NFkB gene set classifier stratified ALCL in distinct subsets with different clinical outcome. Although a selective ALK inhibitor (CEP28122) resulted in a significant clinical response of hPDT mice, nevertheless the disease could not be eradicated. These data indicate that the activation of NFkB signaling contributes to the neoplastic phenotype of TRAF1-ALK ALCL. ALCL hPDTs are invaluable tools to validate the role of druggable molecules, predict therapeutic responses and implement patient specific therapies. PMID:25533804

  7. Identification of positive-acting domains in GCN2 protein kinase required for translational activation of GCN4 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Wek, R.C.; Ramirez, M.; Jackson, B.M.; Hinnebusch, A.G. )

    1990-06-01

    GCN4 is a transcriptional activator of amino acid-biosynthetic genes in the yeast {ital Saccharomyces cerevisiae}. GCN2, a translational activator of {ital GCN4} expression, contains a domain homologous to the catalytic subunit of eukaryotic protein kinases. Substitution of a highly conserved lysine residue in the kinase domain abolished GCN2 regulatory function in vivo and its ability to autophosphorylate in vitro, indicating that GCN2 acts as a protein kinase in stimulating {ital GCN4} expression. Elevated {ital GCN2} gene dosage led to depression of {ital GCN4} under nonstarvation conditions; however, the authors found that {ital GCN2} mRNA and protein levels did not increase in wild-type cells in response to amino acid starvation. Therefore, it appears that GCN2 protein kinase function is stimulated postranslationally in amino acid-starved cells. Three dominant-constitutive {ital GCN2} point mutations were isolated that led to derepressed {ital GCN4} expression under nonstarvation conditions. Two of the {ital GCN2}(Con) mutations mapped in the kinase domain itself. The third mapped just downstream from a carboxyl-terminal segment homologous to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS), which the authors suggest might function to detect uncharged tRNA in amino acid-starved cells and activate the adjacent protein kinase moiety.

  8. Intramolecular activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase is disrupted by insertions in the tether that connects the calmodulin-like domain to the kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitart, V.; Christodoulou, J.; Huang, J. F.; Chazin, W. J.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) have a calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD) tethered to the C-terminal end of the kinase. Activation is proposed to involve intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to a junction sequence that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase domain. Consistent with this model, a truncated CDPK (DeltaNC) in which the CaM-LD has been deleted can be activated in a bimolecular interaction with an isolated CaM-LD or calmodulin, similar to the activation of a calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) by calmodulin. Here we provide genetic evidence that this bimolecular activation requires a nine-residue binding segment from F436 to I444 (numbers correspond to CPK-1 accession number L14771). Two mutations at either end of this core segment (F436/A and VI444/AA) severely disrupted bimolecular activation, whereas flanking mutations had only minor effects. Intramolecular activation of a full-length kinase was also disrupted by a VI444/AA mutation, but surprisingly not by a F436/A mutation (at the N-terminal end of the binding site). Interestingly, intramolecular but not bimolecular activation was disrupted by insertion mutations placed immediately downstream of I444. To show that mutant enzymes were not misfolded, latent kinase activity was stimulated through binding of an antijunction antibody. Results here support a model of intramolecular activation in which the tether (A445 to G455) that connects the CaM-LD to the kinase provides an important structural constraint and is not just a simple flexible connection.

  9. Mutagenesis of charged residues in a conserved sequence in the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, L; Vertommen, D; Feytmans, E; Di Pietro, A; Rider, M H; Hue, L

    1997-01-01

    Arg-136, Glu-137, Arg-138 and Arg-139 are conserved in all sequences of the 2-kinase domain of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase. Their role was studied by site-directed mutagenesis. All the mutations had little, if any, effect on fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase activity. Mutations of Arg-136 and Glu-137 into Ala caused only minor modifications of phosphofructo-2-kinase activity. In contrast, mutation of Arg138 into Ala increased 280-fold the Km for fructose 6-phosphate of phosphofructo-2-kinase. Mutation of Arg-139 into Ala resulted in decreases in phosphofructo-2-kinase Vmax/Km for MgATP and fructose 6-phosphate 600-fold and 5000-fold respectively. Mutation of Arg-139 into Lys and Gln increased the Km of phosphofructo-2-kinase for MgATP (20-fold and 25-fold respectively) and for fructose 6-phosphate (8-fold and 13-fold), and the IC50 for MgADP (30-fold and 50-fold) and for magnesium citrate (7-fold and 25-fold). However, these two mutations did not affect nucleotide binding, as measured by quenching of intrinsic fluorescence. The changes in kinetic properties induced by mutations could not be attributed to structural changes. It is proposed that Arg-138 is involved in fructose 6-phosphate binding and that Arg-139 is probably involved in the stabilization of the transition state and so participates in catalysis. PMID:9032444

  10. Structural Analysis of the Mechanism of Inhibition and Allosteric Activation of the Kinase Domain of HER2 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Skene, Robert; Yano, Jason; Sang, Bi-Ching; Zou, Hua; Snell, Gyorgy; Jennings, Andy; Iwamoto, Keiji; Habuka, Noriyuki; Hirokawa, Aki; Ishikawa, Tomoyasu; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Miki, Hiroshi; Ohta, Yoshikazu; Sogabe, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant signaling of ErbB family members human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in many human cancers, and HER2 expression is predictive of human disease recurrence and prognosis. Small molecule kinase inhibitors of EGFR and of both HER2 and EGFR have received approval for the treatment of cancer. We present the first high resolution crystal structure of the kinase domain of HER2 in complex with a selective inhibitor to understand protein activation, inhibition, and function at the molecular level. HER2 kinase domain crystallizes as a dimer and suggests evidence for an allosteric mechanism of activation comparable with previously reported activation mechanisms for EGFR and HER4. A unique Gly-rich region in HER2 following the α-helix C is responsible for increased conformational flexibility within the active site and could explain the low intrinsic catalytic activity previously reported for HER2. In addition, we solved the crystal structure of the kinase domain of EGFR in complex with a HER2/EGFR dual inhibitor (TAK-285). Comparison with previously reported inactive and active EGFR kinase domain structures gave insight into the mechanism of HER2 and EGFR inhibition and may help guide the design and development of new cancer drugs with improved potency and selectivity. PMID:21454582

  11. Detection of EML4-ALK in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using Pleural Effusion with FISH, IHC, and RT-PCR Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaodie; Song, Yong; Zhou, Xiaojun; Yu, Like; Wang, Jiandong

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 (EML4) gene rearrangements occur in approximately 5% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC), leading to the overexpression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase and predicting a response to the targeted inhibitor, crizotinib. Malignant pleural effusion occurs in most patients with advanced lung cancer, especially adenocarcinoma, and tissue samples are not always available from these patients. We attempted to clarify the feasibility of detecting the EML4-ALK fusion gene in pleural effusion cells using different methods. We obtained 66 samples of pleural effusion from NSCLC patients. The pleural effusion fluid was centrifuged, and the cellular components obtained were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded. The EML4-ALK fusion gene status was determined with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), reverse transcription—polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC). EML4-ALK was detected in three of 66 patient samples (4.5%) with RT-PCR. When the RT-PCR data were used as the standard, one false positive and one false negative samples were identified with IHC; and one false negative sample was identified with FISH. These results suggest that a block of pleural effusion cells can be used to detect the EML4-ALK fusion gene. IHC had good sensitivity, but low specificity. FISH had low sensitivity, but high specificity. RT-PCR is a good candidate method for detecting EML4-ALK in blocks of pleural effusion cells from lung cancer patients. PMID:25785456

  12. Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 Kinase Domain and Elsewhere in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Soverini, Simona; de Benedittis, Caterina; Mancini, Manuela; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2015-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has been the first human malignancy to be associated, more than 50 years ago, with a consistent chromosomal abnormality--the t(9;22)(q34;q11) chromosomal translocation. The resulting BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, encoding a tyrosine kinase with deregulated activity, has a central role in the pathogenesis of CML. Ancestral or additional genetic events necessary for CML to develop have long been hypothesized but never really demonstrated. CML can successfully be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Mutations in the BCR-ABL1 kinase domain might arise, however, that confer resistance to 1 or more of the currently available TKIs. Hence, the critical role of BCR-ABL1 mutation screening for optimal therapeutic management, with the current gold standard technique, conventional sequencing, likely to be replaced soon by ultra-deep sequencing. Mutations in genes other than BCR-ABL1 include ASXL1, TET2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, EZH2, and TP53 in chronic phase patients and RUNX1, ASXL1, IKZF1, WT1, TET2, NPM1, IDH1, IDH2, NRAS, KRAS, CBL, TP53, CDKN2A, RB1, and GATA-2 mutations in advanced phase patients. The latter also display additional cytogenetic abnormalities, including submicroscopic regions of gain or loss that only single nucleotide polymorphism arrays or array comparative genomic hybridization can detect. Whether whole genome/exome sequencing studies will uncover novel mutations relevant for pathogenesis, progression, and risk-adapted therapy is still unclear. PMID:26297264

  13. Protein kinase C epsilon is localized to the Golgi via its zinc-finger domain and modulates Golgi function.

    PubMed Central

    Lehel, C; Olah, Z; Jakab, G; Anderson, W B

    1995-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a multigene family of serine/threonine kinases that are central to many signal transduction pathways. Among the PKC isozymes, only PKC epsilon has been reported to exhibit full oncogenic potential. PKC epsilon also displays unique substrate specificity and intracellular localization. To examine the interrelationship between the biological effects and domain structure of PKC epsilon, NIH 3T3 cells were stably transfected to overexpress different epitope-tagged fragments of PKC epsilon. The overexpressed proteins each contain the epsilon-tag peptide at the C terminus to allow ready detection with an antibody specific for the tag. The holo-PKC epsilon was found to localize with the Golgi network and other compartments, whereas the zinc-finger domain localized exclusively at the Golgi. Golgi-specific glycosaminoglycan sulfation was strongly inhibited in cells overexpressing either holo-PKC epsilon or its zinc-finger domain, while the secretion of sulfated glycosaminoglycans into the medium was impaired in cells expressing the PKC epsilon zinc-finger domain. Thus, these results suggest that PKC epsilon may be involved in specifically regulating Golgi-related processes. Further, the results indicate that PKC epsilon domains other than the kinase domain may also have biological activity and that the zinc-finger domain may function as a subcellular localization signal. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7877991

  14. A lectin S-domain receptor kinase mediates lipopolysaccharide sensing in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ranf, Stefanie; Gisch, Nicolas; Schäffer, Milena; Illig, Tina; Westphal, Lore; Knirel, Yuriy A; Sánchez-Carballo, Patricia M; Zähringer, Ulrich; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-04-01

    The sensing of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) triggers innate immunity in animals and plants. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria is a potent MAMP for mammals, with the lipid A moiety activating proinflammatory responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Here we found that the plant Arabidopsis thaliana specifically sensed LPS of Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas. We isolated LPS-insensitive mutants defective in the bulb-type lectin S-domain-1 receptor-like kinase LORE (SD1-29), which were hypersusceptible to infection with Pseudomonas syringae. Targeted chemical degradation of LPS from Pseudomonas species suggested that LORE detected mainly the lipid A moiety of LPS. LORE conferred sensitivity to LPS onto tobacco after transient expression, which demonstrated a key function in LPS sensing and indicated the possibility of engineering resistance to bacteria in crop species. PMID:25729922

  15. Alk5 inhibition increases delivery of macromolecular and protein-bound contrast agents to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Mohanty, Suchismita; Ansari, Celina; Lenkov, Olga; Shaw, Aubie; Ito, Ken; Hong, Su Hyun; Hoffmann, Matthias; Pisani, Laura; Boudreau, Nancy; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Limited transendothelial permeability across tumor microvessels represents a significant bottleneck in the development of tumor-specific diagnostic agents and theranostic drugs. Here, we show an approach to increase transendothelial permeability of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based contrast agents via inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor, activin-like kinase 5 (Alk5), in tumors. Alk5 inhibition significantly increased tumor contrast agent delivery and enhancement on imaging studies, while healthy organs remained relatively unaffected. Imaging data correlated with significantly decreased tumor interstitial fluid pressure, while tumor vascular density remained unchanged. This immediately clinically translatable concept involving Alk5 inhibitor pretreatment prior to an imaging study could be leveraged for improved tumor delivery of macromolecular and nanoparticle-based imaging probes and, thereby, facilitate development of more sensitive imaging tests for cancer diagnosis, enhanced tumor characterization, and personalized, image-guided therapies. PMID:27182558

  16. A molecular dynamics investigation on the crizotinib resistance mechanism of C1156Y mutation in ALK

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Hui-Yong; Ji, Feng-Qin

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study revealed the detailed resistance mechanism of the non-active mutation C1156Y in ALK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C1156Y leads to crizotinib displacement and conformational changes in the binding cavity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The conformations cause a decline in the vdW and electrostatic energy between crizotinib and ALK. -- Abstract: Crizotinib is an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor that has recently been approved in the US for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Despite its outstanding safety and efficacy, several resistant mutations against crizotinib have been detected in the treatment of NSCLC. However, in contrast to the widely accepted mechanism of steric hindrance by mutations at the active site, the mechanism by which the C1156Y non-active site mutation confers resistance against crizotinib remains unclear. In the present study, the resistance mechanism of C1156Y in ALK was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that despite the non-active site mutation, C1156Y causes the dislocation of crizotinib as well as the indirect conformational changes in the binding cavity, which results in a marked decrease in the van der Waals and electrostatic interactions between crizotinib and ALK. The obtained results provide a detailed explanation of the resistance caused by C1156Y and may give a vital clue for the design of drugs to combat crizotinib resistance.

  17. Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein MLKL causes necrotic membrane disruption upon phosphorylation by RIP3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huayi; Sun, Liming; Su, Lijing; Rizo, Josep; Liu, Lei; Wang, Li-Feng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Wang, Xiaodong

    2014-04-10

    Programmed necrotic cell death induced by the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) family of cytokines is dependent on a kinase cascade consisting of receptor-interacting kinases RIP1 and RIP3. How these kinase activities cause cells to die by necrosis is not known. The mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein MLKL is a functional RIP3 substrate that binds to RIP3 through its kinase-like domain but lacks kinase activity of its own. RIP3 phosphorylates MLKL at the T357 and S358 sites. Reported here is the development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes phosphorylated MLKL in cells dying of this pathway and in human liver biopsy samples from patients suffering from drug-induced liver injury. The phosphorylated MLKL forms an oligomer that binds to phosphatidylinositol lipids and cardiolipin. This property allows MLKL to move from the cytosol to the plasma and intracellular membranes, where it directly disrupts membrane integrity, resulting in necrotic death. PMID:24703947

  18. Tyrosine Kinase 2-mediated Signal Transduction in T Lymphocytes Is Blocked by Pharmacological Stabilization of Its Pseudokinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Tokarski, John S; Zupa-Fernandez, Adriana; Tredup, Jeffrey A; Pike, Kristen; Chang, ChiehYing; Xie, Dianlin; Cheng, Lihong; Pedicord, Donna; Muckelbauer, Jodi; Johnson, Stephen R; Wu, Sophie; Edavettal, Suzanne C; Hong, Yang; Witmer, Mark R; Elkin, Lisa L; Blat, Yuval; Pitts, William J; Weinstein, David S; Burke, James R

    2015-04-24

    Inhibition of signal transduction downstream of the IL-23 receptor represents an intriguing approach to the treatment of autoimmunity. Using a chemogenomics approach marrying kinome-wide inhibitory profiles of a compound library with the cellular activity against an IL-23-stimulated transcriptional response in T lymphocytes, a class of inhibitors was identified that bind to and stabilize the pseudokinase domain of the Janus kinase tyrosine kinase 2 (Tyk2), resulting in blockade of receptor-mediated activation of the adjacent catalytic domain. These Tyk2 pseudokinase domain stabilizers were also shown to inhibit Tyk2-dependent signaling through the Type I interferon receptor but not Tyk2-independent signaling and transcriptional cellular assays, including stimulation through the receptors for IL-2 (JAK1- and JAK3-dependent) and thrombopoietin (JAK2-dependent), demonstrating the high functional selectivity of this approach. A crystal structure of the pseudokinase domain liganded with a representative example showed the compound bound to a site analogous to the ATP-binding site in catalytic kinases with features consistent with high ligand selectivity. The results support a model where the pseudokinase domain regulates activation of the catalytic domain by forming receptor-regulated inhibitory interactions. Tyk2 pseudokinase stabilizers, therefore, represent a novel approach to the design of potent and selective agents for the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:25762719

  19. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ser/thr kinase PknA from M. tuberculosis shows an Src-like autoinhibited conformation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tristan; Alexandre, Matthieu; Duran, Rosario; Barilone, Nathalie; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Alzari, Pedro M; Bellinzoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Signal transduction mediated by Ser/Thr phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been intensively studied in the last years, as its genome harbors eleven genes coding for eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases. Here we describe the crystal structure and the autophosphorylation sites of the catalytic domain of PknA, one of two protein kinases essential for pathogen's survival. The structure of the ligand-free kinase domain shows an auto-inhibited conformation similar to that observed in human Tyr kinases of the Src-family. These results reinforce the high conservation of structural hallmarks and regulation mechanisms between prokaryotic and eukaryotic protein kinases. PMID:25586004

  20. Characterization of the Catalytic and Nucleotide Binding Properties of the α-Kinase Domain of Dictyostelium Myosin-II Heavy Chain Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yidai; Ye, Qilu; Jia, Zongchao; Côté, Graham P

    2015-09-25

    The α-kinases are a widely expressed family of serine/threonine protein kinases that exhibit no sequence identity with conventional eukaryotic protein kinases. In this report, we provide new information on the catalytic properties of the α-kinase domain of Dictyostelium myosin-II heavy chain kinase-A (termed A-CAT). Crystallization of A-CAT in the presence of MgATP yielded structures with AMP or adenosine in the catalytic cleft together with a phosphorylated Asp-766 residue. The results show that the β- and α-phosphoryl groups are transferred either directly or indirectly to the catalytically essential Asp-766. Biochemical assays confirmed that A-CAT hydrolyzed ATP, ADP, and AMP with kcat values of 1.9, 0.6, and 0.32 min(-1), respectively, and showed that A-CAT can use ADP to phosphorylate peptides and proteins. Binding assays using fluorescent 2'/3'-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) analogs of ATP and ADP yielded Kd values for ATP, ADP, AMP, and adenosine of 20 ± 3, 60 ± 20, 160 ± 60, and 45 ± 15 μM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that Glu-713, Leu-716, and Lys-645, all of which interact with the adenine base, were critical for nucleotide binding. Mutation of the highly conserved Gln-758, which chelates a nucleotide-associated Mg(2+) ion, eliminated catalytic activity, whereas loss of the highly conserved Lys-722 and Arg-592 decreased kcat values for kinase and ATPase activities by 3-6-fold. Mutation of Asp-663 impaired kinase activity to a much greater extent than ATPase, indicating a specific role in peptide substrate binding, whereas mutation of Gln-768 doubled ATPase activity, suggesting that it may act to exclude water from the active site. PMID:26260792

  1. Role of individual R domain phosphorylation sites in CFTR regulation by protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Mengos, April; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Timothy J; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a critical role in transcellular ion transport and when defective, results in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is novel in the ATP-binding cassette superfamily as an ion channel that is enabled by a unique unstructured regulatory domain. This R domain contains multiple protein kinase A sites, which when phosphorylated allow channel gating. Most of the sites have been indicated to stimulate channel activity, while two of them have been suggested to be inhibitory. It is unknown whether individual sites act coordinately or distinctly. To address this issue, we raised monoclonal antibodies recognizing the unphosphorylated, but not the phosphorylated states of four functionally relevant sites (700, 737, 768, and 813). This enabled simultaneous monitoring of their phosphorylation and dephosphorylation and revealed that both processes occurred rapidly at the first three sites, but more slowly at the fourth. The parallel phosphorylation rates of the stimulatory 700 and the putative inhibitory 737 and 768 sites prompted us to reexamine the role of the latter two. With serines 737 and 768 reintroduced individually into a PKA insensitive variant, in which serines at 15 sites had been replaced by alanines, a level of channel activation by PKA was restored, showing that these sites can mediate stimulation. Thus, we have provided new tools to study the CFTR regulation by phosphorylation and found that sites proposed to inhibit channel activity can also participate in stimulation. PMID:19328185

  2. Mutational Analysis of the Ethylene Receptor ETR1. Role of the Histidine Kinase Domain in Dominant Ethylene Insensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Rebekah L.; Qu, Xiang; Schaller, G. Eric

    2002-01-01

    The ethylene receptor family of Arabidopsis consists of five members, one of these being ETR1. The N-terminal half of ETR1 contains a hydrophobic domain responsible for ethylene binding and membrane localization. The C-terminal half of the polypeptide contains domains with homology to histidine (His) kinases and response regulators, signaling motifs originally identified in bacteria. The role of the His kinase domain in ethylene signaling was examined in planta. For this purpose, site-directed mutations were introduced into the full-length wild-type ETR1 gene and into etr1-1, a mutant allele that confers dominant ethylene insensitivity on plants. The mutant forms of the receptor were expressed in Arabidopsis and the transgenic plants characterized for their ethylene responses. A mutation that eliminated His kinase activity did not affect the ability of etr1-1 to confer ethylene insensitivity. A truncated version of etr1-1 that lacks the His kinase domain also conferred ethylene insensitivity. Possible mechanisms by which a truncated version of etr1-1 could exert dominance are discussed. PMID:11950991

  3. The Nim1 kinase Gin4 has distinct domains crucial for septin assembly, phospholipid binding and mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Au Yong, Jie Ying; Wang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Yue

    2016-07-15

    In fungi, the Nim1 protein kinases, such as Gin4, are important regulators of multiple cell cycle events, including the G2-M transition, septin assembly, polarized growth and cytokinesis. Compelling evidence has linked some key functions of Gin4 with the large C-terminal non-kinase region which, however, is poorly defined. By systematically dissecting and functionally characterizing the non-kinase region of Gin4 in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we report the identification of three new domains with distinct functions: a lipid-binding domain (LBD), a septin-binding domain (SBD) and a nucleolus-associating domain (NAD). The LBD and SBD are indispensable for the function of Gin4, and they alone could sufficiently restore septin ring assembly in GIN4-null mutants. The NAD localizes to the periphery of the nucleolus and physically associates with Cdc14, the ultimate effector of the mitotic exit network. Gin4 mutants that lack the NAD are defective in spindle orientation and exit mitosis prematurely. Furthermore, we show that Gin4 is a substrate of Cdc14. These findings provide novel insights into the roles and mechanisms of Nim1 kinases in the regulation of some crucial cell cycle events. PMID:27231094

  4. The Nim1 kinase Gin4 has distinct domains crucial for septin assembly, phospholipid binding and mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Au Yong, Jie Ying; Wang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In fungi, the Nim1 protein kinases, such as Gin4, are important regulators of multiple cell cycle events, including the G2–M transition, septin assembly, polarized growth and cytokinesis. Compelling evidence has linked some key functions of Gin4 with the large C-terminal non-kinase region which, however, is poorly defined. By systematically dissecting and functionally characterizing the non-kinase region of Gin4 in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we report the identification of three new domains with distinct functions: a lipid-binding domain (LBD), a septin-binding domain (SBD) and a nucleolus-associating domain (NAD). The LBD and SBD are indispensable for the function of Gin4, and they alone could sufficiently restore septin ring assembly in GIN4-null mutants. The NAD localizes to the periphery of the nucleolus and physically associates with Cdc14, the ultimate effector of the mitotic exit network. Gin4 mutants that lack the NAD are defective in spindle orientation and exit mitosis prematurely. Furthermore, we show that Gin4 is a substrate of Cdc14. These findings provide novel insights into the roles and mechanisms of Nim1 kinases in the regulation of some crucial cell cycle events. PMID:27231094

  5. Correlated Mutation Analysis on the Catalytic Domains of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Du, Pan; Shen, Hongbo; Hu, Hairong; Wu, Qi; Xie, Jun; Yu, Long

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein kinases (PKs) have emerged as the largest family of signaling proteins in eukaryotic cells and are involved in every aspect of cellular regulation. Great progresses have been made in understanding the mechanisms of PKs phosphorylating their substrates, but the detailed mechanisms, by which PKs ensure their substrate specificity with their structurally conserved catalytic domains, still have not been adequately understood. Correlated mutation analysis based on large sets of diverse sequence data may provide new insights into this question. Methodology/Principal Findings Statistical coupling, residue correlation and mutual information analyses along with clustering were applied to analyze the structure-based multiple sequence alignment of the catalytic domains of the Ser/Thr PK family. Two clusters of highly coupled sites were identified. Mapping these positions onto the 3D structure of PK catalytic domain showed that these two groups of positions form two physically close networks. We named these two networks as θ-shaped and γ-shaped networks, respectively. Conclusions/Significance The θ-shaped network links the active site cleft and the substrate binding regions, and might participate in PKs recognizing and interacting with their substrates. The γ-shaped network is mainly situated in one side of substrate binding regions, linking the activation loop and the substrate binding regions. It might play a role in supporting the activation loop and substrate binding regions before catalysis, and participate in product releasing after phosphoryl transfer. Our results exhibit significant correlations with experimental observations, and can be used as a guide to further experimental and theoretical studies on the mechanisms of PKs interacting with their substrates. PMID:19526051

  6. Characterization of the sensor domain of QseE histidine kinase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Kwon Joo; Park, Jin-Wan; Kim, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Young Ho; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Cheong, Hae-Kap

    2016-10-01

    In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), the QseEF two-component system causes attaching and effacing (AE) lesion on epithelial cells. QseE histidine kinase senses the host hormone epinephrine, sulfate, and phosphate; it also regulates QseF response regulator, which activates LEE gene that encodes AE lesion. In order to understand the recognition of ligand molecules and signal transfer mechanism in pathogenic bacteria, structural studies of the sensor domain of QseE of Escherichia coli should be conducted. In this study, we describe the overexpression, purification, and structural and biophysical properties of the sensor domain of QseE. The fusion protein had a 6×His tag at its N-terminus; this protein was overexpressed as inclusion bodies in E. coli BL21 (DE3). The protein was denatured in 7M guanidine hydrochloride and refolded by dialysis. The purification of the refolded protein was carried out using Ni-NTA affinity column and size-exclusion chromatography. Thereafter, the characteristics of the refolded protein were determined from NMR, CD, and MALS spectroscopies. In a pH range of 7.4-5.0, the folded protein existed in a monomeric form with a predominantly helical structure. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectra shows that approximately 93% backbone amide peaks are detected at pH 5.0, suggesting that the number of backbone signals is sufficient for NMR studies. These data might provide an opportunity for structural and functional studies of the sensor domain of QseE. PMID:27371359

  7. The tRNA-binding moiety in GCN2 contains a dimerization domain that interacts with the kinase domain and is required for tRNA binding and kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Dong, Jinsheng; Hu, Cuihua; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates translation of GCN4 mRNA in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 is activated by binding of uncharged tRNA to a domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). The HisRS-like region contains two dimerization domains (HisRS-N and HisRS-C) required for GCN2 function in vivo but dispensable for dimerization by full-length GCN2. Residues corresponding to amino acids at the dimer interface of Escherichia coli HisRS were required for dimerization of recombinant HisRS-N and for tRNA binding by full-length GCN2, suggesting that HisRS-N dimerization promotes tRNA binding and kinase activation. HisRS-N also interacted with the protein kinase (PK) domain, and a deletion impairing this interaction destroyed GCN2 function without reducing tRNA binding; thus, HisRS-N–PK interaction appears to stimulate PK function. The C-terminal domain of GCN2 (C-term) interacted with the PK domain in a manner disrupted by an activating PK mutation (E803V). These results suggest that the C-term is an autoinhibitory domain, counteracted by tRNA binding. We conclude that multiple domain interactions, positive and negative, mediate the activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11250908

  8. NPM-ALK mediates phosphorylation of MSH2 at tyrosine 238, creating a functional deficiency in MSH2 and the loss of mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Bone, K M; Wang, P; Wu, F; Wu, C; Li, L; Bacani, J T; Andrew, S E; Lai, R

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALK+ALCL) tumors express the characteristic oncogenic fusion protein NPM-ALK, which mediates tumorigenesis by exerting its constitutive tyrosine kinase activity on various substrates. We recently identified MSH2, a protein central to DNA mismatch repair (MMR), as a novel binding partner and phosphorylation substrate of NPM-ALK. Here, using liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, we report for the first time that MSH2 is phosphorylated by NPM-ALK at a specific residue, tyrosine 238. Using GP293 cells transfected with NPM-ALK, we confirmed that the MSH2Y238F mutant is not tyrosine phosphorylated. Furthermore, transfection of MSH2Y238F into these cells substantially decreased the tyrosine phosphorylation of endogenous MSH2. Importantly, gene transfection of MSH2Y238F abrogated the binding of NPM-ALK with endogenous MSH2, re-established the dimerization of MSH2:MSH6 and restored the sensitivity to DNA mismatch-inducing drugs, indicative of MMR return. Parallel findings were observed in two ALK+ALCL cell lines, Karpas 299 and SUP-M2. In addition, we found that enforced expression of MSH2Y238F into ALK+ALCL cells alone was sufficient to induce spontaneous apoptosis. In conclusion, our findings have identified NPM-ALK-induced phosphorylation of MSH2 at Y238 as a crucial event in suppressing MMR. Our studies have provided novel insights into the mechanism by which oncogenic tyrosine kinases disrupt MMR. PMID:25978431

  9. Crystal Structures of the Kinase Domain of the Sulfate-Activating Complex in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Poyraz, Ömer; Brunner, Katharina; Lohkamp, Bernhard; Axelsson, Hanna; Hammarström, Lars G. J.; Schnell, Robert; Schneider, Gunter

    2015-01-01

    In Mycobacterium tuberculosis the sulfate activating complex provides a key branching point in sulfate assimilation. The complex consists of two polypeptide chains, CysD and CysN. CysD is an ATP sulfurylase that, with the energy provided by the GTPase activity of CysN, forms adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate (APS) which can then enter the reductive branch of sulfate assimilation leading to the biosynthesis of cysteine. The CysN polypeptide chain also contains an APS kinase domain (CysC) that phosphorylates APS leading to 3’-phosphoadenosine-5’-phosphosulfate, the sulfate donor in the synthesis of sulfolipids. We have determined the crystal structures of CysC from M. tuberculosis as a binary complex with ADP, and as ternary complexes with ADP and APS and the ATP mimic AMP-PNP and APS, respectively, to resolutions of 1.5 Å, 2.1 Å and 1.7 Å, respectively. CysC shows the typical APS kinase fold, and the structures provide comprehensive views of the catalytic machinery, conserved in this enzyme family. Comparison to the structure of the human homolog show highly conserved APS and ATP binding sites, questioning the feasibility of the design of specific inhibitors of mycobacterial CysC. Residue Cys556 is part of the flexible lid region that closes off the active site upon substrate binding. Mutational analysis revealed this residue as one of the determinants controlling lid closure and hence binding of the nucleotide substrate. PMID:25807013

  10. Enhanced Interaction between Pseudokinase and Kinase Domains in Gcn2 stimulates eIF2α Phosphorylation in Starved Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lageix, Sebastien; Rothenburg, Stefan; Dever, Thomas E.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α, from yeast to mammals. The Gcn2 kinase domain (KD) is inherently inactive and requires allosteric stimulation by adjoining regulatory domains. Gcn2 contains a pseudokinase domain (YKD) required for high-level eIF2α phosphorylation in amino acid starved yeast cells; however, the role of the YKD in KD activation was unknown. We isolated substitutions of evolutionarily conserved YKD amino acids that impair Gcn2 activation without reducing binding of the activating ligand, uncharged tRNA, to the histidyl-tRNA synthetase-related domain of Gcn2. Several such Gcn− substitutions cluster in predicted helices E and I (αE and αI) of the YKD. We also identified Gcd− substitutions, evoking constitutive activation of Gcn2, mapping in αI of the YKD. Interestingly, αI Gcd− substitutions enhance YKD-KD interactions in vitro, whereas Gcn− substitutions in αE and αI suppress both this effect and the constitutive activation of Gcn2 conferred by YKD Gcd− substitutions. These findings indicate that the YKD interacts directly with the KD for activation of kinase function and identify likely sites of direct YKD-KD contact. We propose that tRNA binding to the HisRS domain evokes a conformational change that increases access of the YKD to sites of allosteric activation in the adjoining KD. PMID:24811037

  11. Enhanced interaction between pseudokinase and kinase domains in Gcn2 stimulates eIF2α phosphorylation in starved cells.

    PubMed

    Lageix, Sebastien; Rothenburg, Stefan; Dever, Thomas E; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2014-05-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α, from yeast to mammals. The Gcn2 kinase domain (KD) is inherently inactive and requires allosteric stimulation by adjoining regulatory domains. Gcn2 contains a pseudokinase domain (YKD) required for high-level eIF2α phosphorylation in amino acid starved yeast cells; however, the role of the YKD in KD activation was unknown. We isolated substitutions of evolutionarily conserved YKD amino acids that impair Gcn2 activation without reducing binding of the activating ligand, uncharged tRNA, to the histidyl-tRNA synthetase-related domain of Gcn2. Several such Gcn- substitutions cluster in predicted helices E and I (αE and αI) of the YKD. We also identified Gcd- substitutions, evoking constitutive activation of Gcn2, mapping in αI of the YKD. Interestingly, αI Gcd- substitutions enhance YKD-KD interactions in vitro, whereas Gcn- substitutions in αE and αI suppress both this effect and the constitutive activation of Gcn2 conferred by YKD Gcd- substitutions. These findings indicate that the YKD interacts directly with the KD for activation of kinase function and identify likely sites of direct YKD-KD contact. We propose that tRNA binding to the HisRS domain evokes a conformational change that increases access of the YKD to sites of allosteric activation in the adjoining KD. PMID:24811037

  12. The SNF1 Kinase Ubiquitin-associated Domain Restrains Its Activation, Activity, and the Yeast Life Span*♦

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Rubin; Postnikoff, Spike; Harkness, Troy A.; Arnason, Terra G.

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme family of heterotrimeric AMP-dependent protein kinases is activated upon low energy states, conferring a switch toward energy-conserving metabolic pathways through immediate kinase actions on enzyme targets and delayed alterations in gene expression through its nuclear relocalization. This family is evolutionarily conserved, including the presence of a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) motif in most catalytic subunits. The potential for the UBA domain to promote protein associations or direct subcellular location, as seen in other UBA-containing proteins, led us to query whether the UBA domain within the yeast AMP-dependent protein kinase ortholog, SNF1 kinase, was important in these aspects of its regulation. Here, we demonstrate that conserved UBA motif mutations significantly alter SNF1 kinase activation and biological activity, including enhanced allosteric subunit associations and increased oxidative stress resistance and life span. Significantly, the enhanced UBA-dependent longevity and oxidative stress response are at least partially dependent on the Fkh1 and Fkh2 stress response transcription factors, which in turn are shown to influence Snf1 gene expression. PMID:25869125

  13. Rad53 kinase activation-independent replication checkpoint function of the N-terminal forkhead-associated (FHA1) domain.

    PubMed

    Pike, Brietta L; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2004-09-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad53 has crucial functions in many aspects of the cellular response to DNA damage and replication blocks. To coordinate these diverse roles, Rad53 has two forkhead-associated (FHA) phosphothreonine-binding domains in addition to a kinase domain. Here, we show that the conserved N-terminal FHA1 domain is essential for the function of Rad53 to prevent the firing of late replication origins in response to replication blocks. However, the FHA1 domain is not required for Rad53 activation during S phase, and as a consequence of defective downstream signaling, Rad53 containing an inactive FHA1 domain is hyperphosphorylated in response to replication blocks. The FHA1 mutation dramatically hypersensitizes strains with defects in the cell cycle-wide checkpoint pathways (rad9Delta and rad17Delta) to DNA damage, but it is largely epistatic with defects in the replication checkpoint (mrc1Delta). Altogether, our data indicate that the FHA1 domain links activated Rad53 to downstream effectors in the replication checkpoint. The results reveal an important mechanistic difference to the homologous Schizosaccharomyces pombe FHA domain that is required for Mrc1-dependent activation of the corresponding Cds1 kinase. Surprisingly, despite the severely impaired replication checkpoint and also G(2)/M checkpoint functions, the FHA1 mutation by itself leads to only moderate viability defects in response to DNA damage, highlighting the importance of functionally redundant pathways. PMID:15271990

  14. Mixed-lineage kinase 2-SH3 domain binds dynamin and greatly enhances activation of GTPase by phospholipid.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, R K; Rusak, J; Price, G; Robinson, P J; Simpson, R J; Dorow, D S

    1998-01-01

    Mixed-lineage kinase 2 (MLK2) is a cytoplasmic protein kinase expressed at high levels in mammalian brain. The MLK2 structure is composed of a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, two leucine zippers, a basic motif, a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding motif and a large C-terminal domain rich in proline, serine and threonine residues. To begin to define the role of MLK2 in mammalian brain, we used an MLK2-SH3 domain-glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (GST-MLK2-SH3) to isolate MLK2-binding proteins from rat brain extract. This analysis revealed that the major MLK2-SH3-domain-binding protein in rat brain is the GTPase dynamin. By using two different forms of the dynamin proline-rich domain as affinity ligands, the binding site for MLK2-SH3 was mapped to the C-terminal region of dynamin between residues 832 and 864. In GTPase assays, the addition of MLK2-SH3 stimulated the activity of purified dynamin I by 3-fold over the basal level, whereas the addition of a known dynamin activator, phosphatidylserine (PtdSer), stimulated a 6-fold increase. When MLK2-SH3 was added to the assay together with PtdSer, however, dynamin GTPase activity accelerated by more than 23-fold over basal level. An MLK2 mutant (MLK2-W59A-SH3), with alanine replacing a conserved tryptophan residue in the SH3 domain consensus motif, had no effect on dynamin activity, either alone or in the presence of PtdSer. In the same assay the SH3 domain from the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase stimulated a similar synergistic acceleration of dynamin GTPase activity in the presence of PtdSer. These results suggest that synergy between phospholipid and SH3 domain binding might be a general mechanism for the regulation of GTP hydrolysis by dynamin. PMID:9742220

  15. Intracellular Aggregation of Polypeptides with Expanded Polyglutamine Domain Is Stimulated by Stress-Activated Kinase Mekk1

    PubMed Central

    Meriin, Anatoli B.; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Gabai, Vladimir L.; Yaglom, Julia A.; Kazantsev, Alex; Sherman, Michael Y.

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal proteins, which escape chaperone-mediated refolding or proteasome-dependent degradation, aggregate and form inclusion bodies (IBs). In several neurodegenerative diseases, such IBs can be formed by proteins with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domains (e.g., huntingtin). This work studies the regulation of intracellular IB formation using an NH2-terminal fragment of huntingtin with expanded polyQ domain. We demonstrate that the active form of MEKK1, a protein kinase that regulates several stress-activated signaling cascades, stimulates formation of the IBs. This function of MEKK1 requires kinase activity, as the kinase-dead mutant of MEKK1 cannot stimulate this process. Exposure of cells to UV irradiation or cisplatin, both of which activate MEKK1, also augmented the formation of IBs. The polyQ-containing huntingtin fragment exists in cells in two distinct forms: (a) in a discrete soluble complex, and (b) in association with insoluble fraction. MEKK1 strongly stimulated recruitment of polyQ polypeptides into the particulate fraction. Notably, a large portion of the active form of MEKK1 was associated with the insoluble fraction, concentrating in discrete sites, and polyQ-containing IBs always colocalized with them. We suggest that MEKK1 is involved in a process of IB nucleation. MEKK1 also stimulated formation of IBs with two abnormal polypeptides lacking the polyQ domain, indicating that this kinase has a general effect on protein aggregation. PMID:11352944

  16. EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancers are sensitive to intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) complete treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhan, Cheng; Ke, Ji; Xue, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Aiqun; Xu, Kaifeng; Shen, Zhirong; Yu, Lei; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A significant portion of lung cancer patients harbor kinase domain mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) effectively shrink tumors harboring mutant EGFR, clinical efficacy is limited by the development of TKI resistance. Effective alternatives are desperately needed in clinic for treating EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer. In our clinic in treating M1a lung cancer patients through intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cycles of systemic chemotherapy (we termed this procedure IPHC complete treatment, IPHC-CT), we found dramatic tumor shrinkage in mutant EGFR-positive patients. We further confirmed the sensitivity of EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell lines derived from patients to HC (hyperthermic chemotherapy) treatment. We found that hyperthermia promoted accumulation of cisplatin in lung cancer cells. Hyperthermia and cisplatin synergistically downregulated the EGFR protein level, leading to quenching of signal from EGFR and induction of apoptosis. Our work therefore showed IPHC-CT is an effective treatment for EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer patients. PMID:26654941

  17. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  18. Structure of the two-domain hexameric APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans: structural basis for the absence of ATP sulfurylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Sean C.; Segel, Irwin H.; Fisher, Andrew J.

    2009-10-01

    APS kinase from Thiobacillus denitrificans contains an inactive N-terminal ATP sulfurylase domain. The structure presented unveils the first hexameric assembly for an APS kinase, and reveals that structural changes in the N-terminal domain disrupt the ATP sulfurylase active site thus prohibiting activity. The Tbd-0210 gene of the chemolithotrophic bacterium Thiobacillus denitrificans is annotated to encode a 60.5 kDa bifunctional enzyme with ATP sulfurylase and APS kinase activity. This putative bifunctional enzyme was cloned, expressed and structurally characterized. The 2.95 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure reported here revealed a hexameric assembly with D{sub 3} symmetry. Each subunit contains a large N-terminal sulfurylase-like domain and a C-terminal APS kinase domain reminiscent of the two-domain fungal ATP sulfurylases of Penicillium chrysogenum and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which also exhibit a hexameric assembly. However, the T. denitrificans enzyme exhibits numerous structural and sequence differences in the N-terminal domain that render it inactive with respect to ATP sulfurylase activity. Surprisingly, the C-terminal domain does indeed display APS kinase activity, indicating that this gene product is a true APS kinase. Therefore, these results provide the first structural insights into a unique hexameric APS kinase that contains a nonfunctional ATP sulfurylase-like domain of unknown function.

  19. Two Cases of Renal Cell Carcinoma Harboring a Novel STRN-ALK Fusion Gene.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Hironori; Togashi, Yuki; Akiba, Jun; Moriya, Fukuko; Baba, Katsuyoshi; Matsuzaki, Naomi; Yuba, Yoshiaki; Shiraishi, Yusuke; Kanamaru, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Naoto; Sakata, Seiji; Takeuchi, Kengo; Yano, Hirohisa

    2016-06-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) have been reported by several independent groups in recent times. The clinical behavior and histopathologic characteristics of these carcinomas are not fully understood because of the paucity of cases reported. Here, we describe 2 cases of RCC harboring a novel striatin (STRN)-ALK fusion. The first case was a 33-year-old woman with no sickle cell trait who underwent nephrectomy for right renal mass and had late recurrence in para-aortic lymph nodes twice 10 and 12 years after initial surgery. After the second recurrence, she was carefully observed without any treatment. Twenty-six years after the initial nephrectomy, the second para-aortic lymphadenectomy was performed, and gastrectomy was performed for newly developed primary gastric cancer. The resected para-aortic lymph nodes were largely replaced by metastatic carcinoma. The second case was a 38-year-old man with no sickle cell trait who underwent cytoreductive nephrectomy followed by sunitinib therapy for metastatic RCC. In both cases, the tumor showed solid, papillary, tubular, and mucinous cribriform structures. Psammoma bodies were occasionally seen in the stroma. Tumor cells had a large nucleus and prominent nucleoli with predominantly eosinophilic cytoplasm. Rhabdoid cells and signet-ring cells were also observed. Intracytoplasmic mucin deposition and background mucinous stroma were confirmed. In the second case, tumor necrosis was seen in some areas. Tumor cells exhibited diffuse positive staining for ALK in both cases. ALK translocation was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization, and further gene analysis revealed a STRN-ALK fusion. These cases provide great insights into ALK translocation RCCs. PMID:26848800

  20. 3D-QSAR and molecular fragment replacement study on diaminopyrimidine and pyrrolotriazine ALK inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhipeng; Lu, Tao; Liu, Haichun; Yuan, Haoliang; Ran, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Yao, Sihui; Xiong, Xiao; Xu, Jinxing; Xu, Anyang; Chen, Yadong

    2014-06-01

    Over expression of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been found in many types of cancer, and ALK is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. To obtain new potent inhibitors of ALK, we conducted lead optimization using 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking investigation of 2,4-diaminopyrimidines and 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine-based compounds. Three favorable 3D-QSAR models (CoMFA with q2, 0.555; r2, 0.939; CoMSIA with q2, 0.625; r2, 0.974; Topomer CoMFA with q2, 0.557; r2 0.756) have been developed to predict the biological activity of novel compounds. Topomer Search was utilized for virtual screening to obtain suitable fragments. The novel compounds generated by molecular fragment replacement (MFR) were evaluated by Topomer CoMFA prediction, Glide (docking) and further evaluated with CoMFA and CoMSIA prediction. 25 novel 2,7-disubstituted-pyrrolo[2,1-f][1,2,4]triazine derivatives as potential ALK inhibitors were finally obtained. In this paper, a combination of CoMFA, CoMSIA and Topomer CoMFA could obtain favorable 3D-QSAR models and suitable fragments for ALK inhibitors optimization. The work flow which comprised 3D-QSAR modeling, Topomer Search, MFR, molecular docking and evaluating criteria could be applied to de novo drug design and the resulted compounds initiate us to further optimize and design new potential ALK inhibitors.

  1. Targeting of a distinctive protein-serine phosphatase to the protein kinase-like domain of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chinkers, M

    1994-01-01

    Protein kinase-related domains of unknown function are present in the JAK family of protein tyrosine kinases and in receptor/guanylyl cyclases. I used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen for proteins interacting with the kinase-like domain of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor/guanylyl cyclase. A yeast strain was constructed expressing a fusion of this kinase-like domain to the lexA DNA-binding domain and containing a HIS3 gene under the control of lexA upstream activating sequences. These yeast cells were transformed with a plasmid library of mouse embryo cDNA fragments fused to the VP16 transcriptional activation domain. Cells containing VP16-fusion proteins interacting with the lexA-kinase-like domain fusion protein were selected by growth in the absence of histidine. A partial-length cDNA clone isolated by using this approach encoded a protein that interacted specifically with the ANP-receptor protein kinase-like domain both in yeast cells and in vitro. Tissue-specific expression of a 2.2-kb mRNA hybridizing to this cDNA paralleled the known pattern of ANP-receptor mRNA expression. A full-length cDNA clone isolated from a rat lung library was predicted to encode a 55-kDa protein containing at its amino terminus a targeting domain that binds to the ANP-receptor kinase-like domain and containing at its carboxyl terminus a putative protein-serine phosphatase domain. This protein is a possible candidate for the phosphatase involved in desensitizing the ANP receptor. Targeting of regulatory proteins may be an important function of protein kinase-like domains. Images PMID:7972012

  2. Calpain cleavage of the B isoform of Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase separates the catalytic domain from the membrane anchoring domain.

    PubMed Central

    Pattni, Krupa; Millard, Thomas H; Banting, George

    2003-01-01

    Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] is one of the key intracellular second messengers in cells and mobilizes Ca2+ stores in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum). Ins(1,4,5)P3 has a short half-life within the cell, and is rapidly metabolized through one of two pathways, one of which involves further phosphorylation of the inositol ring: Ins(1,4,5)P3 3-kinase (IP3-3K) phosphorylates Ins(1,4,5)P3, resulting in the formation of inositol (1,3,4,5)-tetrakisphosphate [Ins(1,3,4,5)P4]. There are three known isoforms of IP3-3K, designated IP3-3KA, IP3-3KB and IP3-3KC. These have differing N-termini, but highly conserved C-termini harbouring the catalytic domain. The three IP3-3K isoforms have different subcellular locations and the B-kinase is uniquely present in both cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. As it is the N-terminus of the B-kinase that differs most from the A- and C-kinases, we have hypothesized that this portion of the protein may be responsible for membrane localization. Although there are no known membrane-targeting protein motifs within the sequence of IP3-3KB, it is found to be tightly associated with the ER membrane. Here, we show that specific regions of the N-terminus of IP3-3KB are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane localization of the protein. We also report that, in the presence of Ca2+, the kinase domain of IP3-3KB is cleaved from the membrane-anchoring region by calpain. PMID:12906709

  3. OsBRI1 Activates BR Signaling by Preventing Binding between the TPR and Kinase Domains of OsBSK3 via Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baowen; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Zhiying; Wang, Ruiju; Huang, Xiahe; Zhu, Yali; Yuan, Li; Wang, Yingchun; Xu, Xiaodong; Burlingame, Alma L; Gao, Yingjie; Sun, Yu; Tang, Wenqiang

    2016-02-01

    Many plant receptor kinases transduce signals through receptor-like cytoplasmic kinases (RLCKs); however, the molecular mechanisms that create an effective on-off switch are unknown. The receptor kinase BR INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) transduces brassinosteroid (BR) signal by phosphorylating members of the BR-signaling kinase (BSK) family of RLCKs, which contain a kinase domain and a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. Here, we show that the BR signaling function of BSKs is conserved in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) and that the TPR domain of BSKs functions as a "phospho-switchable" autoregulatory domain to control BSKs' activity. Genetic studies revealed that OsBSK3 is a positive regulator of BR signaling in rice, while in vivo and in vitro assays demonstrated that OsBRI1 interacts directly with and phosphorylates OsBSK3. The TPR domain of OsBSK3, which interacts directly with the protein's kinase domain, serves as an autoinhibitory domain to prevent OsBSK3 from interacting with bri1-SUPPRESSOR1 (BSU1). Phosphorylation of OsBSK3 by OsBRI1 disrupts the interaction between its TPR and kinase domains, thereby increasing the binding between OsBSK3's kinase domain and BSU1. Our results not only demonstrate that OsBSK3 plays a conserved role in regulating BR signaling in rice, but also provide insight into the molecular mechanism by which BSK family proteins are inhibited under basal conditions but switched on by the upstream receptor kinase BRI1. PMID:26697897

  4. Cell cycle-dependent nuclear accumulation of the p94fer tyrosine kinase is regulated by its NH2 terminus and is affected by kinase domain integrity and ATP binding.

    PubMed

    Ben-Dor, I; Bern, O; Tennenbaum, T; Nir, U

    1999-02-01

    p94fer and p51ferT are two tyrosine kinases that are encoded by differentially spliced transcripts of the FER locus in the mouse. The two tyrosine kinases share identical SH2 and kinase domains but differ in their NH2-terminal amino acid sequence. Unlike p94fer, the presence of which has been demonstrated in most mammalian cell lines analyzed, the expression of p51ferT is restricted to meiotic cells. Here, we show that the two related tyrosine kinases also differ in their subcellular localization profiles. Although p51ferT accumulates constitutively in the cell nucleus, p94fer is cytoplasmic in quiescent cells and enters the nucleus concomitantly with the onset of S phase. The nuclear translocation of the FER proteins is driven by a nuclear localization signal (NLS), which is located within the kinase domain of these enzymes. The functioning of that NLS depends on the integrity of the kinase domain but was not affected by inactivation of the kinase activity. The NH2 terminus of p94fer dictated the cell cycle-dependent functioning of the NLS of FER kinase. This process was governed by coiled-coil forming sequences that are present in the NH2 terminus of the kinase. The regulatory effect of the p94fer NH2-terminal sequences was not affected by kinase activity but was perturbed by mutations in the kinase domain ATP binding site. Ectopic expression of the constitutively nuclear p51ferT in CHO cells interfered with S-phase progression in these cells. This was not seen in p94fer-overexpressing cells. The FER tyrosine kinases seem, thus, to be regulated by novel mechanisms that direct their different subcellular distribution profiles and may, consequently, control their cellular functioning. PMID:10074905

  5. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  6. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif.

    PubMed

    Awad, Rida; Sévajol, Marion; Ayala, Isabel; Chouquet, Anne; Frachet, Philippe; Gans, Pierre; Reiser, Jean-Baptiste; Kleman, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  7. The SH3 regulatory domain of the hematopoietic cell kinase Hck binds ELMO via its polyproline motif

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Rida; Marion, Sévajol; Isabel, Ayala; Anne, Chouquet; Philippe, Frachet; Pierre, Gans; Jean-Baptiste, Reiser; Jean-Philippe, Kleman

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic EnguLfment and cell MOtility (ELMO) proteins form an evolutionary conserved family of regulators involved in small GTPase dependent actin remodeling processes that regulates the guanine exchange factor activity of some of the Downstream Of CrK (DOCK) family members. Gathered data strongly suggest that DOCK activation by ELMO and the subsequent signaling result from a subtle balance in the binding of partners to ELMO. Among its putative upward modulators, the Hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), a member of the Src kinase superfamily, has been identified as a binding partner and a specific tyrosine kinase for ELMO1. Indeed, Hck is implicated in distinct molecular signaling pathways governing phagocytosis, cell adhesion, and migration of hematopoietic cells. Although ELMO1 has been shown to interact with the regulatory Src Homology 3 (SH3) domain of Hck, no direct evidence indicating the mode of interaction between Hck and ELMO1 have been provided in the literature. In the present study, we report convergent pieces of evidence that demonstrate the specific interaction between the SH3 domain of Hck and the polyproline motif of ELMO1. Our results also suggest that the tyrosine-phosphorylation state of ELMO1 tail might act as a putative modulator of Hck kinase activity towards ELMO1 that in turn participates in DOCK180 activation and further triggers subsequent signaling towards actin remodeling. PMID:25737835

  8. The external PASTA domain of the essential serine/threonine protein kinase PknB regulates mycobacterial growth

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; Loraine, Jessica; Jenkins, Christopher H.; Barthe, Philippe; McFeely, Daniel; Forti, Francesca; Ghisotti, Daniela; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Mobashery, Shahriar; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V.

    2015-01-01

    PknB is an essential serine/threonine protein kinase required for mycobacterial cell division and cell-wall biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the external PknB_PASTA domain in mycobacteria results in delayed regrowth, accumulation of elongated bacteria and increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. These changes are accompanied by altered production of certain enzymes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis as revealed by proteomics studies. The growth inhibition caused by overexpression of the PknB_PASTA domain is completely abolished by enhanced concentration of magnesium ions, but not muropeptides. Finally, we show that the addition of recombinant PASTA domain could prevent regrowth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and therefore offers an alternative opportunity to control replication of this pathogen. These results suggest that the PknB_PASTA domain is involved in regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis and maintenance of cell-wall architecture. PMID:26136255

  9. Pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatases set the amplitude of receptor tyrosine kinase output

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Gloria; Niederst, Matt; Cohen-Katsenelson, Ksenya; Stender, Joshua D.; Kunkel, Maya T.; Chen, Muhan; Brognard, John; Sierecki, Emma; Gao, Tianyan; Nowak, Dawid G.; Trotman, Lloyd C.; Glass, Christopher K.; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2014-01-01

    Growth factor receptor levels are aberrantly high in diverse cancers, driving the proliferation and survival of tumor cells. Understanding the molecular basis for this aberrant elevation has profound clinical implications. Here we show that the pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) suppresses receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling output by a previously unidentified epigenetic mechanism unrelated to its previously described function as the hydrophobic motif phosphatase for the protein kinase AKT, protein kinase C, and S6 kinase. Specifically, we show that nuclear-localized PHLPP suppresses histone phosphorylation and acetylation, in turn suppressing the transcription of diverse growth factor receptors, including the EGF receptor. These data uncover a much broader role for PHLPP in regulation of growth factor signaling beyond its direct inactivation of AKT: By suppressing RTK levels, PHLPP dampens the downstream signaling output of two major oncogenic pathways, the PI3 kinase/AKT and the Rat sarcoma (RAS)/ERK pathways. Our data are consistent with a model in which PHLPP modifies the histone code to control the transcription of RTKs. PMID:25201979

  10. In vivo binding properties of SH2 domains from GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J A; Kashishian, A

    1993-01-01

    We have used a transient expression system and mutant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors to study the binding specificities of the Src homology 2 (SH2) regions of the Ras GTPase-activator protein (GAP) and the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3 kinase). A number of fusion proteins, each tagged with an epitope allowing recognition by a monoclonal antibody, were expressed at levels comparable to those of endogenous GAP. Fusion proteins containing the central SH2-SH3-SH2 region of GAP or the C-terminal region of p85 alpha, which includes two SH2 domains, bound to PDGF receptors in response to PDGF stimulation. Both fusion proteins showed the same requirements for tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the PDGF receptor as the full-length proteins from which they were derived, i.e., binding of the GAP fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-771, and binding of the p85 fusion protein was reduced by mutation of Tyr-740, Tyr-751, or both residues. Fusion proteins containing single SH2 domains from either GAP or p85 alpha did not bind detectably to PDGF receptors in this system, suggesting that two SH2 domains in a single polypeptide cooperate to raise the affinity of binding. The sequence specificities of individual SH2 domains were deduced from the binding properties of fusion proteins containing one SH2 domain from GAP and another from p85. The results suggest that the C-terminal GAP SH2 domain specifies binding to Tyr-771, the C-terminal p85 alpha SH2 domain binds to either Tyr-740 or Tyr-751, and each protein's N-terminal SH2 domain binds to unidentified phosphorylation sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:8382774

  11. Src kinase activity and SH2 domain regulate the dynamics of Src association with lipid and protein targets

    PubMed Central

    Shvartsman, Dmitry E.; Donaldson, John C.; Diaz, Begoña; Gutman, Orit; Martin, G. Steven; Henis, Yoav I.

    2007-01-01

    Src functions depend on its association with the plasma membrane and with specific membrane-associated assemblies. Many aspects of these interactions are unclear. We investigated the functions of kinase, SH2, and SH3 domains in Src membrane interactions. We used FRAP beam-size analysis in live cells expressing a series of c-Src–GFP proteins with targeted mutations in specific domains together with biochemical experiments to determine whether the mutants can generate and bind to phosphotyrosyl proteins. Wild-type Src displays lipid-like membrane association, whereas constitutively active Src-Y527F interacts transiently with slower-diffusing membrane-associated proteins. These interactions require Src kinase activity and SH2 binding, but not SH3 binding. Furthermore, overexpression of paxillin, an Src substrate with a high cytoplasmic population, competes with membrane phosphotyrosyl protein targets for binding to activated Src. Our observations indicate that the interactions of Src with lipid and protein targets are dynamic and that the kinase and SH2 domain cooperate in the membrane targeting of Src. PMID:17698610

  12. A frequent kinase domain mutation that changes the interaction between PI3K[alpha] and the membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mandelker, Diana; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Zhu, Jiuxiang; Cheong, Ian; Huang, Chuan-Hsiang; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario

    2009-12-01

    Mutations in oncogenes often promote tumorigenesis by changing the conformation of the encoded proteins, thereby altering enzymatic activity. The PIK3CA oncogene, which encodes p110{alpha}, the catalytic subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase alpha (PI3K{alpha}), is one of the two most frequently mutated oncogenes in human cancers. We report the structure of the most common mutant of p110{alpha} in complex with two interacting domains of its regulatory partner (p85{alpha}), both free and bound to an inhibitor (wortmannin). The N-terminal SH2 (nSH2) domain of p85{alpha} is shown to form a scaffold for the entire enzyme complex, strategically positioned to communicate extrinsic signals from phosphopeptides to three distinct regions of p110{alpha}. Moreover, we found that Arg-1047 points toward the cell membrane, perpendicular to the orientation of His-1047 in the WT enzyme. Surprisingly, two loops of the kinase domain that contact the cell membrane shift conformation in the oncogenic mutant. Biochemical assays revealed that the enzymatic activity of the p110{alpha} His1047Arg mutant is differentially regulated by lipid membrane composition. These structural and biochemical data suggest a previously undescribed mechanism for mutational activation of a kinase that involves perturbation of its interaction with the cellular membrane.

  13. Mutations in the Kinase Domain of the HER2/ERBB2 Gene Identified in a Wide Variety of Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wenhsiang; Chen, Wangjuh Sting; Xiao, Nick; Bender, Ryan; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Tan, Zheng; Swensen, Jeffrey; Millis, Sherri Z; Basu, Gargi; Gatalica, Zoran; Press, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    The HER2 (official name ERBB2) gene encodes a membrane receptor in the epidermal growth factor receptor family amplified and overexpressed in adenocarcinoma. Activating mutations also occur in several cancers. We report mutation analyses of the HER2 kinase domain in 7497 histologically diverse cancers. Forty-five genes, including the kinase domain of HER2 with HER2 IHC and dual in situ hybridization, were analyzed in tumors from 7497 patients with cancer, including 850 breast, 770 colorectal, 910 non-small cell lung, 823 uterine or cervical, 1372 ovarian, and 297 pancreatic cancers, as well as 323 melanomas and 2152 other solid tumors. Sixty-nine HER2 kinase domain mutations were identified in tumors from 68 patients (approximately 1% of all cases, ranging from absent in sarcomas to 4% in urothelial cancers), which included previously published activating mutations and 13 novel mutations. Fourteen cases with coexisting HER2 mutation and amplification and/or overexpression were identified. Fifty-two of 68 patients had additional mutations in other analyzed genes, whereas 16 patients (23%) had HER2 mutations identified as the sole driver mutation. HER2 mutations coexisted with HER2 gene amplification and overexpression and with mutations in other functionally important genes. HER2 mutations were identified as the only driver mutation in a significant proportion of solid cancers. Evaluation of anti-HER2 therapies in nonamplified, HER2-mutated cancers is warranted. PMID:26320869

  14. Site on the human erythrocyte glucose transporter phosphorylated by protein kinase C resides on the protein's hydrophilic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Deziel, M.R.; McReynolds, J.H.; Lippes, H.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-05-01

    A recently published model of the human erythrocyte hexose transporter deduced from the protein's primary structure proposes that the transporter is organized into two membrane domains comprising 77% of the protein's mass and three hydrophilic domains, a short segment that includes the polypeptide's N-terminus and two larger segments, one lying between the membrane domains and the other at the protein's C-terminus. Limited tryptic digestion of the transporter produces two membrane-bound fragments corresponding to the proposed membrane domains and releases a number of soluble peptides. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectroscopic analysis of the released peptides and comparison of the peptide's masses with the transporter's amino acid sequence revealed that tryptic peptides corresponding to at least 63% of the hydrophilic domains' mass were recovered. The site of phosphorylation by protein kinase C, tagged using (/sup 32/P)-ATP, was also released from the transporter under these conditions, (in contrast to sites located within the protein's membrane domains), indicating that this site is located within one of the hydrophilic domains. Tryptic digestion at elevated ionic strength or cleavage with S. Aureus V8 protease results in the recovery of the /sup 32/P label on the carbohydrate-bearing membrane domain that is located near the protein's N-terminus, thus eliminating the C-terminal hydrophilic segment as a possible site of phosphorylation.

  15. Genetic and Biochemical Dissection of a HisKA Domain Identifies Residues Required Exclusively for Kinase and Phosphatase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Jonathan W.; Kirby, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Two-component signal transduction systems, composed of histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), allow bacteria to respond to diverse environmental stimuli. The HK can control both phosphorylation and subsequent dephosphorylation of its cognate RR. The majority of HKs utilize the HisKA subfamily of dimerization and histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains, which contain the phospho-accepting histidine and directly contact the RR. Extensive genetics, biochemistry, and structural biology on several prototypical TCS systems including NtrB-NtrC and EnvZ-OmpR have provided a solid basis for understanding the function of HK–RR signaling. Recently, work on NarX, a HisKA_3 subfamily protein, indicated that two residues in the highly conserved region of the DHp domain are responsible for phosphatase activity. In this study we have carried out both genetic and biochemical analyses on Myxococcus xanthus CrdS, a member of the HisKA subfamily of bacterial HKs. CrdS is required for the regulation of spore formation in response to environmental stress. Following alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the α1 helix of the DHp domain of CrdS, we determined the role for each mutant protein for both kinase and phosphatase activity. Our results indicate that the conserved acidic residue (E372) immediately adjacent to the site of autophosphorylation (H371) is specifically required for kinase activity but not for phosphatase activity. Conversely, we found that the conserved Thr/Asn residue (N375) was required for phosphatase activity but not for kinase activity. We extended our biochemical analyses to two CrdS homologs from M. xanthus, HK1190 and HK4262, as well as Thermotoga maritima HK853. The results were similar for each HisKA family protein where the conserved acidic residue is required for kinase activity while the conserved Thr/Asn residue is required for phosphatase activity. These data are consistent with conserved mechanisms for kinase and phosphatase activities in the

  16. Left-Handed Dimer of EphA2 Transmembrane Domain: Helix Packing Diversity among Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Bocharov, Eduard V.; Mayzel, Maxim L.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Tkach, Elena N.; Ermolyuk, Yaroslav S.; Schulga, Alexey A.; Efremov, Roman G.; Arseniev, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-bound ephrin ligands control a diverse array of cell-cell interactions in the developing and adult organisms. During signal transduction across plasma membrane, Eph receptors, like other receptor tyrosine kinases, are involved in lateral dimerization and subsequent oligomerization presumably with proper assembly of their single-span transmembrane domains. Spatial structure of dimeric transmembrane domain of EphA2 receptor embedded into lipid bicelle was obtained by solution NMR, showing a left-handed parallel packing of the transmembrane helices (535–559)2. The helices interact through the extended heptad repeat motif L535X3G539X2A542X3V546X2L549 assisted by intermolecular stacking interactions of aromatic rings of (FF557)2, whereas the characteristic tandem GG4-like motif A536X3G540X3G544 is not used, enabling another mode of helix-helix association. Importantly, a similar motif AX3GX3G as was found is responsible for right-handed dimerization of transmembrane domain of the EphA1 receptor. These findings serve as an instructive example of the diversity of transmembrane domain formation within the same family of protein kinases and seem to favor the assumption that the so-called rotation-coupled activation mechanism may take place during the Eph receptor signaling. A possible role of membrane lipid rafts in relation to Eph transmembrane domain oligomerization and Eph signal transduction was also discussed. PMID:20197042

  17. Artocarpus altilis CG-901 alters critical nodes in the JH1-kinase domain of Janus kinase 2 affecting upstream JAK/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Nash, Oyekanmi; Omotuyi, Olaposi; Lee, Joonku; Kwon, Byoung-Mog; Ogbadu, Lucy

    2015-11-01

    As a key step in achieving low-cost, easily accessible anti-cancer therapy for low- and middle-income countries, we recently established the scientific basis for the folkloric use of Artocarpus altilis for the treatment of cancer by investigating the geranyl dihydrochalcone (CG-901) content and its interference with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation and blockage of further downstream signaling. In the current study, the CG-901 upstream target was queried by chemical fingerprinting similarity assessment, semi-empirical (PM6ESCF) QMMM and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Moderate (∼0.4) to high (∼0.7) Tanimoto scores were found when the CG-901 scaffold was compared to ligands co-crystallized with Janus kinases (JAK) 1-3. High negative energy values were obtained when the CG-901 was treated semi-empirically (PM6ESCF) within the classical field of JAK (1-3). Multiple nanosecond MD simulations showed that CG-901 did not cause any large structural perturbations in the nucleotide-binding, activation and catalytic loops within the kinase (JH1) domain of JAK (1-3); however, it reduced the energy required to attain metastability along the path to energy minima conformation. In comparison to JAK1 and Apo-state JAK2, JAK2-bound CG-901 exhibited a highly re-organized key intra-domain protein network; indicating atomic level interference with inter-residue communication. In conclusion, CG-901 isolated from A. altilis represents a broad-spectrum JAK inhibitor, which may underlie the mechanism of STAT3 phosphorylation blockage. Graphical abstract Upper panel Janus kinase 2 upstream signaling pathway. Lower panel Apo-JAK2 (left) and CG-901-bound JAK2 (right). PMID:26442513

  18. Tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 in the Kinase Domain of JAK2 Are Autophosphorylated and Required for Maximal JAK2 Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Robertson, Scott A.; Koleva, Rositsa I.; Cline, Joel M.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Myers, Martin G.; Carter-Su, Christin

    2010-01-01

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is activated by a majority of cytokine family receptors including receptors for GH, leptin, and erythropoietin. To identify novel JAK2-regulatory and/or -binding sites, we set out to identify autophosphorylation sites in the kinase domain of JAK2. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping of in vitro autophosphorylated JAK2 identified tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 as sites of autophosphorylation. Phosphorylated tyrosines 868 and 972 were also identified by mass spectrometry analysis of JAK2 activated by an erythropoietin-bound chimeric erythropoietin receptor/leptin receptor. Phosphospecific antibodies suggest that the phosphorylation of all three tyrosines increases in response to GH. Compared with wild-type JAK2, which is constitutively active when overexpressed, JAK2 lacking tyrosine 868, 966, or 972 has substantially reduced activity. Coexpression with GH receptor and protein tyrosine phosphatase1B allowed us to investigate GH-dependent activation of these mutated JAK2s in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. All three mutated JAK2s are activated by GH, although to a lesser extent than wild-type JAK2. The three mutated JAK2s also mediate GH activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3), signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (Stat5b) and ERK1, but at reduced levels. Coexpression with Src-homology 2B1β (SH2B1β), like coexpression with GH-bound GH receptor, partially restores the activity of all three JAK2 mutants. Based on these results and the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain, we hypothesize that small changes in the conformation of the regions of JAK2 surrounding tyrosines 868, 966, and 972 due to e.g. phosphorylation, binding to a ligand-bound cytokine receptor, and/or binding to Src-homology 2B1, may be essential for JAK2 to assume a maximally active conformation. PMID:20304997

  19. Kinase inhibitor-responsive genotypes in EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinomas: moving past common point mutations or indels into uncommon kinase domain duplications and rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations found by traditional or comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinomas include indels of exon 19 (the exon 19 deletion delE746_A750 being the most common) and the exon 21 L858R point mutation. The current approval labels for first line palliative gefitinib 250 mg/day, erlotinib 150 mg/day and afatinib 40 mg/day for advanced lung cancers require the presence of the aforementioned classical/sensitizing EGFR mutations. Other gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib sensitizing mutations include exon 18 indels, G719X, exon 19 insertions, A763_Y764insFQEA, S768I and L861Q; for which off-label EGFR kinase inhibitor use is generally agreed upon by thoracic oncologists. The main biological mechanism of resistance to approved first line EGFR inhibitors is the selection/acquisition of EGFR-T790M that in itself can be inhibited by osimertinib 80 mg/day, a 3rd generation EGFR inhibitor that is bypassed by EGFR-C797X mutations. Another class of de novo inhibitor insensitive mutation includes EGFR exon 20 insertions. More recently, the dichotomy of only point mutations or indels explaining aberrant kinase activation of EGFR plus inhibitor response has been shattered by the discovery of uncommon (<0.5% of all EGFR mutations) genomic events involving exon 18–25 kinase domain duplications (KDD) and rearrangements (EGFR-RAD51 or EGFR-PURB). The latter lead to oncogene addiction, enhanced sensitivity to kinase inhibitors in vitro and clinical responses to approved EGFR inhibitors. The enhanced landscape of EGFR inhibitor-responsive genotypes highlights that comprehensive molecular profiling may be necessary to maximize the identification of all cases that can benefit from precision oncology. PMID:27413714

  20. Kinase inhibitor-responsive genotypes in EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinomas: moving past common point mutations or indels into uncommon kinase domain duplications and rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Daniel B

    2016-06-01

    The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations found by traditional or comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinomas include indels of exon 19 (the exon 19 deletion delE746_A750 being the most common) and the exon 21 L858R point mutation. The current approval labels for first line palliative gefitinib 250 mg/day, erlotinib 150 mg/day and afatinib 40 mg/day for advanced lung cancers require the presence of the aforementioned classical/sensitizing EGFR mutations. Other gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib sensitizing mutations include exon 18 indels, G719X, exon 19 insertions, A763_Y764insFQEA, S768I and L861Q; for which off-label EGFR kinase inhibitor use is generally agreed upon by thoracic oncologists. The main biological mechanism of resistance to approved first line EGFR inhibitors is the selection/acquisition of EGFR-T790M that in itself can be inhibited by osimertinib 80 mg/day, a 3(rd) generation EGFR inhibitor that is bypassed by EGFR-C797X mutations. Another class of de novo inhibitor insensitive mutation includes EGFR exon 20 insertions. More recently, the dichotomy of only point mutations or indels explaining aberrant kinase activation of EGFR plus inhibitor response has been shattered by the discovery of uncommon (<0.5% of all EGFR mutations) genomic events involving exon 18-25 kinase domain duplications (KDD) and rearrangements (EGFR-RAD51 or EGFR-PURB). The latter lead to oncogene addiction, enhanced sensitivity to kinase inhibitors in vitro and clinical responses to approved EGFR inhibitors. The enhanced landscape of EGFR inhibitor-responsive genotypes highlights that comprehensive molecular profiling may be necessary to maximize the identification of all cases that can benefit from precision oncology. PMID:27413714

  1. Stimulation of the midkine/ALK axis renders glioma cells resistant to cannabinoid antitumoral action.

    PubMed

    Lorente, M; Torres, S; Salazar, M; Carracedo, A; Hernández-Tiedra, S; Rodríguez-Fornés, F; García-Taboada, E; Meléndez, B; Mollejo, M; Campos-Martín, Y; Lakatosh, S A; Barcia, J; Guzmán, M; Velasco, G

    2011-06-01

    Identifying the molecular mechanisms responsible for the resistance of gliomas to anticancer treatments is an issue of great therapeutic interest. Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major active ingredient of marijuana, and other cannabinoids inhibit tumor growth in animal models of cancer, including glioma, an effect that relies, at least in part, on the stimulation of autophagy-mediated apoptosis in tumor cells. Here, by analyzing the gene expression profile of a large series of human glioma cells with different sensitivity to cannabinoid action, we have identified a subset of genes specifically associated to THC resistance. One of these genes, namely that encoding the growth factor midkine (Mdk), is directly involved in the resistance of glioma cells to cannabinoid treatment. We also show that Mdk mediates its protective effect via the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) receptor and that Mdk signaling through ALK interferes with cannabinoid-induced autophagic cell death. Furthermore, in vivo Mdk silencing or ALK pharmacological inhibition sensitizes cannabinod-resistant tumors to THC antitumoral action. Altogether, our findings identify Mdk as a pivotal factor involved in the resistance of glioma cells to THC pro-autophagic and antitumoral action, and suggest that selective targeting of the Mdk/ALK axis could help to improve the efficacy of antitumoral therapies for gliomas. PMID:21233844

  2. Acquired Resistance of Lung Adenocarcinomas to Gefitinib or Erlotinib Is Associated with a Second Mutation in the EGFR Kinase Domain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa) or erlotinib (Tarceva) usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of “acquired” resistance. Methods and Findings We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M) in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec). Conclusion In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers. PMID:15737014

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of FHA domains of Dun1 and Rad53 protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, H; Fontes, M R; Hammet, A; Pike, B L; Teh, T; Gleichmann, T; Gooley, P R; Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J

    2001-03-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are modular protein-protein interaction domains of approximately 130 amino acids present in numerous signalling proteins. FHA-domain-dependent protein interactions are regulated by phosphorylation of target proteins and FHA domains may be multifunctional phosphopeptide-recognition modules. FHA domains of the budding yeast cell-cycle checkpoint protein kinases Dun1p and Rad53p have been crystallized. Crystals of the Dun1-FHA domain exhibit the symmetry of the space group P6(1)22 or P6(5)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 127.3, c = 386.3 A; diffraction data have been collected to 3.1 A resolution on a synchrotron source. Crystals of the N-terminal FHA domain (FHA1) of Rad53p diffract to 4.0 A resolution on a laboratory X-ray source and have Laue-group symmetry 4/mmm, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.7, c = 104.3 A. PMID:11223532

  4. Structural and Functional Characterization of the JH2 Pseudokinase Domain of JAK Family Tyrosine Kinase 2 (TYK2).

    PubMed

    Min, Xiaoshan; Ungureanu, Daniela; Maxwell, Sarah; Hammarén, Henrik; Thibault, Steve; Hillert, Ellin-Kristina; Ayres, Merrill; Greenfield, Brad; Eksterowicz, John; Gabel, Chris; Walker, Nigel; Silvennoinen, Olli; Wang, Zhulun

    2015-11-01

    JAK (Janus family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases) family tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2) participates in signaling through cytokine receptors involved in immune responses and inflammation. JAKs are characterized by dual kinase domain: a tyrosine kinase domain (JH1) that is preceded by a pseudokinase domain (JH2). The majority of disease-associated mutations in JAKs map to JH2, demonstrating its central regulatory function. JH2s were considered catalytically inactive, but JAK2 JH2 was found to have low autoregulatory catalytic activity. Whether the other JAK JH2s share ATP binding and enzymatic activity has been unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 in complex with adenosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (ATP-γS) and characterize its nucleotide binding by biochemical and biophysical methods. TYK2 JH2 did not show phosphotransfer activity, but it binds ATP and the nucleotide binding stabilizes the protein without inducing major conformational changes. Mutation of the JH2 ATP-binding pocket increased basal TYK2 phosphorylation and downstream signaling. The overall structural characteristics of TYK2 JH2 resemble JAK2 JH2, but distinct stabilizing molecular interactions around helix αAL in the activation loop provide a structural basis for differences in substrate access and catalytic activities among JAK family JH2s. The structural and biochemical data suggest that ATP binding is functionally important for both TYK2 and JAK2 JH2s, whereas the regulatory phosphorylation appears to be a unique property of JAK2. Finally, the co-crystal structure of TYK2 JH2 complexed with a small molecule inhibitor demonstrates that JH2 is accessible to ATP-competitive compounds, which offers novel approaches for targeting cytokine signaling as well as potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26359499

  5. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  6. Interactions of polyomavirus middle T with the SH2 domains of the pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Yoakim, M; Hou, W; Liu, Y; Carpenter, C L; Kapeller, R; Schaffhausen, B S

    1992-01-01

    The binding of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase to the polyomavirus middle T antigen is facilitated by tyrosine phosphorylation of middle T on residue 315. The pp85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase contains two SH2 domains, one in the middle of the molecule and one at the C terminus. When assayed by blotting with phosphorylated middle T, the more N-terminal SH2 domain is responsible for binding to middle T. When assayed in solution with glutathione S transferase fusions, both SH2s are capable of binding phosphorylated middle T. While both SH2 fusions can compete with intact pp85 for binding to middle T, the C-terminal SH2 is the more efficient of the two. Interaction between pp85 or its SH2 domains and middle T can be blocked by a synthetic peptide comprising the tyrosine phosphorylation sequence around middle T residue 315. Despite the fact that middle T can interact with both SH2s, these domains are not equivalent. Only the C-terminal SH2-middle T interaction was blocked by anti-SH2 antibody; the two SH2 fusions also interact with different cellular proteins. Images PMID:1380095

  7. Delineation of a T-cell activation motif required for binding of protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Tse, A G; Moingeon, P; Hussey, R E; Mildonian, A; Hannisian, J; Clayton, L K; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To define the T-cell receptor signal transduction motif, we have transfected human and murine T-cell lines with a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 alpha and the membrane-proximal portion of CD3 zeta containing at its C terminus either an 18-amino acid segment (NQLYNELNLGRREEYDVL) or alanine-scanning point mutant derivatives. Crosslinking of the extracellular domain of the chimera is sufficient to initiate Ca2+ flux, interleukin 2 production, and tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins including the chimera. Subsequently, the chimera becomes associated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, among them the 70-kDa protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70. Mutational data identify the T-cell activation motif as Y(X)2L(X)7Y(X)2L and show that each of the four designated residues is necessary for the above activation events. Recombinant protein containing the two tandem SH2 domains derived from ZAP70 binds to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the above 18-amino acid motif but only when both tyrosines are phosphorylated; in contrast, little or no binding is observed to monophosphorylated or nonphosphorylated analogues. These results imply that after receptor crosslinking in T cells, and by inference also in B cells and mast cells, the motif is phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, thereafter serving as a docking site for protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains. Images PMID:7517560

  8. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-07-15

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  9. Metachronous primary uterine cancer surgically resected during Crizotinib treatment in a ALK-rearranged advanced lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Misino, Andrea; Scattone, Anna; Caldarola, Lucia; Petroni, Stella; Logroscino, Antonio; Montagna, Elisabetta Sara; Serio, Gabriella; Simone, Giovanni; Galetta, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Rearrangements of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene are present in 3% to 7% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs). Patients harboring ALK rearrangements show very favourable outcomes if treated with targeted agents, among which crizotinib is the first and best studied. Crizotinib, an oral small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor of ALK, MET, and ROS1 kinases, is a very active and well tolerated drug. Nevertheless, the optimal therapy management with this new drug is still partially unknown, especially with regard to the safety of combined treatments. Recently, the integration of locoregional treatments has been proposed as a feasible multimodality strategy in selected patients with good clinical conditions and slow-growing or oligoprogressive disease. In this report, a case of advanced lung adenocarcinoma, progressed after first line chemotherapy and re-biopsied detecting ALK rearrangement, is described. During crizotinib treatment the primary lung tumor showed an excellent regression; meanwhile a major surgery for a metachronous uterine cancer was safely and successfully carried out. PMID:26958511

  10. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Acts in the Drosophila Mushroom Body to Negatively Regulate Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Lei; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Though evidence is mounting that a major function of sleep is to maintain brain plasticity and consolidate memory, little is known about the molecular pathways by which learning and sleep processes intercept. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (Alk), the gene encoding a tyrosine receptor kinase whose inadvertent activation is the cause of many cancers, is implicated in synapse formation and cognitive functions. In particular, Alk genetically interacts with Neurofibromatosis 1 (Nf1) to regulate growth and associative learning in flies. We show that Alk mutants have increased sleep. Using a targeted RNAi screen we localized the negative effects of Alk on sleep to the mushroom body, a structure important for both sleep and memory. We also report that mutations in Nf1 produce a sexually dimorphic short sleep phenotype, and suppress the long sleep phenotype of Alk. Thus Alk and Nf1 interact in both learning and sleep regulation, highlighting a common pathway in these two processes. PMID:26536237

  11. Analysis of periplasmic sensor domains from Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-C: structure of one sensor domain from a histidine kinase and another from a chemotaxis protein.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, P Raj; Dwulit-Smith, Jeff; Duke, Norma E; Wilton, Rosemarie; Mack, Jamey C; Bearden, Jessica; Rakowski, Ella; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Szurmant, Hendrik; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Schiffer, Marianne

    2013-10-01

    Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans is a δ-proteobacterium found in diverse soils and sediments. It is of interest in bioremediation efforts due to its dechlorination and metal-reducing capabilities. To gain an understanding on A. dehalogenans' abilities to adapt to diverse environments we analyzed its signal transduction proteins. The A. dehalogenans genome codes for a large number of sensor histidine kinases (HK) and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCP); among these 23 HK and 11 MCP proteins have a sensor domain in the periplasm. These proteins most likely contribute to adaptation to the organism's surroundings. We predicted their three-dimensional folds and determined the structures of two of the periplasmic sensor domains by X-ray diffraction. Most of the domains are predicted to have either PAS-like or helical bundle structures, with two predicted to have solute-binding protein fold, and another predicted to have a 6-phosphogluconolactonase like fold. Atomic structures of two sensor domains confirmed the respective fold predictions. The Adeh_2942 sensor (HK) was found to have a helical bundle structure, and the Adeh_3718 sensor (MCP) has a PAS-like structure. Interestingly, the Adeh_3718 sensor has an acetate moiety bound in a binding site typical for PAS-like domains. Future work is needed to determine whether Adeh_3718 is involved in acetate sensing by A. dehalogenans. PMID:23897711

  12. Bivalent Inhibitors of c-Src Tyrosine Kinase That Bind a Regulatory Domain.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Taylor K; Soellner, Matthew B

    2016-07-20

    We have developed a general methodology to produce bivalent kinase inhibitors for c-Src that interact with the SH2 and ATP binding pockets. Our approach led to a highly selective bivalent inhibitor of c-Src. We demonstrate impressive selectivity for c-Src over homologous kinases. Exploration of the unexpected high level of selectivity yielded insight into the inherent flexibility of homologous kinases. Finally, we demonstrate that our methodology is modular and both the ATP-competitive fragment and conjugation chemistry can be swapped. PMID:27266260

  13. Phosphorylation of the TOR ATP binding domain by AGC kinase constitutes a novel mode of TOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hálová, Lenka; Du, Wei; Kirkham, Sara; Smith, Duncan L; Petersen, Janni

    2013-11-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) signaling coordinates cell growth, metabolism, and cell division through tight control of signaling via two complexes, TORC1 and TORC2. Here, we show that fission yeast TOR kinases and mTOR are phosphorylated on an evolutionarily conserved residue of their ATP-binding domain. The Gad8 kinase (AKT homologue) phosphorylates fission yeast Tor1 at this threonine (T1972) to reduce activity. A T1972A mutation that blocked phosphorylation increased Tor1 activity and stress resistance. Nitrogen starvation of fission yeast inhibited TOR signaling to arrest cell cycle progression in G1 phase and promoted sexual differentiation. Starvation and a Gad8/T1972-dependent decrease in Tor1 (TORC2) activity was essential for efficient cell cycle arrest and differentiation. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations, as mTOR was phosphorylated on T2173 in an AKT-dependent manner. In addition, a T2173A mutation increased mTOR activity. Thus, TOR kinase activity can be reduced through AGC kinase-controlled phosphorylation to generate physiologically significant changes in TOR signaling. PMID:24247430

  14. A protein kinase that phosphorylates the C-terminal repeat domain of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, J M; Greenleaf, A L

    1989-01-01

    The unique C-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of the largest subunit (IIa) of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II consists of multiple repeats of the heptapeptide consensus sequence Tyr-Ser-Pro-Thr-Ser-Pro-Ser. The number of repeats ranges from 26 in yeast to 42 in Drosophila to 52 in mouse. The CTD is essential in vivo, but its structure and function are not yet understood. The CTD can be phosphorylated at multiple serine and threonine residues, generating a form of the largest subunit (II0) with markedly reduced mobility in NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gels. To investigate this extensive phosphorylation, which presumably modulates functional properties of RNA polymerase II, we began efforts to purify a specific CTD kinase. Using CTD-containing fusion proteins as substrates, we have purified a CTD kinase from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The enzyme extensively phosphorylates the CTD portion of both the fusion proteins and intact subunit IIa, producing products with reduced electrophoretic mobilities. The properties of the CTD kinase suggest that it is distinct from previously described protein kinases. Analogous activities were also detected in Drosophila and HeLa cell extracts. Images PMID:2657724

  15. Genetic Variations of Kinase Inserts Domain Receptor (KDR) Gene Are Associated with the Risk of Astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yufei; Ma, Piyong; He, Yichun; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytomas is one of the most common central nervous system (CNS) tumors with high mortality rate. Kinase insert domain receptor (KDR) is involved in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, migration, and vascular permeability. The aim of the study was to explore the relationship between KDR polymorphisms and risk of astrocytomas. Blood samples were collected from 157 astrocytomas patients and 160 healthy controls. Three tag-SNPs (rs2071559C/T, rs2305948T/C, and rs1870377A/T) were identified from the International HapMap Project Databases and genotyped using the method of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). We evaluated the astrocytomas risk caused by individual SNPs and haplotype using odds ratios (ORs) and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). In the overall individual SNP analysis, the C allele of rs2071559 was correlated with an increased risk of astrocytomas. However, individuals with mutant allele A and genotype TA + AA of rs1870377 showed a protective effect against astrocytomas. Subgroup analysis based on WHO tumor grade revealed that the C allele of rs2071559 had more influence with the risk of astrocytomas in the grade III-IV (OR = 1.91) subgroup than the grade I-II (OR = 1.47) group. Genotype TT of rs2305948 was found to be significantly associated with susceptibility of astrocytomas only in the grade III-IV subgroup. The protective effect of rs1870377 did not reveal significant difference between the grade III-IV and grade I-II subgroups. Meanwhile, stratified analysis demonstrated that mutation of rs2071559 and rs2305948 could elevate the risk of astrocytomas more significantly in the subgroup of smokers than the nonsmokers. Interestingly, the protective effect of rs1870377 was more obvious in the nonsmokers than the smokers. Additionally, haplotype-specific analysis showed that haplotype CCT and CTT were related with an increased risk of astrocytomas. We found that individual with variants of rs

  16. Moving molecularly directed therapies to the first-line in ALK-positive lung cancer: crizotinib is just the beginning.

    PubMed

    Klempner, Samuel J; Raufi, Alexander; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2015-10-01

    The increasing appreciation of oncogenic driver alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has resulted in a rapid expansion of therapeutic compounds. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) alterations are the prototypical examples and have driven the paradigm shift in NSCLC management. Early phase studies in previously treated ALK+ patients demonstrated activity and recently Solomon et al. confirmed the superiority of crizotinib over chemotherapy in first line treatment. The phase III PROFILE 1014 represents the culmination of the rapid development of crizotinib and provides lessons for future generation ALK inhibitors and other molecularly directed therapies in NSCLC. Important considerations for second and third generation inhibitors include the ability to overcome known resistance mechanisms, CNS activity, improvement in side effect profile, and safety in possible combination strategies. PMID:26629439

  17. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md. Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1−/− mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  18. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 negatively regulates anaplastic lymphoma kinase in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shunpei; Takatori, Atsushi; Ogura, Atsushi; Kohashi, Kenichi; Souzaki, Ryota; Kinoshita, Yoshiaki; Taguchi, Tomoaki; Hossain, Md Shamim; Ohira, Miki; Nakamura, Yohko; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-01-01

    In neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common paediatric solid tumours, activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is often associated with poor outcomes. Although genetic studies have identified copy number alteration and nonsynonymous mutations of ALK, the regulatory mechanism of ALK signalling at protein levels is largely elusive. Neuronal leucine-rich repeat 1 (NLRR1) is a type 1 transmembrane protein that is highly expressed in unfavourable NB and potentially influences receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Here, we showed that NLRR1 and ALK exhibited a mutually exclusive expression pattern in primary NB tissues by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, dorsal root ganglia of Nlrr1+/+ and Nlrr1-/- mice displayed the opposite expression patterns of Nlrr1 and Alk. Of interest, NLRR1 physically interacted with ALK in vitro through its extracellular region. Notably, the NLRR1 ectodomain impaired ALK phosphorylation and proliferation of ALK-mutated NB cells. A newly identified cleavage of the NLRR1 ectodomain also supported NLRR1-mediated ALK signal regulation in trans. Thus, we conclude that NLRR1 appears to be an extracellular negative regulator of ALK signalling in NB and neuronal development. Our findings may be beneficial to comprehend NB heterogeneity and to develop a novel therapy against unfavourable NB. PMID:27604320

  19. Structure of the Toxoplasma gondii ROP18 Kinase Domain Reveals a Second Ligand Binding Pocket Required for Acute Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel; Gold, Daniel A.; Julien, Lindsay; Rosowski, Emily E.; Niedelman, Wendy; Yaffe, Michael B.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2013-01-01

    At least a third of the human population is infected with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which contributes significantly to the disease burden in immunocompromised and neutropenic hosts and causes serious congenital complications when vertically transmitted to the fetus. Genetic analyses have identified the Toxoplasma ROP18 Ser/Thr protein kinase as a major factor mediating acute virulence in mice. ROP18 is secreted into the host cell during the invasion process, and its catalytic activity is required for the acute virulence phenotype. However, its precise molecular function and regulation are not fully understood. We have determined the crystal structure of the ROP18 kinase domain, which is inconsistent with a previously proposed autoinhibitory mechanism of regulation. Furthermore, a sucrose molecule bound to our structure identifies an additional ligand-binding pocket outside of the active site cleft. Mutational analysis confirms an important role for this pocket in virulence. PMID:24129568

  20. Improvement of insulin signaling in myoblast cells by an addition of SKIP-binding peptide within Pak1 kinase domain.

    PubMed

    Ijuin, Takeshi; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in insulin-induced glucose incorporation in skeletal muscle were observed in Type 2 diabetes. Our previous studies revealed that the binding between skeletal muscle and kidney-enriched inositol polyphosphate phosphatase (SKIP) and p21-activated protein kinase (Pak1) at the plasma membrane is induced insulin-dependently and that this binding mediated a rapid and efficient termination of insulin signaling and a subsequent glucose uptake into skeletal muscle cells. Here, we identified 11-amino-acids peptide within kinase domain of Pak1, necessary and sufficient for SKIP binding. Expression of this region in C2C12 cells resulted in an increase in insulin signaling. Supplementation of a synthetic peptide of this sequence increased insulin signaling and insulin-induced glucose uptake into skeletal muscle cell lines. These findings suggest the physiological role of Pak1-SKIP binding in the regulation of insulin signaling in skeletal muscle. PMID:25446075

  1. Identification of Oncogenic Point Mutations and Hyperphosphorylation of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Lung Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Wei; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Lin, Kuen-Tyng; Lin, Shu-Chen; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Jou, Yuh-Shan

    2011-01-01

    The oncogenic property of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of various cancers and serves as an important therapeutic target. In this study, we identified frequent intragenic loss of heterozygosity and six novel driver mutations within ALK in lung adenocarcinomas. Overexpression of H694R or E1384K mutant ALK leads to hyperphosphorylation of ALK, and activation of its downstream mediators STAT3, AKT, and ERK resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, and tumor growth in xenograft models. Furthermore, the activated phospho-Y1604 ALK was increasingly detected in 13 human lung cancer cell lines and 263 lung cancer specimens regardless of tumor stages and types. Treatment of two different ALK inhibitors, WHI-P154 and NVP-TAE684, resulted in the down-regulation of aberrant ALK signaling, shrinkage of tumor, and suppression of metastasis and significantly improved survival of ALK mutant-bearing mice. Together, we identified that novel ALK point mutations possessed tumorigenic effects mainly through hyperphosphorylation of Y1604 and activation of downstream oncogenic signaling. The upregulated phospho-Y1604 ALK could serve as a diagnostic biomarker for lung cancer. Furthermore, targeting oncogenic mutant ALKs with inhibitors could be a promising strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of fatal lung cancers. PMID:21847362

  2. Activin receptor-like kinase 2 and Smad6 regulate epithelial-mesenchymal transformation during cardiac valve formation.

    PubMed

    Desgrosellier, Jay S; Mundell, Nathan A; McDonnell, Maureen A; Moses, Harold L; Barnett, Joey V

    2005-04-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) occurs during both development and tumorigenesis. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) ligands signal EMT in the atrioventricular (AV) cushion of the developing heart, a critical step in valve formation. TGFbeta signals through a complex of type I and type II receptors. Several type I receptors exist although activin receptor-like kinase (ALK) 5 mediates the majority of TGFbeta signaling. Here, we demonstrate that ALK2 is sufficient to induce EMT in the heart. Both ALK2 and ALK5 are expressed throughout the heart with ALK2 expressed abundantly in endocardial cells of the outflow tract (OFT), ventricle, and AV cushion. Misexpression of constitutively active (ca) ALK2 in non-transforming ventricular endocardial cells induced EMT, while caALK5 did not, thus demonstrating that ALK2 activity alone is sufficient to stimulate EMT. Smad6, an inhibitor of Smad signaling downstream of ALK2, but not ALK5, inhibited EMT in AV cushion endocardial cells. These data suggest that ALK2 activation may stimulate EMT in the AV cushion and that Smad6 may act downstream of ALK2 to negatively regulate EMT. PMID:15766759

  3. Alectinib induced CNS radiation necrosis in an ALK+NSCLC patient with a remote (7 years) history of brain radiation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Weitz, Michael; Jalas, John R; Kelly, Daniel F; Wong, Vanessa; Azada, Michele C; Quines, Oliver; Klempner, Samuel J

    2016-06-01

    Alectinib is a second generation ALK inhibitor that has significant clinical activity in central nervous system (CNS) metastases in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Pseudoprogression (PsP) due to radiation necrosis during alecitnib treatment of central nervous system (CNS) metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC as been reported. Hence, distinguishing radiation-related PsP from alectinib-induced radiographic changes is important to avoid erroneous early trial discontinuation and abandonment of an effective treatment. However, it remains difficult to assess casuality of radiation necrosis is related to recent direct radiation or induced by alectinib treatment or both. It is also unknown how long from previous radiation can alectinib still induce radiation necrosis. Here we reported a crizotinib-refractory ALK-positive NSCLC patient who develop radiation necrosis in one of his metastatic CNS lesions after approximately 12 months of alectinib treatment who otherwise had on-going CNS response on alectinib. His most recent radiation to his CNS metastases was 7 years prior to the start of alectinib. This case illustrates that in the setting of pror CNS radiation, given the significant clinical activity of alectinib in CNS metastases in ALK-positive NSCLC patients the risk of CNS radiation necrosis remains long after previous radiation to the CNS metastases has been completed and can occur after durable response of treatment. PMID:27133743

  4. Tmem100, an ALK1 receptor signaling-dependent gene essential for arterial endothelium differentiation and vascular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Somekawa, Satoshi; Imagawa, Keiichi; Hayashi, Hisaki; Sakabe, Masahide; Ioka, Tomoko; Sato, Genki E.; Inada, Ken; Iwamoto, Takaaki; Mori, Toshio; Uemura, Shiro; Nakagawa, Osamu; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily play essential roles in various aspects of embryonic development and physiological organ function. Among them, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 9 and BMP10 regulate embryonic vascular development by activating their endothelial receptor ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1, also called Acvrl1). ALK1-mediated intracellular signaling is implicated in the etiologies of human diseases, but their downstream functional proteins are largely unknown. In this study, we identified Tmem100, a gene encoding a previously uncharacterized intracellular transmembrane protein, to be an embryonic endothelium-enriched gene activated by BMP9 and BMP10 through the ALK1 receptor. Tmem100 null mice showed embryonic lethality due to impaired differentiation of arterial endothelium and defects of vascular morphogenesis, which phenocopied most of the vascular abnormalities observed with the Acvrl1/Alk1 deficiency. The activity of Notch- and Akt-mediated signaling, which is essential for vascular development, was down-regulated in Tmem100 null mice. Cre-mediated deletion of Tmem100 in endothelial cells was sufficient to recapitulate the null phenotypes. These data indicated that TMEM100 may play indispensable roles downstream of BMP9/BMP10-ALK1 signaling during endothelial differentiation and vascular morphogenesis. PMID:22783020

  5. Identification of a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL expressing aberrant levels of ERBB4 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Irene; Pellegrino, Elisa; Mereu, Elisabetta; Kwee, Ivo; Agnelli, Luca; Bergaggio, Elisa; Garaffo, Giulia; Vitale, Nicoletta; Caputo, Manuel; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Circosta, Paola; Abate, Francesco; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Mathew, Susan; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tiacci, Enrico; Serra, Sara; Deaglio, Silvia; Neri, Antonino; Falini, Brunangelo; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio; Piva, Roberto

    2016-01-14

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a clinical and biological heterogeneous disease that includes systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative entities. To discover biomarkers and/or genes involved in ALK-negative ALCL pathogenesis, we applied the cancer outlier profile analysis algorithm to a gene expression profiling data set including 249 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and normal T cells. Ectopic coexpression of ERBB4 and COL29A1 genes was detected in 24% of ALK-negative ALCL patients. RNA sequencing and 5' RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends identified 2 novel ERBB4-truncated transcripts displaying intronic transcription start sites. By luciferase assays, we defined that the expression of ERBB4-aberrant transcripts is promoted by endogenous intronic long terminal repeats. ERBB4 expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lastly, we demonstrated that ERBB4-truncated forms show oncogenic potentials and that ERBB4 pharmacologic inhibition partially controls ALCL cell growth and disease progression in an ERBB4-positive patient-derived tumorgraft model. In conclusion, we identified a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL characterized by aberrant expression of ERBB4-truncated transcripts carrying intronic 5' untranslated regions. PMID:26463425

  6. Crystal Structure of the Frizzled-Like Cysteine-Rich Domain of the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase MuSK

    SciTech Connect

    Stiegler, A.; Burden, S; Hubbard, S

    2009-01-01

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is an essential receptor tyrosine kinase for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Activation of MuSK by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), the agrin receptor, leads to clustering of acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic side of the NMJ. The ectodomain of MuSK comprises three immunoglobulin-like domains and a cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) related to those in Frizzled proteins, the receptors for Wnts. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MuSK Fz-CRD at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a five-disulfide-bridged domain similar to CRDs of Frizzled proteins but with a divergent C-terminal region. An asymmetric dimer present in the crystal structure implicates surface hydrophobic residues that may function in homotypic or heterotypic interactions to mediate co-clustering of MuSK, rapsyn, and acetylcholine receptors at the NMJ.

  7. Crystal structure of the frizzled-like cysteine-rich domain of the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK.

    PubMed

    Stiegler, Amy L; Burden, Steven J; Hubbard, Stevan R

    2009-10-16

    Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is an essential receptor tyrosine kinase for the establishment and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Activation of MuSK by agrin, a neuronally derived heparan-sulfate proteoglycan, and LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4), the agrin receptor, leads to clustering of acetylcholine receptors on the postsynaptic side of the NMJ. The ectodomain of MuSK comprises three immunoglobulin-like domains and a cysteine-rich domain (Fz-CRD) related to those in Frizzled proteins, the receptors for Wnts. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MuSK Fz-CRD at 2.1 A resolution. The structure reveals a five-disulfide-bridged domain similar to CRDs of Frizzled proteins but with a divergent C-terminal region. An asymmetric dimer present in the crystal structure implicates surface hydrophobic residues that may function in homotypic or heterotypic interactions to mediate co-clustering of MuSK, rapsyn, and acetylcholine receptors at the NMJ. PMID:19664639

  8. Requirement of the FATC domain of protein kinase Tel1 for localization to DNA ends and target protein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Hiroo; Goto, Greicy H.; Ghosh, Avik; Zencir, Sevil; Henry, Everett; Sugimoto, Katsunori

    2015-01-01

    Two large phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase–related protein kinases (PIKKs), ATM and ATR, play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. PIKKs contain a highly conserved extreme C-terminus called the FRAP-ATM-TRRAP-C-terminal (FATC) domain. In budding yeast, ATM and ATR correspond to Tel1 and Mec1, respectively. In this study, we characterized functions of the FATC domain of Tel1 by introducing substitution or truncation mutations. One substitution mutation, termed tel1-21, and a truncation mutation, called tel1-ΔC, did not significantly affect the expression level. The tel1-21 mutation impaired the cellular response to DNA damage and conferred moderate telomere maintenance defect. In contrast, the tel1-ΔC mutation behaved like a null mutation, conferring defects in both DNA damage response and telomere maintenance. Tel1-21 protein localized to DNA ends as effectively as wild-type Tel1 protein, whereas Tel1-ΔC protein failed. Introduction of a hyperactive TEL1-hy mutation suppressed the tel1-21 mutation but not the tel1-ΔC mutation. In vitro analyses revealed that both Tel1-21 and Tel1-ΔC proteins undergo efficient autophosphorylation but exhibit decreased kinase activities toward the exogenous substrate protein, Rad53. Our results show that the FATC domain of Tel1 mediates localization to DNA ends and contributes to phosphorylation of target proteins. PMID:26246601

  9. Heterozygous disruption of activin receptor-like kinase 1 is associated with increased arterial pressure in mice

    PubMed Central

    González-Núñez, María; Riolobos, Adela S.; Castellano, Orlando; Fuentes-Calvo, Isabel; de los Ángeles Sevilla, María; Oujo, Bárbara; Pericacho, Miguel; Cruz-Gonzalez, Ignacio; Pérez-Barriocanal, Fernando; ten Dijke, Peter; López-Novoa, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK-1) is a type I cell-surface receptor for the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family of proteins. Hypertension is related to TGF-β1, because increased TGF-β1 expression is correlated with an elevation in arterial pressure (AP) and TGF-β expression is upregulated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of ALK-1 in regulation of AP using Alk1 haploinsufficient mice (Alk1+/−). We observed that systolic and diastolic AP were significantly higher in Alk1+/− than in Alk1+/+ mice, and all functional and structural cardiac parameters (echocardiography and electrocardiography) were similar in both groups. Alk1+/− mice showed alterations in the circadian rhythm of AP, with higher AP than Alk1+/+ mice during most of the light period. Higher AP in Alk1+/− mice is not a result of a reduction in the NO-dependent vasodilator response or of overactivation of the peripheral renin-angiotensin system. However, intracerebroventricular administration of losartan had a hypotensive effect in Alk1+/− and not in Alk1+/+ mice. Alk1+/− mice showed a greater hypotensive response to the β-adrenergic antagonist atenolol and higher concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine in plasma than Alk1+/+ mice. The number of brain cholinergic neurons in the anterior basal forebrain was reduced in Alk1+/− mice. Thus, we concluded that the ALK-1 receptor is involved in the control of AP, and the high AP of Alk1+/− mice is explained mainly by the sympathetic overactivation shown by these animals, which is probably related to the decreased number of cholinergic neurons. PMID:26398936

  10. Identification of Ser/Thr kinase and Forkhead Associated Domains in Mycobacterium ulcerans: Characterization of Novel Association between Protein Kinase Q and MupFHA

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Anshika; Joshi, Jayadev; Virmani, Richa; Gupta, Meetu; Verma, Nupur; Maji, Abhijit; Misra, Richa; Baronian, Grégory; Pandey, Amit K.; Molle, Virginie; Singh, Yogendra

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer in humans, is unique among the members of Mycobacterium genus due to the presence of the virulence determinant megaplasmid pMUM001. This plasmid encodes multiple virulence-associated genes, including mup011, which is an uncharacterized Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK) PknQ. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we have characterized PknQ and explored its interaction with MupFHA (Mup018c), a FHA domain containing protein also encoded by pMUM001. MupFHA was found to interact with PknQ and suppress its autophosphorylation. Subsequent protein-protein docking and molecular dynamic simulation analyses showed that this interaction involves the FHA domain of MupFHA and PknQ activation loop residues Ser170 and Thr174. FHA domains are known to recognize phosphothreonine residues, and therefore, MupFHA may be acting as one of the few unusual FHA-domain having overlapping specificity. Additionally, we elucidated the PknQ-dependent regulation of MupDivIVA (Mup012c), which is a DivIVA domain containing protein encoded by pMUM001. MupDivIVA interacts with MupFHA and this interaction may also involve phospho-threonine/serine residues of MupDivIVA. Conclusions/Significance Together, these results describe novel signaling mechanisms in M. ulcerans and show a three-way regulation of PknQ, MupFHA, and MupDivIVA. FHA domains have been considered to be only pThr specific and our results indicate a novel mechanism of pSer as well as pThr interaction exhibited by MupFHA. These results signify the need of further re-evaluating the FHA domain –pThr/pSer interaction model. MupFHA may serve as the ideal candidate for structural studies on this unique class of modular enzymes. PMID:25412098

  11. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD.

    PubMed

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-03-01

    Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  12. A new protein superfamily includes two novel 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylases from Bacillus cereus, AlkC and AlkD

    PubMed Central

    Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Lindbäck, Toril; Solberg, Inger; Robertsen, Kristin; Kristiansen, Knut Ivan; Mainieri, Davide; Lillehagen, Lucy; Kolstø, Anne-Brit; Bjørås, Magnar

    2006-01-01

    Summary Soil bacteria are heavily exposed to environmental methylating agents such as methylchloride and may have special requirements for repair of alkylation damage on DNA. We have used functional complementation of an Escherichia coli tag alkA mutant to screen for 3-methyladenine DNA glycosylase genes in genomic libraries of the soil bacterium Bacillus cereus. Three genes were recovered: alkC, alkD and alkE. The amino acid sequence of AlkE is homologous to the E. coli AlkA sequence. AlkC and AlkD represent novel proteins without sequence similarity to any protein of known function. However, iterative and indirect sequence similarity searches revealed that AlkC and AlkD are distant homologues of each other within a new protein superfamily that is ubiquitous in the prokaryotic kingdom. Homologues of AlkC and AlkD were also identified in the amoebas Entamoeba histolytica and Dictyostelium discoideum, but no other eukaryotic counterparts of the superfamily were found. The alkC and alkD genes were expressed in E. coli and the proteins were purified to homogeneity. Both proteins were found to be specific for removal of N-alkylated bases, and showed no activity on oxidized or deaminated base lesions in DNA. B. cereus AlkC and AlkD thus define novel families of alkylbase DNA glycosylases within a new protein superfamily. PMID:16468998

  13. Tyrosine kinase gene rearrangements in epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Alice T.; Hsu, Peggy P.; Awad, Mark M.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements that lead to oncogenic kinase activation are observed in many epithelial cancers. These cancers express activated fusion kinases that drive the initiation and progression of malignancy, and often have a considerable response to small-molecule kinase inhibitors, which validates these fusion kinases as ‘druggable’ targets. In this Review, we examine the aetiologic, pathogenic and clinical features that are associated with cancers harbouring oncogenic fusion kinases, including anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), ROS1 and RET. We discuss the clinical outcomes with targeted therapies and explore strategies to discover additional kinases that are activated by chromosomal rearrangements in solid tumours. PMID:24132104

  14. Insight into the sporulation phosphorelay: crystal structure of the sensor domain of Bacillus subtilis histidine kinase, KinD.

    PubMed

    Wu, R; Gu, M; Wilton, R; Babnigg, G; Kim, Y; Pokkuluri, P R; Szurmant, H; Joachimiak, A; Schiffer, M

    2013-05-01

    The Bacillus subtilis KinD signal-transducing histidine kinase is a part of the sporulation phosphorelay known to regulate important developmental decisions such as sporulation and biofilm formation. We have determined crystal structures of the extracytoplasmic sensing domain of KinD, which was copurified and crystallized with a pyruvate ligand. The structure of a ligand-binding site mutant was also determined; it was copurified and crystallized with an acetate ligand. The structure of the KinD extracytoplasmic segment is similar to that of several other sensing domains of signal transduction proteins and is composed of tandem Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS)-like domains. The KinD ligand-binding site is located on the membrane distal PAS-like domain and appears to be highly selective; a single mutation, R131A, abolishes pyruvate binding and the mutant binds acetate instead. Differential scanning fluorimetry, using a variety of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids, identified pyruvate, propionate, and butyrate but not lactate, acetate, or malate as KinD ligands. A recent report found that malate induces biofilm formation in a KinD-dependent manner. It was suggested that malate might induce a metabolic shift and increased secretion of the KinD ligand of unknown identity. The structure and binding assays now suggests that this ligand is pyruvate and/or other small monocarboxylic acids. In summary, this study gives a first insight into the identity of a molecular ligand for one of the five phosphorelay kinases of B. subtilis. PMID:23436677

  15. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein to plasma membrane leads to necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Li, Wenjuan; Ren, Junming; Huang, Deli; He, Wan-ting; Song, Yunlong; Yang, Chao; Li, Wanyun; Zheng, Xinru; Chen, Pengda; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) was identified to function downstream of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced necrosis (also called necroptosis). However, how MLKL functions to mediate necroptosis is unknown. By reconstitution of MLKL function in MLKL-knockout cells, we showed that the N-terminus of MLKL is required for its function in necroptosis. The oligomerization of MLKL in TNF-treated cells is essential for necroptosis, as artificially forcing MLKL together by using the hormone-binding domain (HBD*) triggers necroptosis. Notably, forcing together the N-terminal domain (ND) but not the C-terminal kinase domain of MLKL causes necroptosis. Further deletion analysis showed that the four-α-helix bundle of MLKL (1-130 amino acids) is sufficient to trigger necroptosis. Both the HBD*-mediated and TNF-induced complexes of MLKL(ND) or MLKL are tetramers, and translocation of these complexes to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane precedes cell death. The homo-oligomerization is required for MLKL translocation and the signal sequence for plasma membrane location is located in the junction of the first and second α-helices of MLKL. The plasma membrane translocation of MLKL or MLKL(ND) leads to sodium influx, and depletion of sodium from the cell culture medium inhibits necroptosis. All of the above phenomena were not seen in apoptosis. Thus, the MLKL oligomerization leads to translocation of MLKL to lipid rafts of plasma membrane, and the plasma membrane MLKL complex acts either by itself or via other proteins to increase the sodium influx, which increases osmotic pressure, eventually leading to membrane rupture. PMID:24366341

  16. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain.

    PubMed

    Stroehlein, Andreas J; Young, Neil D; Korhonen, Pasi K; Chang, Bill C H; Sternberg, Paul W; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  17. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of four EphB kinase domains reveals contrasting thermodynamic, kinetic and inhibition profiles.

    PubMed

    Overman, Ross C; Debreczeni, Judit E; Truman, Caroline M; McAlister, Mark S; Attwood, Teresa K

    2013-01-01

    The Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular carcinoma) B receptors are important in a variety of cellular processes through their roles in cell-to-cell contact and signalling; their up-regulation and down-regulation has been shown to have implications in a variety of cancers. A greater understanding of the similarities and differences within this small, highly conserved family of tyrosine kinases will be essential to the identification of effective therapeutic opportunities for disease intervention. In this study, we have developed a route to production of multi-milligram quantities of highly purified, homogeneous, recombinant protein for the kinase domain of these human receptors in Escherichia coli. Analyses of these isolated catalytic fragments have revealed stark contrasts in their amenability to recombinant expression and their physical properties: e.g., a >16°C variance in thermal stability, a 3-fold difference in catalytic activity and disparities in their inhibitor binding profiles. We find EphB3 to be an outlier in terms of both its intrinsic stability, and more importantly its ligand-binding properties. Our findings have led us to speculate about both their biological significance and potential routes for generating EphB isozyme-selective small-molecule inhibitors. Our comprehensive methodologies provide a template for similar in-depth studies of other kinase superfamily members. PMID:23627399

  18. Analyses of Compact Trichinella Kinomes Reveal a MOS-Like Protein Kinase with a Unique N-Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Stroehlein, Andreas J.; Young, Neil D.; Korhonen, Pasi K.; Chang, Bill C. H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; La Rosa, Giuseppe; Pozio, Edoardo; Gasser, Robin B.

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worms of the genus Trichinella (phylum Nematoda; class Enoplea) represent a complex of at least twelve taxa that infect a range of different host animals, including humans, around the world. They are foodborne, intracellular nematodes, and their life cycles differ substantially from those of other nematodes. The recent characterization of the genomes and transcriptomes of all twelve recognized taxa of Trichinella now allows, for the first time, detailed studies of their molecular biology. In the present study, we defined, curated, and compared the protein kinase complements (kinomes) of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis using an integrated bioinformatic workflow employing transcriptomic and genomic data sets. We examined how variation in the kinome might link to unique aspects of Trichinella morphology, biology, and evolution. Furthermore, we utilized in silico structural modeling to discover and characterize a novel, MOS-like kinase with an unusual, previously undescribed N-terminal domain. Taken together, the present findings provide a basis for comparative investigations of nematode kinomes, and might facilitate the identification of Enoplea-specific intervention and diagnostic targets. Importantly, the in silico modeling approach assessed here provides an exciting prospect of being able to identify and classify currently unknown (orphan) kinases, as a foundation for their subsequent structural and functional investigation. PMID:27412987

  19. Assessing the range of kinase autoinhibition mechanisms in the insulin receptor family

    PubMed Central

    Artim, Stephen C.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the range of autoinhibitory mechanisms used by TKDs (tyrosine kinase domains) from the insulin receptor family of RTKs (receptor tyrosine kinases), we determined crystal structures of TKDs from TrkA (tropomyosin receptor kinase A, a nerve growth factor receptor) and Ror2 (receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2, an unconventional Wnt receptor). TrkA autoinhibition closely resembles that seen for the insulin receptor, relying on projection of an activation loop tyrosine residue into the substrate-binding site and occlusion of the ATP-binding site by the activation loop. Ror2 employs similar mechanisms, but the unusual replacement of the phenylalanine residue in its Asp-Phe-Gly motif with leucine necessitates occlusion of the ATP-binding site by other means. The unusual Asp-Leu-Gly motif in Ror2 is displaced compared with other inactive kinases, allowing the activation loop to interact directly with the TKD's αC helix, in another mode of autoinhibition that is characteristic of the other extreme of this receptor family: ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) and Met. These findings provide insight into the expected range of activating mutations in these TKDs in cancer. We also describe symmetrical dimers of the inactive TrkA TKD resembling those found in other RTKs, possibly reflecting an arrangement of kinase domains in a pre-formed TrkA dimer. PMID:22992069

  20. Crystal structures of GCN2 protein kinase C-terminal domains suggest regulatory differences in yeast and mammals.

    PubMed

    He, Hongzhen; Singh, Isha; Wek, Sheree A; Dey, Souvik; Baird, Thomas D; Wek, Ronald C; Georgiadis, Millie M

    2014-05-23

    In response to amino acid starvation, GCN2 phosphorylation of eIF2 leads to repression of general translation and initiation of gene reprogramming that facilitates adaptation to nutrient stress. GCN2 is a multidomain protein with key regulatory domains that directly monitor uncharged tRNAs which accumulate during nutrient limitation, leading to activation of this eIF2 kinase and translational control. A critical feature of regulation of this stress response kinase is its C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, we present high resolution crystal structures of murine and yeast CTDs, which guide a functional analysis of the mammalian GCN2. Despite low sequence identity, both yeast and mammalian CTDs share a core subunit structure and an unusual interdigitated dimeric form, albeit with significant differences. Disruption of the dimeric form of murine CTD led to loss of translational control by GCN2, suggesting that dimerization is critical for function as is true for yeast GCN2. However, although both CTDs bind single- and double-stranded RNA, murine GCN2 does not appear to stably associate with the ribosome, whereas yeast GCN2 does. This finding suggests that there are key regulatory differences between yeast and mammalian CTDs, which is consistent with structural differences. PMID:24719324

  1. Stability and solubility engineering of the EphB4 tyrosine kinase catalytic domain using a rationally designed synthetic library.

    PubMed

    Overman, R C; Green, I; Truman, C M; Read, J A; Embrey, K J; McAlister, M S B; Attwood, T K

    2013-10-01

    The inability to generate soluble, correctly folded recombinant protein is often a barrier to successful structural and functional studies. Access to affordable synthetic genes has, however, made it possible to design, make and test many more variants of a target protein to identify suitable constructs. We have used rational design and gene synthesis to create a controlled randomised library of the EphB4 receptor tyrosine kinase, with the aim of obtaining soluble, purifiable and active catalytic domain material at multi-milligram levels in Escherichia coli. Three main parameters were tested in designing the library--construct length, functional mutations and stability grafting. These variables were combined to generate a total of 9720 possible variants. The screening of 480 clones generated a 3% hit rate, with a purifiable solubility of up to 15 mg/L for some EphB4 constructs that was largely independent of construct length. Sequencing of the positive clones revealed a pair of hydrophobic core mutations that were key to obtaining soluble material. A minimal kinase domain construct containing these two mutations exhibited a +4.5°C increase in thermal stability over the wild-type protein. These approaches will be broadly applicable for solubility engineering of many different protein target classes. Atomic coordinates and structural factors have been deposited in PDB under the accession 2yn8 (EphB4 HP + staurosporine). PMID:23840071

  2. Aberrant Expression of Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Ovarian Carcinoma Independent of Gene Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shaoxian; Yang, Fei; Du, Xiang; Lu, Yongming; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. The oncogenic role of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is well characterized in many hematopoietic and solid tumors. ALK expression in ovarian carcinoma has been reported but the exact status of ALK protein and its association with clinicopathologic features requires further investigation. ALK expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in 110 primary ovarian carcinomas, including 85 cases of serous carcinoma and 25 cases of mucinous carcinoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were used for evaluating ALK translocation in ALK-positive ovarian carcinomas. Among 110 ovarian carcinomas, 23 (20.9%) cases were ALK positive by immunohistochemistry. All ALK-positive cases were ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma. ALK expression was detected in 23/85 (27.1%) ovarian serous carcinoma and 0/25 (0%) in ovarian mucinous carcinoma. None of the 23 ALK IHC-positive cases harbored ALK gene translocations by FISH or RT-PCR. ALK protein expression was associated with patient age, tumor stage, and histologic type. Specifically, the probability of ALK protein expression was significantly higher in high-grade serous carcinomas in older patients (above 50 y) with advanced disease (FIGO stage III and IV) compared with the low-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas in younger patients with relatively early disease. In conclusion, aberrant ALK expression is observed in ovarian serous carcinoma but not in mucinous carcinoma, is independent of gene translocation, and might be associated with progression and prognosis. PMID:27271776

  3. Human mutation within Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain-containing protein kinase (PASK) causes basal insulin hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Semplici, Francesca; Vaxillaire, Martine; Fogarty, Sarah; Semache, Meriem; Bonnefond, Amélie; Fontés, Ghislaine; Philippe, Julien; Meur, Gargi; Diraison, Frederique; Sessions, Richard B; Rutter, Jared; Poitout, Vincent; Froguel, Philippe; Rutter, Guy A

    2011-12-23

    PAS kinase (PASK) is a glucose-regulated protein kinase involved in the control of pancreatic islet hormone release and insulin sensitivity. We aimed here to identify mutations in the PASK gene that may be associated with young-onset diabetes in humans. We screened 18 diabetic probands with unelucidated maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). We identified two rare nonsynonymous mutations in the PASK gene (p.L1051V and p.G1117E), each of which was found in a single MODY family. Wild type or mutant PASKs were expressed in HEK 293 cells. Kinase activity of the affinity-purified proteins was assayed as autophosphorylation at amino acid Thr307 or against an Ugp1p-derived peptide. Whereas the PASK p.G1117E mutant displayed a ∼25% increase with respect to wild type PASK in the extent of autophosphorylation, and a ∼2-fold increase in kinase activity toward exogenous substrates, the activity of the p.L1051V mutant was unchanged. Amino acid Gly1117 is located in an α helical region opposing the active site of PASK and may elicit either: (a) a conformational change that increases catalytic efficiency or (b) a diminished inhibitory interaction with the PAS domain. Mouse islets were therefore infected with adenoviruses expressing wild type or mutant PASK and the regulation of insulin secretion was examined. PASK p.G1117E-infected islets displayed a 4-fold decrease in glucose-stimulated (16.7 versus 3 mM) insulin secretion, chiefly reflecting a 4.5-fold increase in insulin release at low glucose. In summary, we have characterized a rare mutation (p.G1117E) in the PASK gene from a young-onset diabetes family, which modulates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. PMID:22065581

  4. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    PubMed Central

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity. The phosphorylation state of the response regulator DegU also does not confer a straightforward “on/off” response; it is fine-tuned and at different levels triggers different sub-regulons. Here we describe serine phosphorylation of the DegS sensing domain, which stimulates its kinase activity. We demonstrate that DegS phosphorylation can be carried out by at least two B. subtilis Hanks-type kinases in vitro, and this stimulates the phosphate transfer towards DegU. The consequences of this process were studied in vivo, using phosphomimetic (Ser76Asp) and non-phosphorylatable (Ser76Ala) mutants of DegS. In a number of physiological assays focused on different processes regulated by DegU, DegS S76D phosphomimetic mutant behaved like a strain with intermediate levels of DegU phosphorylation, whereas DegS S76A behaved like a strain with lower levels of DegU phophorylation. These findings suggest a link between DegS phosphorylation at serine 76 and the level of DegU phosphorylation, establishing this post-translational modification as an additional trigger for this two-component system. PMID:21304896

  5. AtVPS34, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase of Arabidopsis thaliana, is an essential protein with homology to a calcium-dependent lipid binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Welters, P; Takegawa, K; Emr, S D; Chrispeels, M J

    1994-01-01

    The cDNA encoding phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase was cloned from Arabidopsis thaliana, and the derived amino acid sequence (AtVPS34) has a significantly higher homology to yeast PI 3-kinase (VPS34) than to the mammalian (p110). The protein has two conserved domains: a catalytic site with the ATP-binding site near the C terminus and a calcium-dependent lipid-binding domain near the N terminus. The plant cDNA does not rescue a yeast vps34 deletion mutant, but a chimeric gene in which the coding sequence for the C-terminal third of VPS34 is replaced by the corresponding sequence from the plant gene does rescue the yeast mutant. PI 3-kinase activity is detectable in extracts from plants that overexpress the plant PI 3-kinase. Expression of antisense constructs gives rise to second-generation transformed plants severely inhibited in growth and development. Images PMID:7972072

  6. Rapid and dramatic response to alectinib in an anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer patient who is critically ill.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tatsuya; Hida, Toyoaki; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-07-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have shown promising clinical activity in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that harbors ALK rearrangement. The next-generation ALK-TKI, alectinib, has been reported to have potent efficacy in ALK-positive NSCLC patients including on mutations that confer resistance to crizotinib, which was the first ALK-TKI approved for ALK-positive NSCLC. The efficacy and safety of ALK-TKIs, including crizotinib and alectinib, as the first-line treatment in critically ill patients is unclear. We report one ALK-positive NSCLC patient with poor performance status (PS) and disseminated intravascular coagulation because of respiratory failure and multiple metastases, and experienced the rapid and dramatic response to alectinib without adverse events that can lead to discontinuation and dose reduction of the drug. After a couple of months of treatment with alectinib, radiological review indicated a complete response. The present case is the first reported case of rapid and marked response to alectinib in ALK-positive NSCLC patients who had poor PS and severe organ dysfunction, such as disseminated intravascular coagulation. Further investigation of the safety and efficacy of ALK-TKI for ALK-positive NSCLC patients who are critically ill is warranted. PMID:26938871

  7. P-glycoprotein Mediates Ceritinib Resistance in Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase-rearranged Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Ryohei; Sakashita, Takuya; Yanagitani, Noriko; Ninomiya, Hironori; Horiike, Atsushi; Friboulet, Luc; Gainor, Justin F.; Motoi, Noriko; Dobashi, Akito; Sakata, Seiji; Tambo, Yuichi; Kitazono, Satoru; Sato, Shigeo; Koike, Sumie; John Iafrate, A.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Shaw, Alice T.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Takeuchi, Kengo; Nishio, Makoto; Fujita, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion oncogene is observed in 3%–5% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Crizotinib and ceritinib, a next-generation ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) active against crizotinib-refractory patients, are clinically available for the treatment of ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients, and multiple next-generation ALK-TKIs are currently under clinical evaluation. These ALK-TKIs exhibit robust clinical activity in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients; however, the emergence of ALK-TKI resistance restricts the therapeutic effect. To date, various secondary mutations or bypass pathway activation-mediated resistance have been identified, but large parts of the resistance mechanism are yet to be identified. Here, we report the discovery of p-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1) overexpression as a ceritinib resistance mechanism in ALK-rearranged NSCLC patients. P-gp exported ceritinib and its overexpression conferred ceritinib and crizotinib resistance, but not to PF-06463922 or alectinib, which are next-generation ALK inhibitors. Knockdown of ABCB1 or P-gp inhibitors sensitizes the patient-derived cancer cells to ceritinib, in vitro and in vivo. P-gp overexpression was identified in three out of 11 cases with in ALK-rearranged crizotinib or ceritinib resistant NSCLC patients. Our study suggests that alectinib, PF-06463922, or P-gp inhibitor with ceritinib could overcome the ceritinib or crizotinib resistance mediated by P-gp overexpression. PMID:26870817

  8. Kinase domain inhibition of leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) using a [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-b]pyridazine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Paul; Henderson, Jaclyn L; Kormos, Bethany L; Han, Seungil; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Wager, Travis T; Verhoest, Patrick R; Noell, G Stephen; Chen, Yi; Needle, Elie; Berger, Zdenek; Steyn, Stefanus J; Houle, Christopher; Hirst, Warren D

    2014-09-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been genetically linked to Parkinson's disease (PD). The most common mutant, G2019S, increases kinase activity, thus LRRK2 kinase inhibitors are potentially useful in the treatment of PD. We herein disclose the structure, potential ligand-protein binding interactions, and pharmacological profiling of potent and highly selective kinase inhibitors based on a triazolopyridazine chemical scaffold. PMID:25113930

  9. Comprehensive histologic analysis of ALK-rearranged lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Tsuta, Koji; Nakamura, Harumi; Kohno, Takashi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Asamura, Hisao; Sekine, Ikuo; Fukayama, Masashi; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Furuta, Koh; Tsuda, Hitoshi

    2011-08-01

    A subset (1% to 5%) of non-small-cell lung carcinomas harbors the EML4-ALK fusion gene. Data from previous studies on the histomorphology of ALK-rearranged lung cancer are inconsistent, and the specific histologic parameters that characterize this subset and how accurately such parameters predict underlying ALK abnormality remain uncertain. To answer these questions, we performed a comprehensive histologic analysis of 54 surgically resected, extensively sampled ALK-rearranged lung carcinomas and compared them with 100 consecutive resections of ALK-wild-type lung cancers. All 54 cases showed at least a focal adenocarcinoma component, and 3 and 2 cases had additional squamous and sarcomatoid differentiation, respectively. Solid or acinar growth pattern, cribriform structure, presence of mucous cells (signet-ring cells or goblet cells), abundant extracellular mucus, lack of lepidic growth, and lack of significant nuclear pleomorphism were more common in ALK-positive cancers. Two recognizable constellations of findings, a solid signet-ring cell pattern and a mucinous cribriform pattern, were present at least focally in the majority (78%) of ALK-positive tumors, but were rare (1%) in ALK-negative tumors. Multivariate analysis showed that a combination of these 2 patterns was the most powerful histologic indicator of ALK rearrangement. Characteristic histologies were present both in primary sites and in metastases. Thus, histologic findings may help to identify cases for ALK testing. However, none of the histologic parameters were completely sensitive or specific to ALK rearrangement, and histomorphology should not replace confirmatory molecular or immunohistochemical studies. ALK-positive cancers commonly showed coexpression of thyroid transcription factor-1 and p63, and its significance is currently unclear. PMID:21753699

  10. Mutations in N-terminal Flanking Region of Blue Light-sensing Light-Oxygen and Voltage 2 (LOV2) Domain Disrupt Its Repressive Activity on Kinase Domain in the Chlamydomonas Phototropin*

    PubMed Central

    Aihara, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Okajima, Koji; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Tomomi; Tokutomi, Satoru; Tanaka, Kazuma; Nagatani, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Phototropin is a light-regulated kinase that mediates a variety of photoresponses such as phototropism, chloroplast positioning, and stomata opening in plants to increase the photosynthetic efficiency. Blue light stimulus first induces local conformational changes in the chromophore-bearing light-oxygen and voltage 2 (LOV2) domain of phototropin, which in turn activates the serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) kinase domain in the C terminus. To examine the kinase activity of full-length phototropin conventionally, we employed the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this organism, Ser/Thr kinases (Fpk1p and Fpk2p) that show high sequence similarity to the kinase domain of phototropins exist. First, we demonstrated that the phototropin from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrPHOT) could complement loss of Fpk1p and Fpk2p to allow cell growth in yeast. Furthermore, this reaction was blue light-dependent, indicating that CrPHOT was indeed light-activated in yeast cells. We applied this system to a large scale screening for amino acid substitutions in CrPHOT that elevated the kinase activity in darkness. Consequently, we identified a cluster of mutations located in the N-terminal flanking region of LOV2 (R199C, L202L, D203N/G/V, L204P, T207I, and R210H). An in vitro phosphorylation assay confirmed that these mutations substantially reduced the repressive activity of LOV2 on the kinase domain in darkness. Furthermore, biochemical analyses of the representative T207I mutant demonstrated that the mutation affected neither spectral nor multimerization properties of CrPHOT. Hence, the N-terminal flanking region of LOV2, as is the case with the C-terminal flanking Jα region, appears to play a crucial role in the regulation of kinase activity in phototropin. PMID:22291022

  11. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 7 (ERK7), a Novel ERK with a C-Terminal Domain That Regulates Its Activity, Its Cellular Localization, and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mark K.; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Hershenson, Marc B.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play distinct roles in a variety of cellular signaling pathways and are regulated through multiple mechanisms. In this study, a novel 61-kDa member of the MAP kinase family, termed extracellular signal-regulated kinase 7 (ERK7), has been cloned and characterized. Although it has the signature TEY activation motif of ERK1 and ERK2, ERK7 is not activated by extracellular stimuli that typically activate ERK1 and ERK2 or by common activators of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Instead, ERK7 has appreciable constitutive activity in serum-starved cells that is dependent on the presence of its C-terminal domain. Interestingly, the C-terminal tail, not the kinase domain, of ERK7 regulates its nuclear localization and inhibition of growth. Taken together, these results elucidate a novel type of MAP kinase whereby interactions via its C-terminal tail, rather than extracellular signal-mediated activation cascades, regulate its activity, localization, and function. PMID:9891064

  12. Involvement of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk tyrosine kinase in Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Yuji; Kawana, Akiko; Igarashi, Asae; Yamaguchi, Naoto . E-mail: nyama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2006-07-15

    Chk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates Src-family kinases and suppresses their kinase activity. We recently showed that Chk localizes to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm and inhibits cell proliferation. In this study, we explored the role of the N-terminal unique domain of Chk in nuclear localization and Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. In situ binding experiments showed that the N-terminal domain of Chk was associated with the nucleus and the nuclear matrix. The presence of the N-terminal domain of Chk led to a fourfold increase in cell population exhibiting Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus. Expression of Chk but not kinase-deficient Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a variety of proteins ranging from 23 kDa to {approx}200 kDa, especially in Triton X-100-insoluble fraction that included chromatin and the nuclear matrix. Intriguingly, in situ subnuclear fractionations revealed that Chk induced tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins that were associated with the nuclear matrix. These results suggest that various unidentified substrates of Chk, besides Src-family kinases, may be present in the nucleus. Thus, our findings indicate that the importance of the N-terminal domain to Chk-induced tyrosine phosphorylation in the nucleus, implicating that these nuclear tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins may contribute to inhibition of cell proliferation.

  13. Directed Evolution of a Highly Specific FN3 Monobody to the SH3 Domain of Human Lyn Tyrosine Kinase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Renhua; Fang, Pete; Hao, Zengping; Kay, Brian K

    2016-01-01

    Affinity reagents of high affinity and specificity are very useful for studying the subcellular locations and quantities of individual proteins. To generate high-quality affinity reagents for human Lyn tyrosine kinase, a phage display library of fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies was affinity selected with a recombinant form of the Lyn SH3 domain. While a highly specific monobody, TA8, was initially isolated, we chose to improve its affinity through directed evolution. A secondary library of 1.2 × 109 variants was constructed and screened by affinity selection, yielding three variants, two of which have affinities of ~ 40 nM, a 130-fold increase over the original TA8 monobody. One of the variants, 2H7, displayed high specificity to the Lyn SH3 domain, as shown by ELISA and probing arrays of 150 SH3 domains. Furthermore, the 2H7 monobody was able to pull down endogenous Lyn from a lysate of Burkitt's lymphoma cells, thereby demonstrating its utility as an affinity reagent for detecting Lyn in a complex biological mixture. PMID:26731115

  14. Directed Evolution of a Highly Specific FN3 Monobody to the SH3 Domain of Human Lyn Tyrosine Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Fang, Pete; Hao, Zengping; Kay, Brian K.

    2016-01-01

    Affinity reagents of high affinity and specificity are very useful for studying the subcellular locations and quantities of individual proteins. To generate high-quality affinity reagents for human Lyn tyrosine kinase, a phage display library of fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies was affinity selected with a recombinant form of the Lyn SH3 domain. While a highly specific monobody, TA8, was initially isolated, we chose to improve its affinity through directed evolution. A secondary library of 1.2 × 109 variants was constructed and screened by affinity selection, yielding three variants, two of which have affinities of ~ 40 nM, a 130-fold increase over the original TA8 monobody. One of the variants, 2H7, displayed high specificity to the Lyn SH3 domain, as shown by ELISA and probing arrays of 150 SH3 domains. Furthermore, the 2H7 monobody was able to pull down endogenous Lyn from a lysate of Burkitt's lymphoma cells, thereby demonstrating its utility as an affinity reagent for detecting Lyn in a complex biological mixture. PMID:26731115

  15. Identification of tyrosines 154 and 307 in the extracellular domain and 653 and 766 in the intracellular domain as phosphorylation sites in the heparin-binding fibroblast growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (flg).

    PubMed Central

    Hou, J.; McKeehan, K.; Kan, M.; Carr, S. A.; Huddleston, M. J.; Crabb, J. W.; McKeehan, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Four tyrosine residues have been identified as phosphorylation sites in the tyrosine kinase isoform of the heparin-binding fibroblast growth factor receptor flg (FGF-R1). Baculoviral-insect cell-derived recombinant FGF-R1 was phosphorylated and fragmented with trypsin while immobilized on heparin-agarose beads. Phosphotyrosine peptides were purified by chromatography on immobilized anti-phosphotyrosine antibody and analyzed by Edman degradation and electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Tyrosine residue 653, which is in a homologous spatial position to major autophosphorylation sites in the catalytic domain of the src and insulin receptor kinases, is the major intracellular FGF-R1 phosphorylation site. Residue 766 in the COOH-terminus outside the kinase domain is a secondary site. Tyrosine residues 154 and 307, which are in the extracellular domain of transmembrane receptor isoforms and are in an unusual sequence context for tyrosine phosphorylation, were also phosphorylated. PMID:8443592

  16. Development of potent ALK inhibitor and its molecular inhibitory mechanism against NSCLC harboring EML4-ALK proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Chung Hyo; Yun, Jeong In; Lee, Kwangho; Lee, Chong Ock; Lee, Heung Kyoung; Yun, Chang-Soo; Hwang, Jong Yeon; Cho, Sung Yun; Jung, Heejung; Kim, Pilho; Ha, Jae Du; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Choi, Sang Un; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Kim, Hyoung Rae; Park, Chi Hoon

    2015-08-28

    Here, we show the newly synthesized and potent ALK inhibitor having similar scaffold to KRCA-0008, which was reported previously, and its molecular mechanism against cancer cells harboring EML4-ALK fusion protein. Through ALK wild type enzyme assay, we selected two compounds, KRCA-0080 and KRCA-0087, which have trifluoromethyl instead of chloride in R2 position. We characterized these newly synthesized compounds by in vitro and in vivo assays. Enzyme assay shows that KRCA-0080 is more potent against various ALK mutants, including L1196M, G1202R, T1151-L1152insT, and C1156Y, which are seen in crizotinib-resistant patients, than KRCA-0008 is. Cell based assays demonstrate our compounds downregulate the cellular signaling, such as Akt and Erk, by suppressing ALK activity to inhibit the proliferation of the cells harboring EML4-ALK. Interestingly, our compounds induced strong G1/S arrest in H3122 cells leading to the apoptosis, which is proved by PARP-1 cleavage. In vivo H3122 xenograft assay, we found that KRCA-0080 shows significant reduction in tumor size compared to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%. Conclusively, we report a potent ALK inhibitor which shows significant in vivo efficacy as well as excellent inhibitory activity against various ALK mutants. - Highlights: • We synthesized KRCA-0008 derivatives having trifluoromethyl instead of chloride. • KRCA-0080 shows superior activity against several ALK mutants to KRCA-0008. • Cellular assays show our ALK inhibitors suppress only EML4-ALK positive cells. • Our ALK inhibitors induce G1/S arrest to lead apoptosis in H3122 cells. • KRCA-0080 has superior in vivo efficacy to crizotinib and KRCA-0008 by 15–20%.

  17. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry; Leprieur, Etienne Giroux

    2016-03-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  18. Fatal Haemoptysis Associated with Dramatic Response to Crizotinib in an ALK-Rearranged Lung Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mussat, Elodie; Giraud, Violaine; Julie, Catherine; Chinet, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    The presence of an ALK (Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase) rearrangement is a rare molecular feature in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC), and concerns mainly non- or light smokers, young patients, with adenocarcinoma histological type. These tumours are particularly sensitive to Alk-targeted therapies, as crizotinib. Crizotinib is usually well-tolerated. We report a case of fatal haemoptysis associated with dramatic response to crizotinib in a patient with an ALK-rearranged lung adenocarcinoma. The patient presented a mediastinal invasion with tracheal involvement and compression of the right pulmonary artery. The initial evolution under crizotinib was good with tumour response. At 6 weeks of crizotinib the patient presented a massive haemoptysis with a tracheobronchial fistula and pneumomediastinum. She died of acute respiratory failure. Our case is the first to report a fatal effect of crizotinib associated with tumour necrosis and good tumour response on a massive mediastinal infiltration. Precautions are recommended with the use of crizotinib in proximal lung tumours with vascular invasion. PMID:27134984

  19. Alectinib's activity against CNS metastases from ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer: a single institution case series.

    PubMed

    Metro, Giulio; Lunardi, Gianluigi; Bennati, Chiara; Chiarini, Pietro; Sperduti, Isabella; Ricciuti, Biagio; Marcomigni, Luca; Costa, Cinzia; Crinò, Lucio; Floridi, Piero; Gori, Stefania; Chiari, Rita

    2016-09-01

    In the present study we assessed the activity of the next-generation anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (-TKI) alectinib, in patients with ALK-postive, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and central nervous system (CNS) metastases. NSCLCs with ALK-positive disease, as assessed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and CNS metastases were treated with alectinib 600 mg BID. Included patients were followed prospectively in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drug, with particular emphasis on activity in the CNS. Eleven consecutive patients were enrolled. The majority of them were pretreated with crizotinib (n = 10, 90.9 %), and cranial radiotherapy (n = 8, 72.7 %). Six of the seven patients with measurable CNS disease experienced a CNS response, including three patients who were naïve for cranial radiation. Median duration of response was 8 months. For the whole population, median CNS-progression-free survival (-PFS), systemic-PFS, overall-PFS, overall survival, and 1-year survival were 8, 11, 8, 13 months, and 31.1 %, respectively. Two patients experiencing a CNS response were assessed for alectinib's concentrations in serum and cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), and showed a CSF-to-serum ratio ranging from 0.001 to 0.003 ng/mL. Alectinib is highly active against CNS metastases from ALK-positive NSCLCs, irrespective of prior treatment(s) with ALK-TKI(s) and/or cranial radiotherapy. The low CSF-to-serum ratio of alectinib suggests that measuring the concentrations of the drug in the CSF may not be a reliable surrogate of its distribution into the CNS. PMID:27324494

  20. Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Concomitant EGFR, KRAS, and ALK Mutation: Clinicopathologic Features of 12 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Taebum; Lee, Boram; Choi, Yoon-La; Han, Joungho; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Um, Sang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene (KRAS), and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were thought to be mutually exclusive, some tumors harbor concomitant mutations. Discovering a driver mutation on the basis of morphologic features and therapeutic responses with mutation analysis can be used to understand pathogenesis and predict resistance in targeted therapy. Methods: In 6,637 patients with NSCLC, 12 patients who had concomitant mutations were selected and clinicopathologic features were reviewed. Clinical characteristics included sex, age, smoking history, previous treatment, and targeted therapy with response and disease-free survival. Histologic features included dominant patterns, nuclear and cytoplasmic features. Results: All patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma and had an EGFR mutation. Six patients had concomitant KRAS mutations and the other six had KRAS mutations. Five of six EGFR-KRAS mutation patients showed papillary and acinar histologic patterns with hobnail cells. Three of six received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and showed partial response for 7–29 months. All six EGFR-ALK mutation patients showed solid or cribriform patterns and three had signet ring cells. Five of six EGFR-ALK mutation patients received EGFR TKI and/or ALK inhibitor and four showed partial response or stable disease, except for one patient who had acquired an EGFR mutation. Conclusions: EGFR and ALK mutations play an important role as driver mutations in double mutated NSCLC, and morphologic analysis can be used to predict treatment response. PMID:27086595

  1. Gain-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans lin-1 ETS gene identify a C-terminal regulatory domain phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, D; Beitel, G J; Clark, S G; Horvitz, H R; Kornfeld, K

    1998-01-01

    Genetic analysis of lin-1 loss-of-function mutations suggests that lin-1 controls multiple cell-fate decisions during Caenorhabditis elegans development and is negatively regulated by a conserved receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-ERK mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signal transduction pathway. LIN-1 protein contains an ETS domain and presumably regulates transcription. We identified and characterized six gain-of-function mutations that define a new class of lin-1 allele. These lin-1 alleles appeared to be constitutively active and unresponsive to negative regulation. Each allele has a single-base change that affects the predicted C terminus of LIN-1, suggesting this region is required for negative regulation. The C terminus of LIN-1 was a high-affinity substrate for Erk2 in vitro, suggesting that LIN-1 is directly regulated by ERK MAP kinase. Because mpk-1 ERK MAP kinase controls at least one cell-fate decision that does not require lin-1, our results suggest that MPK-1 contributes to the specificity of this receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by phosphorylating different proteins in different developmental contexts. These lin-1 mutations all affect a four-amino-acid motif, FQFP, that is conserved in vertebrate and Drosophila ETS proteins that are also phosphorylated by ERK MAP kinase. This sequence may be a substrate recognition motif for the ERK subfamily of MAP kinases. PMID:9691039

  2. Interaction between the tRNA-binding and C-terminal domains of Yeast Gcn2 regulates kinase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lageix, Sebastien; Zhang, Jinwei; Rothenburg, Stefan; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2015-02-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α. Gcn2 is activated in amino acid-deprived cells by binding of uncharged tRNA to the regulatory domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. We used a genetic approach to identify a key regulatory surface in Gcn2 that is proximal to the predicted active site of the HisRS domain and likely remodeled by tRNA binding. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions on this surface were identified that activate Gcn2 at low levels of tRNA binding (Gcd- phenotype), while other substitutions block kinase activation (Gcn- phenotype), in some cases without altering tRNA binding by Gcn2 in vitro. Remarkably, the Gcn- substitutions increase affinity of the HisRS domain for the C-terminal domain (CTD), previously implicated as a kinase autoinhibitory segment, in a manner dampened by HisRS domain Gcd- substitutions and by amino acid starvation in vivo. Moreover, tRNA specifically antagonizes HisRS/CTD association in vitro. These findings support a model wherein HisRS-CTD interaction facilitates the autoinhibitory function of the CTD in nonstarvation conditions, with tRNA binding eliciting kinase activation by weakening HisRS-CTD association with attendant disruption of the autoinhibitory KD-CTD interaction. PMID:25695491

  3. Interaction between the tRNA-Binding and C-Terminal Domains of Yeast Gcn2 Regulates Kinase Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lageix, Sebastien; Zhang, Jinwei; Rothenburg, Stefan; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2015-01-01

    The stress-activated protein kinase Gcn2 regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α. Gcn2 is activated in amino acid-deprived cells by binding of uncharged tRNA to the regulatory domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase, but the molecular mechanism of activation is unclear. We used a genetic approach to identify a key regulatory surface in Gcn2 that is proximal to the predicted active site of the HisRS domain and likely remodeled by tRNA binding. Mutations leading to amino acid substitutions on this surface were identified that activate Gcn2 at low levels of tRNA binding (Gcd- phenotype), while other substitutions block kinase activation (Gcn- phenotype), in some cases without altering tRNA binding by Gcn2 in vitro. Remarkably, the Gcn- substitutions increase affinity of the HisRS domain for the C-terminal domain (CTD), previously implicated as a kinase autoinhibitory segment, in a manner dampened by HisRS domain Gcd- substitutions and by amino acid starvation in vivo. Moreover, tRNA specifically antagonizes HisRS/CTD association in vitro. These findings support a model wherein HisRS-CTD interaction facilitates the autoinhibitory function of the CTD in nonstarvation conditions, with tRNA binding eliciting kinase activation by weakening HisRS-CTD association with attendant disruption of the autoinhibitory KD-CTD interaction. PMID:25695491

  4. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  5. Small molecules that allosterically inhibit p21-activated kinase activity by binding to the regulatory p21-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Duk-Joong; Choi, Chang-Ki; Lee, Chan-Soo; Park, Mee-Hee; Tian, Xizhe; Kim, Nam Doo; Lee, Kee-In; Choi, Joong-Kwon; Ahn, Jin Hee; Shin, Eun-Young; Shin, Injae; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2016-01-01

    p21-activated kinases (PAKs) are key regulators of actin dynamics, cell proliferation and cell survival. Deregulation of PAK activity contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders. Using an ELISA-based screening protocol, we identified naphtho(hydro)quinone-based small molecules that allosterically inhibit PAK activity. These molecules interfere with the interactions between the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1 and Rho GTPases by binding to the PBD. Importantly, they inhibit the activity of full-length PAKs and are selective for PAK1 and PAK3 in vitro and in living cells. These compounds may potentially be useful for determining the details of the PAK signaling pathway and may also be used as lead molecules in the development of more selective and potent PAK inhibitors. PMID:27126178

  6. Flavonol Activation Defines an Unanticipated Ligand-Binding Site in the Kinase-RNase Domain of IRE1

    SciTech Connect

    Wiseman, R. Luke; Zhang, Yuhong; Lee, Kenneth P.K.; Harding, Heather P.; Haynes, Cole M.; Price, Joshua; Sicheri, Frank; Ron, David

    2010-08-18

    Signaling in the most conserved branch of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) unfolded protein response (UPR) is initiated by sequence-specific cleavage of the HAC1/XBP1 mRNA by the ER stress-induced kinase-endonuclease IRE1. We have discovered that the flavonol quercetin activates yeast IRE1's RNase and potentiates activation by ADP, a natural activating ligand that engages the IRE1 nucleotide-binding cleft. Enzyme kinetics and the structure of a cocrystal of IRE1 complexed with ADP and quercetin reveal engagement by quercetin of an unanticipated ligand-binding pocket at the dimer interface of IRE1's kinase extension nuclease (KEN) domain. Analytical ultracentrifugation and crosslinking studies support the preeminence of enhanced dimer formation in quercetin's mechanism of action. These findings hint at the existence of endogenous cytoplasmic ligands that may function alongside stress signals from the ER lumen to modulate IRE1 activity and at the potential for the development of drugs that modify UPR signaling from this unanticipated site.

  7. The effector domain of myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate binds strongly to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Arbuzova, A; Hangyás-Mihályné, G; McLaughlin, S

    2001-02-16

    Both the myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate protein (MARCKS) and a peptide corresponding to its basic effector domain, MARCKS-(151-175), inhibit phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC)-catalyzed hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) in vesicles (Glaser, M., Wanaski, S., Buser, C. A., Boguslavsky, V., Rashidzada, W., Morris, A., Rebecchi, M., Scarlata, S. F., Runnels, L. W., Prestwich, G. D., Chen, J., Aderem, A., Ahn, J., and McLaughlin, S. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 26187-26193). We report here that adding 10-100 nm MARCKS-(151-175) to a subphase containing either PLC-delta or -beta inhibits hydrolysis of PIP(2) in a monolayer and that this inhibition is due to the strong binding of the peptide to PIP(2). Two direct binding measurements, based on centrifugation and fluorescence, show that approximately 10 nm PIP(2), in the form of vesicles containing 0.01%, 0.1%, or 1% PIP(2), binds 50% of MARCKS-(151-175). Both electrophoretic mobility measurements and competition experiments suggest that MARCKS-(151-175) forms an electroneutral complex with approximately 4 PIP(2). MARCKS-(151-175) binds equally well to PI(4,5)P(2) and PI(3,4)P(2). Local electrostatic interactions of PIP(2) with MARCKS-(151-175) contribute to the binding energy because increasing the salt concentration from 100 to 500 mm decreases the binding 100-fold. We hypothesize that the effector domain of MARCKS can bind a significant fraction of the PIP(2) in the plasma membrane, and release the bound PIP(2) upon interaction with Ca(2+)/calmodulin or phosphorylation by protein kinase C. PMID:11053422

  8. Dimerization of the EphA1 receptor tyrosine kinase transmembrane domain: Insights into the mechanism of receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Chavent, Matthieu; Chetwynd, Alan P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2014-10-28

    EphA1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that plays a key role in developmental processes, including guidance of the migration of axons and cells in the nervous system. EphA1, in common with other RTKs, contains an N-terminal extracellular domain, a single transmembrane (TM) α-helix, and a C-terminal intracellular kinase domain. The TM helix forms a dimer, as seen in recent NMR studies. We have modeled the EphA1 TM dimer using a multiscale approach combining coarse-grain (CG) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The one-dimensional potential of mean force (PMF) for this system, based on interhelix separation, has been calculated using CG MD simulations. This provides a view of the free energy landscape for helix-helix interactions of the TM dimer in a lipid bilayer. The resulting PMF profiles suggest two states, consistent with a rotation-coupled activation mechanism. The more stable state corresponds to a right-handed helix dimer interacting via an N-terminal glycine zipper motif, consistent with a recent NMR structure (2K1K). A second metastable state corresponds to a structure in which the glycine zipper motif is not involved. Analysis of unrestrained CG MD simulations based on representative models from the PMF calculations or on the NMR structure reveals possible pathways of interconversion between these two states, involving helix rotations about their long axes. This suggests that the interaction of TM helices in EphA1 dimers may be intrinsically dynamic. This provides a potential mechanism for signaling whereby extracellular events drive a shift in the repopulation of the underlying TM helix dimer energy landscape. PMID:25286141

  9. Binding of Drosophila Polo kinase to its regulator Matrimony is noncanonical and involves two separate functional domains

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Amanda M.; Hughes, Stacie E.; Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Smith, S. Kendall; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Collins, Kimberly A.; Friederichs, Jennifer M.; Florens, Laurence; Swanson, Selene K.; Pelot, Marissa C.; Miller, Danny E.; Washburn, Michael P.; Jaspersen, Sue L.; Hawley, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Polo kinase physically interacts with, and is repressed by, the Matrimony (Mtrm) protein during oogenesis. Females heterozygous for a deletion of the mtrm gene display defects in chromosome segregation at meiosis I. However, a complete absence of Mtrm results in both meiotic catastrophe and female sterility. We show that three phosphorylated residues in an N-terminal region in Mtrm are required for Mtrm::Polo binding. However, this binding is noncanonical; it does not require either a complete S-pS/pT-P motif in Mtrm or key residues in the Polo-box domain of Polo that allow Polo to bind phosphorylated substrates. By using fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy to characterize the Mtrm::Polo interaction in vivo, we show that a sterile α-motif (SAM) domain located at the C terminus of Mtrm increases the stability of Mtrm::Polo binding. Although Mtrm’s C-terminal SAM domain is not required to rescue the chromosome segregation defects observed in mtrm/+ females, it is essential to prevent both meiotic catastrophe and the female sterility observed in mtrm/mtrm females. We propose that Polo’s interaction with the cluster of phosphorylated residues alone is sufficient to rescue the meiosis I defect. However, the strengthening of Mtrm::Polo binding mediated by the SAM domain is necessary to prevent meiotic catastrophe and ensure female fertility. Characterization of the Mtrm::Polo interaction, as well as that of other Polo regulators, may assist in the design of a new class of Polo inhibitors to be used as targeted anticancer therapeutic agents. PMID:23479640

  10. ATP forms a stable complex with the essential histidine kinase WalK (YycG) domain

    SciTech Connect

    Celikel, Reha; Veldore, Vidya Harini; Mathews, Irimpan; Devine, Kevin M.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2012-07-01

    The histidine WalK (YycG) plays a crucial role in coordinating murein synthesis with cell division and the crystal structure of its ATP binding domain has been determined. Interestingly the bound ATP was not hydrolyzed during crystallization and remains intact in the crystal lattice. In Bacillus subtilis, the WalRK (YycFG) two-component system coordinates murein synthesis with cell division. It regulates the expression of autolysins that function in cell-wall remodeling and of proteins that modulate autolysin activity. The transcription factor WalR is activated upon phosphorylation by the histidine kinase WalK, a multi-domain homodimer. It autophosphorylates one of its histidine residues by transferring the γ-phosphate from ATP bound to its ATP-binding domain. Here, the high-resolution crystal structure of the ATP-binding domain of WalK in complex with ATP is presented at 1.61 Å resolution. The bound ATP remains intact in the crystal lattice. It appears that the strong binding interactions and the nature of the binding pocket contribute to its stability. The triphosphate moiety of ATP wraps around an Mg{sup 2+} ion, providing three O atoms for coordination in a near-ideal octahedral geometry. The ATP molecule also makes strong interactions with the protein. In addition, there is a short contact between the exocyclic O3′ of the sugar ring and O2B of the β-phosphate, implying an internal hydrogen bond. The stability of the WalK–ATP complex in the crystal lattice suggests that such a complex may exist in vivo poised for initiation of signal transmission. This feature may therefore be part of the sensing mechanism by which the WalRK two-component system is so rapidly activated when cells encounter conditions conducive for growth.

  11. Determination and validation of mTOR kinase-domain 3D structure by homology modeling

    PubMed Central

    Lakhlili, Wiame; Chevé, Gwénaël; Yasri, Abdelaziz; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is considered as one of the commonly activated and deregulated signaling pathways in human cancer. mTOR is associated with other proteins in two molecular complexes: mTOR complex 1/Raptor and the mTOR complex 2/Rictor. Using the crystal structure of the related lipid kinase PI3Kγ, we built a model of the catalytic region of mTOR. The modeling of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of the mTOR was performed by homology modeling program SWISS-MODEL. The quality and validation of the obtained model were performed using PROCHECK and PROVE softwares. The overall stereochemical property of the protein was assessed by the Ramachandran plot. The model validation was also done by docking of known inhibitors. In this paper, we describe and validate a 3D model for the mTOR catalytic site. PMID:26257525

  12. Oncogenic activation of the PI3-kinase p110β isoform via the tumor-derived PIK3Cβ(D1067V) kinase domain mutation.

    PubMed

    Pazarentzos, E; Giannikopoulos, P; Hrustanovic, G; St John, J; Olivas, V R; Gubens, M A; Balassanian, R; Weissman, J; Polkinghorn, W; Bivona, T G

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway occurs widely in human cancers. Although somatic mutations in the PI3K pathway genes PIK3CA and PTEN are known to drive PI3K pathway activation and cancer growth, the significance of somatic mutations in other PI3K pathway genes is less clear. Here, we establish the signaling and oncogenic properties of a recurrent somatic mutation in the PI3K p110β isoform that resides within its kinase domain (PIK3Cβ(D1067V)). We initially observed PIK3Cβ(D1067V) by exome sequencing analysis of an EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor biopsy from a patient with acquired erlotinib resistance. On the basis of this finding, we hypothesized that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) might function as a novel tumor-promoting genetic alteration, and potentially an oncogene, in certain cancers. Consistent with this hypothesis, analysis of additional tumor exome data sets revealed the presence of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) at low frequency in other patient tumor samples (including renal cell carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, thyroid carcinoma and endometrial carcinoma). Functional studies revealed that PIK3Cβ(D1067V) promoted PI3K pathway signaling, enhanced cell growth in vitro, and was sufficient for tumor formation in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of PIK3Cβ with TGX-221 (isoform-selective p110β inhibitor) specifically suppressed growth in patient-derived renal-cell carcinoma cells with endogenous PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and in NIH-3T3 and human EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells engineered to express this mutant PI3K. In the EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinoma cells, expression of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) also promoted erlotinib resistance. Our data establish a novel oncogenic form of PI3K, revealing the signaling and oncogenic properties of PIK3Cβ(D1067V) and its potential therapeutic relevance in cancer. Our findings provide new insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying PI3K pathway activation in

  13. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration. PMID:26681405

  14. Structure of the Brachydanio Rerio Polo-Like Kinase 1 (Plk1) Catalytic Domain in Complex With An Extended Inhibitor Targeting the Adaptive Pocket of the Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Elling, R.A.; Fucini, R.V.; Hanan, E.J.; Barr, K.J.; Zhu, J.; Paulvannan, K.; Yang, W.; Romanowski, M.J.

    2009-05-18

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is a member of the Polo-like kinase family of serine/threonine kinases involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression and cytokinesis and is an attractive target for the development of anticancer therapeutics. The catalytic domain of this enzyme shares significant primary amino-acid homology and structural similarity with another mitotic kinase, Aurora A. While screening an Aurora A library of ATP-competitive compounds, a urea-containing inhibitor with low affinity for mouse Aurora A but with submicromolar potency for human and zebrafish Plk1 (hPlk1 and zPlk1, respectively) was identified. A crystal structure of the zebrafish Plk1 kinase domain-inhibitor complex reveals that the small molecule occupies the purine pocket and extends past the catalytic lysine into the adaptive region of the active site. Analysis of the structures of this protein-inhibitor complex and of similar small molecules cocrystallized with other kinases facilitates understanding of the specificity of the inhibitor for Plk1 and documents for the first time that Plk1 can accommodate extended ATP-competitive compounds that project toward the adaptive pocket and help the enzyme order its activation segment.

  15. Mitoxantrone targets the ATP-binding site of FAK, binds the FAK kinase domain and decreases FAK, Pyk-2, c-Src, and IGF-1R in vitro kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita M; Ho, Baotran; Zheng, Min; Magis, Andrew; Ostrov, David; Cance, William G

    2013-05-01

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor kinase that is overexpressed in many types of tumors and plays a key role in cell adhesion, spreading, motility, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and survival. Recently, FAK has been proposed as a target for cancer therapy, and we performed computer modeling and screening of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) small molecule compounds database to target the ATP-binding site of FAK, K454. More than 140,000 small molecule compounds were docked into the crystal structure of the kinase domain of FAK in 100 different orientations using DOCK5.1 that identified small molecule compounds, targeting the K454 site, called A-compounds. To find the therapeutic efficacy of these compounds, we examined the effect of twenty small molecule compounds on cell viability by MTT assays in different cancer cell lines. One compound, A18 (1,4-bis(diethylamino)-5,8- dihydroxy anthraquinon) was a mitoxantrone derivative and significantly decreased viability in most of the cells comparable to the to the level of FAK kinase inhibitors TAE-226 (Novartis, Inc) and PF-573,228 (Pfizer). The A18 compound specifically blocked autophosphorylation of FAK like TAE-226 and PF-228. ForteBio Octet Binding assay demonstrated that mitoxantrone (1,4-dihydroxy- 5,8-bis[2-(2-hydroxyethylamino) ethylamino] anthracene-9,10-dione directly binds the FAK-kinase domain. In addition, mitoxantrone significantly decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and inhibited the kinase activity of FAK and Y56/577 FAK phosphorylation at 10-20 μM. Mitoxantrone did not affect phosphorylation of EGFR, but decreased Pyk-2, c-Src, and IGF-1R kinase activities. The data demonstrate that mitoxantrone decreases cancer viability, binds FAK-Kinase domain, inhibits its kinase activity, and also inhibits in vitro kinase activities of Pyk-2 and IGF-1R. Thus, this novel function of the mitoxantrone drug can be critical for future development of anti

  16. Combating autophagy is a strategy to increase cytotoxic effects of novel ALK inhibitor entrectinib in neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Aveic, Sanja; Pantile, Marcella; Seydel, Anke; Esposito, Maria Rosaria; Zanon, Carlo; Li, Gary; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a threatening childhood malignancy. Its prognosis is affected by several morphological, and biological characteristics, including the constitutive expression of ALK tyrosine kinase. In this study we examined the therapeutic potential of a novel ALK inhibitor, entrectinib, in obliterating NB tumor cells. Entrectinib showed the growth-inhibitory effects on NB cells with a 50% inhibitory concentration range of 0.03–5 μM. In the ALK-dependent cells, entrectinib mediated G1-arrest, which was associated with modified expression of multiple cell-cycle regulators. Down-regulation of Ki-67, and attenuated phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and STAT3, correlated with observed antiproliferative capacity of entrectinib. Initial cytostatic activity of entrectinib was followed by concentration-dependent apoptotic cell death, and Caspase-3 activation. However, we delineated a reduced sensitivity of ALK mutated NB cells to entrectinib, and demonstrated strong activation of autophagy in SH-SY5YF1174L NB cell line. Abrogation of autophagy by chloroquine increased significantly the toxicity of entrectinib, as confirmed by enhanced death rate, and PARP protein cleavage in SH-SY5YF1174L cells. In aggregate, our data show that entrectinib inhibits proliferation, and induces G1-arrest, and apoptosis in NB cells. We propose entrectinib for further consideration in treatment of NB, and recommend pharmacological inhibition of autophagy to be explored for a combined therapeutic approach in NB patients that might develop resistance to entrectinib. PMID:26735175

  17. Alk1 and Alk5 inhibition by Nrp1 controls vascular sprouting downstream of Notch

    PubMed Central

    Aspalter, Irene Maria; Gordon, Emma; Dubrac, Alexandre; Ragab, Anan; Narloch, Jarek; Vizán, Pedro; Geudens, Ilse; Collins, Russell Thomas; Franco, Claudio Areias; Abrahams, Cristina Luna; Thurston, Gavin; Fruttiger, Marcus; Rosewell, Ian; Eichmann, Anne; Gerhardt, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis drives blood vessel growth in healthy and diseased tissues. Vegf and Dll4/Notch signalling cooperate in a negative feedback loop that specifies endothelial tip and stalk cells to ensure adequate vessel branching and function. Current concepts posit that endothelial cells default to the tip-cell phenotype when Notch is inactive. Here we identify instead that the stalk-cell phenotype needs to be actively repressed to allow tip-cell formation. We show this is a key endothelial function of neuropilin-1 (Nrp1), which suppresses the stalk-cell phenotype by limiting Smad2/3 activation through Alk1 and Alk5. Notch downregulates Nrp1, thus relieving the inhibition of Alk1 and Alk5, thereby driving stalk-cell behaviour. Conceptually, our work shows that the heterogeneity between neighbouring endothelial cells established by the lateral feedback loop of Dll4/Notch utilizes Nrp1 levels as the pivot, which in turn establishes differential responsiveness to TGF-β/BMP signalling. PMID:26081042

  18. Chemotactic signaling by the P1 phosphorylation domain liberated from the CheA histidine kinase of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, A; Parkinson, J S

    1996-01-01

    CheA is a histidine kinase central to the signal transduction pathway for chemotaxis in Escherichia coli. CheA autophosphorylates at His-48, with ATP as the phosphodonor, and then donates its phosphoryl groups to two aspartate autokinases, CheY and CheB. Phospho-CheY controls the flagellar motors, whereas phospho-CheB participates in sensory adaptation. Polypeptides encompassing the N-terminal P1 domain of CheA can be transphosphorylated in vitro by the CheA catalytic domain and yet have no deleterious effect on chemotactic ability when expressed at high levels in wild-type cells. To find out why, we examined the effects of a purified P1 fragment, CheA[1-149], on CheA-related signaling activities in vitro and devised in vivo assays for those same activities. Although readily phosphorylated by CheA[260-537], the CheA catalytic domain, CheA[1-149], was a poor substrate for transphosphorylation by full-length CheA molecules, implying that the resident P1 domain monopolizes the CheA catalytic center. CheA-H48Q, a nonphosphorylatable mutant, failed to transphosphorylate CheA[1-149], suggesting that phosphorylation of the P1 domain in cis may alleviate the exclusion effect. In agreement with these findings, a 40-fold excess of CheA[1-149] fragments did not impair the CheA autophosphorylation reaction. CheA[1-149] did acquire phosphoryl groups via reversible phosphotransfer reactions with CheB and CheY molecules. An H48Q mutant of CheA[1-149] could not participate in these reactions, indicating that His-48 is probably the substrate site. The low level of efficiency of these phosphotransfer reactions and the inability of CheA[1-149] to interfere with CheA autophosphorylation most likely account for the failure of liberated P1 domains to jam chemotactic signaling in wild-type cells. However, an excess of CheA[1-149] fragments was able to support chemotactic signaling by P1-deficient cheA mutants, demonstrating that CheA[1-149] fragments have both transphosphorylation and

  19. Role of the N-terminal forkhead-associated domain in the cell cycle checkpoint function of the Rad53 kinase.

    PubMed

    Pike, B L; Hammet, A; Heierhorst, J

    2001-04-27

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are multifunctional phosphopeptide-binding modules and are the hallmark of the conserved family of Rad53-like checkpoint protein kinases. Rad53-like kinases, including the human tumor suppressor protein Chk2, play crucial roles in cell cycle arrest and activation of repair processes following DNA damage and replication blocks. Here we show that ectopic expression of the N-terminal FHA domain (FHA1) of the yeast Rad53 kinase causes a growth defect by arresting the cell cycle in G(1). This phenotype was highly specific for the Rad53-FHA1 domain and not observed with the similar Rad53-FHA2, Dun1-FHA, and Chk2-FHA domains, and it was abrogated by mutations that abolished binding to a phosphothreonine-containing peptide in vitro. Furthermore, replacement of the RAD53 gene with alleles containing amino acid substitutions in the FHA1 domain resulted in an increased DNA damage sensitivity in vivo. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the FHA1 domain contributes to the checkpoint function of Rad53, possibly by associating with a phosphorylated target protein in response to DNA damage in G(1). PMID:11278522

  20. Insertion element analysis and mapping of the Pseudomonas plasmid alk regulon.

    PubMed Central

    Fennewald, M; Benson, S; Oppici, M; Shapiro, J

    1979-01-01

    We characterized and mapped new mutations of the alk (alkane utilization) genes found on Pseudomonas plasmids of the Inc P-2 group. These mutations were isolated after (i) nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, (ii) transposition of the Tn7 trimethoprim and streptomycin resistance determinant, and (iii) reversion of polarity effects of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations. Our results indicate the existence of two alk loci not previously described--alkD, whose product is required for synthesis of membrane alkane-oxidizing activities, and alkE, whose product is required for synthesis of inducible membrane alcohol dehydrogenase activity. Polarity of alk::Tn7 insertion mutations indicates the existence of an alkBAE operon. Mapping of alk loci by transduction in P. aeruginosa shows that there are at least three alk clusters in the CAM-OCT plasmid--alkRD, containing regulatory genes; alkBAE, containing genes for specific biochemical activities; and alkC, containing one or more genes needed for normal synthesis of membrane alcohol dehydrogenase. The alkRD and alkBAE clusters are linked but separated by about 42 kilobases. The alkC cluster is not linked to either of the other two alk regions. Altogether, these results indicate a complex genetic control of the alkane utilization phenotype in P. putida and P. aeruginosa involving at least six separate genes. Images PMID:479111

  1. Absence of catalytic domain in a putative protein kinase C (PkcA) suppresses tip dominance in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Wasima; Ray, Sibnath; Brazill, Derrick; Baskar, Ramamurthy

    2015-09-01

    A number of organisms possess several isoforms of protein kinase C but little is known about the significance of any specific isoform during embryogenesis and development. To address this we characterized a PKC ortholog (PkcA; DDB_G0288147) in Dictyostelium discoideum. pkcA expression switches from prestalk in mound to prespore in slug, indicating a dynamic expression pattern. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of PkcA (pkcA(-)) did not exhibit tip dominance. A striking phenotype of pkcA- was the formation of an aggregate with a central hollow, and aggregates later fragmented to form small mounds, each becoming a fruiting body. Optical density wave patterns of cAMP in the late aggregates showed several cAMP wave generation centers. We attribute these defects in pkcA(-) to impaired cAMP signaling, altered cell motility and decreased expression of the cell adhesion molecules - CadA and CsaA. pkcA(-) slugs showed ectopic expression of ecmA in the prespore region. Further, the use of a PKC-specific inhibitor, GF109203X that inhibits the activity of catalytic domain phenocopied pkcA(-). PMID:26183108

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of a BH domain from the GTPase regulatory protein associated with focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, P J; Derewenda, U; Taylor, J; Parsons, T J; Derewenda, Z S

    1999-01-01

    Signaling by small GTPases is down-regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) which enhance the rate of GTP hydrolysis. The activity of GAPs specific for Rho GTPases resides in the BH domain, many homologues of which are found in any mammalian genome. One of them was identified in the GTPase regulator associated with focal-adhesion kinase (GRAF). It shares approximately 20% sequence identity with p50RhoGAP. This GAP activates RhoA and Cdc42Hs, but not Rac. In order to dissect the molecular basis of this specificity, a 231-residue-long fragment corresponding to the BH domain of GRAF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Trigonal crystals, of space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21, with unit-cell dimensions a = b = 63.5, c = 90.38 A were grown from solutions of PEG 6000. Data to 2.15 A were collected from a flash-frozen sample on an R-AXIS IV imaging-plate detector mounted on a rotating anode X-ray generator. PMID:10232922

  3. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors with Tyrosine Kinase Domain Mutations Exhibit Reduced Cbl Association, Poor Ubiquitylation, and Down-regulation but Are Efficiently Internalized

    PubMed Central

    Padrón, David; Sato, Mitsuo; Shay, Jerry W.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Minna, John D.; Roth, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Some non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase domain mutations require altered signaling through the EGFR for cell survival and are exquisitely sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. EGFR down-regulation was impaired in two NSCLCs with EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations. The mutant receptors were poorly ubiquitylated and exhibited decreased association with the ubiquitin ligase Cbl. Over-expression of Cbl increased the degradation of EGFR. Treatment with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of the chaperone heat shock protein 90, also increased both wild-type and mutant EGFR degradation without affecting internalization. The down-regulation of the mutant EGFRs was still impaired when they were stably expressed in normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, the mutations that altered signaling also decreased the interaction of EGFRs with the mechanisms responsible for endosomal sorting. PMID:17699773

  4. SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 regulates pyruvate kinase M2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Chu, Pei-Yi; Chen, Yao-Li; Chen, Li-Ju; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Min-Husan; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Boo, Yin-Pin; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is known to promote tumourigenesis through dimer formation of p-PKM2Y105. Here, we investigated whether SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) decreases p-PKM2Y105 expression and, thus, determines the sensitivity of sorafenib through inhibiting the nuclear-related function of PKM2. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblot confirmed the effect of SHP-1 on PKM2Y105 dephosphorylation. Lactate production was assayed in cells and tumor samples to determine whether sorafenib reversed the Warburg effect. Clinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumor samples were assessed for PKM2 expression. SHP-1 directly dephosphorylated PKM2 at Y105 and further decreased the proliferative activity of PKM2; similar effects were found in sorafenib-treated HCC cells. PKM2 was also found to determine the sensitivity of targeted drugs, such as sorafenib, brivanib, and sunitinib, by SHP-1 activation. Significant sphere-forming activity was found in HCC cells stably expressing PKM2. Clinical findings suggest that PKM2 acts as a predicting factor of early recurrence in patients with HCC, particularly those without known risk factors (63.6%). SHP-1 dephosphorylates PKM2 at Y105 to inhibit nuclear function of PKM2 and determines the efficacy of targeted drugs. Targeting PKM2 by SHP-1 might provide new therapeutic insights for patients with HCC. PMID:26959741

  5. The accessory factor Nef links HIV-1 to Tec/Btk kinases in an Src homology 3 domain-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Tarafdar, Sreya; Poe, Jerrod A; Smithgall, Thomas E

    2014-05-30

    The HIV-1 Nef virulence factor interacts with multiple host cell-signaling proteins. Nef binds to the Src homology 3 domains of Src family kinases, resulting in kinase activation important for viral infectivity, replication, and MHC-I down-regulation. Itk and other Tec family kinases are also present in HIV target cells, and Itk has been linked to HIV-1 infectivity and replication. However, the molecular mechanism linking Itk to HIV-1 is unknown. In this study, we explored the interaction of Nef with Tec family kinases using a cell-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. In this approach, interaction of Nef with a partner kinase juxtaposes nonfluorescent YFP fragments fused to the C terminus of each protein, resulting in YFP complementation and a bright fluorescent signal. Using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we observed that Nef interacts with the Tec family members Bmx, Btk, and Itk but not Tec or Txk. Interaction with Nef occurs through the kinase Src homology 3 domains and localizes to the plasma membrane. Allelic variants of Nef from all major HIV-1 subtypes interacted strongly with Itk in this assay, demonstrating the highly conserved nature of this interaction. A selective small molecule inhibitor of Itk kinase activity (BMS-509744) potently blocked wild-type HIV-1 infectivity and replication, but not that of a Nef-defective mutant. Nef induced constitutive Itk activation in transfected cells that was sensitive to inhibitor treatment. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that Nef interacts with cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases of the Tec family and suggest that Nef provides a mechanistic link between HIV-1 and Itk signaling in the viral life cycle. PMID:24722985

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation is mediated by high-affinity interactions between distinct domains within the p110 and p85 subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, K H; Olson, L; Moye-Rowley, W S; Pessin, J E

    1994-01-01

    Domains of interaction between the p85 and p110 subunits of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) were studied with the yeast two-hybrid expression system. A gene fusion between the GAL4 transactivation domain and p85 activated transcription from a GAL1-lacZ reporter gene when complemented with a gene fusion between the GAL4 DNA binding domain and p110. To define subdomains responsible for this interaction, a series of p85 deletion mutants were analyzed. A 192-amino-acid inter-SH2 (IS) fragment (residues 429 to 621) was the smallest determinant identified that specifically associated with p110. In analogous experiments, the subdomain within p110 responsible for interaction with p85 was localized to an EcoRI fragment encoding the amino-terminal 127 residues. Expression of these two subdomains [p85(IS) with p110RI] resulted in 100-fold greater reporter activity than that obtained with full-length p85 and p110. Although the p85(IS) domain conferred a strong interaction with the p110 catalytic subunit, this region was not sufficient to impart phosphotyrosine peptide stimulation of PI 3-kinase activity. In contrast, coexpression of the p110 subunit with full-length p85 or with constructs containing the IS sequences flanked by both SH2 domains of p85 [p85(n/cSH2)] or either of the individual SH2 domains [p85(nSH2+IS) or p85(IS+cSH2)] resulted in PI 3-kinase activity that was activated by a phosphotyrosine peptide. These data suggest that phosphotyrosine peptide binding to either SH2 domain generates an intramolecular signal propagated through the IS region to allosterically activate p110. Images PMID:8264609

  7. ATP forms a stable complex with the essential histidine kinase WalK (YycG) domain.

    PubMed

    Celikel, Reha; Veldore, Vidya Harini; Mathews, Irimpan; Devine, Kevin M; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2012-07-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the WalRK (YycFG) two-component system coordinates murein synthesis with cell division. It regulates the expression of autolysins that function in cell-wall remodeling and of proteins that modulate autolysin activity. The transcription factor WalR is activated upon phosphorylation by the histidine kinase WalK, a multi-domain homodimer. It autophosphorylates one of its histidine residues by transferring the γ-phosphate from ATP bound to its ATP-binding domain. Here, the high-resolution crystal structure of the ATP-binding domain of WalK in complex with ATP is presented at 1.61 Å resolution. The bound ATP remains intact in the crystal lattice. It appears that the strong binding interactions and the nature of the binding pocket contribute to its stability. The triphosphate moiety of ATP wraps around an Mg(2+) ion, providing three O atoms for coordination in a near-ideal octahedral geometry. The ATP molecule also makes strong interactions with the protein. In addition, there is a short contact between the exocyclic O3' of the sugar ring and O2B of the β-phosphate, implying an internal hydrogen bond. The stability of the WalK-ATP complex in the crystal lattice suggests that such a complex may exist in vivo poised for initiation of signal transmission. This feature may therefore be part of the sensing mechanism by which the WalRK two-component system is so rapidly activated when cells encounter conditions conducive for growth. PMID:22751669

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain Mutations in Esophageal and Pancreatic Adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Eunice L.; Jankowski, Janusz; Thayer, Sarah P.; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Brannigan, Brian W.; Harris, Patricia L.; Okimoto, Ross A.; Haserlat, Sara M.; Dris coll, David R.; Ferry, David; Muir, Beth; Settleman, Jeff; Fuchs, Charles S.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Ryan, David P.; Clark, Jeff W.; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Haber, Daniel A.; Bell, Daphne W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Specific activating mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) identify a subset of non – small cell lung cancers with dramatic sensitivity to the specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib. Despite the abundant expression of EGFR protein in a broad range of epithelial cancers, EGFR mutations have not been reported in a substantial fraction of other cancers. Given recent reports of TKI-responsive cases of esophageal and pancreatic cancer, this study was designed to determine the prevalence of EGFR mutations in these gastrointestinal cancers. Experimental Design We sequenced exons 18 to 21 of EGFR from 21cases of Barrett's esophagus, 5 cases of high-grade esophageal dysplasia, 17 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, and 55 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Subsets of esophageal (n = 7) and pancreatic cancer cases (n = 5) were obtained from patients who were subsequently treated with gefitinib or erlotinib-capecitabine, respectively. Results Mutations of EGFR were identified in two esophageal cancers (11.7%), three cases of Barrett's esophagus (14.2%), and two pancreatic cancers (3.6%). The mutations consisted of the recurrent missense L858R and in-frame deletion delE746-A750, previously characterized as activating EGFR mutations in non – small cell lung cancer. We also identified the TKI drug resistance – associated EGFR T790M mutation in an untreated case of Barrett's esophagus and the corresponding adenocarcinoma. Conclusion The presence of activating mutations within EGFR in both esophageal and pancreatic adenocarcinomas defines a previously unrecognized subset of gastrointestinal tumors in which EGFR signaling may play an important biological role. EGFR mutations in premalignant lesions of Barrett's esophagus also point to these as an early event in transformation of the esophageal epithelium. The role of genotype-directed TKI therapy should be tested in prospective clinical trials. PMID:16857803

  9. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the ALK gene in 2,045 non-small cell lung cancer patients from North-Western Spain (Galicia)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ares, María; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José M.; Vázquez-Estévez, Sergio; Lázaro-Quintela, Martín; Vázquez-Boquete, Ángel; Afonso-Afonso, Francisco J.; Casal-Rubio, Joaquín; González-Piñeiro, Ana L.; Rico-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Fírvida-Pérez, José L.; Ruíz-Bañobre, Juan; Couso, Elena; Santomé, Lucía; Pérez-Becerra, Raquel; García-Campelo, Rosario; Amenedo, Margarita; Azpitarte-Raposeiras, Cristina; Antúnez, José; Abdulkader, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Identification of anaplastic lymphoma receptor tyrosine kinase (ALK) gene rearrangements is a standard diagnostic test in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The current study describes the experience of ALK rearrangement detection of a referral center in the public health care system of Galicia in North-Western Spain. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) patterns of the ALK gene and the clinical and pathological features of these patients are reported. This study is also of interest for comparative purposes due to the relative geographical isolation of the area, which could have contributed to particular genetic features. A total of 2,045 tissue samples from NSCLC patients were collected between October 2010 and July 2015 and tested for ALK rearrangements by FISH. Examination of 1,686 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 395 cytological samples (306 cell block preparations and 53 cytological smears) was conducted, and any associations between the FISH results and clinicopathological features were assessed. The rate of successful evaluation was marginally higher in tissue samples than in cytological samples (92.9% vs. 84.1%); this difference was not significant. ALK rearrangements were identified in 82 patients(4%): 65 (79.3%) in tissue specimens, 15 (18.3%) in cell block samples and 2 (2.4%) in cytological smears. This genetic translocation appeared to be associated with a non-smoking history, younger age, female gender, stage IV and adenocarcinoma histological type. The findings demonstrate that ALK evaluation by FISH is feasible in tissue and cytological samples. The clinical and pathological features of the ALK-positive series of patients are similar to those previously reported in the literature. PMID:27446444

  10. Activation of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase involves intramolecular binding of a calmodulin-like regulatory domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, J. F.; Teyton, L.; Harper, J. F.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are regulated by a C-terminal calmodulin-like domain (CaM-LD). The CaM-LD is connected to the kinase by a short junction sequence which contains a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitor. To understand how the CaM-LD regulates a CDPK, a recombinant CDPK (isoform CPK-1 from Arabidopsis, accession no. L14771) was made as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We show here that a truncated CDPK lacking a CaM-LD (e.g. mutant delta NC-26H) can be activated by exogenous calmodulin or an isolated CaM-LD (Kact approximately 2 microM). We propose that Ca2+ activation of a CDPK normally occurs through intramolecular binding of the CaM-LD to the junction. When the junction and CaM-LD are made as two separate polypeptides, the CaM-LD can bind the junction in a Ca(2+)-dependent fashion with a dissociation constant (KD) of 6 x 10(-6) M, as determined by kinetic binding analyses. When the junction and CaM-LD are tethered in a single polypeptide (e.g. in protein JC-1), their ability to engage in bimolecular binding is suppressed (e.g. the tethered CaM-LD cannot bind a separate junction). A mutation which disrupts the putative CaM-LD binding sequence (e.g. substitution LRV-1444 to DLPG) appears to block intramolecular binding, as indicated by the restored ability of a tethered CaM-LD to engage in bimolecular binding. This mutation, in the context of a full-length enzyme (mutant KJM46H), appears to block Ca2+ activation. Thus, a disruption of intramolecular binding correlates with a disruption of the Ca2+ activation mechanism. CDPKs provide the first example of a member of the calmodulin superfamily where a target binding sequence is located within the same polypeptide.

  11. Expression, purification, characterization and crystallization of non- and phosphorylated states of JAK2 and JAK3 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Troii; Emmons, Thomas L.; Chrencik, Jill E.; Gormley, Jennifer A.; Weinberg, Robin A.; Leone, Joseph W.; Hirsch, Jeffrey L.; Saabye, Matthew J.; Schindler, John F.; Day, Jacqueline E.; Williams, Jennifer M.; Kiefer, James R.; Lightle, Sandra A.; Harris, Melissa S.; Guru, Siradanahalli; Fischer, H. David; Tomasselli, Alfredo G.

    2012-05-29

    Janus-associated kinases (JAKs) play critical roles in cytokine signaling, and have emerged as viable therapeutic targets in inflammation and oncology related diseases. To date, targeting JAK proteins with highly selective inhibitor compounds have remained elusive. We have expressed the active kinase domains for both JAK2 and JAK3 and devised purification protocols to resolve the non-, mono- (Y1007) and diphosphorylated (Y1007 and Y1008) states of JAK2 and non- and monophosphorylated states of JAK3 (Y980). An optimal purified protein yield of 20, 29 and 69 mg per 20 L cell culture was obtained for the three JAK2 forms, respectively, and 12.2 and 2.3 mg per 10 L fermentation for the two JAK3 forms allowing detailed biochemical and biophysical studies. To monitor the purification process we developed a novel HPLC activity assay where a sequential order of phosphorylation was observed whereby the first tyrosine residue was completely phosphorylated prior to phosphorylation of the tandem tyrosine residue. A Caliper-based microfluidics assay was used to determine the kinetic parameters (K{sub m} and k{sub cat}) for each phosphorylated state, showing that monophosphorylated (Y1007) JAK2 enzyme activity increased 9-fold over that of the nonphosphorylated species, and increased an additional 6-fold for the diphosphorylated (Y1007/Y1008) species, while phosphorylation of JAK3 resulted in a negligible increase in activity. Moreover, crystal structures have been generated for each isolated state of JAK2 and JAK3 with resolutions better than 2.4 {angstrom}. The generation of these reagents has enabled kinetic and structural characterization to inform the design of potent and selective inhibitors of the JAK family.

  12. ETV6-NTRK3 Is Expressed in a Subset of ALK-Negative Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Alassiri, Ali H; Ali, Rola H; Shen, Yaoqing; Lum, Amy; Strahlendorf, Caron; Deyell, Rebecca; Rassekh, Rod; Sorensen, Poul H; Laskin, Janessa; Marra, Marco; Yip, Stephen; Lee, Cheng-Han; Ng, Tony L

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is a genetically heterogenous tumor of the viscera and soft tissues, with multiple molecular features having been demonstrated in this tumor type. About 50% of cases harbor an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) gene rearrangement, and recent studies have described novel fusions involving the ROS1 and PDGFRβ genes in a subset of ALK-negative cases. However, the molecular features of the remaining subset of cases are not yet defined. We report a case of a large, highly aggressive IMT of the lung in a 17-year-old girl. This case was molecularly characterized through whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing. Subsequently, we investigated a cohort of 15 ALK-negative IMTs of various anatomic sites. All cases were screened using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for rearrangement of the ETV6 locus and with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript. Whole-genome and transcriptome sequencing revealed an ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript in our index case. This was confirmed by FISH studies for ETV6 gene rearrangement, as well as by RT-PCR. In addition, 2 additional cases in our cohort demonstrated ETV6 rearrangement by FISH. The presence of ETV6-NTRK3 fusion transcript was demonstrated by RT-PCR in one of these additional cases. In summary, we demonstrate the expression of the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion oncogene in a small subset of IMTs, lending further support to the role of oncogenic tyrosine kinases in the pathophysiology of this tumor type. Our data also further expand the growing spectrum of tumor types expressing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion. PMID:27259007

  13. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed. PMID:26758803

  14. Nuclear localization of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and its role in regulating LIM domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu; Yu, Chao-Lan

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lmo2 expression is elevated in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both endogenous and exogenous Lck localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear Lck is active in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lck binds to the promoter region of Lmo2 gene in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In contrast to JAK2, Lck does not increase histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. -- Abstract: LIM domain only protein 2 (Lmo2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the development of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). A previous report established a link between Lmo2 expression and the nuclear presence of oncogenic Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic JAK2 kinase phosphorylates histone H3 on Tyr 41 that leads to the relief of Lmo2 promoter repression and subsequent gene expression. Similar to JAK2, constitutive activation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) has been implicated in lymphoid malignancies. However, it is not known whether oncogenic Lck regulates Lmo2 expression through a similar mechanism. We show here that Lmo2 expression is significantly elevated in T cell leukemia LSTRA overexpressing active Lck kinase and in HEK 293 cells expressing oncogenic Y505FLck kinase. Nuclear localization of active Lck kinase was confirmed in both Lck-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy. More importantly, in contrast to oncogenic JAK2, oncogenic Lck kinase does not result in significant increase in histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment shows that oncogenic Y505FLck kinase binds to the Lmo2 promoter in vivo. This result raises the possibility that oncogenic Lck may activate Lmo2 promoter through direct interaction.

  15. The C-terminal Kinase and ERK-binding Domains of Drosophila S6KII (RSK) Are Required for Phosphorylation of the Protein and Modulation of Circadian Behavior*

    PubMed Central

    Tangredi, Michelle M.; Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2012-01-01

    A detailed structure/function analysis of Drosophila p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (S6KII) or its mammalian homolog RSK has not been performed in the context of neuronal plasticity or behavior. We previously reported that S6KII is required for normal circadian periodicity. Here we report a site-directed mutagenesis of S6KII and analysis of mutants, in vivo, that identifies functional domains and phosphorylation sites critical for the regulation of circadian period. We demonstrate, for the first time, a role for the S6KII C-terminal kinase that is independent of its known role in activation of the N-terminal kinase. Both S6KII C-terminal kinase activity and its ERK-binding domain are required for wild-type circadian period and normal phosphorylation status of the protein. In contrast, the N-terminal kinase of S6KII is dispensable for modulation of circadian period and normal phosphorylation of the protein. We also show that particular sites of S6KII phosphorylation, Ser-515 and Thr-732, are essential for normal circadian behavior. Surprisingly, the phosphorylation of S6KII residues, in vivo, does not follow a strict sequential pattern, as implied by certain cell-based studies of mammalian RSK protein. PMID:22447936

  16. Biophysical and Structural Characterization of the Thioredoxin-binding Domain of Protein Kinase ASK1 and Its Interaction with Reduced Thioredoxin*

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Dalibor; Kylarova, Salome; Psenakova, Katarina; Rezabkova, Lenka; Herman, Petr; Vecer, Jaroslav; Obsilova, Veronika; Obsil, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase, plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple diseases. Its activity is regulated by thioredoxin (TRX1) but the precise mechanism of this regulation is unclear due to the lack of structural data. Here, we performed biophysical and structural characterization of the TRX1-binding domain of ASK1 (ASK1-TBD) and its complex with reduced TRX1. ASK1-TBD is a monomeric and rigid domain that forms a stable complex with reduced TRX1 with 1:1 molar stoichiometry. The binding interaction does not involve the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds. Residues from the catalytic WCGPC motif of TRX1 are essential for complex stability with Trp31 being directly involved in the binding interaction as suggested by time-resolved fluorescence. Small-angle x-ray scattering data reveal a compact and slightly asymmetric shape of ASK1-TBD and suggest reduced TRX1 interacts with this domain through the large binding interface without inducing any dramatic conformational change. PMID:25037217

  17. Alk3 Mediated Bmp Signaling Controls the Contribution of Epicardially Derived Cells to the Tissues of the Atrioventricular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Marie M.; Boukens, Bastiaan J. D.; Phelps, Aimee L.; Brown, Christina-Lin M.; Toomer, Katelynn A.; Burns, Tara A.; Mukherjee, Rupak D.; Norris, Russell A.; Trusk, Thomas C.; van den Hoff, Maurice J.B.; Wessels, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using mouse models for cell fate tracing of epicardial derived cells (EPDCs) have demonstrated that at the atrioventricular (AV) junction EPDCs contribute to the mesenchyme of the AV sulcus, the annulus fibrosus, and the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. There is little insight, however, into the mechanisms that govern the contribution of EPDCs to these tissues. While it has been demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling is required for AV cushion formation, its role in regulating EPDC contribution to the AV junction remains unexplored. To determine the role of Bmp signaling in the contribution of EPDCs to the AV junction, the Bmp receptor activin-like kinase 3 (Alk3; or Bmpr1a) was conditionally deleted in the epicardium and EPDCs using the mWt1/IRES/GFP-Cre (Wt1Cre) mouse. Embryonic Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl specimens showed a significantly smaller AV sulcus and a severely underdeveloped annulus fibrosus. Electrophysiological analysis of adult Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl mice showed, unexpectedly, no ventricular pre-excitation. Cell fate tracing revealed a significant decrease in the number of EPDCs within the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. Postnatal Wt1Cre;Alk3fl/fl specimens showed myxomatous changes in the leaflets of the mitral valve. Together these observations indicate that Alk3 mediated Bmp signaling is important in the cascade of events that regulate the contribution of EPDCs to the AV sulcus, annulus fibrosus, and the parietal leaflets of the AV valves. Furthermore, this study shows that EPDCs do not only play a critical role in early developmental events at the AV junction, but that they also are important in the normal maturation of the AV valves. PMID:25300579

  18. Decoding Tumor Phenotypes for ALK, ROS1, and RET Fusions in Lung Adenocarcinoma Using a Radiomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Sohn, Insuk; Cho, Jong Ho; Lee, Ho Yun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Yoon-La; Kim, Hyeseung; Lee, Genehee; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jhingook

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Quantitative imaging using radiomics can capture distinct phenotypic differences between tumors and may have predictive power for certain phenotypes according to specific genetic mutations. We aimed to identify the clinicoradiologic predictors of tumors with ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase), ROS1 (c-ros oncogene 1), or RET (rearranged during transfection) fusions in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. A total of 539 pathologically confirmed lung adenocarcinomas were included in this retrospective study. The baseline clinicopathologic characteristics were retrieved from the patients’ medical records and the ALK/ROS1/RET fusion status was reviewed. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography imaging characteristics were evaluated using a radiomics approach. Significant features for the fusion-positive tumor prediction model were extracted from all of the clinicoradiologic features, and were used to calculate diagnostic performance for predicting 3 fusions’ positivity. The clinicoradiologic features were compared between ALK versus ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors to identify the clinicoradiologic similarity between the 2 groups. The fusion-positive tumor prediction model was a combination of younger age, advanced tumor stage, solid tumor on CT, higher values for SUVmax and tumor mass, lower values for kurtosis and inverse variance on 3-voxel distance than those of fusion-negative tumors (sensitivity and specificity, 0.73 and 0.70, respectively). ALK fusion-positive tumors were significantly different in tumor stage, central location, SUVmax, homogeneity on 1-, 2-, and 3-voxel distances, and sum mean on 2-voxel distance compared with ROS1/RET fusion-positive tumors. ALK/ROS1/RET fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas possess certain clinical and imaging features that enable good discrimination of fusion-positive from fusion-negative lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:26469915

  19. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the BRI1 receptor kinase occurs via a posttranslational modification and is activated by the juxtamembrane domain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In metazoans, receptor kinases control many essential processes related to growth and development and response to the environment. The receptor kinases in plants and animals are structurally similar but evolutionarily distinct from one another, and thus while most animal receptor kinases are tyrosin...

  20. Phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase causes a conformational change in the R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Dulhanty, A M; Riordan, J R

    1994-04-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis have a defect in the CFTR protein, a chloride channel regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). The majority of the phosphorylation sites of PKA are located in the R domain of CFTR. It has been postulated that this domain may act as a gate for the chloride channel. Of the many possible mechanisms whereby the R domain could gate the channel, including interdomain interactions, charge distribution, or conformational change, we investigated the possibility that phosphorylation leads to conformational changes in the R domain. To test this hypothesis, a protocol for purification of human R domain peptide synthesized in a bacterial expression system was developed. Purified R domain was phosphorylated by PKA, and CD spectra were obtained. As a result of phosphorylation by PKA, a significant spectral change, indicative of a reduction in the alpha-helical content, was found. CD spectra of the R domain of a shark homologue of CFTR indicated similar changes in conformation as a result of phosphorylation by PKA. In contrast, phosphorylation of the human R domain by PKC, which has only a small influence on CFTR channel activity, failed to elicit CD spectral changes, indicating no conformational change comparable to those induced by PKA phosphorylation. These observations provide the first structural characterization of the R domain and suggest that the gating of the CFTR chloride channel by PKA may involve a conformational change in the R domain. PMID:7511414

  1. Disulfide-mediated stabilization of the IκB kinase binding domain of NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Yeo, Alan T; Ballarano, Carmine; Weber, Urs; Allen, Karen N; Gilmore, Thomas D; Whitty, Adrian

    2014-12-23

    Human NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is a 419 residue scaffolding protein that, together with catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ, forms the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, a key regulator of NF-κB pathway signaling. NEMO is an elongated homodimer comprising mostly α-helix. It has been shown that a NEMO fragment spanning residues 44-111, which contains the IKKα/β binding site, is structurally disordered in the absence of bound IKKβ. Herein we show that enforcing dimerization of NEMO1-120 or NEMO44-111 constructs through introduction of one or two interchain disulfide bonds, through oxidation of the native Cys54 residue and/or at position 107 through a Leu107Cys mutation, induces a stable α-helical coiled-coil structure that is preorganized to bind IKKβ with high affinity. Chemical and thermal denaturation studies showed that, in the context of a covalent dimer, the ordered structure was stabilized relative to the denatured state by up to 3 kcal/mol. A full-length NEMO-L107C protein formed covalent dimers upon treatment of mammalian cells with H2O2. Furthermore, NEMO-L107C bound endogenous IKKβ in A293T cells, reconstituted TNF-induced NF-κB signaling in NEMO-deficient cells, and interacted with TRAF6. Our results indicate that the IKKβ binding domain of NEMO possesses an ordered structure in the unbound state, provided that it is constrained within a dimer as is the case in the constitutively dimeric full-length NEMO protein. The stability of the NEMO coiled coil is maintained by strong interhelix interactions in the region centered on residue 54. The disulfide-linked constructs we describe herein may be useful for crystallization of NEMO's IKKβ binding domain in the absence of bound IKKβ, thereby facilitating the structural characterization of small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:25400026

  2. Disulfide-Mediated Stabilization of the IκB Kinase Binding Domain of NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) is a 419 residue scaffolding protein that, together with catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ, forms the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, a key regulator of NF-κB pathway signaling. NEMO is an elongated homodimer comprising mostly α-helix. It has been shown that a NEMO fragment spanning residues 44–111, which contains the IKKα/β binding site, is structurally disordered in the absence of bound IKKβ. Herein we show that enforcing dimerization of NEMO1–120 or NEMO44–111 constructs through introduction of one or two interchain disulfide bonds, through oxidation of the native Cys54 residue and/or at position 107 through a Leu107Cys mutation, induces a stable α-helical coiled-coil structure that is preorganized to bind IKKβ with high affinity. Chemical and thermal denaturation studies showed that, in the context of a covalent dimer, the ordered structure was stabilized relative to the denatured state by up to 3 kcal/mol. A full-length NEMO-L107C protein formed covalent dimers upon treatment of mammalian cells with H2O2. Furthermore, NEMO-L107C bound endogenous IKKβ in A293T cells, reconstituted TNF-induced NF-κB signaling in NEMO-deficient cells, and interacted with TRAF6. Our results indicate that the IKKβ binding domain of NEMO possesses an ordered structure in the unbound state, provided that it is constrained within a dimer as is the case in the constitutively dimeric full-length NEMO protein. The stability of the NEMO coiled coil is maintained by strong interhelix interactions in the region centered on residue 54. The disulfide-linked constructs we describe herein may be useful for crystallization of NEMO’s IKKβ binding domain in the absence of bound IKKβ, thereby facilitating the structural characterization of small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:25400026

  3. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  4. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  5. TGF-ß induces Lysyl hydroxylase 2b in human synovial osteoarthritic fibroblasts through ALK5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Remst, Dennis F G; Blaney Davidson, Esmeralda N; Vitters, Elly L; Bank, Ruud A; van den Berg, Wim B; van der Kraan, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Lysyl hydroxylase 2b (LH2b) is known to increase pyridinoline cross-links, making collagen less susceptible to enzymatic degradation. Previously, we observed a relationship between LH2b and osteoarthritis-related fibrosis in murine knee joint. For this study, we investigate if transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-ß) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) regulate procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) (gene encoding LH2b) and LH2b expression differently in osteoarthritic human synovial fibroblasts (hSF). Furthermore, we investigate via which TGF-ß route (Smad2/3P or Smad1/5/8P) LH2b is regulated, to explore options to inhibit LH2b during fibrosis. To answer these questions, fibroblasts were isolated from knee joints of osteoarthritis patients. The hSF were stimulated with TGF-ß with or without a kinase inhibitor of ALK4/5/7 (SB-505124) or ALK1/2/3/6 (dorsomorphin). TGF-ß, CTGF, constitutively active (ca)ALK1 and caALK5 were adenovirally overexpressed in hSF. The gene expression levels of PLOD1/2/3, CTGF and COL1A1 were analyzed with Q-PCR. LH2 protein levels were determined with western blot. As expected, TGF-ß induced PLOD2/LH2 expression in hSF, whereas CTGF did not. PLOD1 and PLOD3 were not affected by either TGF-ß or CTGF. SB-505124 prevented the induction of TGF-ß-induced PLOD2, CTGF and COL1A1. Surprisingly, dorsomorphin completely blocked the induction of CTGF and COL1A1, whereas TGF-ß-induced PLOD2 was only slightly reduced. Overexpression of caALK5 in osteoarthritic hSF significantly induced PLOD2/LH2 expression, whereas caALK1 had no effect. We showed, in osteoarthritic hSF, that TGF-ß induced PLOD2/LH2 via ALK5 Smad2/3P. This elevation of LH2b in osteoarthritic hSF makes LH2b an interesting target to interfere with osteoarthritis-related persistent fibrosis. PMID:24192939

  6. Modulation of Pantothenate Kinase 3 Activity by Small Molecules that Interact with the Substrate/Allosteric Regulatory Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Leonardi, Roberta; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Yun, Mi-Kyung; Zhou, Ruobing; Zeng, Fu-Yue; Lin, Wenwei; Cui, Jimmy; Chen, Taosheng; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.; Jackowski, Suzanne

    2010-09-27

    Pantothenate kinase (PanK) catalyzes the rate-controlling step in coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis. PanK3 is stringently regulated by acetyl-CoA and uses an ordered kinetic mechanism with ATP as the leading substrate. Biochemical analysis of site-directed mutants indicates that pantothenate binds in a tunnel adjacent to the active site that is occupied by the pantothenate moiety of the acetyl-CoA regulator in the PanK3 acetyl-CoA binary complex. A high-throughput screen for PanK3 inhibitors and activators was applied to a bioactive compound library. Thiazolidinediones, sulfonylureas and steroids were inhibitors, and fatty acyl-amides and tamoxifen were activators. The PanK3 activators and inhibitors either stimulated or repressed CoA biosynthesis in HepG2/C3A cells. The flexible allosteric acetyl-CoA regulatory domain of PanK3 also binds the substrates, pantothenate and pantetheine, and small molecule inhibitors and activators to modulate PanK3 activity.

  7. Conformational Transition Pathways of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Domain from Multiple Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Bayesian Clustering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is aberrantly activated in various cancer cells and an important target for cancer treatment. Deep understanding of EGFR conformational changes between the active and inactive states is of pharmaceutical interest. Here we present a strategy combining multiply targeted molecular dynamics simulations, unbiased molecular dynamics simulations, and Bayesian clustering to investigate transition pathways during the activation/inactivation process of EGFR kinase domain. Two distinct pathways between the active and inactive forms are designed, explored, and compared. Based on Bayesian clustering and rough two-dimensional free energy surfaces, the energy-favorable pathway is recognized, though DFG-flip happens in both pathways. In addition, another pathway with different intermediate states appears in our simulations. Comparison of distinct pathways also indicates that disruption of the Lys745-Glu762 interaction is critically important in DFG-flip while movement of the A-loop significantly facilitates the conformational change. Our simulations yield new insights into EGFR conformational transitions. Moreover, our results verify that this approach is valid and efficient in sampling of protein conformational changes and comparison of distinct pathways. PMID:25136273

  8. A single-base change in the tyrosine kinase II domain of ovine FGFR3 causes hereditary chondrodysplasia in sheep.

    PubMed

    Beever, J E; Smit, M A; Meyers, S N; Hadfield, T S; Bottema, C; Albretsen, J; Cockett, N E

    2006-02-01

    Ovine hereditary chondrodysplasia, or spider lamb syndrome (SLS), is a genetic disorder that is characterized by severe skeletal abnormalities and has resulted in substantial economic losses for sheep producers. Here we demonstrate that a non-synonymous T>A transversion in the highly conserved tyrosine kinase II domain of a positional candidate gene, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), is responsible for SLS. We also demonstrate that the mutant FGFR3 allele has an additive effect on long-bone length, calling into question the long-standing belief that SLS is inherited as a strict monogenic, Mendelian recessive trait. Instead, we suggest that SLS manifestation is determined primarily by the presence of the mutant FGFR3 allele, but it is also influenced by an animal's genetic background. In contrast to FGFR3 mutations causing dwarfism in humans, this single-base change is the only known natural mutation of FGFR3 that results in a skeletal overgrowth phenotype in any species. PMID:16441300

  9. Structural and functional analyses of minimal phosphopeptides targeting the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Sang-Moon; Moulaei, Tinoush; Lim, Dan; Bang, Jeong K.; Park, Jung-Eun; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Liu, Fa; Kang, Young H.; Liao, Chenzhong; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Lee, Sunhee; Yoon, Do-Young; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Dong-Hee; Otaka, Akira; Appella, Ettore; McMahon, James B.; Nicklaus, Marc C.; Burke, Jr., Terrence R.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Lee, Kyung S.

    2009-09-14

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) has a pivotal role in cell proliferation and is considered a potential target for anticancer therapy. The noncatalytic polo-box domain (PBD) of Plk1 forms a phosphoepitope binding module for protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification of minimal phosphopeptides that specifically interact with the PBD of human PLK1, but not those of the closely related PLK2 and PLK3. Comparative binding studies and analyses of crystal structures of the PLK1 PBD in complex with the minimal phosphopeptides revealed that the C-terminal SpT dipeptide functions as a high-affinity anchor, whereas the N-terminal residues are crucial for providing specificity and affinity to the interaction. Inhibition of the PLK1 PBD by phosphothreonine mimetic peptides was sufficient to induce mitotic arrest and apoptotic cell death. The mode of interaction between the minimal peptide and PBD may provide a template for designing therapeutic agents that target PLK1.

  10. Mutational analysis of dimeric linkers in peri- and cytoplasmic domains of histidine kinase DctB reveals their functional roles in signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiwei; Yang, Jianguo; Wen, Jin; Yang, Yun; Wei, Xiaolu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Membrane-associated histidine kinases (HKs) in two-component systems respond to environmental stimuli by autophosphorylation and phospho-transfer. HK typically contains a periplasmic sensor domain that regulates the cytoplasmic kinase domain through a conserved cytoplasmic linker. How signal is transduced from the ligand-binding site across the membrane barrier remains unclear. Here, we analyse two linker regions of a typical HK, DctB. One region connects the first transmembrane helix with the periplasmic Per-ARNT-Sim domains, while the other one connects the second transmembrane helix with the cytoplasmic kinase domains. We identify a leucine residue in the first linker region to be essential for the signal transduction and for maintaining the delicate balance of the dimeric interface, which is key to its activities. We also show that the other linker, belonging to the S-helix coiled-coil family, plays essential roles in signal transduction inside the cell. Furthermore, by combining mutations with opposing activities in the two regions, we show that these two signalling transduction elements are integrated to produce a combined effect on the final activity of DctB. PMID:24898140

  11. Proteomic identification of M. tuberculosis protein kinase substrates: PknB recruits GarA, a FHA domain-containing protein, through activation loop-mediated interactions.

    PubMed

    Villarino, A; Duran, R; Wehenkel, A; Fernandez, P; England, P; Brodin, P; Cole, S T; Zimny-Arndt, U; Jungblut, P R; Cerveñansky, C; Alzari, P M

    2005-07-29

    Genes for functional Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) are ubiquitous in prokaryotic genomes, but little is known about their physiological substrates and their actual involvement in bacterial signal transduction pathways. We report here the identification of GarA (Rv1827), a Forkhead-associated (FHA) domain-containing protein, as a putative physiological substrate of PknB, an essential Ser/Thr protein kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a global proteomic approach, GarA was found to be the best detectable substrate of the PknB catalytic domain in non-denatured whole-cell protein extracts from M. tuberculosis and the saprophyte Mycobacterium smegmatis. Enzymological and binding studies of the recombinant proteins demonstrate that docking interactions between the activation loop of PknB and the C-terminal FHA domain of GarA are required to enable efficient phosphorylation at a single N-terminal threonine residue, Thr22, of the substrate. The predicted amino acid sequence of the garA gene, including both the N-terminal phosphorylation motif and the FHA domain, is strongly conserved in mycobacteria and other related actinomycetes, suggesting a functional role of GarA in putative STPK-mediated signal transduction pathways. The ensuing model of PknB-GarA interactions suggests a substrate recruitment mechanism that might apply to other mycobacterial kinases bearing multiple phosphorylation sites in their activation loops. PMID:15978616

  12. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  13. ALK-rearranged non-small cell lung cancers: how best to optimize the safety of crizotinib in clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Girard, Nicolas; Audigier-Valette, Clarisse; Cortot, Alexis B; Mennecier, Bertrand; Debieuvre, Didier; Planchard, David; Zalcman, Gérard; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Cadranel, Jacques; Barlési, Fabrice

    2015-02-01

    Crizotinib (XALKORI™, Pfizer) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting ALK, MET and ROS1, currently approved for the treatment of adults with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer. Optimizing the management of frequent crizotinib-related adverse events is crucial to ensure its continuous administration and reproduce the response and survival rates reported in clinical trials. Here, we propose some practical measures, which are mostly derived from the recommendations given to the investigators of the PROFILE 1001, 1005, 1007 and 1014 trials and are based on experience and scientific findings regarding the management of these disorders. While visual disturbances or bradycardia are frequent but benign, the severity of the cardiac and hepatic adverse events requires special attention potential to QT interval prolongations and to the monitoring of electrolyte levels and liver function, taking into account potential drug-drug interactions. PMID:25413260

  14. Conformation of the C1 phorbol-ester-binding domain participates in the activating conformational change of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, C; Slater, S J; Stagliano, B A; Stubbs, C D

    1999-01-01

    The fluorescent phorbol ester 12-N-methylanthraniloylphorbol 13-acetate [sapintoxin D (SAPD)] was used as both the activator and the probe for the activating conformational change of the C1 domain of recombinant protein kinase C (PKC)alpha. Fluorescence emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy measurements of SAPD in fully active membrane-associated PKC show that there is a relatively hydrophobic environment and restricted motional freedom characterizing the phorbol-ester-binding site. SAPD also interacts with the membrane lipids so that it was necessary to resort to time-resolved anisotropy measurements to resolve the signals corresponding to PKC-bound SAPD from that associated with buffer and lipid. In the presence of membrane lipids (unilamellar vesicles of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, 4:1 molar ratio) and Ca(2+), at a concentration sufficient to activate the enzyme fully, a long correlation time characteristic of highly restricted motion was observed for PKC-associated SAPD. The fraction of SAPD molecules displaying this restricted motion, in comparison with the total SAPD including that in lipids and in buffer, increased with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) and paralleled the appearance of enzyme activity, whereas the rotational correlation time remained constant. This could be rationalized as an increase in the number of active PKC conformers in the total population of PKC molecules. It therefore seems that there is a distinct conformation of the C1 activator-binding domain associated with the active form of PKC. The addition of SAPD and dioleoyl-sn-glycerol together produced an activity higher than that achievable by either activator alone both at concentrations that alone induced maximal activity for the respective activator; this higher activity was associated with a further restriction in SAPD motion. Increasing the cholesterol concentration, the phosphatidylethanolamine concentration, the sn-2 unsaturation in phosphatidylcholine

  15. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP) transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  16. WW Domains of the Yes-Kinase-Associated-Protein (YAP) Transcriptional Regulator Behave as Independent Units with Different Binding Preferences for PPxY Motif-Containing Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S.; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  17. Pto Kinase Binds Two Domains of AvrPtoB and Its Proximity to the Effector E3 Ligase Determines if It Evades Degradation and Activates Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Johannes; Schwizer, Simon; Martin, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    The tomato—Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst)—pathosystem is one of the best understood models for plant-pathogen interactions. Certain wild relatives of tomato express two closely related members of the same kinase family, Pto and Fen, which recognize the Pst virulence protein AvrPtoB and activate effector-triggered immunity (ETI). AvrPtoB, however, contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase domain in its carboxyl terminus which causes degradation of Fen and undermines its ability to activate ETI. In contrast, Pto evades AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and triggers ETI in response to the effector. It has been reported recently that Pto has higher kinase activity than Fen and that this difference allows Pto to inactivate the E3 ligase through phosphorylation of threonine-450 (T450) in AvrPtoB. Here we show that, in contrast to Fen which can only interact with a single domain proximal to the E3 ligase of AvrPtoB, Pto binds two distinct domains of the effector, the same site as Fen and another N-terminal domain. In the absence of E3 ligase activity Pto binds to either domain of AvrPtoB to activate ETI. However, the presence of an active E3 ligase domain causes ubiquitination of Pto that interacts with the domain proximal to the E3 ligase, identical to ubiquitination of Fen. Only when Pto binds its unique distal domain can it resist AvrPtoB-mediated degradation and activate ETI. We show that phosphorylation of T450 is not required for Pto-mediated resistance in vivo and that a kinase-inactive version of Pto is still capable of activating ETI in response to AvrPtoB. Our results demonstrate that the ability of Pto to interact with a second site distal to the E3 ligase domain in AvrPtoB, and not a higher kinase activity or T450 phosphorylation, allows Pto to evade ubiquitination and to confer immunity to Pst. PMID:25058029

  18. Lung adenocarcinoma harboring concomitant SPTBN1-ALK fusion, c-Met overexpression, and HER-2 amplification with inherent resistance to crizotinib, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Yang-Yang; Hong, Xiao-Hua; Liang, Jin-Yan; Tong, Fan; Yang, Jing-Song; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Crizotinib is a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) with activity against mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). However, the concomitant oncogenic drivers may affect the sensitivity of crizotinib. Herein, we present a 69-year-old never-smoker Chinese male with advanced lung adenocarcinoma harboring concomitant spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1)-ALK fusion, c-Met overexpression, and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) amplification with inherent resistance to crizotinib, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Although the patient received timely and comprehensive treatment, the overall survival was only 8 months. Therefore, c-Met overexpression, HER-2 gene amplification, and SPTBN1-ALK gene fusion can coexist in lung adenocarcinoma and may become a potential biomarker of cancer refractory to crizotinib, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy as well as of a relatively poor prognosis. In addition, the novel SPTBN1-ALK fusion gene may become a potential target for anti-tumor therapy. PMID:27496196

  19. The catalytic domain of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase-a contributes to ITPKA-induced modulation of F-actin.

    PubMed

    Ashour, Dina Julia; Pelka, Benjamin; Jaaks, Patricia; Wundenberg, Torsten; Blechner, Christine; Zobiak, Bernd; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Windhorst, Sabine

    2015-02-01

    Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-3-kinase-A (ITPKA) has been considered as an actin bundling protein because its N-terminal actin binding domain (ABD) induces formation of linear actin bundles. Since in many cancer cell lines ITPKA is essential for formation of lamellipodia, which consist of cross-linked actin filaments, here we analyzed if full length-ITPKA may induce formation of more complex actin structures. Indeed, we found that incubation of F-actin with ITPKA resulted in formation of dense, branched actin networks. Based on our result that ITPKA does not exhibit an additional C-terminal ABD, we exclude that ITPKA cross-links actin filaments by simultaneous F-actin binding with two different ABDs. Instead, stimulated-emission-depletion-microscopy and measurement of InsP3 Kinase activity give evidence that that N-terminal ABD-homodimers of ITPKA bind to F-actin while the monomeric C-termini insert between adjacent actin filaments. Thereby, they prevent formation of thick actin bundles but induce formation of thin branched actin structures. Interestingly, when embedded in this dense actin network, InsP3 Kinase activity is doubled and the product of InsP3 Kinase activity, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4 , inhibits spontaneous actin polymerization which may reflect a local negative feedback regulation of InsP3 Kinase activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate that not only the ABD of ITPKA modulates actin dynamics but reveal that the InsP3 Kinase domain substantially contributes to this process. PMID:25620569

  20. Distinct functional domains of the Abelson tyrosine kinase control axon guidance responses to Netrin and Slit to regulate the assembly of neural circuits.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Michael P; Bashaw, Greg J

    2013-07-01

    To develop a functional nervous system, axons must initially navigate through a complex environment, directed by guidance ligands and receptors. These receptors must link to intracellular signaling cascades to direct axon pathfinding decisions. The Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl) plays a crucial role in multiple Drosophila axon guidance pathways during development, though the mechanism by which Abl elicits a diverse set of guidance outputs is currently unknown. We identified Abl in a genetic screen for genes that contribute to Netrin-dependent axon guidance in midline-crossing (commissural) neurons. We find that Abl interacts both physically and genetically with the Netrin receptor Frazzled, and that disrupting this interaction prevents Abl from promoting midline axon crossing. Moreover, we find that Abl exerts its diverse activities through at least two different mechanisms: (1) a partly kinase-independent, structural function in midline attraction through its C-terminal F-actin binding domain (FABD) and (2) a kinase-dependent inhibition of repulsive guidance pathways that does not require the Abl C terminus. Abl also regulates motor axon pathfinding through a non-overlapping set of functional domains. These results highlight how a multifunctional kinase can trigger diverse axon guidance outcomes through the use of distinct structural motifs. PMID:23720041

  1. Imatinib binding to human c-Src is coupled to inter-domain allostery and suggests a novel kinase inhibition strategy.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Yuko; Deredge, Daniel; Wintrode, Patrick L; Hays, Franklin A

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib (Gleevec), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (nRTKI), is one of the most successful anti-neoplastic drugs in clinical use. However, imatinib-resistant mutations are increasingly prevalent in patient tissues and driving development of novel imatinib analogs. We present a detailed study of the conformational dynamics, in the presence and absence of bound imatinib, for full-length human c-Src using hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate that imatinib binding to the kinase domain effects dynamics of proline-rich or phosphorylated peptide ligand binding sites in distal c-Src SH3 and SH2 domains. These dynamic changes in functional regulatory sites, distal to the imatinib binding pocket, show similarities to structural transitions involved in kinase activation. These data also identify imatinib-sensitive, and imatinib-resistant, mutation sites. Thus, the current study identifies novel c-Src allosteric sites associated with imatinib binding and kinase activation and provide a framework for follow-on development of TKI binding modulators. PMID:27480221

  2. Imatinib binding to human c-Src is coupled to inter-domain allostery and suggests a novel kinase inhibition strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Yuko; Deredge, Daniel; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Hays, Franklin A.

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib (Gleevec), a non-receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (nRTKI), is one of the most successful anti-neoplastic drugs in clinical use. However, imatinib-resistant mutations are increasingly prevalent in patient tissues and driving development of novel imatinib analogs. We present a detailed study of the conformational dynamics, in the presence and absence of bound imatinib, for full-length human c-Src using hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry. Our results demonstrate that imatinib binding to the kinase domain effects dynamics of proline-rich or phosphorylated peptide ligand binding sites in distal c-Src SH3 and SH2 domains. These dynamic changes in functional regulatory sites, distal to the imatinib binding pocket, show similarities to structural transitions involved in kinase activation. These data also identify imatinib-sensitive, and imatinib-resistant, mutation sites. Thus, the current study identifies novel c-Src allosteric sites associated with imatinib binding and kinase activation and provide a framework for follow-on development of TKI binding modulators. PMID:27480221

  3. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, YOKO; KODAMA, KEN; MANIWA, TOMOHIRO; TAKEDA, MASASHI; KISHIMA, HIROKI

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4 anaplastic lymphoma kinase (EML4-ALK) rearrangement mostly occurs in the adenocarcinoma subtype of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with squamous cell carcinoma harboring the ALK rearrangement are extremely rare. This is a case report of a squamous cell carcinoma patient with EML4-ALK rearrangement. An elderly man with a heavy smoking history presented with a mass lesion in the right main bronchus. Bronchoscopic biopsy of the tumor confirmed a diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma, and it was proven to harbor ALK rearrangement, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not epidermal growth factor receptor mutations. The patient underwent radiation therapy, with a markedly favorable response. ALK-targeted treatment may be a viable option if disease progression occurs in such a case in the future. PMID:27330767

  4. Focal Adhesion Kinase Directly Interacts with TSC2 Through Its FAT Domain and Regulates Cell Proliferation in Cashmere Goat Fetal Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xu; Bao, Wenlei; Yang, Jiaofu; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Dongsheng; Liang, Yan; Li, Shuyu; Wang, Yanfeng; Feng, Xue; Hao, Huifang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that senses a variety of extracellular signals, such as growth factors and integrins, to control the process of cell proliferation and metabolism. We cloned three goat FAK transcript variants (KM655805, KM658268, and KM658269) that encode 1052, 1006, and 962 amino-acid residue proteins. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the putative FAK protein contains an FERM domain, a PTK domain, two Proline-rich regions, and a focal adhesion-targeting (FAT) domain. All the three transcript variants of FAK were detected in seven different goat tissues, and variant 1 had the most accumulation whereas variant 2 and variant 3 had lower accumulation. Treatment of goat fetal fibroblasts (GFbs) with a specific FAK inhibitor, TAE226, inhibited cell proliferation (p < 0.05) and induced damage to the cell morphology in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Further research demonstrated that FAK directly interacted with TSC2 (Tuberous sclerosis 2) tuberin domain through its C-terminus, which contains the complete FAT domain. In conclusion, our results indicated that FAK may be widely expressed in Cashmere goat tissues and its products participate in the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and cell proliferation through a direct interaction with TSC2 in GFBs. PMID:27380318

  5. Entrectinib, a Pan-TRK, ROS1, and ALK Inhibitor with Activity in Multiple Molecularly Defined Cancer Indications.

    PubMed

    Ardini, Elena; Menichincheri, Maria; Banfi, Patrizia; Bosotti, Roberta; De Ponti, Cristina; Pulci, Romana; Ballinari, Dario; Ciomei, Marina; Texido, Gemma; Degrassi, Anna; Avanzi, Nilla; Amboldi, Nadia; Saccardo, Maria Beatrice; Casero, Daniele; Orsini, Paolo; Bandiera, Tiziano; Mologni, Luca; Anderson, David; Wei, Ge; Harris, Jason; Vernier, Jean-Michel; Li, Gang; Felder, Eduard; Donati, Daniele; Isacchi, Antonella; Pesenti, Enrico; Magnaghi, Paola; Galvani, Arturo

    2016-04-01

    Activated ALK and ROS1 tyrosine kinases, resulting from chromosomal rearrangements, occur in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as well as other tumor types and their oncogenic relevance as actionable targets has been demonstrated by the efficacy of selective kinase inhibitors such as crizotinib, ceritinib, and alectinib. More recently, low-frequency rearrangements of TRK kinases have been described in NSCLC, colorectal carcinoma, glioblastoma, and Spitzoid melanoma. Entrectinib, whose discovery and preclinical characterization are reported herein, is a novel, potent inhibitor of ALK, ROS1, and, importantly, of TRK family kinases, which shows promise for therapy of tumors bearing oncogenic forms of these proteins. Proliferation profiling against over 200 human tumor cell lines revealed that entrectinib is exquisitely potent in vitro against lines that are dependent on the drug's pharmacologic targets. Oral administration of entrectinib to tumor-bearing mice induced regression in relevant human xenograft tumors, including the TRKA-dependent colorectal carcinoma KM12, ROS1-driven tumors, and several ALK-dependent models of different tissue origins, including a model of brain-localized lung cancer metastasis. Entrectinib is currently showing great promise in phase I/II clinical trials, including the first documented objective responses to a TRK inhibitor in colorectal carcinoma and in NSCLC. The drug is, thus, potentially suited to the therapy of several molecularly defined cancer settings, especially that of TRK-dependent tumors, for which no approved drugs are currently available. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(4); 628-39. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26939704

  6. A New Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases with a Venus Flytrap Binding Domain in Insects and Other Invertebrates Activated by Aminoacids

    PubMed Central

    Ahier, Arnaud; Rondard, Philippe; Gouignard, Nadège; Khayath, Naji; Huang, Siluo; Trolet, Jacques; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Gauthier, Monique; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Dissous, Colette

    2009-01-01

    Background Tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) comprise a large family of membrane receptors that regulate various cellular processes in cell biology of diverse organisms. We previously described an atypical RTK in the platyhelminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, composed of an extracellular Venus flytrap module (VFT) linked through a single transmembrane domain to an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain similar to that of the insulin receptor. Methods and Findings Here we show that this receptor is a member of a new family of RTKs found in invertebrates, and particularly in insects. Sixteen new members of this family, named Venus Kinase Receptor (VKR), were identified in many insects. Structural and phylogenetic studies performed on VFT and TK domains showed that VKR sequences formed monophyletic groups, the VFT group being close to that of GABAB receptors and the TK one being close to that of insulin receptors. We show that a recombinant VKR is able to autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues, and report that it can be activated by L-arginine. This is in agreement with the high degree of conservation of the alpha amino acid binding residues found in many amino acid binding VFTs. The presence of high levels of vkr transcripts in larval forms and in female gonads indicates a putative function of VKR in reproduction and/or development. Conclusion The identification of RTKs specific for parasites and insect vectors raises new perspectives for the control of human parasitic and infectious diseases. PMID:19461966

  7. Crystal Structures of the p21-Activated Kinases PAK4, PAK5, and PAK6 Reveal Catalytic Domain Plasticity of Active Group II PAKs

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Lee, Wen Hwa; Debreczeni, Judit É.; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Turnbull, Andrew; Fedorov, Oleg; Deacon, Sean W.; Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Knapp, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Summary p21-activated kinases have been classified into two groups based on their domain architecture. Group II PAKs (PAK4–6) regulate a wide variety of cellular functions, and PAK deregulation has been linked to tumor development. Structural comparison of five high-resolution structures comprising all active, monophosphorylated group II catalytic domains revealed a surprising degree of domain plasticity, including a number of catalytically productive and nonproductive conformers. Rearrangements of helix αC, a key regulatory element of kinase function, resulted in an additional helical turn at the αC N terminus and a distortion of its C terminus, a movement hitherto unseen in protein kinases. The observed structural changes led to the formation of interactions between conserved residues that structurally link the glycine-rich loop, αC, and the activation segment and firmly anchor αC in an active conformation. Inhibitor screening identified six potent PAK inhibitors from which a tri-substituted purine inhibitor was cocrystallized with PAK4 and PAK5. PMID:17292838

  8. A human primary T-lymphocyte-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-associated kinase phosphorylates the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and induces CAK activity.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, S; Shukla, R R; Kumar, A

    1997-10-01

    Tat protein mediates transactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which results in more-efficient transcript elongation. Since phosphorylation of C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II correlates with its enhanced processivity, we studied the properties of a Tat-associated CTD kinase derived from mitogenically stimulated human primary T lymphocytes (TTK). TTK binds to full-length Tat and specifically phosphorylates CTD and CDK2. This dual kinase activity is characteristic of CDK-activating kinase (CAK). The CTD kinase activity is induced upon mitogenic stimulation of primary T lymphocytes. Fractionation of T-cell lysate demonstrates that Tat-associated CTD kinase activity elutes in two peaks. About 60% of Tat-associated CTD kinase copurifies with CDK2 kinase activity and contains the CAK components CDK7 and cyclin H. The rest of Tat-associated kinase is free of CDK2 kinase activity and the CAK components and thus may represent a novel CTD kinase. The kinase activities of TTK are blocked by the adenosine analog 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-benzimidazole (DRB) as well as by the kinase inhibitor H8 at concentrations known to block transcript elongation. Importantly, the Tat-associated kinase markedly induced CAK. We suggest that the mechanism of Tat-mediated processive transcription of the HIV-1 promoter includes a Tat-associated CAK activator. PMID:9311822

  9. Structural Studies on the Extracellular Domain of Sensor Histidine Kinase YycG from Staphylococcus aureus and Its Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Truc; Choi, Jongkeun; Lee, Sangho; Yeo, Kwon Joo; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial two-component signal transduction systems are used to adapt to fluctuations in the environment. YycG, a key two-component histidine kinase in Staphylococcus aureus, plays an essential role in cell viability and regulates cell wall metabolism, biofilm formation, virulence, and antibiotic resistance. For these reasons, YycG is considered a compelling target for the development of novel antibiotics. However, to date, the signaling mechanism of YycG and its stimulus are poorly understood mainly because of a lack of structural information on YycG. To address this deficiency, we determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of S. aureus YycG (YycGex) at 2.0-Å resolution. The crystal structure indicated two subunits with an extracellular Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) topology packed into a dimer with interloop interactions. Disulfide scanning using cysteine-substituted mutants revealed that YycGex possessed dimeric interfaces not only in the loop but also in the helix α1. Cross-linking studies using intact YycG demonstrated that it was capable of forming high molecular weight oligomers on the cell membrane. Furthermore, we also observed that two auxiliary proteins of YycG, YycH and YycI, cooperatively interfered with the multimerization of YycG. From these results, we propose that signaling through YycG is regulated by multimerization and binding of YycH and YycI. These structural studies, combined with biochemical analyses, provide a better understanding of the signaling mechanism of YycG, which is necessary for developing novel antibacterial drugs targeting S. aureus. PMID:27389096

  10. Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Rearrangement in Digestive Tract Cancer: Implication for Targeted Therapy in Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Guo, Lei; Qiu, Tian; Ling, Yun; Shan, Ling; Zhou, Haitao; Zhao, Dongbing; Wang, Jian; Liang, Jianwei; Zhao, Jianjun; Jiao, Yuchen; Lu, Ning; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements define a subgroup of lung cancer which is eligible to targeted kinase inhibition. The aim of this study is to observe the incidence rate of ALK fusion in a large cohort of Chinese digestive tract cancer patients. Patients and Methods Tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from 808 digestive tract cancer cases, including 169 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, 182 gastric cancer and 457 colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. We tested all cases for ALK expression via a fully automated immunohistochemistry (IHC) assay. The IHC-positive cases were subjected to fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), target gene enrichment and sequencing for confirmation of ALK gene rearrangement and discovery of novel fusion partner. Results Among the tested cases, 2 (0.44%) CRC cases showed positive both by IHC and FISH. By qRT-PCR, EML4–ALK fusion was found in one IHC-positive CRC case. In another IHC-positive CRC case, target gene enrichment and sequencing revealed ALK was fused to a novel partner, spectrin beta non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1). One gastric cancer case showed partially positive IHC result, but no fusion was found by FISH and gene sequencing. Conclusions The incidence rate of ALK gene fusion in Chinese CRC patients was 0.44%,but not detectable in gastric and esophageal cancers. The novel SPTBN1 -ALK fusion, together with other ALK fusion genes, may become a potential target for anti-ALK therapy. PMID:26678488

  11. Intra-domain Cross-talk Regulates Serine-arginine Protein Kinase 1-dependent Phosphorylation and Splicing Function of Transformer 2β1.

    PubMed

    Jamros, Michael A; Aubol, Brandon E; Keshwani, Malik M; Zhang, Zhaiyi; Stamm, Stefan; Adams, Joseph A

    2015-07-10

    Transformer 2β1 (Tra2β1) is a splicing effector protein composed of a core RNA recognition motif flanked by two arginine-serine-rich (RS) domains, RS1 and RS2. Although Tra2β1-dependent splicing is regulated by phosphorylation, very little is known about how protein kinases phosphorylate these two RS domains. We now show that the serine-arginine protein kinase-1 (SRPK1) is a regulator of Tra2β1 and promotes exon inclusion in the survival motor neuron gene 2 (SMN2). To understand how SRPK1 phosphorylates this splicing factor, we performed mass spectrometric and kinetic experiments. We found that SRPK1 specifically phosphorylates 21 serines in RS1, a process facilitated by a docking groove in the kinase domain. Although SRPK1 readily phosphorylates RS2 in a splice variant lacking the N-terminal RS domain (Tra2β3), RS1 blocks phosphorylation of these serines in the full-length Tra2β1. Thus, RS2 serves two new functions. First, RS2 positively regulates binding of the central RNA recognition motif to an exonic splicing enhancer sequence, a phenomenon reversed by SRPK1 phosphorylation on RS1. Second, RS2 enhances ligand exchange in the SRPK1 active site allowing highly efficient Tra2β1 phosphorylation. These studies demonstrate that SRPK1 is a regulator of Tra2β1 splicing function and that the individual RS domains engage in considerable cross-talk, assuming novel functions with regard to RNA binding, splicing, and SRPK1 catalysis. PMID:26013829

  12. Cooperative Roles of Fish Protein Kinase Containing Z-DNA Binding Domains and Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase in Interferon-Mediated Antiviral Response▿†

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Kai; Zhang, Yi-Bing; Liu, Ying; Sun, Fan; Gui, Jian-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR) inhibits protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). In fish species, in addition to PKR, there exists a PKR-like protein kinase containing Z-DNA binding domains (PKZ). However, the antiviral role of fish PKZ and the functional relationship between fish PKZ and PKR remain unknown. Here we confirmed the coexpression of fish PKZ and PKR proteins in Carassius auratus blastula embryonic (CAB) cells and identified them as two typical interferon (IFN)-inducible eIF2α kinases, both of which displayed an ability to inhibit virus replication. Strikingly, fish IFN or all kinds of IFN stimuli activated PKZ and PKR to phosphorylated eIF2α. Overexpression of both fish kinases together conferred much more significant inhibition of virus replication than overexpression of either protein, whereas morpholino knockdown of both made fish cells more vulnerable to virus infection than knockdown of either. The antiviral ability of fish PKZ was weaker than fish PKR, which correlated with its lower ability to phosphorylate eIF2α than PKR. Moreover, the independent association of fish PKZ or PKR reveals that each of them formed homodimers and that fish PKZ phosphorylated eIF2α independently on fish PKR and vice versa. These results suggest that fish PKZ and PKR play a nonredundant but cooperative role in IFN antiviral response. PMID:21937641

  13. Durable brain response with pulse-dose crizotinib and ceritinib in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer compared with brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dudnik, Elizabeth; Siegal, Tali; Zach, Leor; Allen, Aaron M; Flex, Dov; Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Limon, Dror; Hirsch, Fred R; Peled, Nir

    2016-04-01

    Crizotinib achieves excellent systemic control in anaplastic lymphoma kinase-rearranged (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, central nervous system (CNS) metastases frequently occur as an early event. Whole brain irradiation, the standard treatment, results in neurocognitive impairment. We present a case series of three ALK+ NSCLC patients with progressing CNS metastases who were treated with pulse-dose crizotinib followed by ceritinib. Three ALK+ NSCLC patients treated between 2011 and 2014 (two males, two never smokers, age range 20-54years, all echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4/ALK rearrangement), were diagnosed with progressing cerebral disease while receiving crizotinib. Clinico-pathological characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. In two patients the progression was limited to the CNS, and radiological evidence of leptomeningeal spread was present in one patient. Sequential use of crizotinib 500mg administered once daily (pulse-dose) followed by ceritinib on progression achieved control of the disease in the CNS for over 18 months and over 7 months in Patient 1 and Patient 2, respectively. This strategy provided durable CNS control after whole-brain radiotherapy failure in Patient 1, and allowed the whole-brain radiotherapy to be deferred in Patient 2. Limited CNS progression was documented in Patient 3 while he was on standard-dose/pulse-dose crizotinib for 15months; durable (over 7 months) complete remission was achieved with stereotactic radiotherapy and ceritinib. Manipulating the crizotinib schedule in ALK+ NSCLC patients with CNS metastases and using a novel ALK-inhibitor at the time of further progression may provide durable CNS control and allow brain radiotherapy to be deferred. PMID:26677785

  14. The interaction between the pleckstrin homology domain of ceramide kinase and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate regulates the plasma membrane targeting and ceramide 1-phosphate levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tack-Joong; Mitsutake, Susumu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki . E-mail: yigarash@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp

    2006-04-07

    Ceramide kinase (CERK) converts ceramide to ceramide-1-phosphate (C1P), which has recently emerged as a new bioactive molecule capable of regulating diverse cellular functions. The N-terminus of the CERK protein encompasses a sequence motif known as a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Although the PH domain was previously demonstrated to be an important domain for the subcellular localization of CERK, the precise properties of this domain remained unclear. In this study, we reveal that the PH domain of CERK exhibits high affinity for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P{sub 2}), among other lipids. Furthermore, in COS7 cells, GFP-fused CERK translocated rapidly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in response to hyper-osmotic stress, which is known to increase the intracellular PI(4,5)P{sub 2} levels, whereas a PH domain deletion mutant did not. Additionally, in [{sup 32}P]orthophosphate-labeled COS7 cells, the translocation of CERK to the plasma membrane induced a 2.8-fold increase in C1P levels. The study presented here provides insight into the crucial role of the CERK-PH domain in plasma membrane targeting, through its binding to PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and subsequent induction of C1P production in the vicinity of the membrane.

  15. Modification in hydrophobic packing of HAMP domain induces a destabilization of the auto-phosphorylation site in the histidine kinase CpxA.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marlet; Duclert-Savatier, Nathalie; Betton, Jean-Michel; Alzari, Pedro M; Nilges, Michael; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2016-10-01

    The histidine kinases belong to the family of two-component systems, which serves in bacteria to couple environmental stimuli to adaptive responses. Most of the histidine kinases are homodimers, in which the HAMP and DHp domains assemble into an elongated helical region flanked by two CA domains. Recently, X-ray crystallographic structures of the cytoplasmic region of the Escherichia coli histidine kinase CpxA were determined and a phosphotransferase-defective mutant, M228V, located in HAMP, was identified. In the present study, we recorded 1 μs molecular dynamics trajectories to compare the behavior of the WT and M228V protein dimers. The M228V modification locally induces the appearance of larger voids within HAMP as well as a perturbation of the number of voids within DHp, thus destabilizing the HAMP and DHp hydrophobic packing. In addition, a disruption of the stacking interaction between F403 located in the lid of the CA domain involved in the auto-phosphorylation and R296 located in the interacting DHp region, is more often observed in the presence of the M228V modification. Experimental modifications R296A and R296D of CpxA have been observed to reduce also the CpxA activity. These observations agree with the destabilization of the R296/F403 stacking, and could be the sign of the transmission of a conformational event taking place in HAMP to the auto-phosphorylation site of histidine kinase. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 670-682, 2016. PMID:27124288

  16. Significance and evaluation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase by immunohistochemistry in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shuting; Liu, Nan; Zhao, Huanyu; Jiang, Guiyang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Wang, Enhua

    2016-08-01

    We used immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to evaluate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) protein expression and gene rearrangements, respectively, in 283 cases of wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) non-small cell lung cancer biopsy specimens. Immunohistochemistry was positive for ALK in 52 cases (18.4 %), and there was no significant difference in staining between various monoclonal antibodies (Roche ALK test kit, D5F3, p-ALK, and EML4-ALK). On RT-PCR, 36 cases (12.7 %) were positive for ALK. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR were both positive in 35 cases and both negative in 230 cases, and both have a high consistency (265/283, 93.6 %). Including 17 cases, immunohistochemistry was positive but RT-PCR was negative, and in one case, immunohistochemistry was negative but RT-PCR was positive. On fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) testing of these 18 cases, only three cases were positive (one RT-PCR was positive; two immunohistochemistry were positive). There is a high prevalence of ALK positivity in wild-type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer. Immunohistochemistry for the detection of ALK gene rearrangements was highly consistent with RT-PCR, and thus, it is a good screening tool but produces false positive results that necessitate further screening by RT-PCR or FISH. PMID:26886284

  17. SRPK1 and Akt Protein Kinases Phosphorylate the RS Domain of Lamin B Receptor with Distinct Specificity: A Combined Biochemical and In Silico Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nikolakaki, Eleni; Vlassi, Metaxia; Giannakouros, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Activated Akt has been previously implicated in acting on RS domain-containing proteins. However, it has been questioned whether its action is direct or it is mediated by co-existing SR kinase activity. To address this issue we studied in detail the phosphorylation of Lamin B Receptor (LBR) by Akt. Using synthetic peptides and a set of recombinant proteins expressing mutants of the LBR RS domain we now demonstrate that while all serines of the RS domain represent more or less equal phosphoacceptor sites for SRPK1, Ser80 and Ser82 are mainly targeted by Akt. 3D-modeling combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations show that amongst short, overlapping LBR RS-containing peptides complying with the minimum Akt recognition consensus sequence, only those bearing phosphosites either at Ser80 or Ser82 are able to fit into the active site of Akt, at least as effectively as its known substrate, GSK3-β. Combined our results provide evidence that Akt kinases directly phosphorylate an RS domain-containing protein and that both the residues N-terminal the phosphosite and at position +1 are essential for Akt specificity, with the latter substrate position being compatible with the arginine residue of RS-repeats. PMID:27105349

  18. The role of water molecules in the binding of class I and II peptides to the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Camara-Artigas, Ana; Ortiz-Salmeron, Emilia; Andujar-Sánchez, Montserrrat; Bacarizo, Julio; Martin-Garcia, Jose Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Interactions of proline-rich motifs with SH3 domains are present in signal transduction and other important cell processes. Analysis of structural and thermodynamic data suggest a relevant role of water molecules in these protein-protein interactions. To determine whether or not the SH3 domain of the Fyn tyrosine kinase shows the same behaviour, the crystal structures of its complexes with two high-affinity synthetic peptides, VSL12 and APP12, which are class I and II peptides, respectively, have been solved. In the class I complexes two water molecules were found at the binding interface that were not present in the class II complexes. The structures suggest a role of these water molecules in facilitating conformational changes in the SH3 domain to allow the binding of the class I or II peptides. In the third binding pocket these changes modify the cation-π and salt-bridge interactions that determine the affinity of the binding. Comparison of the water molecules involved in the binding of the peptides with previous reported hydration spots suggests a different pattern for the SH3 domains of the Src tyrosine kinase family. PMID:27599862

  19. The ALK inhibitor ASP3026 eradicates NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in vitro and in a systemic xenograft lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Manshouri, Roxsan; Shi, Ping; Amin, Hesham M.

    2014-01-01

    NPM-ALK+ T-cell anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is an aggressive type of cancer. Standard treatment of NPM-ALK+ ALCL is CHOP polychemotherapy. Although patients initially respond favorably to CHOP, resistance, relapse, and death frequently occur. Recently, selective targeting of ALK has emerged as an alternative therapeutic strategy. ASP3026 is a second-generation ALK inhibitor that can overcome crizotinib resistance in non-small cell lung cancer, and is currently being evaluated in clinical trials of patients with ALK+ solid tumors. However, NPM-ALK+ ALCL patients are not included in these trials. We studied the effects of ASP3026 on NPM-ALK+ ALCL cell lines in vitro and on systemic lymphoma growth in vivo. ASP3026 decreased the viability, proliferation, and colony formation, as well as induced apoptotic cell death of NPM-ALK+ ALCL cells. In addition, ASP3026 significantly reduced the proliferation of 293T cells transfected with NPM-ALK mutants that are resistant to crizotinib and downregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of these mutants. Moreover, ASP3026 abrogated systemic NPM-ALK+ ALCL growth in mice. Importantly, the survival of ASP3026-treated mice was superior to that of control and CHOP-treated mice. Our data suggest that ASP3026 is an effective treatment for NPM-ALK+ ALCL, and support the enrollment of patients with this lymphoma in the ongoing clinical trials. PMID:25026277

  20. Targeted Therapies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer—Beyond EGFR and ALK

    PubMed Central

    Rothschild, Sacha I.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has undergone a dramatic paradigm shift over the past decade. Advances in our understanding of the underlying biology of NSCLC have revealed distinct molecular subtypes. A substantial proportion of NSCLC depends on oncogenic molecular aberrations (so-called “driver mutations”) for their malignant phenotype. Personalized therapy encompasses the strategy of matching these subtypes with effective targeted therapies. EGFR mutations and ALK translocation are the most effectively targeted oncogenes in NSCLC. EGFR mutations and ALK gene rearrangements are successfully being targeted with specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The number of molecular subgroups of NSCLC continues to grow. The scope of this review is to discuss recent data on novel molecular targets as ROS1, BRAF, KRAS, HER2, c-MET, RET, PIK3CA, FGFR1 and DDR2. Thereby the review will focus on therapeutic strategies targeting these aberrations. Moreover, the emerging challenge of acquired resistance to initially effective therapies will be discussed. PMID:26018876

  1. ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma with soft tissue involvement in a young woman

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kehai; Li, Hongtao; Huang, Caihong; Li, Huazhuang; Fang, Jun; Tian, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has strong expression of CD30. ALCL can sometimes involve the bone marrow, and in advanced stages, it can produce destructive extranodal lesions. But anaplastic large cell lymphoma kinase (ALK)+ ALCL with soft tissue involvement is very rare. Case report A 35-year-old woman presented with waist pain for over 1 month. The biopsy of soft tissue lesions showed that these cells were positive for ALK-1, CD30, TIA-1, GranzymeB, CD4, CD8, and Ki67 (90%+) and negative for CD3, CD5, CD20, CD10, cytokeratin (CK), TdT, HMB-45, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), and pan-CK, which identified ALCL. After six cycles of Hyper-CVAD/MA regimen, she achieved partial remission. Three months later, she died due to disease progression. Conclusion This case illustrates the unusual presentation of ALCL in soft tissue with a bad response to chemotherapy. Because of the tendency for rapid progression, ALCL in young adults with extra-nodal lesions are often treated with high-grade chemotherapy, such as Hyper-CVAD/MA. PMID:27445489

  2. Targeted Therapies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Beyond EGFR and ALK.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Sacha I

    2015-01-01

    Systemic therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has undergone a dramatic paradigm shift over the past decade. Advances in our understanding of the underlying biology of NSCLC have revealed distinct molecular subtypes. A substantial proportion of NSCLC depends on oncogenic molecular aberrations (so-called "driver mutations") for their malignant phenotype. Personalized therapy encompasses the strategy of matching these subtypes with effective targeted therapies. EGFR mutations and ALK translocation are the most effectively targeted oncogenes in NSCLC. EGFR mutations and ALK gene rearrangements are successfully being targeted with specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The number of molecular subgroups of NSCLC continues to grow. The scope of this review is to discuss recent data on novel molecular targets as ROS1, BRAF, KRAS, HER2, c-MET, RET, PIK3CA, FGFR1 and DDR2. Thereby the review will focus on therapeutic strategies targeting these aberrations. Moreover, the emerging challenge of acquired resistance to initially effective therapies will be discussed. PMID:26018876

  3. Effects of meal type on the oral bioavailability of the ALK inhibitor ceritinib in healthy adult subjects.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yvonne Y; Gu, Wen; Lin, Tiffany; Song, Dongweon; Yu, Richard; Scott, Jeffrey W

    2016-05-01

    Ceritinib is a potent inhibitor of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which has shown acceptable safety and substantial antitumor activity in ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Two food-effect studies were conducted in healthy adults to investigate the influence of food on the oral bioavailability of ceritinib: a study with low- or high-fat meals at 500 mg and a study with a light snack at 750 mg. Compared with the fasted state, AUC0-∞ (90%CI) of ceritinib was increased by 58% (34%, 86%) after the intake of a low-fat meal, by 73% (46%, 105%) after the intake of a high-fat meal, and by 54% (19%, 99%) after the intake of a light snack. Safety assessments also suggested that food may improve gastrointestinal (GI) tolerability after a single ceritinib dose. Based on the pharmacokinetic results, it is essential to avoid any type of meal during dosing of ceritinib because the intake of food may increase the occurrence of exposure-dependent, non-GI toxicities at the labeled dose of 750 mg daily during fasting. A randomized trial is ongoing to determine an alternative way to give ceritinib (450 mg or 600 mg with food) that may enhance GI tolerability in ALK-positive NSCLC patients. PMID:26272586

  4. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of the Human Long Myosin Light-Chain Kinase 1-Specific Domain IgCAM3

    SciTech Connect

    W Vallen Graham; A Magis; K Bailey; J Turner; D Ostrov

    2011-12-31

    Myosin light-chain kinase-dependent tight junction regulation is a critical event in inflammatory cytokine-induced increases in epithelial paracellular permeability. MLCK is expressed in human intestinal epithelium as two isoforms, long MLCK1 and long MLCK2, and MLCK1 is specifically localized to the tight junction, where it regulates paracellular permeability. The sole difference between these long MLCK splice variants is the presence of an immunoglobulin-like cell-adhesion molecule domain, IgCAM3, in MLCK1. To gain insight into the structure of the IgCAM3 domain, the IgCAM3 domain of MLCK1 has been expressed, purified and crystallized. Preliminary X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution and were consistent with the primitive trigonal space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}.

  5. The therapeutic potential of p53 reactivation by nutlin-3a in ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma with wild-type or mutated p53.

    PubMed

    Drakos, E; Atsaves, V; Schlette, E; Li, J; Papanastasi, I; Rassidakis, G Z; Medeiros, L J

    2009-12-01

    p53 is expressed frequently, but is rarely mutated in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) tumours. Nutlin-3a is a recently developed small molecule that targets Mdm2, a critical negative regulator of p53, and disrupts the p53-Mdm2 interaction resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. We show that nutlin-3a activates p53 in ALK+ ALCL cells carrying a wild type (wt) or mutated but partially functional p53 gene resulting in p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cell-cycle arrest was associated with upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Nutlin-3a-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by Bax and Puma upregulation, downregulation of Bcl-xl, survivin, and caspase-3 cleavage, and this was reduced when p53-dependent transactivation activity was inhibited by pifithrin-alpha, or when pifithrin-mu was used to inhibit direct p53 targeting of mitochondria. Nutlin-3a sensitized the activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in wt-p53 ALK+ ALCL cells, in part, through upregulation of DR-5 and downregulation of c-Flip(S/L), and was synergistic with TRAIL in cell death induction. In addition, nutlin-3a treatment enhanced doxorubicin cytotoxicity against ALK+ ALCL cells harbouring mt p53, and this was associated with p73 upregulation. These data suggest that disruption of the p53-mdm2 interaction by nutlin-3a offers a novel therapeutic approach for ALK+ ALCL patients. PMID:19741726

  6. Computational Analysis of Phosphopeptide Binding to the Polo-Box Domain of the Mitotic Kinase PLK1 Using Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, David J.; McKenzie, Grahame J.; Robinson, Daniel D.; Narváez, Ana J.; Hardwick, Bryn; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.; Grant, Guy H.; Payne, Mike C.

    2010-01-01

    The Polo-Like Kinase 1 (PLK1) acts as a central regulator of mitosis and is over-expressed in a wide range of human tumours where high levels of expression correlate with a poor prognosis. PLK1 comprises two structural elements, a kinase domain and a polo-box domain (PBD). The PBD binds phosphorylated substrates to control substrate phosphorylation by the kinase domain. Although the PBD preferentially binds to phosphopeptides, it has a relatively broad sequence specificity in comparison with other phosphopeptide binding domains. We analysed the molecular determinants of recognition by performing molecular dynamics simulations of the PBD with one of its natural substrates, CDC25c. Predicted binding free energies were calculated using a molecular mechanics, Poisson-Boltzmann surface area approach. We calculated the per-residue contributions to the binding free energy change, showing that the phosphothreonine residue and the mainchain account for the vast majority of the interaction energy. This explains the very broad sequence specificity with respect to other sidechain residues. Finally, we considered the key role of bridging water molecules at the binding interface. We employed inhomogeneous fluid solvation theory to consider the free energy of water molecules on the protein surface with respect to bulk water molecules. Such an analysis highlights binding hotspots created by elimination of water molecules from hydrophobic surfaces. It also predicts that a number of water molecules are stabilized by the presence of the charged phosphate group, and that this will have a significant effect on the binding affinity. Our findings suggest a molecular rationale for the promiscuous binding of the PBD and highlight a role for bridging water molecules at the interface. We expect that this method of analysis will be very useful for probing other protein surfaces to identify binding hotspots for natural binding partners and small molecule inhibitors. PMID:20711360

  7. A PAS domain with an oxygen labile [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster in the oxygen sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Martin; Hammel, Oliver; Mienert, Bernd; Schlag, Steffen; Bill, Eckhard; Unden, Gottfried

    2008-12-30

    The cytoplasmic histidine sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus responds to O(2) and controls together with the response regulator NreC the expression of genes of nitrate/nitrite respiration. nreBC homologous genes were found in Staphylococcus strains and Bacillus clausii, and a modified form was found in some Lactobacillus strains. NreB contains a sensory domain with similarity to heme B binding PAS domains. Anaerobically prepared NreB of S. carnosus exhibited a (diamagnetic) [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster when assessed by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Upon reaction with air, the cluster was degraded with a half-life of approximately 2.5 min. No significant amounts of Mossbauer or EPR detectable intermediates were found during the decay, but magnetic Mossbauer spectra revealed formation of diamagnetic [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters. After extended exposure to air, NreB was devoid of a FeS cluster. Photoreduction with deazaflavin produced small amounts of [4Fe-4S](+), which were degraded subsequently. The magnetically perturbed Mossbauer spectrum of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster corroborated the S = 0 spin state and revealed uniform electric field gradient tensors of the iron sites, suggesting full delocalization of the valence electrons and binding of each of the Fe ions by four S ligands, including the ligand to the protein. Mutation of each of the four Cys residues inactivated NreB function in vivo in accordance with their role as ligands. [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster-containing NreB had high kinase activity. Exposure to air decreased the kinase activity and content of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster with similar half-lives. We conclude that the sensory domain of NreB represents a new type of PAS domain containing a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster for sensing and function. PMID:19102705

  8. Titins in C.elegans with unusual features: coiled-coil domains, novel regulation of kinase activity and two new possible elastic regions.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Denise B; Gernert, Kim M; Shmeleva, Nataliya; Tang, Xuexin; Mercer, Kristina B; Borodovsky, Mark; Benian, Guy M

    2002-10-25

    We report that there are previously unrecognized proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans that are similar to the giant muscle proteins called titins, and these are encoded by a single approximately 90kb gene. The gene structure was predicted by GeneMark.hmm and then experimentally verified. The Ce titin gene encodes polypeptides of 2.2MDa, 1.2MDa and 301kDa. The 2.2MDa isoform resembles twitchin and UNC-89 in that it contains multiple Ig (56) and FnIII (11) domains, and a single protein kinase domain. In addition, however, the 2.2MDa isoform contains four classes of short, 14-51 residue, repeat motifs arranged mostly in many tandem copies. One of these tandem repeat regions is similar to the PEVK regions of vertebrate and fly titins. As the PEVK region is one of the main elastic elements of the titins and is also composed of short tandem repeats, this suggests that the repeat motifs in the Ce titins may have a similar elastic function. An interesting aspect of the two largest Ce titin isoforms, is that in contrast to other members of the twitchin/titin family, there are multiple regions which are likely to form coiled-coil structure. In transgenic animals, the first approximately 100 residues of the largest isoforms targets to dense bodies, the worm analogs of Z-discs. Anti-Ce titin antibodies show localization to muscle I-bands beginning at the L2-L3 larval stages and this pattern continues into adult muscle. Ce titins may not have a role in early myofibril assembly: (1) Ce titins are too short to span half a sarcomere, and the onset of their expression is well after the initial assembly of thick filaments. (2) Ce titins are not localized to I-bands in embryonic or L1 larval muscle. The Ce titin protein kinase domain is most similar to the kinase domains of the twitchins and projectin. The Ce titin kinase has protein kinase activity in vitro, and this activity is regulated by a novel mechanism. PMID:12381307

  9. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Kyaw L.; Stockley, Tracy L.; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L.; Siu, Lillian L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients’ clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  10. Antibodies to the extracellular receptor domain restore the hormone-insensitive kinase and conformation of the mutant insulin receptor valine 382.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, C; Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Taylor, S; Accili, D; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-05-25

    A mutation substituting a valine for phenylalanine at residue 382 in the insulin receptor alpha-subunit has been found in two sisters with a genetic form of extreme insulin resistance. This receptor mutation impairs the ability of the hormone to activate autophosphorylation of solubilized receptors and phosphorylation of substrates (Accili, D., Mosthaf, L., Ullrich, A., and Taylor, S. I. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 434-439). We have previously demonstrated that in native receptors insulin induces a conformational change in the receptor beta-subunit, which is thought to be necessary for receptor activation (Baron, V., Gautier, N., Komoriya, A., Hainaut, P., Scimeca, J. C., Mervic, M., Lavielle, S., Dolais-Kitabgi, J., and Van Obberghen, E. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 4634-4641). Hence, it was thought that a defect in this conformational change might explain the functional defect of the mutant receptor. This appears to be the case, as we demonstrate here that the mutant receptor is locked in its inactive configuration. However, we found two monoclonal antibodies, directed to the extracellular domain, which are capable of restoring the mutant receptor kinase activity. The activation of the mutant receptor was accompanied by restoration of conformational changes in the beta-subunit C terminus. From these data, we draw the two following conclusions. (i) A causal link exists between receptor kinase activation and the occurrence of conformational changes. (ii) Ligands other than insulin, such as antibodies, which perturb the extracellular domain, can function as alternative ways to restore the mutant receptor kinase. PMID:8388389

  11. Testing ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation as a druggable target in a patient with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw L; Stockley, Tracy L; Serra, Stefano; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Siu, Lillian L

    2016-09-01

    Recent advances in molecular profiling technologies allow genetic driver events in individual tumors to be identified. The hypothesis behind this ongoing molecular profiling effort is that improvement in patients' clinical outcomes will be achieved by inhibiting these discovered genetic driver events with matched targeted drugs. This hypothesis is currently being tested in oncology clinics with variable early results. Herein, we present our experience with a case of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) with an ERBB2 p.L755S kinase domain mutation, a BRAF p.N581S mutation, and an APC p.Q1429fs mutation, together with a brief review of the literature describing the biological and clinical significance of ERRB2 kinase domain mutations in CRC. The patient was treated with trastuzumab combined with infusional 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin based on the presence of ERBB2 p.L755S kinase mutation in the tumor and based on the available evidence at the time when standard treatment options had been exhausted. However, there was no therapeutic response illustrating the challenges we face in managing patients with potentially targetable mutations where results from functional in vitro and in vivo studies lag behind those of genomic sequencing studies. Also lagging behind are clinical utility data from oncology clinics, hampering rapid therapeutic advances. Our case also highlights the logistical barriers associated with getting the most optimal therapeutic agents to the right patient in this era of personalized therapeutics based on cancer genomics. PMID:27626067

  12. ALK inhibitor resistance in ALKF1174L-driven neuroblastoma is associated with AXL activation and induction of EMT

    PubMed Central

    Debruyne, D N; Bhatnagar, N; Sharma, B; Luther, W; Moore, N F; Cheung, N-K; Gray, N S; George, R E

    2016-01-01

    The crizotinib-resistant ALKF1174L mutation arises de novo in neuroblastoma (NB) and is acquired in ALK translocation-driven cancers, lending impetus to the development of novel anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors with different modes of action. The diaminopyrimidine TAE684 and its derivative ceritinib (LDK378), which are structurally distinct from crizotinib, are active against NB cells expressing ALKF1174L. Here we demonstrate acquired resistance to TAE684 and LDK378 in ALKF1174L-driven human NB cells that is linked to overexpression and activation of the AXL tyrosine kinase and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). AXL phosphorylation conferred TAE684 resistance to NB cells through upregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling. Inhibition of AXL partly rescued TAE684 resistance, resensitizing these cells to this compound. AXL activation in resistant cells was mediated through increased expression of the active form of its ligand, GAS6, that also served to stabilize the AXL protein. Although ectopic expression of AXL and TWIST2 individually in TAE684-sensitive parental cells led to the elevated expression of mesenchymal markers and invasive capacity, only AXL overexpression induced resistance to TAE684 as well. TAE684-resistant cells showed greater sensitivity to HSP90 inhibition than did their parental counterparts, with downregulation of AXL and AXL-mediated ERK signaling. Our studies indicate that aberrant AXL signaling and development of an EMT phenotype underlie resistance of ALKF1174L-driven NB cells to TAE684 and its derivatives. We suggest that the combination of ALK and AXL or HSP90 inhibitors be considered to delay the emergence of such resistance. PMID:26616860

  13. Distribution and evolution of multiple-step phosphorelay in prokaryotes: lateral domain recruitment involved in the formation of hybrid-type histidine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Weiwen; Shi, Liang

    2005-06-01

    Although most two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) use a simple phosphotransfer pathway from one histidine kinase (HK) to one response regulator (RR), a multiple-step phosphorelay involving a phosphotransfer scheme of His-Asp-His-Asp was discovered in recent years. Central to this multiple-step type signal transduction pathway are a hybrid-type HK, containing both an HK kinase domain and a RR receiver domain in a single protein, and a histidine-containing phosphotransfer (HPT) that can exist as either a domain in hybrid-type HKs or as a separate protein. While multiple-step phosphorelay systems predominant in eukaryotes, it has been previously suggested that they are less common in prokaryotes. In this study, we found that putative hybrid-type HKs were present in 56 out of 156 complete prokaryotic genomes, indicating that multiple-step phosphorelay systems are more common in prokaryotes than previously appreciated. Large expansions of hybrid-type HKs were observed in several types of bacterial species, including cyanobacteria, several bacteria involved in bacteria-eukaryote interaction, and metabolically versatile bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that there was no common ancestor for hybrid-type of HKs, and their origin and expansion was achieved by lateral recruitment of a receiver domain into an HK molecule and then duplication as one unit. Lateral recruitment of additional sensory domains such as PAS was also evident. HPT domains or proteins were identified in 32 of the genomes with hybrid-type HKs, however, no significant gene expansion was observed for HPTs even in genome with large number of hybrid-type HKs. In addition, the observation of fewer HPTs than hybrid-type HKs in almost all genomes studied suggests that there is no simple one-to-one relationship between them

  14. Crystal structure of the N-terminal SH3 domain of mouse {beta}PIX, p21-activated kinase-interacting exchange factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiaofeng; Liu Xueqi; Sun Fei; Gao Jia; Zhou Hongwei; Gao, George F.; Bartlam, Mark; Rao Zihe . E-mail: raozh@xtal.tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-01-06

    The mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain, residues 8-63 of P21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor, has been characterized by X-ray diffraction. Crystals belonging to space group P3{sub 2}21 diffracted to 2.0 A and the structure was phased by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. The domain is a compact {beta}-barrel with an overall conformation similar to the general SH3 structure. The X-ray structure shows mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain binding the way in which the {beta}PIX characteristic amino acids do so for an unconventional ligand binding surface. This arrangement provides a rationale for the unusual ligand recognition motif exhibited by mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain. Comparison with another SH3/peptide complex shows that the recognition mode of the mouse {beta}PIX-SH3 domain should be very similar to the RXXK ligand binding mode. The unique large and planar hydrophobic pocket may contribute to the promiscuity of {beta}PIX-SH3 domain resulting in its multiple biological functions.

  15. ALK evaluation in the world of multiplex testing: Network Genomic Medicine (NGM): the Cologne model for implementing personalised oncology.

    PubMed

    Heydt, C; Kostenko, A; Merkelbach-Bruse, S; Wolf, J; Büttner, R

    2016-09-01

    Comprehensive molecular genotyping of lung cancers has become a key requirement for guiding therapeutic decisions. As a paradigm model of implementing next-generation comprehensive diagnostics, Network Genomic Medicine (NGM) has established central diagnostic and clinical trial platforms for centralised testing and decentralised personalised treatment in clinical practice. Here, we describe the structures of the NGM network and give a summary of technologies to identify patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusion-positive lung adenocarcinomas. As unifying test platforms will become increasingly important for delivering reliable, quick and affordable tests, the NGM diagnostic platform is currently implementing a comprehensive hybrid capture-based parallel sequencing pan-cancer assay. PMID:27573753

  16. The Abi-domain protein Abx1 interacts with the CovS histidine kinase to control virulence gene expression in group B Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Firon, Arnaud; Tazi, Asmaa; Da Cunha, Violette; Brinster, Sophie; Sauvage, Elisabeth; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Golenbock, Douglas T; Glaser, Philippe; Poyart, Claire; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS), a common commensal of the female genital tract, is the leading cause of invasive infections in neonates. Expression of major GBS virulence factors, such as the hemolysin operon cyl, is regulated directly at the transcriptional level by the CovSR two-component system. Using a random genetic approach, we identified a multi-spanning transmembrane protein, Abx1, essential for the production of the GBS hemolysin. Despite its similarity to eukaryotic CaaX proteases, the Abx1 function is not involved in a post-translational modification of the GBS hemolysin. Instead, we demonstrate that Abx1 regulates transcription of several virulence genes, including those comprising the hemolysin operon, by a CovSR-dep