Science.gov

Sample records for alkaline stored energy

  1. Storing and transporting energy

    DOEpatents

    McClaine, Andrew W.; Brown, Kenneth

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  2. Sunlight-energy-storing method

    SciTech Connect

    Kitao, T.; Ishihara, Sh.; Setsune, J.I.; Yamamoto, R.

    1984-05-22

    This invention is a method for storing light energy using an indigo derivative. Among indigo derivatives capable of storing light energy by the photoisomerization of the molecule from the trans-form to the cis-form, compounds heretofore obtained have been soluble only in expensive solvents such as benzene, toluene, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride and the like and harmful substances. On the other hand, the indigo derivative of this invention has the form of a pyridinium salt, is soluble in water and/or ethanol, and permits employment of safe and inexpensive water and/or an alcohol as a solvent. The indigo derivative of this invention converted from the trans-form to the cis-form by irradiation with sunlight and storing sunlight energy liberates the aforesaid stored energy as heat on addition of a catalyst and/or a heat trigger.

  3. Storing solar energy in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-06-01

    This article describes the world`s largest power tower incorporating one of the newest commercial solar energy systems and being build in California`s Mojave Desert. The project -- sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and a consortium of western utilities, municipalities, and associations -- is called Solar Two, and it will use molten salt to absorb solar energy and store that energy until it is needed to generate electricity. Construction will be completed on Solar Two in September. Solar thermal systems convert the sun`s rays into electricity by using a thousand or more dual-axis, sun-tracking mirrors, called heliostats, to focus optimum sunlight on the solar receiver of a power tower containing a working fluid. The fluid is heated to a desired temperature and sent to a storage facility. During periods of peak demand, the fluid is circulating through heat exchangers to generate steam used to drive a turbine.

  4. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.A. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  5. Distributed energy store railguns experiment and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Electromagnetic acceleration of projectiles holds the potential for achieving higher velocities than yet achieved by any other means. A railgun is the simplest form of electromagnetic macroparticle accelerator and can generate the highest sustained accelerating force. The practical length of conventional railguns is limited by the impedance of the rails because current must be carried along the entire length of the rails. A railgun and power supply system called the distributed energy store railgun was proposed as a solution to this limitation. The distributed energy store railgun used multiple current sources connected to the rails of a railgun at points distributed along the bore. These current sources (energy stores) are turned on in sequence as the projectile moves down the bore so that current is fed to the railgun from behind the armature. In this system the length of the rails that carry the full armature current is less than the total length of the railgun. If a sufficient number of energy stores is used, this removes the limitation on the length of a railgun. An additional feature of distributed energy store type railguns is that they can be designed to maintain a constant pressure on the projectile being accelerated. A distributed energy store railgun was constructed and successfully operated. In addition to this first demonstration of the distributed energy store railgun principle, a theoretical model of the system was also constructed.

  6. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  7. How to Store Energy Fast

    SciTech Connect

    Augustyn, Veronica; Ko, Jesse; Rauda, Iris

    2013-07-18

    Representing the Molecularly Engineered Energy Materials (MEEM), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of MEEM, using inexpensive custom-designed molecular building blocks, aims to create revolutionary new materials with self-assembled multi-scale architectures that will enable high performing energy generation and storage applications.

  8. Battery Technology Stores Clean Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Headquartered in Fremont, California, Deeya Energy Inc. is now bringing its flow batteries to commercial customers around the world after working with former Marshall Space Flight Center scientist, Lawrence Thaller. Deeya's liquid-cell batteries have higher power capability than Thaller's original design, are less expensive than lead-acid batteries, are a clean energy alternative, and are 10 to 20 times less expensive than nickel-metal hydride batteries, lithium-ion batteries, and fuel cell options.

  9. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    ScienceCinema

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2014-06-13

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  10. Charge and Energy Stored in a Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Using a data-acquisition system, the charge and energy stored in a capacitor are measured and displayed during the charging/discharging process. The experiment is usable as a laboratory work and/or a lecture demonstration. (Contains 3 figures.)

  11. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2013-03-27

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  12. Stored energy release behaviour of disordered carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, K.; Barat, P.; Sarkar, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2007-06-01

    The use of graphite as a moderator in a low temperature thermal nuclear reactor is restricted due to accumulation of energy caused by displacement of atoms by neutrons and high energetic particles. Thermal transients may lead to a release of stored energy that may raise the temperature of the fuel clad above the design limit. Disordered carbon is thought to be an alternative choice for this purpose. Two types of disordered carbon composites, namely, CB (made up of 15 wt. % carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin) and PAN (made up of 20 vol. % chopped polyacrylonitrile carbon fibre dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix) have been irradiated with 145 MeV Ne6+ ions at three fluence levels of 1.0×1013, 5.0×1013 and 1.5×1014 Ne6+/cm2, respectively. The XRD patterns revealed that both the samples remained disordered even after irradiation. The maximum release of stored energy for CB was 212 J/g and that of PAN was 906 J/g. For CB, the release of stored energy was a first order reaction with activation energy of 2.79 eV and a frequency factor of 3.72×1028 per second. 13% of the defects got annealed by heating up to 700 °C. PAN showed a third-order release rate with activation energy of 1.69 eV and a frequency factor of 1.77×1014 per second. 56% of the total defects got annealed by heating it up to 700 °C. CB seems to be the better choice than PAN as it showed less energy release with a slower rate.

  13. Mixing in thermally stratified energy stores

    SciTech Connect

    Berkle, J. van

    1996-10-01

    Two important aspects of short-term thermally stratified energy storage, thermocline mixing and thermocline thickness, are studied analytically, experimentally and numerically. The storage detrimental aspects are investigated for a simplified configuration, i.e., an adiabatic box containing a quasi-stationary thermocline. Numerical finite difference/volume simulations agree well with experiments. The dissipation-free 1D analytical model shows a large discrepancy. It appears that mixing inside thermally stratified stores is a two-state process. First fluid is withdrawn from the thermocline by viscous drag. Subsequent mixing takes place by stretching and folding of fluid particles, thereby enabling diffusion to become active. 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Glycogen: the forgotten cerebral energy store.

    PubMed

    Gruetter, Rolf

    2003-10-15

    The brain contains a significant amount of glycogen that is an order of magnitude smaller than that in muscle, but several-fold higher than the cerebral glucose content. Although the precise role of brain glycogen to date is unknown, it seems affected by focal activation, neurotransmitters, and overall electrical activity and hormones. Based on its relatively low concentration, the role of brain glycogen as a significant energy store has been discounted. This work reviews recent experimental evidence that brain glycogen is an important reserve of glucose equivalents: (1) glial glycogen can provide the majority of the glucose supply deficit during hypoglycemia for more than 100 min, consistent with the proposal that glial lactate is a fuel for neurons; (2) glycogen concentrations may be as high as 10 micromol/g, substantially higher than was thought previously; (3) glucose cycling in and out of glycogen amounts to approximately 1% of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) in human and rat brain, amounting to an effective stability of glycogen in the resting awake brain during euglycemia and hyperglycemia, (4) brain glycogen metabolism/concentrations are insulin/glucose sensitive; and (5) after a single episode of hypoglycemia, brain glycogen levels rebound to levels that exceed the pre-hypoglycemic concentrations (supercompensation). This experimental evidence supports the proposal that brain glycogen may be involved in the development of diabetes complications, specifically impaired glucose sensing (hypoglycemia unawareness) observed clinically in some diabetes patients under insulin treatment. It is proposed further that brain glycogen becomes important in any metabolic state where supply transiently cannot meet demand, such conditions that could occur during prolonged focal activation, sleep deprivation, seizures, and mild hypoxia. PMID:14515346

  15. Treated Carbon Nanofibers for Storing Energy in Aqueous KOH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firsich, David W.

    2004-01-01

    A surface treatment has been found to enhance the performances of carbon nanofibers as electrode materials for electrochemical capacitors in which aqueous solutions of potassium hydroxide are used as the electrolytes. In the treatment, sulfonic acid groups are attached to edge plane sites on carbon atoms. The treatment is applicable to a variety of carbon nanofibers, including fibrils and both single- and multiple-wall nanotubes. The reason for choosing nanofibers over powders and other forms of carbon is that nanofibers offer greater power features. In previous research, it was found that the surface treatment of carbon nanofibers increased energy-storage densities in the presence of acid electrolytes. Now, it has been found that the same treatment increases energy-storage densities of carbon nanofibers in the presence of alkaline electrolytes when the carbon is paired with a NiOOH electrode. This beneficial effect varies depending on the variety of carbon substrate to which it is applied. It has been conjectured that the sulfonic acid groups, which exist in a deprotonated state in aqueous KOH solutions, undergo reversible electro-chemical reactions that are responsible for the observed increases in energystorage capacities. The increases can be considerable: For example, in one case, nanofibers exhibited a specific capacitance of 34 Farads per gram before treatment and 172 Farads per gram (an increase of about 400 percent) after treatment. The most promising application of this development appears to lie in hybrid capacitors, which are devices designed primarily for storing energy. These devices are designed to be capable of (1) discharge at rates greater than those of batteries and (2) storing energy at densities approaching those of batteries. A hybrid capacitor includes one electrode like that of a battery and one electrode like that of an electrochemical capacitor. For example, a hybrid capacitor could contain a potassium hydroxide solution as the electrolyte

  16. Storing the Electric Energy Produced by an AC Generator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, P. Simeao; Lima, Ana Paula; Carvalho, Pedro Simeao

    2010-01-01

    Producing energy from renewable energy sources is nowadays a priority in our society. In many cases this energy comes as electric energy, and when we think about electric energy generators, one major issue is how we can store that energy. In this paper we discuss how this can be done and give some ideas for applications that can serve as a…

  17. "Finite part" electric and magnetic stored energies for planar antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockrell, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    A pair of formulas representing the time-average "finite part" electric and magnetic stored energies for planar antennas are derived. It is also shown that the asymptotic reciprocal relationship between quality factor and relative bandwidth exists for planar antennas.

  18. System and method for storing energy

    DOEpatents

    Yarger, Eric Jay [Rigby, ID; Morrison, John [Butte, MT; Richardson, John Grant [Idaho Falls, ID; Spencer, David Frazer [Idaho Falls, ID; Christiansen, Dale W [Blackfoot, ID

    2010-03-30

    A self-recharging battery comprising a generator and an energy storage device contained within the battery case. The generator comprises a magnetic structure configured to generate a compressed magnetic field and a coil configured to focus the compressed magnetic field in electrical conductive elements of the coil.

  19. MPD thruster operation with inductively stored energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. E.; Von Jaskowsky, W. F.; Wolff, M.; Budd, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters with 10-cm and 2.5-cm long thoriated tungsten cathodes have been operated with both inductive and capacitive energy sources at currents up to 8 kA. Voltage-current characteristics and magnetic field measurements show that over most of the operating range, the inductively driven thruster acts as a continuously varying quasi-steady accelerator at the same current. However, at values of a specified parameter near the onset condition for voltage fluctuations and electrode and insulator erosion, the voltage for the inductively driven thruster is higher than its quasi-steady counterpart. This higher voltage occurs because the equilibration time constant of the MPD discharge, is too large to allow the terminal voltage to attain a quasi-steady value as the inductively driven current decreases.

  20. Using Defects in Materials to Store Energy: a Theoretical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, I.-Te; Bernardi, Marco

    We study the energy stored by defects in materials using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Leveraging experimental data to estimate the energy density of defects, expressed as the defect formation energy per unit volume (units of MJ/L) or weight (units of MJ/kg), we identify candidates for high energy density storage, including tungsten, diamond, graphite, silicon, and graphene. DFT calculations are applied to these materials to study the formation energy of vacancies, interstitials, and Frenkel pairs. Our results indicate that the energy density stored by defects in these materials, with experimentally accessible non-equilibrium defect concentrations, can be higher than that of common energy storage technologies such as lithium batteries and supercapacitors. We discuss storage of solar energy and electrical energy (through ion bombardment) using defects.

  1. Pressure Systems Stored-Energy Threshold Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Paulsen, Samuel S.

    2009-08-25

    Federal Regulation 10 CFR 851, which became effective February 2007, brought to light potential weaknesses regarding the Pressure Safety Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The definition of a pressure system in 10 CFR 851 does not contain a limit based upon pressure or any other criteria. Therefore, the need for a method to determine an appropriate risk-based hazard level for pressure safety was identified. The Laboratory has historically used a stored energy of 1000 lbf-ft to define a pressure hazard; however, an analytical basis for this value had not been documented. This document establishes the technical basis by evaluating the use of stored energy as an appropriate criterion to establish a pressure hazard, exploring a suitable risk threshold for pressure hazards, and reviewing the methods used to determine stored energy. The literature review and technical analysis concludes the use of stored energy as a method for determining a potential risk, the 1000 lbf-ft threshold, and the methods used by PNNL to calculate stored energy are all appropriate. Recommendations for further program improvements are also discussed

  2. Estimation of Energy Stores of Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchford, Mary Demarest

    1987-01-01

    The study sought to identify reliable measurements for estimating energy stores of retarded adults (N=80) and possible correlations between energy intakes and obesity. Among results were a lack of significant correlations between caloric intake and anthropometric measures (e.g., tricepts skinfold). Body mass index is suggested as a more practical…

  3. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S.; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E.; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-01

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L -band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system.

  4. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-31

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L-band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system. PMID:26764996

  5. Chain store engineer aims for 30% energy reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Warrock, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    An energy management program designed to save Cumberland Farms Inc. 30% on its annual energy bill won its designer, Charles Bowser, the Energy User News' Commercial Energy Manager of the Year award. The program includes a customized energy management system (EMS), heat recovery, insulating, reduced outdoor air infiltration, and redesign of the lighting systems and the basic floor plan. Paybacks for the investments are mostly one to two years. The variety of 1200 facilities in the chain prompted the custom design. An erasable memory chip programmed at Cumberland's headquarters is installed in each store's EMS. (DCK)

  6. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  7. Estimation of energy stores of mentally retarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Litchford, M D

    1987-03-01

    Average caloric intake over 6 days, age, sex, height, weight, mid arm circumference, and triceps skinfold were determined for 31 females and 49 males ages 17 to 36 living in a residential care facility for mentally retarded persons. Ideal body weight, body mass index (W/H2), percentiles for arm muscle area, arm fat area, and triceps skinfold were determined to interpret the anthropometric measurements. Pearson r correlation coefficients were calculated to compare relative merits of ideal body weight, body mass index, percentile for arm muscle area, arm fat area, and triceps skinfold as an estimation of energy stores. Correlations suggest that body mass index is a more practical tool for estimation of energy stores. PMID:3565496

  8. SIMULATIONS OF THE AGS MMPS STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS,I.; BADEA, V.S.; BONATI, R.; ROSER, T.; SANDBERG, J.

    2007-06-25

    The Brookhaven AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-9000 Volts. The peak magnet power is 50 MWatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The generator is 3 phase 7500 Volts rated at 50 MVA. The peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The motor generator is about 45 years old, made by Siemens and it is not clear if companies will be manufacturing similar machines in the future. We are therefore investigating different ways of storing energy for future AGS MMPS operations. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. Two dc to dc converters will be presented along with the control system of the power section. The switching elements will be IGCT's made by ABB. The simulation program used is called PSIM version 6.1. The average power from the local power authority into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  9. Demand-driven energy supply from stored biowaste for biomethanisation.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, Peter; Kuprian, Martin; Probst, Maraike; Insam, Heribert; Ebner, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Energy supply is a global hot topic. The social and political pressure forces a higher percentage of energy supplied by renewable resources. The production of renewable energy in form of biomethane can be increased by co-substrates such as municipal biowaste. However, a demand-driven energy production or its storage needs optimisation, the option to store the substrate with its inherent energy is investigated in this study. The calorific content of biowaste was found unchanged after 45 d of storage (19.9±0.19 kJ g(-1) total solids), and the methane yield obtained from stored biowaste was comparable to fresh biowaste or even higher (approx. 400 m(3) Mg(-1) volatile solids). Our results show that the storage supports the hydrolysis of the co-substrate via acidification and production of volatile fatty acids. The data indicate that storage of biowaste is an efficient way to produce bioenergy on demand. This could in strengthen the role of biomethane plants for electricity supply the future. PMID:26189781

  10. Body condition predicts energy stores in apex predatory sharks.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Austin J; Wagner, Dominique N; Irschick, Duncan J; Hammerschlag, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Animal condition typically reflects the accumulation of energy stores (e.g. fatty acids), which can influence an individual's decision to undertake challenging life-history events, such as migration and reproduction. Accordingly, researchers often use measures of animal body size and/or weight as an index of condition. However, values of condition, such as fatty acid levels, may not always reflect the physiological state of animals accurately. While the relationships between condition indices and energy stores have been explored in some species (e.g. birds), they have yet to be examined in top predatory fishes, which often undertake extensive and energetically expensive migrations. We used an apex predatory shark (Galeocerdo cuvier, the tiger shark) as a model species to evaluate the relationship between triglycerides (energy metabolite) and a metric of overall body condition. We captured, blood sampled, measured and released 28 sharks (size range 125-303 cm pre-caudal length). In the laboratory, we assayed each plasma sample for triglyceride values. We detected a positive and significant relationship between condition and triglyceride values (P < 0.02). This result may have conservation implications if the largest and highest-condition sharks are exploited in fisheries, because these individuals are likely to have the highest potential for successful reproduction. Our results suggest that researchers may use either plasma triglyceride values or an appropriate measure of body condition for assessing health in large sharks. PMID:27293643

  11. Energy stores, lipid mobilization and leptin endocrinology of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Marcus; Morgenroth, Daniel; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg Eir; Gong, Ningping; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur

    2016-08-01

    The physiological role of leptin in fish is not fully elucidated. In the present study, the involvement of the leptin system in lipid deposition and mobilization in rainbow trout during feeding and 1, 2 and 4 weeks of fasting was investigated in two lines of rainbow trout with different muscle and visceral adiposity: a fat line (FL) with high total energy reserves, high muscle adiposity, but low visceral adiposity and a lean line (LL) with lower total energy reserves and lower muscle adiposity, but higher visceral adiposity. During 4 weeks of fasting, muscle lipids decreased by 63 % in the FL fish, while no such energy mobilization from muscle occurred in the LL fish. On the other hand, lipid stores in liver and visceral adipose tissue was utilized to a similar extent by the two fish lines during fasting. Under normal feeding conditions, plasma leptin levels were higher in the LL than the FL fish, suggesting a possible contribution of visceral adipocytes to plasma leptin levels. Plasma leptin-binding protein levels did not differ between the lines and were not affected by fasting. After 4 weeks of fasting, the long leptin receptor and the leptin-binding protein isoforms 1 and 3 muscle expression increased in the LL fish, as well as hepatic expression of leptin A1 and the two binding protein isoforms. These responses were not seen in the FL fish. The data suggest that the Lep system in rainbow trout is involved in regulation of energy stores and their mobilization. PMID:27083432

  12. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell systems for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Reid, M. A.; Martin, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A description is presented of the results of a preliminary design study of a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for application to future low-earth orbit space missions. The high energy density storage system is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte cell technology and incorporates dedicated fuel cell and electrolysis cell modules. In addition to providing energy storage, the system can provide hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. During the daylight portion of the orbit the electrolysis module uses power provided by the solar array to generate H2 and O2 from the product water produced by the fuel cell module. The fuel cell module supplies electrical power during the dark period of the orbit.

  13. Neutron diffraction method for stored energy measurement in interstitial free steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rajmohan, N.; Hayakawa, Y.; Szpunar, J.A.; Root, J.H.

    1997-06-01

    Part of the energy acquired by polycrystalline metals during plastic deformation is stored in the form of dislocations and other crystal defects. A method is described for the measurement of the orientation dependence of the stored energy of cold work, using neutron diffraction line broadening. To illustrate the method, the measured stored energy values for 80% cold rolled interstitial free (IF) steel are compared with the stored energy in a stress relieved specimen. The correlation between the Taylor factor and the stored energy for an 80% cold rolled specimen is discussed.

  14. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores--50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of grocery store buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004.

  15. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOEpatents

    Fingersh, Lee Jay

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  16. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide: Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Grocery Stores (Revised) (Book)

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, B.

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed the Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) to provide specific methodologies, information, and guidance to help energy managers and other stakeholders successfully plan and execute energy efficiency improvements. Detailed technical discussion is fairly limited in these guides. Instead, we emphasize actionable information, practical methodologies, diverse case studies, and unbiased evaluations of the most promising retrofit measures for each building type. A series of AERGs is under development, addressing key segments of the commercial building stock. Grocery stores were selected as one of the highest priority sectors, because they represent one of the most energy-intensive market segments.

  17. Preliminary design of an energy storing orthosis for providing gait to people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boughner, Kyle J; Durfee, William K

    2014-01-01

    A new design is proposed for an energy storing orthosis (ESO) that restores walking to people with spinal cord injury by combining functional electrical stimulation of the quadriceps muscle with a mechanical brace that uses elastic elements to store and transfer energy between hip and knee joints. The new ESO is a variation of a previous design and uses constant force springs for energy storage. Based on the detailed design and on dynamic simulations, the concept has demonstrated preliminary technical feasibility. PMID:25570518

  18. The Energy General Store, sunscreen production and sales: A business plan for Tucson Urban League

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, R.; Goldberg, A.; Johnson, C.; Robinson, M.

    1987-06-01

    The Tucson Urban League, in an effort to reduce its dependence on federal grants for the operation of community programs, proposes to establish a profit-making component of the agency which has been named Park Avenue Enterprises. Initially, Park Avenue Enterprises will consist of three divisions: Wood Unlimited, Weatherization-Home Repair, and The Energy General Store. Wood Unlimited will market, fabricate, and install wood products including cabinets, pallets, crates, and other custom items. The Weatherization-Home Repair division of PAE will be labor intensive and designed to provide unique energy-saving services. Finally, The Energy General Store division of PAE will provide goods and services conducive to principles of energy conservation: sunscreens, low-flow showerheads, energy-efficient light bulbs, toilet tank insert, and other conservation items. The Energy General Store is also planned to be a resource for information and ideas in energy and water conservation. This plan will use sunscreen production and marketing as its focus.

  19. A Better Way to Store Energy for Less Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Darmon, Jonathan M.; Weiss, Charles J.; Hulley, Elliott B.; Helm, Monte L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-01-01

    Representing the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis (CME), this document is one of the entries in the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge. As part of the challenge, the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers were invited to represent their science in images, cartoons, photos, words and original paintings, but any descriptions or words could only use the 1000 most commonly used words in the English language, with the addition of one word important to each of the EFRCs and the mission of DOE energy. The mission of CME to understand, design and develop molecular electrocatalysts for solar fuel production and use.

  20. Pulsed inductive energy store. Final report July 1982-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Barber, J.P.

    1984-05-01

    The objective of this program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of coaxial toroidal coils as high current pulsed energy storage inductors. The program included an analytic investigation, and the design, fabrication and testing of a cryogenically cooled coaxial toroidal coil. The most promising concept we investigated was a multiturn sectored inductor constructed by arranging several pancake coils (sectors) so that they approximate a toroid and connecting the coils electrically in parallel.

  1. How Much Energy Can Be Stored in Solar Active Region Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J.; Downs, C.; Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Major solar eruptions such as X-class flares and very fast coronal mass ejections usually originate in active regions on the Sun. The energy that powers these events is believed to be stored as free magnetic energy (energy above the potential field state) prior to eruption. While coronal magnetic fields are not in general force-free, active regions have very strong magnetic fields and at low coronal heights the plasma beta is therefore very small, making the field (in equilibrium) essentially force-free. The Aly-Sturrock theorem shows that the energy of a fully force-free field cannot exceed the energy of the so-called open field. If the theorem holds, this places an upper limit on the amount of free energy that can be stored: the maximum free energy (MFE) is the difference between the open field energy and the potential field energy of the active region. In thermodynamic MHD simulations of a major eruption (the July 14, 2000 'Bastille' day event) and a modest event (February 13, 2009, we have found that the MFE indeed bounds the energy stored prior to eruption. We compute the MFE for major eruptive events in cycles 23 and 24 to investigate the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in solar active regions.Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  2. Pulsed inductive energy store. Final report, July 1982-January 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.E.; Barber, J.P.

    1984-05-01

    The objective of this program was to evaluate the technical feasibility of coaxial toroidal coils as high current pulsed energy storage inductors. The program included an analytic investigation, and the design, fabrication and testing of a cryogenically cooled coaxial toroidal coil. The most promising concept investigated was a multiturn sectored inductor constructed by arranging several pancake coils (sectors) so that they approximate a toroid and connecting the coils electrically in parallel. The advantage of the sectored concept is that coil construction is considerably simpler than with other toroidal designs. The sectored coil was modeled on a computer and the magnitude of the fringing fields was calculated for coils of various numbers of sectors. A 10 kA demonstration coil was designed, fabricated, and tested. The performance of the demonstration coil surpassed all design parameters. The coil conducted peak currents of 9.2 kA and pulses of 5 kA for up to 8.9s. Testing was limited by the maximum current available at the test facility. A significant increase in resistance was not detected during any of the tests. To verify current sharing among sectors, individual sector currents were measured at various coil currents. Four sectors conducted within 1.5% of one sixth of the total coil current. One sector conducted 6.4% more than one sixth and another conducted 5.3% less than one sixth of the total coil current.

  3. In-situ fault detection apparatus and method for an encased energy storing device

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Ronald A.; Comte, Christophe; Knudson, Orlin B.; Rosenthal, Brian; Rouillard, Jean

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a breach in an electrically insulating surface of an electrically conductive power system enclosure within which a number of series connected energy storing devices are disposed. The energy storing devices disposed in the enclosure are connected to a series power connection. A detector is coupled to the series connection and detects a change of state in a test signal derived from the series connected energy storing devices. The detector detects a breach in the insulating layer of the enclosure by detecting a state change in the test signal from a nominal state to a non-nominal state. A voltage detector detects a state change of the test signals from a nominal state, represented by a voltage of a selected end energy storing device, to a non-nominal state, represented by a voltage that substantially exceeds the voltage of the selected opposing end energy storing device. Alternatively, the detector may comprise a signal generator that produces the test signal as a time-varying or modulated test signal and injects the test signal into the series connection. The detector detects the state change of the time-varying or modulated test signal from a nominal state, represented by a signal substantially equivalent to the test signal, to a non-nominal state, representative by an absence of the test signal.

  4. Influence of the Thyroid State on the Intrinsic Contractile Properties and Energy Stores of the Myocardium*

    PubMed Central

    Buccino, Robert A.; Spann, James F.; Pool, Peter E.; Sonnenblick, Edmund H.; Braunwald, Eugene

    1967-01-01

    The intrinsic contractile properties of isolated cat papillary muscles and myocardial high energy phosphate stores were examined at three levels of thyroid activity and correlated with hemodynamic measurements in the intact animal. In addition, the relationship of thyroid state to endogenous norepinephrine stores and myocardial responsiveness to certain inotropic interventions were studied. In muscles from hyperthyroid cats, the velocity of shortening and the rate of tension development were markedly augmented, while duration of active state was decreased, compared to euthyroid muscles. These findings occurred in the presence and absence of intact norepinephrine stores and over a wide range of temperature and contraction frequency. The opposite changes occurred in muscles from hypothyroid cats. Isometric tension was slightly higher in muscles from hyperthyroid and lower in muscles from hypothyroid cats. The inotropic response to both norepinephrine and strophanthidin varied inversely with the level of thyroid state and allowed all three groups of muscles to reach a common ceiling of isometric tension regardless of thyroid state. Creatine phosphate and adenosine triphosphate stores were intact at all three levels of thyroid state. Thus, the level of thyroid activity profoundly affects the intrinsic contractile state of cardiac muscle, independent of both norepinephrine stores and alterations in high energy phosphate stores, and, in addition, modifies the responsiveness of cardiac muscle to inotropic agents. Images PMID:6061742

  5. Muscle Energy Stores and Stroke Rates of Emperor Penguins: Implications for Muscle Metabolism and Dive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cassondra L.; Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    In diving birds and mammals, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction potentially isolate muscle from the circulation. During complete ischemia, ATP production is dependent on the size of the myoglobin oxygen (O2) store and the concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and glycogen (Gly). Therefore, we measured PCr and Gly concentrations in the primary underwater locomotory muscle of emperor penguin and modeled the depletion of muscle O2 and those energy stores under conditions of complete ischemia and a previously determined muscle metabolic rate. We also analyzed stroke rate to assess muscle workload variation during dives and evaluate potential limitations on the model. Measured PCr and Gly concentrations, 20.8 and 54.6 mmol kg−1, respectively, were similar to published values for non-diving animals. The model demonstrated that PCr and Gly provide a large anaerobic energy store, even for dives longer than 20 min. Stroke rate varied throughout the dive profile indicating muscle workload was not constant during dives as was assumed in the model. The stroke rate during the first 30 seconds of dives increased with increased dive depth. In extremely long dives, lower overall stroke rates were observed. Although O2 consumption and energy store depletion may vary during dives, the model demonstrated that PCr and Gly, even at concentrations typical of terrestrial birds and mammals, are a significant anaerobic energy store and can play an important role in the emperor penguin’s ability to perform long dives. PMID:22418705

  6. The use of nested chevron rails in a distributed energy store railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.

    1984-03-01

    It is pointed out that the large amounts of energy required by electromagnetic launchers will necessitate that energy stores be distributed along their length. The nested chevron rail construction will make it possible for a railgun launcher to be produced in which most of the switching requirements for the launcher/energy store system will be met automatically. Each nested chevron-shaped conductor will be electrically insulated from its neighbors, and each opposing chevron pair (one on each rail) will be connected to the terminals of one energy store (Marshall, 1982). It is explained that as the projectile moves down the railgun the chevrons and associated energy stores at first are unaffected by the approach. At this time the inductors can be charged, and any other preliminary operation can be performed. When the armature comes into contact with the Nth chevron, charge begins to flow from the Nth energy storage system; it flows through one chevron, into the armature, out of the armature into the other chevron, and from that chevron back to the energy storage system.

  7. Fat or lean: adjustment of endogenous energy stores to predictable and unpredictable changes in allostatic load

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schultner, Jannik; Kitaysky, Alexander S.; Welcker, Jorg; Hatch, Scott

    2013-01-01

    6. Overall, results of this study support the ‘lean and fit’ hypothesis. We conclude that increased energy stores may not necessarily reflect better environmental conditions experienced by individuals or predict their higher fitness. A major advantage of adopting a lean physique when environmental conditions allow may be the avoidance of additional energetic costs for moving a heavy body. In breeding seabirds, this advantage may be more important during chick-rearing. In the focal species, the secretion of glucocorticoids might be involved in regulation of energy stores within a life history stage but does not appear to mediate an adaptive shift in energy stores between the incubating and chick-rearing stages of reproduction.

  8. Alkaline quinone flow battery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kaixiang; Chen, Qing; Gerhardt, Michael R; Tong, Liuchuan; Kim, Sang Bok; Eisenach, Louise; Valle, Alvaro W; Hardee, David; Gordon, Roy G; Aziz, Michael J; Marshak, Michael P

    2015-09-25

    Storage of photovoltaic and wind electricity in batteries could solve the mismatch problem between the intermittent supply of these renewable resources and variable demand. Flow batteries permit more economical long-duration discharge than solid-electrode batteries by using liquid electrolytes stored outside of the battery. We report an alkaline flow battery based on redox-active organic molecules that are composed entirely of Earth-abundant elements and are nontoxic, nonflammable, and safe for use in residential and commercial environments. The battery operates efficiently with high power density near room temperature. These results demonstrate the stability and performance of redox-active organic molecules in alkaline flow batteries, potentially enabling cost-effective stationary storage of renewable energy. PMID:26404834

  9. The capacity of the human iliotibial band to store elastic energy during running.

    PubMed

    Eng, Carolyn M; Arnold, Allison S; Lieberman, Daniel E; Biewener, Andrew A

    2015-09-18

    The human iliotibial band (ITB) is a poorly understood fascial structure that may contribute to energy savings during locomotion. This study evaluated the capacity of the ITB to store and release elastic energy during running, at speeds ranging from 2-5m/s, using a model that characterizes the three-dimensional musculoskeletal geometry of the human lower limb and the force-length properties of the ITB, tensor fascia lata (TFL), and gluteus maximus (GMax). The model was based on detailed analyses of muscle architecture, dissections of 3-D anatomy, and measurements of the muscles' moment arms about the hip and knee in five cadaveric specimens. The model was used, in combination with measured joint kinematics and published EMG recordings, to estimate the forces and corresponding strains in the ITB during running. We found that forces generated by TFL and GMax during running stretch the ITB substantially, resulting in energy storage. Anterior and posterior regions of the ITB muscle-tendon units (MTUs) show distinct length change patterns, in part due to different moment arms at the hip and knee. The posterior ITB MTU likely stores more energy than the anterior ITB MTU because it transmits larger muscle forces. We estimate that the ITB stores about 1J of energy per stride during slow running and 7J during fast running, which represents approximately 14% of the energy stored in the Achilles tendon at a comparable speed. This previously unrecognized mechanism for storing elastic energy may be an adaptation to increase human locomotor economy. PMID:26162548

  10. Low stored energy 100 kV regulator for ion sources at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, E.G.; Haffner, R.L.; Ingalls, W.B.; Meyer, B.J.; Stelzer, J.E.

    1998-12-31

    To minimize accelerating column damage caused by uncontrolled energy release during arc-downs, it is desirable to minimize the available stored electrical energy. For the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) H{sup {minus}} ion sources, the stored energy includes, in addition to the charge in the power supply output capacitance, the charge on the electronics racks. They are supported and insulated from ground by PVC pipe and have a capacitance to ground of approximately 900 pf. In 1988 (LANSCE) personnel designed a high-voltage current source using a low-stored-energy power supply and planar triode with the goal of eliminating uncontrolled release of charge stored in the power supply. Construction and testing were performed intermittently as resources permitted until 1993. When work on the Short Pulse Spallation Source (SPSS) started on the LANSCE Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS) it was recognized that a higher current power supply would be needed and work resumed on the regulator circuitry. A 120 kV power supply having low output capacitance, and a planar triode have been used to supply 40 mA, 120 Hz, 12% duty-factor current for the ISTS beam. The triode`s cathode current is controlled by circuitry operating both at power-supply voltage level and at ground level via a fiber optic link. Voltage droop is approximately 600 V during the 1 ms beam pulse. The authors present the status of the regulator and its special challenges.

  11. Energy Saving Effects of Wireless Sensor Networks: A Case Study of Convenience Stores in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Sheng; Lee, Da-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) technology has been successfully applied to energy saving applications in many places, and plays a significant role in achieving power conservation. However, previous studies do not discuss WSN costs and cost-recovery. The application of WSNs is currently limited to research and laboratory experiments, and not mass industrial production, largely because business owners are unfamiliar with the possible favorable return and cost-recovery on WSN investments. Therefore, this paper focuses on the cost-recovery of WSNs and how to reduce air conditioning energy consumption in convenience stores. The WSN used in this study provides feedback to the gateway and adopts the predicted mean vote (PMV) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to allow customers to shop in a comfortable yet energy-saving environment. Four convenience stores in Taipei have used the proposed WSN since 2008. In 2008, the experiment was initially designed to optimize air-conditioning for energy saving, but additions to the set-up continued beyond 2008, adding the thermal comfort and crowds peak, off-peak features in 2009 to achieve human-friendly energy savings. Comparison with 2007 data, under the same comfort conditions, shows that the power savings increased by 40% (2008) and 53% (2009), respectively. The cost of the WSN equipment was 500 US dollars. Experimental results, including three years of analysis and calculations, show that the marginal energy conservation benefit of the four convenience stores achieved energy savings of up to 53%, recovering all costs in approximately 5 months. The convenience store group participating in this study was satisfied with the efficiency of energy conservation because of the short cost-recovery period. PMID:22319396

  12. The secondary supernova machine: Gravitational compression, stored Coulomb energy, and SNII displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Meyer, Bradley S.

    2016-04-01

    Radioactive power for several delayed optical displays of core-collapse supernovae is commonly described as having been provided by decays of 56Ni nuclei. This review analyses the provenance of that energy more deeply: the form in which that energy is stored; what mechanical work causes its storage; what conservation laws demand that it be stored; and why its release is fortuitously delayed for about 106 s into a greatly expanded supernova envelope. We call the unifying picture of those energy transfers the secondary supernova machine owing to its machine-like properties; namely, mechanical work forces storage of large increases of nuclear Coulomb energy, a positive energy component within new nuclei synthesized by the secondary machine. That positive-energy increase occurs despite the fusion decreasing negative total energy within nuclei. The excess of the Coulomb energy can later be radiated, accounting for the intense radioactivity in supernovae. Detailed familiarity with this machine is the focus of this review. The stored positive-energy component created by the machine will not be reduced until roughly 106 s later by radioactive emissions (EC and β +) owing to the slowness of weak decays. The delayed energy provided by the secondary supernova machine is a few × 1049 erg, much smaller than the one percent of the 1053 erg collapse that causes the prompt ejection of matter; however, that relatively small stored energy is vital for activation of the late displays. The conceptual basis of the secondary supernova machine provides a new framework for understanding the energy source for late SNII displays. We demonstrate the nuclear dynamics with nuclear network abundance calculations, with a model of sudden compression and reexpansion of the nuclear gas, and with nuclear energy decompositions of a nuclear-mass law. These tools identify excess Coulomb energy, a positive-energy component of the total negative nuclear energy, as the late activation energy. If the

  13. Alkaline regenerative fuel cell energy storage system for manned orbital satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Gitlow, B.; Sheibley, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that the alkaline regenerative fuel cell system represents a highly efficient, lightweight, reliable approach for providing energy storage in an orbiting satellite. In addition to its energy storage function, the system can supply hydrogen and oxygen for attitude control of the satellite and for life support. A summary is presented of the results to date obtained in connection with the NASA-sponsored fuel cell technology advancement program, giving particular attention to the requirements of the alkaline regenerative fuel cell and the low-earth mission. Attention is given to system design guidelines, weight considerations, gold-platinum cathode cell performance, matrix development, the electrolyte reservoir plate, and the cyclical load profile tests.

  14. Can seismic (destructive) energy be stored after conversion into useful electrical or acoustic energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Umesh P.; Sinha, Madhurendra N.

    2014-06-01

    Since the dawn of precursory revolution in the seismology and electromagnetic radiation platform., F.T. Freund (2010) et.al, have used piezoelectric effect on the crustal geo-materials and emanation of seismic pre signals frequently. Their effect in form of ULF and VHF are commonly detected (by Greece and American seismologists)in the upper ionosphere from surface of globe. TEC, OLR. MMC are the consequent instrumentation in acquiring data to these pre-earthquake signals. Our attempt is to detect the signals prior to earthquake due to impending stress in the area and store the spreading destructive energy to electrical voltage applying the mathematics of piezoelectric equations and algebra. Energy released during seismic eruption is in the range of 10 13 to 1018 Joule for each event of 6 to 8 Mw. Spread and propagation of energy follows the Maxwell theory of wave equation and fundamental law of electricity and electromagnetism. Stress accumulated within the crustal block is triggered into bringing about geophysical and geochemical changes within the reservoir rocks interacting stress. Study made by pioneers in the seismic precursory development states generation of charge and coronal discharge prior seismicity within the rocks under stress. This is consequence to admixing of positive charge developed at unstressed volume and negative at stressed sub volume of rocks1 [F.T.Freidemann2010]. Ionosphere proturbance in form of ULF, ELF, ELS and EQL, EQS are the projected consequence of electromagnetic wave propagation 2 [10,11,15 ] Harnessing of electrical components from the energy propagated due to stress inducing EM waves is the aim of paper. Electrical discharge prior to seismicity within geo-materials is established phenomena which can be calibrated with the piezoelectric sensors application implanted for detection and harnessing the signals. These prior signals induced in form of electromagnetic response are felicitated into being converted into electrical energy

  15. Relation between transmission and energy stored in random media with gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Ben; Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao, Hui; Yamilov, Alexey

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we investigate a possibility of using the ratio between optical transmission, T , and energy stored inside the system, E , as a quantitative measure of the enhanced mesoscopic corrections to diffusive transport of light through a random medium with gain. We obtain an expression for T/E as a function of amplification strength in the diffusive approximation and show that it does not a have tendency to diverge when the threshold for random lasing is approached, as both T and E do. Furthermore, we find that a change in T/E signifies a change in the electric field distribution inside the random medium. In the localization regime, we also investigate the correlations between transmission and energy stored in the medium with and without amplification. Our results suggest that T/E is a promising parameter which can help characterize the nature of wave transport in random medium with gain.

  16. Thermal analysis of energy storage in packed beds of multilayer storing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Ziada, M.A.; Abdel Rehim, Z.S.

    1998-04-01

    Thermal analysis of energy storage in layers of various materials used as a packed bed storage system is presented. It is more economical to minimize insulation costs, to store more energy from the same input conditions, to lengthen the time of charging that the energy could be kept stored with acceptable losses, and to obtain higher storage capacity. These are the focus of this work. A cylindrical bed is formed from three layers of different materials, equal in length, as heat-absorbing media. The bed is charged with flowing hot air in the axial direction, the hot air representing the heat source. A transient one-dimensional model is used to describe the thermal behavior of the system. The partial differential equations that govern the flow and heat transfer for both the air and the solid, constituting the bed and their boundary conditions, are driven. The numerical solution of two partial differential equations is obtained using the finite difference method through a computer program especially constructed for this purpose. The temperature field for the air and the solid are obtained, and the energy stored inside the bed is computed. A wide range of layers of storage media of different materials with different thermal properties is selected. Comparison is made between the present system and packed bed systems using one storing medium. The results show that the bed packed with different layers has higher storage capacity and there is step stratification of the temperature between the materials layers. Also, the bed that includes metal material (such as steel) has a maximum storage capacity, and less considerable temperature than other beds, so such a bed can realize the claimed function.

  17. Fascicles from energy-storing tendons show an age-specific response to cyclic fatigue loading

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Some tendons, such as the human Achilles and equine superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT), act as energy stores, stretching and recoiling to increase efficiency during locomotion. Our previous observations of rotation in response to applied strain in SDFT fascicles suggest a helical structure, which may provide energy-storing tendons with a greater ability to extend and recoil efficiently. Despite this specialization, energy-storing tendons are prone to age-related tendinopathy. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cyclic fatigue loading (FL) on the microstructural strain response of SDFT fascicles from young and old horses. The data demonstrate two independent age-related mechanisms of fatigue failure; in young horses, FL caused low levels of matrix damage and decreased rotation. This suggests that loading causes alterations to the helix substructure, which may reduce their ability to recoil and recover. By contrast, fascicles from old horses, in which the helix is already compromised, showed greater evidence of matrix damage and suffer increased fibre sliding after FL, which may partially explain the age-related increase in tendinopathy. Elucidation of helix structure and the precise alterations occurring owing to both ageing and FL will help to develop appropriate preventative and repair strategies for tendinopathy. PMID:24402919

  18. Uncertainties in modeling and scaling in the prediction of fuel stored energy and thermal response

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.

    1987-01-01

    The steady-state temperature distribution and the stored energy in nuclear fuel elements are computed by analytical methods and used to rank, in the order of importance, the effects on stored energy from statistical uncertainties in modeling parameters, in boundary and in operating conditions. An integral technique is used to calculate the transient fuel temperature and to estimate the uncertainties in predicting the fuel thermal response and the peak clad temperature during a large-break loss of coolant accident. The uncertainty analysis presented here is an important part of evaluating the applicability, the uncertainties and the scaling capabilities of computer codes for nuclear reactor safety analyses. The methods employed in this analysis merit general attention because of their simplicity. It is shown that the blowdown peak is dominated by fuel stored energy alone or, equivalently, by linear heating rate. Gap conductance, peaking factors and fuel thermal conductivity are the three most important fuel modeling parameters affecting peak clad temperature uncertainty. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Strategies to Save 50% Site Energy in Grocery and General Merchandise Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, A.; Hale, E.; Leach, M.

    2011-03-01

    This paper summarizes the methodology and main results of two recently published Technical Support Documents. These reports explore the feasibility of designing general merchandise and grocery stores that use half the energy of a minimally code-compliant building, as measured on a whole-building basis. We used an optimization algorithm to trace out a minimum cost curve and identify designs that satisfy the 50% energy savings goal. We started from baseline building energy use and progressed to more energy-efficient designs by sequentially adding energy design measures (EDMs). Certain EDMs figured prominently in reaching the 50% energy savings goal for both building types: (1) reduced lighting power density; (2) optimized area fraction and construction of view glass or skylights, or both, as part of a daylighting system tuned to 46.5 fc (500 lux); (3) reduced infiltration with a main entrance vestibule or an envelope air barrier, or both; and (4) energy recovery ventilators, especially in humid and cold climates. In grocery stores, the most effective EDM, which was chosen for all climates, was replacing baseline medium-temperature refrigerated cases with high-efficiency models that have doors.

  20. The cross-bridge spring: can cool muscles store elastic energy?

    PubMed

    George, N T; Irving, T C; Williams, C D; Daniel, T L

    2013-06-01

    Muscles not only generate force. They may act as springs, providing energy storage to drive locomotion. Although extensible myofilaments are implicated as sites of energy storage, we show that intramuscular temperature gradients may enable molecular motors (cross-bridges) to store elastic strain energy. By using time-resolved small-angle x-ray diffraction paired with in situ measurements of mechanical energy exchange in flight muscles of Manduca sexta, we produced high-speed movies of x-ray equatorial reflections, indicating cross-bridge association with myofilaments. A temperature gradient within the flight muscle leads to lower cross-bridge cycling in the cooler regions. Those cross-bridges could elastically return energy at the extrema of muscle lengthening and shortening, helping drive cyclic wing motions. These results suggest that cross-bridges can perform functions other than contraction, acting as molecular links for elastic energy storage. PMID:23618763

  1. An astrophysical engine that stores gravitational work as nuclear Coulomb energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald

    2014-03-01

    I describe supernovae gravity machines that store large internal nuclear Coulomb energy, 0.80Z2A- 1 / 3MeV per nucleus. Excess of it is returned later by electron capture and positron emission. Decay energy manifests as (1) observable gamma-ray lines (2) light curves of supernovae (3) chemical energy of free carbon dissociated from CO molecules (4) huge abundances of radiogenic daughters. I illustrate by rapid silicon burning, a natural epoch in SN II. Gravitational work produces the high temperatures that photoeject nucleons and alpha particles from heavy nuclei. These are retained by other nuclei to balance photoejection rates (quasiequilibrium). The abundance distribution adjusts slowly as remaining abundance of Z = N 28Si decomposes, so p, n, α recaptures hug the Z = N line. This occurs in milliseconds, too rapidly for weak decay to alter bulk Z/N ratio. The figure displays those quasiequilibrium abundances color-coded to their decays. Z = N = 2k nuclei having k < 11 are stable, whereas k > 10 are radioactive owing to excess Coulomb energy. Weak decays radiate that excess energy weeks later to fuel the four macroscopic energetic phenomena cited. How startling to think of the Coulomb nuclear force as storing cosmic energy and its weak decay releasing macroscopic activation to SNII.

  2. SIMULATION RESULTS OF RUNNING THE AGS MMPS, BY STORING ENERGY IN CAPACITOR BANKS.

    SciTech Connect

    MARNERIS, I.

    2006-09-01

    The Brookhaven AGS is a strong focusing accelerator which is used to accelerate protons and various heavy ion species to equivalent maximum proton energy of 29 GeV. The AGS Main Magnet Power Supply (MMPS) is a thyristor control supply rated at 5500 Amps, +/-go00 Volts. The peak magnet power is 49.5 Mwatts. The power supply is fed from a motor/generator manufactured by Siemens. The motor is rated at 9 MW, input voltage 3 phase 13.8 KV 60 Hz. The generator is rated at 50 MVA its output voltage is 3 phase 7500 Volts. Thus the peak power requirements come from the stored energy in the rotor of the motor/generator. The rotor changes speed by about +/-2.5% of its nominal speed of 1200 Revolutions per Minute. The reason the power supply is powered by the Generator is that the local power company (LIPA) can not sustain power swings of +/- 50 MW in 0.5 sec if the power supply were to be interfaced directly with the AC lines. The Motor Generator is about 45 years old and Siemens is not manufacturing similar machines in the future. As a result we are looking at different ways of storing energy and being able to utilize it for our application. This paper will present simulations of a power supply where energy is stored in capacitor banks. The simulation program used is called PSIM Version 6.1. The control system of the power supply will also be presented. The average power from LIPA into the power supply will be kept constant during the pulsing of the magnets at +/-50 MW. The reactive power will also be kept constant below 1.5 MVAR. Waveforms will be presented.

  3. Development and deposition of resilin in energy stores for locust jumping.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2016-08-15

    Locusts jump by using a catapult mechanism in which energy produced by slow contractions of the extensor tibiae muscles of the hind legs is stored in distortions of the exoskeleton, most notably (1) the two semi-lunar processes at each knee joint and (2) the tendons of the extensor muscles themselves. The energy is then suddenly released from these stores to power the rapid, propulsive movements of the hind legs. The reliance on the mechanical storage of energy is likely to impact on jumping because growth occurs by a series of five moults, at each of which the exoskeleton is replaced by a new one. All developmental stages (instars) nevertheless jump as a means of forward locomotion, or as an escape movement. Here, I show that in each instar, resilin is added to the semi-lunar processes and to the core of the extensor tendons so that their thickness increases. As the next moult approaches, a new exoskeleton forms within the old one, with resilin already present in the new semi-lunar processes. The old exoskeleton, the tendons and their resilin are discarded at moulting. The resilin of the semi-lunar processes and tendons of the new instar is initially thin, but a similar pattern of deposition results in an increase of their thickness. In adults, resilin continues to be deposited so that at 4 weeks old the thickness in the semi-lunar processes has increased fourfold. These changes in the energy stores accompany changes in jumping ability and performance during each moulting cycle. PMID:27259374

  4. Theoretical dissociation energies for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, S. R.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.; Partridge, H.

    1986-01-01

    Spectroscopic parameters are accurately determined for the alkali and alkaline-earth monofluorides and monochlorides by means of ab initio self-consistent field and correlated wave function calculations. Numerical Hartree-Fock calculations are performed on selected systems to ensure that the extended Slater basis sets employed are near the Hartree-Fock limit. Since the bonding is predominantly electrostatic in origin, a strong correlation exists between the dissociation energy (to ions) and the spectroscopic parameter r(e). By dissociating to the ionic limits, most of the differential correlation effects can be embedded in the accurate experimental electron affinities and ionization potentials.

  5. Alkaline water electrolysis technology for Space Station regenerative fuel cell energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, F. H.; Hoberecht, M. A.; Le, M.

    1986-01-01

    The regenerative fuel cell system (RFCS), designed for application to the Space Station energy storage system, is based on state-of-the-art alkaline electrolyte technology and incorporates a dedicated fuel cell system (FCS) and water electrolysis subsystem (WES). In the present study, emphasis is placed on the WES portion of the RFCS. To ensure RFCS availability for the Space Station, the RFCS Space Station Prototype design was undertaken which included a 46-cell 0.93 cu m static feed water electrolysis module and three integrated mechanical components.

  6. Engineering evaluation of the energy-storing orthosis FES gait system.

    PubMed

    Kangude, Abhijit; Burgstahler, Brett; Durfee, William

    2010-01-01

    A system to restore walking in the vicinity of a wheelchair for people with paraplegia resulting from spinal cord injury is under development. The approach combines single channel surface electrical stimulation with an orthosis. The orthosis is spring loaded and contains a pneumatic system that stores energy during knee extension caused by quadriceps stimulation and transfers it to hip joint for hip extension. A laboratory version of the prototype of the gait system has been fabricated and engineering bench tests were performed. The paper presents the design of the wearable prototype and results of bench testing. PMID:21096941

  7. Antibody labelling of resilin in energy stores for jumping in plant sucking insects.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Borycz, Jolanta A; Shaw, Stephen R; Elvin, Christopher M; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    The rubbery protein resilin appears to form an integral part of the energy storage structures that enable many insects to jump by using a catapult mechanism. In plant sucking bugs that jump (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha), the energy generated by the slow contractions of huge thoracic jumping muscles is stored by bending composite bow-shaped parts of the internal thoracic skeleton. Sudden recoil of these bows powers the rapid and simultaneous movements of both hind legs that in turn propel a jump. Until now, identification of resilin at these storage sites has depended exclusively upon characteristics that may not be specific: its fluorescence when illuminated with specific wavelengths of ultraviolet (UV) light and extinction of that fluorescence at low pH. To consolidate identification we have labelled the cuticular structures involved with an antibody raised against a product of the Drosophila CG15920 gene. This encodes pro-resilin, the first exon of which was expressed in E. coli and used to raise the antibody. We show that in frozen sections from two species, the antibody labels precisely those parts of the metathoracic energy stores that fluoresce under UV illumination. The presence of resilin in these insects is thus now further supported by a molecular criterion that is immunohistochemically specific. PMID:22163306

  8. Comparison of liquid hot water and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed for improved enzymatic digestibility and biogas energy production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danping; Ge, Xumeng; Zhang, Quanguo; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed biomass were compared in terms of digestibility, methane production, and cost-benefit efficiency for electricity generation via anaerobic digestion with a combined heat and power system. Compared to LHW pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment retained more of the dry matter in giant reed biomass solids due to less severe conditions. Under their optimal conditions, LHW pretreatment (190°C, 15min) and alkaline pretreatment (20g/L of NaOH, 24h) improved glucose yield from giant reed by more than 2-fold, while only the alkaline pretreatment significantly (p<0.05) increased cumulative methane yield (by 63%) over that of untreated biomass (217L/kgVS). LHW pretreatment obtained negative net electrical energy production due to high energy input. Alkaline pretreatment achieved 27% higher net electrical energy production than that of non-pretreatment (3859kJ/kg initial total solids), but alkaline liquor reuse is needed for improved net benefit. PMID:27233098

  9. Water Holding as Determinant for the Elastically Stored Energy in Protein-Based Gels.

    PubMed

    Pouvreau, Laurice; van Wijlen, Emke; Klok, Jan; Urbonaite, Vaida; Munialo, Claire D; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the importance of the water holding capacity for the elastically stored energy of protein gels, a range of gels were created from proteins from different origin (plant: pea and soy proteins, and animal: whey, blood plasma, egg white proteins, and ovalbumin) varying in network morphology set by the protein concentration, pH, ionic strength, or the presence of specific ions. The results showed that the observed positive and linear relation between water holding (WH) and elastically stored energy (RE) is generic for globular protein gels studied. The slopes of this relation are comparable for all globular protein gels (except for soy protein gels) whereas the intercept is close to 0 for most of the systems except for ovalbumin and egg white gels. The slope and intercept obtained allows one to predict the impact of tuning WH, by gel morphology or network stiffness, on the mechanical deformation of the protein-based gel. Addition of charged polysaccharides to a protein system leads to a deviation from the linear relation between WH and RE and this deviation coincides with a change in phase behavior. PMID:26894687

  10. Information stored in high-Q space: Role of high energy scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Kycia, S.; Eberhardt, A. S.

    1997-07-01

    Much of crystallographic diffraction measurements are focused on obtaining information with Q (=4{pi} sin {theta}/{lambda}) below 17 A{sup -1} or d>0.35 A, with the implicit assumption that no useful information is stored in the Q space above. However, this assumption is valid only with respect to the periodic lattice structure. Actually, high-Q space is full of information on the local atomic structure that could be of major importance in some cases. We discuss high energy x-ray or neutron scattering as the methods of obtaining the data from the high-Q space, and the atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis as the means of extracting information from such data. Preliminary data of our recent high-energy x-ray scattering measurement on a MX compound are shown for which this type of analysis is likely to play a significant role in understanding the properties.

  11. Body Morphology, Energy Stores, and Muscle Enzyme Activity Explain Cricket Acoustic Mate Attraction Signaling Variation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Ian R.; Darveau, Charles-A.; Bertram, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: <20 pulses/chirp) and G. texensis (triller: >20 pulses/chirp). Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour. PMID:24608102

  12. Control of Plasma-Stored Energy for Burn Control using DIII-D In-Vessel Coils

    SciTech Connect

    Hawryluk, R. J.; Eidietis, N. W.; Grierson, B. A.; Hyatt, A. W.; Koleman, E.; Logan, N. C.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Wolf, S.

    2014-09-01

    A new approach has been experimentally demonstrated to control the stored energy by applying a non-axisymmetric magnetic field using the DIII-D in-vessel coils to modify the energy confinement time. In future burning plasma experiments as well as magnetic fusion energy power plants, various concepts have been proposed to control the fusion power. The fusion power in a power plant operating at high gain can be related to the plasma-stored energy and hence, is a strong function of the energy confinement time. Thus, an actuator, that modifies the confinement time, can be used to adjust the fusion power. In relatively low collisionality DIII-D discharges, the application of non-axisymmetric magnetic fields results in a decrease in confinement time and density pumpout. Gas puffing was used to compensate the density pumpout in the pedestal while control of the stored energy was demonstrated by the application of non-axisymmetric fields.

  13. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  14. Structural optimization of structured carbon-based energy-storing composite materials used in space vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Yu, Zhichao; Tang, Chenlong

    2016-01-01

    The hot work environment of electronic components in the instrument cabin of spacecraft was researched, and a new thermal protection structure, namely graphite carbon foam, which is an impregnated phase-transition material, was adopted to implement the thermal control on the electronic components. We used the optimized parameters obtained from ANSYS to conduct 2D optimization, 3-D modeling and simulation, as well as the strength check. Finally, the optimization results were verified by experiments. The results showed that after optimization, the structured carbon-based energy-storing composite material could reduce the mass and realize the thermal control over electronic components. This phase-transition composite material still possesses excellent temperature control performance after its repeated melting and solidifying. PMID:27387673

  15. Stored energy function and compressibility of compressible rubberlike materials under large strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, S. T. J.; Landel, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    By using new invariants in the theory of finite elasticity an expression is obtained for the stored energy function of slightly compressible materials in which the effects of the distortional change (change of shape) and of the volume change are clearly separated. The volume-related terms are expressed as a function of the third invariant, the classical compressibility, and an induced anisotropy of the effective compressibility which is due to the large deformations. After evaluating the terms, using data on pressure, volume, uniaxial strain, and fractional volume change vs strain data on natural rubber from the literature, it is shown that the volume change contribution to the total stress observed in a simple tensile experiment can be clearly separated from the distortional contribution, even at finite strains.

  16. Thermal management system and method for a solid-state energy storing device

    DOEpatents

    Rouillard, Roger; Domroese, Michael K.; Gauthier, Michel; Hoffman, Joseph A.; Lindeman, David D.; Noel, Joseph-Robert-Gaetan; Radewald, Vern E.; Ranger, Michel; Rouillard, Jean; Shiota, Toshimi; St-Germain, Philippe; Sudano, Anthony; Trice, Jennifer L.; Turgeon, Thomas A.

    2000-01-01

    An improved electrochemical energy storing device includes a number of thin-film electrochemical cells which are maintained in a state of compression through use of an internal or an external pressure apparatus. A thermal conductor, which is connected to at least one of the positive or negative contacts of each electrochemical cell, conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cells and also conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cells and thermally conductive material disposed on a wall structure adjacent the conductors. The wall structure includes electrically resistive material, such as an anodized coating or a thin film of plastic. The thermal conductors are fabricated to include a spring mechanism which expands and contacts to maintain mechanical contact between the electrochemical cells and the thermally conductive material in the presence of relative movement between the electrochemical cells and the wall structure. An active cooling apparatus may be employed external to a hermetically sealed housing containing the electrochemical cells to enhance the transfer of thermal energy into and out of the electrochemical cells. An integrated interconnect board may be disposed within the housing onto which a number of electrical and electro-mechanical components are mounted. Heat generated by the components is conducted from the interconnect board to the housing using the thermal conductors.

  17. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux--Scaling with stored energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E0. The ion number fluence (ions m-2) and energy fluence (J m-2) computed as 2.4-7.8 × 1020 and 2.2-33 × 106, respectively, are found to be independent of E0 from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E0 at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E0 for the high inductance INTI PF.

  18. Electrochemical determination of activation energies for methanol oxidation on polycrystalline platinum in acidic and alkaline electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jamie L; Volpe, David J; Abruña, Héctor D

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation pathways of methanol (MeOH) have been the subject of intense research due to its possible application as a liquid fuel in polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The design of improved catalysts for MeOH oxidation requires a deep understanding of these complex oxidation pathways. This paper will provide a discussion of the literature concerning the extensive research carried out in acidic and alkaline electrolytes. It will highlight techniques that have proven useful in the determination of product ratios, analysis of surface poisoning, anion adsorption, and oxide formation processes, in addition to the effects of temperature on the MeOH oxidation pathways at bulk polycrystalline platinum (Pt(poly)) electrodes. This discussion will provide a framework with which to begin the analysis of activation energy (E(a)) values. This kinetic parameter may prove useful in characterizing the rate-limiting step of the MeOH oxidation at an electrode surface. This paper will present a procedure for the determination of E(a) values for MeOH oxidation at a Pt(poly) electrode in acidic and alkaline media. Values from 24-76 kJ mol(-1) in acidic media and from 36-86 kJ mol(-1) in alkaline media were calculated and found to be a function of applied potential and direction of the potential sweep in a voltammetric experiment. Factors that influence the magnitude of the calculated E(a) include surface poisoning from MeOH oxidation intermediates, anion adsorption from the electrolyte, pH effects, and oxide formation processes. These factors are all potential, and temperature, dependent and must clearly be addressed when citing E(a) values in the literature. Comparison of E(a) values must be between systems of comparable electrochemical environment and at the same potential. E(a) values obtained on bulk Pt(poly), compared with other catalysts, may give insight into the superiority of other Pt-based catalysts for MeOH oxidation and lead to the development of new catalysts

  19. Information stored in high-Q space: Role of high energy scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, T.; Dmowski, W. Billinge, S.J.L. Kycia, S. Eberhardt, A.S.

    1997-07-01

    Much of crystallographic diffraction measurements are focused on obtaining information with Q(=4{pi}sin{theta}/{lambda}) below 17{Angstrom}{sup {minus}1} or d{gt}0.35{Angstrom}, with the implicit assumption that no useful information is stored in the Q space above. However, this assumption is valid only with respect to the periodic lattice structure. Actually, high-Q space is full of information on the local atomic structure that could be of major importance in some cases. We discuss high energy x-ray or neutron scattering as the methods of obtaining the data from the high-Q space, and the atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) analysis as the means of extracting information from such data. Preliminary data of our recent high-energy x-ray scattering measurement on a MX compound are shown for which this type of analysis is likely to play a significant role in understanding the properties. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Effects of potting on training and quench propagation in a large stored energy superconducting dipole coil

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.; Garbincius, P.H.; Guerra, J.; Mazur, P.O.; Satti, J.A.; Tilles, E.B.

    1980-09-01

    A superconducting racetrack dipole coil was constructed to compare directly training and quench behavior in potted and non-potted coils. The stored energy of this coil was 175 KJoules at the conductor's short sample limit of 238 Amp with a peak field on the coil of 7.6 Tesla. The outward magnetic forces were restrained by rows of tie rods between side plates. Comparisons of training behavior were made for both steel and aluminum tie rods. Helium flow was provided by channels in the fiberglass cable tape allowing 1/4 of the conductor direct access to the helium supply. After training the coil to 90% of short sample limit, the tie rods were relaxed and the entire coil was vacuum impregnated with a standard clear magnet epoxy. After potting, the previous tie rod preloads were re-established. This resulted in a much shallower training curve, and required retraining after thermal cycling. The unpotted coil showed no evidence of internal quench propagation below 80% short sample, whereas the potted coil exhibited good quench propagation and energy dissipation at all currents, simplifying protection strategies. Fully impregnated coils of this design are not practical for thermally cycled magnets designed to operate above 80% of short sample limit.

  1. The Stored Energy of Gravitational Collapse Powers Gamma Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei and Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206 (1) confirms my ````Strong'' Magnetic Field'' model (SMF). In SMF, Storage Ring (SR) particles were accelerated during the gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma that is permeated by a large-scale primordial magnetic field (2.3). The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, coherent Astrophysical Storage Ring stores a small fraction of the gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. Galactic morphology varies as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in each object. GRB are due to a ``rock'' i.e. white dwarf,ordinary star,neutron star,planet,etc. falling through the SR and being rapidly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball. The fireball speeds on into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations. A ``rock'' racing at 1000 km/sec across a 20,000 km path in the beam produces a twenty second burst. Tracking across a short chord yields a short burst. Typical currents in space are sometimes made of many slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular SR at that time. 1. W. Coburn & S. E. Boggs, Nature 423, 425 (2003) 2. H. D. Greyber in After the Dark Ages:When Galaxies Were Young, AIP Conf. Proc. 470, eds. S. Holt & E. Smith, (1998) 3. H. D. Greyber in a Space Telescope Science Institute Report from their 2001 Spring Symposium, ``The Dark Universe: Matter, Energy and Gravity'', ed. Mario Livio, published March 2003.

  2. Estimating changes in heat energy stored within a column of wetland surface water and factors controlling their importance in the surface energy budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, W.B.; Sumner, D.M.; Castillo, A.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Changes in heat energy stored within a column of wetland surface water can be a considerable component of the surface energy budget, an attribute that is demonstrated by comparing changes in stored heat energy to net radiation at seven sites in the wetland areas of southern Florida, including the Everglades. The magnitude of changes in stored heat energy approached the magnitude of net radiation more often during the winter dry season than during the summer wet season. Furthermore, the magnitude of changes in stored heat energy in wetland surface water generally decreased as surface energy budgets were upscaled temporally. A new method was developed to estimate changes in stored heat energy that overcomes an important data limitation, namely, the limited spatial and temporal availability of water temperature measurements. The new method is instead based on readily available air temperature measurements and relies on the convolution of air temperature changes with a regression-defined transfer function to estimate changes in water temperature. The convolution-computed water temperature changes are used with water depths and heat capacity to estimate changes in stored heat energy within the Everglades wetland areas. These results likely can be adapted to other humid subtropical wetlands characterized by open water, saw grass, and rush vegetation type communities. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  4. Dynamics of Bound Monopoles in Artificial Spin Ice: How to Store Energy in Dirac Strings.

    PubMed

    Vedmedenko, E Y

    2016-02-19

    Dirac strings in spin ices are lines of reversed dipoles joining two quasiparticle excitations. These excitations behave as unbound emergent monopoles if the tension of Dirac strings vanishes. In this Letter, analytical and numerical analysis are used to study the dynamics of two-dimensional dipolar spin ices, artificially created analogs of bulk spin ice, in the regime of bound monopoles. It is shown that, in this regime, strings, rather than monopoles, are effective degrees of freedom explaining the finite-width band of Pauling states. A measurable prediction of path-time dependence of endpoints of a stretched and, then, released Dirac string is made and verified via simulations. It is shown that string dynamics is defined by the characteristic tension-to-mass ratio, which is determined by the fine structure constant and lattice dependent parameter. It is proposed to use string tension to achieve spontaneous magnetic currents. A concept of an energy storing device on the basis of this principle is proposed and illustrated by an experimental demonstration. A scheme of independent measurement at the nanoscale is proposed. PMID:26943555

  5. Stored energy in metallic glasses due to strains within the elastic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, A. L.; Sun, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    Room temperature loading of metallic glasses, at stresses below the macroscopic yield stress, raises their enthalpy and causes creep. Thermal cycling of metallic glasses between room temperature and 77 K also raises their enthalpy. In both cases, the enthalpy increases are comparable to those induced by heavy plastic deformation, but, as we show, the origins must be quite different. For plastic deformation, the enthalpy increase is a fraction (<10%) of the work done (WD) (and, in this sense, the behaviour is similar to that of conventional polycrystalline metals and alloys). In contrast, the room temperature creep and the thermal cycling involve small strains well within the elastic limit; in these cases, the enthalpy increase in the glass exceeds the WD, by as much as three orders of magnitude. We argue that the increased enthalpy can arise only from an endothermic disordering process drawing heat from the surroundings. We examine the mechanisms of this process. The increased enthalpy ('stored energy') is a measure of rejuvenation and appears as an exothermic heat of relaxation on heating the glass. The profile of this heat release (the 'relaxation spectrum') is analysed for several metallic glasses subjected to various treatments. Thus, the effects of the small-strain processing (creep and thermal cycling) can be better understood, and we can explore the potential for improving properties, in particular the plasticity, of metallic glasses. Metallic glasses can exhibit a wide range of enthalpy at a given temperature, and small-strain processing may assist in accessing this for practical purposes.

  6. Dynamics of Bound Monopoles in Artificial Spin Ice: How to Store Energy in Dirac Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedmedenko, E. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Dirac strings in spin ices are lines of reversed dipoles joining two quasiparticle excitations. These excitations behave as unbound emergent monopoles if the tension of Dirac strings vanishes. In this Letter, analytical and numerical analysis are used to study the dynamics of two-dimensional dipolar spin ices, artificially created analogs of bulk spin ice, in the regime of bound monopoles. It is shown that, in this regime, strings, rather than monopoles, are effective degrees of freedom explaining the finite-width band of Pauling states. A measurable prediction of path-time dependence of endpoints of a stretched and, then, released Dirac string is made and verified via simulations. It is shown that string dynamics is defined by the characteristic tension-to-mass ratio, which is determined by the fine structure constant and lattice dependent parameter. It is proposed to use string tension to achieve spontaneous magnetic currents. A concept of an energy storing device on the basis of this principle is proposed and illustrated by an experimental demonstration. A scheme of independent measurement at the nanoscale is proposed.

  7. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  8. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  9. A systemic approach to explore the flexibility of energy stores at the cellular scale: Examples from muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Taghipoor, Masoomeh; van Milgen, Jaap; Gondret, Florence

    2016-09-01

    Variations in energy storage and expenditure are key elements for animals adaptation to rapidly changing environments. Because of the multiplicity of metabolic pathways, metabolic crossroads and interactions between anabolic and catabolic processes within and between different cells, the flexibility of energy stores in animal cells is difficult to describe by simple verbal, textual or graphic terms. We propose a mathematical model to study the influence of internal and external challenges on the dynamic behavior of energy stores and its consequence on cell energy status. The role of the flexibility of energy stores on the energy equilibrium at the cellular level is illustrated through three case studies: variation in eating frequency (i.e., glucose input), level of physical activity (i.e., ATP requirement), and changes in cell characteristics (i.e., maximum capacity of glycogen storage). Sensitivity analysis has been performed to highlight the most relevant parameters of the model; model simulations have then been performed to illustrate how variation in these key parameters affects cellular energy balance. According to this analysis, glycogen maximum accumulation capacity and homeostatic energy demand are among the most important parameters regulating muscle cell metabolism to ensure its energy equilibrium. PMID:27338303

  10. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  11. Storage Rings in the Sky: Gamma Ray Bursts and Galactic Gravitational Collapse Stored Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greyber, H. D.

    2004-05-01

    The recent discovery of almost 100% polarization of the prompt gamma ray emission from GRB021206, (1), confirms my 44 year old ``Strong" Magnetic Field" model (SMF) for galactic dynamics. In SMF, Storage Ring particles were accelerated long ago during the original gravitational collapse of the pregalactic/prequasar plasma cloud that is permeated by an almost uniform primordial magnetic field (2,3) The enormous, intense, slender, relativistic, stable, completely coherent Storage Ring stores a very small fraction of the huge galactic gravitational collapse energy in an almost radiationless state, unless disturbed. The concept of an Astrophysical Storage Ring was introduced by me in l961. At first it was to explain galactic structure, but soon it proved useful to explain active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the dynamics of quasar/AGN jets. AGN and galactic morphology, energetics and dynamics vary as the ratio of magnetic energy to rotational energy in the particular object. Gamma ray bursts (GRB) are due simply to a ``rock". i.e. a white dwarf, ordinary star, neutron sstar, asteroid, planet, etc. falling rapidly through the Storage Ring and being almost instantly vaporized into a hot plasma fireball, causing an electromagnetic shower (2) Then the fireball speeds into the huge organized magnetic field surrounding the current ring, thus generating very highly polarized prompt gamma ray emission (as seen in GRB021206) from the synchrotron radiation process. The timing fits the GRB observations nicely. For instance, a ``rock" racing at 1000 kilometers per second across a 20,000 km. path in the beam would produce a twenty second burst. Other times, a target might track across a short chord for a short burst. Space missions have shown that often typical currents in space plasmas are made up of slender filaments. Thus the puzzling less than one millisecond spikes observed in some GRB are simply describing the structure of that particular ring current at that particular time. 1

  12. Food Store Choice Among Urban Slum Women Is Associated With Consumption of Energy-Dense Food.

    PubMed

    Anggraini, Roselynne; Februhartanty, Judhiastuty; Bardosono, Saptawati; Khusun, Helda; Worsley, Anthony

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations of food store choice with food consumption among urban slum women. A cross-sectional survey was carried out among 188 urban slum women (19-50 years old) in Jakarta, Indonesia. A semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess food consumption. Associations between food consumption and food store choice were tested by linear regression. This study found that frequencies of buying food from small shops (warung), street food vendors, and modern food stores were significantly associated with consumption of snacks, mixed dishes, and fruit respectively. In addition, buying food from traditional markets and small cafes (warung makan) was not significantly associated with particular types of food consumption. As modern food stores are rarely utilized by these women, small shops (warung) and street food vendors are likely to be important channels to improve slum dwellers' diet. PMID:27208014

  13. Alkaline ceramidase 1 is essential for mammalian skin homeostasis and regulating whole-body energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Vancollie, Valerie E; Lelliott, Christopher J; Speak, Anneliese O; Lafont, David; Protheroe, Hayley J; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Galli, Antonella; Green, Angela; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Ed; Glover, Leanne; Vizcay-Barrena, Gema; Karp, Natasha A; Arends, Mark J; Brenn, Thomas; Spiegel, Sarah; Adams, David J; Watt, Fiona M; van der Weyden, Louise

    2016-07-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin that acts as a barrier to protect the body from the external environment and to control water and heat loss. This barrier function is established through the multistage differentiation of keratinocytes and the presence of bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramides, the levels of which are tightly regulated by a balance of ceramide synthase and ceramidase activities. Here we reveal the essential role of alkaline ceramidase 1 (Acer1) in the skin. Acer1-deficient (Acer1(-/-) ) mice showed elevated levels of ceramide in the skin, aberrant hair shaft cuticle formation and cyclic alopecia. We demonstrate that Acer1 is specifically expressed in differentiated interfollicular epidermis, infundibulum and sebaceous glands and consequently Acer1(-/-) mice have significant alterations in infundibulum and sebaceous gland architecture. Acer1(-/-) skin also shows perturbed hair follicle stem cell compartments. These alterations result in Acer1(-/-) mice showing increased transepidermal water loss and a hypermetabolism phenotype with associated reduction of fat content with age. We conclude that Acer1 is indispensable for mammalian skin homeostasis and whole-body energy homeostasis. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:27126290

  14. The alkaline solution to the emergence of life: energy, entropy and early evolution.

    PubMed

    Russell, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The Earth agglomerates and heats. Convection cells within the planetary interior expedite the cooling process. Volcanoes evolve steam, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide and pyrophosphate. An acidulous Hadean ocean condenses from the carbon dioxide atmosphere. Dusts and stratospheric sulfurous smogs absorb a proportion of the Sun's rays. The cooled ocean leaks into the stressed crust and also convects. High temperature acid springs, coupled to magmatic plumes and spreading centers, emit iron, manganese, zinc, cobalt and nickel ions to the ocean. Away from the spreading centers cooler alkaline spring waters emanate from the ocean floor. These bear hydrogen, formate, ammonia, hydrosulfide and minor methane thiol. The thermal potential begins to be dissipated but the chemical potential is dammed. The exhaling alkaline solutions are frustrated in their further attempt to mix thoroughly with their oceanic source by the spontaneous precipitation of biomorphic barriers of colloidal iron compounds and other minerals. It is here we surmise that organic molecules are synthesized, filtered, concentrated and adsorbed, while acetate and methane--separate products of the precursor to the reductive acetyl-coenzyme-A pathway-are exhaled as waste. Reactions in mineral compartments produce acetate, amino acids, and the components of nucleosides. Short peptides, condensed from the simple amino acids, sequester 'ready-made' iron sulfide clusters to form protoferredoxins, and also bind phosphates. Nucleotides are assembled from amino acids, simple phosphates carbon dioxide and ribose phosphate upon nanocrystalline mineral surfaces. The side chains of particular amino acids register to fitting nucleotide triplet clefts. Keyed in, the amino acids are polymerized, through acid-base catalysis, to alpha chains. Peptides, the tenuous outer-most filaments of the nanocrysts, continually peel away from bound RNA. The polymers are concentrated at cooler regions of the mineral compartments through

  15. Total Energy Management: A Practical Handbook on Energy Conservation and Management. For Use of Owners and Managers of Office Buildings and Small Retail Stores. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Electrical Contractors Association, Washington, DC.

    Described in this guide for owners and managers of office buildings and small retail stores, is a program entitled Total Energy Management (TEM). The TEM program approach rests on the premise that buildings should be examined in terms of total energy consumption, rather than prescribing energy budgets for a building's separate systems. The…

  16. Ion transfer battery: storing energy by transferring ions across liquid-liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Peljo, Pekka; Bichon, Marie; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-07-28

    A battery utilizing the Galvani potential difference between aqueous and organic phases is demonstrated. The battery consists of two organic redox electrolytes separated by an immiscible aqueous phase. The charge is stored by transferring a salt from the aqueous phase into organic phases in ion transfer coupled electron transfer reactions. PMID:27327108

  17. Locusts use a composite of resilin and hard cuticle as an energy store for jumping and kicking.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Sutton, Gregory P

    2012-10-01

    Locusts jump and kick by using a catapult mechanism in which energy is first stored and then rapidly released to extend the large hind legs. The power is produced by a slow contraction of large muscles in the hind femora that bend paired semi-lunar processes in the distal part of each femur and store half the energy needed for a kick. We now show that these energy storage devices are composites of hard cuticle and the rubber-like protein resilin. The inside surface of a semi-lunar process consists of a layer of resilin, particularly thick along an inwardly pointing ridge and tightly bonded to the external, black cuticle. From the outside, resilin is visible only as a distal and ventral triangular area that tapers proximally. High-speed imaging showed that the semi-lunar processes were bent in all three dimensions during the prolonged muscular contractions that precede a kick. To reproduce these bending movements, the extensor tibiae muscle was stimulated electrically in a pattern that mimicked the normal sequence of its fast motor spikes recorded in natural kicking. Externally visible resilin was compressed and wrinkled as a semi-lunar process was bent. It then sprung back to restore the semi-lunar process rapidly to its original natural shape. Each of the five nymphal stages jumped and kicked and had a similar distribution of resilin in their semi-lunar processes as adults; the resilin was shed with the cuticle at each moult. It is suggested that composite storage devices that combine the elastic properties of resilin with the stiffness of hard cuticle allow energy to be stored by bending hard cuticle over only a small distance and without fracturing. In this way all the stored energy is returned and the natural shape of the femur is restored rapidly so that a jump or kick can be repeated. PMID:22693029

  18. Metabolic correlation between polyol and energy-storing carbohydrate under osmotic and oxidative stress condition in Moniliella megachiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yosuke; Iwata, Hisashi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2015-10-01

    Moniliella megachiliensis, the osmo-tolerant basidiomycetous yeast was found to accumulate intracellularly energy-storing carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) along with polyols (glycerol and erythritol) up to stationary growth phase. In trehalose-loaded cell, osmotic-stress resulted in the rapid generation of glycerol, and oxidative stress with menadione resulted in the rapid generation of erythritol. Under either of these conditions, the levels of the energy-storing carbohydrates were depleted, while little glucose uptake was observed. These results suggested that the intracellular pools of trehalose and glycogen were rapidly converted to glycerol in response to osmotic stress, and to erythritol in response to oxidative stress and altered redox balance. Expression of tps1 encoding trehalose synthetic enzymes paralleled trehalose accumulation in the cell during the culture in 2% glucose, in contrast, expression of tpp1 or tpp2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase was little increased under the same condition. Expression of tre (tre1/tre2) encoding trehalose hydrolase (trehalase) increased with time associated with depletion of trehalose during oxidative stress. From these results, we concluded that glycerol and erythritol, the compatible solutes in M. megachiliensis were metabolically interrelated to energy-storing carbohydrates such as trehalose or glycogen during conditions of osmotic or oxidative stress. PMID:25795573

  19. Overwinter survival of juvenile lake herring in relation to body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pangle, Kevin L.; Sutton, Trent M.; Kinnunen, Ronald E.; Hoff, Michael H.

    2004-01-01

    Populations of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior have exhibited high recruitment variability over the past three decades. To improve our understanding of the mechanisms which influence year-class strength, we conducted a 225-d laboratory experiment to evaluate the effects of body size, physiological condition, energy stores, and food ration on the winter survival of age-0 lake herring. Small (total length (TL) range = 60–85 mm) and large (TL range = 86–110 mm) fish were maintained under thermal and photoperiod regimes that mimicked those in Lake Superior from October through May. Fish in each size-class were maintained at two feeding treatments: brine shrimp Artemiaspp. ad libitum and no food. The mortality of large lake herring (fed, 3.8%; starved, 20.1%) was significantly less than that of small fish (fed, 11.7%; starved, 32.0%). Body condition and crude lipid content declined for all fish over the experiment; however, these variables were significantly greater for large fed (0.68% and 9.8%) and small fed (0.65% and 7.3%) fish than large starved (0.49% and 5.7%) and small starved (0.45% and 4.8%) individuals. Final crude protein and gross energy contents were also significantly greater in large fed lake herring (17.6% and 1,966 cal/g), followed by small fed (17.1% and 1,497 cal/g), large starved (15.4% and 1,125 cal/g), and small starved (13.2% and 799 cal/g) fish. Lake herring that died during the experiment had significantly lower body condition and energy stores relative to those of the surviving fish. These results suggest that the depletion of energy stores contributes to greater winter mortality of small lake herring with limited energy uptake and may partially explain the variability in recruitment observed in Lake Superior.

  20. The roles of direct input of energy from the solar wind and unloading of stored magnetotail energy in driving magnetospheric substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rostoker, G.; Akasofu, S. I.; Baumjohann, W.; Kamide, Y.; Mcpherron, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The contributions to the substorm expansive phase of direct energy input from the solar wind and from energy stored in the magnetotail which is released in an unpredictable manner are considered. Two physical processes for the dispensation of the energy input from the solar wind are identified: (1) a driven process in which energy supplied from the solar wind is directly dissipated in the ionosphere; and (2) a loading-unloading process in which energy from the solar wind is first stored in the magnetotail and then is suddenly released to be deposited in the ionosphere. The pattern of substorm development in response to changes in the interplanetary medium has been elucidated for a canonical isolated substorm.

  1. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Clathrate Hydrates in Storing Energy Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, N. I.; Tsimpanogiannis, I. N.; Economou, I. G.; Stubos, A. K.

    2015-09-01

    We use Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations to examine the efficiency of hydrates in storing hydrogen. In this way, the hydrate lattice is treated as a solid substrate where gas adsorption takes place. Special focus is given to the study of multiple occupancy, namely the presence of more than one gas molecules in the same hydrate cavity. This phenomenon occurs in the case of hydrogen hydrates and may drastically increase their storage capacity. A parametric analysis is also carried out to quantify the correlation between the change in the lattice constant and the storage capacity since small changes in the size of the crystal unit cell may induce significant changes in the storage capacity especially in cases were multiple occupancy occurs.

  2. Alkaline fuel cells for the regenerative fuel cell energy storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the alkaline Regenerative Fuel Cell System, whose fuel cell module would be a derivative of the 12-kW fuel cell power plant currently being produced for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, is reviewed. Long-term endurance testing of full-size fuel cell modules has demonstrated: (1) the extended endurance capability of potassium titanate matrix cells, (2) the long-term performance stability of the anode catalyst, and (3) the suitability of a lightweight graphite structure for use at the anode. These approaches, developed in the NASA-sponsored fuel cell technology advancement program, would also reduce cell weight by nearly one half.

  3. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M.; Cabrera, Marco E.

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or ∼20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an ∼70% decrease (or ∼3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼35% decrease (or ∼25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an ∼50% increase (or ∼35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an ∼30% increase (or ∼25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the model simulations of exercise response are consistent with the hypothesis that mitochondrial NADH

  4. Target Pilots Energy Efficiency Measures for Broad Rollout in Existing Stores

    SciTech Connect

    2013-03-01

    Target Corporation partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to retrofit existing buildings to reduce annual energy consumption by at least 30% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  5. "Supergreen" Renewables: Integration of Mineral Weathering Into Renewable Energy Production for Air CO2 Removal and Storage as Ocean Alkalinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. H.; Carroll, S.; Ren, Z. J.

    2015-12-01

    Excess planetary CO2 and accompanying ocean acidification are naturally mitigated on geologic time scales via mineral weathering. Here, CO2 acidifies the hydrosphere, which then slowly reacts with silicate and carbonate minerals to produce dissolved bicarbonates that are ultimately delivered to the ocean. This alkalinity not only provides long-term sequestration of the excess atmospheric carbon, but it also chemically counters the effects of ocean acidification by stabilizing or raising pH and carbonate saturation state, thus helping rebalance ocean chemistry and preserving marine ecosystems. Recent research has demonstrated ways of greatly accelerating this process by its integration into energy systems. Specifically, it has been shown (1) that some 80% of the CO2 in a waste gas stream can be spontaneously converted to stable, seawater mineral bicarbonate in the presence of a common carbonate mineral - limestone. This can allow removal of CO2 from biomass combustion and bio-energy production while generating beneficial ocean alkalinity, providing a potentially cheaper and more environmentally friendly negative-CO2-emissions alternative to BECCS. It has also been demonstrated that strong acids anodically produced in a standard saline water electrolysis cell in the formation of H2 can be reacted with carbonate or silicate minerals to generate strong base solutions. These solutions are highly absorptive of air CO2, converting it to mineral bicarbonate in solution. When such electrochemical cells are powered by non-fossil energy (e.g. electricity from wind, solar, tidal, biomass, geothermal, etc. energy sources), the system generates H2 that is strongly CO2-emissions-negative, while producing beneficial marine alkalinity (2-4). The preceding systems therefore point the way toward renewable energy production that, when tightly coupled to geochemical mitigation of CO2 and formation of natural ocean "antacids", forms a high capacity, negative-CO2-emissions, "supergreen

  6. Physical factors determining the fraction of stored energy recoverable from hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1975-01-01

    This report contains background analyses for the estimates of Nathenson and Muffler (1975) of geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction-dominated areas. The first section discusses heat and fluid recharge potential of geothermal reservoirs. The second section analyzes the physical factors that determine the fraction of stored energy obtainable at the surface from a geothermal reservoir. Conversion of heat to electricity and the use of geothermal energy for direct-heating applications are discussed in the last two sections. Nathenson, Manuel, and Muffler, L.J.P., 1975, Geothermal resources in hydrothermal convection systems and conduction dominated areas, in White, D.E., and Williams, D.L., eds., Assessment of the Geothermal Resources of the United States--1975: U.S. Geological Survey Circular 726, p. 104-121, available at http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/cir/cir726

  7. Storing solar energy with liquid phase Diels-Alder reactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Poling, B.E.

    1983-07-28

    At the beginning of this project, a preliminary study was completed that indicated the Diels-Alder reaction between maleic anhydride and 2 methyl furan had an energy storage capacity greater than water. During the last two years when this grant was in effect, three additional projects have been completed. First, an improved calorimetric techniques was developed for determination of the energy storage capacity of a reversible liquid phase chemical reaction. This technique confirmed the validity of the earlier results for the maleic anhydride-methyl furan reaction. Second, a technique was developed for characterizing solution nonidealities for mixtures in which reversible chemical reactions occur. It was found that for the maleic anhydride-2 methyl furan reaction, these non idealities could affect equilibrium compositions by nearly 40%. Third, drop calorimetry was used as a screening method to examine sixteen reactions for their potential as energy storage candidates. Of the sixteen examined, three (all involving maleic anhydride and substituted furan) showed an increased energy storage capacity due to reaction while the remaining thirteen showed no increase. In the following report, results of these three studies are summarized. Finally, a general summary of the status of energy storage by chemical reactions is presented.

  8. Involvement of energy metabolism to chilling tolerance induced by hydrogen sulfide in cold-stored banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Limwachiranon, Jarukitt; Li, Li; Du, Ruixue; Luo, Zisheng

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on energy metabolism in postharvest banana fruit under chilling stress was investigated. Banana fruit, fumigated with optimal concentration (0.5mM) of aqueous sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) solution for 24h, were initially stored at 7°C for 14d and 20°C for another 6d. H2S treated banana fruit showed both higher value of firmness and Hue angle, as well as lower value of electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and ethylene production. These indicated slower development of chilling injury compared with the control. Decrease in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and energy charge was not noticeable in H2S treated banana fruit. Moreover, the activity of H(+)-ATPase, Ca(2+)-ATPase, cytochrome C oxidase (CCO) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), associated with energy metabolism, were significantly enhanced by H2S treatment. Therefore, it can be deduced that H2S can potentially alleviate chilling development in banana fruit by increasing enzymes activities, involved in energy metabolism, to maintain energy charge. PMID:27132850

  9. Simulation of the dissipated and stored energy under deformation and failure of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostina, Anastasiia; Plekhov, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    This work is devoted to the development of the statistical model of the structural defect evolution which was developed at the Institute of continuous media mechanics UB RAS. This model takes into account stochastic properties of the defect evolution process, nonlinear interaction of defects, and connection between microplasticity and damage accumulation. The obtained constitutive equations allow us to propose a model of the energy storage and dissipation in the process of plastic deformation and failure of metallic materials. The obtained relations were adapted for standard finite-element package. Applicability of this model was demonstrated in three-dimensional simulation of the strain localization and crack propagation in metals.

  10. Simulation of the dissipated and stored energy under deformation and failure of metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kostina, Anastasiia Plekhov, Oleg

    2015-10-27

    This work is devoted to the development of the statistical model of the structural defect evolution which was developed at the Institute of continuous media mechanics UB RAS. This model takes into account stochastic properties of the defect evolution process, nonlinear interaction of defects, and connection between microplasticity and damage accumulation. The obtained constitutive equations allow us to propose a model of the energy storage and dissipation in the process of plastic deformation and failure of metallic materials. The obtained relations were adapted for standard finite-element package. Applicability of this model was demonstrated in three-dimensional simulation of the strain localization and crack propagation in metals.

  11. Optimal sizing of heating systems that store and use thermal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersh, H. N.

    1981-06-01

    An analysis of the factors that enter into the sizing of thermal energy storage (TES) space heating systems is given. These TES systems, having to fulfill the same thermal comfort functions as conventional space heating systems, have different operating characteristics and more severe constraints, and therefore require different and more critical sizing procedures. Thermal energy storage heating systems offer social and private benefits, and the achievement of these benefits depends in large part on proper sizing. Proper sizing is a probabilistic rather than a deterministic procedure, and is utility-specific as well. Analysis of experimental data obtained in field studies of TEST in New England provided information on the accuracy of equipment-sizing procedures used by vendors and on the consequences of undersizing and oversizing. Based on simulation studies and other techniques, additional useful sizing information was developed. The information implies the need for an upward adjustment of the sizing factor if the sizing is to be optimal for US climatological conditions and living habits. A summary and a general theoretical analysis of the information presented in this report are then combined to provide guidelines for optimally sizing TES systems.

  12. The effects of potting on training and quench propagation in a large stored energy superconducting dipole coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, B.; Garbincius, P. H.; Guerra, J.; Mazur, P. O.; Satti, J. A.; Tilles, E. B.

    1981-01-01

    The training and quench behavior of a superconducting racetrack dipole coil were compared in potted and non-potted coils. The coil stored energy was 175 KJoules at the conductor's short sample limit of 238 amp with a peak field of 7.6 Tesla. Steel and aluminum rods were tested with helium flow provided by fiberglass cable tape channels permitting direct access to the He supply to 1/4 of the conductor surface. The coil was trained to 90% of the short sample limit, the tie rods were relaxed, and the whole coil was impregnated with a standard clear magnet epoxy. The tests showed that fully impregnated coils of this design are not suitable for thermally cycled magnets operating above 80% of the short sample limit.

  13. Development of a Wearable Sensor System for Dynamically Mapping the Behavior of an Energy Storing and Returning Prosthetic Foot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, James; Noroozi, Siamak; Dupac, Mihai; Sewell, Philip

    2016-06-01

    It has been recognized that that the design and prescription of Energy Storing and Returning prosthetic running feet are not well understood and that further information on their performance would be beneficial to increase this understanding. Dynamic analysis of an amputee wearing a prosthetic foot is typically performed using reflective markers and motion-capture systems. High-speed cameras and force plates are used to collect data of a few strides. This requires specialized and expensive equipment in an unrepresentative environment within a large area. Inertial Measurement Units are also capable of being used as wearable sensors but suffer from drift issues. This paper presents the development of a wearable sensing system that records the action of an Energy Storing and Returning prosthetic running foot (sagittal plane displacement and ground contact position) which could have research and/or clinical applications. This is achieved using five standalone pieces of apparatus including foot-mounted pressure sensors and a rotary vario-resistive displacement transducer. It is demonstrated, through the collection of profiles for both foot deflection and ground contact point over the duration of a stride, that the system can be attached to an amputee's prosthesis and used in a non-laboratory environment. It was found from the system that the prosthetic ground contact point, for the amputee tested, progresses along the effective metatarsal portion of the prosthetic foot towards the distal end of the prosthesis over the duration of the stride. Further investigation of the effective stiffness changes of the foot due to the progression of the contact point is warranted.

  14. Sedimentation rapidly induces an immune response and depletes energy stores in a hard coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C.; Grosjean, Ph.; Leblud, J.; Palmer, C. V.; Kushmaro, A.; Eeckhaut, I.

    2014-12-01

    High sedimentation rates have been linked to reduced coral health within multiple systems; however, whether this is a direct result of compromised coral immunity has not been previously investigated. The potential effects of sedimentation on immunity of the hard coral Montipora patula were examined by comparing physiological responses of coral fragments inoculated with sterilized marine sediments and those under control conditions. Sediments were collected from terrestrial runoff-affected reefs in SW Madagascar and applied cyclically for a total of 24 h at a rate observed during precipitation-induced sedimentation events. Coral health was determined 24 h after the onset of the sedimentation stress through measuring metabolic proxies of O2 budget and lipid ratios. Immune response of the melanin synthesis pathway was measured by quantifying phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposits. Sedimentation induced both immune and metabolic responses in M. patula. Both phenoloxidase activity and melanin deposition were significantly higher in the sediment treatment compared to controls, indicating an induced immune response. Sediment-treated corals also showed a tendency towards increased respiration (during the night) and decreased photosynthesis (during the day) and a significant depletion of energy reserves as compared to controls. These data highlight that short-term (24 h) sedimentation, free of live microorganisms, compromises the health of M. patula. The energetically costly immune response, potentially elicited by residual endotoxins and other inflammatory particles associated with the sterile sediments, likely contributes to the energy depletion. Overall, exposure to sedimentation adversely affects coral health and continued exposure may lead to resource depletion and an increased susceptibility to disease.

  15. High stored-energy breakdown tests on electrodes made of stainless steel, copper, titanium and molybdenum

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, H. P. L. de Simonin, A.; Grand, C.

    2015-04-08

    IRFM have conducted resilience tests on electrodes made of Cu, stainless steel 304L, Ti and Mo against breakdowns up to 170 kV and 300 J. The tests of the 10×10 cm{sup 2} electrodes have been performed at an electrode distance d=11 mm under vacuum (P∼5×10{sup −6} mbar). No great difference in voltage holding between the materials could be identified; all materials could reach a voltage holding between 140 and 170 kV over the 11 mm gap, i.e. results scatter within a ±10% band. After exposure to ∼10000 seconds of high-voltage (HV) on-time, having accumulated ∼1000 breakdowns, the electrodes were inspected. The anodes were covered with large and small craters. The rugosity of the anodes had increased substantially, that of the cathodes to a lesser extent. The molybdenum electrodes are least affected, but this does not show in their voltage holding capability. It is hypothesized that penetrating high-energy electrons from the breakdown project heat below the surface of the anode and cause a micro-explosion of material when melting point is exceeded. Polished electrodes have also been tested. The polishing results in a substantially reduced breakdown rate in the beginning, but after having suffered a relatively small number (∼100) of breakdowns, the polished electrodes behaved the same as the unpolished ones.

  16. High stored-energy breakdown tests on electrodes made of stainless steel, copper, titanium and molybdenum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Esch, H. P. L.; Simonin, A.; Grand, C.

    2015-04-01

    IRFM have conducted resilience tests on electrodes made of Cu, stainless steel 304L, Ti and Mo against breakdowns up to 170 kV and 300 J. The tests of the 10×10 cm2 electrodes have been performed at an electrode distance d=11 mm under vacuum (P˜5×10-6 mbar). No great difference in voltage holding between the materials could be identified; all materials could reach a voltage holding between 140 and 170 kV over the 11 mm gap, i.e. results scatter within a ±10% band. After exposure to ˜10000 seconds of high-voltage (HV) on-time, having accumulated ˜1000 breakdowns, the electrodes were inspected. The anodes were covered with large and small craters. The rugosity of the anodes had increased substantially, that of the cathodes to a lesser extent. The molybdenum electrodes are least affected, but this does not show in their voltage holding capability. It is hypothesized that penetrating high-energy electrons from the breakdown project heat below the surface of the anode and cause a micro-explosion of material when melting point is exceeded. Polished electrodes have also been tested. The polishing results in a substantially reduced breakdown rate in the beginning, but after having suffered a relatively small number (˜100) of breakdowns, the polished electrodes behaved the same as the unpolished ones.

  17. Effect of sexual maturation and polyploidy on chemical composition and fatty acid content of energy stores in female rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy and nutrient demanding physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many fish species. Lipid mobilization from fat stores supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of sexual maturation on lipid mobilization ...

  18. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were

  19. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  20. Surface functionality and electrochemical investigations of a graphitic electrode as a candidate for alkaline energy conversion and storage devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-02-01

    Graphite is a typical electrocatalyst support in alkaline energy conversion and storage devices such as fuel cells, supercapacitores and lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical behaviour of a graphite electrode in 0.5 M NaOH was studied to elucidate its surface structure/electrochemical activity relationship. Graphite voltammograms are characterized by an anodic shoulder AI and a cathodic peak CI in addition to the oxygen reduction reaction plateaus, PI and PII. AI and CI were attributed to oxidation and reduction of some graphite surface function groups, respectively. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study revealed two different oxygen types assigned as inner and outer oxygen. The inner oxygen was reduced via the more efficient 4-electron pathway. The outer oxygen reduction proceeded with a lower efficient 2-electron pathway. The calculated percentages of the 4-electron pathway were ranged from 70% to 90%. A full mechanism for the graphite surface function groups changes over the studied potential window was suggested through the combination between the voltammetric, FT-IR and Raman results.

  1. Surface functionality and electrochemical investigations of a graphitic electrode as a candidate for alkaline energy conversion and storage devices

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ahmed B.; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S.; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S.; Hassan, Hamdy H.

    2016-01-01

    Graphite is a typical electrocatalyst support in alkaline energy conversion and storage devices such as fuel cells, supercapacitores and lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical behaviour of a graphite electrode in 0.5 M NaOH was studied to elucidate its surface structure/electrochemical activity relationship. Graphite voltammograms are characterized by an anodic shoulder AI and a cathodic peak CI in addition to the oxygen reduction reaction plateaus, PI and PII. AI and CI were attributed to oxidation and reduction of some graphite surface function groups, respectively. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study revealed two different oxygen types assigned as inner and outer oxygen. The inner oxygen was reduced via the more efficient 4-electron pathway. The outer oxygen reduction proceeded with a lower efficient 2-electron pathway. The calculated percentages of the 4-electron pathway were ranged from 70% to 90%. A full mechanism for the graphite surface function groups changes over the studied potential window was suggested through the combination between the voltammetric, FT-IR and Raman results. PMID:26916054

  2. Surface functionality and electrochemical investigations of a graphitic electrode as a candidate for alkaline energy conversion and storage devices.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed B; Abdel-Samad, Hesham S; Abdel Rehim, Sayed S; Hassan, Hamdy H

    2016-01-01

    Graphite is a typical electrocatalyst support in alkaline energy conversion and storage devices such as fuel cells, supercapacitores and lithium ion batteries. The electrochemical behaviour of a graphite electrode in 0.5 M NaOH was studied to elucidate its surface structure/electrochemical activity relationship. Graphite voltammograms are characterized by an anodic shoulder AI and a cathodic peak CI in addition to the oxygen reduction reaction plateaus, PI and PII. AI and CI were attributed to oxidation and reduction of some graphite surface function groups, respectively. Rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) study revealed two different oxygen types assigned as inner and outer oxygen. The inner oxygen was reduced via the more efficient 4-electron pathway. The outer oxygen reduction proceeded with a lower efficient 2-electron pathway. The calculated percentages of the 4-electron pathway were ranged from 70% to 90%. A full mechanism for the graphite surface function groups changes over the studied potential window was suggested through the combination between the voltammetric, FT-IR and Raman results. PMID:26916054

  3. PREFACE: Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles, PSTP-87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, I.; Mowat, J. R.; Bárány, A.

    1988-01-01

    The Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles, PSTP-87, was organized by the Research Institute of Physics (AFI) and held at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, June 14-18, 1987. One reason for the conference was the 50th Anniversary celebrated by AFI in 1987, having started out as the Nobel Institute for Physics under the directorship of Manne Siegbahn in 1937. More important, though, was the fact that AFI presently is replacing its basic research equipment. Having relied for nearly four decades on the world's largest conventional cyclotron, the Institute is now constructing a storage ring with electron cooling for heavy ions, a very difficult but challenging project named CRYRING. When organizing the conference, our main idea was to bring together representatives of the rather well-established group of scientists relying on the use of ion traps and scientists planning to use the new generation of heavy ion storage rings. After all, what is a storage ring but a gigantic ion trap! The conference met with an overwhelming interest, which finally stabilized around 160 participants, more than double the number we had originally hoped for. The program featured invited talks, most of which are presented here in the order they appeared in the program. Round-table panel discussions were organized in the evenings, summaries of most of them are published herein. An extended poster session at AFI resulted in a fair number of contributed papers which are included in the last part of the proceedings. Participants were thus kept busy from Sunday noon until late Thursday afternoon - maybe somewhat too busy according to certain accompanying persons! To make the scientific burden somewhat more bearable, a half-day excursion to the archipelago of Stockholm was planned and performed, even though the weather was miserable. During the conference dinner, held on the island of Sandhamn, a spontaneous form of coherent excitation at one

  4. Selective Growth of Low Stored Energy Grains During δ Sub-solvus Annealing in the Inconel 718 Nickel-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnoli, Andrea; Bernacki, Marc; Logé, Roland; Franchet, Jean-Michel; Laigo, Johanne; Bozzolo, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure stability during δ sub-solvus annealing in Inconel 718 was investigated, focusing on the conditions that may lead to the development of very large grains (about 100 μm) in a recrystallized fine grained matrix (4 to 5 μm) despite the presence of second-phase particles. Microstructure evolution was analyzed by EBSD (grain size, intragranular misorientation) and SEM ( δ phase particles). Results confirm that, in the absence of stored energy, the grain structure is controlled by the δ phase particles, as predicted by the Smith-Zener equation. If the initial microstructure is strained ( ɛ < 0.1) before annealing, then low stored energy grains grow to a large extent, despite the Zener pinning forces exerted by the second-phase particles on the grain boundaries. Those selectively growing grains could be those of the initial microstructure that were the least deformed, or they could result from a nucleation process. The balance of three forces acting on boundary migration controls the growth process: if the sum of capillarity and stored energy driving forces exceeds the Zener pinning force, then selective grain growth occurs. Such phenomenon could be simulated, using a level set approach in a finite element context, by taking into account the three forces acting on boundary migration and by considering a realistic strain energy distribution (estimated from EBSD measurements).

  5. Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

    1984-01-01

    At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

  6. Preparation of Nano-Composite Ca2-αZnα(OH)4 with High Thermal Storage Capacity and Improved Recovery of Stored Heat Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Sun, S. M.; Hu, J.; Zhao, Y.; Yu, L. J.

    2014-11-01

    Thermal energy storage has very important prospects in many applications related to the use of renewable energies (solar energy, etc.) or other energy sources, such as waste heat from industrial processes. Thermochemical storage is very attractive for long-term storage, since it could be conducted at room temperature without energy losses. In the present paper, a novel nanocomposite material, Ca2-αZnα(OH)4, is prepared using coprecipitation methodology and is characterized by XRD and DSC tests. The XRD result shows that the grain size of the nano-composite ranges from 40 nm to 95 nm. The DSC test result shows that the nano-composite exhibits high thermal storage capacity: 764.5 J/g at α = 0.8555. Its thermal decomposition temperature was found to be approximately 180º. Itwas found possible to recover 63.25% of the stored heat energy.

  7. Physics-based control-oriented modeling and robust feedback control of the plasma safety factor profile and stored energy dynamics in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Justin E.; Besseghir, Karim; Lister, Jo; Schuster, Eugenio

    2015-11-01

    Many challenging plasma control problems still need to be addressed in order for the ITER plasma control system (PCS) to be able to maintain the plasma within a predefined operational space and optimize the plasma state evolution in the tokamak, which will greatly aid in the successful achievement of ITER’s goals. Firstly in this work, a general control-oriented, physics-based modeling approach is developed to obtain first-principles-driven (FPD) models of the plasma magnetic profile and stored energy evolutions valid for high performance, high confinement (H-mode) scenarios, with the goal of developing model-based closed-loop algorithms to control the safety factor profile (q profile) and stored energy evolutions in the tokamak. The FPD model is tailored to H-mode burning plasma scenarios in ITER by employing the DINA-CH & CRONOS free-boundary tokamak simulation code, and the FPD model’s prediction capabilities are demonstrated by comparing the prediction to data obtained from DINA-CH & CRONOS. Secondly, a model-based feedback control algorithm is designed to simultaneously track target q profile and stored energy evolutions in H-mode burning plasma scenarios in ITER by embedding the developed FPD model of the magnetic profile evolution into the control design process. The feedback controller is designed to ensure that the closed-loop system is robust to uncertainties in the electron density, electron temperature and plasma resistivity, and is tested in simulations with the developed FPD model. The effectiveness of the controller is demonstrated by first tracking nominal q profile and stored energy target evolutions, and then modulating the generated fusion power while maintaining the q profile in a stationary condition. In the process, many key practical issues for plasma profile control in ITER are investigated, which will be useful for the development of the ITER PCS that has recently been initiated. Some of the more pertinent investigated issues are the

  8. Variations in the proportion of glycolytic/non-glycolytic energy substrates modulate sperm membrane integrity and function in diluted boar samples stored at 15-17 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Medrano, A; Peña, A; Rigau, T; Rodrìguez-Gil, J E

    2005-10-01

    In this work the role of energy substrates in the maintenance of boar-sperm survival during storage at 15-17 degrees C was tested. For this purpose, boar spermatozoa were stored at 15-17 degrees C in several defined media with separate combinations of a monosaccharide, glucose and a non-monosaccharide, either citrate or lactate, energy substrates. Our results indicate that the medium containing the highest concentration of glucose together with low lactate levels was the most suitable to maintain sperm quality for 168 h at 15-17 degrees C. This was confirmed after observation of the results of the percentages of viability and altered acrosomes, the osmotic resistance test, the hyperosmotic resistance test and the rhythm of L-lactate production. The survival ability of boar sperm was greater in this experimental medium than in the standard Beltsville Thawing Solution extender, which contains only glucose as an energy substrate, although at a concentration far higher than that of all the tested experimental media. Our results indicate that the exact composition, more than the pure quantity of energy substrates, is a very important modulatory factor which affects survival ability of boar sperm in refrigeration. Thus, the exact combination of several energy substrates would have to be taken into account when optimizing the design of commercial extenders to store boar spermatozoa at 15-17 degrees C. PMID:16149951

  9. ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... known as: ALK PHOS; Alkp Formal name: Alkaline Phosphatase Related tests: AST ; ALT ; GGT ; Bilirubin ; Liver Panel ; Bone Markers ; Alkaline Phosphatase Isoenzymes; Bone Specific ALP All content on Lab ...

  10. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2014-04-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic Ca(2+) homeostasis, by analyzing interdependency of glycogen and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a mechanism in cellular signaling that maintains high endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration and thus provides the basis for store-dependent Ca(2+) signaling. We stimulated SOCE in primary cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical astrocytes by 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol, the amount of Ca(2+) loaded into ER via sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2)-ATPase (SERCA) was reduced, which suggests that SERCA pumps preferentially metabolize glycogenolytic ATP. Our study demonstrates SOCE as a novel pathway in stimulating astrocytic glycogenolysis. We also provide first evidence for a new functional role of brain glycogen, in providing local ATP to SERCA, thus establishing the bioenergetic basis for astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling. This mechanism could offer a novel explanation for the impact of glycogen on learning and memory. PMID:24464850

  11. Free energy distribution and hydrothermal mineral precipitation in Hadean submarine alkaline vent systems: Importance of iron redox reactions under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takazo; Russell, Michael J.; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of mixing between hypothetical seawater and hydrothermal fluid in the Hadean deep ocean were carried out to predict saturation states of mineral precipitates and redox reactions that could occur in Hadean submarine alkaline hydrothermal systems associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. In the calculations, the seawater was assumed to be weakly acidic (pH = 5.5) and to include carbon dioxide, ferrous iron and silica, with or without nitrate, while the Hadean hydrothermal fluid was assumed to be highly alkaline (pH = 11) and to contain abundant molecular hydrogen, methane and bisulfide, based on the Archean geologic record, the modern low-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vent fluid (Lost City field), and experimental and theoretical considerations. The modeling indicates that potential mineral precipitates in the mixing zone (hydrothermal chimney structures) could consist mainly of iron sulfides but also of ferrous serpentine and brucite, siderite, and ferric iron-bearing minerals such as goethite, hematite and/or magnetite as minor phases. The precipitation of ferric iron-bearing minerals suggests that chemical iron oxidation would be made possible by pH shift even under anoxic condition. In the mixing zone, comprising an inorganic barrier precipitated at the interface of the two contrasting solutions, various redox reactions release free energy with the potential to drive endergonic reactions, assuming the involvement of coupling inorganic protoenzymes. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis - long considered the most ancient forms of biological energy metabolisms - are able to achieve higher maximum energy yield (>0.5 kJ/kg hydrothermal fluid) than those in the modern serpentinization-associated seafloor hydrothermal systems (e.g., Kairei field). Furthermore, the recently proposed methanotrophic acetogenesis pathway was also thermodynamically investigated. It is known that methanotrophic acetogenesis would

  12. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  13. Analysis of the metatranscriptome of microbial communities of an alkaline hot sulfur spring revealed different gene encoding pathway enzymes associated with energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Swetaleena; Padhi, Soumesh Kumar; Mohanty, Sriprakash; Samanta, Mrinal; Maiti, Nikhil Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Alkaline sulfur hot springs notable for their specialized and complex ecosystem powered by geothermal energy are abundantly rich in different chemotrophic and phototrophic thermophilic microorganisms. Survival and adaptation of these organisms in the extreme environment is specifically related to energy metabolism. To gain a better understanding of survival mechanism of the organisms in these ecosystems, we determined the different gene encoding enzymes associated with anaerobic pathways of energy metabolism by applying the metatranscriptomics approach. The analysis of the microbial population of hot sulfur spring revealed the presence of both aerobic and anaerobic organisms indicating dual mode of lifestyle of the community members. Proteobacteria (28.1 %) was the most dominant community. A total of 988 reads were associated with energy metabolism, out of which 33.7 % of the reads were assigned to nitrogen, sulfur, and methane metabolism based on KEGG classification. The major lineages of hot spring communities were linked with the anaerobic pathways. Different gene encoding enzymes (hao, nir, nar, cysH, cysI, acs) showed the involvement of microbial members in nitrification, denitrification, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, and methane generation. This study enhances our understanding of important gene encoding enzymes involved in energy metabolism, required for the survival and adaptation of microbial communities in the hot spring. PMID:27290724

  14. Grocery Store Math.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    Presents a hands-on activity, adaptable to various grade levels, to reinforce the mathematical concept of rounding by utilizing grocery store advertisements to demonstrate the concept in a real life setting. Describes the activity on a step-by-step basis and includes suggestions for additional grocery store games. (SD)

  15. Anodes for alkaline electrolysis

    DOEpatents

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2011-02-01

    A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

  16. Alkaline "Permanent" Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Antony

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of paper manufacturing processes and their effects on library materials focuses on the promotion of alkaline "permanent" paper, with less acid, by Canadian library preservation specialists. Standards for paper acidity are explained; advantages of alkaline paper are described, including decreased manufacturing costs; and recyclability is…

  17. Waste from grocery stores

    SciTech Connect

    Lieb, K.

    1993-11-01

    The Community Recycling Center, Inc., (CRC, Champaign, Ill.), last year conducted a two-week audit of waste generated at two area grocery stores. The stores surveyed are part of a 10-store chain. For two of the Kirby Foods Stores, old corrugated containers (OCC) accounted for 39-45% of all waste. The summary drew correlations between the amount of OCC and the sum of food and garbage waste. The study suggested that one can reasonably estimate volumes of waste based on the amount of OCC because most things come in a box. Auditors set up a series of containers to make the collection process straightforward. Every day the containers were taken to local recycling centers and weighed. Approximate waste breakdowns for the two stores were as follows: 45% OCC; 35% food waste; 20% nonrecyclable or noncompostable items; and 10% other.

  18. The ability of genetically lean or fat slow-growing chickens to synthesize and store lipids is not altered by the dietary energy source.

    PubMed

    Baéza, E; Gondret, F; Chartrin, P; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C; Gabriel, I; Narcy, A; Lessire, M; Métayer-Coustard, S; Collin, A; Jégou, M; Lagarrigue, S; Duclos, M J

    2015-10-01

    The increasing use of unconventional feedstuffs in chicken's diets results in the substitution of starch by lipids as the main dietary energy source. To evaluate the responses of genetically fat or lean chickens to these diets, males of two experimental lines divergently selected for abdominal fat content were fed isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets with either high lipid (80 g/kg), high fiber (64 g/kg) contents (HL), or low lipid (20 g/kg), low fiber (21 g/kg) contents (LL) from 22 to 63 days of age. The diet had no effect on growth performance and did not affect body composition evaluated at 63 days of age. Glycolytic and oxidative energy metabolisms in the liver and glycogen storage in liver and Sartorius muscle at 63 days of age were greater in chicken fed LL diet compared with chicken fed HL diet. In Pectoralis major (PM) muscle, energy metabolisms and glycogen content were not different between diets. There were no dietary-associated differences in lipid contents of the liver, muscles and abdominal fat. However, the percentages of saturated (SFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) in tissue lipids were generally higher, whereas percentages of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were lower for diet LL than for diet HL. The fat line had a greater feed intake and average daily gain, but gain to feed ratio was lower in that line compared with the lean line. Fat chickens were heavier than lean chickens at 63 days of age. Their carcass fatness was higher and their muscle yield was lower than those of lean chickens. The oxidative enzyme activities in the liver were lower in the fat line than in the lean line, but line did not affect energy metabolism in muscles. The hepatic glycogen content was not different between lines, whereas glycogen content and glycolytic potential were higher in the PM muscle of fat chickens compared with lean chickens. Lipid contents in the liver, muscles and abdominal fat did not differ between lines, but fat chickens stored less MUFA and

  19. Alkaline igneous rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitton, J.G.; Upton, B.G.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this volume, an international team of scientists provides an up-to-date overview of the nature, origin, and evolution of alkaline magmas. Particular attention is paid to carbonatites, lamprophyres, and lamproites which are rock suites of current interest not recently reviewed elsewhere. Recent work on the classical alkaline provinces of East Africa, South Greenland, and the Kola Peninsula is included together with reviews of other areas of alkaline magmatism in North and South America, East Greenland, Europe, West Africa, and the ocean basins. Other papers discuss the impact of experimental isotopic and geochemical studies of the petrogenesis of alkaline rocks. This book will be of interest to petrologists and geochemists studying alkaline igneous rocks, and to other earth scientists as a reference on the rapidly expanding field of igneous petrology.

  20. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  1. Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California. Predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Michael G.; Mendell, Mark J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Dutton, Spencer M.; Berkeley, Pam M.; Spears, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Through mass-balance modeling of various ventilation scenarios that might satisfy the ASHRAE 62.1 Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Procedure, we estimate indoor concentrations of contaminants of concern (COCs) in California “big box” stores, compare estimates to available thresholds, and for selected scenarios estimate differences in energy consumption. Findings are intended to inform decisions on adding performance-based approaches to ventilation rate (VR) standards for commercial buildings. Using multi-zone mass-balance models and available contaminant source rates, we estimated concentrations of 34 COCs for multiple ventilation scenarios: VRmin (0.04 cfm/ft2 ), VRmax (0.24 cfm/ft2 ), and VRmid (0.14 cfm/ft2 ). We compared COC concentrations with available health, olfactory, and irritant thresholds. We estimated building energy consumption at different VRs using a previously developed EnergyPlus model. VRmax did control all contaminants adequately, but VRmin did not, and VRmid did so only marginally. Air cleaning and local ventilation near strong sources both showed promise. Higher VRs increased indoor concentrations of outdoor air pollutants. Lowering VRs in big box stores in California from VRmax to VRmid would reduce total energy use by an estimated 6.6% and energy costs by 2.5%. Reducing the required VRs in California’s big box stores could reduce energy use and costs, but poses challenges for health and comfort of occupants. Source removal, air cleaning, and local ventilation may be needed at reduced VRs, and even at current recommended VRs. Also, alternative ventilation strategies taking climate and season into account in ventilation schedules may provide greater energy cost savings than constant ventilation rates, while improving IAQ.

  2. Alkaline battery operational methodology

    DOEpatents

    Sholklapper, Tal; Gallaway, Joshua; Steingart, Daniel; Ingale, Nilesh; Nyce, Michael

    2016-08-16

    Methods of using specific operational charge and discharge parameters to extend the life of alkaline batteries are disclosed. The methods can be used with any commercial primary or secondary alkaline battery, as well as with newer alkaline battery designs, including batteries with flowing electrolyte. The methods include cycling batteries within a narrow operating voltage window, with minimum and maximum cut-off voltages that are set based on battery characteristics and environmental conditions. The narrow voltage window decreases available capacity but allows the batteries to be cycled for hundreds or thousands of times.

  3. Storing your medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000534.htm Storing your medicines To use the sharing features on this page, ... child latch or lock. Do not use Damaged Medicine Damaged medicine may make you sick. DO NOT ...

  4. Provenance Store Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  5. Evaluation of the alkaline electrolysis of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Meisenhelder, J.H.; Brown, A.P.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1981-05-01

    The alkaline leach and electrolysis process for zinc production is compared to the conventional acid-sulfate process in terms of both energy saving and technical merit. In addition, the potential for industrial application of the alkaline process is discussed on the basis of present market conditions, possible future zinc market scenarios, and the probability of increased secondary zinc recovery. In primary zinc production, the energy-saving potential for the alkaline process was estimated to be greater than 10%, even when significantly larger electrolysis current densities than those required for the sulfate process are used. The principal technical advantages of the alkaline process are that it can handle low-grade, high-iron-content or oxidized ores (like most of those found in the US) in a more cost- and energy-efficient manner than can the sulfate process. Additionally, in the electrowinning operation, the alkaline process should be technically superior because a dendritic or sponge deposit is formed that is amenable to automated collection without interruption of the electrolysis. Also, use of the higher current densities would result in significant capital cost reductions. Alkaline-based electrolytic recovery processes were considered for the recycling of zinc from smelter baghouse dusts and from the potential source of nickel/zinc electric-vehicle batteries. In all comparisons, an alkaline process was shown to be technically superior and, particularly for the baghouse dusts, energetically and economically superior to alternatively proposed recovery methods based on sulfate electrolysis. It is concluded that the alkaline zinc method is an important alternative technology to the conventional acid zinc process. (WHK)

  6. Basalt as a solid source of calcium and alkalinity for the sequestration of carbon dioxide in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, N. C.; Westfield, I.; Lu, P.; Bourcier, W. L.; Kendall, T.; Constantz, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    . Both multi-step CO2 sequestration processes use little energy, safely capture and store CO2 for geologic time periods, and produce commercial building materials that partially replace traditional cement, which is itself a major generator of CO2 emissions.

  7. School Store Operation and Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Bill J.

    Written to assist the teacher-sponsor responsible for operating a school store, this book offers a system developed specifically for the operation and control of such a store. It also shows ways in which a school store can be used for training students. Chapter 1 discusses a successful school store operated by students and a store record system…

  8. Alkaline Capacitors Based on Nitride Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldissi, Matt

    2003-01-01

    High-energy-density alkaline electrochemical capacitors based on electrodes made of transition-metal nitride nanoparticles are undergoing development. Transition- metal nitrides (in particular, Fe3N and TiN) offer a desirable combination of high electrical conductivity and electrochemical stability in aqueous alkaline electrolytes like KOH. The high energy densities of these capacitors are attributable mainly to their high capacitance densities, which, in turn, are attributable mainly to the large specific surface areas of the electrode nanoparticles. Capacitors of this type could be useful as energy-storage components in such diverse equipment as digital communication systems, implanted medical devices, computers, portable consumer electronic devices, and electric vehicles.

  9. Design and simulation of control algorithms for stored energy and plasma current in non-inductive scenarios on NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, Mark; Andre, Robert; Gates, David; Gerhardt, Stefan; Menard, Jonathan; Poli, Francesca

    2015-11-01

    One of the major goals of NSTX-U is to demonstrate non-inductive operation. To facilitate this and other program goals, the center stack has been upgraded and a second neutral beam line has been added with three sources aimed more tangentially to provide higher current drive efficiency and the ability to shape the current drive profile. While non-inductive start-up and ramp-up scenarios are being developed, initial non-inductive studies will likely rely on clamping the Ohmic coil current after the plasma current has been established inductively. In this work the ability to maintain control of stored energy and plasma current once the Ohmic coil has been clamped is explored. The six neutral beam sources and the mid-plane outer gap of the plasma are considered as actuators. System identification is done using TRANSP simulations in which the actuators are modulated around a reference shot. The resulting reduced model is used to design an optimal control law with anti-windup and a recently developed framework for closed loop simulations in TRANSP is used to test the control. Limitations due to actuator saturation are assessed and robustness to beam modulation, changes in the plasma density and confinement, and changes in density and temperature profile shapes are studied. Supported by US DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  10. The low temperature radiolysis of cis-syn-cis-dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 complexes with alkaline earth metal nitrates: An evidence for energy transfer to the macrocyclic ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakurdaeva, O. A.; Nesterov, S. V.; Shmakova, N. A.; Sokolova, N. A.; Feldman, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    Formation of paramagnetic intermediates in macrocyclic complexes of cis-syn-cis-dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) with alkaline earth metal nitrates under X-rays irradiation was studied by EPR spectroscopy. NO32- dianions appear to be predominant intermediate species in the samples irradiated at 77 K at low doses (up to 40 kGy). This result was interpreted as an evidence for energy transfer within the complex from crown ether to nitrate anion. Increase in the absorbed dose from 40 kGy to 284 kGy results in built-up of a new EPR signal assigned to macrocyclic -CH2-ĊH-O- radicals produced from crown ether moieties. Thermal annealing of the irradiated macrocyclic complexes at 273 К led to fast decay of NO32- . This process was accompanied by a formation of -CH2-ĊH-O- radicals in secondary reactions. The nature of the metal cations coordinated in the macrocycle cavity had no appreciable effect on the composition of radical products and their post-radiation transformations.

  11. A mitochondrial alkaline/neutral invertase isoform (A/N-InvC) functions in developmental energy-demanding processes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mariana L; Lechner, Leandra; Zabaleta, Eduardo J; Salerno, Graciela L

    2013-03-01

    Recent findings demonstrate that alkaline/neutral invertases (A/N-Invs), enzymes that catalyze the breakdown of sucrose into glucose and fructose, are essential proteins in plant life. The fact that different isoforms are present in multiple locations makes them candidates for the coordination of metabolic processes. In the present study, we functionally characterized the encoding gene of a novel A/N-Inv (named A/N-InvC) from Arabidopsis, which localizes in mitochondria. A/N-InvC is expressed in roots, in aerial parts (shoots and leaves) and flowers. A detailed phenotypic analysis of knockout mutant plants (invc) reveals an impaired growth phenotype. Shoot growth was severely reduced, but root development was not affected as reported for A/N-InvA mutant (inva) plants. Remarkably, germination and flowering, two energy demanding processes, were the most affected stages. The effect of exogenous growth regulators led us to suggest that A/N-InvC may be modulating hormone balance in relation to the radicle emergence. We also show that oxygen consumption is reduced in inva and invc in comparison with wild-type plants, indicating that both organelle isoenzymes may play a fundamental role in mitochondrion functionality. Taken together, our results emphasize the involvement of mitochondrial A/N-Invs in developmental processes and uncover the possibility of playing different roles for the two isoforms located in the organelle. PMID:23135328

  12. Low energy SIMS characterization of passive oxide films formed on a low-nickel stainless steel in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajardo, S.; Bastidas, D. M.; Ryan, M. P.; Criado, M.; McPhail, D. S.; Morris, R. J. H.; Bastidas, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used to study the oxide films formed on a low-nickel austenitic stainless steel (SS), potential replacement to conventional AISI 304 SS in reinforced concrete structures (RCS) that are subjected to aggressive environments. The effect of carbonation and the presence of chloride ions were studied. The oxide films formed a chemically gradated bi-layer structure with an outer layer predominately constituted by iron oxides and an inner layer enriched in chromium oxides. Chloride ions were not found in the oxide film but did have an effect on film structure and thickness.

  13. The Store Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and robotic technologies are merging to present a wonderful opportunity to develop artificial limbs and prosthetic devices for humans injured on the job, in the military, or due to disease. In this challenge, students will have the opportunity to design a store or online service that specifically dedicates itself to amputees. Described…

  14. Stored luminescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ge

    2014-09-01

    Phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors and pre-excited by x-ray radiation were recently reported for their luminescence emission in the range of 650-770 nm upon near-infrared (NIR) light stimulation. These nanophosphors can be functionalized as optical probes for molecular imaging. In this paper, we present stored luminescence computed tomography to reconstruct a nanophosphor distribution in an object. The propagation of x rays in a biological object allows significantly better localization and deeper penetration. Moreover, the nanophosphors, which are pre-excited with collimated x-ray beams or focused x-ray waves, can be successively stimulated for stored luminescence emissions by variable NIR stimulation patterns. The sequentially detected luminescence signals provide more information of a nanophosphor spatial distribution for more accurate image reconstruction and higher image resolution. A realistic numerical study is performed to demonstrate the feasibility and merits of the proposed approach. PMID:25321362

  15. Storing Blood Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute worked with Goddard Space Flight Center to propose a solution to the blood-cell freezing problem. White blood cells and bone marrow are stored for future use by leukemia patients as a result of Goddard and Jet Propulsion Laboratory expertise in electronics and cryogenics. White blood cell and bone marrow bank established using freezing unit. Freezing unit monitors temperature of cells themselves. Thermocouple placed against polyethylene container relays temperature signals to an electronic system which controls small heaters located outside container. Heaters allow liquid nitrogen to circulate at constant temperature and maintain consistent freezing rate. Ability to freeze, store, and thaw white cells and bone marrow without damage is important in leukemia treatment.

  16. Process for storing calories

    SciTech Connect

    Perrut, M.; Ronc, M.; Valentin, P.

    1980-09-09

    A process is described for storing heat in the form of fusion/solidification latent heat which comprises passing a thermo-conductive fluid into a thermally insulated storage element containing a substance having a melting point that corresponds to the supply and heat consumption temperatures, characterized in that said fusible substance is absorbed on a microporous carrier which forms a granular bed in which the thermo-conductive fluid circulates.

  17. Alkaline sodium borohydride gel as a hydrogen source for PEMFC or an energy carrier for NaBH 4-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. H.; Li, Z. P.; Chen, L. L.

    In this preliminary study, we tried to use sodium polyacrylate as the super absorbent polymer to form alkaline NaBH 4 gel and explored its possibilities for borohydride hydrolysis and borohydride electro-oxidation. It was found that the absorption capacity of sodium polyacrylate decreased with increasing NaBH 4 concentration. The formed gel was rather stable in the sealed vessel but tended to slowly decompose in open air. Hydrogen generation from the gel was carried out using CoCl 2 catalyst precursor solutions. Hydrogen generation rate from the alkaline NaBH 4 gel was found to be higher and impurities in hydrogen were less than that from the alkaline NaBH 4 solution. The NaBH 4 gel also successfully powered a NaBH 4-air battery.

  18. The explicit token store

    SciTech Connect

    Culler, D.E. ); Papadopoulos, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper presents an unusually simple approach to dynamic dataflow execution, called the Explicit Token Store (ETS) architecture, and its current realization in Monsoon. The essence of dynamic dataflow execution is captured by a simple transition on state bits associated with storage local to a processor. Low-level storage management is performed by the compiler in assigning nodes to slots in an activation frame, rather than dynamically in hardware. The processor is simple, highly pipelined, and quite general. There is exactly one instruction executed for each action on the dataflow graph. Thus, the machine-oriented ETS model provides new insight into the real cost of direct execution of dataflow graphs.

  19. Determination of the energy storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between methylfuran and maleic anhydride as applied to storing solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, B.G.

    1981-01-01

    The heat storage capacity of the Diels-Alder reaction between 2-methylfuran and maleic anhydride is calculated using reaction parameters obtained from solution calorimetry. An equilibrium constant of .614 1/mol and a heat of reaction of 14.33 kcal/mole were obtained from experiments at 45/sup 0/C. A reaction ..delta..C/sub p/ of -21.8 cal/mole was calculated from heat capacity information at 25/sup 0/C. From these parameters, a solution initially seven molar in methylfuran and maleic anhydride was found to have a maximum apparent volumetric heat capacity of about 1.85 times that of water. This maximum occurs at about 335/sup 0/K. Typical active solar energy schemes operate between 300 and 400/sup 0/K. When cycled between these temperatures, this system has an overall apparent heat capacity about 1.5 times that of water. The apparent heat capacity increases as the temperature range is narrowed.

  20. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers. PMID:20476831

  1. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  2. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. I. ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  3. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS - ALKALINE HYDROLYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to allow the calculation of alkaline hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition state...

  4. Accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1990-10-01

    Polarization hadron experiments at high energies continue to generate surprises. Many questions remain unanswered or unanswerable within the frame work of QCD. These include such basic questions as to why at high energies the polarization analyzing power in pp elastic scattering remains high, why hyperons are produced with high polarizations etc. It is, therefore, interesting to investigate the possibilities of accelerating and storing polarized beams in high energy colliders. On the technical side the recent understanding and confirmation of the actions of partial and multiple Siberian snakes made it possible to contemplate accelerating and storing polarized hadron beams to multi-TeV energies. In this paper, we will examine the equipment, the operation and the procedure required to obtain colliding beams of polarized protons at TeV energies.

  5. Alkaline Phosphatase in Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Štefková, Kateřina; Procházková, Jiřina; Pacherník, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme commonly expressed in almost all living organisms. In humans and other mammals, determinations of the expression and activity of alkaline phosphatase have frequently been used for cell determination in developmental studies and/or within clinical trials. Alkaline phosphatase also seems to be one of the key markers in the identification of pluripotent embryonic stem as well as related cells. However, alkaline phosphatases exist in some isoenzymes and isoforms, which have tissue specific expressions and functions. Here, the role of alkaline phosphatase as a stem cell marker is discussed in detail. First, we briefly summarize contemporary knowledge of mammalian alkaline phosphatases in general. Second, we focus on the known facts of its role in and potential significance for the identification of stem cells. PMID:25767512

  6. Alkaline fuel cells applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordesch, Karl; Hacker, Viktor; Gsellmann, Josef; Cifrain, Martin; Faleschini, Gottfried; Enzinger, Peter; Fankhauser, Robert; Ortner, Markus; Muhr, Michael; Aronson, Robert R.

    On the world-wide automobile market technical developments are increasingly determined by the dramatic restriction on emissions as well as the regimentation of fuel consumption by legislation. Therefore there is an increasing chance of a completely new technology breakthrough if it offers new opportunities, meeting the requirements of resource preservation and emission restrictions. Fuel cell technology offers the possibility to excel in today's motive power techniques in terms of environmental compatibility, consumer's profit, costs of maintenance and efficiency. The key question is economy. This will be decided by the costs of fuel cell systems if they are to be used as power generators for future electric vehicles. The alkaline hydrogen-air fuel cell system with circulating KOH electrolyte and low-cost catalysed carbon electrodes could be a promising alternative. Based on the experiences of Kordesch [K. Kordesch, Brennstoffbatterien, Springer, Wien, 1984, ISBN 3-387-81819-7; K. Kordesch, City car with H 2-air fuel cell and lead-battery, SAE Paper No. 719015, 6th IECEC, 1971], who operated a city car hybrid vehicle on public roads for 3 years in the early 1970s, improved air electrodes plus new variations of the bipolar stack assembly developed in Graz are investigated. Primary fuel choice will be a major issue until such time as cost-effective, on-board hydrogen storage is developed. Ammonia is an interesting option. The whole system, ammonia dissociator plus alkaline fuel cell (AFC), is characterised by a simple design and high efficiency.

  7. Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Kozubal, E.; Norton, P.

    2010-08-01

    Walmart opened two experimental stores--one in Colorado and one in Texas--in 2005 to serve as test beds for several advanced building systems. Each embodied more than 50 experiments covering materials, water systems, energy systems, and renewable energy production. Walmart worked for three years with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Colorado Store and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Texas store to monitor, analyze, and report on their performance. HVAC experiments included waste oil boilers, a microturbine/absorption chiller combined heat and power system, evaporative cooling, and a transpired solar collector. The refrigeration systems integrated a medium-temperature secondary loop, evaporatively cooled condenser, doors on medium-temperature cases, and light-emitting diodes on cases. Experiments in the lighting systems included a redesigned roof for clerestory daylighting and T-5 fluorescent lamps. Three photovoltaic systems for a total of 135 kW and a 50-kW wind turbine are also included. The energy system performance was compared to the measured performance of a prototypical Walmart store and to other benchmarks.

  8. 10 CFR 20.1801 - Security of stored material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security of stored material. 20.1801 Section 20.1801 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1801 Security of stored material. The licensee shall secure from...

  9. 10 CFR 20.1801 - Security of stored material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of stored material. 20.1801 Section 20.1801 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1801 Security of stored material. The licensee shall secure from unauthorized removal or access licensed materials that...

  10. 10 CFR 20.1801 - Security of stored material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security of stored material. 20.1801 Section 20.1801 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Storage and Control of Licensed Material § 20.1801 Security of stored material. The licensee shall secure from...

  11. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    PubMed

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  12. Kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose.

    PubMed

    Christodoulatos, C; Su, T L; Koutsospyros, A

    2001-01-01

    Cellulose nitrate (nitrocellulose) is an explosive solid substance used in large quantities in various formulations of rocket and gun propellants. Safe destruction of nitrocellulose can be achieved by alkaline hydrolysis, which converts it to biodegradable products that can then be treated by conventional biological processes. The kinetics of the alkaline hydrolysis of munitions-grade nitrocellulose in sodium hydroxide solutions were investigated in completely mixed batch reactors. Experiments were conducted using solutions of alkaline strength ranging from 0.1 to 15% by mass and temperatures in the range of 30 to 90 degrees C. Regression analysis of the kinetic data revealed that alkaline hydrolysis of nitrocellulose is of the order 1.0 and 1.5 with respect to nitrocellulose and hydroxide concentration, respectively. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction was found to be 100.9 kJ/mol with a preexponential Arrhenius constant of 4.73 x 10(13). Nitrite and nitrate, in a 3:1 ratio, were the primary nitrogen species present in the posthydrolysis solution. The kinetic information is pertinent to the development and optimization of nitrocellulose chemical-biological treatment systems. PMID:11563378

  13. Silica in alkaline brines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.F.; Rettig, S.L.; Eugster, H.P.

    1967-01-01

    Analysis of sodium carbonate-bicarbonate brines from closed basins in volcanic terranes of Oregon and Kenya reveals silica contents of up to 2700 parts per million at pH's higher than 10. These high concentrations of SiO 2 can be attributed to reaction of waters with silicates, and subsequent evaporative concentration accompanied by a rise in pH. Supersaturation with respect to amorphous silica may occur and persist for brines that are out of contact with silicate muds and undersaturated with respect to trona; correlation of SiO2 with concentration of Na and total CO2 support this interpretation. Addition of moredilute waters to alkaline brines may lower the pH and cause inorganic precipitation of substantial amounts of silica.

  14. Bifunctional alkaline oxygen electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swette, L.; Kackley, N.; Mccatty, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe the identification and testing of electrocatalysts and supports for the positive electrode of moderate-temperature, single-unit, rechargeable alkaline fuel cells. Recent work on Na(x)Pt3O4, a potential bifunctional catalyst, is described, as well as the application of novel approaches to the development of more efficient bifunctional electrode structures. The three dual-character electrodes considered here showed similar superior performance; the Pt/RhO2 and Rh/RhO2 electrodes showed slightly better performance than the Pt/IrO2 electrode. It is concluded that Na(x)Pt3O4 continues to be a promising bifunctional oxygen electrode catalyst but requires further investigation and development.

  15. Electrically actuated multiple store launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Frank P.; Travor, Bruce W.

    1991-12-01

    This invention comprises a multi-store, electrical pulse initiated launcher that fits into, and is electrically connected with a transporting vehicle and that contains sequentially stacked assemblies. An electrical pulse from the transporting vehicle causes a resistor with the least value to transfer the electric sufficient gas pressure to force the store out of the launcher. The present invention discloses an electrically-actuated, multi-store dispenser wherein an initial electrical charge ignites gas cartridges causing sequential launching of stores from their tandem position inside a launch container. In some environments, it is desirable to dispense multiple stores from a launch vehicle, for instance sonobuoys, in dense patterns. Due to physical limitations of space in the dispensing vehicle, an effort was made to miniaturize the active components inside the store and therefore reduce the overall outer dimensions thereof. Once the size of the store was reduced, in order to meet the demands of the denser patterns, the inside of the individual launch containers were modified to allow each to hold and dispense more than one store. This new type of launch container, in addition to maintaining the size requirement dictated by the transporting vehicle, is operated by the vehicle's electrical system.

  16. The evolution with strain of the stored energy in different texture components of cold-rolled IF steel revealed by high resolution X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wauthier-Monnin, A.; Chauveau, T.; Castelnau, O.; Réglé, H.; Bacroix, B.

    2015-06-15

    During the deformation of low carbon steel by cold-rolling, dislocations are created and stored in grains depending on local crystallographic orientation, deformation, and deformation gradient. Orientation dependent dislocation densities have been estimated from the broadening of X-ray diffraction lines measured on a synchrotron beamline. Different cold-rolling levels (from 30% to 95% thickness reduction) have been considered. It is shown that the present measurements are consistent with the hypothesis of the sole consideration of screw dislocations for the analysis of the data. The presented evolutions show that the dislocation density first increases within the α fiber (=(hkl)<110>) and then within the γ fiber (=(111)). A comparison with EBSD measurements is done and confirms that the storage of dislocations during the deformation process is orientation dependent and that this dependence is correlated to the cold-rolling level. If we assume that this dislocation density acts as a driving force during recrystallization, these observations can explain the fact that the recrystallization mechanisms are generally different after moderate or large strains. - Highlights: • Dislocation densities are assessed by XRD in main texture components of a steel sheet. • Dislocation densities vary with both strain and texture components. • The analysis relies on the sole presence of screw dislocations. • The measured dislocation densities include the contribution of both SSD and GND.

  17. Effect of sexual maturation and polyploidy on chemical composition and fatty acid content of energy stores in female rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy and nutrient demanding physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many food fish species. Lipid mobilization supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of sexual maturation on lipid mobilization in female r...

  18. Effects of feeding level and sexual maturation on fatty acid composition of energy stores in diploid and triploid rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sexual maturation is an energy demanding, physiological process that alters growth efficiency and compromises muscle quality in many food-fish species. Lipid mobilization supplies energy required for this process. To study the effect of ration level on fatty acid mobilization, diploid (2N) rainbow t...

  19. Modulators of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule modulators of phosphatases can lead to clinically useful drugs and serve as invaluable tools to study functional roles of various phosphatases in vivo. Here, we describe lead discovery strategies for identification of inhibitors and activators of intestinal alkaline phosphatases. To identify isozyme-selective inhibitors and activators of the human and mouse intestinal alkaline phosphatases, ultrahigh throughput chemiluminescent assays, utilizing CDP-Star as a substrate, were developed for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase (mIAP), human intestinal alkaline phosphatase (hIAP), human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), and human tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) isozymes. Using these 1,536-well assays, concurrent HTS screens of the MLSMR library of 323,000 compounds were conducted for human and mouse IAP isozymes monitoring both inhibition and activation. This parallel screening approach led to identification of a novel inhibitory scaffold selective for murine intestinal alkaline phosphatase. SAR efforts based on parallel testing of analogs against different AP isozymes generated a potent inhibitor of the murine IAP with IC50 of 540 nM, at least 65-fold selectivity against human TNAP, and >185 selectivity against human PLAP. PMID:23860652

  20. Alkaline battery, separator therefore

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, George F. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An improved battery separator for alkaline battery cells has low resistance to electrolyte ion transfer and high resistance to electrode ion transfer. The separator is formed by applying an improved coating to an electrolyte absorber. The absorber, preferably, is a flexible, fibrous, and porous substrate that is resistant to strong alkali and oxidation. The coating composition includes an admixture of a polymeric binder, a hydrolyzable polymeric ester and inert fillers. The coating composition is substantially free of reactive fillers and plasticizers commonly employed as porosity promoting agents in separator coatings. When the separator is immersed in electrolyte, the polymeric ester of the film coating reacts with the electrolyte forming a salt and an alcohol. The alcohol goes into solution with the electrolyte while the salt imbibes electrolyte into the coating composition. When the salt is formed, it expands the polymeric chains of the binder to provide a film coating substantially permeable to electrolyte ion transfer but relatively impermeable to electrode ion transfer during use.

  1. Evaluation of Alkaline Cleaner Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partz, Earl

    1998-01-01

    Alkaline cleaners used to process aluminum substrates have contained chromium as the corrosion inhibitor. Chromium is a hazardous substance whose use and control are described by environmental laws. Replacement materials that have the characteristics of chromated alkaline cleaners need to be found that address both the cleaning requirements and environmental impacts. This report will review environmentally friendly candidates evaluated as non-chromium alkaline cleaner replacements and methods used to compare those candidates one versus another. The report will also list characteristics used to select candidates based on their declared contents. It will also describe and evaluate methods used to discriminate among the large number of prospective candidates.

  2. Breast milk - pumping and storing

    MedlinePlus

    ... bottle. DO NOT use everyday plastic bags or formula bottle bags. They leak. Store your breast milk. ... means not giving any other food, drinks, or formula. If you use formula, still breastfeed and give ...

  3. Device Stores and Discharges Metered Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, S. L.; Setzer, D.

    1983-01-01

    Hand-held container accepts measured amount of liquid from pressurized supply. Supply pressure drives spring-loaded piston that stores enough mechanical energy to discharge measured liquid into another container. Original application of container was to rehydrate sterilized pre-packaged food in zerogravity environment of space vehicles. Possible terrestrial applicatios include dispensing of toxic fluids or metering of fluids for household, commercial or laboratory uses.

  4. One-step electrosynthesis of ethylene and ethanol from CO2 in an alkaline electrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Sichao; Sadakiyo, Masaaki; Luo, Raymond; Heima, Minako; Yamauchi, Miho; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Electroreduction of CO2 has potential for storing otherwise wasted intermittent renewable energy, while reducing emission of CO2 into the atmosphere. Identifying robust and efficient electrocatalysts and associated optimum operating conditions to produce hydrocarbons at high energetic efficiency (low overpotential) remains a challenge. In this study, four Cu nanoparticle catalysts of different morphology and composition (amount of surface oxide) are synthesized and their activities towards CO2 reduction are characterized in an alkaline electrolyzer. Use of catalysts with large surface roughness results in a combined Faradaic efficiency (46%) for the electroreduction of CO2 to ethylene and ethanol in combination with current densities of ∼200 mA cm-2, a 10-fold increase in performance achieved at much lower overpotential (only < 0.7 V) compared to prior work. Compared to prior work, the high production levels of ethylene and ethanol can be attributed mainly to the use of alkaline electrolyte to improve kinetics and the suppressed evolution of H2, as well as the application of gas diffusion electrodes covered with active and rough Cu nanoparticles in the electrolyzer. These high performance levels and the gained fundamental understanding on Cu-based catalysts bring electrochemical reduction processes such as presented here closer to practical application.

  5. Use of hydrogen to store, transmit power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccanera, P.; Moriconi, A.; Naviglio, A.

    1980-02-01

    A mode of using hydrogen specifically as an energy storage component is discussed. A system is described in which electrical energy taken from the power distribution network during low-demand periods is used to produce H2 by electrolysis. The hydrogen energy potential produced is stored by absorption of the gas in iron-titanium hydrid beds, from which it is recovered (during energy peak demand periods) in the form of electrical energy through hydrogen-fueled fuel cells, that is, electric cells that use as a fuel the hydrogen previously absorbed by the FeTi hydride and subsequently dissociated from it through simple heating. The thermal energy developed during the formation of the metallic hydride and that which must be supplied to release hydrogen are respectively removed and transferred by a thermal-carrier liquid circulating in pipes inside the vessels containing the hydride.

  6. The alkaline and alkaline-carbonatite magmatism from Southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruberti, E.; Gomes, C. D. B.; Comin-Chiaramonti, P.

    2015-12-01

    Early to Late Cretaceous lasting to Paleocene alkaline magmatism from southern Brazil is found associated with major extensional structural features in and around the Paraná Basin and grouped into various provinces on the basis of several data. Magmatism is variable in size, mode of occurrence and composition. The alkaline rocks are dominantly potassic, a few occurrences showing sodic affinity. The more abundant silicate rocks are evolved undersaturated to saturated in silica syenites, displaying large variation in igneous forms. Less evolved types are restricted to subvolcanic environments and outcrops of effusive suites occur rarely. Cumulatic mafic and ultramafic rock types are very common, particularly in the alkali-carbonatitic complexes. Carbonatite bodies are represented by Ca-carbonatites and Mg-carbonatites and more scarcely by Fe-carbonatites. Available radiometric ages for the alkaline rocks fit on three main chronological groups: around 130 Ma, subcoveal with the Early Cretaceous flood tholeiites of the Paraná Basin, 100-110 Ma and 80-90 Ma (Late Cretaceous). The alkaline magmatism also extends into Paleocene times, as indicated by ages from some volcanic lavas. Geochemically, alkaline potassic and sodic rock types are distinguished by their negative and positive Nb-Ta anomalies, respectively. Negative spikes in Nb-Ta are also a feature common to the associated tholeiitic rocks. Sr-Nd-Pb systematics confirm the contribution of both HIMU and EMI mantle components in the formation of the alkaline rocks. Notably, Early and Late Cretaceous carbonatites have the same isotopic Sr-Nd initial ratios of the associated alkaline rocks. C-O isotopic Sr-Nd isotopic ratios indicate typical mantle signature for some carbonatites and the influence of post-magmatic processes in others. Immiscibility of liquids of phonolitic composition, derived from mafic alkaline parental magmas, has been responsible for the origin of the carbonatites. Close association of alkaline

  7. Calcium Stores in Vertebrate Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Križaj, David

    2012-01-01

    This review lays out the emerging evidence for the fundamental role of Ca2+ stores and store-operated channels in the Ca2+ homeostasis of rods and cones. Calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is a major contributor to steady-state and light-evoked photoreceptor Ca2+ homeostasis in the darkness whereas store-operated Ca2+ channels play a more significant role under sustained illumination conditions. The homeostatic response includes dynamic interactions between the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria and/or outer segment disk organelles which dynamically sequester, accumulate and release Ca2+. Coordinated activation of SERCA transporters, ryanodine receptors (RyR), inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and TRPC channels amplifies cytosolic voltage-operated signals but also provides a memory trace of previous exposures to light. Store-operated channels, activated by the STIM1 sensor, prevent pathological decrease in [Ca2+]i mediated by excessive activation of PMCA transporters in saturating light. CICR and SOCE may also modulate the transmission of afferent and efferent signals in the outer retina. Thus, Ca2+ stores provide additional complexity, adaptability, tuneability and speed to photoreceptor signaling. PMID:22453974

  8. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.; Ward, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    A mobile robot system called Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is under development by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Robotics Group of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform mandated inspections of waste drums stored in warehouse facilities. The system will reduce personnel exposure to potential hazards and create accurate, high-quality documentation to ensure regulatory compliance and enhance waste management operations. Development work is coordinated among several Department of Energy (DOE), academic, and commercial entities in accordance wit DOE`s technology transfer initiative. The prototype system, SWAMI I, was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) in November, 1993. SWAMI II is now under development for field trails at the Fernald site.

  9. Hybrid system for producing and storing ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, C. E.; Larash, R. C.; Gorski, A. J.

    Refrigeration, cooling and/or chilling methods usually require rather large amounts of energy for operation. This system uses naturally frozen ice in long term storage to provide an economical source of ice for various cooling or chilling purposes. Initial research and computer simulations indicate that in areas where the winter is suffuciently cold and of sufficient duration, this system would be an economical, viable option for uses such as simple refrigeration, summer air conditioning, or simply for effective dehumidification. In a 36 day melting period in June and July 1984, the system ran nearly continuously for 768 hours, recovering a total of 743 tons of cooling with an estimated 5 to 8% of the stored cooling capacity remaining. The seasonal melting loss was approximately 50% of the stored capacity.

  10. Store Security: Internal Shrinkage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The document presents a 10-week training program designed to provide helpful and proven methods for controlling internal shrinkage in retail stores. Shrinkage includes the three problems of shoplifting, employee theft, and errors, each of which is addressed by the course. Ohio's laws are also discussed. The format for the course content section is…

  11. Chemical control in stored products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of grain protectants to control insect pests in stored bulk grains is reviewed and discussed, with emphasis on those insecticides that are currently registered for use in the United States (US). Contact insecticides and aerosols used to control insects in milling, processing, and warehousing...

  12. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  13. Breast milk - pumping and storing

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical supply store. Most mothers find electric pumps the best. They create and release suction on their own, and you can easily learn to use one. Either a lactation consultant or the ... help you buy or rent a pump. They can also teach you how to use ...

  14. Solar ponds in alkaline lake and oil well regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lodhi, M.A.K.

    1996-05-01

    Solar ponds are probably the simplest technology available for useful conversion of solar energy. The basic technology is proven. Solar ponds have been shown to be technically feasible and economically viable for many applications particularly for thermal use. The electrical conversion and use of solar energy via solar ponds is still questionable in general for economic viability. By putting the untapped sources together in the South Plains region it looks promising economically both for thermal and electrical conversions and applications. There are a number of alkaline lake basins randomly scattered in the South Plains region of the USA. In that area there are thousands of crude oil producing wells which produce brine in abundance. Selection of suitable alkaline lake basins as a solar pond site and as depository sites of brine from oil wells and using of this brine and salty water from alkaline lakes makes the solar pond economically viable for both thermal and electrical demands in the area.

  15. Bigger Stores, More Stores, or No Stores: Paths of Retail Restructuring in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vias, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes such as the development of large international retail chains, retail concentration, locational changes, technological innovation, new labor practices, and the increasing scale of individual stores, have revolutionized the retail sector. This broad restructuring will have profound impacts in rural America because employment in retail is a…

  16. RECLAMATION OF ALKALINE ASH PILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the study was to develop methods for reclaiming ash disposal piles for the ultimate use as agricultural or forest lands. The ashes studied were strongly alkaline and contained considerable amounts of salts and toxic boron. The ashes were produced from burning bit...

  17. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  18. Model/School Store Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This teacher-coordinator manual assists in planning, organizing, directing, and evaluating student learning experiences associated with either a model store, school store, or combination. (A model store in a marketing laboratory simulates marketing functions; the school store markets merchandise to fellow students, faculty, and/or the public.)…

  19. Isolation of alkaline mutagens from complex mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.H.; Guerin, M.R.; Clark, B.R.; Rao, T.K.; Epler, J.L.

    1981-05-01

    A method for the preparative-scale enrichment of alkaline mutagens from complex natural and anthropogenic mixtures is described. Mutagenic alkaline fractions were isolated from cigarette smoke, crude petroleum, and petroleum substitutes derived from coal and shale.

  20. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  1. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  2. Kinetic approach to evaluate the energy and entropy of activation for the exchange of alkaline earth metal ions on tin(IV) tungstate cation exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Varshney, K.G.; Khan, A.A.; Varshney, K.; Agrawal, S.

    1984-01-01

    A new approach based on the Nernst-Planck equations has been applied to study the reaction kinetics on the surface of tin(IV) tungstate for the Mg(II)-H(I), Ca(II)-H(I), Sr(II)-H(I) and Ba(II)-H(I) exchanges under the conditions favouring a particle diffusion phenomenon. On the basis of these studies the various physical parameters such as the effective diffusion coefficients, activation energies and entropies of activation have been evaluated which give some informations regarding the mechanism of ion-exchange on the surface of inorganic materials. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  4. Storing data from fusion experiments at the National Storage Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Butner, D.N.; Meyer, W.H.

    1993-09-03

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) at the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center (NERSC) is a prototype facility which is developing data storage and retrieval techniques using hardware that includes a hierarchy of storage devices. The ultimate goal is to store terabytes of data and achieve rapid retrieval times compatible with the type of media where the data is stored. Files stored in the NSL are accessed directly using the Network File System (NFS); in the future, the Andrew File System (AFS) is expected to be used. System level control of files is available using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or a set of program-callable routines. We have experimented with storing and retrieving data from fusion experiments at LLNL and at General Atomics in San Diego, California, using computers running UNIX and VMS operating systems. We discuss some issues associated with accessing files whose names are known, but which are not immediately available, the time required for retrieval, and other pertinent parameters.

  5. Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    SciTech Connect

    Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L.

    1996-06-06

    Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed.

  6. Improved Performance of the Alkaline-Side CSEX Process for Cesium Extraction from Alkaline High-Level Waste Obtained by Characterization of the Effect of Surfactant Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    1999-11-04

    Improved understanding and performance of the alkaline-side CSEX process has been obtained through the characterization of impurity effects that hinder complete stripping of cesium from the solvent. It is shown in this report that tests of the alkaline-side CSEX process conducted in the summer and fall of 1998 were complicated by the presence of common surfactant anions, undecyl- and dodecylsulfonate, as trace impurities in the two simulants tested. This conclusion was drawn from the results of a series of systematic extraction tests followed by a definitive identification by electrospray mass spectrometry (ES-MS). Based on this understanding, a straightforward preventative measure involving the addition of a lipophilic tertiary amine extractant at a small concentration to the solvent is proposed and demonstrated. As part of the task ''Fission Product Solvent Extraction'' supported by the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program within the USDOE Office of Environmental Management, the alkaline-side CSEX process has been developed for removal of radio-cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site and Savannah River Site (SRS). As described in a previous report, tests conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 generally demonstrated performance meeting the requirements for cesium removal from the waste to be treated at the SRS. However, discrepancies in stripping behavior were shown to arise from unidentified differences ''in the batches of waste simulant employed for testing. Various effects such as solvent impurities, kinetics, contacting method, and counting method were eliminated as possible causes of the observed discrepancies. Tests in Fiscal Year 1999 reported herein confirmed the earlier suspicion that the simulants contained lipophilic anionic impurities. Extraction tests demonstrated that the impurities could be concentrated in the solvent, and by ES-MS in the negative-ion mode it was possible to

  7. Infant Formula - Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000806.htm Infant Formula – Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding To use the ... using infant formula . Buying, Preparing, and Storing Infant Formula The following tips can help you buy, prepare, ...

  8. Geochemical Modeling of pH Neutralization of High Alkaline-Saline Waste Fluids in Unsaturated Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Zheng, Z.

    2004-12-01

    Leakage of high alkaline-saline fluids, such as those stored in Hanford, a site of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in Washington State, has raised attention of scientific community. These fluids have unique thermodynamic and physical properties. Chemical components in the fluids are incompletely dissociated, especially those containing divalent or polyvalent ions. A number of laboratory experiments through injecting synthetic high alkaline-saline fluids (up to 10M of sodium nitrate, pH >12) into the sediments sampled from the DOE Hanford site were conducted to study the reactive transport processes of the fluids in subsurface environments. The experimental results observed show that the composition of the high alkaline sodium nitrate fluids can be drastically changed due to fluid-rock interactions, and eventually lead to pH neutralization of the fluid in the plume front. The dominant fluid-rock interactions are cation exchanges (Na+-K+-Ca+2-Mg+2-H+), precipitation of calcium and magnesium minerals, and dissolution of silica. In order to precisely model the reactive transport of these processes, a coupling of the Pitzer's ion-interaction geochemical model and a flow and transport model would be highly needed. The extended existing reactive geochemical transport code, BIO-CORE2Dc, incorporating a comprehensive Pitzer ion-interaction model, is capable of predicting the experimental observations. In addition, the developed model was tested against two reported cases. In both cases, the measured mean ionic activity coefficients were well reproduced by our model, while the Debye-Hückel model, usually used to calculate aqueous species activities in dilute solutions, was unable to predict the experimental data. Finally, modeling study based on our laboratory column experiment was performed. Our simulation is able to capture the observed pH trends, changes in exchangeable cations such as Ca+2, Mg+2, and formation of secondary precipitation phases in the plume front.

  9. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Removal and Conversion to Ocean Alkalinity: Why and How

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Drastic reduction in anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the most obvious way to stabilize atmospheric CO2. However, there is growing risk that effective emissions reduction policies and technologies will not engage soon enough to avoid significant CO2-induced climate and ocean acidification impacts. This realization has lead to increased interest (e.g., IPCC AR5, 2014; NRC/NAS, 2014) in the possibility of pro-actively increasing CO2 removal (CDR) from the atmosphere above the 55% of our emissions that are already removed from air by natural land and ocean processes. While a variety of biotic, abiotic, and hybrid CDR methods have been proposed, those involving geochemistry have much to recommend them. These methods employ the same geochemical reactions that naturally and effectively remove excess planetary CO2 and neutralize ocean acidity on geologic time scales. These reactions proceed when the hydrosphere, acidified by excess air CO2, contacts and reacts with carbonate and silicate minerals (>90% of the Earth's crust), producing dissolved bicarbonates and carbonates, i.e., ocean alkalinity. This alkalinity is eventually removed and the excess carbon stored via carbonate precipitation. So while the importance and global effectiveness of such reactions are not in question, it remains to be seen if this very slow, natural CDR could be safely and cost-effectively accelerated to help manage air CO2 levels on human rather than geologic time scales. Various terrestrial and marine, geochemistry-based CDR methods will be reviewed including: 1) the addition of minerals to soils and the ocean, 2) removal of CO2 from waste streams, esp. from biomass energy, via wet mineral contacting, and 3) the production and use of mineral derivatives, e.g. oxides or hydroxides, as CDR agents. The additional potential environmental benefits (e.g., reversal of ocean carbonate saturation loss) and impacts (e.g., increased mineral extraction), as well as potential economics will also be discussed.

  11. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more than two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  12. Alkaline fuel cell performance investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, R. E.; Manzo, M. A.

    1988-01-01

    An exploratory experimental fuel cell test program was conducted to investigate the performance characteristics of alkaline laboratory research electrodes. The objective of this work was to establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance and evaluate candidate cathode configurations having the potential for improved performance. The performance characterization tests provided data to empirically establish the effect of temperature, pressure, and concentration upon performance for cell temperatures up to 300 F and reactant pressures up to 200 psia. Evaluation of five gold alloy cathode catalysts revealed that three doped gold alloys had more that two times the surface areas of reference cathodes and therefore offered the best potential for improved performance.

  13. Anode conductor for alkaline cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schrenk, D.J.; Murphy, P.E.

    1988-12-13

    This patent describes an electrochemical cell comprised of an anode comprised of zinc; a cathode; and alkaline electrolyte; and a current collector comprised of a silicon bronze alloy that is comprised of 85-98% by weight copper and 1-5% by weight silicon with the remainder being comprised of at least one of manganese, iron, zinc, aluminum, tin, lead, or mixtures thereof; and a strip of metal tab stock welded to the current collector, the tab stock being a metal other than silicon bronze alloy.

  14. Grace DAKASEP alkaline battery separator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannoni, R. T.; Lundquist, J. T.; Choi, W. M.

    1987-01-01

    The Grace DAKASEP separator was originally developed as a wicking layer for nickel-zinc alkaline batteries. The DAKASEP is a filled non-woven separator which is flexible and heat sealable. Through modification of formulation and processing variables, products with a variety of properties can be produced. Variations of DAKASEP were tested in Ni-H2, Ni-Zn, Ni-Cd, and primary alkaline batteries with good results. The properties of DAKASEP which are optimized for Hg-Zn primary batteries are shown in tabular form. This separator has high tensile strength, 12 micron average pore size, relatively low porosity at 46-48 percent, and consequently moderately high resistivity. Versions were produced with greater than 70 percent porosity and resistivities in 33 wt percent KOH as low as 3 ohm cm. Performance data for Hg-Zn E-1 size cells containing DAKASEP with the properties shown in tabular form, are more reproducible than data obtained with a competitive polypropylene non-woven separator. In addition, utilization of active material is in general considerably improved.

  15. Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-06-01

    The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.

  16. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  17. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-3 - Stores inventories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Stores inventories. 109-1.5108-3 Section 109-1.5108-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION...

  18. 18 CFR 367.1630 - Account 163, Stores expense undistributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Account 163, Stores expense undistributed. 367.1630 Section 367.1630 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY..., FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR CENTRALIZED SERVICE COMPANIES...

  19. A Constructed Alkaline Consortium and Its Dynamics in Treating Alkaline Black Liquor with Very High Pollution Load

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyu; Cao, Guangchun; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Ren, Hongyan; Wang, Xia; Feng, Jinhui; Zhao, Liping; Xu, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Background Paper pulp wastewater resulting from alkaline extraction of wheat straw, known as black liquor, is very difficult to be treated and causes serious environmental problems due to its high pH value and chemical oxygen demand (COD) pollution load. Lignin, semicellulose and cellulose are the main contributors to the high COD values in black liquor. Very few microorganisms can survive in such harsh environments of the alkaline wheat straw black liquor. A naturally developed microbial community was found accidentally in a black liquor storing pool in a paper pulp mill of China. The community was effective in pH decreasing, color and COD removing from the high alkaline and high COD black liquor. Findings Thirty-eight strains of bacteria were isolated from the black liquor storing pool, and were grouped as eleven operational taxonomy units (OTUs) using random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR profiles (RAPD). Eleven representative strains of each OTU, which were identified as genera of Halomonas and Bacillus, were used to construct a consortium to treat black liquor with a high pH value of 11.0 and very high COD pollution load of 142,600 mg l−1. After treatment by the constructed consortium, about 35.4% of color and 39,000 mg l−1 (27.3%) CODcr were removed and the pH decreased to 7.8. 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis suggested a two-stage treatment mechanism to elucidate the interspecies collaboration: Halomonas isolates were important in the first stage to produce organic acids that contributed to the pH decline, while Bacillus isolates were involved in the degradation of lignin derivatives in the second stage under lower pH conditions. Conclusions/Significance Tolerance to the high alkaline environment and good controllability of the simple consortium suggested that the constructed consortium has good potential for black liquor treatment

  20. Microbial Thiocyanate Utilization under Highly Alkaline Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Tourova, Tatyana P.; Lysenko, Anatoly M.; Kuenen, J. Gijs

    2001-01-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS−) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  1. Microbial thiocyanate utilization under highly alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, D Y; Tourova, T P; Lysenko, A M; Kuenen, J G

    2001-02-01

    Three kinds of alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate (CNS-) at pH 10 were found in highly alkaline soda lake sediments and soda soils. The first group included obligate heterotrophs that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source while growing at pH 10 with acetate as carbon and energy sources. Most of the heterotrophic strains were able to oxidize sulfide and thiosulfate to tetrathionate. The second group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles which utilized thiocyanate nitrogen during growth with thiosulfate as the energy source. Genetic analysis demonstrated that both the heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that utilized thiocyanate as a nitrogen source were related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the gamma subdivision of the division Proteobacteria (the Halomonas group for the heterotrophs and the genus Thioalkalivibrio for autotrophs). The third group included obligately autotrophic sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphilic bacteria able to utilize thiocyanate as a sole source of energy. These bacteria could be enriched on mineral medium with thiocyanate at pH 10. Growth with thiocyanate was usually much slower than growth with thiosulfate, although the biomass yield on thiocyanate was higher. Of the four strains isolated, the three vibrio-shaped strains were genetically closely related to the previously described sulfur-oxidizing alkaliphiles belonging to the genus Thioalkalivibrio. The rod-shaped isolate differed from the other isolates by its ability to accumulate large amounts of elemental sulfur inside its cells and by its ability to oxidize carbon disulfide. Despite its low DNA homology with and substantial phenotypic differences from the vibrio-shaped strains, this isolate also belonged to the genus Thioalkalivibrio according to a phylogenetic analysis. The heterotrophic and autotrophic alkaliphiles that grew with thiocyanate as an N source possessed a relatively high level of cyanase

  2. Transcriptome analysis of Enterococcus faecalis in response to alkaline stress

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Shujun; Liu, Bin; Jiang, Wei; Sun, Zhe; Liang, Jingping

    2015-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the most commonly isolated species from endodontic failure root canals; its persistence in treated root canals has been attributed to its ability to resist high pH stress. The goal of this study was to characterize the E. faecalis transcriptome and to identify candidate genes for response and resistance to alkaline stress using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing. We found that E. faecalis could survive and form biofilms in a pH 10 environment and that alkaline stress had a great impact on the transcription of many genes in the E. faecalis genome. The transcriptome sequencing results revealed that 613 genes were differentially expressed (DEGs) for E. faecalis grown in pH 10 medium; 211 genes were found to be differentially up-regulated and 402 genes differentially down-regulated. Many of the down-regulated genes found are involved in cell energy production and metabolism and carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, and the up-regulated genes are mostly related to nucleotide transport and metabolism. The results presented here reveal that cultivation of E. faecalis in alkaline stress has a profound impact on its transcriptome. The observed regulation of genes and pathways revealed that E. faecalis reduced its carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and increased nucleotide synthesis to adapt and grow in alkaline stress. A number of the regulated genes may be useful candidates for the development of new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of E. faecalis infections. PMID:26300863

  3. The pressure induced B1-B2 phase transition of alkaline halides and alkaline earth chalcogenides. A first principles investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Potzel, Oliver; Taubmann, Gerhard

    2011-05-15

    In this work, we considered the pressure induced B1-B2 phase transition of AB compounds. The DFT calculations were carried out for 11 alkaline halides, 11 alkaline earth chalcogenides and the lanthanide pnictide CeP. For both the B1 and the B2 structures of each compound, the energy was calculated as a function of the cell volume. The transition pressure, the bulk moduli and their pressure derivatives were obtained from the corresponding equations of state. The transition path of the Buerger mechanism was described using roots of the transition matrix. We correlated the computed enthalpies of activation to some structure defining properties of the compounds. A fair correlation to Pearsons hardness of the ions was observed. -- Graphical abstract: Pressure induced transition from the B1 structure (left) via the transition state (middle) to the B2 structure (right). Display Omitted highlights: > Pressure induced phase transitions in AB compounds were considered. > Alkaline halides and alkaline earth chalcogenides were treated. > DFT calculations with periodic boundary conditions were applied. > The transition path was described by roots of the transition matrix. > The enthalpy of activation was calculated for numerous compounds.

  4. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  5. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

  6. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N. R.; Mattoon, C. M.; Beck, B. R.; Summers, N. C.; Brown, D. A.

    2014-06-01

    Some evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. Moreover, the “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  7. Structure for Storing Properties of Particles (PoP)

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Beck, B.R.; Summers, N.C.; Brown, D.A.

    2014-06-15

    Evaluated nuclear databases are critical for applications such as nuclear energy, nuclear medicine, homeland security, and stockpile stewardship. Particle masses, nuclear excitation levels, and other “Properties of Particles” are essential for making evaluated nuclear databases. Currently, these properties are obtained from various databases that are stored in outdated formats. A “Properties of Particles” (PoP) structure is being designed that will allow storing all information for one or more particles in a single place, so that each evaluation, simulation, model calculation, etc. can link to the same data. Information provided in PoP will include properties of nuclei, gammas and electrons (along with other particles such as pions, as evaluations extend to higher energies). Presently, PoP includes masses from the Atomic Mass Evaluation version 2003 (AME2003), and level schemes and gamma decays from the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL-3). The data are stored in a hierarchical structure. An example of how PoP stores nuclear masses and energy levels will be presented here.

  8. Alkaline-resistance model of subtilisin ALP I, a novel alkaline subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Maeda, H; Mizutani, O; Yamagata, Y; Ichishima, E; Nakajima, T

    2001-05-01

    The alkaline-resistance mechanism of the alkaline-stable enzymes is not yet known. To clarify the mechanism of alkaline-resistance of alkaline subtilisin, structural changes of two typical subtilisins, subtilisin ALP I (ALP I) and subtilisin Sendai (Sendai), were studied by means of physicochemical methods. Subtilisin NAT (NAT), which exhibits no alkaline resistance, was examined as a control. ALP I gradually lost its activity, accompanied by protein degradation, but, on the contrary, Sendai was stable under alkaline conditions. CD spectral measurements at neutral and alkaline pH indicated no apparent differences between ALP I and Sendai. A significant difference was observed on measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of the tryptophan residues of ALP I that were exposed on the enzyme surface. The fluorescence intensity of ALP I was greatly reduced under alkaline conditions; moreover, the reduction was reversed when alkaline-treated ALP I was neutralized. The fluorescence spectrum of Sendai remained unchanged. The enzymatic and optical activities of NAT were lost at high pH, indicating a lack of functional and structural stability in an alkaline environment. Judging from these results, the alkaline resistance is closely related to the surface structure of the enzyme molecule. PMID:11328588

  9. Ground state properties of alkali and alkaline-earth hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentealba, P.; Reyes, O.; Stoll, H.; Preuss, H.

    1987-11-01

    The ground state potential energy curves of alkali (LiH to CsH) and alkaline-earth monohydrides (BeH to BaH) have been calculated. A pseudopotential formalism including a core-polarization potential has been used. For the valence correlation energy, two different methods, the local spin-density functional and the configuration interaction with single and double excitations, have been employed. Dissociation energies, bond lengths, vibrational frequencies, anharmonicity constants, and dipole moments are reported. The agreement with experimental values, where available, is very good. A discussion and a comparison with other theoretical values, at different levels of approximation, are also included.

  10. Engineering challenges of ocean alkalinity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, T.; Renforth, P.

    2012-04-01

    The addition of calcium oxide (CaO) to the ocean as a means of enhancing the capacity of the ocean as a carbon sink was first proposed by Haroon Kheshgi in 1995. Calcium oxide is created by heating high purity limestone in a kiln to temperatures of approximately 1000°C. Addition of this material to the ocean draws carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere (approximately 1 tonne of CaO could sequester 1.3 tonnes of CO2). Abiotic carbonate precipitation is inhibited in the surface ocean. This is a carbon and energy expensive process, where approximately 0.8 tonnes of CO2 are produced at a point source for every tonne sequestered. The feasibility of ocean alkalinity enhancement requires capture and storage of the point source of CO2. We present details of a feasibility study of the engineering challenges of Kheshgi's method focusing on the potential scalability and costs of the proposed process. To draw down a PgC per year would require the extraction and processing of ~6Pg of limestone per year, which is similar in scale to the current coal industry. Costs are estimated at ~USD30-40 per tonne of CO2 sequestered through the process, which is favourable to comparative processes. Kheshgi, H. (1995) Energy 20 (9) 915-922

  11. 7 CFR 1170.6 - Store.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Store. 1170.6 Section 1170.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.6 Store. (a)...

  12. SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF PSOCIDS IN STORED WHEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Psocids are an emerging problem in stored grain and in grain processing facilities in the United States. We conducted preliminary studies to determine which species of psocids were present in a feed mill, a grain elevator, and wheat stored in steel bins. We then conducted a more extensive study in...

  13. Storing Peanuts in Flexible Hermetically Sealed Containers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-shell peanuts stored in large bulk warehouses lose approximately 1.5-2% of their value. However, peanuts stored as long as nine months may lose as much as 5% of their value due to excessive moisture loss, a reduction of peanut kernel size and damage due to insects or microbial growth. Research h...

  14. Gauging triple stores with actual biological data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Semantic Web technologies have been developed to overcome the limitations of the current Web and conventional data integration solutions. The Semantic Web is expected to link all the data present on the Internet instead of linking just documents. One of the foundations of the Semantic Web technologies is the knowledge representation language Resource Description Framework (RDF). Knowledge expressed in RDF is typically stored in so-called triple stores (also known as RDF stores), from which it can be retrieved with SPARQL, a language designed for querying RDF-based models. The Semantic Web technologies should allow federated queries over multiple triple stores. In this paper we compare the efficiency of a set of biologically relevant queries as applied to a number of different triple store implementations. Results Previously we developed a library of queries to guide the use of our knowledge base Cell Cycle Ontology implemented as a triple store. We have now compared the performance of these queries on five non-commercial triple stores: OpenLink Virtuoso (Open-Source Edition), Jena SDB, Jena TDB, SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. We examined three performance aspects: the data uploading time, the query execution time and the scalability. The queries we had chosen addressed diverse ontological or biological questions, and we found that individual store performance was quite query-specific. We identified three groups of queries displaying similar behaviour across the different stores: 1) relatively short response time queries, 2) moderate response time queries and 3) relatively long response time queries. SwiftOWLIM proved to be a winner in the first group, 4Store in the second one and Virtuoso in the third one. Conclusions Our analysis showed that some queries behaved idiosyncratically, in a triple store specific manner, mainly with SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. Virtuoso, as expected, displayed a very balanced performance - its load time and its response time for all the

  15. Store-operate-coherence-on-value

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-11-18

    A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. PMID:25071469

  17. Enhancing alkaline hydrogen evolution reaction activity through Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Liu, Peng Fei; Zhang, Le; Zu, Meng Yang; Yang, Yun Xia; Yang, Hua Gui

    2016-08-18

    Developing efficient, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts towards hydrogen production in alkaline environments is vital to improve energy efficiency for water splitting. In this work, we prepared Ni-Mn3O4 nanocomposites on Ni foam which exhibit an excellent hydrogen evolution reaction catalytic activity with a current density (j) of 10 mA cm(-2) at an overpotential (η) of 91 mV and show good stability in an alkaline medium. PMID:27500290

  18. Inorganic-organic separators for alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible separator is reported for use between the electrodes of Ni-Cd and Ni-Zn batteries using alkaline electrolytes. The separator was made by coating a porous substrate with a battery separator composition. The coating material included a rubber-based resin copolymer, a plasticizer and inorganic and organic fillers which comprised 55% by volume or less of the coating as finally dried. One or more of the filler materials, whether organic or inorganic, is preferably active with the alkaline electrolyte to produce pores in the separator coating. The plasticizer was an organic material which is hydrolyzed by the alkaline electrolyte to improve conductivity of the separator coating.

  19. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Sachleben, Richard A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  20. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  1. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Deborah A.; Holmes, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  2. Alkaline static feed electrolyzer based oxygen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, L. D.; Kovach, A. J.; Fortunato, F. A.; Schubert, F. H.; Grigger, D. J.

    1988-01-01

    In preparation for the future deployment of the Space Station, an R and D program was established to demonstrate integrated operation of an alkaline Water Electrolysis System and a fuel cell as an energy storage device. The program's scope was revised when the Space Station Control Board changed the energy storage baseline for the Space Station. The new scope was aimed at the development of an alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer for use in an Environmental Control/Life Support System as an oxygen generation system. As a result, the program was divided into two phases. The phase 1 effort was directed at the development of the Static Feed Electrolyzer for application in a Regenerative Fuel Cell System. During this phase, the program emphasized incorporation of the Regenerative Fuel Cell System design requirements into the Static Feed Electrolyzer electrochemical module design and the mechanical components design. The mechanical components included a Pressure Control Assembly, a Water Supply Assembly and a Thermal Control Assembly. These designs were completed through manufacturing drawing during Phase 1. The Phase 2 effort was directed at advancing the Alkaline Static Feed Electrolyzer database for an oxygen generation system. This development was aimed at extending the Static Feed Electrolyzer database in areas which may be encountered from initial fabrication through transportation, storage, launch and eventual Space Station startup. During this Phase, the Program emphasized three major areas: materials evaluation, electrochemical module scaling and performance repeatability and Static Feed Electrolyzer operational definition and characterization.

  3. Proteomic analysis of protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum in response to alkaline stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, KiBeom; Rho, Beom-Seop; Pi, KyungBae; Kim, Ho-Jin; Choi, Yun-Jaie

    2011-04-20

    Lactobacillus plantarum, a probiotic organism that plays an important role in the microbial fermentation of alkaline materials in fermenting foods, faces alkaline stress during the fermentation process. Here, we report the patterns of protein expression in L. plantarum subjected to transient (1h) alkaline stress at pH 7.7, 8.7 or 9.7. Thirty-three alkaline-responsive proteins were identified by two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Identification of proteins showing differential expression in response to alkaline stress revealed that the alkaline stress response of L. plantarum is a complex process. Some proteins appear to be induced, others repressed. These proteins could be clustered into nine groups based on their probable functions: energy metabolism, transport system, purine/pyrimidine metabolism, amino acid metabolism, proteolytic activity, transcription-translation, stress-related, general function, and unknown functions. These proteomic analyses are expected to prove useful in understanding the adaptive response of L. plantarum strains to alkaline stress and may facilitate future investigations into the genetic and physiological aspects of this response. PMID:21356255

  4. Structure and ionic diffusion of alkaline-earth ions in mixed cation glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Sushko, Petr; Duffy, Dorothy M.

    2015-08-15

    A series of mixed cation silicate glasses of the composition A2O – 2MO – 4SiO2, with A=Li,Na,K and M=Ca,Sr,Ba has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations in order to understand the effect of the nature of the cations on the mobility of the alkaline-earth ions within the glass network. The size of the alkaline-earth cation was found to affect the inter-atomic distances, the coordination number distributions and the bond angle distributions , whereas the medium-range order was almost unaffected by the type of the cation. All the alkaline-earth cations contribute to lower vibrational frequencies but it is observed that that there is a shift to smaller frequencies and the vibrational density of states distribution gets narrower as the size of the alkaline-earth increases. The results from our modeling for the ionic diffusion of the alkaline-earth cations are in a qualitative agreement with the experimental observations in that there is a distinct correlation between the activation energy for diffusion of alkaline earth-ions and the cation radii ratio. An asymmetrical linear behavior in the diffusion activation energy with increasing size difference is observed. The results can be described on the basis of a theoretical model that relates the diffusion activation energy to the electrostatic interactions of the cations with the oxygens and the elastic deformation of the silicate network.

  5. Theoretical study of the alkali and alkaline-earth monosulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Ab initio calculations have been used to obtain accurate spectroscopic constants for the X2Pi and A2Sigma(+) states of the alkali sulfides and the X1Sigma(+), a3Pi, and A1Pi states of the alkaline-earth sulfides. In contrast to the alkali oxides, the alkali sulfides are found to have X2Pi ground states, due to the larger electrostatic interaction. Dissociation energies of 3.27 eV for BeS, 2.32 eV for MgS, 3.29 eV for CaS, and 3.41 eV for SrS have been obtained for the X1Sigma(+) states of the alkaline-earth sulfides, in good agreement with experimental results. Core correlation is shown to increase the Te values for the a3Pi and A1Pi states of MgS, CaS, and SrS.

  6. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-01

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  7. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, Yoong-Kee; Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  8. The Origin of Life in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vents.

    PubMed

    Sojo, Victor; Herschy, Barry; Whicher, Alexandra; Camprubí, Eloi; Lane, Nick

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 70 years, prebiotic chemists have been very successful in synthesizing the molecules of life, from amino acids to nucleotides. Yet there is strikingly little resemblance between much of this chemistry and the metabolic pathways of cells, in terms of substrates, catalysts, and synthetic pathways. In contrast, alkaline hydrothermal vents offer conditions similar to those harnessed by modern autotrophs, but there has been limited experimental evidence that such conditions could drive prebiotic chemistry. In the Hadean, in the absence of oxygen, alkaline vents are proposed to have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with relatively acidic ocean waters rich in CO2, through a labyrinth of interconnected micropores with thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. The difference in pH across these thin barriers produced natural proton gradients with equivalent magnitude and polarity to the proton-motive force required for carbon fixation in extant bacteria and archaea. How such gradients could have powered carbon reduction or energy flux before the advent of organic protocells with genes and proteins is unknown. Work over the last decade suggests several possible hypotheses that are currently being tested in laboratory experiments, field observations, and phylogenetic reconstructions of ancestral metabolism. We analyze the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in alkaline hydrothermal vents. Based on this mechanism, we show that the evolution of active ion pumping could have driven the deep divergence of bacteria and archaea. PMID:26841066

  9. Measuring the healthfulness of food retail stores: variations by store type and neighbourhood deprivation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The consumer nutrition environment has been conceptualised as in-store environmental factors that influence food shopping habits. More healthful in-store environments could be characterised as those which promote healthful food choices such as selling good quality healthy foods or placing them in prominent locations to prompt purchasing. Research measuring the full-range of in-store environmental factors concurrently is limited. Purpose To develop a summary score of ‘healthfulness’ composed of nine in-store factors that influence food shopping behaviour, and to assess this score by store type and neighbourhood deprivation. Methods A cross-sectional survey of 601 retail food stores, including supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores, was completed in Hampshire, United Kingdom between July 2010 and June 2011. The survey measured nine variables (variety, price, quality, promotions, shelf placement, store placement, nutrition information, healthier alternatives and single fruit sale) to assess the healthfulness of retail food stores on seven healthy and five less healthy foods that are markers of diet quality. Four steps were completed to create nine individual variable scores and another three to create an overall score of healthfulness for each store. Results Analysis of variance showed strong evidence of a difference in overall healthfulness by store type (p < 0.001). Large and premium supermarkets offered the most healthful shopping environments for consumers. Discount supermarkets, ‘world’, convenience and petrol stores offered less healthful environments to consumers however there was variation across the healthfulness spectrum. No relationship between overall healthfulness and neighbourhood deprivation was observed (p = 0.1). Conclusions A new composite measure of nine variables that can influence food choices was developed to provide an overall assessment of the healthfulness of retail food stores. This composite score could be

  10. Composite seal reduces alkaline battery leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Plitt, K. F.

    1965-01-01

    Composite seal consisting of rubber or plastic washers and a metal washer reduces alkaline battery leakage. Adhesive is applied to each washer interface, and the washers are held together mechanically.