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Sample records for alkaloids berberine hydrastine

  1. Microbial transformation of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid, (-)-beta-hydrastine.

    PubMed

    Herath, W H M W; Ferreira, D; Khan, I A

    2003-08-01

    The phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid (-)-beta-hydrastine is one of the main active constituents of the medicinal plant, Hydrastis canadensis, which is used in many dietary supplements intended to enhance the immune system. Treatment of hydrastine with the fermentation broth of Polyporous brumalis (ATCC 34487) as a model for mammalian metabolism, gave a new alkaloid, (1S)-hydroxyhydrastine. Structure elucidation was based primarily on NMR and chiroptical studies. PMID:12822906

  2. High-performance liquid chromatography determination of hydrastine and berberine in dietary supplements containing goldenseal.

    PubMed

    Abourashed, E A; Khan, I A

    2001-07-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L., Ranunculaceae) is an ingredient of various dietary supplements intended for enhancing general body immunity. Many goldenseal products are currently available in the United States, either alone or in combination with echinacea. In most products, the content of the main active alkaloids of goldenseal, hydrastine and berberine, is not indicated on the label. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the detection and quantification of hydrastine and berberine in a number of products obtained from the United States market. The method uses a Phenomenex Luna C(18) column, a mobile phase consisting of solvent A (100 mM sodium acetate/acetic acid, pH 4.0) and solvent B (acetonitrile/methanol; 90/10, v/v). Elution was run at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, with a linear gradient of 80- 40% A in B over 20 min and ultraviolet detection at 290 nm. A wide range of content variation was observed for both alkaloids in the tested samples. PMID:11458331

  3. Photochemistry and photocytotoxicity of alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.). 2. Palmatine, hydrastine, canadine, and hydrastinine.

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, J J; Kukielczak, B M; Bilski, P; He, Y-Y; Sik, R H; Chignell, C F

    2006-06-01

    Goldenseal is an herb that is widely used in dietary supplements, eye washes, and skin lotions. The presence of Goldenseal root powder in dietary supplements and the topical application of Goldenseal preparations raise the possibility that an adverse phototoxic reaction may result from an interaction between its constituent alkaloids and light in exposed tissues. We have previously shown that berberine, the major alkaloid in Goldenseal powder, in combination with UVA causes DNA damage and cell death in HaCaT keratinocytes [(2001) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 14, 1529]. We have studied the photochemical and photobiological properties of four minor alkaloids found in Goldenseal, namely, hydrastine, palmatine, canadine, and hydrastinine. UVA radiation of palmatine in aqueous solutions generated no (1)O(2), but in CH(2)Cl(2), copious amounts of (1)O(2) were detected (Phi = 0.2). Palmatine also photogenerated oxygen-centered radicals, (*)OH and O(2)(*)(-) in aerated aqueous buffer and acetonitrile, respectively, as detected by the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO). In nitrogen-sparged acetonitrile containing DMPO, we observed the neutral palmatine radical formed by one-electron reduction. UVA irradiation (4 J/cm(2)) of HaCaT keratinocytes in the presence of palmatine (50 microM) resulted in a 50% decrease in cell viability but no DNA damage as measured by the comet assay. UVA irradiation of hydrastine, hydrastinine, or canadine (50 microM) did not cause DNA damage or cell death in keratinocytes. Although palmatine is photoactive, it is present in such small amounts in Goldenseal root powder that the phototoxicity of the herb is most likely due to berberine, the major constituent alkaloid. PMID:16780351

  4. Determination of hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal raw materials, extracts, and dietary supplements by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Brown, Paula N; Roman, Mark C

    2008-01-01

    A multilaboratory collaborative study was conducted on a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method utilizing UV detection, previously validated using AOAC single-laboratory validation guidelines for determination of hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) raw materials, extracts, and dietary supplements at levels ranging from 0.4 to 6% (w/w). Nine collaborating laboratories determined the hydrastine and berberine content in 8 blind samples. Sample materials included powdered botanical raw materials, whole root material, and 4 finished product dietary supplements containing either goldenseal powdered root material or extract. The materials were extracted with an acidified water and acetonitrile solution. HPLC analyses of the extracts were performed on a C18 column using UV detection at 230 nm. Results for powdered root material and capsule products ranged from about 0.2% (w/w) for each alkaloid to about 4% (w/w) for each alkaloid. Liquid tincture results were approximately 4000-5000 microg/mL for each alkaloid. Reproducibility relative standard deviations (RSDR) for hydrastine ranged from 2.68 to 6.65%, with HorRat values ranging from 0.77 to 1.89. RSDR for berberine ranged from 5.66 to 7.68%, with HorRat values ranging from 1.32 to 2.12. All finished products containing goldenseal extract yielded HorRat values <2.0. Based on these results, the method is recommended for Official First Action for determination of hydrastine and berberine in goldenseal raw materials and dietary supplement finished products containing powdered goldenseal and goldenseal extract. PMID:18727526

  5. Validation of a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the quantitative determination of hydrastine and berberine in human serum.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prem K; Hubbard, Martha; Gurley, Bill; Hendrickson, Howard P

    2009-05-01

    A high throughput liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for the simultaneous determination of berberine and hydrastine in human serum, after oral administration of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.), was developed using simple acetonitrile treatment of serum samples. Noscapine served as the internal standard. Lower limit of quantification for both analytes was 0.1 ng mL(-1) using positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The intra-day (n=5) accuracy and precision of the method for hydrastine was 82+/-8.8%, 97.9+/-2.4% and 96.2+/-3.3%, respectively. The inter-day (n=4) accuracy and precision for hydrastine was 90.0+/-15.17%, 99.9+/-7.1% and 98+/-6.54%, respectively. For berberine quantitation intra-day accuracy and precision was 96.0+/-8.4%, 92.5+/-4.7% and 94.4+/-3.7%, respectively. The respective values for inter-day quantitation were 91.0+/-8.4%, 94.3+/-4.7% and 94.4+/-3.7%. The analytical recovery for hydrastine was 82.4-96.2% and for berberine it was 94.4-96.0%. The analytes and noscapine were stable for 24h at room temperature (CV 5-10%). Matrix ion effects were studied by post-column infusion of hydrastine and berberine, calculation of calibration curve slope precision was obtained using serum from five different subjects, and by comparison of the response of methanol standards and extracted serum samples. The method was further validated by determination of serum pharmacokinetics of hydrastine and berberine after administration of a single oral dose of goldenseal extract containing 77 mg of hydrastine and 132 mg of berberine. PMID:19269122

  6. Multicomponent Therapeutics of Berberine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Yan, Dan; Yang, Meihua; Dong, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2013-01-01

    Although berberine alkaloids (BAs) are reported to be with broad-spectrum antibacterial and antiviral activities, the interactions among BAs have not been elucidated. In the present study, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was chosen as a model organism, and modified broth microdilution was applied for the determination of the fluorescence absorption values to calculate the anti-MRSA activity of BAs. We have initiated four steps to seek the optimal combination of BAs that are (1) determining the anti-MRSA activity of single BA, (2) investigating the two-component combination to clarify the interactions among BAs by checkerboard assay, (3) investigating the multicomponent combination to determine the optimal ratio by quadratic rotation-orthogonal combination design, and (4) in vivo and in vitro validation of the optimal combination. The results showed that the interactions among BAs are related to their concentrations. The synergetic combinations included “berberine and epiberberine,” “jatrorrhizine and palmatine” and “jatrorrhizine and coptisine”; the antagonistic combinations included “coptisine and epiberberine”. The optimal combination was berberine : coptisine : jatrorrhizine : palmatine : epiberberine = 0.702 : 0.863 : 1 : 0.491 : 0.526, and the potency of the optimal combination on cyclophosphamide-immunocompromised mouse model was better than the natural combinations of herbs containing BAs. PMID:23634170

  7. Berberine.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with a long history of medicinal use in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. It is present in Hydrastis canadensis (goldenseal), Coptis chinensis (Coptis or goldenthread), Berberis aquifolium (Oregon grape), Berberis vulgaris (barberry), and Berberis aristata (tree turmeric). The berberine alkaloid can be found in the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of the plants. Berberine extracts and decoctions have demonstrated significant antimicrobial activity against a variety of organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoans, helminths, and chlamydia. Currently, the predominant clinical uses of berberine include bacterial diarrhea, intestinal parasite infections, and ocular trachoma infections. PMID:10767672

  8. Antitubercular natural products: berberine from the roots of commercial Hydrastis canadensis powder. Isolation of inactive 8-oxotetrahydrothalifendine, canadine, beta-hydrastine, and two new quinic acid esters, hycandinic acid esters-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Gentry, E J; Jampani, H B; Keshavarz-Shokri, A; Morton, M D; Velde, D V; Telikepalli, H; Mitscher, L A; Shawar, R; Humble, D; Baker, W

    1998-10-01

    Berberine (4) is responsible for the activity of an extract of a commercial root sample of Hydrastis canadensis against multiply drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Two new quinic acid feruloyl esters, compounds 2 and 3, have been isolated from the same source along with canadine (1c), 8-oxotetrahydrothalifendine (1), and beta-hydrastine (5). These were found to be inactive. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated from spectral (1H, 13C, HMQC, HMBC, and H-H COSY) and chemical evidences. PMID:9784149

  9. Characterization of Vacuolar Transport of the Endogenous Alkaloid Berberine in Coptis japonica1

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Mihoko; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sakai, Kyoko; Martinoia, Enrico; Sato, Fumihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2005-01-01

    Alkaloids comprise one of the largest groups of plant secondary metabolites. Many of them exhibit strong biological activities, and, in most cases, they are accumulated in the central vacuole of alkaloid-producing plants after synthesis. However, the mechanisms involved in alkaloid transport across the tonoplast are only poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the vacuolar transport mechanism of an isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine, which is produced and accumulated in the vacuole of cultured cells of Coptis japonica. The characterization of berberine transport using intact vacuoles and a tonoplast vesicle system showed that berberine uptake was stimulated by Mg/ATP, as well as GTP, CTP, UTP, and Mg/pyrophosphate. Berberine uptake was strongly inhibited by NH4+ and bafilomycin A1, while vanadate, which is commonly used to inhibit ATP-binding cassette transporters, had only a slight effect, which suggests the presence of a typical secondary transport mechanism. This is contrary to the situation in the plasma membrane of this plant cell, where the ATP-binding cassette transporter is involved in berberine transport. Model experiments with liposomes demonstrated that an ion-trap mechanism was hardly implicated in berberine transport. Further studies suggested that berberine was transported across the tonoplast via an H+/berberine antiporter, which has a Km value of 43.7 μm for berberine. Competition experiments using various berberine analogs, as well as other classes of alkaloids, revealed that this transporter is fairly specific, but not exclusive, for berberine. PMID:16024684

  10. Analysis of goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis L., and related alkaloids in urine using HPLC with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Michelle L; Brettell, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A screening method was developed to extract and detect berberine and hydrastine alkaloids from goldenseal root powder and urine samples using HPLC with UV detection. The isocratic method was developed to detect alkaloids in 5 mL of urine prior to drug screening. Urine samples were spiked with the alkaloids at varying concentrations and extracted twice with 3:1 chloroform:2-propanol (CHCl(3):2-propanol). The extracts were combined, concentrated using nitrogen gas and the residue was then reconstituted with a mobile phase of acetonitrile:buffer (32:68). A 17 min isocratic run time was performed with a flow rate of 2.0 mL/min, and UV detection at 230 nm using a C(18) (250 mm × 4.6 mm) column at room temperature. The method showed good linearity for berberine (r(2)=0.9990) and hydrastine (r(2)=0.9983) over a range of 11.80 ng/mL to 17.64 μg/mL. The LOD for berberine in urine was 12.74 ng/mL and the LOD for hydrastine in urine was 54.48 ng/mL. Urine samples were spiked with goldenseal root powder and liquid extract as part of a blinded study to determine whether berberine and hydrastine alkaloids could also be extracted in vitro from goldenseal and show a presence in urine samples. Out of the 37 blinded urine samples extracted the two spiked samples were correctly identified based on the presence or absence of berberine and hydrastine. The results demonstrated that this method will enable laboratories to test for the herbal supplement in submitted urine samples prior to drug testing, avoiding false negative results. PMID:22177787

  11. Seasonal variation of biomass and bioactive alkaloid content of goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis.

    PubMed

    Douglas, James A; Follett, John M; Parmenter, Graeme A; Sansom, Catherine E; Perry, Nigel B; Littler, Ray A

    2010-10-01

    Seasonal variations in biomass and alkaloid contents of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) were investigated. Five-year-old plants gave 5x the yield of roots and rhizomes of two-year-old plants, and summer growth gave significant increases in root biomass but not rhizomes. Berberine contents of roots plus rhizomes did not vary significantly and were >3.4% in all samples. Hydrastine contents of 5 y roots plus rhizomes showed significant seasonal variation. These variations were due to significant changes in the hydrastine contents of the roots (1.3-1.9%), but not the rhizomes (2.2-2.8%). Goldenseal leaves plus stems had lower contents of hydrastine (0.4-0.8%) and berberine (1.0-1.5%). PMID:20550958

  12. Photochemistry and photocytotoxicity of alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) 1. Berberine.

    PubMed

    Inbaraj, J J; Kukielczak, B M; Bilski, P; Sandvik, S L; Chignell, C F

    2001-11-01

    Goldenseal is an herb which is widely used for many medical applications such as in eyewashes and skin lotions and which is currently undergoing testing by the National Toxicology Program. The main alkaloid constituent of Goldenseal is berberine. The topical application of Goldenseal or berberine to the skin or eyes raises the possibility that an adverse phototoxic reaction may result from an interaction between the alkaloid and light. We have therefore studied the photochemistry of berberine in different solvents and its phototoxicty to HaCaT keratinocytes. Irradiation of berberine in aqueous solutions does not generate (1)O(2), but in CH(2)Cl(2), (1)O(2) is produced with a quantum yield phi = 0.34. With the aid of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique and 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), we have detected oxygen-centered radicals photogenerated by berberine in water and acetonitrile. In the latter solvent and in the absence of oxygen, the neutral berberine radical formed by one electron reduction was observed. Methanol radicals were detected by EPR in water/alcohol low-temperature glasses irradiated in the berberine long-wavelength absorption band. In such alcoholic glasses, we have also detected an EPR signal from the berberine triplet at 77 K, in contrast to aqueous glasses where neither triplet nor radicals were detectable. Our data show that, although a weak photosensitizer in water, berberine is able to produce both (1)O(2) and radical species in a nonpolar environment. UVA irradiation of HaCaT keratinocytes in the presence of 50 microM berberine resulted in an 80% decrease in cell viability and a 3-fold increase in DNA damage as measured by the Comet assay. These findings suggest that exposure to sunlight or artificial light sources emitting UVA should be avoided when topical preparations derived from Goldenseal or containing berberine are used. PMID:11712911

  13. Method validation for determination of alkaloid content in goldenseal root powder.

    PubMed

    Weber, Holly A; Zart, Matthew K; Hodges, Andrew E; White, Kellie D; Barnes, Sarah M; Moody, Leslie A; Clark, Alice P; Harris, Roger K; Overstreet, J Diane; Smith, Cynthia S

    2003-01-01

    A fast, practical ambient extraction methodology followed by isocratic liquid chromatography (LC) analysis with UV detection was validated for the determination of berberine, hydrastine, and canadine in goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) root powder. The method was also validated for palmatine, a major alkaloid present in the possible bioadulterants Coptis, Oregon grape root, and barberry bark. Alkaloid standard solutions were linear over the evaluated concentration ranges. The analytical method was linear for alkaloid extraction using 0.3-2 g goldenseal root powder/100 mL extraction solvent. Precision of the method was demonstrated using 10 replicate extractions of 0.5 g goldenseal root powder, with percent relative standard deviation for all 4 alkaloids < or = 1.6. Alkaloid recovery was determined by spiking each alkaloid into triplicate aliquots of neat goldenseal root powder. Recoveries ranged from 92.3% for palmatine to 101.9% for hydrastine. Ruggedness of the method was evaluated by performing multiple analyses of goldenseal root powder from 3 suppliers over a 2-year period. The method was also used to analyze Coptis root, Oregon grape root, barberry bark, and celandine herb, which are possible goldenseal bioadulterants. The resulting chromatographic profiles of the bioadulterants were significantly different from that of goldenseal. The method was directly transferred to LC with mass spectrometry, which was used to confirm the presence of goldenseal alkaloids tetrahydroberberastine, berberastine, canadaline, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine, as well as alkaloids from the bioadulterants, including palmatine, jatrorrhizine, and coptisine. PMID:12852562

  14. Relaxant effects of Hydrastis canadensis L. and its major alkaloids on guinea pig isolated trachea.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Haq, H; Cometa, M F; Palmery, M; Leone, M G; Silvestrini, B; Saso, L

    2000-11-01

    Hydrastis or goldenseal, one of the most popular medicinal herbs in the U.S.A., is used in mild pathological conditions like cold and flu, based on the pharmacological properties of its active components, berberine (anticholinergic, antisecretory, and antimicrobial) and beta-hydrastine (astringent). We previously reported the relaxant effect of a total ethanolic extract of hydrastis on carbachol precontracted isolated guinea pig trachea, and with the present study, using the same experimental model, we aimed at evaluating the contribution of its major alkaloids, berberine, beta-hydrastine, canadine and canadaline to the total effect. Furthermore, using specific pharmacological tools, like timolol and xanthine amine congener, we attempted to elucidate its mechanism of action. The EC50 of berberine, beta-hydrastine, canadine and canadaline, were 34.2+/-0.6, 72.8+/-0.6, 11.9+/-1.2 and 2.4+/-0.8 microg/ml, respectively. Timolol effectively antagonized the effect of canadine (EC50 = 19.7+/-3.0 microg/ml) and canadaline (EC50 = 17.1+/-1.2 microg/ml) but not that of berberine and beta-hydrastine, while xanthine amine congener antagonized the effect of beta-hydrastine (EC50 = 149.9+/-35.3 microg/ml) and canadaline (EC50 = 26.1+/-3.0 microg/ml) but not that of berberine and canadine. Besides, the hydrastis extract, at concentrations between 0.01 and 0.1 microg/ml, potentiated the relaxant effect of isoprenaline on carbachol-precontracted isolated guinea pig trachea. These data, which are insufficient to draw definite mechanistic conclusions, indicate that the aforementioned alkaloids may act by interacting with adrenergic and adenosinic receptors. PMID:11129501

  15. Studies on quantitative determination of total alkaloids and berberine in five origins of crude medicine "Sankezhen".

    PubMed

    Li, Luyang; Long, Weifang; Wan, Xiangluan; Ding, Qi; Zhang, Fei; Wan, Dingrong

    2015-02-01

    The roots of Berberis plants are widely used as a traditional Chinese medicine called "Sankezhen", having the activities of antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, and the ingredients are alkaloids. This work aims to study and compare the total alkaloids and individual alkaloid (berberine) contents in roots and stems from five origins of Berberis plants (Berberis soulieana Schneid., B. henryana Schneid., B. triacanthophora Fedde, B. gagnepainii Schneid. and B. bergmanniae Schneid.) and provides some references for resource and quality evaluation of the medicine. Acid dye colorimetry and high-performance liquid chromatography were used in the determination. The results showed that the contents for the total alkaloids in root and stem samples were in the range of 1.60-4.72% and 0.76-2.70%, while those of the berberine were 0.70-2.92% and 0.23-1.07%. With higher contents of the total alkaloids and berberine, the roots of B. soulieana, B. gagnepainii and B. bergmanniae were good sources of "Sankezhen". Meanwhile, the contents were also high in stems of the three plants, indicating that the stems were likely to be alternative sources of "Sankezhen" after further research. As the results of precision, stability and recovery tests shown, the methods were simple, rapid and reliable, and provided valuable basis for quality evaluation and new resource investigation of "Sankezhen". PMID:25013028

  16. IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strekal', N. D.; Motevich, I. G.; Nowicky, J. W.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the IR absorption and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra of the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine adsorbed on a silver hydrosol and on the surface of a silver electrode for different potentials. Based on quantum chemical calculations, for the first time we have assigned the vibrations in the berberine molecule according to vibrational mode. The effect of the potential of the silver electrode on the geometry of sorption of the molecule on the surface is considered, assuming a short-range mechanism for enhancement of Raman scattering.

  17. Effect of ion pairing on the fluorescence of berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megyesi, Mónika; Biczók, László

    2007-10-01

    Effect of association with chloride or perchlorate anions on the fluorescence properties of berberine, a cationic isoquinoline alkaloid, has been studied. Interaction with Cl - caused more efficient fluorescence quenching; it significantly accelerated the radiationless deactivation and slowed down the radiative transition. Combined analysis of spectrophotometric, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence results provided 1.5 × 10 5 M -1 for the equilibrium constant of ion pairing with Cl - in CH 2Cl 2. Both ion pairing and enrichment of the microenvironment of berberine in ions led to excited state quenching in solvents of medium polarity, but only the latter effect was observed in the presence of perchlorates in butyronitrile.

  18. Berberine

    MedlinePlus

    ... platelet counts (thrombocytopenia). Blood platelets are important for blood clotting. Early research suggests that taking berberine for 15 ... Talk with your health provider.Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Berberine might slow blood clotting. ...

  19. Effects of root isoquinoline alkaloids from Hydrastis canadensis on Fusarium oxysporum isolated from Hydrastis root tissue.

    PubMed

    Tims, Michael c; Batista, Charisma

    2007-07-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is a popular medicinal plant distributed widely in North America. The rhizome, rootlets, and root hairs produce medicinally active alkaloids. Berberine, one of the Hydrastis alkaloids, has shown antifungal activity. The influence of a combination of the major Hydrastis alkaloids on the plant rhizosphere fungal ecology has not been investigated. A bioassay was developed to study the effect of goldenseal isoquinoline alkaloids on three Fusarium isolates, including the two species isolated from Hydrastis rhizosphere. The findings suggest that the Hydrastis root extract influences macroconidia germination, but that only the combined alkaloids--berberine, canadine, and hydrastine--appear to synergistically stimulate production of the mycotoxin zearalenone in the Fusarium oxysporum isolate. The Hydrastis root rhizosphere effect provided a selective advantage to the Fusarium isolates closely associated with the root tissue in comparison with the Fusarium isolate that had never been exposed to Hydrastis. PMID:17549565

  20. Structural modification of berberine alkaloids in relation to cytotoxic activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Orfila, L; Rodríguez, M; Colman, T; Hasegawa, M; Merentes, E; Arvelo, F

    2000-08-01

    The cytotoxicity of two protoberberine alkaloids: berberine and lincangenine, their 8-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-derivatives and tetrahydroprotoberberine:thaicanine, was evaluated. The cellular responses through the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide] (MTT) method were measured in Hela (uterus carcinoma), SVKO3 (ovary carcinoma), Hep-2 (larynx carcinoma), primary culture from mouse embryon, and human fibroblast cells at the concentration: 10-1000 ppm (microg/ml) for 24 h. Berberine showed the highest cytotoxicity among the compounds tested, giving LC50 values for all cell lines at the concentration of 10 ppm. The results indicated that the cytotoxicity was notably decreased by structural changes, i.e. by modulation of the planarity caused by the introduction of hydroxyl group at C-8 and concomitant saturation of double bond between N-C8 in protoberberine molecules. In the case of berberine, the cytotoxic effect changed from 98.8 (berberine) to 39% for 8-hydroxydihydroberberine at the concentration of 100 ppm in Hela cells line. The same effect was observed with lincangenine and 8-OH-lincangenine (cytotoxicities 70 and 25%, respectively, at 1000 ppm in SVKO3 cells). On the other hand, these compounds showed a low selectivity for the different human cancer cell lines tested. PMID:10940582

  1. Photochemistry and photocytotoxicity of alkaloids from Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) 3: effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chignell, Colin F; Sik, Robert H; Watson, Mary A; Wielgus, Albert R

    2007-01-01

    The dried root or rhizome of Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) contains several alkaloids including berberine, hydrastine, palmatine and lesser amounts of canadine and hydrastinine. Preparations derived from Goldenseal have been used to treat skin and eye ailments. Berberine, the major alkaloid in Goldenseal root powder, has been used in eye drops to treat trachoma, a disease characterized by keratoconjunctivitis. Berberine and palmatine are also present in extracts from Berberis amurensis Ruprecht (Berberidaceae) which are used to treat ocular disorders. We have previously shown that Goldenseal alkaloids are phototoxic to keratinocytes (Chem Res Toxicol. 14, 1529, 2001; ibid 19, 739, 2006) and now report their effect on human lens and retinal pigment epithelial cells. Human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) were severely damaged when incubated with berberine (25 microM) and exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)). Under the same conditions, palmatine was less phototoxic and hydrastine, canadine and hydrastinine were inactive. Moderate protection against berberine phototoxicity was afforded by the antioxidants ascorbate (2 mM) and N-acetylcysteine (5 mM). When exposed to UVA (5 J cm(-2)) both berberine (10 microM) and palmatine (10 microM) caused mild DNA damage as determined by the alkaline comet assay which measures single strand breaks. Berberine and palmatine are the only Goldenseal alkaloids with appreciable absorption above 400 nm. Because light at wavelengths below 400 nm is cut off by the anterior portion of the adult human eye only berberine and palmatine were tested for phototoxicity to human retinal pigment epithelial (hRPE) cells. Although berberine did damage hRPE cells when irradiated with visible light (lambda > 400 nm) approximately 10 times higher concentrations were required to produce the same amount of damage as seen in lens cells. Palmatine was not phototoxic to hRPE cells. Neither berberine nor palmatine photodamaged DNA in hRPE. Infusions of Goldenseal

  2. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) extracts synergistically enhance the antibacterial activity of berberine via efflux pump inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ettefagh, Keivan A; Burns, Johnna T; Junio, Hiyas A; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cech, Nadja B

    2011-05-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is used to combat inflammation and infection. Its antibacterial activity in vitRO has been attributed to its alkaloids, the most abundant of which is berberine. The goal of these studies was to compare the composition, antibacterial activity, and efflux pump inhibitory activity of ethanolic extracts prepared from roots and aerial portions of H. canadensis. Ethanolic extracts were prepared separately from roots and aerial portions of six H. canadensis plants. Extracts were analyzed for alkaloid concentration using LC-MS and tested for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (NCTC 8325-4) and for inhibition of ethidium bromide efflux. Synergistic antibacterial activity was observed between the aerial extract (FIC 0.375) and to a lesser extent the root extract (FIC 0.750) and berberine. The aerial extract inhibited ethidium bromide efflux from wild-type S. aureus but had no effect on the expulsion of this compound from an isogenic derivative deleted for norA. Our studies indicate that the roots of H. canadensis contain higher levels of alkaloids than the aerial portions, but the aerial portions synergize with berberine more significantly than the roots. Furthermore, extracts from the aerial portions of H. canadensis contain efflux pump inhibitors, while efflux pump inhibitory activity was not observed for the root extract. The three most abundant H. canadensis alkaloids, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine, are not responsible for the efflux pump inhibitory activity of the extracts from H. canadensis aerial portions. PMID:21157683

  3. Versatile methods for synthesizing organic acid salts of quaternary berberine-type alkaloids as anti-ulcerative colitis agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Li, Jing; Zhang, Hai-Jing; Deng, An-Jun; Wu, Lian-Qiu; Li, Zhi-Hong; Song, Hong-Rui; Wang, Wen-Jie; Qin, Hai-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Two versatile methods to synthesize kinds of organic acid salts of quaternary berberine-type alkaloids were investigated in order to determine which is more efficient to improve the liposolubility of the target compounds and to explore the efficacy of the target compounds as anti-ulcerative colitis (UC) agents. Overall evaluation according to the reaction results and yields of the final products indicated that the synthetic method using tertiary (±)-8-acylmethyldihydroberberine-type alkaloids as key intermediates is superior to that of using tertiary dihydroberberine-type alkaloids as intermediates. Ten target compounds were synthesized using quaternary berberine chloride and quaternary coptisine chloride as starting materials, respectively, and the anti-UC activity of some target compounds was evaluated in an in vitro x-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) transcriptional activity assay using dual luciferase reporter detection. At 10 μM, the tested compounds were found to activate the transcription of XBP1 target at almost the same level as that of quaternary coptisine chloride. The synthesized target compounds were also found to share higher liposolubility than the inorganic acid salts of quaternary berberine-type alkaloid. PMID:27097666

  4. Inclusion complex formation of ionic liquids with 4-sulfonatocalixarenes studied by competitive binding of berberine alkaloid fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskolczy, Zsombor; Biczók, László

    2009-07-01

    A clinically important natural isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine, was used as a fluorescent probe to study the encapsulation of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (C nMIm +) type ionic liquids in 4-sulfonato-substituted calix[4]arene (SCX4) and calix[6]arene (SCX6) at pH 2. Addition of ionic liquids to the aqueous solution of berberine-SCXn inclusion complexes brought about considerable fluorescence intensity diminution due to the extrusion of berberine from the macrocycle into the aqueous phase by the competitive inclusion of C nMIm + cation. The lengthening of the aliphatic side chain of the imidazolium moiety diminished the equilibrium constant of complexation with SCX4, but enhanced the stability of SCX6 complexes. Larger binding strength was found for SCX4.

  5. Antibacterial activity of Hydrastis canadensis extract and its major isolated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Scazzocchio, F; Cometa, M F; Tomassini, L; Palmery, M

    2001-08-01

    The antibacterial activity of extract and isolated major alkaloids (berberine, beta-hydrastine, canadine and canadaline) of Hydrastis canadensis L. (Ranunculaceae) was evaluated against 6 strains of microorganism: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25 993 and ATCC 6538P), Streptococcus sanguis (ATCC 10 556), Escherichia coli (ATCC 25 922), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27 853). Bactericidal activity was evaluated by contact test by measuring the "killing time" on a low density bacterial inoculum, and bacteriostatic activity in liquid medium by M.I.C. values. The results provide a rational basis for the traditional antibacterial use of Hydrastis canadensis. PMID:11509983

  6. Molecular mechanisms of action of herbal antifungal alkaloid berberine, in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Devaux, Frédéric; Vandeputte, Patrick; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Sanglard, Dominique; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Prasad, Rajendra

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans causes superficial to systemic infections in immuno-compromised individuals. The concomitant use of fungistatic drugs and the lack of cidal drugs frequently result in strains that could withstand commonly used antifungals, and display multidrug resistance (MDR). In search of novel fungicidals, in this study, we have explored a plant alkaloid berberine (BER) for its antifungal potential. For this, we screened an in-house transcription factor (TF) mutant library of C. albicans strains towards their susceptibility to BER. Our screen of TF mutant strains identified a heat shock factor (HSF1), which has a central role in thermal adaptation, to be most responsive to BER treatment. Interestingly, HSF1 mutant was not only highly susceptible to BER but also displayed collateral susceptibility towards drugs targeting cell wall (CW) and ergosterol biosynthesis. Notably, BER treatment alone could affect the CW integrity as was evident from the growth retardation of MAP kinase and calcineurin pathway null mutant strains and transmission electron microscopy. However, unlike BER, HSF1 effect on CW appeared to be independent of MAP kinase and Calcineurin pathway genes. Additionally, unlike hsf1 null strain, BER treatment of Candida cells resulted in dysfunctional mitochondria, which was evident from its slow growth in non-fermentative carbon source and poor labeling with mitochondrial membrane potential sensitive probe. This phenotype was reinforced with an enhanced ROS levels coinciding with the up-regulated oxidative stress genes in BER-treated cells. Together, our study not only describes the molecular mechanism of BER fungicidal activity but also unravels a new role of evolutionary conserved HSF1, in MDR of Candida. PMID:25105295

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Isoquinoline Alkaloid Berberine on Ischemia-Induced Apoptosis via Activation of Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Protein Kinase B Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mia; Shin, Mal Soon; Lee, Jae Min; Cho, Han Sam; Kim, Chang Ju; Kim, Young Joon; Choi, Hey Ran

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Berberine is a type of isoquinoline alkaloid that has been used to treat various diseases. A neuroprotective effect of berberine against cerebral ischemia has been reported; however, the effects of berberine on apoptosis in relation to reactive astrogliosis and microglia activation under ischemic conditions have not yet been fully evaluated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of berberine on global ischemia-induced apoptosis, and focused on the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway in the hippocampus using gerbils. Methods Gerbils received berberine orally once a day for 14 consecutive days, starting one day after surgery. In this study, a step-down avoidance task was used to assess short-term memory. Furthermore, we employed the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay to evaluate DNA fragmentation, immunohistochemistry to investigate glial fibriallary acidic protein, CD11b, and caspase-3, and western blot to assess PI3K, Akt, Bax, Bcl-2, and cytochrome c. Results Our results revealed that berberine treatment alleviated ischemia-induced short-term memory impairment. Treatment with berbeine also attenuated ischemia-induced apoptosis and inhibited reactive astrogliosis and microglia activation. Furthermore, berberine enhanced phospho-PI3K and phospho-Akt expression in the hippocampus of ischemic gerbils. Conclusions Berberine exerted a neuroprotective effect against ischemic insult by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis via activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. The antiapoptotic effect of berberine was achieved through inhibition of reactive astrogliosis and microglia activation. Berberine may therefore serve as a therapeutic agent for stroke-induced neurourological problems. PMID:25279238

  8. Binding of DNA-binding alkaloids berberine and palmatine to tRNA and comparison to ethidium: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Pandya, Prateek; Chowdhury, Sebanti Roy; Kumar, Surat; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2008-11-01

    The interaction of two natural protoberberine plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine with tRNA phe was studied using various biophysical techniques and molecular modeling and the data were compared with the binding of the classical DNA intercalator, ethidium. Circular dichroic studies revealed that the tRNA conformation was moderately perturbed on binding of the alkaloids. The cooperative binding of both the alkaloids and ethidium to tRNA was revealed from absorbance and fluorescence studies. Fluorescence quenching studies advanced a conclusion that while berberine and palmatine are partially intercalated, ethidium is fully intercalated on the tRNA molecule. The binding of the alkaloids as well as ethidium stabilized the tRNA melting, and the binding constant evaluated from the averaged optical melting temperature data was in agreement with fluorescence spectral-binding data. Differential scanning calorimetry revealed that the tRNA melting showed three close transitions that were affected on binding of these small molecules. Molecular docking calculations performed showed the preferred regions of binding of these small molecules on the tRNA. Taken together, the results suggest that the binding of the alkaloids berberine and palmatine on the tRNA structure appears to be mostly by partial intercalation while ethidium intercalates fully on the tRNA. These results further advance our knowledge on the molecular aspects on the interaction of these alkaloids to tRNA.

  9. The alkaloid Berberine inhibits the growth of Anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines by inducing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, J B; Yu, J-H; Ko, E; Lee, K-W; Song, A K; Park, S Y; Shin, I; Han, W; Noh, D Y

    2010-05-01

    Berberine is a pure phenanthren alkaloid isolated from the roots and bark of herbal plants such as Berberis, Hydrastis canadensis and Coptis chinensis. Berberine has been established to inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells, but its effects on the drug resistance and anoikis-resistance of breast cancer cells have yet to be elucidated. Anoikis, or detachment-induced apoptosis, may prevent cancer progression and metastasis by blocking signals necessary for survival of localized cancer cells. Resistance to anoikis is regarded as a prerequisite for metastasis; however, little is known about the role of berberine in anoikis-resistance. We established anoikis-resistant cells from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 by culturing them on a Poly-Hema substratum. We then investigated the effects of berberine on the growth of these cells. The anoikis-resistant cells had a reduced growth rate and were more invasive than their respective adherent cell lines. The effect of berberine on growth was compared to that of doxorubicine, which is a drug commonly used to treat breast cancer, in both the adherent and anoikis-resistant cell lines. Berberine promoted the growth inhibition of anoikis-resistant cells to a greater extent than doxorubicine treatment. Treatment with berberine-induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 in the anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells as compared to untreated control cells. In summary, these results revealed that berberine can efficiently inhibit growth by inducing cell cycle arrest in anoikis-resistant MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Further analysis of these phenotypes is essential for understanding the effect of berberine on anoikis-resistant breast cancer cells, which would be relevant for the therapeutic targeting of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:19800775

  10. Inhibition of H1N1 influenza A virus growth and induction of inflammatory mediators by the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine and extracts of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis).

    PubMed

    Cecil, Chad E; Davis, Jeanine M; Cech, Nadja B; Laster, Scott M

    2011-11-01

    In this study we tested whether the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine can inhibit the growth of influenza A. Our experiments showed strong inhibition of the growth of H1N1 influenza A strains PR/8/34 or WS/33 in RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells, A549 human lung epithelial-derived cells and murine bone marrow derived macrophages, but not MDCK canine kidney cells. Studies of the mechanism underlying this effect suggest that berberine acts post-translationally to inhibit virus protein trafficking/maturation which in turn inhibits virus growth. Berberine was also evaluated for its ability to inhibit production of TNF-α and PGE(2) from A/PR/8/34 infected-RAW 264.7 cells. Our studies revealed strong inhibition of production of both mediators and suggest that this effect is distinct from the anti-viral effect. Finally, we asked whether berberine-containing ethanol extracts of goldenseal also inhibit the growth of influenza A and production of inflammatory mediators. We found strong effectiveness at high concentrations, although upon dilution extracts were somewhat less effective than purified berberine. Taken together, our results suggest that berberine may indeed be useful for the treatment of infections with influenza A. PMID:21683808

  11. RNA targeting by small molecule alkaloids: Studies on the binding of berberine and palmatine to polyribonucleotides and comparison to ethidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-03-01

    The binding affinity, energetics and conformational aspects of the interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids berberine and palmatine to four single stranded polyribonucleotides polyguanylic acid [poly(G)], polyinosinic acid [poly(I)], polycytidylic acid [poly(C)] and polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] were studied by absorption, fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy and compared with ethidium. Berberine, palmatine and ethidium binds strongly with poly(G) and poly(I) with affinity in the order 10 5 M -1 while their binding to poly(C) and poly(U) were very weak or practically nil. The same conclusions have also emerged from isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The binding of all the three compounds to poly(C) and poly(I) was exothermic and favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. Conformational change in the polymer associated with the binding was observed in poly(I) with all the three molecules and poly(U) with ethidium but not in poly(G) and poly(C) revealing differences in the orientation of the bound molecules in the hitherto different helical organization of these polymers. These fundamental results may be useful and serve as database for the development of futuristic RNA based small molecule therapeutics.

  12. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits melanoma cancer cell migration by reducing the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Vaid, Mudit; Katiyar, Nandan; Sharma, Samriti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease due, in large part, to its propensity to metastasize. We have examined the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, on human melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using melanoma cell lines, A375 and Hs294. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we show that over expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE2 receptors promote the migration of cells. We found that treatment of A375 and Hs294 cells with berberine resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4). Treatment of cells with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, or transient transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA, also inhibited cell migration. Treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an inducer of COX-2 or PGE2, enhanced cell migration, whereas berberine inhibited TPA- or PGE2-promoted cell migration. Berberine reduced the basal levels as well as PGE2-stimulated expression levels of EP2 and EP4. Treatment of the cells with the EP4 agonist stimulated cell migration and berberine blocked EP4 agonist-induced cell migration activity. Moreover, berberine inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2, in A375 cells, and treatment of cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of NF-κB, inhibited cell migration. Together, these results indicate for the first time that berberine inhibits melanoma cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis, by inhibition of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:20974686

  13. Cardiovascular actions of berberine.

    PubMed

    Lau, C W; Yao, X Q; Chen, Z Y; Ko, W H; Huang, Y

    2001-01-01

    Berberine, is an alkaloid from Hydrastis canadensis L., Chinese herb Huanglian, and many other plants. It is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as an antimicrobial in the treatment of dysentery and infectious diarrhea. This manuscript describes cardiovascular effects of berberine and its derivatives, tetrahydroberberine and 8-oxoberberine. Berberine has positive inotropic, negative chronotropic, antiarrhythmic, and vasodilator properties. Both derivatives of berberine have antiarrhythmic activity. Some cardiovascular effects of berberine and its derivatives are attributed to the blockade of K+ channels (delayed rectifier and K(ATP)) and stimulation of Na+ -Ca(2+) exchanger. Berberine has been shown to prolong the duration of ventricular action potential. Its vasodilator activity has been attributed to multiple cellular mechanisms. The cardiovascular effects of berberine suggest its possible clinical usefulness in the treatment of arrhythmias and/or heart failure. PMID:11607041

  14. Unveiling the Mode of Interaction of Berberine Alkaloid in Different Supramolecular Confined Environments: Interplay of Surface Charge between Nano-Confined Charged Layer and DNA.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Niloy; Roy, Arpita; Banik, Debasis; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2016-02-18

    In this Article, we demonstrate a detailed characterization of binding interaction of berberine chloride (BBCl) with calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in buffer solution as well as in two differently charged reverse micelles (RMs). The photophyscial properties of this alkaloid have been modulated within these microheterogeneous bioassemblies. The mode of binding of this alkaloid with DNA is of debate to date. However, fluorescence spectroscopic measurements, circular dichroism (CD) measurement, and temperature-dependent study unambiguously establish that BBCl partially intercalates into the DNA base pairs. The nonplanarity imposed by partial saturation in their structure causes the nonclassical types of intercalation into DNA. Besides the intercalation, electrostatic interactions also play a significant role in the binding between BBCl and DNA. DNA structure turns into a condensed form after encapsulation into RMs, which is followed by the CD spectra and microscopy study. The probe location and dynamics in the nanopool of the RMs depended on the electrostatic interaction between the charged surfactants and cationic berberine. The structural alteration of CT-DNA from B form to condensed form and the interplay of surface charge between RMs and DNA determine the interaction between the alkaloid and DNA in RMs. Time-resolved study and fluorescence anisotropy measurements successfully provide the binding interaction of BBCl in the nanopool of the RMs in the absence and in the presence of DNA. This study motivates us to judge further the potential applicability of this alkaloid in other biological systems or other biomimicking organized assemblies. PMID:26756221

  15. Phellodendron amurense and Its Major Alkaloid Compound, Berberine Ameliorates Scopolamine-Induced Neuronal Impairment and Memory Dysfunction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Bongjun; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung

    2012-01-01

    We examine whether Phellodendron amurense (PA) and its major alkaloid compound, berberine (BER), improved memory defects caused by administering scopolamine in rats. Effects of PA and BER on the acetylcholinergic system and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus were also investigated. Male rats were administered daily doses for 14 days of PA (100 and 200 mg/kg, i.p.) and BER (20 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before scopolamine injection (2 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of PA and BER improved memory impairment as measured by the passive avoidance test and reduced the escape latency for finding the platform in the Morris water maze test. Administration of PA and BER significantly alleviated memory-associated decreases in cholinergic immunoreactivity and restored brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cAMP-response element-binding protein mRNA expression in the hippocampus. PA and BER also decreased significantly the expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA in the hippocampus. These results demonstrated that PA and BER had significant neuroprotective effects against neuronal impairment and memory dysfunction caused by scopolamine in rats. These results suggest that PA and BER may be useful as therapeutic agents for improving cognitive functioning by stimulating cholinergic enzyme activity and alleviating inflammatory responses. PMID:22563252

  16. Berberine alkaloid: Quantum chemical study of different forms by the DFT and MP2 methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. I.; Dailidonis, V. V.; Hovorun, D. M.; Kurita, N.; Murayama, Y.; Natsume, T.; Potopalsky, A. I.; Zaika, L. A.

    2006-10-01

    The stable structures and electronic properties for the berberine cation as well as possible ammonium, carbinol and amino-aldehyde forms of protoberberine salts in the presence of hydroxyl ions were investigated by the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) methods. The geometry optimizations by both methods lead to the nonplanar propeller-twisted and buckled structure for the all forms. The obtained bond lengths and bond angles agree with the experimental values. The comparison of total energies elucidates that the amino-aldehyde form is the most preferable tautomer in gas phase, while the carbinol form is less stable. The least stable tautomer is the ammonium form.

  17. Transgenic and Mutation-Based Suppression of a Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like (BBL) Gene Family Reduces Alkaloid Content in Field-Grown Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ramsey S.; Lopez, Harry O.; Bowen, Steve W.; Andres, Karen R.; Steede, William T.; Dewey, Ralph E.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation exists to develop tobacco cultivars with reduced nicotine content for the purpose of facilitating compliance with expected tobacco product regulations that could mandate the lowering of nicotine levels per se, or the reduction of carcinogenic alkaloid-derived tobacco specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). A berberine bridge enzyme-like (BBL) gene family was recently characterized for N. tabacum and found to catalyze one of the final steps in pyridine alkaloid synthesis for this species. Because this gene family acts downstream in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway, it may represent an attractive target for genetic strategies with the objective of reducing alkaloid content in field-grown tobacco. In this research, we produced transgenic doubled haploid lines of tobacco cultivar K326 carrying an RNAi construct designed to reduce expression of the BBL gene family. Field-grown transgenic lines carrying functional RNAi constructs exhibited average cured leaf nicotine levels of 0.684%, in comparison to 2.454% for the untransformed control. Since numerous barriers would need to be overcome to commercialize transgenic tobacco cultivars, we subsequently pursued a mutation breeding approach to identify EMS-induced mutations in the three most highly expressed isoforms of the BBL gene family. Field evaluation of individuals possessing different homozygous combinations of truncation mutations in BBLa, BBLb, and BBLc indicated that a range of alkaloid phenotypes could be produced, with the triple homozygous knockout genotype exhibiting greater than a 13-fold reduction in percent total alkaloids. The novel source of genetic variability described here may be useful in future tobacco breeding for varied alkaloid levels. PMID:25688975

  18. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to isoquinoline alkaloids from Sanguinaria canadensis and Hydrastis canadensis.

    PubMed

    Mahady, Gail B; Pendland, Susan L; Stoia, Adenia; Chadwick, Lucas R

    2003-03-01

    Methanol extracts of the rhizomes of Sanguinaria canadensis, and the roots and rhizomes of Hydrastis canadensis, two plants used traditionally for the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments, were screened for in vitro antibacterial activity against 15 strains of Helicobacter pylori. The rhizome extracts, as well as a methanol extract of S. canadensis suspension-cell cultures inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro, with a MIC50 range of 12.5-50.0 microg/ml. Three isoquinoline alkaloids were identified in the active fraction. Sanguinarine and chelerythrine, two benzophenanthridine alkaloids, inhibited the growth of the bacterium, with an MIC50 of 50.0 and 100.0 microg/ml, respectively. Protopine, a protopine alkaloid, also inhibited the growth of the bacterium, with a MIC50 of 100 microg/ml. The crude methanol extract of H. canadensis rhizomes was very active, with an MIC50 of 12.5 microg/ml. Two isoquinoline alkaloids, berberine and beta-hydrastine, were identified as the active constituents, and having an MIC50 of 12.5 and 100.0 microg/ml, respectively. PMID:12672149

  19. Novel mitochondria-targeted compounds composed of natural constituents: conjugates of plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine with plastoquinone.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, B V; Antonenko, Y N; Galimov, E R; Domnina, L V; Dugina, V B; Zvyagilskaya, R A; Ivanova, O Yu; Izyumov, D S; Lyamzaev, K G; Pustovidko, A V; Rokitskaya, T I; Rogov, A G; Severina, I I; Simonyan, R A; Skulachev, M V; Tashlitsky, V N; Titova, E V; Trendeleva, T A; Shagieva, G S

    2012-09-01

    Novel mitochondria-targeted compounds composed entirely of natural constituents have been synthesized and tested in model lipid membranes, in isolated mitochondria, and in living human cells in culture. Berberine and palmatine, penetrating cations of plant origin, were conjugated by nonyloxycarbonylmethyl residue with the plant electron carrier and antioxidant plastoquinone. These conjugates (SkQBerb, SkQPalm) and their analogs lacking the plastoquinol moiety (C10Berb and C10Palm) penetrated across planar bilayer phospholipid membrane in their cationic forms and accumulated in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria in living human cells in culture. Reduced forms of SkQBerb and SkQPalm inhibited lipid peroxidation in isolated mitochondria at nanomolar concentrations. In isolated mitochondria and in living cells, the berberine and palmatine moieties were not reduced, so antioxidant activity belonged exclusively to the plastoquinol moiety. In human fibroblasts, nanomolar SkQBerb and SkQPalm prevented fragmentation of mitochondria and apoptosis induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide. At higher concentrations, conjugates of berberine and palmatine induced proton transport mediated by free fatty acids both in model and in mitochondrial membrane. In mitochondria this process was facilitated by the adenine nucleotide carrier. As an example of application of the novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidants SkQBerb and SkQPalm to studies of signal transduction, we discuss induction of cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and morphological normalization of some tumor cells. We suggest that production of oxygen radicals in mitochondria is necessary for growth factors-MAP-kinase signaling, which supports proliferation and transformed phenotype. PMID:23157257

  20. Derivatives of the cationic plant alkaloids berberine and palmatine amplify protonophorous activity of fatty acids in model membranes and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pustovidko, Antonina V; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Antonenko, Yuri N; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Skulachev, Vladimir P; Chernyak, Boris V

    2013-09-01

    Previously it has been shown by our group that berberine and palmatine, penetrating cations of plant origin, when conjugated with plastoquinone (SkQBerb and SkQPalm), can accumulate in isolated mitochondria or in mitochondria of living cells and effectively protect them from oxidative damage. In the present work, we demonstrate that SkQBerb, SkQPalm, and their analogs lacking the plastoquinone moiety (C10Berb and C10Palm) operate as mitochondria-targeted compounds facilitating protonophorous effect of free fatty acids. These compounds induce proton transport mediated by small concentrations of added fatty acids both in planar and liposomal model lipid membranes. In mitochondria, such an effect can be carried out by endogenous fatty acids and the adenine nucleotide translocase. PMID:23026390

  1. Quantitative determination of alkaloids from roots of Hydrastis canadensis L. and dietary supplements using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) with UV detection was used for the quantification of alkaloids from roots of Hydrastis canadensis L. (goldenseal) and dietary supplements claiming to contain goldenseal. The analysis was performed on a Waters Acquity UPLC system with an Acquity UPLC BEH Shield RP18 column using gradient elution with ammonium formate and acetonitrile containing formic acid. The chromatographic run time was less than 6 min. The detection wavelength used for beta-hydrastine and canadine was 290 nm; for hydrastinine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and berberine, it was 344 nm. A total of five different extraction solvents, including 100% methanol, 90% methanol, 90% methanol + 1% acetic acid, 90% acetonitrile + 0.1% phosphoric acid, and 100% acetonitrile, were tested for recovery of the major compounds. The samples extracted with the 90% methanol + 1% acetic acid displayed the best recovery (>97%). The analytical method was validated for linearity, repeatability, LOD, and LOQ. The RSDs for intraday and interday experiments were less than 3.5%, and the recovery was 98-103%. UPLC/MS with a quadrupole mass analyzer and electrospray ionization source was used to confirm the identity of seven alkaloids. The analytical method was successfully applied to confirm the identification of seven alkaloids from the roots of H. canadensis, dietary supplements that claimed to contain goldenseal, and possible adulterant species. PMID:23175972

  2. Hydrastine pharmacokinetics and metabolism after a single oral dose of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) to humans.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Prem K; Barone, Gary; Gurley, Bill J; Fifer, E Kim; Hendrickson, Howard P

    2015-04-01

    The disposition and metabolism of hydrastine was investigated in 11 healthy subjects following an oral dose of 2.7 g of goldenseal supplement containing 78 mg of hydrastine. Serial blood samples were collected for 48 hours, and urine was collected for 24 hours. Hydrastine serum and urine concentrations were determined by Liquid Chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Pharmacokinetic parameters for hydrastine were calculated using noncompartmental methods. The maximal serum concentration (Cmax) was 225 ± 100 ng/ml, Tmax was 1.5 ± 0.3 hours, and area under the curve was 6.4 ± 4.1 ng ⋅ h/ml ⋅ kg. The elimination half-life was 4.8 ± 1.4 hours. Metabolites of hydrastine were identified in serum and urine by using liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Hydrastine metabolites were identified by various mass spectrometric techniques, such as accurate mass measurement, neutral loss scanning, and product ion scanning using Quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-ToF) and triple quadrupole instruments. The identity of phase II metabolites was further confirmed by hydrolysis of glucuronide and sulfate conjugates using bovine β-glucuronidase and a Helix pomatia sulfatase/glucuronidase enzyme preparation. Hydrastine was found to undergo rapid and extensive phase I and phase II metabolism. Reduction, O-demethylation, N-demethylation, hydroxylation, aromatization, lactone hydrolysis, and dehydrogenation of the alcohol group formed by lactone hydrolysis to the ketone group were observed during phase I biotransformation of hydrastine. Phase II metabolites were primarily glucuronide and sulfate conjugates. Hydrastine undergoes extensive biotransformation, and some metabolites may have pharmacological activity. Further study is needed in this area. PMID:25609220

  3. Current knowledge and pharmacological profile of berberine: An update.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Ekavali; Chopra, Kanwaljit; Mukherjee, Madhurima; Pottabathini, Raghavender; Dhull, Dinesh K

    2015-08-15

    Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, occurs as an active constituent in numerous medicinal plants and has an array of pharmacological properties. It has been used in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine for its antimicrobial, antiprotozoal, antidiarrheal and antitrachoma activity. Moreover, several clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate ameliorative effect of berberine against several disorders including metabolic, neurological and cardiological problems. This review provides a summary regarding the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic features of berberine, with a focus on the different mechanisms underlying its multispectrum activity. Studies regarding the safety profile, drug interactions and important clinical trials of berberine have also been included. Clinical trials with respect to neurological disorders need to be undertaken to exploit the beneficiary effects of berberine against serious disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Also, clinical studies to detect rare adverse effects of berberine need to be initiated to draw a complete safety profile of berberine and strengthen its applicability. PMID:26092760

  4. Berberine and coptisine free bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jiří; Man, Stanislav; Sečkářová, Pavlína; Hulová, Dagmar; Nečas, Marek; Potáček, Milan; Toušek, Jaromír.; Dommisse, Roger; Van Dongen, Walter; Marek, Radek

    2004-01-01

    The free bases of protoberberine alkaloids berberine and coptisine and related compounds have been examined. The 1H and 13C NMR data of 8-hydroxy-7,8-dihydroberberine (2a), 8-hydroxy-7,8-dihydrocoptisine (2b), bis(7,8-dihydroberberin-8-yl) ether (3a), 8-oxoberberine (5a), and 8-oxocoptisine (5b) as well as X-ray data of compounds 2a, 5a, and 5b are reported and discussed.

  5. Berberine exposure triggers developmental effects on planarian regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balestrini, Linda; Isolani, Maria Emilia; Pietra, Daniele; Borghini, Alice; Bianucci, Anna Maria; Deri, Paolo; Batistoni, Renata

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of action underlying the pharmacological properties of the natural alkaloid berberine still need investigation. Planarian regeneration is instrumental in deciphering developmental responses following drug exposure. Here we report the effects of berberine on regeneration in the planarian Dugesia japonica. Our findings demonstrate that this compound perturbs the regenerative pattern. By real-time PCR screening for the effects of berberine exposure on gene expression, we identified alterations in the transcriptional profile of genes representative of different tissues, as well as of genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Although berberine does not influence cell proliferation/apoptosis, our experiments prove that this compound causes abnormal regeneration of the planarian visual system. Potential berberine-induced cytotoxic effects were noticed in the intestine. Although we were unable to detect abnormalities in other structures, our findings, sustained by RNAi-based investigations, support the possibility that berberine effects are critically linked to anomalous ECM remodeling in treated planarians. PMID:24810466

  6. Quantitative determination of alkaloids from roots of Hydrastis canadensis L. and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UPLC with UV detection was used for the quantification of alkaloids from roots of Hydrastis canadensis L. (goldenseal) and dietary supplements claiming to contain goldenseal. The chromatographic run time was less than 6 min. The detection wavelengths used were 290 and 344 nm for '-hydrastine, canadi...

  7. (-)-β-hydrastine suppresses the proliferation and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting PAK4 kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bingyu; Li, Xiaodong; Song, Shuai; Chen, Meng; Cheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Dongmei; Li, Feng

    2016-04-01

    (-)-β-hydrastine is one of the main active components of the medicinal plant, Hydrastis canadensis, which is used in many dietary supplements intended to enhance the immune system. However, whether (-)-β-hydrastine affects the tumor signaling pathway remains unexplored. In the present study, we found that (-)-β-hydrastine inhibited the kinase activity of p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), which is involved in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization, cell proliferation, gene transcription, oncogenic transformation and cell invasion. In the present study, (-)-β-hydrastine suppressed lung adenocarcinoma cell proliferation by inhibiting expression of cyclin D1/D3 and CDK2/4/6, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, in a PAK4 kinase-dependent manner. Moreover, inhibition of PAK4 kinase activity by (-)-β-hydrastine also promoted the early apoptosis of lung adenocarcinoma cells through the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. In addition, (-)-β-hydrastine significantly suppressed the migration and invasion of human lung adenocarcinoma cells in conjunction with concomitant blockage of the PAK4/LIMK1/cofilin, PAK4/SCG10 and PAK4/MMP2 pathways. All of these data indicate that (-)-β-hydrastine, as a novel PAK4 inhibitor, suppresses the proliferation and invasion of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Taken together, these results provide novel insight into the development of a PAK4 kinase inhibitor and a potential therapeutic strategy for lung cancer. PMID:26821251

  8. Quaternary alkaloids of tinospora species.

    PubMed

    Bisset, N G; Nwaiwu, J

    1983-08-01

    The occurrence of quaternary alkaloids in TINOSPORA (and PARABAENA) species (Menispermaceae) has been studied. The main components were generally the protoberberine bases berberine and palmatine, with jatrorrhizine an occasional minor constituent, and the aporphine base magnoflorine. Choline was also often present. Only magnoflorine was detected in the PARABAENA material examined. PMID:17404996

  9. Synthesis of berberine loaded polymeric nanoparticles by central composite design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Meenakshi; Sheorain, Jyoti; Kumari, Santosh

    2016-04-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid which is extracted from bark and roots of Berberis vulgaris plant. It has been used in ayurvedic medicine as it possess antimicrobial, antidiabetic, anticancer, antioxidant properties etc. But poor solubility of berberine leads to poor stability and bioavailability in medical formulations decreasing its efficacy. Hence nanoformulations of berberine can help in removing the limiting factors of alkaloid enhancing its utilization in pharmaceutical industry. Sodium alginate polymer was used to encapsulate berberine within nanoparticles by emulsion solvent evaporation method using tween 80 as a surfactant. Two factors and three level in central composite design was used to study the formulation. The optimized formulation (1% v/v of Tween 80 and 0.01% w/v of sodium alginate) of polymeric nanoparticles was taken for further evaluations. The size of synthesized nanoparticles was found to be 71.18 nm by particle size analysis (PSA). The berberine loaded polymeric nanoparticles showed better antibacterial activity compared to aqueous solution of berberine by well diffusion assay.

  10. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    PubMed Central

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  11. Berberine and neurodegeneration: A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Touqeer; Gilani, Anwar-Ul-Hassan; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2015-10-01

    The excessive production of reactive oxygen species in nervous tissues is considered one of the major risk factors of neurodegenerative diseases. During the last two decades, much attention has been paid to the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of natural products and compounds isolated from natural products which are often characterized by high efficacy and low adverse effects. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid, widely present in different medicinal herbs, especially in the genus Berberis. It is mainly used as antidiarrhoeal, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiprotozoal agent. However, current research has focused on its beneficial role in neurodegenerative diseases, mainly due to its powerful antioxidant effect. The therapeutic potential of Berberine in different neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington disease has been brought to evidence by numerous studies. However, a limited number of reviews focus on the beneficial role of Berberine against neurodegeneration. The main objective of this review is to discuss the role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration and the potential role of antioxidant compounds, in particular Berberine which is analyzed in its chemical structure, source, bioavailability, therapeutic potential, with special attention to its mechanism of action at a molecular level. PMID:26398393

  12. Berberine suppresses migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells through down-regulation of chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh; Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Mishan, Mohammad Amir; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Moghaddam, Maryam; Mirfeyzi, Seyed Jamal Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine is one of the main alkaloids and it has been proven to have different pharmacological effects including inhibition of cell cycle and progression of apoptosis in various cancerous cells; however, its effects on cancer metastasis are not well known. Cancer cells obtain the ability to change their chemokine system and convert into metastatic cells. In this study, we examined the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration and its probable interaction with the chemokine system in cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was cultured, and then, treated with berberine (10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml) for 24 hr. MTT assay was used in order to determine the cytotoxic effect of berberine on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Wound healing assay was applied to determine the inhibitory effect of berberine on cell migration. Moreover, real-time quantitative PCR analysis of selected chemokine receptors was performed to determine the probable molecular mechanism underlying the effect of berberine on breast cancer cell migration. Results: The results of wound healing assay revealed that berberine decreases cell migration. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of some chemokine receptors were reduced after berberine treatment, and this may be the underlying mechanism for decreased cell migration. Conclusion: Our results indicate that berberine might be a potential preventive biofactor for human breast cancer metastasis by targeting chemokine receptor genes. PMID:27081456

  13. Effect of new berberine derivatives on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guamán Ortiz, Luis Miguel; Croce, Anna Leta; Aredia, Francesca; Sapienza, Simone; Fiorillo, Gaetano; Syeda, Tanjia Monir; Buzzetti, Franco; Lombardi, Paolo; Scovassi, Anna Ivana

    2015-10-01

    The natural alkaloid berberine has been recently described as a promising anticancer drug. In order to improve its efficacy and bioavailability, several derivatives have been designed and synthesized and found to be even more potent than the lead compound. Among the series of berberine derivatives we have produced, five compounds were identified to be able to heavily affect the proliferation of human HCT116 and SW613-B3 colon carcinoma cell lines. Remarkably, these active compounds exhibit high fluorescence emission property and ability to induce autophagy. PMID:26341980

  14. Radiolysis of berberine or palmatine in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marszalek, Milena; Wolszczak, Marian

    2011-01-01

    The reactions of hydrated electron (eaq-), hydrogen atom (H rad ) (reducing species) and Cl2•-, Br2•-, N,O•H radicals (oxidizing species) with berberine or palmatine in aqueous solution have been studied by steady-state and pulse radiolysis. The spectra of transient intermediates, leading to the final products, are presented. The rate constants of the reaction of eaq- and rad OH radical with both alkaloids in the homogenous solution and in the presence of DNA are reported. It is demonstrated that the primary products of the reaction of berberine and palmatine with eaq- and radicals generated during radiolysis are unstable and undergo further reactions.

  15. Effects of berberine in the gastrointestinal tract - a review of actions and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunqiu; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid present in several plant species, including Coptis sp. and Berberis sp. In traditional medicine, extracts of berberine are used in the treatment of diarrhea of different origins. Recent studies have shown that berberine and its derivatives have significant biological effects on gastrointestinal (GI) and other functions and may become therapeutics for the treatment of diarrhea, gastroenteritis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory conditions. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the actions of berberine in the GI tract. Binding and target sites, activated intracellular pathways, as well as the absorption and metabolism of berberine are discussed. Effects that may be useful in future clinical treatment, like antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects are critically reviewed and potential clinical applications are presented in detail. PMID:25183302

  16. Multiple Effects of Berberine Derivatives on Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guamán Ortiz, Luis Miguel; Dutto, Ilaria; Arcamone, Andrea G.; Buzzetti, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological use of the plant alkaloid berberine is based on its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; recently, anticancer activity has been attributed to this compound. To exploit this interesting feature, we synthesized three berberine derivatives, namely, NAX012, NAX014, and NAX018, and we tested their effects on two human colon carcinoma cell lines, that is, HCT116 and SW613-B3, which are characterized by wt and mutated p53, respectively. We observed that cell proliferation is more affected by cell treatment with the derivatives than with the lead compound; moreover, the derivatives proved to induce cell cycle arrest and cell death through apoptosis, thus suggesting that they could be promising anticancer drugs. Finally, we detected typical signs of autophagy in cells treated with berberine derivatives. PMID:25045712

  17. In vivo anticoccidial activity of berberine [18, 5,6-dihydro-9,10-dimethoxybenzo(g)-1,3-benzodioxolo(5,6-a) quinolizinium]--an isoquinoline alkaloid present in the root bark of Berberis lycium.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tauseef Ahmad; Kamili, Azra N; Chishti, M Z; Tanveer, Syed; Ahad, Shazia; Johri, R K

    2014-04-15

    Coccidiosis, caused by various Eimeria species, is a major parasitic disease in chicken. However the increasing resistance of these parasites to currently used anticoccidial drugs has stimulated the search for new methods of control. As part of this effort we investigated the root bark of Berberis lycium (barberry) as a potential source of compounds with anticoccidial activity. In the present study anticoccidial activity of different solvent extracts of the root bark of B. lycium and berberine was evaluated in vivo using broiler chicken. Results of the study demonstrated equipotent efficacy of pure berberine in comparison to that of standard drug amprolium on the basis of reduction in coccidian oocyst output, body weight gain of chicken and feed conversion ratio. Among the extracts crude methanolic extract showed highest anticoccidial activity tested at 300 mg/kg body weight which could be due to the presence of alcohol-soluble active ingredients in root bark of B. lycium. Toxicological studies revealed that B. lycium extracts as well as berberine were not lethal up to dosage of 2000 mg/kg body weight. LD(50) was not determined as mortalities were not recorded in any of the five groups of chicken. From the present study it can be concluded that root bark of B. lycium has the immense potential to contribute to the control of coccidian parasites of chicken. Our results corroborate the use of berberine for treatment of severe diarrhoea, amoebiasis and intestinal infections and could justify its use in folk medicine for treatment of haemorrhagic dysentery. PMID:24411651

  18. Berberine attenuates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Zhang, J; Tong, N; Liao, X; Wang, E; Li, Z; Luo, Y; Zuo, H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of berberine, a natural alkaloid, on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with saline 10 ml/kg (n = 10), doxorubicin 2.5 mg/kg (n = 10), 60 mg/kg berberine 1 h before doxorubicin 2.5 mg/kg (n = 10), or 60 mg/kg berberine alone (n = 10) every other day for 14 days. Body weight, general condition and mortality were recorded over the 14-day study period. Electro cardiography was performed before the start of treatment and after 14 days and plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was measured after 14 days. At the end of the study period the heart was excised and examined histologically. An increase in mortality, an initial decrease in body weight, increased LDH activity, prolongation of QRS duration and increased myocardial injury were seen in the doxorubicin-treated group compared with the saline control group. These changes were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with berberine. The study suggests that berberine may have a potential protective role against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice. PMID:22117972

  19. Berberine sulfate inhibits tumor-promoting activity of teleocidin in two-stage carcinogenesis on mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Nishino, H; Kitagawa, K; Fujiki, H; Iwashima, A

    1986-01-01

    Berberine sulfate, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Hydrastis canadensis L., inhibited the effects of the tumor promoters 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate and teleocidin, such as increased 32Pi-incorporation into phospholipids of cell membrane and hexose transport. Berberine sulfate also markedly suppressed the promoting effect of teleocidin on skin tumor formation in mice initiated with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. PMID:3081844

  20. Berberine: New Insights from Pharmacological Aspects to Clinical Evidences in the Management of Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, Cristiana; Franco, Placido; Spinozzi, Silvia; Roda, Aldo; Cicero, Arrigo F G

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is a quaternary ammonium salt from the protoberberine group of isoquinoline alkaloids found in such plants as gender Berberis. Berberine is recognised to improve glucose and lipid metabolism disorders and preliminary clinical evidences suggest the ability of berberine to reduce endothelial inflammation improving vascular health, even in patients already affected by cardiovascular diseases, suggesting a possible interesting role of berberine and its metabolites in clinical practice. However, its physicochemical properties, pharmacokinetic, and metabolism are not fully elucidated and contradictory data have been reported. This review provides a summary regarding the pharmacological and biological features of berberine, with a focus on berberine as well as their pharmacologically active metabolites and the different mechanisms underlying their activities in order to clarify the correct use of berberine supplementation, alone or in association with other nutraceuticals, for the management of metabolic disorders associated to increased cardiovascular disease risk. A particular attention has also been given to the available clinical trials assessing its short- and middle- term use tolerability, safety and efficacy in various conditions, such as dyslipidaemia, impaired fasting glucose, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27063256

  1. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Yan-Chen; Kang, Jia-Rui; Chu, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Kai-Lin; Ding, Ling-Yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-Xin; Yin, Yi-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs' aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases. PMID:27103062

  2. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Yan-Chen; Kang, Jia-Rui; Chu, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Kai-Lin; Ding, Ling-Yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-Xin; Yin, Yi-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2016-04-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases.

  3. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-bo; Liu, Yan-chen; Kang, Jia-rui; Chu, Zheng-yun; Yin, Kai-lin; Ding, Ling-yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-xin; Yin, Yi-nan; Liu, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yue-dan

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases. PMID:27103062

  4. Role of berberine in anti-bacterial as a high-affinity LPS antagonist binding to TLR4/MD-2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly extracted from Rhizoma Coptidis and has been shown to possess a potent inhibitory activity against bacterial. However, the role of berberine in anti-bacterial action has not been extensively studied. Methods The animal model was established to investigate the effects of berberine on bacterial and LPS infection. Docking analysis, Molecular dynamics simulations and Real-time RT-PCR analysis was adopted to investigate the molecular mechanism. Results Treatment with 40 mg/kg berberine significantly increased the survival rate of mice challenged with Salmonella typhimurium (LT2), but berberine show no effects in bacteriostasis. Further study indicated that treatment with 0.20 g/kg berberine markedly increased the survival rate of mice challenged with 2 EU/ml bacterial endotoxin (LPS) and postpone the death time of the dead mice. Moreover, pretreatment with 0.05 g/kg berberine significantly lower the increasing temperature of rabbits challenged with LPS. The studies of molecular mechanism demonstrated that Berberine was able to bind to the TLR4/MD-2 receptor, and presented higher affinity in comparison with LPS. Furthermore, berberine could significantly suppressed the increasing expression of NF-κB, IL-6, TNFα, and IFNβ in the RAW264.7 challenged with LPS. Conclusion Berberine can act as a LPS antagonist and block the LPS/TLR4 signaling from the sourse, resulting in the anti-bacterial action. PMID:24602493

  5. Potential antimutagenic activity of berberine, a constituent of Mahonia aquifolium

    PubMed Central

    Čerňáková, Marta; Košt'álová, Daniela; Kettmann, Viktor; Plodová, Miriam; Tóth, Jaroslav; Dřímal, Ján

    2002-01-01

    Background As part of a study aimed at developing new pharmaceutical products from natural resources, the purpose of this research was twofold: (1) to fractionate crude extracts from the bark of Mahonia aquifolium and (2) to evaluate the strength of the antimutagenic activity of the separate components against one of the common direct-acting chemical mutagens. Methods The antimutagenic potency was evaluated against acridine orange (AO) by using Euglena gracilis as an eukaryotic test model, based on the ability of the test compound/fraction to prevent the mutagen-induced damage of chloroplast DNA. Results It was found that the antimutagenicity of the crude Mahonia extract resides in both bis-benzylisoquinoline (BBI) and protoberberine alkaloid fractions but only the protoberberine derivatives, jatrorrhizine and berberine, showed significant concentration-dependent inhibitory effect against the AO-induced chloroplast mutagenesis of E. gracilis. Especially berberine elicited, at a very low dose, remarkable suppression of the AO-induced mutagenicity, its antimutagenic potency being almost three orders of magnitude higher when compared to its close analogue, jatrorrhizine. Possible mechanisms of the antimutagenic action are discussed in terms of recent literature data. While the potent antimutagenic activity of the protoberberines most likely results from the inhibition of DNA topoisomerase I, the actual mechanism(s) for the BBI alkaloids is hard to be identified. Conclusions Taken together, the results indicate that berberine possesses promising antimutagenic/anticarcinogenic potential that is worth to be investigated further. PMID:11943071

  6. Protective mechanisms of berberine against experimental autoimmune myocarditis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuefei; Zhang, Xinghua; Ye, Lin; Yuan, Haitao

    2016-04-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid derivative extracted from numerous plants of the general Berberis and Coptis, has been reported to have immunomodulatory effects against immune-mediated disorders in emerging studies. In this study, the effects of berberine and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated from the myosin-induced myocardial injury in rats. Lewis rats were immunized with porcine cardiac myosin to induce experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM), treated with berberine and specific JAK inhibitor AG490 as a positive control. Our data showed that both berberine and AG490 significantly reduced the impaired cardiac function and the pathophysiological severity, impeded high levels of anti-cardiac myosin antibody of EAM rats. Th17 and Th1 cells as well as their cytokines IL-17 and IFN-γ were up-regulated in EAM. However, the excessive increase of Th17/Th1 responses was restored by berberine and AG490. We also examined the expression level of phosphorylated proteins of JAK-STAT pathway which has a key role in the Th17 and Th1 lineage commitment. The phosphorylated (p)-STAT1,STAT3 and STAT4 increased significantly in EAM, while berberine notably attenuated their excessive expression. This effect of berberine was equivalent to that of AG490 blockade. Our current study demonstrated that berberine could ameliorate EAM and the underling mechanisms may be due to the fact that berberine differentially modulates the activities of p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT4 to suppress Th17 and Th1 cell differentiation. PMID:27044832

  7. Berberine Inhibits the Release of Glutamate in Nerve Terminals from Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2013-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline plant alkaloid, protects neurons against neurotoxicity. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. In this study, we investigated whether berberine could affect endogenous glutamate release in nerve terminals of rat cerebral cortex (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Berberine inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was prevented by the chelating extracellular Ca2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Inhibition of glutamate release by berberine was not due to it decreasing synaptosomal excitability, because berberine did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of berberine on glutamate release was associated with a reduction in the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration. Involvement of the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels in the berberine action was confirmed by blockade of the berberine-mediated inhibition of glutamate release by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA. In addition, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitors. Berberine decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synapsin I, the main presynaptic target of ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibition. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of berberine on evoked glutamate release was prevented in nerve terminals from mice lacking synapsin I. Together, these results indicated that berberine inhibits glutamate release from rats cortical synaptosomes, through the suppression of presynaptic Cav2.1 channels and ERK/synapsin I signaling

  8. Microbial production of plant benzylisoquinoline alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hiromichi; Kim, Ju-Sung; Ikezawa, Nobuhiro; Takemura, Tomoya; Katayama, Takane; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Sato, Fumihiko

    2008-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, such as the analgesic compounds morphine and codeine, and the antibacterial agents berberine, palmatine, and magnoflorine, are synthesized from tyrosine in the Papaveraceae, Berberidaceae, Ranunculaceae, Magnoliaceae, and many other plant families. It is difficult to produce alkaloids on a large scale under the strict control of secondary metabolism in plants, and they are too complex for cost-effective chemical synthesis. By using a system that combines microbial and plant enzymes to produce desired benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, we synthesized (S)-reticuline, the key intermediate in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis, from dopamine by crude enzymes from transgenic Escherichia coli. The final yield of (S)-reticuline was 55 mg/liter within 1 h. Furthermore, we synthesized an aporphine alkaloid, magnoflorine, or a protoberberine alkaloid, scoulerine, from dopamine via reticuline by using different combination cultures of transgenic E. coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The final yields of magnoflorine and scoulerine were 7.2 and 8.3 mg/liter culture medium. These results indicate that microbial systems that incorporate plant genes cannot only enable the mass production of scarce benzylisoquinoline alkaloids but may also open up pathways for the production of novel benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. PMID:18492807

  9. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Huang, Min; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made. PMID:22988474

  10. Berberine potently attenuates intestinal polyps growth in ApcMin mice and familial adenomatous polyposis patients through inhibition of Wnt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junfang; Cao, Hailong; Zhang, Bing; Cao, Hanwei; Xu, Xiuqin; Ruan, Hang; Yi, Tingting; Tan, Li; Qu, Rui; Song, Gang; Wang, Bangmao; Hu, Tianhui

    2013-01-01

    As a traditional anti-inflammatory Chinese herbal medicine, Alkaloid berberine has been recently reported to exhibit anti-tumour effects against a wide spectrum of cancer. However, the mechanism was largely unknown. Gene chip array reveals that with berberine treatment, c-Myc, the target gene of Wnt pathway, was down-regulated 5.3-folds, indicating that berberine might inhibit Wnt signalling. TOPflash analysis revealed that Wnt activity was significantly reduced after berberine treatment, and the mechanism of which might be that berberine disrupted β-catenin transfer to nucleus through up-regulating the expression of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene and stabilized APC-β-catenin complex. Berberine administration in ApcMin/+ mice exhibited fewer and smaller polyps in intestine, along with reduction in cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression. In clinical practice, oral administration of berberine also significantly reduced the familial adenomatous polyposis patients' polyp size along with the inhibition of cyclin D1 expression in polyp samples. These observations indicate that berberine inhibits colon tumour formation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signalling and berberine might be a promising drug for the prevention of colon cancer. PMID:24015932

  11. Protective effects of berberine on doxorubicin-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Jie; Tong, Nannan; Chen, Youran; Luo, Yonghuang

    2012-01-01

    Doxorubicin, a very potent and often used anti-cancer drug, is largely limited due to the dose-related toxic effects. The present study investigated whether berberine, a natural product alkaloid, can reduce the liver injury induced by doxorubicin. Mice of either gender were randomly divided into four groups: the control group, doxorubicin group, berberine group, and berberine+doxorubicin group. In the tests, body weight, general condition and mortality of the mice were observed, and serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase levels were determined to evaluate liver function. Furthermore, the liver was excised for determination of the weight changes, as well as histopathological analysis in the tissues. Mortality rate and significant decline in body weight, and increased plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate transaminase activities were observed in doxorubicin-treated mice. These changes were significantly prevented by pretreatment with berberine. Histopathological studies showed that doxorubicin caused structural injuries, such as vascular congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, hepatocellular degeneration and necrosis, fibrosis in the liver. These histopathological changes were largely attenuated by berberine pretreatment. These findings indicate that berberine has the hepatoprotective effect on doxorubicin-induced liver injury in mice. PMID:22687420

  12. Metformin and berberine prevent olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueshan; Young, Alan J; Ehli, Erik A; Nowotny, Dustin; Davies, Paige S; Droke, Elizabeth A; Soundy, Timothy J; Davies, Gareth E

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is a first line medication for the treatment of schizophrenia, but it is also one of the atypical antipsychotics carrying the highest risk of weight gain. Metformin was reported to produce significant attenuation of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in patients, while the study of preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain in an animal model is absent. Berberine, an herbal alkaloid, was shown in our previous studies to prevent fat accumulation in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing a well-replicated rat model of olanzapine-induced weight gain, here we demonstrated that two weeks of metformin or berberine treatment significantly prevented the olanzapine-induced weight gain and white fat accumulation. Neither metformin nor berberine treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of olanzapine-increased food intake. But interestingly, a significant loss of brown adipose tissue caused by olanzapine treatment was prevented by the addition of metformin or berberine. Our gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the weight gain prevention efficacy of metformin or berberine treatment was associated with changes in the expression of multiple key genes controlling energy expenditure. This study not only demonstrates a significant preventive efficacy of metformin and berberine treatment on olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats, but also suggests a potential mechanism of action for preventing olanzapine-reduced energy expenditure. PMID:24667776

  13. Metformin and Berberine Prevent Olanzapine-Induced Weight Gain in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yueshan; Young, Alan J.; Ehli, Erik A.; Nowotny, Dustin; Davies, Paige S.; Droke, Elizabeth A.; Soundy, Timothy J.; Davies, Gareth E.

    2014-01-01

    Olanzapine is a first line medication for the treatment of schizophrenia, but it is also one of the atypical antipsychotics carrying the highest risk of weight gain. Metformin was reported to produce significant attenuation of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in patients, while the study of preventing olanzapine-induced weight gain in an animal model is absent. Berberine, an herbal alkaloid, was shown in our previous studies to prevent fat accumulation in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing a well-replicated rat model of olanzapine-induced weight gain, here we demonstrated that two weeks of metformin or berberine treatment significantly prevented the olanzapine-induced weight gain and white fat accumulation. Neither metformin nor berberine treatment demonstrated a significant inhibition of olanzapine-increased food intake. But interestingly, a significant loss of brown adipose tissue caused by olanzapine treatment was prevented by the addition of metformin or berberine. Our gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the weight gain prevention efficacy of metformin or berberine treatment was associated with changes in the expression of multiple key genes controlling energy expenditure. This study not only demonstrates a significant preventive efficacy of metformin and berberine treatment on olanzapine-induced weight gain in rats, but also suggests a potential mechanism of action for preventing olanzapine-reduced energy expenditure. PMID:24667776

  14. Inhibitory effect of berberine on human skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, D X; Zhang, J; Zhang, Y; Zhao, P W; Yang, L M

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural alkaloid with significant anti-tumor activity against many types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms employed by BBR to repress the proliferation and growth of skin squamous cell carcinoma A431 cells. Berberine was reported to inhibit the proliferation of A431 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was observed to induce a series of biochemical events, including the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c to cytosol, induction of proteins of the Bcl-2 family and caspases, and the cleavage of poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase. This suggested its ability to induce apoptosis. The results of a wound healing test revealed that berberine inhibited the migration of A431 cells. Ezrin was transfected into A431 cells by RNA interference. The level of expression of Ezrin in the transfected A431 cells was observed to decrease with berberine treatment, which suggested that berberine might inhibit the invasion of A431 cells through Ezrin. The results of this study demonstrated that berberine could potentially inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and inhibit the invasion of A431 cells. PMID:26400287

  15. Inhibition of CYP1 by berberine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine: Selectivity, kinetic characterization, and molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Sheng-Nan; Chang, Yu-Ping; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Chia-Yu; Wu, Tian-Shung; Ueng, Yune-Fang

    2013-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) 1 family plays a primary role in the detoxification and bioactivation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Human CYP1A1, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1 exhibit differential substrate specificity and tissue distribution. Berberine, palmatine, and jatrorrhizine are protoberberine alkaloids present in several medicinal herbs, such as Coptis chinensis (Huang-Lian) and goldenseal. These protoberberines inhibited CYP1A1.1- and CYP1B1.1-catalyzed 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD) activities, whereas CYP1A2.1 activity was barely affected. Kinetic analysis revealed that berberine noncompetitively inhibited EROD activities of CYP1A1.1 and CYP1B1.1, whereas palmatine and jatrorrhizine caused either competitive or mixed type of inhibition. Among protoberberines, berberine caused the most potent and selective inhibitory effect on CYP1B1.1 with the least K{sub i} value of 44 ± 16 nM. Berberine also potently inhibited CYP1B1.1 activities toward 7-ethoxycoumarin and 7-methoxyresorufin, whereas the inhibition of benzo(a)pyrene hydroxylation activity was less pronounced. Berberine inhibited the polymorphic variants, CYP1B1.3 (V432L) and CYP1B1.4 (N453S), with IC{sub 50} values comparable to that for CYP1B1.1 inhibition. Berberine-mediated inhibition was abolished by a mutation of Asn228 to Thr in CYP1B1.1, whereas the inhibition was enhanced by a reversal mutation of Thr223 to Asn in CYP1A2.1. This result in conjugation with the molecular modeling revealed the crucial role of hydrogen-bonding interaction of Asn228 on CYP1B1.1 with the methoxy moiety of berberine. These findings demonstrate that berberine causes a selective CYP1B1-inhibition, in which Asn228 appears to be crucial. The inhibitory effects of berberine on CYP1B1 activities toward structurally diverse substrates can be different. - Highlights: • Berberine preferentially inhibited CYP1B1 activity. • Berberine caused similar inhibitory effects on CYP1B1.1, CYP1B1.3 and CYP1B1.4. • Asn228 in CYP

  16. Berberine suppresses Id-1 expression and inhibits the growth and development of lung metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Man; Cheung, Kenneth Chat Pan; Cheung, Yuk Chun; Man, Kwan; Lui, Vivian Wai-Yan; Tsao, Sai Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an invasive cancer with a high rate of recurrence and metastasis. Agents with anti-proliferative as well as anti-metastatic activity will be ideal for effective treatment. Here, we demonstrated that berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, harbored potent anti-metastatic and anti-proliferative activities in vivo. Using an orthotopic model of HCC (MHCC-97L), which spontaneously develops lung metastases (one of the most common sites of HCC metastasis), we found that berberine treatment (10mg/kg/2days) significantly reduced lung metastasis from the liver tumors by ~85% (quantitated by bioluminescence emitted from lung metastases). Histological examination also confirmed the reduced incidence and number of lung metastases in berberine-treated mice. Furthermore, berberine effectively suppressed extra-tumor invasion of the primary HCC implant into the surrounding normal liver tissue, illustrating its potent anti-metastatic action in vivo. Consistent with previous reports in other cancer, berberine's anti-tumor activity was accompanied by suppression of cellular proliferation, invasiveness and HIF-1α/VEGF signaling. Strikingly, further mechanistic investigation revealed that berberine exerted profound inhibitory effect on the expression of Id-1, which is a key regulator for HCC development and metastasis. Berberine could suppress the transcription level of Id-1 through inhibiting its promotor activity. Specific downregulation of Id-1 by knocking down its RNA transcripts in HCC cells inhibited cellular growth, invasion and VEGF secretion, demonstrating the functional relevance of Id-1 downregulation induced by berberine. Lastly, berberine's anti-proliferative and anti-invasive activities could be partially rescued by Id-1 overexpression in HCC models, revealing a novel anti-cancer/anti-invasive mechanism of berberine via Id-1 suppression. PMID:25496992

  17. Uptake of and Resistance to the Antibiotic Berberine by Individual Dormant, Germinating and Outgrowing Bacillus Spores as Monitored by Laser Tweezers Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Jing; Suvira, Milomir; Setlow, Peter; Li, Yong-qing

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid originally extracted from the plant Coptis chinensis and other herb plants, has been used as a pharmacological substance for many years. The therapeutic effect of berberine has been attributed to its interaction with nucleic acids and blocking cell division. However, levels of berberine entering individual microbial cells minimal for growth inhibition and its effects on bacterial spores have not been determined. In this work the kinetics and levels of berberine accumulation by individual dormant and germinated spores were measured by laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy and differential interference and fluorescence microscopy, and effects of berberine on spore germination and outgrowth and spore and growing cell viability were determined. The major conclusions from this work are that: (1) colony formation from B. subtilis spores was blocked ~ 99% by 25 μg/mL berberine plus 20 μg/mL INF55 (a multidrug resistance pump inhibitor); (2) 200 μg/mL berberine had no effect on B. subtilis spore germination with L-valine, but spore outgrowth was completely blocked; (3) berberine levels accumulated in single spores germinating with ≥ 25 μg/mL berberine were > 10 mg/mL; (4) fluorescence microscopy showed that germinated spores accumulated high-levels of berberine primarily in the spore core, while dormant spores accumulated very low berberine levels primarily in spore coats; and (5) during germination, uptake of berberine began at the time of commitment (T1) and reached a maximum after the completion of CaDPA release (Trelease) and spore cortex lysis (Tlysis). PMID:26636757

  18. Antiproliferation of berberine is mediated by epigenetic modification of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) metabolic pathway in hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Miao, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Xin; Pan, Hai-Hui; Li, Pu; Ren, Hong; Jia, Yong-Rui; Lu, Chuang; Wang, Hong-Bing; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates hepatic xenobiotic and energy metabolism, as well as promotes cell growth and hepatocarcinogenesis. Berberine is an ancient multipotent alkaloid drug which derived from Coptis chinensis plants. Here we report that berberine is able to be cellular uptake and accessible to chromatin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine induces more apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, but less ROS production in CAR overexpressed mCAR-HepG2 cells. Moreover, berberine inhibits expressions of CAR and its target genes CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. Furthermore, berberine enhances DNA methylation level in whole genome but reduces that in promoter regions CpG sites of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 genes under the presence of CAR condition. These results indicated that the antiproliferation of berberine might be mediated by the unique epigenetic modifying mechanism of CAR metabolic pathway, suggesting that berberine is a promising candidate in anticancer adjuvant chemotherapy, due to its distinct pharmacological properties in clinic. PMID:27311637

  19. Antiproliferation of berberine is mediated by epigenetic modification of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) metabolic pathway in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Miao, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Xin; Pan, Hai-Hui; Li, Pu; Ren, Hong; Jia, Yong-Rui; Lu, Chuang; Wang, Hong-Bing; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Guo-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates hepatic xenobiotic and energy metabolism, as well as promotes cell growth and hepatocarcinogenesis. Berberine is an ancient multipotent alkaloid drug which derived from Coptis chinensis plants. Here we report that berberine is able to be cellular uptake and accessible to chromatin in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine induces more apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, but less ROS production in CAR overexpressed mCAR-HepG2 cells. Moreover, berberine inhibits expressions of CAR and its target genes CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. Furthermore, berberine enhances DNA methylation level in whole genome but reduces that in promoter regions CpG sites of CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 genes under the presence of CAR condition. These results indicated that the antiproliferation of berberine might be mediated by the unique epigenetic modifying mechanism of CAR metabolic pathway, suggesting that berberine is a promising candidate in anticancer adjuvant chemotherapy, due to its distinct pharmacological properties in clinic. PMID:27311637

  20. Modulations of cytochrome P450 expression in diabetic mice by berberine.

    PubMed

    Chatuphonprasert, Waranya; Nemoto, Nobuo; Sakuma, Tsutomu; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan

    2012-03-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from medicinal plants such as Berberis aristata, Coptis chinesis, Coptis japonica, Coscinium fenestatun, and Hydrastis Canadensis, is widely used in Asian countries for the treatment of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Interaction between berberine and the cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) has been extensively reported, but there are only a few reports of this interaction in the diabetic state. In this study, the effect of berberine on the mRNA of the CYPs in primary mouse hepatocytes and in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice was investigated. In primary mouse hepatocytes, berberine suppressed the induction of Cyp1a1, Cyp1a2, Cyp2e1, Cyp3a11, Cyp4a10, and Cyp4a14 mRNA expression by their prototypical inducers in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, berberine treatment alone increased the expression of Cyp2b9 and Cyp2b10 mRNA. In vivo, berberine showed the same hypoglycemic activity as metformin, an established hypoglycemic drug. The hepatic mRNA levels of Cyp1a1, Cyp2b9, Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, Cyp4a10, and Cyp4a14 were increased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. Interestingly, berberine itself suppressed the expression of Cyp2e1, an adverse hepatic event-associated enzyme, while the expression of Cyp3a11, Cyp4a10, and Cyp4a14 were restored to normal levels by berberine. In conclusion, berberine has the potential to modify the expression of CYPs by either suppression or enhancement of CYPs' levels. Consumption of berberine as an anti-hyperglycemic compound by diabetic patients might provide an extra benefit due to its potential to restore the expression of Cyp2e1, Cyp3a, and Cyp4a to normal levels. However, an herb-drug interaction might be of concern since any berberine-containing product would definitely cause pronounced interactions based on CYP3A4 inhibition. PMID:22342832

  1. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  2. Systems pharmacology to investigate the interaction of berberine and other drugs in treating polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Fu, Xin; Xu, Jing; Wang, Qiuhong; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common multifactorial endocrine disorder among women of childbearing age. PCOS has various and heterogeneous clinical features apart from its indefinite pathogenesis and mechanism. Clinical drugs for PCOS are multifarious because it only treats separate symptoms. Berberine is an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with numerous biological activities, and it was testified to improve some diseases related to PCOS in animal models and in humans. Systems pharmacology was utilized to predict the potential targets of berberine related to PCOS and the potential drug-drug interaction base on the disease network. In conclusion, berberine is a promising polypharmacological drug for treating PCOS, and for enhancing the efficacy of clinical drugs. PMID:27306862

  3. Vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Moudi, Maryam; Go, Rusea; Yien, Christina Yong Seok; Nazre, Mohd

    2013-11-01

    Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL), vinorelbine (VRL), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS). VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard. PMID:24404355

  4. Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Moudi, Maryam; Go, Rusea; Yien, Christina Yong Seok; Nazre, Mohd.

    2013-01-01

    Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL), vinorelbine (VRL), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS). VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard. PMID:24404355

  5. Digital Gene Expression Analysis of Microsporum canis Exposed to Berberine Chloride

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chen-Wen; Ji, Quan-An; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Yan; Pan, Li-Jun; Bao, Guo-Lian

    2015-01-01

    Berberine, a natural isoquinoline alkaloid of many medicinal herbs, has an active function against a variety of microbial infections including Microsporum canis (M. canis). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To study the effect of berberine chloride on M. canis infection, a Digital Gene Expression (DGE) tag profiling was constructed and a transcriptome analysis of the M. canis cellular responses upon berberine treatment was performed. Illimina/Hisseq sequencing technique was used to generate the data of gene expression profile, and the following enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology (GO) and Pathway function were conducted based on the data of transcriptome. The results of DGE showed that there were 8476945, 14256722, 7708575, 5669955, 6565513 and 9303468 tags respectively, which was obtained from M. canis incubated with berberine or control DMSO. 8,783 genes were totally mapped, and 1,890 genes have shown significant changes between the two groups. 1,030 genes were up-regulated and 860 genes were down-regulated (P<0.05) in berberine treated group compared to the control group. Besides, twenty-three GO terms were identified by Gene Ontology functional enrichment analysis, such as calcium-transporting ATPase activity, 2-oxoglutarate metabolic process, valine catabolic process, peroxisome and unfolded protein binding. Pathway significant enrichment analysis indicated 6 signaling pathways that are significant, including steroid biosynthesis, steroid hormone biosynthesis, Parkinson’s disease, 2,4-Dichlorobenzoate degradation, and tropane, piperidine and Isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis. Among these, eleven selected genes were further verified by qRT-PCR. Our findings provide a comprehensive view on the gene expression profile of M. canis upon berberine treatment, and shed light on its complicated effects on M. canis. PMID:25874937

  6. [Effect of berberine, glaucine, stephaglabrine and sanguiritrine on neuromuscular transmission].

    PubMed

    Bitkov, V V; Khashaev, Kh -M; Pronevich, L A; Nenashev, V A; Batrakov, S G

    1991-01-01

    Natural alkaloid drugs, glaucine, stephaglabrine and sanguiritrine, are shown to affect the synaptic transmission in a fairly complicated manner and seem to involve several different mechanisms of action. These substances as well as berberine reduce amplitude of the spontaneous miniature end plate potentials in a frog neuromuscular junction. At low concentrations all the mentioned alkaloids diminish frequency of miniature potentials, but increase it when their concentration exceeds a certain value. Sanguiritrine is the most active in this respect (nearly a 100-fold increase), that is probably associated with its uncoupling effect on the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Sanguiritrine and stephaglabrine both cause repeated muscle contractions, that is in line with their anti-cholinesterase properties. Glaucine provokes only muscle contracture if present at relatively high concentration. PMID:1652103

  7. Berberine Reduces Neurotoxicity Related to Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghareeb, Doaa A.; Khalil, Sofia; Hafez, Hani S.; Bajorath, Jürgen; Ahmed, Hany E. A.; Sarhan, Eman; Elwakeel, Eiman; El-Demellawy, Maha A.

    2015-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid that has several pharmacological effects such as antioxidant, antilipidemic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) triggers different aspects of disorders such as impaired endogenous lipid metabolism, hypercholesterolemia, oxidative stress, and neurotoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism by which NASH induces neurotoxicity and the protective effect of berberine against both NASH and its associated neurotoxicity. NASH induced rats showed significant impairments in lipid metabolism with increased serum triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The NASH induced group also demonstrated a significant oxidative stress which is characterized by increased TBARs level and decreased antioxidant capacity such as GSH and SOD levels. Moreover, the NASH induction was associated with inflammation which was demonstrated by increased TNFα and nitric oxide levels. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were observed in the NASH induced group. Also, our results showed a significant increase in the expression of the acetylcholine esterase (AChE) and amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP). These changes were significantly correlated with decreased insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) and beta-amyloid40 (Aβ40) and increased beta-amyloid42 (Aβ42) in the hippocampal region. Daily administration of berberine (50 mg/kg) for three weeks ameliorated oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and the observed neurotoxicity. PMID:26576191

  8. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-An; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2016-07-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  9. Berberine ameliorates cartilage degeneration in interleukin-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes and in a rat model of osteoarthritis via Akt signalling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honghai; Zhang, Tongen; Xia, Chun; Shi, Lei; Wang, Shaojie; Zheng, Xinpeng; Hu, Tianhui; Zhang, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Berberine, a plant alkaloid used in Chinese medicine, has broad cell-protective functions in a variety of cell lines. Chondrocyte apoptosis contributes to the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known about the effect and underlying mechanism of berberine on OA chondrocytes. Here, we assessed the effects of berberine on cartilage degeneration in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-stimulated rat chondrocytes and in a rat model of OA. The results of an MTT assay and western blotting analysis showed that berberine attenuated the inhibitory effect of IL-1β on the cell viability and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat chondrocytes. Furthermore, berberine activated Akt, which triggered p70S6K/S6 pathway and up-regulated the levels of aggrecan and Col II expression in IL-1β-stimulated rat chondrocytes. In addition, berberine increased the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage, with the elevated levels of Col II, p-Akt and p-S6 expression in a rat OA model, as demonstrated by histopathological and immunohistochemistry techniques. The data thus strongly suggest that berberine may ameliorate cartilage degeneration from OA by promoting cell survival and matrix production of chondrocytes, which was partly attributed to the activation of Akt in IL-1β-stimulated articular chondrocytes and in a rat OA model. The resultant chondroprotective effects indicate that berberine merits consideration as a therapeutic agent in OA. PMID:24286347

  10. Activating transcription factor-3 induction is involved in the anti-inflammatory action of berberine in RAW264.7 murine macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-An

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid found in Rhizoma coptidis, and elicits anti-inflammatory effects through diverse mechanisms. Based on previous reports that activating transcription factor-3 (ATF-3) acts as a negative regulator of LPS signaling, the authors investigated the possible involvement of ATF-3 in the anti-inflammatory effects of berberine. It was found berberine concentration-dependently induced the expressions of ATF-3 at the mRNA and protein levels and concomitantly suppressed the LPS-induced productions of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β). In addition, ATF-3 knockdown abolished the inhibitory effects of berberine on LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production, and prevented the berberine-induced suppression of MAPK phosphorylation, but had little effect on AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, the effects of berberine, that is, ATF-3 induction, proinflammatory cytokine inhibition, and MAPK inactivation, were prevented by AMPK knockdown, suggesting ATF-3 induction occurs downstream of AMPK activation. The in vivo administration of berberine to mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia increased ATF-3 expression and AMPK phosphorylation in spleen and lung tissues, and concomitantly reduced the plasma and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines. These results suggest berberine has an anti-inflammatory effect on macrophages and that this effect is attributable, at least in part, to pathways involving AMPK activation and ATF-3 induction. PMID:27382358

  11. Effects of berberine on proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis of human breast cancer T47D and MCF7 cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Barzegar, Elmira; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Movahhed, Tahereh Komeili; Atashpour, Shekoufeh; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Azizi, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Berberine, a naturally occurring isoquinoline alkaloid, has shown antitumor properties in some in vitro systems. But the effect of berberine on breast cancer has not yet been completely studied. In this study, we evaluated anticancer properties of berberine in comparison to doxorubicin. Materials and Methods: The antiproliferative effects of berberine and doxorubicin alone and in combination were evaluated in T47D and MCF7 cell lines using MTT cytotoxicity assay. In addition, flow cytometry analysis was performed to evaluate the cell cycle alteration and apoptosis induction in these cell lines following exposure to berberine and doxorubicin alone and in combination. Results: The IC50 of berberine was determined to be 25 µM after 48 hr of treatment in both cell lines but for doxorubicin it was 250 nM and 500 nM in T47D and MCF-7 cell lines, respectively. Co-treatment with berberine and doxorubicin increased cytotoxicity in T47D cells more significantly than in MCF-7 cells. Flow cytometry results demonstrated that berberine alone or in combination with doxorubicin induced G2/M arrest in the T47D cells, but G0/G1 arrest in the MCF-7 cells. Doxorubicin alone induced G2/M arrest in both cell lines. Furthermore, berberine and doxorubicin alone or in combination significantly induced apoptosis in both cell lines. Conclusion: Berberine alone and in combination with doxorubicin inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and altered cell cycle distribution of breast cancer cells. Therefore, berberine showed to be a good candidate for further studies as a new anticancer drug in the treatment of human breast cancer. PMID:26019795

  12. Berberine Reduces cAMP-Induced Chloride Secretion in T84 Human Colonic Carcinoma Cells through Inhibition of Basolateral KCNQ1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Alzamora, Rodrigo; O'Mahony, Fiona; Ko, Wing-Hung; Yip, Tiffany Wai-Nga; Carter, Derek; Irnaten, Mustapha; Harvey, Brian Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with multiple pharmacological actions, including antidiarrhoeal activity and has been shown to inhibit Cl(-) secretion in distal colon. The aims of this study were to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms of action of berberine on Cl(-) secretion and the ion transporter targets. Monolayers of T84 human colonic carcinoma cells grown in permeable supports were placed in Ussing chambers and short-circuit current measured in response to secretagogues and berberine. Whole-cell current recordings were performed in T84 cells using the patch-clamp technique. Berberine decreased forskolin-induced short-circuit current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) 80 ± 8 μM). In apically permeabilized monolayers and whole-cell current recordings, berberine inhibited a cAMP-dependent and chromanol 293B-sensitive basolateral membrane K(+) current by 88%, suggesting inhibition of KCNQ1 K(+) channels. Berberine did not affect either apical Cl(-) conductance or basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. Berberine stimulated p38 MAPK, PKCα and PKA, but had no effect on p42/p44 MAPK and PKCδ. However, berberine pre-treatment prevented stimulation of p42/p44 MAPK by epidermal growth factor. The inhibitory effect of berberine on Cl(-) secretion was partially blocked by HBDDE (∼65%), an inhibitor of PKCα and to a smaller extent by inhibition of p38 MAPK with SB202190 (∼15%). Berberine treatment induced an increase in association between PKCα and PKA with KCNQ1 and produced phosphorylation of the channel. We conclude that berberine exerts its inhibitory effect on colonic Cl(-) secretion through inhibition of basolateral KCNQ1 channels responsible for K(+) recycling via a PKCα-dependent pathway. PMID:21747769

  13. Berberine induces apoptosis via ROS generation in PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 pancreatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, S H; Sung, J H; Kim, E J; Chung, N

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Gemcitabine is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, but the prognosis is still poor. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from a variety of natural herbs, possesses a variety of pharmacological properties including anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of berberine and compared its use with that of gemcitabine in the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2. Berberine inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. After berberine treatment, the G1 phase of PANC-1 cells increased by 10% compared to control cells, and the G1 phase of MIA-PaCa2 cells was increased by 2%. Whereas gemcitabine exerts antiproliferation effects through S-phase arrest, our results showed that berberine inhibited proliferation by inducing G1-phase arrest. Berberine-induced apoptosis of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 cells increased by 7 and 2% compared to control cells, respectively. Notably, berberine had a greater apoptotic effect in PANC-1 cells than gemcitabine. Upon treatment of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 with berberine at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), apoptosis was induced by a mechanism that involved the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than caspase 3/7 activation. Our findings showed that berberine had anti-cancer effects and may be an effective drug for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25517919

  14. Berberine induces apoptosis via ROS generation in PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 pancreatic cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.H.; Sung, J.H.; Kim, E.J.; Chung, N.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Gemcitabine is widely used as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, but the prognosis is still poor. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from a variety of natural herbs, possesses a variety of pharmacological properties including anticancer effects. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects of berberine and compared its use with that of gemcitabine in the pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2. Berberine inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. After berberine treatment, the G1 phase of PANC-1 cells increased by 10% compared to control cells, and the G1 phase of MIA-PaCa2 cells was increased by 2%. Whereas gemcitabine exerts antiproliferation effects through S-phase arrest, our results showed that berberine inhibited proliferation by inducing G1-phase arrest. Berberine-induced apoptosis of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 cells increased by 7 and 2% compared to control cells, respectively. Notably, berberine had a greater apoptotic effect in PANC-1 cells than gemcitabine. Upon treatment of PANC-1 and MIA-PaCa2 with berberine at a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), apoptosis was induced by a mechanism that involved the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) rather than caspase 3/7 activation. Our findings showed that berberine had anti-cancer effects and may be an effective drug for pancreatic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25517919

  15. A new isoquinoline alkaloid with anti-microbial properties from Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid. var. jaeschkeana.

    PubMed

    Alamzeb, Muhammad; Khan, M Rafiullah; Mamoon-Ur-Rashid; Ali, Saqib; Khan, Ashfaq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    One new isoquinoline alkaloid named berberidione (1) along with four new source alkaloids berberine (2), palmatine (3), jatrorrhizine (4) and chondrofoline (5) and three new source non-alkaloids syringic acid (6), β-sitosterol (7) and stigmasterol (8) was isolated and characterised from different fractions of Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid var. jaeschkeana. All the structures were determined from 1D and 2D spectroscopic data. Crude extract, sub-fractions and isolated compounds showed excellent anti-microbial properties. The toxicity level for the alkaloids was found to be very low on THP-1 cells. PMID:25424893

  16. Characterization of berberine transport into Coptis japonica cells and the involvement of ABC protein.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kyoko; Shitan, Nobukazu; Sato, Fumihiko; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2002-09-01

    Cultured Coptis japonica cells are able to take up berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, from the medium and transport it exclusively into the vacuoles. Uptake activity depends on the growth phase of the cultured cells whereas the culture medium had no effect on uptake. Treatment with several inhibitors suggested that berberine uptake depended on the ATP level. Some inhibitors of P-glycoprotein, an ABC transporter involved in multiple drug resistance in cancer cells, strongly inhibited berberine uptake, whereas a specific inhibitor for glutathione biosynthesis and vacuolar ATPase, bafilomycin A1, had little effect. Vanadate-induced ATP trap experiments to detect ABC proteins expressed in C. japonica cells showed that three membrane proteins of between 120 and 150 kDa were photolabelled with 8-azido-[alpha-32P] ATP. Two revealed the same photoaffinity-labelling pattern as P-glycoprotein, and the interaction of these proteins with berberine was also demonstrated. These results suggest that ABC proteins of the MDR-type are involved in the uptake of berberine from the medium. PMID:12177126

  17. Chemopreventive effects of berberine on intestinal tumor development in Apcmin/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has shown inhibitory effects on growth of several tumor cell lines in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate chemopreventive effects of berberine on intestinal tumor development in Apcmin/+ mice. Methods Four-week old Apcmin/+ mice were treated with 0.05% or 0.1% berberine in drinking water for twelve weeks. The number and the size of tumors were measured to evaluate intestinal tumor development. Tissue sections were prepared for PCNA and Ki-67 immunostaining to detect cell proliferation, and TUNEL assay and cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining for apoptosis. Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed to detect the activation of Wnt and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling pathways and COX-2 expression in the intestinal tumor cells. The prostaglandin E2 level in the small intestine was detected using ELISA. Results Compared with untreated Apcmin/+ mice, the total numbers of tumors in the small intestine and the colon were reduced by 39.6% and 62.5% in 0.05% and 0.1% berberine-treated mice, respectively. The numbers of tumors in proximal, middle, and distal segments of the small intestine in 0.1% berberine-treated mice were significantly reduced by 53.7%, 55.3%, and 76.5% respectively. Berberine treatment also decreased the numbers of all sizes of tumors (>2 mm, 1–2 mm, and <1 mm) in the small intestine. Berberine suppressed tumor cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, berberine decreased the activation levels of Wnt and EGFR signaling pathways, and down-regulated COX-2 expression in intestinal tumor cells and prostaglandin E2 production in the small intestine. Conclusions Berberine inhibits intestinal tumor development, which is correlated with its activity to suppress tumor cell proliferation and increase apoptosis in Apcmin/+ mice. Down-regulation of Wnt and EGFR signaling pathways and COX-2 expression by berberine may be involved in its anti-tumorigenic effects

  18. Synergy in a medicinal plant: antimicrobial action of berberine potentiated by 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin, a multidrug pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Stermitz, F R; Lorenz, P; Tawara, J N; Zenewicz, L A; Lewis, K

    2000-02-15

    Multidrug resistance pumps (MDRs) protect microbial cells from both synthetic and natural antimicrobials. Amphipathic cations are preferred substrates of MDRs. Berberine alkaloids, which are cationic antimicrobials produced by a variety of plants, are readily extruded by MDRs. Several Berberis medicinal plants producing berberine were found also to synthesize an inhibitor of the NorA MDR pump of a human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitor was identified as 5'-methoxyhydnocarpin (5'-MHC), previously reported as a minor component of chaulmoogra oil, a traditional therapy for leprosy. 5'-MHC is an amphipathic weak acid and is distinctly different from the cationic substrates of NorA. 5'-MHC had no antimicrobial activity alone but strongly potentiated the action of berberine and other NorA substrates against S. aureus. MDR-dependent efflux of ethidium bromide and berberine from S. aureus cells was completely inhibited by 5'-MHC. The level of accumulation of berberine in the cells was increased strongly in the presence of 5'-MHC, indicating that this plant compound effectively disabled the bacterial resistance mechanism against the berberine antimicrobial. PMID:10677479

  19. Protective Effects of Berberine on Isoproterenol-Induced Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Rats through Regulating HMGB1-TLR4 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Yang, Shihai; Du, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid originally isolated from the Chinese herb Coptis chinensis (Huanglian), has been shown to display a wide array of pharmacological activities. The present study was to investigate the effects of berberine against myocardial ischemia produced in rats by isoproterenol. 50 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized equally into five groups: a control group, an untreated model group, berberine (30, 60 mg/kg) treatment, or propranolol (30 mg/kg). Rats were treated for 12 days and then given isoproterenol, 85 mg/kg for 2 consecutive days by subcutaneous injection. ST-segment elevation was measured after the last administration. Serum levels of creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured after the rats were sacrificed. The hearts were excised for determining heart weight index, microscopic examination, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), toll-like receptor (TLR4), prodeath protein (Bax), antideath protein (Bcl-2), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) protein were determined by western blot. Berberine decreased the ST elevation induced by acute myocardial ischemia, and decreased serum levels of CK-MB, LDH, TNF-α, and IL-6. Berberine increased total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) content in myocardial tissue. Berberine can regulate HMGB1-TLR4 axis to protect myocardial ischemia. PMID:25477998

  20. Involvement of CjMDR1, a plant multidrug-resistance-type ATP-binding cassette protein, in alkaloid transport in Coptis japonica

    PubMed Central

    Shitan, Nobukazu; Bazin, Ingrid; Dan, Kazuyuki; Obata, Kazuaki; Kigawa, Koji; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Sato, Fumihiko; Forestier, Cyrille; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2003-01-01

    Alkaloids comprise one of the largest groups of plant secondary metabolites. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, is preferentially accumulated in the rhizome of Coptis japonica, a ranunculaceous plant, whereas gene expression for berberine biosynthetic enzymes has been observed specifically in root tissues, which suggests that berberine synthesized in the root is transported to the rhizome, where there is high accumulation. We recently isolated a cDNA encoding a multidrug-resistance protein (MDR)-type ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (Cjmdr1) from berberine-producing cultured C. japonica cells, which is highly expressed in the rhizome. Functional analysis of Cjmdr1 by using a Xenopus oocyte expression system showed that CjMDR1 transported berberine in an inward direction, resulting in a higher accumulation of berberine in Cjmdr1-injected oocytes than in the control. Typical inhibitors of ABC proteins, such as vanadate, nifedipine, and glibenclamide, as well as ATP depletion, clearly inhibited this CjMDR1-dependent berberine uptake, suggesting that CjMDR1 functioned as an ABC transporter. Conventional membrane separation methods showed that CjMDR1 was localized in the plasma membrane of C. japonica cells. In situ hybridization indicated that Cjmdr1 mRNA was expressed preferentially in xylem tissues of the rhizome. These findings strongly suggest that CjMDR1 is involved in the translocation of berberine from the root to the rhizome. PMID:12524452

  1. BIAdb: A curated database of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Benzylisoquinoline is the structural backbone of many alkaloids with a wide variety of structures including papaverine, noscapine, codeine, morphine, apomorphine, berberine, protopine and tubocurarine. Many benzylisoquinoline alkaloids have been reported to show therapeutic properties and to act as novel medicines. Thus it is important to collect and compile benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in order to explore their usage in medicine. Description We extract information about benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from various sources like PubChem, KEGG, KNApSAcK and manual curation from literature. This information was processed and compiled in order to create a comprehensive database of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, called BIAdb. The current version of BIAdb contains information about 846 unique benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, with multiple entries in term of source, function leads to total number of 2504 records. One of the major features of this database is that it provides data about 627 different plant species as a source of benzylisoquinoline and 114 different types of function performed by these compounds. A large number of online tools have been integrated, which facilitate user in exploring full potential of BIAdb. In order to provide additional information, we give external links to other resources/databases. One of the important features of this database is that it is tightly integrated with Drugpedia, which allows managing data in fixed/flexible format. Conclusions A database of benzylisoquinoline compounds has been created, which provides comprehensive information about benzylisoquinoline alkaloids. This database will be very useful for those who are working in the field of drug discovery based on natural products. This database will also serve researchers working in the field of synthetic biology, as developing medicinally important alkaloids using synthetic process are one of important challenges. This database is available from http

  2. Hypolipidemic Effects of Alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemic Hamsters.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Kou, Shuming; Zou, Zongyao; Hu, Yinran; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Li, Xuegang; Ye, Xiaoli

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the antihyperlipidemic activity of five major alkaloids in Rhizoma Coptidis using high-fat- and high-cholesterol-induced hyperlipidemic hamsters. Hyperlipidemic hamsters were treated with coptisine, berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, epiberberine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids with a dose of 46.7 mg/kg × day for 140 days. Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and total bile acids were examined after alkaloid treatment. The results showed that all therapy agents prevented body weight gain, reduced the serum total cholesterol, and increased the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of hamsters. Berberine, jatrorrhizine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids decreased the triglyceride level in hyperlipidemic hamsters, while coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids significantly suppressed the elevation of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. The fecal excretion of bile acids was significantly elevated by berberine, coptisine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids, and orlistat. Notably, total Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids possess a much stronger lipid-lowering effect than the pure Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids could retard the synthesis of cholesterol by downregulating the mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase and accelerate the clearance of lipids by upregulating the low-density lipoprotein receptor, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, and uncoupling protein-2 expression. These findings highlight the critical role of Rhizoma Coptidis alkaloids in hyperlipidemia treatment. Thus, they need to be considered in future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26848702

  3. Berberine Decreased Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA Stability through Negative Regulation of Human Antigen R in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Choi, Hye-Eun; Seo, SeungHwan; Choi, Jung-Hye; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Berberine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid found in medicinal herbs, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory effects; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for its actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of berberine and the molecular mechanisms involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophages and its effects in LPS-induced septic shock in mice. In both macrophage cell types, berberine inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression, but it had no effect on iNOS mRNA transcription. Suppression of LPS-induced iNOS protein expression by berberine occurred via a human antigen R (HuR)-mediated reduction of iNOS mRNA stability. Molecular data revealed that the suppression on the LPS-induced HuR binding to iNOS mRNA by berberine was accompanied by a reduction in nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Pretreatment with berberine reduced LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR in liver tissues and increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results show that the suppression of iNOS protein expression by berberine under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions is associated with a reduction in iNOS mRNA stability resulting from inhibition of the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR. PMID:27189969

  4. Myocardial Salvaging Effects of Berberine in Experimental Diabetes Co-Existing with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Borde, Manjusha K.; Mohanty, Ipseeta Ray; Maheshwari, Ujwala; Deshmukh, Y.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the Berberis aristata, has been shown to display a wide array of pharmacological activities (hypoglycaemic and hypolipidemic). Aim The present study was designed to investigate whether these pharmacological properties translate into the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in the setting of diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods Necessary approval from the Institutional Animal Ethics Committee was taken for the study. Experimental diabetes was produced with single dose of Streptozotocin (STZ): 45mg/kg ip and myocardial infarction was induced by administering Isoproterenol (ISP): 85mg/kg, sc to rats on 35th & 36th day. After the confirmation of diabetes on 7th day (>200mg/dl), Berberine (100 mg/kg) was administered orally to experimental rats from day 8 and continued for 30 days thereafter. Various anti-diabetic (Glucose, HbA1c), cardioprotective (CPK-MB), metabolic (lipid profile), safety {liver function (SGPT, kidney function (Creatinine)} and histopathological indices of injury were evaluated in Healthy Control, Diabetic Control and Berberine treated groups. Results Administration of STZ-ISP resulted in a significant decrease in body weight (p<0.001), diabetic changes (increase in blood glucose, HbA1c), cardiac injury (leakage of myocardial CPK-MB), altered lipid profile, SGPT, creatinine levels (p<0.001) in the diabetic control group rats as compared to healthy control. Berberine treatment demonstrated significant antidiabetic as well as myocardial salvaging effects as indicated by restoration of blood glucose, HbA1c and CPK-MB levels (p<0.001) compared to diabetic control group. In addition, Berberine favourably modulated the lipid parameters (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL). Subsequent to ISP challenge, histopathological assessment of heart, pancreas and biochemical indices of injury confirmed the cardioprotective effects of Berberine in setting of diabetes. In addition, Berberine

  5. Berberine alleviates postoperative cognitive dysfunction by suppressing neuroinflammation in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhijie; Li, Xiuhua; Li, Fayin; An, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a significant cause of morbidity after surgery, especially for the elderly. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of POCD. Thus, we hypothesized that berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid with anti-inflammatory effects, could improve surgery-induced cognitive impairment. Twenty-month-old male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to exploratory laparotomy with isoflurane anesthesia to mimic the clinical human abdominal surgery. For the interventional studies, mice received berberine (10mg/kg) or vehicle intraperitoneally. For the in vitro study, we examined the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory mediators by cultured BV2 cells. Behavioral tests, expressions of IBA1, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 were performed at the indicated time points. In the present study, we showed that surgery impaired the contextual fear memory, as evidenced by the significantly decreased freezing time to the context. This behavioral change coincided with marked increases in IBA1, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus only at 24h but not 7 d after surgery. In BV2 cells, LPS induced significantly increased TNF-α and IL-1β expressions. Notably, berberine treatment rescued surgery-induced cognitive impairment and inhibited the release of IBA1, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the hippocampus. In line with the in vivo study, berberine treatment suppressed LPS-stimulated production of TNF-α and IL-1β in BV2 cells. In conclusion, our study suggests that berberine could alleviate POCD by suppressing neuroinflammation in aged mice. PMID:27376853

  6. Production of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Kristy M; Smolke, Christina D

    2010-01-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a diverse class of metabolites that exhibit a broad range of pharmacological activities and are synthesized through plant biosynthetic pathways comprised of complex enzyme activities and regulatory strategies. We have engineered yeast to produce the key intermediate reticuline and downstream BIA metabolites from a commercially available substrate. An enzyme tuning strategy was implemented that identified activity differences between variants from different plants and determined optimal expression levels. By synthesizing both stereoisomer forms of reticuline and integrating enzyme activities from three plant sources and humans, we demonstrated the synthesis of metabolites in the sanguinarine/berberine and morphinan branches. We also demonstrated that a human P450 enzyme exhibits a novel activity in the conversion of (R)-reticuline to the morphinan alkaloid salutaridine. Our engineered microbial hosts offer access to a rich group of BIA molecules and associated activities that will be further expanded through synthetic chemistry and biology approaches. PMID:18690217

  7. [Effects of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yao-zong; Huang, Tao; Li, Ling; Mou, Shao-xia; Kou, Shu-ming; Li, Xue-gang

    2015-12-01

    This work was mainly studied the effects of the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro and preliminarily discussed the regulating mechanisms. The effect of alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma on the vitality of macrophages was measured by the MTT assay. The effect of alkaloids on the phagocytosis of macrophages was determined by neutral red trial and respiratory burst activity was tested by NBT. The expressions of respiratory-burst-associated genes influenced by alkaloids were detected by qRT-PCR. The conformation change of membrane protein in macrophages by the impact of alkaloids was studied by fluorospectro-photometer. Results showed that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could increase the phagocytosis of macrophages in different level and berberine had the best effect. Berberine, coptisine and palmatine had up-regulation effects on respiratory burst activity of mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated by PMA and regulatory activity on the mRNA expression of PKC, p40phox or p47phox, whereas the epiberberine had no significant influence on respiratory burst. Moreover, alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma could change the conformation of membrane protein and the berberine showed the strongest activity. The results suggested that the four alkaloids from Coptidis Rhizoma might activate macrophages through changing the conformation of membrane protein of macrophages and then enhanced the phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity of macrophages. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanism of alkaloids on the respiratory burst activity of macrophages may be also related to the expression level of PKC, p40phox and p47phox. PMID:27141680

  8. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis. PMID:25393968

  9. Delayed luminescence to monitor programmed cell death induced by berberine on thyroid cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordino, Agata; Campisi, Agata; Grasso, Rosaria; Bonfanti, Roberta; Gulino, Marisa; Iauk, Liliana; Parenti, Rosalba; Musumeci, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Correlation between apoptosis and UVA-induced ultraweak photon emission delayed luminescence (DL) from tumor thyroid cell lines was investigated. In particular, the effects of berberine, an alkaloid that has been reported to have anticancer activities, on two cancer cell lines were studied. The FTC-133 and 8305C cell lines, as representative of follicular and anaplastic thyroid human cancer, respectively, were chosen. The results show that berberine is able to arrest cell cycle and activate apoptotic pathway as shown in both cell lines by deoxyribonucleic acid fragmentation, caspase-3 cleavage, p53 and p27 protein overexpression. In parallel, changes in DL spectral components after berberine treatment support the hypothesis that DL from human cells originates mainly from mitochondria, since berberine acts especially at the mitochondrial level. The decrease of DL blue component for both cell lines could be related to the decrease of intra-mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and may be a hallmark of induced apoptosis. In contrast, the response in the red spectral range is different for the two cell lines and may be ascribed to a different iron homeostasis.

  10. Rational design of berberine-based FtsZ inhibitors with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Chan, Fung-Yi; Lu, Yu-Jing; Neves, Marco A C; Lui, Hok-Kiu; Wang, Yong; Chow, Ka-Yan; Chan, Kin-Fai; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Leung, Yun-Chung; Abagyan, Ruben; Chan, Tak-Hang; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the functional activity of Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z (FtsZ) protein, an essential and highly conserved bacterial cytokinesis protein, is a promising approach for the development of a new class of antibacterial agents. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid widely used in traditional Chinese and native American medicines for its antimicrobial properties, has been recently reported to inhibit FtsZ. Using a combination of in silico structure-based design and in vitro biological assays, 9-phenoxyalkyl berberine derivatives were identified as potent FtsZ inhibitors. Compared to the parent compound berberine, the derivatives showed a significant enhancement of antibacterial activity against clinically relevant bacteria, and an improved potency against the GTPase activity and polymerization of FtsZ. The most potent compound 2 strongly inhibited the proliferation of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, with MIC values between 2 and 4 µg/mL, and was active against the Gram-negative E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with MIC values of 32 and 64 µg/mL respectively. The compound perturbed the formation of cytokinetic Z-ring in E. coli. Also, the compound interfered with in vitro polymerization of S. aureus FtsZ. Taken together, the chemical modification of berberine with 9-phenoxyalkyl substituent groups greatly improved the antibacterial activity via targeting FtsZ. PMID:24824618

  11. Rational Design of Berberine-Based FtsZ Inhibitors with Broad-Spectrum Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ning; Chan, Fung-Yi; Lu, Yu-Jing; Neves, Marco A. C.; Lui, Hok-Kiu; Wang, Yong; Chow, Ka-Yan; Chan, Kin-Fai; Yan, Siu-Cheong; Leung, Yun-Chung; Abagyan, Ruben; Chan, Tak-Hang; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of the functional activity of Filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z (FtsZ) protein, an essential and highly conserved bacterial cytokinesis protein, is a promising approach for the development of a new class of antibacterial agents. Berberine, a benzylisoquinoline alkaloid widely used in traditional Chinese and native American medicines for its antimicrobial properties, has been recently reported to inhibit FtsZ. Using a combination of in silico structure-based design and in vitro biological assays, 9-phenoxyalkyl berberine derivatives were identified as potent FtsZ inhibitors. Compared to the parent compound berberine, the derivatives showed a significant enhancement of antibacterial activity against clinically relevant bacteria, and an improved potency against the GTPase activity and polymerization of FtsZ. The most potent compound 2 strongly inhibited the proliferation of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium, with MIC values between 2 and 4 µg/mL, and was active against the Gram-negative E. coli and K. pneumoniae, with MIC values of 32 and 64 µg/mL respectively. The compound perturbed the formation of cytokinetic Z-ring in E. coli. Also, the compound interfered with in vitro polymerization of S. aureus FtsZ. Taken together, the chemical modification of berberine with 9-phenoxyalkyl substituent groups greatly improved the antibacterial activity via targeting FtsZ. PMID:24824618

  12. Downregulation of Cellular c-Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase and NF-κB Activation by Berberine May Result in Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Song, Siwei; Qiu, Min; Chu, Ying; Chen, Deyan; Wang, Xiaohui; Su, Airong

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is a quaternary ammonium salt from the protoberberine group of isoquinoline alkaloids. Some reports show that berberine exhibits anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiviral properties by modulating multiple cellular signaling pathways, including p53, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), and mitogen-activated protein kinase. In the present study, we investigated the antiviral effect of berberine against herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. Current antiherpes medicines such as acyclovir can lessen the recurring activation when used early at infection but are unable to prevent or cure infections where treatment has selected for resistant mutants. In searching for new antiviral agents against herpesvirus infection, we found that berberine reduced viral RNA transcription, protein synthesis, and virus titers in a dose-dependent manner. To elucidate the mechanism of its antiviral activity, the effect of berberine on the individual steps of viral replication cycle of HSV was investigated via time-of-drug addition assay. We found that berberine acted at the early stage of HSV replication cycle, between viral attachment/entry and genomic DNA replication, probably at the immediate-early gene expression stage. We further demonstrated that berberine significantly reduced HSV-induced NF-κB activation, as well as IκB-α degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. Moreover, we found that berberine also depressed HSV-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation but had little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the berberine inhibition of HSV infection may be mediated through modulating cellular JNK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:24913175

  13. [HPTLC separation and fluorodensitometric determination of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L].

    PubMed

    Niu, C Q; He, L Y

    1992-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Chelidonine majus L. was investigated and a HPTLC method has been established. Using this method, we separated and determined eight isoquinoline alkaloids, i.e. chelidonine, protopine, berberine, coptisine, tetrahydrocoptisine, 6-methoxydihydrochelerythrine, 6-methoxydihydrosanguinarine and dihydrosanguinarine. The HPTLC method developed used one developing system on high performance silica gel plate (10 x 10 cm). After separation of these eight alkaloids, fluorescence derivatization was carried out in situ. The content was determined by fluorescence scanning. TLC fluorescence derivatization, fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence stability have been studied. Experiments showed that this method is simple, fast, highly sensitive and highly selective. PMID:1529718

  14. Potential benefits of berberine in the management of perimenopausal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, Cristiana; Rizzo, Paola; Cicero, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women after menopause and 56% of all causes of death in Western European countries. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend approximately one-third of their life-time in postmenopausal state; therefore, the development of new strategies to improve the prevention and treatment of menopause-associated pathologies is important topic in clinical practice. The studies to assess the safety of hormone replacement therapy in women with estrogen deficiency have not been conclusive due to the relative contraindications; therefore, hormone replacement therapy is prescribed only in selected cases and for a limited time. For this reason, today women are encouraged to use naturally available compounds to prevent or to attenuate menopausal symptoms and correlated pathologies, with fewer side effects. Among these compounds, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants of the generis Berberis, has been recognized as being capable of decreasing oxidative stress, LDL, triglycerides, and insulin resistance and of improving the mood. This review describes the cellular and clinical effects associated with the use of berberine, which suggest that this molecule could be an effective natural supplement to ensure a smooth peri- and postmenopausal transition. PMID:25785174

  15. Potential Benefits of Berberine in the Management of Perimenopausal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Paola; Cicero, Arrigo Francesco Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in women after menopause and 56% of all causes of death in Western European countries. Nowadays, with increasing life span, women spend approximately one-third of their life-time in postmenopausal state; therefore, the development of new strategies to improve the prevention and treatment of menopause-associated pathologies is important topic in clinical practice. The studies to assess the safety of hormone replacement therapy in women with estrogen deficiency have not been conclusive due to the relative contraindications; therefore, hormone replacement therapy is prescribed only in selected cases and for a limited time. For this reason, today women are encouraged to use naturally available compounds to prevent or to attenuate menopausal symptoms and correlated pathologies, with fewer side effects. Among these compounds, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid derived from plants of the generis Berberis, has been recognized as being capable of decreasing oxidative stress, LDL, triglycerides, and insulin resistance and of improving the mood. This review describes the cellular and clinical effects associated with the use of berberine, which suggest that this molecule could be an effective natural supplement to ensure a smooth peri- and postmenopausal transition. PMID:25785174

  16. Berberine inhibits SREBP-1-related clozapine and risperidone induced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueshan; Kutscher, Eric; Davies, Gareth E

    2010-12-01

    Weight gain is a common and potentially serious complication associated with the treatment of second generation antipsychotics such as clozapine and risperidone. Increased peripheral adipogenesis via the SREBP-1 pathway could be one critical mechanism responsible for antipsychotic drug-induced weight gain. Berberine, a botanical alkaloid, has been shown in our previous studies to inhibit adipogenesis in cell and animal models. MTT was used to determine the cytotoxic effects of clozapine and risperidone in combination with berberine. Differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells was monitored by Oil-Red-O staining and the expression of SREBP-1 and related proteins was determined by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neither clozapine nor risperidone, alone or in combination with berberine had significant effects on cell viability. Eight days treatment with 15 μM clozapine increased adipogenesis by 37.4% and 50 μM risperidone increased adipogenesis by 26.5% during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation accompanied by increased SREBP-1, PPARγ, C/EBPα, LDLR and Adiponectin gene expression. More importantly, the addition of 8 μM berberine diminished the induction of adipogenesis almost completely accompanied by down-regulated mRNA and protein expression levels of SREBP-1-related proteins. These encouraging results may lead to the use of berberine as an adjuvant to prevent weight gain during second generation antipsychotic medication. PMID:20564506

  17. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  18. Synergistic approach for treatment of chicken coccidiosis using berberine - A plant natural product.

    PubMed

    Malik, Tauseef Ahmad; Kamili, Azra N; Chishti, M Z; Tanveer, Syed; Ahad, Shazia; Johri, R K

    2016-04-01

    Despite the advent of anticoccidial drugs and vaccines, coccidiosis continues to result in substantial economic losses to the poultry industry. Berberine, a natural alkaloid is well known in studies involving synergistic approaches, thereby reducing the dosage of principal drugs. Therefore, a study was designed to see whether a synergistic anticoccidial effect could be obtained between amprolium and berberine, in vivo using broiler chicken. Anticoccidial activity was measured in comparison to the reference drug amprolium on the basis of oocyst output reduction, mean weight gain and feed conversion ratio. Oocyst output was measured using Mc-Masters counting technique. Different combinations of berberine and amprolium were tested and out of which 1:1 ratio was the most effective for controlling these parasites. Oral gavaging of 100(50 + 50) mg/kg body weight of 1:1 ratio of amprolium and berberine caused the equivalent reduction in number of oocysts (38.85 ± 9.61) one day prior to that of standard drug amprolium (49.95 ± 16.65) as well as pure berberine (44.4 ± 9.61) used in the study. Weight gain of birds was also highest in the synergistic group (1547.43 ± 12.86) among all the infected groups. Besides feed conversion ratio in the synergistic group was also better (1.387 ± 0.026). The results of this study proved the effectiveness of both amprolium and berberine and revealed synergism between amprolium and berberine against coccidian oocysts, confirmed by significant reduction in the number of coccidian oocysts shed in the feces, leading to better weight gain and improved feed conversion ratio. The study deep-rooted the synergistic potential of berberine, a natural bioactive compound for controlling a protozoan parasite and the results of this study corroborate with its use for treatment of severe diarrhoea, amoebiasis and intestinal infections. PMID:26802524

  19. Comparison of Helicobacter pylori Urease Inhibition by Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri and Berberine: Mechanisms of Interaction with the Sulfhydryl Group.

    PubMed

    Li, Cailan; Xie, Jianhui; Chen, Xiaoying; Mo, Zhizhun; Wu, Wen; Liang, Yeer; Su, Zuqing; Li, Qian; Li, Yucui; Su, Ziren; Yang, Xiaobo

    2016-03-01

    Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri, and berberine were reported to inhibit Helicobacter pylori. However, the underlying mechanism remained elusive. Urease plays a vital role in H. pylori colonization and virulence. In this work, aqueous extracts of Rhizoma Coptidis, Cortex Phellodendri of different origins, and purified berberine were investigated against H. pylori urease and jack bean urease to elucidate the inhibitory capacity, kinetics, and mechanism. Results showed that berberine was the major chemical component in Rhizoma Coptidis and Cortex Phellodendri, and the content of berberine in Rhizoma Coptidis was higher than in Cortex Phellodendri. The IC50 values of Rhizoma Coptidis were significantly lower than those Cortex Phellodendri and purified berberine, of which Coptis chinensis was shown to be the most active concentration- and time-dependent urease inhibitor. The Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that the inhibition pattern of C. chinensis against urease was noncompetitive for both H. pylori urease and jack bean urease. Thiol protectors (L-cysteine, glutathione, and dithiothreithol) significantly protected urease from the loss of enzymatic activity, while fluoride and boric acid showed weaker protection, indicating the active-site sulfhydryl group was possibly responsible for its inhibition. Furthermore, the urease inhibition proved to be reversible since C. chinensis-blocked urease could be reactivated by glutathione. The results suggested that the anti-urease activity of Rhizoma Coptidis was superior to that of Cortex Phellodendri and berberine, which was believed to be more likely to correlate to the content of total alkaloids rather than berberine monomer. The concentration- and time-dependent, reversible, and noncompetitive inhibition against urease by C. chinensis might be attributed to its interaction with the sulfhydryl group of the active site of urease. PMID:26669678

  20. Evaluation of alkaloids binding to the parallel quadruplex structure [d(TGGGGT)]4 by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Niusheng; Yang, Hongmei; Cui, Meng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2012-06-01

    In this study, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used to investigate the binding interaction of six alkaloids with parallel intermolecular G-quadruplex [d(TGGGGT)](4), and five alkaloids including berberine, jatrorrhizine, palmatine, tetrandrine, and fangchinoline showed complexation with the target DNA. Relative binding affinities were estimated on the basis of mass spectrometric data. The slight differences in chemical structures of berberine, jatrorrhizine, and palmatine had little influence on their binding affinities to [d(TGGGGT)](4). Tetrandrine and fangchinoline selectively bound to [d(TGGGGT)](4) versus duplex DNA. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments showed that the complexes with berberine, jatrorrhizine, and palmatine dissociated via strand separation and ligand retaining in the strand while the complexes with tetrandrine and fangchinoline were dissociated via ligand elimination. A comparison of dissociation patterns in CID experiments of complexes with the alkaloids to those with the traditional G-quadruplex DNA binders suggested an end-stacking binding mode for tetrandrine and fangchinoline and an intercalation binding mode for berberine, jatrorrhizine, and palmatine to the target DNA. The current work not only provides deep insight into alkaloid/[d(TGGGGT)](4) complexes and useful guidelines for design of efficient anticancer agents but also demonstrates the utility of ESI-MS as a powerful tool for evaluating interaction between ligand and quadruplex DNA. PMID:22707161

  1. Berberine Induced Apoptosis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by Inhibiting Phosphoinositide 3 Kinase/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/Akt) Signal Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor with high mortality but effective therapy has not yet been developed. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid component in several Chinese herbs including Huanglian, has been shown to induce growth inhibition and the apoptosis of certain cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine the role of berberine on human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and its potential mechanism. Methods: The proliferation effect of U20S was exanimed by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo(-z-y1)-3,5-di- phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) and the percentage of apoptotic cells were determined by flow cytometric analysis. The expression of PI3K, p-Akt, Bax, Bcl-2, cleavage-PARP and Caspase3 were detected by Western blott. Results: Berberine treatment caused dose-dependent inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of U20S cell. Mechanistically, berberine inhibits PI3K/AKT activation that, in turn, results in up-regulating the expression of Bax, and PARP and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and caspase3. In all, berberine can suppress the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of U2OS cell through inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. Conclusion: Berberine can suppress the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of U2OS cell through inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. PMID:27398330

  2. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship. PMID:26452787

  3. A new alkaloid from the fruit of Nandina domestica Thunb.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cai-Ying; Liu, Jian-Qun; Zhang, Rui; Shu, Ji-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    A new steroidal alkaloid, (20S,22R,24R)-24-ethyl-3-oxocholest-4-en-22-amino, named as nandsterine (1), together with 10 known alkaloids, palmatine (2), O-methylbulbocapnine (3), nantenine (4), dehydronantenine (5), glaucine (6), didehydroglaucine (7), dehydrocorydaline (8), jatrorrhizine (9), magnoflorine (10) and berberine (11), was isolated from the fruit of Nandina domestica Thunb. Their structures were elucidated by using spectroscopic methods as well as by comparing with the published data. Compound 1 was a new class of steroidal alkaloid isolated from the family Berberidaceae, meanwhile compounds 2, 3, 6-8 and 10 were obtained from N. domestica for the first time. Compound 1 exhibited cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells (human leukaemia) with IC50 values of 52.1 μM. PMID:24897106

  4. Dose-Dependent AMPK-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms of Berberine and Metformin Inhibition of mTORC1, ERK, DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Ming; Sinnett-Smith, James; Wang, Jia; Soares, Heloisa P.; Young, Steven H.; Eibl, Guido; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Natural products represent a rich reservoir of potential small chemical molecules exhibiting anti-proliferative and chemopreventive properties. Here, we show that treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells (PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2) with the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine (0.3–6 µM) inhibited DNA synthesis and proliferation of these cells and delay the progression of their cell cycle in G1. Berberine treatment also reduced (by 70%) the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cell growth when implanted into the flanks of nu/nu mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that berberine decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels and induced potent AMPK activation, as shown by phosphorylation of AMPK α subunit at Thr-172 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser79. Furthermore, berberine dose-dependently inhibited mTORC1 (phosphorylation of S6K at Thr389 and S6 at Ser240/244) and ERK activation in PDAC cells stimulated by insulin and neurotensin or fetal bovine serum. Knockdown of α1 and α2 catalytic subunit expression of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effect produced by treatment with low concentrations of berberine on mTORC1, ERK and DNA synthesis in PDAC cells. However, at higher concentrations, berberine inhibited mitogenic signaling (mTORC1 and ERK) and DNA synthesis through an AMPK-independent mechanism. Similar results were obtained with metformin used at doses that induced either modest or pronounced reductions in intracellular ATP levels, which were virtually identical to the decreases in ATP levels obtained in response to berberine. We propose that berberine and metformin inhibit mitogenic signaling in PDAC cells through dose-dependent AMPK-dependent and independent pathways. PMID:25493642

  5. Human cytochrome p450 inhibition and metabolic-intermediate complex formation by goldenseal extract and its methylenedioxyphenyl components.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Parnali; Franklin, Michael R

    2003-11-01

    The concurrent use of herbal medicinals with prescription and over-the-counter drugs carries a risk for unanticipated adverse drug-botanical pharmacokinetic interactions, particularly as a result of cytochrome P450 (P450) inhibition. Extracts of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) containing approximately equal concentrations ( approximately 17 mM) of two methylenedioxyphenyl alkaloids, berberine and hydrastine, inhibited with increasing potency (CYP2C9) diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation, (CYP2D6) bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation, and (CYP3A4) testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activities in human hepatic microsomes. The inhibition of testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activity was noncompetitive with an apparent Ki of 0.11% extract. Of the methylenedioxyphenyl alkaloids, berberine (IC50 = 45 microM) was the more inhibitory toward bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation and hydrastine (IC50 approximately 350 microM for both isomers), toward diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation. For testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, berberine was the least inhibitory component (IC50 approximately 400 microM). Hydrastine inhibited testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation with IC50 values for the (+)- and (-)-isomers of 25 and 30 microM, respectively. For (-)-hydrastine, an apparent Ki value of 18 microM without preincubation and an NADPH-dependent mechanism-based inhibition with a kinactivation of 0.23 min(-1) and a KI of approximately 110 microM were determined. Cytochrome P450 metabolic-intermediate (MI) complex formation could be demonstrated for both hydrastine isomers. With expressed P450 isoforms, hydrastine formed a P450 MI complex with CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4. Coexpression of cytochrome b5 with the P450 isoforms enhanced the rate but not the extent of P450 MI complex formation. PMID:14570772

  6. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the binding of sanguinarine and berberine to triple and double helical DNA and RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Ray, Arghya; Maiti, Motilal

    2003-04-01

    A comparative study on the interaction of sanguinarine and berberine with DNA and RNA triplexes and their parent duplexes was performed, by using a combination of spectrophotometric, UV thermal melting, circular dichroic and thermodynamic techniques. Formation of the DNA and RNA triplexes was confirmed from UV-melting and circular dichroic measurements. The interaction process was characterized by increase of thermal melting temperature, perturbation in circular dichroic spectrum and the typical hypochromic and bathochromic effects in the absorption spectrum. Scatchard analysis indicated that both the alkaloids bound to the triplex and duplex structures in a non-cooperative manner and the binding was stronger to triplexes than to parent duplexes. Thermal melting studies further indicated that sanguinarine stabilized the Hoogsteen base paired third strand of both DNA and RNA triplexes more tightly compared to their Watson-Crick strands, while berberine stabilized the third strand only without affecting the Watson-Crick strand. However, sanguinarine stabilized the parent duplexes while no stabilization was observed with berberine under identical conditions. Circular dichroic studies were also consistent with the observation that perturbations of DNA and RNA triplexes were more compared to their parent duplexes in presence of the alkaloids. Thermodynamic data revealed that binding of sanguinarine and berberine to triplexes (T.AxT and U.AxU) and duplexes (A.T and A.U) showed negative enthalpy changes and positive entropy changes but that of sanguinarine to C.GxC(+) triplex and G.C duplex exhibited negative enthalpy and negative entropy changes. Taken together, these results suggest that both sanguinarine and berberine can bind and stabilize the DNA and RNA triplexes more strongly than their respective parent duplexes. PMID:12643773

  7. Measurement of antiphotooxidative properties of isoquinoline alkaloids using transient thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.; Castillo, J.; Laboren, I.; Rodríguez, M.; Hassegawa, M.

    2005-11-01

    The antiphotooxidative properties of boldine and chloride berberine were studied by time-resolved thermal lensing technique. These compounds belong to isoquinoline alkaloids possessing interesting biological activity (e.g. antibacterial, antimalarial, antitumor). Antiphotooxidative properties of the alkaloids were studied by mechanism of energy transference between powerful oxidizing agents such as singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen was produced by energy transfer from chlorophyll-sensitized photooxidation of oil by exposure of high light intensities like laser. The lifetimes of singlet oxygen in dimethylsulfoxide, methanol and water were determined to confirm the assignment of the singlet molecular oxygen O II (1Δ g) in the experiments. In order to understand the effect of the alkaloids on active oxygen species, we carried out in detail an analysis of the thermal lensing signal. It was shown that the alkaloids can act as quenchers of singlet oxygen. To demonstrate the ability of the alkaloids to act efficient singlet oxygen acceptors, we have measured the fluorescence spectra of the studied alkaloids in the presence and in the absence of singlet oxygen. The antiphotooxidative activity of boldine and chloride berberine can be explained by the ability to quench singlet oxygen.

  8. Protection by and anti-oxidant mechanism of berberine against rat liver fibrosis induced by multiple hepatotoxic factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ben-Jian; Xu, Dan; Guo, Yu; Ping, Jie; Chen, Liao-Bin; Wang, Hui

    2008-03-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of berberine, an alkaloid extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine coptis, on rat liver fibrosis induced by multiple hepatotoxic factors. 2. Male Wistar rats were separated into five groups, a normal control group, a fibrotic control group and fibrotic groups treated with three different doses of berberine. The fibrotic models were established by introduction of multiple hepatotoxic factors, including CCl(4), ethanol and high cholesterol. Rats in the treatment groups were administered 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg berberine, intragastrically, daily for 4 weeks. Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hepatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and hepatic hydroxyproline (Hyp) content were determined. Liver biopsies were obtained for histological and immunohistochemical studies to detect the expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1. 3. The results showed that, compared with the fibrotic control group, serum levels of ALT and AST and hepatic content of MDA and Hyp were markedly decreased, but the activity of hepatic SOD was significantly increased in berberine-treated groups in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, histopathological changes, such as steatosis, necrosis and myofibroblast proliferation, were reduced and the expression of a-SMA and TGF-b1 was significantly downregulated in the berberine-treated groups (P < 0.01). 4. These results suggest that berberine could be used to prevent experimental liver fibrosis through regulation of the anti-oxidant system and lipid peroxidation. PMID:17973934

  9. Berberine ameliorates chronic relapsing dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in C57BL/6 mice by suppressing Th17 responses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Hong; Xiao, Hai-Tao; Hu, Dong-Dong; Fatima, Sarwat; Lin, Cheng-Yuan; Mu, Huai-Xue; Lee, Nikki P; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an increasingly common condition particularly in developed countries. The lack of satisfactory treatment has fueled the search for alternative therapeutic strategies. In recent studies, berberine, a plant alkaloid with a long history of medicinal use in Chinese medicine, has shown beneficial effects against animal models of acute UC. However, UC usually presents as a chronic condition with frequent relapse in patients. How berberine will act on chronic UC remains unclear. In the present study, we adopted dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic relapsing colitis model to assess the ameliorating activity of berberine. Colitis was induced by two cycles of 2.0% DSS for five days followed by 14days of drinking water plus a third cycle consisting of DSS only for five days. The colitis mice were orally administered 20mg/kg berberine from day 13 onward for 30days and monitored daily. The body weight, stool consistency, and stool bleeding were recorded for determination of the disease activity index (DAI). At the end of treatment, animals were sacrificed and samples were collected and subjected to histological, RT-qPCR, Western blot, and LC-MS analyses. Lymphocytes were isolated from spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and cultured for flow cytometry analysis of IL-17 secretion from CD4(+) cells and the Th17 cell differentiation. Results showed that berberine significantly ameliorated the DAI, colon shortening, colon tissue injury, and reduction of colonic expression of tight junction (TJ) protein ZO-1 and occludin of colitis mice. Notably, berberine treatment pronouncedly reduced DSS-upregulated Th17-related cytokine (IL-17 and ROR-γt) mRNAs in the colon. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-23, and the phosphorylation of STAT3 in colon tissues from DSS-treated mice were pronouncedly inhibited by berberine. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-17 secretion from CD4(+) cells of spleens and MLNs caused by DSS were significantly

  10. Nanostructured electrochemical DNA biosensors for detection of the effect of berberine on DNA from cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ovádeková, Renáta; Jantová, Sona; Letasiová, Silvia; Stepánek, Ivan; Labuda, Ján

    2006-12-01

    Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) in dimethylformamide (DMF) or aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, colloidal gold nanoparticles (GNP) in phosphate buffer solution (PBS), and a GNP-MWNT mixture in aqueous SDS solution have been investigated for chemical modification of a screen-printed carbon electrode used as the signal transducer of a dsDNA-based biosensor. Differential pulse voltammetry of the DNA redox marker Co[(phen)3]3+ and the guanine moiety anodic oxidation and cyclic voltammetry with K3[Fe(CN)6] as indicator revealed substantial enhancement of the response of the biosensor, particularly when MWNT in SDS solution was used. The biosensor was used in testing of berberine, an isoquinoline plant alkaloid with significant antimicrobial and anticancer activity. Berberine had a very strong, concentration-dependent, effect on the structural stability of DNA from the human cancer cells (U937 cells) whereas non-cancer cells were changed only when berberine concentrations were relatively high 75 and 50 microg mL(-1). PMID:17053918

  11. Interaction of 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl berberine analogs with single stranded ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2014-05-01

    Studies on the molecular aspects of alkaloid-RNA complexation are of prime importance for the development of rational RNA targeted drug design strategies. Towards this goal, the binding aspects of three novel 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs to four single stranded ribonucleotides, poly(G), poly(I), poly(C) and poly(U), were studied for the first time employing multifaceted biophysical tools. Absorbance and fluorescence studies revealed that these analogs bound non-cooperatively to poly(G) and poly(I) with binding affinities remarkably higher than berberine. The binding of these analogs to poly(U) and poly(C) was weaker in comparison to poly(G) and poly(I) but were one order higher in comparison to berberine. Quantum efficiency values revealed that energy transfer occurred from the RNA bases to the analogs upon complexation. The binding was dominated by large positive entropic contributions and small but favorable enthalpic contributions. Salt dependent studies established that the binding was dominated by hydrophobic forces that contributed around 90% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy. The chain length of the substitution at the 9-position was found to be critical in modulating the binding affinities. These results provide new insights into the binding efficacy of these novel berberine analogs to single stranded RNA sequences. PMID:24792476

  12. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis.

    PubMed

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  13. Effect of Catnip Charcoal on the In Vivo Pharmacokinetics of the Main Alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yanfei; Chen, Siyu; Yu, Hai; Zhu, Long; Liu, Yayun; Han, Chunyang; Liu, Cuiyan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effect of catnip Nepeta cataria (CNC) charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma Coptidis in vivo. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups and given oral administration of an aqueous extract of Rhizoma Coptidis (RCAE), RCAE plus CNC, RCAE plus activated carbon (AC), or distilled water, respectively. Plasma samples were collected after administration. The concentrations of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine in plasma were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pharmacokinetics data were calculated using pharmacokinetic DAS 2.0 software. The results showed that the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of berberine increased, while the AUC of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the rabbits that received RCAE plus CNC. Meanwhile, the AUC of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine decreased in the group given RCAE plus AC. The difference of main pharmacokinetics parameters among the four groups was significant (P < 0.05). This study showed that CNC improved the bioavailability of berberine in comparison to AC and prolonged its release in comparison to RCAE alone. However, it decreased the bioavailability of coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. In comparison, AC uniformly declined the bioavailability of berberine, coptisine, palmatine, and epiberberine. PMID:27313645

  14. Berberine enhances the anti‑tumor activity of tamoxifen in drug‑sensitive MCF‑7 and drug‑resistant MCF‑7/TAM cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Chunjie; Wu, Lanxiang; Fu, Lijuan; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Honghao

    2016-09-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been previously demonstrated to possess anti‑breast cancer properties. Tamoxifen is widely used in the prevention and treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Thus, the aim of the present study was to assess whether berberine enhanced the anticancer effect of tamoxifen, and the underlying mechanism involved in this combined effect in tamoxifen-sensitive (MCF-7) and tamoxifen-resistant (MCF-7/TAM) cells using MTS, flow cytometry and western blot assays. The results indicated that berberine demonstrated dose‑ and time‑dependent anti‑proliferative activity in MCF‑7 and MCF‑7/TAM cells. Furthermore, the combination of berberine and tamoxifen induced cell growth inhibition more effectively than tamoxifen alone. The present study also demonstrated that combinational treatment is more effective in inducing G1 phase arrest and activating apoptosis compared tamoxifen alone, which may be due to upregulation of P21 expression and downregulation of the B‑cell CLL/lymphoma 2(Bcl‑2)/Bcl‑2 associated X protein ratio. The results of the present study suggested that berberine may potentially be useful as an adjuvant agent in cancer chemotherapy to enhance the effect of tamoxifen, which will be useful for anti‑tumor therapy and further research. PMID:27432642

  15. A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of berberine, palmatine, coptisine, epiberberine and jatrorrhizine from Coptidis Rhizoma in rat plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sen; Pang, Xiaoyan; Deng, Yuanxiong; Liu, Li; Liang, Yan; Liu, Xiaodong; Xie, Lin; Wang, Guangji; Wang, Xinting

    2007-11-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) method has been developed and validated for the identification and quantification of five protoberberine alkaloids, which are berberine, palmatine, coptisine, epiberberine and jatrorrhizine, in rat plasma using tetrahydroberberine as an internal standard. Following solid-phase extraction, the analytes were separated by linear gradient elution on a Shim-pack ODS (4.6 [mu]m, 150 mm × 2.0 mm i.d.) column and analyzed in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode with a positive electrospray ionization (ESI) interface using the respective [M]+ and [M + H]+ ions, [M]+ = 336 for berberine; 320 for coptisine; 336 for epiberberine; 338 for jatrorrhizine; 352 for palmatine and [M + H]+ = 340 for the internal standard. The method was validated over the concentration range of 0.31-20 ng mL-1 for all the five protoberberine alkaloids. Within-batch and between-batch precisions (R.S.D.%) were all within 15% and accuracy (%Er) ranged from -5 to 5%. The lower limits of quantification were 0.31 ng mL-1 for all analytes. The extraction recoveries were on average 80.8% for berberine, 67E0% for coptisine, 66.2% for epiberberine, 71.8% for jatrorrhizine and 73E2% for palmatine. The validated method was used to study the pharmacokinetic profile of the five protoberberine alkaloids in rat plasma after oral administration of Coptidis Rhizoma extract.

  16. Berberine Is a Novel Type Efflux Inhibitor Which Attenuates the MexXY-Mediated Aminoglycoside Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Yuji; Nakashima, Ken-ichi; Nishino, Kunihiko; Kotani, Kenta; Tomida, Junko; Inoue, Makoto; Kawamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa infections is of great concern, as very few agents are effective against strains of this species. Methanolic extracts from the Coptidis Rhizoma (the rhizomes of Coptis japonica var. major Satake) or Phellodendri Cortex (the bark of Phellodendron chinense Schneider) markedly reduced resistance to anti-pseudomonal aminoglycosides (e.g., amikacin) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Berberine, the most abundant benzylisoquinoline alkaloid in the two extracts, reduced aminoglycoside resistance of P. aeruginosa via a mechanism that required the MexXY multidrug efflux system; berberine also reduced aminoglycoside MICs in Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Burkholderia cepacia, two species that harbor intrinsic multidrug efflux systems very similar to the MexXY. Furthermore this compound inhibited MexXY-dependent antibiotic resistance of other classes including cephalosporins (cefepime), macrolides (erythromycin), and lincosamides (lincomycin) demonstrated using a pseudomonad lacking the four other major Mex pumps. Although phenylalanine-arginine beta-naphthylamide (PAβN), a well-known efflux inhibitor, antagonized aminoglycoside in a MexXY-dependent manner, a lower concentration of berberine was sufficient to reduce amikacin resistance of P. aeruginosa in the presence of PAβN. Moreover, berberine enhanced the synergistic effects of amikacin and piperacillin (and vice versa) in multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains. Thus, berberine appears to be a novel type inhibitor of the MexXY-dependent aminoglycoside efflux in P. aeruginosa. As aminoglycosides are molecules of choice to treat severe infections the clinical impact is potentially important. PMID:27547203

  17. Berberine treatment prevents cardiac dysfunction and remodeling through activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in type 2 diabetic rats and in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Zhang, Ming; Meng, Zhaojie; Yu, Yang; Yao, Fan; Hatch, Grant M; Chen, Li

    2015-12-15

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is the major cause of death in type 2 diabetic patients. Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract from traditional chinese herbs and its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects make it a promising drug for treatment of type 2 diabetes. We examined if berberine improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis in high fat diet and streptozotocin induced-type 2 diabetic rats in vivo and reduced expression of hypertrophy markers in palmitate-induced hypertrophic H9c2 cells in vitro. Treatment of diabetic animals with berberine partially improved cardiac function and restored fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, and triglyceride levels to that of control. In addition, berberine treatment of diabetic animals increased cardiac 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase B (AKT) activation and reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) activation compared to control. Palmitate incubation of H9c2 cells resulted in cellular hypertrophy and decreased expression of alpha-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) and increased expression of beta-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) compared to controls. Berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells reduced hypertrophy, increased α-MHC expression and decreased β-MHC expression. In addition, berberine treatment of palmitate-incubated H9c2 cells increased AMPK and AKT activation and reduced GSK3β activation. The presence of the AMPK inhibitor Compound C attenuated the effects of berberine. The results strongly indicate that berberine treatment may be protective against the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26522928

  18. Berberine

    MedlinePlus

    ... health provider.Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2C9 [CYP2C9] substrates)Some medications are changed and ... health provider.Medications changed by the liver (Cytochrome P450 2D6 [CYP2D6] substrates)Some medications are changed and ...

  19. Isotope effects suggest a stepwise mechanism for Berberine Bridge Enzyme†

    PubMed Central

    Gaweska, Helena M.; Roberts, Kenneth M.; Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2012-01-01

    The flavoprotein Berberine Bridge Enzyme (BBE) catalyzes the regioselective oxidative cyclization of (S)-reticuline to (S)-scoulerine in an alkaloid biosynthetic pathway. A series of solvent and substrate deuterium kinetic isotope effect studies were conducted in order to discriminate between a concerted mechanism in which deprotonation of the substrate phenol occurs before or during hydride transfer from the substrate to the flavin cofactor and substrate cyclization, and a stepwise mechanism, in which hydride transfer results in the formation of a methylene iminium ion intermediate that is subsequently cyclized. The substrate deuterium isotope effect of 3.5 on kred, the rate constant for flavin reduction, is pH-independent, indicating that C-H bond cleavage is rate-limiting during flavin reduction. Solvent isotope effects on kred are one for both wild-type BBE and the E417Q mutant, indicating that solvent exchangeable protons are not in flight during or before flavin reduction, thus eliminating a fully concerted mechanism as a possibility for catalysis by BBE. An intermediate was not detected by rapid chemical quench or continuous-flow mass spectrometry experiments, indicating that it must be short-lived. PMID:22931234

  20. A convenient method for the determination of the quality of goldenseal.

    PubMed

    Govindan, M; Govindan, G

    2000-06-01

    Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) has emerged as one of the top five herbal supplements in the world-wide market. A convenient method for the determination of the quality and possible adulteration of goldenseal products is thin-layer chromatography (TLC). TLC analysis of 10 goldenseal samples using two solvent systems and spray reagents was conducted. Five of these samples contained both hydrastine and berberine, four contained berberine and one did not contain either of these alkaloids. These TLC results were verified by HPLC analysis. PMID:10844160

  1. Improvement of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid productivity by overexpression of 3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase in transgenic Coptis japonica plants.

    PubMed

    Inui, Takayuki; Kawano, Noriaki; Shitan, Nobukazu; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Sato, Fumihiko; Yoshimatsu, Kayo

    2012-01-01

    Coptis japonica (Cj) rhizomes are used as a crude drug for gastroenteritis, since they accumulate antimicrobial berberine. Berberine also shows various useful bioactivities, including cholesterol-lowering activity. Unfortunately, Cj is a slow-growing plant and more than 5 years are required to obtain a crude drug suitable for the Japanese Pharmacopoeia. To improve alkaloid productivity, we overexpressed the 3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase (4'OMT) gene in Cj. We established the transgenic plant (named CjHE4') by introducing one copy of Cj4'OMT by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The successful overexpression of 4'OMT was confirmed in all tissues of CjHE4' by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. HPLC analysis revealed that the berberine content of CjHE4' leaves and roots cultivated for 4 months was increased to 2.7- and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with non-transgenic wild-type (CjWT), and these inductions of alkaloids were stable for at least 20 months. Furthermore, in CjHE4' cultivated for 20 months, the berberine content in medicinal parts, stems and rhizomes was significantly increased (1.6-fold). As a consequence, increased amounts of alkaloids in CjHE4' resulted in the improvement of berberine yields (1.5-fold), whereas CjHE4' showed slower growth than CjWT. These results indicated that 4'OMT is one of the key-step enzymes in berberine biosynthesis and is useful for metabolic engineering in Cj. PMID:22687397

  2. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense. Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). PMID:27021328

  3. Berberine Antifungal Activity in Fluconazole-Resistant Pathogenic Yeasts: Action Mechanism Evaluated by Flow Cytometry and Biofilm Growth Inhibition in Candida spp.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Anderson Ramos; de Andrade Neto, João Batista; da Silva, Cecília Rocha; Campos, Rosana de Sousa; Costa Silva, Rose Anny; Freitas, Daniel Domingues; do Nascimento, Francisca Bruna Stefany Aires; de Andrade, Larissa Nara Dantas; Sampaio, Letícia Serpa; Grangeiro, Thalles Barbosa; Magalhães, Hemerson Iury Ferreira; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Nobre Júnior, Hélio Vitoriano

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of fungal infections and, in particular, the incidence of fungal antibiotic resistance, which is associated with biofilm formation, have significantly increased, contributing to morbidity and mortality. Thus, new therapeutic strategies need to be developed. In this context, natural products have emerged as a major source of possible antifungal agents. Berberine is a protoberberine-type isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the roots, rhizomes, and stem bark of natural herbs, such as Berberis aquifolium, Berberis vulgaris, Berberis aristata, and Hydrastis canadensis, and of Phellodendron amurense Berberine has been proven to have broad antibacterial and antifungal activity. In the present study, the potential antifungal effect of berberine against fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains, as well as against the biofilm form of Candida spp., was assessed. The antifungal effect of berberine was determined by a broth microdilution method (the M27-A3 method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) and flow cytometry techniques, in which the probable mechanism of action of the compound was also assessed. For biofilm assessment, a colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to determine the susceptibility of sessile cells. The isolates used in the study belonged to the Laboratory of Bioprospection and Experiments in Yeast (LABEL) of the Federal University of Ceará. After 24 and 72 h, fluconazole-resistant Candida and Cryptococcus neoformans strains showed berberine MICs equal to 8 μg/ml and 16 μg/ml, respectively. Cytometric analysis showed that treatment with berberine caused alterations to the integrity of the plasma and mitochondrial membranes and DNA damage, which led to cell death, probably by apoptosis. Assessment of biofilm-forming isolates after treatment showed statistically significant reductions in biofilm cell activity (P < 0.001). PMID:27021328

  4. Simultaneous determination of matrine and berberine in fruits, vegetables, and soil using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingang; Tian, Yingying; Dong, Fengshou; Xu, Jun; Li, Yuanbo; Liang, Xuyang; Wang, Yunhao; Zheng, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    An ultra-performance LC/tandem MS (UPLC/MS/MS) method for the simultaneous quantification and identification of matrine and berberine, alkaloids widely used in plant fungicides, has been developed and validated. Methanol or 1% ammonia-acetonitrile were selected as extraction solvents, and primary secondary amine sorbent was chosen for cleanup to achieve satisfactory recoveries in accordance with European Union guidelines. The chromatographic separation was carried out on a hydrophilic interaction LC column with a UPLC/MS/MS-based method to improve the retentions and shapes of the peaks. Method validation was performed for linearity, repeatability, interday precision, and sensitivity. Recoveries and RSDs were acceptable (73.1-109.3% recovery, RSD < or = 15.8%). The LODs varied from 0.34 to 1.07 microg/kg for matrine and 0.09 to 0.18 microg/kg for berberine, while the LOQs ranged from 1.12 to 3.58 microg/kg for matrine and 0.31 to 0.60 microg/kg for berberine. This method was successfully and efficiently applied for the analysis of matrine and berberine in real samples. PMID:24672881

  5. Hippocampal synaptic plasticity restoration and anti-apoptotic effect underlie berberine improvement of learning and memory in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz

    2013-01-01

    Chronic diabetes mellitus initiates apoptosis and negatively affects synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus with ensuing impairments of learning and memory. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, exhibits anti-diabetic, antioxidant and nootropic effects. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of berberine on hippocampal CA1 neuronal apoptosis, synaptic plasticity and learning and memory of streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. Long-term potentiation (LTP) in perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses was recorded for assessment of synaptic plasticity and field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) slope and population spike (PS) amplitude. PS amplitude and fEPSP significantly decreased in diabetic group versus control, and chronic berberine treatment (100mg/kg/day, p.o.) restored PS amplitude and fEPSP and ameliorated learning and memory impairment and attenuated apoptosis of pyramidal neurons in the CA1 area, as determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling method. In summary, chronic berberine treatment of STZ-diabetic rats significantly ameliorates learning and memory impairment and part of its beneficial effect could be attributed to improvement of synaptic dysfunction and anti-apoptotic property. PMID:23099256

  6. Simultaneous determination of the content of isoquinoline alkaloids in Dicranostigma leptopodum (Maxim) Fedde and the effective fractionation of the alkaloids by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yali; Li, Min; Liu, Jianjun; Yan, Qian; Zhong, Mei; Liu, Junxi; Di, Duolong; Liu, Jinxia

    2015-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was developed for the simultaneous determination of eight isoquinoline alkaloids in methanol extracts of Dicranostigma leptopodum (Maxim) Fedde and the effective fractionation of the alkaloids of D. leptopodum by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The chromatographic conditions were optimized on a SinoChrom ODS-BP column to obtain a good separation of the four types of alkaloid analytes, including two aporphines (isocorydine, corydine), two protopines (protopine and allocryptopine), a morphine (sinoacutine), and three quaternary protoberberine alkaloids (berberrubine, 5-hydroxycoptisine, and berberine). The separation of these alkaloids was significantly affected by the composition of the mobile phase, and particularly by its pH value. Acetonitrile (A) and 0.2% phosphoric acid solution adjusted to pH 6.32 with triethylamine (B) were selected as the mobile phase with a gradient elution. With this method, a new quaternary protoberberine alkaloid was isolated and the two structural isomers (isocorydine and corydine) were baseline separated. The appropriate harvest period for D. leptopodum was also recommended based on our analysis. The method for the effective fraction of the alkaloids of D. leptopodum was optimized under this method with regard to the varying significant pharmacological activities of the alkaloids. PMID:25330407

  7. Cardiovascular effects of berberine in patients with severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Marin-Neto, J A; Maciel, B C; Secches, A L; Gallo Júnior, L

    1988-04-01

    Berberine, an alkaloid of the protoberberine family, has been shown to have strong positive inotropic and peripheral resistance-lowering effects in dogs with and without heart failure. To determine the acute cardiovascular effects of berberine in humans, 12 patients with refractory congestive heart failure were studied before and during berberine intravenous infusion at rates of 0.02 and 0.2 mg/kg per min for 30 minutes. The lower infusion dose produced no significant circulatory changes, apart from a reduction in heart rate (14%). The 0.2 mg/kg per min dose elicited several significant changes: (a) Decreases in systemic (48%, p less than 0.01) and pulmonary vascular resistance (41%, p less than 0.01), and in right atrium (28%, p less than 0.05) and left ventricular end-diastolic pressures (32%, p less than 0.01). (b) Increases in cardiac index (45%, p less than 0.01), stroke index (45%, p less than 0.01), and LV ejection fraction measured by contrast angiography (56%, p less than 0.01). (c) Increases in hemodynamic and echocardiographic indices of LV performance: peak measured velocity of shortening (45%, p less than 0.01), peak shortening velocity at zero load (41%, p less than 0.01), rate of development of pressure at developed isovolumic pressure of 40 mmHg (20%, p less than 0.01), percent fractional shortening (50%, p less than 0.01), and the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (54%, p less than 0.01). (d) Decrease of arteriovenous oxygen difference (28%, p less than 0.05) with no changes in total body oxygen uptake, arterial oxygen tension, or hemoglobin dissociation properties.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3365876

  8. In vitro cytotoxicity of berberine against HeLa and L1210 cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kettmann, V; Kosfálová, D; Jantová, S; Cernáková, M; Drímal, J

    2004-07-01

    Previous studies on anti-cancer activity of protoberberine alkaloids against a variety of cancer cell lines were extended to human uterus HeLa nad murine leukemia L1210 cell lines. Cytotoxicity was measured using in vitro techniques and cell morphology changes were examined by light microscopy in both cytostatic and cytocidal concentration ranges. The IC50 was found to be less than 4 microg/ml, a limit put forward by NCI for classification of the compound as a potential anti-cancer drug. The microscopy examination indicated that at cytocidal concentrations the HeLa and L120 cells died apoptotically. The comparative analysis revealed that berberine belongs to the camptothecin family of drugs characterized by the ability to induce DNA topoisomerase poisoning and hence apoptotic cell death. Although the cytotoxic potency of berberine was found to be several orders of magnitude lower compared to camptothecin, its significance may increase in future in view of the lack of unwanted side effects characteristic for camptothecin compounds currently in clinical use for treatment of cancer. PMID:15296093

  9. FoxO proteins' nuclear retention and BH3-only protein Bim induction evoke mitochondrial dysfunction-mediated apoptosis in berberine-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shatrunajay; Rizvi, Fatima; Raisuddin, Sheikh; Kakkar, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Mammalian forkhead-box family members belonging to the 'O' category (FoxO) manipulate a plethora of genes modulating a wide array of cellular functions including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, DNA damage repair, and energy metabolism. FoxO overexpression and nuclear accumulation have been reported to show correlation with hindered tumor growth in vitro and size in vivo, while FoxO's downregulation via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) pathway has been linked with tumor promotion. In this study, we have explored for the first time intervention of berberine, a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid, with FoxO family proteins in hepatoma cells. We observed that berberine significantly upregulated the mRNA expression of both FoxO1 and FoxO3a. Their phosphorylation-mediated cytoplasmic sequestration followed by degradation was prevented by berberine-induced downmodulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway which promoted FoxO nuclear retention. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene and negative regulator of the PI3K/Akt axis, was upregulated while phosphorylation of its Ser380 residue (possible mechanism of PTEN degradation) was significantly decreased in treated HepG2 cells. Exposure to berberine induced a significant increase in transcriptional activity of FoxO, as shown by GFP reporter assay. FoxO transcription factors effectively heightened BH3-only protein Bim expression, which in turn, being a direct activator of proapoptotic protein Bax, altered Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, culminating into mitochondrial dysfunction, caspases activation, and DNA fragmentation. The pivotal role of Bim in berberine-mediated cytotoxicity was further corroborated by knockdown experiments where Bim-silencing partially restored HepG2 cell viability during berberine exposure. In addition, a correlation between oxidative overload and FoxO's nuclear accumulation via JNK activation was evident as berberine treatment led to a pronounced increase in JNK phosphorylation together with enhanced

  10. Two Faces of Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostál, Jirí

    2000-08-01

    Alkaloids can occur in two forms, denoted as ammonium salts and free bases. These forms differ substantially in their properties and in some cases in their structures. The article discusses and compares the salts and free bases of six well-known alkaloids: nicotine, morphine, cocaine, sanguinarine, allocryptopine, and magnoflorine. Relevance for the biological and medical uses of these compounds is emphasized.

  11. Amaryllidaceae and Sceletium alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhong

    2013-06-01

    Covering: July 2010 to June 2012. Previous review: Nat. Prod. Rep., 2011, 28, 1126-1142. Recent progress on the isolation, identification, biological activity and synthetic studies of structurally diverse alkaloids from plants of the family Amaryllidaceae is summarized in this review. In addition, the structurally related alkaloids isolated from Sceletium species are discussed as well. PMID:23644557

  12. Alkaloids from Chasmanthera dependens.

    PubMed

    Ohiri, F C; Verpoorte, R; Baerheim Svendsen, A

    1982-12-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the stem of Chasmanthera dependens Hochst led to the isolation and identification of five quaternary alkaloids: jatrorrhizine, columbamine, pseudocolumbamine, magnoflorine and palmatine and nine tertiary non-phenolic alkaloids: tetrahydropalmatine, liriodenine, lysicamine, oxoglaucine, glaucine, anonaine, nornuciferine, norglaucine and O,O-dimethylcorytuberine. PMID:17396979

  13. Poor permeability and absorption affect the activity of four alkaloids from Coptis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Han-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Wang, Jia-Long; Chen, Jian-Long; Zhang, Yu-Ling; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2015-11-01

    Coptidis rhizoma (Coptis) and its alkaloids exert various pharmacological functions in cells and tissues; however, the oral absorption of these alkaloids requires further elucidation. The present study aimed to examine the mechanism underlying the poor absorption of alkaloids, including berberine (BER), coptisine (COP), palmatine (PAL) and jatrorrhizine (JAT). An ultra‑performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method was validated for the determination of BER, COP, PAL and JAT in the above experimental medium. In addition, the apparent oil‑water partition coefficient (Po/w); apparent permeability coefficient (Papp), determined using a parallel artificial membrane permeability assay (PAMPA) plate; membrane retention coefficient (R %); and effect of P‑glycoprotein (P‑gp) inhibitor on the Papp of the four alkaloids were investigated. The intestinal absorption rate constant (Ka) and absorption percentage (A %) of the four alkaloids were also determined. The results of the present study demonstrated that the Po/w of the four alkaloids in 0.1 mol·l‑1 HCl medium was significantly higher (P<0.01), compared with those of the alkaloids in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). The Papp of BER was 1.0‑1.2x10‑6 cm·s‑1, determined using a PAMPA plate, and the Papp of BER, COP, PAL and JAT decreased sequentially. The concentrations of the four alkaloids on the apical‑to‑basolateral (AP‑BL) surface and the basolateral‑to‑apical (BL‑AP) surface increased in a linear manner, with increasing concentrations between 10 and 100 µmol. In addition, the transportation of BER on the BL‑AP surface was significantly faster (P<0.01), compared with that on the AP‑BL surface and, following the addition of verpamil (a P‑gp inhibitor), the Papp (AP‑BL) of the four alkaloids increased, whereas the Papp (BL‑AP) was significantly decreased (P<0.01). The rat intestinal perfusion experiment demonstrated that the four alkaloids were poorly absorbed; however, the Ka of BER

  14. Berberine chloride improved synaptic plasticity in STZ induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moghaddam, Hamid Kalalian; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht; Roghani, Mehrdad; Goshadrou, Fatemeh; Ronaghi, Abdolaziz

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that diabetes affects synaptic transmission in the hippocampus, leading to impairments of synaptic plasticity and defects in learning and memory. Although berberine treatment ameliorates memory impairment and improves synaptic plasticity in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats, it is not clear if the effects are pre- or post-synaptic or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of berberine chloride on short-term plasticity in inhibitory interneurons in the dentate gyrus of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Experimental groups included: The control, control berberine treated (100 mg/kg), diabetic and diabetic berberine treated (50,100 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks) groups. The paired pulse paradigm was used to stimulate the perforant pathway and field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSP) were recorded in dentate gyrus (DG). In comparison with control, paired pulse facilitation in the diabetic group was significantly increased (P < 0.01) and this effect prevented by chronic berberine treatment (50,100 mg/kg). However, there were no differences between responses of the control berberine 100 mg/kg treated and diabetes berberine treated (50 and 100 mg/kg) groups as compared to the control group. The present results suggest that the pre-synaptic component of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus is affected under diabetic conditions and that berberine prevents this effect. PMID:23640014

  15. Berberine attenuates intestinal disaccharidases in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Deng, Yuanxiong; Yu, Sen; Lu, Shousi; Xie, Lin; Liu, Xiaodong

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies demonstrated anti-diabetic effects of berberine. However, the facts that berberine had low bioavailability and poor absorption through the gut wall indicated that berberine might exert its antihyperglycaemic effect in the intestinal tract before absorption. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether berberine attenuates disaccharidase activities and beta-glucuronidase activity in the small intestine of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Two groups of STZ-induced diabetic rats were treated with protamine zinc insulin (10 U/Kg) subcutaneously twice daily and berberine (100 mg/Kg) orally once daily for 4 weeks, respectively. Both age-matched normal rats and diabetic control rats received physiological saline only. Fasting blood glucose levels, body weight, intestinal disaccharidase and beta-glucuronidase activities in duodenum, jejunum and ileum were assessed for changes. Our findings suggested that berberine treatment significantly decreases the activities of intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase in STZ-induced diabetic rats. The results demonstrated that the inhibitory effect on intestinal disaccharidases and beta-glucuronidase of berberine might be one of the mechanisms for berberine as an antihyperglycaemic agent. PMID:18557425

  16. Characterization of Encapsulated Berberine in Yeast Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Salari, Roshanak; Rajabi, Omid; Khashyarmanesh, Zahra; Fathi Najafi, Mohsen; Fazly Bazzaz, BiBi Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Berberine was loaded in yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeas a novel pharmaceutical carrier to improve the treatment ofmany diseases. The yeast-encapsulated active materialsshowedhigh stability and bioavailability due to the enhanced solubility and sustained releasing. In this study, different characteristics of prepared berberine loaded yeast cells (loading capacity, release kinetic order, MIC and stability) were evaluatedby different analytical methods (fluorescence spectroscopy, HPLC and SEM).The loading capacity was about 78% ± 0.6%.Berberine release patterns of microcapsules happened in two different stages and followed by zero and first-order kinetic,respectively. About 99% of all active material released during 34 h. MIC was improved by berberine loaded microcapsules in comparison withberberine powder. The microcapsules were completely stable. Berberine loaded Sac. Cerevisiae could be considered as a favorite sustained release drug delivery system. The yeast would be applied as an efficient carrier to improve various properties of different active materials. PMID:26664393

  17. Dimeric Cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Boratyński, Przemysław J

    2015-05-01

    Nature is full of dimeric alkaloids of various types from many plant families, some of them with interesting biological properties. However, dimeric Cinchona alkaloids were not isolated from any species but were products of designed partial chemical synthesis. Although the Cinchona bark is amongst the sources of oldest efficient medicines, the synthetic dimers found most use in the field of asymmetric synthesis. Prominent examples include the Sharpless dihydroxylation and aminohydroxylation ligands, and dimeric phase transfer catalysts. In this article the syntheses of Cinchona alkaloid dimers and oligomers are reviewed, and their structure and applications are outlined. Various synthetic routes exploit reactivity of the alkaloids at the central 9-hydroxyl group, quinuclidine, and quinoline rings, as well as 3-vinyl group. This availability of reactive sites, in combination with a plethora of linker molecules, contributes to the diversity of the products obtained. PMID:25586655

  18. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  19. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  20. Marine Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-08-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  1. Sarpagine and related alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Namjoshi, Ojas A.; Cook, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids share a common biosynthetic origin, and bear important structural similarities, as expected. These indole alkaloids are widely dispersed in 25 plant genera, principally in the Apocynaceae family. Very diverse and interesting biological properties have been reported for this group of natural products. Isolation of new sarpagine-related alkaloids as well as the asymmetric synthesis of these structurally complex molecules are of paramount importance to the synthetic and medicinal chemists. A total of 115 newly isolated sarpagine-related macroline and ajmaline alkaloids, along with their physicochemical properties have been included in this chapter. A general and efficient strategy for the synthesis of these monomeric alkaloids, as well as bisindoles has been presented, which involves application of the asymmetric Pictet–Spengler reaction (>98% ee) as a key step because of the ease of scale up of the tetracyclic template. Also included in this chapter are the syntheses of the sarpagine-related alkaloids, published since the year 2000. PMID:26827883

  2. Effects of Chelidonium majus extracts and major alkaloids on hERG potassium channels and on dog cardiac action potential - a safety approach.

    PubMed

    Orvos, Péter; Virág, László; Tálosi, László; Hajdú, Zsuzsanna; Csupor, Dezső; Jedlinszki, Nikoletta; Szél, Tamás; Varró, András; Hohmann, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Chelidonium majus or greater celandine is spread throughout the world, and it is a very common and frequent component of modern phytotherapy. Although C. majus contains alkaloids with remarkable physiological effect, moreover, safety pharmacology properties of this plant are not widely clarified, medications prepared from this plant are often used internally. In our study the inhibitory effects of C. majus herb extracts and alkaloids on hERG potassium current as well as on cardiac action potential were investigated. Our data show that hydroalcoholic extracts of greater celandine and its alkaloids, especially berberine, chelidonine and sanguinarine have a significant hERG potassium channel blocking effect. These extracts and alkaloids also prolong the cardiac action potential in dog ventricular muscle. Therefore these compounds may consequently delay cardiac repolarization, which may result in the prolongation of the QT interval and increase the risk of potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:25481375

  3. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture. PMID:17961129

  4. ENHANCED ACTIVITY OF STROBILURIN AND FLUDIOXONIL BY TARGETING FUNGAL ANTIOXIDATIVE STRESS RESPONSE WITH BERBERINE AND PHENOLIC SYNERGISTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antifungal activity of strobilurins was tested using berberine hemisulfate and different phenolic compounds. With berberine, the most effective phenolic was veratraldehyde. The sod2delta mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was highly sensitive to berberine and veratraldehyde. Functional complementati...

  5. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Lianci; Kang, Shuai; Yin, Zhongqiong; Jia, Renyong; Song, Xu; Li, Li; Li, Zhengwen; Zou, Yuanfeng; Liang, Xiaoxia; Li, Lixia; He, Changliang; Ye, Gang; Yin, Lizi; Shi, Fei; Lv, Cheng; Jing, Bo

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial activity and mechanism of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, morphology and protein of the S. agalactiae cells treated with berberine. The antibacterial susceptibility test result indicated minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) of berberine against Streptococcus agalactiae was 78 μg/mL and the time-kill curves showed the correlation of concentration-time. After the bacteria was exposed to 78 μg/mL berberine, the fragmentary cell membrane and cells unequal division were observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), indicating the bacterial cells were severely damaged. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) study demonstrated that berberine could damage bacterial cells through destroying cellular proteins. Meanwhile, Fluorescence microscope revealed that berberine could affect the synthesis of DNA. In conclusion, these results strongly suggested that berberine may damage the structure of bacterial cell membrane and inhibit synthesis of protein and DNA, which cause Streptococcus agalactiae bacteria to die eventually. PMID:26191220

  6. Efficacy and safety of Stephania glabra: an alkaloid-rich traditional medicinal plant.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Semwal, Ruchi Badoni

    2015-01-01

    Stephania glabra (Roxb.) Miers (Menispermaceae) has long been used for the treatment of asthma, tuberculosis, dysentery, hyperglycaemia, cancer, fever, intestinal complaints, sleep disturbances and inflammation in many Asian countries. It mainly contains alkaloids and, until now, over 30 alkaloids such as bisbenzylisoquinolines, hasubanalactams, berberines and aporphines have been isolated from its tuber. Most of its traditional medicinal activities are scientifically approved by various in vitro and in vivo studies. It shows remarkable anti-psychotic, anti-diabetic, antipyretic, analgesic, antimicrobial and anti-hypertensive activities. This work includes comprehensive information on the ethnobotany, chemistry and pharmacology of S. glabra. This review also focuses on the future perspectives with main emphasis on the establishment of therapeutic index and safety index of the plant. This review concludes that S. glabra has a great potential to treat various diseases, and could be used as a source for novel healthcare products in the near future, which needs further studies. PMID:25186139

  7. Belladonna Alkaloid Combinations and Phenobarbital

    MedlinePlus

    Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital are used to relieve cramping pains in conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome and ... Belladonna alkaloid combinations and phenobarbital come as a regular tablet, a slow-acting tablet, capsule, and liquid to take ...

  8. Cytotoxicity of Hymenocallis expansa alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Antoun, M D; Mendoza, N T; Ríos, Y R; Proctor, G R; Wickramaratne, D B; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D

    1993-08-01

    From the bulbs and leaves of Hymenocallis expansa (Amaryllidaceae), three alkaloid constituents were identified: (+)-tazettine, (+)-hippeastrine, and (-)-haemanthidine. These alkaloids demonstrated significant cytotoxicity when tested against a panel of human and murine tumor cell lines. PMID:8229020

  9. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  10. Combinations of alkaloids affecting different molecular targets with the saponin digitonin can synergistically enhance trypanocidal activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Krstin, Sonja; Peixoto, Herbenya Silva; Wink, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Only a few drugs are registered to treat trypanosomiasis, but those drugs show severe side effects. Also, because some pathogen strains have become resistant, new strategies are urgently needed to combat this parasitic disease. An underexplored possibility is the application of combinations of several trypanocidal agents, which may potentiate their trypanocidal activity in a synergistic fashion. In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei. Alkaloids were selected that affect different molecular targets: berberine and chelerythrine (intercalation of DNA), piperine (induction of apoptosis), vinblastine (inhibition of microtubule assembly), emetine (intercalation of DNA, inhibition of protein biosynthesis), homoharringtonine (inhibition of protein biosynthesis), and digitonin (membrane permeabilization and uptake facilitation of polar compounds). Most combinations resulted in an enhanced trypanocidal effect. The addition of digitonin significantly stimulated the activity of almost all alkaloids against trypanosomes. The strongest effect was measured in a combination of digitonin with vinblastine. The highest dose reduction indexes (DRI) were measured in the two-drug combination of digitonin or piperine with vinblastine, where the dose of vinblastine could be reduced 9.07-fold or 7.05-fold, respectively. The synergistic effects of mutual combinations of alkaloids and of alkaloids with digitonin present a new avenue to treat trypanosomiasis but one which needs to be corroborated in future animal experiments. PMID:26349826

  11. Combinations of Alkaloids Affecting Different Molecular Targets with the Saponin Digitonin Can Synergistically Enhance Trypanocidal Activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei

    PubMed Central

    Peixoto, Herbenya Silva

    2015-01-01

    The flagellate Trypanosoma brucei causes sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Only a few drugs are registered to treat trypanosomiasis, but those drugs show severe side effects. Also, because some pathogen strains have become resistant, new strategies are urgently needed to combat this parasitic disease. An underexplored possibility is the application of combinations of several trypanocidal agents, which may potentiate their trypanocidal activity in a synergistic fashion. In this study, the potential synergism of mutual combinations of bioactive alkaloids and alkaloids with a membrane-active steroidal saponin, digitonin, was explored with regard to their effect on T. b. brucei. Alkaloids were selected that affect different molecular targets: berberine and chelerythrine (intercalation of DNA), piperine (induction of apoptosis), vinblastine (inhibition of microtubule assembly), emetine (intercalation of DNA, inhibition of protein biosynthesis), homoharringtonine (inhibition of protein biosynthesis), and digitonin (membrane permeabilization and uptake facilitation of polar compounds). Most combinations resulted in an enhanced trypanocidal effect. The addition of digitonin significantly stimulated the activity of almost all alkaloids against trypanosomes. The strongest effect was measured in a combination of digitonin with vinblastine. The highest dose reduction indexes (DRI) were measured in the two-drug combination of digitonin or piperine with vinblastine, where the dose of vinblastine could be reduced 9.07-fold or 7.05-fold, respectively. The synergistic effects of mutual combinations of alkaloids and of alkaloids with digitonin present a new avenue to treat trypanosomiasis but one which needs to be corroborated in future animal experiments. PMID:26349826

  12. Lycorine alkaloids from Hymenocallis littoralis.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Hu, S F; Chai, H B; Pengsuparp, T; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Ruangrungsi, N

    1995-11-01

    From Hymenocallis littoralis, one new alkaloid, named littoraline, together with 13 known lycorine alkaloids and one lignan, were isolated. The structure and NMR assignments of this new alkaloid were determined by 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Littoraline showed inhibitory activity of HIV reverse transcriptase, and lycorine and haemanthamine showed potent in vitro cytotoxicity. PMID:7492374

  13. Molecular characterization of carnitine palmitoyltransferase IA in Megalobrama amblycephala and effects on its expression of feeding status and dietary lipid and berberine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kang-Le; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Wang, Li-Na; Xu, Wei-Na; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I, EC 2.3.1.21) controls the main regulatory step of fatty acid oxidation, and hence studies of its molecular characterization are useful to understand lipid metabolism in cultured fish. Here, a full-length cDNA coding CPT I was cloned from liver of blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala. This cDNA obtained covered 2499bp with an open reading frame of 2181bp encoding 726 amino acids. This CPT I mRNA predominantly expressed in heart and white muscle, while little in eye and spleen. The phylogenetic tree constructed on the basis of sequence alignments among several vertebrate species suggests that this blunt snout bream CPT I sequence belongs to the CPT IA family. In order to investigate the characterization of CPT IA mRNA expression, post-prandial experiment and feeding trial were conducted. The results showed that CPT IA mRNA expression was unchanged from 2 to 12h, and then significantly increased at 24h post-feeding in liver and heart. Berberine, an alkaloid, was identified as a promising lipid-lowering drug. In order to elucidate the effect of berberine on CPT I expression, fish were fed for 8 weeks with three diets (low-fat diet (LFD, 5% fat), high-fat diet (HFD, 15% fat), and berberine-supplemented diet (BSD, 15% fat). The results showed that HFD could decrease the expression of CPT IA and PPARα, while BSD increased those expressions. PMID:26342959

  14. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Crews, Colin

    2015-06-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  15. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Crews, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes. PMID:26046699

  16. Novel molecularly imprinted magnetic nanoparticles for the selective extraction of protoberberine alkaloids in herbs and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiawei; Zhang, Wenpeng; Bao, Tao; Chen, Zilin

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a novel magnetic nanomaterial functionalized with a molecularly imprinted polymer was prepared for the extraction of protoberberine alkaloids. Molecularly imprinted polymers were made on the surface of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles by using berberine as template, acetonitrile/water as porogen, acrylamide as functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker. The optimized molar ratio of template/functional monomer was 1:7. The polymeric magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The stability and adsorption capacity of the molecularly imprinted polymers were investigated. The molecularly imprinted polymers were used as a selective sorbent for the magnetic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction and determination of jatrorrhizine, palmatine, and berberine. Extraction parameters were studied including loading pH, sample volume, stirring speed, and extraction time. Finally, a magnetic molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed. Under the optimized conditions, the method showed good linear range of 0.1-150 ng/mL for berberine and 0.1-100 ng/mL for jatrorrhizine and palmatine. The limit of detection was 0.01 ng/mL for berberine and 0.02 ng/mL for jatrorrhizine and palmatine. The proposed method has been applied to determine protoberberine alkaloids in Cortex phellodendri and rat plasma samples. The recoveries ranged from 87.33-102.43%, with relative standard deviation less than 4.54% in Cortex phellodendri and from 102.22-111.15% with relative standard deviation less than 4.59% in plasma. PMID:25832420

  17. Plant-like biosynthesis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Le, Henry H; Brandenburger, Eileen; Gomez, Christian; Bok, Jin Woo; Macheleidt, Juliane; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Keller, Nancy P; Schroeder, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Natural product discovery efforts have focused primarily on microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) containing large multimodular polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases; however, sequencing of fungal genomes has revealed a vast number of BGCs containing smaller NRPS-like genes of unknown biosynthetic function. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that a BGC in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus named fsq, which contains an NRPS-like gene lacking a condensation domain, produces several new isoquinoline alkaloids known as the fumisoquins. These compounds derive from carbon-carbon bond formation between two amino acid-derived moieties followed by a sequence that is directly analogous to isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in plants. Fumisoquin biosynthesis requires the N-methyltransferase FsqC and the FAD-dependent oxidase FsqB, which represent functional analogs of coclaurine N-methyltransferase and berberine bridge enzyme in plants. Our results show that BGCs containing incomplete NRPS modules may reveal new biosynthetic paradigms and suggest that plant-like isoquinoline biosynthesis occurs in diverse fungi. PMID:27065235

  18. Simultaneous Determination of Five Alkaloid Compounds in a Drug Based on a Hydrophilic Monolithic Column by Capillary Electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongbao; Ye, Qing; Liu, Linghai; Dong, Hongxia

    2016-01-01

    A novel capillary electrochromatography (CEC) method was developed by using a hydrophilic monolithic column for the simultaneous determination of five alkaloids in a drug. The monolithic stationary phase was first prepared via in situ polymerization of acrylamide (AM), glycidyl methacrylate (GMA), N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane-sulfonic acid (AMPS) in a ternary porogen solvent system consisting of cyclohexanol, dodecanol and toluene. The obtained monolithic stationary phase was subsequently modified by 0.1 mol/L ammonia water for opening epoxide groups of GMA. The separation performance and efficiency of the resulting monolithic column were investigated by the use of five compounds (thiourea, aniline, naphthylamine, diphenylamine and dimethyl acetamide) by CEC. The optimized monolithic column has obtained high column efficiencies with 74,000-121,000 theoretical plates/m. Finally, the prepared monolithic column was used to separate and determine five alkaloids (piperine, nuciferine, kukoline, berberine and tetrandrine) using CEC. Under the conditions of acetonitrile/10 mM phosphate buffer solution (65/35, v/v, pH 8.5) and 15 kV applied voltage, the baseline separation of five alkaloids was achieved. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the determination of berberine in a tablet sample. The percentage of recovery of spiked tablet samples ranged from 93.4 to 108.0% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) <9.20%. PMID:26187925

  19. Separation of Berberine Hydrochloride and Tetrahydropalmatine and Their Quantitative Analysis with Thin Layer Chromatography Involved with Ionic Liquids

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Ma, Hong-yan; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Zhi-guo; Yao, Shun

    2015-01-01

    [BMIM]OH was used in mobile and stationary phase of thin layer chromatography (TLC) to analyze berberine hydrochloride and tetrahydropalmatine for the first time. Supported imidazole ionic liquid with hydroxide ion on silica gel (SiO2·Im+·OH−) was synthesized through simple procedure and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Moreover, on the plates prepared by SiO2·Im+·OH−, the contents of the above alkaloids in the Chinese patent medicine (CPM) of “Stomacheasy” capsule were successfully determined by TLC scanner. The key conditions and chromatographic behaviors were also investigated in detail. According to similar ways, ionic liquids (ILs) also can be used in other planar chromatographies in two modes. This study is expected to be helpful in expanding the application of IL and its bonded silica gel in TLC separation field. PMID:26609463

  20. Immunoassay of alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, S. K.

    1993-08-01

    A survey is presented of literature data concerning the development and applications of the immunochemical methods for the assay of alkaloids — one of the classes of physiologically active compounds of plant origin most widely used in medical practice. The bibliography includes 141 references.

  1. Alkaloids Toxic to Livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids are a specific group of nitrogen-containing natural metabolites that enable plants to overcome temporary or continuous threats integral to their environment, while also controlling essential functions of growth and reproduction. These compounds are probably produced primarily to control f...

  2. The Securinega alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  3. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  4. Overexpression of Coptis japonica norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase overcomes the rate-limiting step in Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in cultured Eschscholzia californica.

    PubMed

    Inui, Takayuki; Tamura, Ken-Ichi; Fujii, Nanae; Morishige, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko

    2007-02-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids are one of the most important secondary metabolite groups, and include the economically important analgesic morphine and the antimicrobial agent berberine. To improve the production of these alkaloids, we investigated the effect of the overexpression of putative rate-limiting step enzymes in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis. We introduced two O-methyltransferase [Coptis japonica norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT) and 3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase (4'OMT)] expression vectors into cultured California poppy cells to avoid the gene silencing effect of endogenous genes. We established 20 independent lines for 6OMT transformants and 15 independent lines for 4'OMT transformants. HPLC/liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis revealed that the overexpression of C. japonica 6OMT was associated with an average alkaloid content 7.5 times greater than that in the wild type, whereas the overexpression of C. japonica 4'OMT had only a marginal effect. Further characterization of 6OMT in California poppy cells indicated that a 6OMT-specific gene is missing and 4OMT catalyzes the 6OMT reaction with low activity in California poppy, which supports the notion that the 6OMT reaction is important for alkaloid biosynthesis in this plant species. We discuss the importance of 6OMT in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis and the potential for using a rate-limiting step gene to improve alkaloid production. PMID:17189286

  5. LC-MS/MS determination and urinary excretion study of seven alkaloids in healthy Chinese volunteers after oral administration of Shuanghua Baihe tablets.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Minlu; Liu, Ruijuan; Wu, Yao; Gu, Pan; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Yujie; Ma, Pengcheng; Ding, Li

    2016-01-25

    An LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of magnoflorine, berberrubine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, epiberberine, palmatine and berberine in human urine. The sample preparation procedure involved the four-fold dilution of the urine samples with acetonitrile/water (1:3, v/v). The chromatographic separation was achieved on a Hedera ODS-2 column under gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min with acetonitrile and water containing 0.5% formic acid as the mobile phase. The mass detection was performed in the positive mode. Calibration curves of the seven alkaloids showed good linearity (correlation coefficients>0.9973) over their concentration ranges. To meet the requirements of urinary excretion study for each alkaloid in human, the lower limit of quantification was set at different values from 0.05063 ng/mL to 2.034 ng/mL for the seven alkaloids, respectively. The intra- and inter-batch precision and accuracy were all within ± 15%. No matrix effect was observed for the analytes. The validated method was applied to the excretion study for the seven alkaloids in healthy Chinese volunteers after oral administration of Shuanghua Baihe tablets. The average 72 h cumulative urinary excretion of magnoflorine, berberrubine, jatrorrhizine, coptisine, epiberberine, palmatine and berberine accounted for 1.81%, 0.27%, 0.29%, 0.046%, 0.027%, 0.010% and 0.021% of the respective administered dose. PMID:26519688

  6. Vacuole-Localized Berberine Bridge Enzyme-Like Proteins Are Required for a Late Step of Nicotine Biosynthesis in Tobacco1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Shoji, Tsubasa; Kato, Akira; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants synthesize nicotine and related pyridine-type alkaloids, such as anatabine, in their roots and accumulate them in their aerial parts as chemical defenses against herbivores. Herbivory-induced jasmonate signaling activates structural genes for nicotine biosynthesis and transport by way of the NICOTINE (NIC) regulatory loci. The biosynthesis of tobacco alkaloids involves the condensation of an unidentified nicotinic acid-derived metabolite with the N-methylpyrrolinium cation or with itself, but the exact enzymatic reactions and enzymes involved remain unclear. Here, we report that jasmonate-inducible tobacco genes encoding flavin-containing oxidases of the berberine bridge enzyme family (BBLs) are expressed in the roots and regulated by the NIC loci. When expression of the BBL genes was suppressed in tobacco hairy roots or in tobacco plants, nicotine production was highly reduced, with a gradual accumulation of a novel nicotine metabolite, dihydromethanicotine. In the jasmonate-elicited cultured tobacco cells, suppression of BBL expression efficiently inhibited the formation of anatabine and other pyridine alkaloids. Subcellular fractionation and localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged BBLs showed that BBLs are localized in the vacuoles. These results indicate that BBLs are involved in a late oxidation step subsequent to the pyridine ring condensation reaction in the biosynthesis of tobacco alkaloids. PMID:21343426

  7. Capillary zone electrophoresis as a tool for the quality control of goldenseal extracts.

    PubMed

    Unger, Matthias; Laug, Stefanie; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2005-06-01

    The root extracts of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) are popular phytomedicines for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders and upper respiratory tract infections. Here we describe a simple and fast capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) method with ultraviolet detection at 225 nm for the quantification of the major goldenseal constituents, berberine and hydrastine, in herbal remedies containing goldenseal root extracts. Tritoqualine, an antihistaminic drug with a hydrastine-like phthalidisoquinoline structure, was applied as an internal standard. The running buffer was a 1:5 mixture of 500 mM ammonium acetate (adjusted to pH 3.4 with acetic acid) and methanol. Our newly developed CZE method was validated regarding limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification, linearity, accuracy and precision. For both berberine and hydrastine, the LOD was 1.0 microg/mL and the linearity was obtained between 2.5 and 500 microg/mL. Using our newly developed method, both the alkaloids could be analysed in herbal remedies containing goldenseal root extracts within 8 min. PMID:15912542

  8. Thin-Layer Chromatography/Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Investigation of Goldenseal Alkaloids

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cm x 10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed RF value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (ca. 5 ng each or 14 -28 pmol) in mass spectral full scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5 - 100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing RF value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values indicating the quantitative ability of

  9. Mechanism study of goldenseal-associated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Wan, Liqing; Couch, Letha; Lin, Haixia; Li, Yan; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Mei, Nan; Guo, Lei

    2013-07-31

    Goldenseal has been used for the treatment of a wide variety of ailments including gastrointestinal disturbances, urinary tract disorders, and inflammation. The five major alkaloid constituents in goldenseal are berberine, palmatine, hydrastine, hydrastinine, and canadine. When goldenseal was evaluated by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in the standard 2-year bioassay, goldenseal induced an increase in liver tumors in rats and mice; however, the mechanism of goldenseal-associated liver carcinogenicity remains unknown. In this study, the toxicity of the five goldenseal alkaloid constituents was characterized, and their toxic potencies were compared. As measured by the Comet assay and the expression of γ-H2A.X, berberine, followed by palmatine, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Berberine and palmatine suppressed the activities of both topoisomerase (Topo) I and II. In berberine-treated cells, DNA damage was shown to be directly associated with the inhibitory effect of Topo II, but not Topo I by silencing gene of Topo I or Topo II. In addition, DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available goldenseal extracts and the extent of DNA damage was positively correlated to the berberine content. Our findings suggest that the Topo II inhibitory effect may contribute to berberine- and goldenseal-induced genotoxicity and tumorigenicity. PMID:23747414

  10. Antibacterial Activity of Alkaloid Fractions from Berberis microphylla G. Forst and Study of Synergism with Ampicillin and Cephalothin.

    PubMed

    Manosalva, Loreto; Mutis, Ana; Urzúa, Alejandro; Fajardo, Victor; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Berberis microphylla is a native plant that grows in Patagonia and is commonly used by aboriginal ethnic groups in traditional medicine as an antiseptic for different diseases. The present study evaluated the antibacterial and synergistic activity of alkaloid extracts of B. microphylla leaves, stems and roots used either individually or in combination with antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The in vitro antibacterial activities of leaf, stem and root alkaloid extracts had significant activity only against Gram-positive bacteria. Disc diffusion tests demonstrated that the root extract showed similar activity against B. cereus and S. epidermidis compared to commercial antibiotics, namely ampicillin and cephalothin, and pure berberine, the principal component of the alkaloid extracts, was found to be active only against S. aureus and S. epidermidis with similar activity to that of the root extract. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of the alkaloid extracts ranged from 333 to 83 μg/mL, whereas minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) varied from 717 to 167 μg/mL. In addition, synergistic or indifferent effects between the alkaloid extracts and antibiotics against bacterial strains were confirmed. PMID:26760994

  11. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  12. Berberine behind the thriller of marked symptomatic bradycardia.

    PubMed

    Cannillo, Margherita; Frea, Simone; Fornengo, Cristina; Toso, Elisabetta; Mercurio, Giancarlo; Battista, Stefania; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2013-07-26

    Patients with chronic aortic dissections are at high risk of catheter-induced complications. We report a Berberine is used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidaemia and has a good safety profile. We report a case of a 53-year-old sportsman referred to our hospital for the onset of fatigue and dyspnoea upon exertion after he started berberine to treat hypercholesterolaemia. An electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia (45 bpm), first-degree atrioventricular block, and competitive junctional rhythm. An ergometric stress test showed slightly reduced chronotropic competence and the presence of runs of competitive junctional rhythm, atrial tachycardia, and sinus pauses in the recovery. After 10 d of wash-out from berberine, the patient experienced a complete resolution of symptoms, and an ergometric stress test showed good chronotropic competence. An electrocardiogram Holter showed a latent hypervagotonic state. This is the first case report that shows that berberine could present certain side effects in hypervagotonic people, even in the absence of a situation that could cause drug accumulation. Therefore, berberine's use should be carefully weighed in hypervagotonic people due to the drug's bradycardic and antiarrhythmic properties, which could became proarrhythmic, exposing patients to potential health risks. PMID:23888197

  13. Interaction of berberine with human platelet. alpha. sub 2 adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Ka Kit; Yu, Jun Liang; Chan, Wai Fong A.; Tse, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Berberine was found to inhibit competitively the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine. The displacement curve was parallel to those of clonidine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, with the rank order of potency (IC{sub 50}) being clonidine {gt} epinephrine {gt} norepinephrine (14.5 {mu}M) = berberine. Increasing concentrations of berberine from 0.1 {mu}M to 10 {mu}M inhibited ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine binding, shifting the saturation binding curve to the right without decreasing the maximum binding capacity. In platelet cyclic AMP accumulation experiments, berberine at concentrations of 0.1 {mu}M to 0.1 mM inhibited the cAMP accumulation induced by 10 {mu}M prostaglandin E{sub 1} in a dose dependent manner, acting as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor agonist. In the presence of L-epinephrine, berberine blocked the inhibitory effect of L-epinephrine behaving as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor antagonist.

  14. A new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Thalictrum foliolosum, as a potent inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase IB of Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Chowdhury, Somenath Roy; Sarkar, Tapas; Chakrabarti, Tulika; Majumder, Hemanta K; Jha, Tarun; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata

    2016-03-01

    Chemical investigation of the stem of Thalictrum foliolosum resulted in the isolation of two new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (1 and 2) along with known protoberberine group of isoquinoline alkaloids thalifendine (3) and berberine (4). The structures of the new compounds were established by detailed 2D NMR spectral analysis with their configurations determined from their optical rotation values and confirmed using circular dichroism. Inhibitory activities of these four compounds against DNA topoisomerase IB of Leishmania donovani were evaluated. Compound 2 exhibited almost complete inhibition of the enzyme activity at 50 μM concentration and it was found to be effective in killing both wild type as well as SAG resistant promastigotes of the parasite. PMID:26625837

  15. Berberine Nanosuspension Enhances Hypoglycemic Efficacy on Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Wu, Junbiao; Zhou, Qun; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid and active ingredient of Coptis, has been demonstrated to possess antidiabetic activities. However its low oral bioavailability restricts its clinical application. In this report, Ber nanosuspension (Ber-NS) composed of Ber and D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was prepared by high pressure homogenization technique. Antidiabetic effects of Ber-NS relative to efficacy of bulk Ber were evaluated in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice. The particle size and zeta potential of Ber-NS were 73.1 ± 3.7 nm and 6.99 ± 0.17 mV, respectively. Ber-NS (50 mg/kg) treatment via oral gavage for 8 weeks resulted in a superior hypoglycemic and total cholesterol (TC) and body weight reduction effects compared to an equivalent dose of bulk Ber and metformin (Met, 300 mg/kg). These data indicate that a low dosage Ber-NS decreases blood glucose and improves lipid metabolism in type 2 diabetic C57BL/6 mice. These results suggest that the delivery of Ber as a nanosuspension is a promising approach for treating type 2 diabetes. PMID:25866534

  16. Berberine inhibits inflammatory mediators and attenuates acute pancreatitis through deactivation of JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun-Bok; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Wang, Shaofan; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2016-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a life-threatening disease. Berberine (BBR), a well-known plant alkaloid, is reported to have anti-inflammatory activity in many diseases. However, the effects of BBR on AP have not been clearly elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on cerulein-induced AP in mice. AP was induced by either cerulein or l-arginine. In the BBR treated group, BBR was administered intraperitoneally 1h before the first cerulein or l-arginine injection. Blood samples were obtained to determine serum amylase and lipase activities and nitric oxide production. The pancreas and lung were rapidly removed for examination of histologic changes, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, the regulating mechanisms of BBR were evaluated. Treatment of mice with BBR reduced pancreatic injury and activities of amylase, lipase, and pancreatitis-associated lung injury, as well as inhibited several inflammatory parameters such as the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthesis (iNOS). Furthermore, BBR administration significantly inhibited c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in the cerulein-induced AP. Deactivation of JNK resulted in amelioration of pancreatitis and the inhibition of inflammatory mediators. These results suggest that BBR exerts anti-inflammatory effects on AP via JNK deactivation on mild and severe acute pancreatitis model, and could be a beneficial target in the management of AP. PMID:27148818

  17. Mechanism and pharmacological rescue of berberine-induced hERG channel deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meng; Zhang, Kaiping; Shi, Yanhui; Feng, Lifang; Lv, Lin; Li, Baoxin

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline alkaloid mainly isolated from plants of Berberidaceae family, is extensively used to treat gastrointestinal infections in clinics. It has been reported that BBR can block human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) potassium channel and inhibit its membrane expression. The hERG channel plays crucial role in cardiac repolarization and is the target of diverse proarrhythmic drugs. Dysfunction of hERG channel can cause long QT syndrome. However, the regulatory mechanisms of BBR effects on hERG at cell membrane level remain unknown. This study was designed to investigate in detail how BBR decreased hERG expression on cell surface and further explore its pharmacological rescue strategies. In this study, BBR decreases caveolin-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells stably expressing hERG channel. Knocking down the basal expression of caveolin-1 alleviates BBR-induced hERG reduction. In addition, we found that aromatic tyrosine (Tyr652) and phenylalanine (Phe656) in S6 domain mediate the long-term effect of BBR on hERG by using mutation techniques. Considering both our previous and present work, we propose that BBR reduces hERG membrane stability with multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, we found that fexofenadine and resveratrol shorten action potential duration prolongated by BBR, thus having the potential effects of alleviating the cardiotoxicity of BBR. PMID:26543354

  18. Discovery of berberine, abamectin and ivermectin as antivirals against chikungunya and other alphaviruses.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Finny S; Kaukinen, Pasi; Gläsker, Sabine; Bespalov, Maxim; Hanski, Leena; Wennerberg, Krister; Kümmerer, Beate M; Ahola, Tero

    2016-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic arbovirus of the Alphavirus genus, which has infected millions of people after its re-emergence in the last decade. In this study, a BHK cell line containing a stable CHIKV replicon with a luciferase reporter was used in a high-throughput platform to screen approximately 3000 compounds. Following initial validation, 25 compounds were chosen as primary hits for secondary validation with wild type and reporter CHIKV infection, which identified three promising compounds. Abamectin (EC50 = 1.5 μM) and ivermectin (EC50 = 0.6 μM) are fermentation products generated by a soil dwelling actinomycete, Streptomyces avermitilis, whereas berberine (EC50 = 1.8 μM) is a plant-derived isoquinoline alkaloid. They inhibited CHIKV replication in a dose-dependent manner and had broad antiviral activity against other alphaviruses--Semliki Forest virus and Sindbis virus. Abamectin and ivermectin were also active against yellow fever virus, a flavivirus. These compounds caused reduced synthesis of CHIKV genomic and antigenomic viral RNA as well as downregulation of viral protein expression. Time of addition experiments also suggested that they act on the replication phase of the viral infectious cycle. PMID:26752081

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis and molecular properties of berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ming-Ju; Lee, Ken S.; Hurley, Sharon J.

    An extensive theoretical study of berberine has been performed at the ab initio HF/6-31G**, HF/6-311G**, and B3LYP/6-311G** levels with and without solvent effects. The optimized structures are compared with X-ray data. We found that the optimized structures with solvent effects are in slightly better agreement with X-ray data than those without solvent effects. The 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts of berberine were calculated by using the gauge-independent atomic orbital (GIAO) (with and without solvent effects), CSGT, and IGAIM methods. The calculated chemical shifts were compared with the two-dimensional NMR experimental data. Overall, the calculated chemical shifts show very good agreement with the experimental results. The harmonic vibrational frequencies for berberine were calculated at the B3LYP/6-311G** level.

  20. Chemical comparison of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) root powder from three commercial suppliers.

    PubMed

    Weber, Holly A; Zart, Matthew K; Hodges, Andrew E; Molloy, H Michael; O'Brien, Brandon M; Moody, Leslie A; Clark, Alice P; Harris, Roger K; Overstreet, J Diane; Smith, Cynthia S

    2003-12-01

    The characterization of herbal materials is a significant challenge to analytical chemists. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.), which has been chosen for toxicity evaluation by NIEHS, is among the top 15 herbal supplements currently on the market and contains a complex mixture of indigenous components ranging from carbohydrates and amino acids to isoquinoline alkaloids. One key component of herbal supplement production is botanical authentication, which is also recommended prior to initiation of efficacy or toxicological studies. To evaluate material available to consumers, goldenseal root powder was obtained from three commercial suppliers and a strategy was developed for characterization and comparison that included Soxhlet extraction, HPLC, GC-MS, and LC-MS analyses. HPLC was used to determine the weight percentages of the goldenseal alkaloids berberine, hydrastine, and canadine in the various extract residues. Palmatine, an isoquinoline alkaloid native to Coptis spp. and other common goldenseal adulterants, was also quantitated using HPLC. GC-MS was used to identify non-alkaloid constituents in goldenseal root powder, whereas LC-MS was used to identify alkaloid components. After review of the characterization data, it was determined that alkaloid content was the best biomarker for goldenseal. A 20-min ambient extraction method for the determination of alkaloid content was also developed and used to analyze the commercial material. All three lots of purchased material contained goldenseal alkaloids hydrastinine, berberastine, tetrahydroberberastine, canadaline, berberine, hydrastine, and canadine. Material from a single supplier also contained palmatine, coptisine, and jatrorrhizine, thus indicating that the material was not pure goldenseal. Comparative data for three commercial sources of goldenseal root powder are presented. PMID:14640583

  1. The Veratrum and Solanum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Heretsch, Philipp; Giannis, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    This survey on steroidal alkaloids of the Veratrum and Solanum family isolated between 1974 and 2014 includes 187 compounds and 197 references. New developments in the chemistry and biology of this family of natural products with a special focus on the medicinal relevance of the jervanine alkaloid cyclopamine are discussed. PMID:25845062

  2. Automatic alkaloid removal system.

    PubMed

    Yahaya, Muhammad Rizuwan; Hj Razali, Mohd Hudzari; Abu Bakar, Che Abdullah; Ismail, Wan Ishak Wan; Muda, Wan Musa Wan; Mat, Nashriyah; Zakaria, Abd

    2014-01-01

    This alkaloid automated removal machine was developed at Instrumentation Laboratory, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin Malaysia that purposely for removing the alkaloid toxicity from Dioscorea hispida (DH) tuber. It is a poisonous plant where scientific study has shown that its tubers contain toxic alkaloid constituents, dioscorine. The tubers can only be consumed after it poisonous is removed. In this experiment, the tubers are needed to blend as powder form before inserting into machine basket. The user is need to push the START button on machine controller for switching the water pump ON by then creating turbulence wave of water in machine tank. The water will stop automatically by triggering the outlet solenoid valve. The powders of tubers are washed for 10 minutes while 1 liter of contaminated water due toxin mixture is flowing out. At this time, the controller will automatically triggered inlet solenoid valve and the new water will flow in machine tank until achieve the desire level that which determined by ultra sonic sensor. This process will repeated for 7 h and the positive result is achieved and shows it significant according to the several parameters of biological character ofpH, temperature, dissolve oxygen, turbidity, conductivity and fish survival rate or time. From that parameter, it also shows the positive result which is near or same with control water and assuming was made that the toxin is fully removed when the pH of DH powder is near with control water. For control water, the pH is about 5.3 while water from this experiment process is 6.0 and before run the machine the pH of contaminated water is about 3.8 which are too acid. This automated machine can save time for removing toxicity from DH compared with a traditional method while less observation of the user. PMID:24783795

  3. Therapeutic potential of berberine against neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, WenXiao; Li, ShiHua; Li, XiaoJiang

    2015-06-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an organic small molecule isolated from various plants that have been used in traditional Chinese medicine. Isolation of this compound was its induction into modern medicine, and its usefulness became quickly apparent as seen in its ability to combat bacterial diarrhea, type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, inflammation, heart diseases, and more. However, BBR's effects on neurodegenerative diseases remained relatively unexplored until its ability to stunt Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression was characterized. In this review, we will delve into the multi-faceted defensive capabilities and bio-molecular pathways of BBR against AD, Parkinson's disease (PD), and trauma-induced neurodegeneration. The multiple effects of BBR, some of which enhance neuro-protective factors/pathways and others counteract targets that induce neurodegeneration, suggest that there are many more branches to the diverse capabilities of BBR that have yet to be uncovered. The promising results seen provide a convincing and substantial basis to support further scientific exploration and development of the therapeutic potential of BBR against neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25749423

  4. Neuraminidase inhibitory activities of quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids from Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jang Hoon; Ryu, Young Bae; Lee, Woo Song; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium that causes food poisoning. The neuraminidase (NA) protein of C. perfringens plays a pivotal role in bacterial proliferation and is considered a novel antibacterial drug target. Based on screens for novel NA inhibitors, a 95% EtOH extract of Corydalis turtschaninovii rhizome showed NA inhibitory activity (68% at 30 μg/ml), which resulted in the isolation of 10 isoquinoline alkaloids; namely, palmatine (1), berberine (2), coptisine (3), pseudodehydrocorydaline (4), jatrorrhizine (5), dehydrocorybulbine (6), pseudocoptisine (7), glaucine (8), corydaline (9) and tetrahydrocoptisine (10). Interestingly, seven quaternary isoquinoline alkaloids 1-7 (IC50 = 12.8 ± 1.5 to 65.2 ± 4.5 μM) showed stronger NA inhibitory activity than the tertiary alkaloids 8-10. In addition, highly active compounds 1 and 2 showed reversible non-competitive behavior based on a kinetic study. Molecular docking simulations using the Autodock 4.2 software increased our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of these compounds. In addition, we demonstrated that compounds 1 and 2 suppressed bacterial growth. PMID:25277281

  5. Simultaneous determination of seven alkaloids in Phellodendron chinense Schneid by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Chen, Juan; Li, Xue-Hu; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2010-01-01

    By optimizing the extraction, separation, and analytical conditions, a reliable and accurate HPLC method coupled with a photodiode array detector was developed for simultaneous detection and quantification of seven alkaloids, i.e., (-)-(R)-platydesmin, noroxyhydrastinine, berberine, skimmianine, canthin-6-one, chilenine, and pteleine in "huangbo" (the bark of Phellodendron chinense), a commonly used herb in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The optimal condition for separation was achieved on a reversed-phase Cis column with a stepwise mobile phase gradient prepared from 0.1% phosphoric acid and acetonitrile. For all the alkaloids, a good linear regression relationship (r > 0.9997) was obtained between the peak area and concentration at the range of 0.5-700 microg/mL. The LODs and LOQs for the analytes ranged from 0.07 to 0.28 microg/mL and from 0.28 to 1.12 microg/mL, respectively. The optimized method was applied to the determination of alkaloids in several P. chinense samples, and found to be feasible and reliable. This method and quantitative results can provide scientific and technical bases for setting up QC standards to assure the safety and quality of P. chinense bark raw material, as well as for proprietary Chinese medicine products containing P. chinense bark. PMID:21140651

  6. Biocatalysts from alkaloid producing plants.

    PubMed

    Kries, Hajo; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways leading to benzylisoquinoline and monoterpene indole alkaloids in plants are revealing remarkable new reactions. Understanding of the enzymes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis provides access to a variety of applications in biocatalysis and bioengineering. In chemo-enzymatic settings, plant biocatalysts can transform medically important scaffolds. Additionally, synthetic biologists are taking alkaloid pathways as templates to assemble pathways in microorganisms that are tailored to the needs of medicinal chemistry. In light of these many recent discoveries, it is expected that plants will continue to be a source of novel biocatalysts for the foreseeable future. PMID:26773811

  7. Estimation of berberine in ayurvedic formulations containing Berberis aristata.

    PubMed

    Rout, Kedar Kumar; Pradhan, Subhalaxmi; Mishra, Sagar Kumar

    2008-01-01

    A sensitive, simple, rapid, and efficient high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method has been developed and validated for the analysis of berberine in marketed Ayurvedic formulations containing Berberis aristata DC for regulatory purposes. Chromatography of methanolic extracts of these formulations was performed on silica gel 60 F254 aluminum-backed TLC plates of 0.2 mm layer thickness. The plate was developed up to 66 mm with the ternary-mobile phase butanol-acetic acid-water (8 + 1 + 1, v/v/v) at 33 +/- 5 degrees C with 5 min of tank saturation. The marker, berberine, was quantified at its maximum absorbance of 350 nm. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation values were found to be 5 and 10 ng/spot. The linear regression analysis data for the calibration plot showed a good linear relationship with correlation coefficient = 0.9994 in the concentration range of 10 to 50 ng/spot for berberine with respect to peak area. The instrumental precision was found to be 0.49% coefficient of variation (CV), and repeatability of the method was 0.73% CV. Recovery values from 98.27 to 99.11% indicate excellent accuracy of the method. The developed HPTLC method is very accurate, precise, and cost-effective, and it has been successfully applied to the assay of marketed formulations containing B. aristata for determination of berberine. PMID:18980133

  8. Berberine behind the thriller of marked symptomatic bradycardia

    PubMed Central

    Cannillo, Margherita; Frea, Simone; Fornengo, Cristina; Toso, Elisabetta; Mercurio, Giancarlo; Battista, Stefania; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic aortic dissections are at high risk of catheter-induced complications. We report a Berberine is used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of congestive heart failure, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidaemia and has a good safety profile. We report a case of a 53-year-old sportsman referred to our hospital for the onset of fatigue and dyspnoea upon exertion after he started berberine to treat hypercholesterolaemia. An electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia (45 bpm), first-degree atrioventricular block, and competitive junctional rhythm. An ergometric stress test showed slightly reduced chronotropic competence and the presence of runs of competitive junctional rhythm, atrial tachycardia, and sinus pauses in the recovery. After 10 d of wash-out from berberine, the patient experienced a complete resolution of symptoms, and an ergometric stress test showed good chronotropic competence. An electrocardiogram Holter showed a latent hypervagotonic state. This is the first case report that shows that berberine could present certain side effects in hypervagotonic people, even in the absence of a situation that could cause drug accumulation. Therefore, berberine’s use should be carefully weighed in hypervagotonic people due to the drug’s bradycardic and antiarrhythmic properties, which could became proarrhythmic, exposing patients to potential health risks. PMID:23888197

  9. Antihyperglycemia and Antihyperlipidemia Effect of Protoberberine Alkaloids From Rhizoma Coptidis in HepG2 Cell and Diabetic KK-Ay Mice.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hang; Hu, Yinran; Zou, Zongyao; Feng, Min; Ye, Xiaoli; Li, Xuegang

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research Rhizoma Coptidis (RC), the root of Coptis chinensis Franch, a species in the genus Coptis (family Ranunculaceae), has been commonly prescribed for the treatment of diabetes in Chinese traditional herbal medicine applications. The present study is focused on the assessment of the antihyperglycemia and antidiabetic hyperlipidemia effect of five protoberberine alkaloids, berberine (BBR), coptisine (COP), palmatine (PAL), epiberberine (EPI), and jatrorrhizine (JAT), separated from R. Coptidis in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells and diabetic KK-Ay mice. Protoberberine alkaloids are effective in modulating hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. After adding BBR and COP to culture medium, glucose consumption of HepG2 cells was increased. In KK-Ay mice assays, suppressed fasting blood glucose level and ameliorated glucose tolerance were observed after BBR/COP administration. After treated with berberine and coptisine, in the same dose of 5 µg/mL, the glucose consumption of HepG2 cells were promoted and, respectively, reached 96.1% and 17.6%. Body weight, food consumption, water intake, and urinary output of KK-Ay mice were reduced after treated with EPI. Serum total cholesterol and triglyceride of mice were decreased after treated with palmatine and jatrorrhizine. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol of mice was increased after palmatine, jatrorrhizine, and berberine administrated. Moreover, hepatomegaly was attenuated in JTR-treated mice. Suggested that these protoberberine alkaloids from R. Coptidis have potential curative effect for diabetes. Drug Dev Res 77 : 163-170, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27045983

  10. Berberine Ameliorates Allodynia Induced by Chronic Constriction Injury of the Sciatic Nerve in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jee

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether berberine could ameliorate allodynia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats. After inducement of CCI, significant increases in the number of paw lifts from a cold plate test (cold allodynia) and decreased paw withdrawal threshold in the von Frey hair stimulation test (mechanical allodynia) were observed. However, these cold and mechanical allodynia were markedly alleviated by berberine administration in a dose-dependent manner. Sciatic nerve myeloperoxidase and malondialdehyde activities were also attenuated by berberine administration. Continuous injection for 7 days induced no development of tolerance. The antiallodynic effect of 20 mg/kg berberine was comparable to that of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg. This study demonstrated that berberine could mitigate allodynia induced by CCI, a neuropathic pain model, and it suggested that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties of berberine contributed to the antiallodynic effect in the CCI model. PMID:25674823

  11. Antiangiogenic and antitumor activities of berberine derivative NAX014 compound in a transgenic murine model of HER2/neu-positive mammary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pierpaoli, Elisa; Damiani, Elisa; Orlando, Fiorenza; Lucarini, Guendalina; Bartozzi, Beatrice; Lombardi, Paolo; Salvatore, Carmela; Geroni, Cristina; Donati, Abele; Provinciali, Mauro

    2015-10-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a natural isoquinoline alkaloid with proven antiangiogenic and anticancer activities. We recently demonstrated that BBR and its synthetic derivative 13-(4-chlorophenylethyl)berberine iodide, NAX014, exert antiproliferative activity against HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, inducing apoptosis, modulating the expression of cell cycle checkpoint molecules involved in cell senescence, and reducing both HER2 expression and phosphorylation on tumor cells. In this study, we examined the anticancer properties of BBR and NAX014 in a transgenic mouse model which spontaneously develops HER2-positive mammary tumors. Repeated intraperitoneal injections of a safety dose (2.5mg/kg) of NAX014 delayed the development of tumors, reducing both the number and size of tumor masses. In vivo sidestream dark field videomicroscopy revealed a significant lower vessel density in mammary tumors from NAX014-treated mice in comparison with the control group. Immunohistochemical evaluation using CD34 antibody confirmed the reduced vessel density in NAX014 group. Statistically significant increase of senescence associated β-galactosidase and p16 expression, and reduced expression of heparanase were observed in tumors from NAX014-treated mice than in tumors from control animals. Finally, NAX014 treatment decreased the level of perforine and granzyme mRNA in mammary tumors. Berberine did not show any statistically significant modulation in comparison with control mice. The results of the present study indicate that NAX014 is more effective than BBR in exerting anticancer activity delaying the development of mammary tumors in mice transgenic for the HER-2/neu oncogene. The antitumor efficacy of NAX014 is mainly related to its effect on tumor vascular network and on induction of tumor cell senescence. PMID:26168818

  12. A metabolomic and pharmacokinetic study on the mechanism underlying the lipid-lowering effect of orally administered berberine.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shenghua; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Tang, Yueqing; Paletta, Janice L; Wu, Xiaolei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Linsheng; Zha, Weibin; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Ridlon, Jason M; Radlon, Jason M; Hylemon, Phillip B; Zhou, Huiping; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2015-02-01

    Clinical and animal studies demonstrated that orally administered berberine had a distinct lipid-lowering effect. However, pharmacokinetic studies showed that berberine was poorly absorbed into the body so the levels of berberine in the blood and target tissues were far below the effective concentrations revealed. To probe the underlying mechanism, the effect of berberine on the biological system was studied on a high-fat-diet-induced hamster hyperlipidemia model. Our results showed that intragastrically-administered berberine was poorly absorbed into circulation and most berberine accumulated in gut content. Although the bioavailability of intragastrically administered berberine was much lower than that of intraperitoneally administered berberine, it had a stronger lipid-lowing effect, indicating that the gastrointestinal tract is a potential target for the hypolipidemic effect of berberine. A metabolomic study on both serum and gut content showed that orally administered berberine significantly regulated molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and increased the generation of bile acids in the hyperlipidemic model. DNA analysis revealed that the orally administered berberine modulated the gut microbiota, and berberine showed a significant inhibition of the 7α-dehydroxylation conversion of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid, indicating a decreased elimination of bile acids in the gut. However, in model hamsters, elevated bile acids failed to downregulate the expression and function of CYP7A1 in a negative feedback loop. It was suggested that the hypocholesterolemic effect of orally administered berberine involves modulating the turnover of bile acids and the farnesoid X receptor signal pathway. PMID:25411028

  13. Solid dispersion of berberine-phospholipid complex/TPGS 1000/SiO₂: preparation, characterization and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhai; Chen, Yan; Deng, Jin; Jia, Xiaobin; Zhou, Jianping; Lv, Huixia

    2014-04-25

    Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline alkaloid, arouses wide interests in many researchers in recent years because of its numerous new pharmacological actions. However Ber's low oral bioavailability restricts its wide application. In this study, a solid dispersion (BPTS-SD) composed of berberine-phospholipid complex (BPC), D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS 1000) and SiO₂ was prepared by simple solvent evaporation technique. BPC was employed to improve the liposolubility of Ber, and SiO₂ was used to improve the flowability of BPTS-SD, while TPGS 1000 played a dual role: firstly, as a solid dispersion carrier to improve the dissolution rate of BPC and secondly, as a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor to enhance the intestinal absorption of Ber. FTIR, DSC and SEM analysis proved the formation of BPC and BPTS-SD. Po/w of BPC successfully increased from 0.25 to 8.75. In vitro dissolution study showed that the cumulative dissolution percentages of BPTS-SDs were nearly 2.67-4.78-folds of BPC. Single-pass intestinal perfusion studies showed that the absorption of Ber in BPC was increased nearly 1.4-2.0-folds compared to that of Ber which was mainly due to the improved liposolubility, and further increased by BPTS-SD around 0.1-1.3-folds compared to that of BPC through the P-gp inhibition of TPGS 1000. Significant improvements in Cmax and AUC₀→t of BPC and BPTS-SD were obtained in pharmacokinetic study (the highest improvement in oral relative bioavailability of BPTS-SD-1 was 322.66% of Ber). All these results indicated that BPTS-SD can be a promising drug delivery system to improve their oral bioavailability for the Ber's analogues. In particular this solid dispersion can be prepared just by a simple method and has a strong feasibility for industrialization. PMID:24456672

  14. Biochemical genomics for gene discovery in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy and related species.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thu Thuy T; Onoyovwi, Akpevwe; Farrow, Scott C; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a large, diverse group of ∼2500 specialized plant metabolites. Many BIAs display potent pharmacological activities, including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine, the antimicrobial agents sanguinarine and berberine, and the muscle relaxant (+)-tubocurarine. Opium poppy remains the sole commercial source for codeine, morphine, and a variety of semisynthetic drugs, including oxycodone and buprenorphine, derived primarily from the biosynthetic pathway intermediate thebaine. Recent advances in transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics have created unprecedented opportunities for isolating and characterizing novel BIA biosynthetic genes. Here, we describe the application of next-generation sequencing and cDNA microarrays for selecting gene candidates based on comparative transcriptome analysis. We outline the basic mass spectrometric techniques to perform deep proteome and targeted metabolite analyses on BIA-producing plant tissues and provide methodologies for functionally characterizing biosynthetic gene candidates through in vitro enzyme assays and transient gene silencing in planta. PMID:22999177

  15. Alkaloids of Litsea wightiana1.

    PubMed

    Bhakuni, D S; Gupta, S

    1983-05-01

    Six aporphine alkaloids glaucine, boldine, norboldine, isoboldine, norcorydine and laurotetanine have been isolated from the ethanolic extract of the stems of LITSEA WIGHTIANA in which spasmolytic, hypothermic and blood pressure lowering activities have been confirmed. PMID:17404942

  16. Biosynthetic pathways of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  17. Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

  18. Berberine-induced anticancer activities in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yo-Seob; Yim, Min-Ji; Kim, Bok-Hee; Kang, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Sook-Young; Oh, Ji-Su; You, Jae-Seek; Kim, Su-Gwan; Yu, Sang-Joun; Lee, Gyeong-Je; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Sung

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated berberine‑induced apoptosis and the signaling pathways underlying its activity in FaDu head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells. Berberine did not affect the viability of primary human normal oral keratinocytes. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of berberine was significantly increased in FaDu cells stimulated with berberine for 24 h. Furthermore, berberine increased nuclear condensation and apoptosis rates in FaDu cells than those in untreated control cells. Berberine also induced the upregulation of apoptotic ligands, such as FasL and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand, and triggered the activation of caspase-8, -7 and -3, and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, characteristic of death receptor-dependent extrinsic apoptosis. Moreover, berberine activated the mitochondria‑dependent apoptotic signaling pathway by upregulating pro-apoptotic factors, such as Bax, Bad, Apaf-1, and the active form of caspase-9, and downregulating anti-apoptotic factors, such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. In addition, berberine increased the expression of the tumor suppressor p53 in FaDu cells. The pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-fmk suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and prevented cytotoxicity in FaDu cells treated with berberine. Interestingly, berberine suppressed cell migration through downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9. Moreover, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and p38, components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway that are associated with the expression of MMP and VEGF, was suppressed in FaDu cells treated with berberine for 24 h. Therefore, these data suggested that berberine exerted anticancer effects in FaDu cells through induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration. Berberine may have potential applications as a chemotherapeutic agent for the management of head and neck squamous carcinoma. PMID:26503508

  19. Berberine Inhibits Intestinal Polyps Growth in Apc (min/+) Mice via Regulation of Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Piao, Meiyu; Cao, Hailong; He, NaNa; Yang, Boli; Dong, Wenxiao; Xu, Mengque; Yan, Fang; Zhou, Bing; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor effect of berberine has been reported in a wide spectrum of cancer, however, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that berberine suppresses tumorigenesis in the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) by regulating the macrophage polarization in Apc (min/+) mouse model. Berberine was given to Apc (min/+) mice for 12 weeks. Primary macrophages were isolated; after berberine treatment, the change in signaling cascade was determined. The total number and size of polyps were reduced remarkably in berberine group, compared with control group. A significant decrease in protein levels of F4/80, mannose receptor (MR), and COX-2 in stroma of intestinal polyps and an increase in the level of iNOS were observed after berberine treatment. The mRNA level of MR and Arg-1 in berberine group was significantly lower than those in IL-10 or IL-4 group, while no significant difference in mRNA levels of iNOS and CXCL10 was observed. The migration and invasiveness assays in vitro showed that berberine could reduce the capability of migration and invasiveness. These findings suggest that berberine attenuates intestinal tumorigenesis by inhibiting the migration and invasion of colorectal tumor cells via regulation of macrophage polarization. PMID:27493671

  20. Berberine Inhibits Intestinal Polyps Growth in Apc (min/+) Mice via Regulation of Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Meiyu; Cao, Hailong; He, NaNa; Yang, Boli; Dong, Wenxiao; Xu, Mengque; Yan, Fang; Zhou, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Antitumor effect of berberine has been reported in a wide spectrum of cancer, however, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that berberine suppresses tumorigenesis in the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) by regulating the macrophage polarization in Apc (min/+) mouse model. Berberine was given to Apc (min/+) mice for 12 weeks. Primary macrophages were isolated; after berberine treatment, the change in signaling cascade was determined. The total number and size of polyps were reduced remarkably in berberine group, compared with control group. A significant decrease in protein levels of F4/80, mannose receptor (MR), and COX-2 in stroma of intestinal polyps and an increase in the level of iNOS were observed after berberine treatment. The mRNA level of MR and Arg-1 in berberine group was significantly lower than those in IL-10 or IL-4 group, while no significant difference in mRNA levels of iNOS and CXCL10 was observed. The migration and invasiveness assays in vitro showed that berberine could reduce the capability of migration and invasiveness. These findings suggest that berberine attenuates intestinal tumorigenesis by inhibiting the migration and invasion of colorectal tumor cells via regulation of macrophage polarization. PMID:27493671

  1. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  2. Effects of herbal products and their constituents on human cytochrome P450(2E1) activity.

    PubMed

    Raner, Gregory M; Cornelious, Sean; Moulick, Kamalika; Wang, Yingqing; Mortenson, Ashley; Cech, Nadja B

    2007-12-01

    Ethanolic extracts from fresh Echinacea purpurea and Spilanthes acmella and dried Hydrastis canadensis were examined with regard to their ability to inhibit cytochrome P450(2E1) mediated oxidation of p-nitrophenol in vitro. In addition, individual constituents of these extracts, including alkylamides from E. purpurea and S. acmella, caffeic acid derivatives from E. purpurea, and several of the major alkaloids from H. canadensis, were tested for inhibition using the same assay. H. canadensis (goldenseal) was a strong inhibitor of the P450(2E1), and the inhibition appeared to be related to the presence of the alkaloids berberine, hydrastine and canadine in the extract. These compounds inhibited 2E1 with K(I) values ranging from 2.8 microM for hydrastine to 18 microM for berberine. The alkylamides present in E. purpurea and S. acmella also showed significant inhibition at concentrations as low as 25 microM, whereas the caffeic acid derivatives had no effect. Commercial green tea preparations, along with four of the individual tea catechins, were also examined and were found to have no effect on the activity of P450(2E1). PMID:17658211

  3. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs. PMID:20112250

  4. Inhibitory Effects of Coptidis rhizoma and Berberine on Cocaine-induced Sensitization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Yang, Chae Ha; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Choe, Eun Sang; Lee, Hye-Jung; Pyun, Kwang-Ho; Shim, Insop

    2009-03-01

    Substantial evidence suggests that the behavioral and reinforcing effects of cocaine can be mediated by the central dopaminergic systems. Repeated injections of cocaine produce an increase in locomotor activity and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the main dopaminergic areas. Protoberberine alkaloids affect neuronal functions. Coptidis rhizoma (CR) and its main compound, berberine (BER) reduced the dopamine content in the central nervous system. In order to investigate the effects of CR or BER on the repeated cocaine-induced neuronal and behavioral alterations, we examined the influence of CR or BER on the repeated cocaine-induced locomotor activity and the expression of TH in the brain by using immunohistochemistry. Male SD rats were given repeated injections of saline or cocaine hydrochloride (15 mg/kg, i.p. for 10 consecutive days) followed by one challenge injection on the 4th day after the last daily injection. Cocaine challenge (15 mg/kg, i.p) produced a larger increase in locomotor activity and expression of TH in the central dopaminergic areas. Pretreatment with CR (50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and BER (200 mg/kg, p.o.) 30 min before the daily injections of cocaine significantly inhibited the cocaine-induced locomotor activity as well as TH expression in the central dopaminergic areas. Our data demonstrate that the inhibitory effects of CR and BER on the repeated cocaine-induced locomotor activity were closely associated with the reduction of dopamine biosynthesis and post-synaptic neuronal activity. These results suggest that CR and BER may be effective for inhibiting the behavioral effects of cocaine by possibly modulating the central dopaminergic system. PMID:18955248

  5. Protective effect of berberine on doxorubicin‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Zhang, Yu; Zhu, Zhongning; Liu, Huanlong; Guo, Huicai; Xiong, Chen; Xie, Kerang; Zhang, Xiaofei; Su, Suwen

    2016-05-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX), a potent broad‑spectrum chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of several types of cancer, is largely limited due to its serious side effects on non‑target organs. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline alkaloid, could reduce DOX‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats. Fifty rats were randomly divided into five groups: i) Control group, ii) DOX group, iii) DOX+Ber (5 mg kg) group; iv) DOX+Ber (10 mg kg), and v) DOX+Ber (20 mg kg) group. In the tests, body weight, organ index, general condition and mortality were observed. In addition, the serum levels of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TCHO) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were determined to evaluate hepatorenal function. Hepatorenal toxicity was further assessed using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Furthermore, the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat serum or tissue homogenate were also assessed to determine the mechanisms of action. Results suggested that pretreatment with Ber ameliorated the DOX‑induced liver and kidney injury by lowering the serum ALT, AST, TCHO and BUN levels, and the damage observed histologically, such as hemorrhage and focal necrosis of liver and kidney tissues induced by DOX were also attenuated by Ber. Furthermore, Ber also exerted certain antioxidative properties through reversing the changes in the levels of MDA, SOD, GSH and MDA induced by DOX. These findings indicate that Ber has protective effects against DOX‑induced acute hepatorenal toxicity in rats. Combination of Ber with DOX is a novel strategy that has the potential for protecting against DOX‑induced hepatorenal toxicity in clinical practice. PMID:27035423

  6. Sieving characteristics of cytokine- and peroxide-induced epithelial barrier leak: Inhibition by berberine

    PubMed Central

    DiGuilio, Katherine M; Mercogliano, Christina M; Born, Jillian; Ferraro, Brendan; To, Julie; Mixson, Brittany; Smith, Allison; Valenzano, Mary Carmen; Mullin, James M

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study whether the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) colon which exhibits varying severity and cytokine levels across its mucosa create varying types of transepithelial leak. METHODS: We examined the effects of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1-β (IL1β) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) - singly and in combinations - on barrier function of CACO-2 cell layers. Our focus was on the type (not simply the magnitude) of transepithelial leak generated by these agents as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) and transepithelial flux of 14C-D-mannitol, 3H-Lactulose and 14C-Polyethylene glycol as radiolabeled probe molecules. The isoquinoline alkaloid, berberine, was then examined for its ability to reduce specific types of transepithelial leak. RESULTS: Exposure to TNF-α alone (200 ng/mL; 48 h) induced a 50% decrease in TER, i.e., increased leak of Na+ and Cl- - with only a marginal but statistically significant increase in transepithelial leak of 14C-mannitol (Jm). Exposure to TNF-α + IFN-γ (200 ng/mL; 48 h) + IL1β (50 ng/mL; 48 h) did not increase the TER change (from TNF-α alone), but there was now a 100% increase in Jm. There however was no increase in transepithelial leak of two larger probe molecules, 3H-lactulose and 14C-polyethylene glycol (PEG). However, exposure to TNF-α + IFN-γ + IL1β followed by a 5 h exposure to 2 mmol/L H2O2 resulted in a 500% increase in 14C-PEG leak as well as leak to the luminal mitogen, epidermal growth factor. CONCLUSION: This model of graded transepithelial leak is useful in evaluating therapeutic agents reducing IBD morbidity by reducing barrier leak to various luminal substances. PMID:27190695

  7. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Bułdak, Rafał J; Skonieczna, Magda; Cholewa, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628), cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL) and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration) during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50) after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles

  8. HPLC Estimation of berberine in Tinospora cordifolia and Tinospora sinensis.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, G V; Unnikrishnan, K P; Rema Shree, A B; Balachandran, Indira

    2008-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the estimation of berberine in the stem of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. ex Hook.f. and Thoms. and Tinospora sinensis (Lour.) Merrill is described. The dried stems of T. cordifolia and T. sinensis were defatted with petroleum ether (60-80 degrees ). The marc was dried and further extracted with methanol. The concentration of berberine in methanol extract was determined using a C-18 reverse phase column with a mobile phase of acetonitrile:water (10:90 v/v) at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min and with UV detection at 266 nm. TLC and HPLC comparison of both the species revealed significant variation in the chemical constitution of the two species. This observation becomes important in the context of the use of T. sinensis in place of the genuine drug T. cordifolia. PMID:20390090

  9. HPLC Estimation of berberine in Tinospora cordifolia and Tinospora sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, G. V.; Unnikrishnan, K. P.; Rema Shree, A. B.; Balachandran, Indira

    2008-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the estimation of berberine in the stem of Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. ex Hook.f. and Thoms. and Tinospora sinensis (Lour.) Merrill is described. The dried stems of T. cordifolia and T. sinensis were defatted with petroleum ether (60-80°). The marc was dried and further extracted with methanol. The concentration of berberine in methanol extract was determined using a C-18 reverse phase column with a mobile phase of acetonitrile:water (10:90 v/v) at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min and with UV detection at 266 nm. TLC and HPLC comparison of both the species revealed significant variation in the chemical constitution of the two species. This observation becomes important in the context of the use of T. sinensis in place of the genuine drug T. cordifolia. PMID:20390090

  10. Spectrofluorometric determination of DNA and RNA with berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Guo-Quan; Zong, Zhi-Xin; Song, Yu-Min

    1999-08-01

    On binding to nucleic acids, the dye berberine increases its fluorescence quantum efficiency by a factor of 25-30. Based on this, an easy, rapid and accurate method for the determination of nucleic acids was developed. Berberine is very like ethidium bromide (EB), but it is non-poisonous. Determination can be made at any pH between 4 and 10, where the native structure of DNA and RNA is not disrupted. The maximum emission is near 520 nm for excitation at 355 or 450 nm. This method has good sensitivity (0.01 μg ml -1 of ctDNA), high selectivity and a wide linear range (0.05-14.0 μg ml -1 of ctDNA).

  11. [The effect of berberine in sterilizing infective root canal of deciduous teeth].

    PubMed

    Su, R Y

    1992-09-01

    This investigation introduces the effect of sterilizing infective deciduous root canal with Chinese traditional herb berberine. Through the bacterial test, animal test, clinical practice, and comparing with the dental root disinfectant for mocresol (FC) and comphorphenol (CP) it indicates that berberine Chinese traditional herb is a excellent disinfectant for infective deciduous root canal. PMID:1306446

  12. Mitochondria and NMDA Receptor-Dependent Toxicity of Berberine Sensitizes Neurons to Glutamate and Rotenone Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kysenius, Kai; Brunello, Cecilia A.; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2014-01-01

    The global incidence of metabolic and age-related diseases, including type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, is on the rise. In addition to traditional pharmacotherapy, drug candidates from complementary and alternative medicine are actively being pursued for further drug development. Berberine, a nutraceutical traditionally used as an antibiotic, has recently been proposed to act as a multi-target protective agent against type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, ischemic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. However, the safety profile of berberine remains controversial, as isolated reports suggest risks with acute toxicity, bradycardia and exacerbation of neurodegeneration. We report that low micromolar berberine causes rapid mitochondria-dependent toxicity in primary neurons characterized by mitochondrial swelling, increased oxidative stress, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depletion of ATP content. Berberine does not induce caspase-3 activation and the resulting neurotoxicity remains unaffected by pan-caspase inhibitor treatment. Interestingly, inhibition of NMDA receptors by memantine and MK-801 completely blocked berberine-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, subtoxic nanomolar concentrations of berberine were sufficient to sensitize neurons to glutamate excitotoxicity and rotenone injury. Our study highlights the need for further safety assessment of berberine, especially due to its tendency to accumulate in the CNS and the risk of potential neurotoxicity as a consequence of increasing bioavailability of berberine. PMID:25192195

  13. The influence of clay surface modification with berberine on the sorption of anthocyanins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, A. N.; Deineka, V. I.; Tikhova, A. A.; Vesentzev, A. I.; Deineka, L. A.

    2012-03-01

    The influence of preliminary sorption of berberine on the sorption of anthocyanins by bentonite clay was studied. The cation exchange sorption mechanism was found to be replaced by hydrophobic sorption of these compounds after clay modification with berberine. The enthalpy of sorption along the initial isotherm part changed from endothermic to exothermic.

  14. Berberine is a potent agonist of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Li, Changqing; Yang, Junqing; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Qixin

    2016-01-01

    Although berberine has hypolipidemic effects with a high affinity to nuclear proteins, the underlying molecular mechanism for this effect remains unclear. Here, we determine whether berberine is an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), with a lipid-lowering effect. The cell-based reporter gene analysis showed that berberine selectively activates PPARalpha (EC50 =0.58 mM, Emax =102.4). The radioligand binding assay shows that berberine binds directly to the ligand-binding domain of PPARalpha (Ki=0.73 mM) with similar affinity to fenofibrate. The mRNA and protein levels of CPT-Ialpha gene from HepG2 cells and hyperlipidemic rat liver are remarkably up-regulated by berberine, and this effect can be blocked by MK886, a non-competitive antagonist of PPARalpha. A comparison assay in which berberine and fenofibrate were used to treat hyperlipidaemic rats for three months shows that these drugs produce similar lipid-lowering effects, except that berberine increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol more effectively than fenofibrate. These findings provide the first evidence that berberine is a potent agonist of PPARalpha and seems to be superior to fenofibrate for treating hyperlipidemia. PMID:27100490

  15. Antimicrobial activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Villar, A; Mares, M; Rios, J L; Canton, E; Gobernado, M

    1987-04-01

    The antimicrobial in vitro activity of 14 benzylisoquinoline alkaloids was investigated by agar diffusion and agar dilution methods against several genera of microorganisms that included Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Lysteria, Escherichia, Salmonella, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Shigella, Mycobacterium and Candida. Anolobine was the most active compound against grampositive bacteria with MIC90 between 12 and 50 mg/l; less active were anonaine, lysicamine and liriodenine. All the alkaloids of the noraporphine and oxoaporphine groups, with the exception of isopiline, showed activity against Mycobacterium phlei (MIC 6-25 mg/l). Candida albicans ATCC26555 was inhibited by anonaine, nornantenine and xylopine (MIC 3-12 mg/l). None of the alkaloids tested had a significant activity against gramnegative rods. The action against susceptible microorganisms was bactericidal. PMID:3615557

  16. Thin-layer chromatography/desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: investigation of goldenseal alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2007-04-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was investigated as a means to qualitatively identify and to quantify analytes directly from developed normal-phase thin-layer chromatography plates. The atmospheric sampling capillary of a commercial ion trap mass spectrometer was extended to permit sampling and ionization of analytes in bands separated on intact TLC plates (up to 10 cmx10 cm). A surface positioning software package and the appropriate hardware enabled computer-controlled surface scanning along the length of development lanes or at fixed Rf value across the plates versus the stationary desorption electrospray emitter. Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) and related alkaloids and commercial dietary supplements were used as standards and samples. Alkaloid standards and samples were spotted and separated on aluminum- or glass-backed plates using established literature methods. The mass spectral signal levels as a function of desorption spray solvent were investigated with acetonitrile proving superior to methanol. The detection levels (approximately 5 ng each or 14-28 pmol) in mass spectral full-scan mode were determined statistically from the calibration curves (2.5-100 pmol) for the standards berberine, palmatine, and hydrastinine spotted as a mixture and separated on the plates. Qualitative screening of the major alkaloids present in six different over-the-counter "goldenseal" dietary supplements was accomplished by obtaining full-scan mass spectra during surface scans along the development lane in the direction of increasing Rf value. In one sample, alkaloids were detected that strongly suggested the presence of at least one additional herb undeclared on the product label. These same data indicated the misidentification of one of the alkaloids in the TLC literature. Quantities of the alkaloids present in two of the samples determined using the mass spectral data were in reasonable agreement with the label values, indicating the quantitative

  17. Isolation and identification of berberine and berberrubine metabolites by berberine-utilizing bacterium Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Takeda, Hisashi; Wakana, Daigo; Sato, Fumihiko; Hosoe, Tomoo

    2016-05-01

    Based on the finding of a novel berberine (BBR)-utilizing bacterium, Rhodococcus sp. strain BD7100, we investigated the degradation of BBR and its analog berberrubine (BRU). Resting cells of BD7100 demethylenated BBR and BRU, yielding benzeneacetic acid analogs. Isolation of benzeneacetic acid analogs suggested that BD7100 degraded the isoquinoline ring of the protoberberine skeleton. This work represents the first report of cleavage of protoberberine skeleton by a microorganism. PMID:26882131

  18. Time-Dependent Inhibition of CYP2C19 by Isoquinoline Alkaloids: In Vitro and In Silico Analysis.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Kaisa A; Rahnasto-Rilla, Minna; Väänänen, Raija; Imming, Peter; Meyer, Achim; Horling, Aline; Poso, Antti; Laitinen, Tuomo; Raunio, Hannu; Lahtela-Kakkonen, Maija

    2015-12-01

    The cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) enzyme plays an important role in the metabolism of many commonly used drugs. Relatively little is known about CYP2C19 inhibitors, including compounds of natural origin, which could inhibit CYP2C19, potentially causing clinically relevant metabolism-based drug interactions. We evaluated a series (N = 49) of structurally related plant isoquinoline alkaloids for their abilities to interact with CYP2C19 enzyme using in vitro and in silico methods. We examined several common active alkaloids found in herbal products such as apomorphine, berberine, noscapine, and papaverine, as well as the previously identified mechanism-based inactivators bulbocapnine, canadine, and protopine. The IC50 values of the alkaloids ranged from 0.11 to 210 µM, and 42 of the alkaloids were confirmed to be time-dependent inhibitors of CYP2C19. Molecular docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis revealed key interactions of the potent inhibitors with the enzyme active site. We constructed a comparative molecular field analysis model that was able to predict the inhibitory potency of a series of independent test molecules. This study revealed that many of these isoquinoline alkaloids do have the potential to cause clinically relevant drug interactions. These results highlight the need for studying more profoundly the potential interactions between drugs and herbal products. When further refined, in silico methods can be useful in the high-throughput prediction of P450 inhibitory potential of pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:26400396

  19. Determination of berberine and the study of fluorescence quenching mechanism between berberine and enzyme-catalyzed product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaiyou; Zhang, Miao; Lv, Qingluan; Yue, Ningning; Gong, Bin

    2009-08-01

    A new method for determining berberine has been established based on the principle of fluorescence quenching. The calibration curve was found to be linear between F0/ F and the concentration of berberine with the range of 3.00-20.0 μg mL -1. The detection limit was 0.51 μg mL -1 and the relative standard derivative was 0.18%. Effects of pH, foreign ions and the optimization of variables on the determination of berberine have been examined. The mechanism of the fluorescence quenching has been discussed. The binding constant and the number of binding sites were 1.70 × 10 6 L mol -1 and 1.14, respectively. The data, Δ H = 42.71 kJ mol -1, Δ S = 264.3 J K -1 mol -1 and the mean value Δ G = -39.65 kJ mol -1 were estimated which showed that the reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. The main binding force was hydrophobic force because both Δ H and Δ S were positive.

  20. Berberine induces GLP-1 secretion through activation of bitter taste receptor pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yunli; Hao, Gang; Zhang, Quanying; Hua, Wenyan; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wenjia; Zong, Shunlin; Huang, Ming; Wen, Xiaozhou

    2015-09-15

    Our previous studies revealed that berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion was a possible mechanism for berberine exerting good effects on hyperglycemia. This study was designed to ascertain whether berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1 was related with activation of bitter taste receptors expressed in gastrointestinal tract. Western blotting results showed that TAS2R38, a subtype of bitter taste receptor, was expressed on human enteroendocrine NCI-H716 cells. GLP-1 secretion induced by berberine from NCI-H716 cells was inhibited by incubation with anti-TAS2R38 antibody. We further performed gene silencing using siRNA to knockdown TAS2R38 from NCI-H716 cells, which showed that siRNA knockdown of the TAS2R38 reduced berberine-mediated GLP-1 secretion. We adopted inhibitors of PLC and TRPM5 known to be involved in bitter taste transduction to investigate the underlying pathways mediated in berberine-induced GLP-1 secretion. It was found that PLC inhibitor U73122 inhibited berberine-induced GLP-1 release in NCI-H716 cells, while TRPM5 blocker quinine failed to attenuate berberine-induced secretion of GLP-1. The present results demonstrated that berberine stimulated GLP-1 secretion via activation of gut-expressed bitter taste receptors in a PLC-dependent manner. Because berberine was found to be a ligand of bitter taste receptor, the results of present study may provide an explanation for some bitter taste substance obtain hypoglycemic effect. PMID:26206195

  1. The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sulphureus.

    PubMed

    Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Welch, Kevin D; Green, Benedict T; Davis, T Zane; Panter, Kip E

    2009-02-25

    Lupines are common plants on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloid profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed. PMID:19182952

  2. Antioxidant and Immunomodulatory Activity of the Alkaloidal Fraction of Cissampelos pareira Linn.

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Anand; Mishra, Shrihari

    2010-01-01

    The alkaloidal fraction (AFCP) of roots of Cissampelos pareira Linn. was screened for in-vitro antioxidant activity and immunomodulatory activity in mice. The HPTLC finger print profile was also established for the identification of AFCP which was found to contain 0.176 % of berberine. AFCP possess strong antioxidant activity which was revealed by its ability to scavenge the stable free radical DPPH, superoxide ion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate induced by iron/ADP/Ascorbate complex. AFCP was found to have significant immunosuppressive activity at lower doses (25 and 50 mg/kg) while no activity was observed at higher doses (75 and 100 mg/kg). Humoral antibody titre was significantly (p<0.01) lowered by AFCP at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg. Delayed type hypersensitivity response was also significantly (p<0.01) suppressed by the AFCP at the dose of 75 mg/kg. Thus the present study revealed the immunosuppressive and antioxidant activities of the alkaloidal fraction of C. pareira roots. PMID:21179368

  3. Antioxidant and immunomodulatory activity of the alkaloidal fraction of Cissampelos pareira linn.

    PubMed

    Bafna, Anand; Mishra, Shrihari

    2010-01-01

    The alkaloidal fraction (AFCP) of roots of Cissampelos pareira Linn. was screened for in-vitro antioxidant activity and immunomodulatory activity in mice. The HPTLC finger print profile was also established for the identification of AFCP which was found to contain 0.176 % of berberine. AFCP possess strong antioxidant activity which was revealed by its ability to scavenge the stable free radical DPPH, superoxide ion and to inhibit lipid peroxidation in rat liver homogenate induced by iron/ADP/Ascorbate complex. AFCP was found to have significant immunosuppressive activity at lower doses (25 and 50 mg/kg) while no activity was observed at higher doses (75 and 100 mg/kg). Humoral antibody titre was significantly (p<0.01) lowered by AFCP at the doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg. Delayed type hypersensitivity response was also significantly (p<0.01) suppressed by the AFCP at the dose of 75 mg/kg. Thus the present study revealed the immunosuppressive and antioxidant activities of the alkaloidal fraction of C. pareira roots. PMID:21179368

  4. Fungal Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis: Genetic and Biochemical Investigation of Tryptoquialanine Pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D.; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T.; Tang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline 2 that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine 1, which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2. PMID:21299212

  5. In vitro and in vivo antitumor efficacy of berberine-nanostructured lipid carriers against H22 tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-ping; Wu, Jun-biao; Chen, Tong-sheng; Zhou, Qun; Wang, Yi-fei

    2015-03-01

    Hepatocarcinoma, a malignant cancer, threaten human life badly. It is a current issue to seek the effective natural remedy from plant to treat cancer due to the resistance of the advanced hepatocarcinoma to chemotherapy. Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-hepatocarcinoma effects. However its low oral bioavailability restricts its wide application. In this report, Ber loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (Ber-NLC) was prepared by hot melting and then high pressure homogenization technique. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-hepatocarcinoma effects of Ber-NLC relative to efficacy of bulk Ber were evaluated. The particle size and zeta potential of Ber-NLC were 189.3 nm and -19.3 mV, respectively. MTT assay showed that Ber-NLC effectively inhibited the proliferation of H22 cells, and the corresponding IC50 values were 6.3 μg/ml (22.1 μg/ml of bulk Ber). In vivo studies also showed higher antitumor efficacy, and inhibition rates was 68.3 % (41.4 % of bulk Ber) at 100 mg/kg intragastric administration in the H22 solid tumor bearing mice. These results suggest that the delivery of Ber-NLC is a promising approach for treating tumors.

  6. Berberine attenuates myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury by suppressing the activation of PI3K/AKT signaling

    PubMed Central

    QIN-WEI, ZHU; YONG-GUANG, LI

    2016-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline alkaloid originally isolated from the Chinese herb Coptis chinensis (Huanglian), exhibits anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Since myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is associated with an excessive immune response, the current study was conducted to investigate the impact of BBR on myocardial I/R injury, a common disorder in clinical settings. Preconditioning of Sprague-Dawley rats with BBR (100 mg/kg/day, by gavage) for 14 days prior to the induction of I/R significantly attenuated myocardial I/R injury as manifested by a reduction in the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia and the amelioration of myocardial histological changes. These effects were found to be associated with the suppression of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway and the subsequent reduction of the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α in the serum and myocardial tissue. These results indicate that BBR has the potential be an effective alternative therapy for the prevention and treatment of myocardial I/R injury in clinical practice. PMID:26998023

  7. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved. PMID:25823584

  8. Cyclopeptide Alkaloids from Hymenocardia acida.

    PubMed

    Tuenter, Emmy; Exarchou, Vassiliki; Baldé, Aliou; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Apers, Sandra; Pieters, Luc

    2016-07-22

    Four cyclopeptide alkaloids (1-4) were isolated from the root bark of Hymenocardia acida by means of semipreparative HPLC with DAD and ESIMS detection and conventional separation methods. Structure elucidation was performed by spectroscopic means. In addition to the known compound hymenocardine (1), three other alkaloids were isolated for the first time from a natural source. These included a hymenocardine derivative with a hydroxy group instead of a carbonyl group that was named hymenocardinol (2), as well as hymenocardine N-oxide (3) and a new cyclopeptide alkaloid containing an unusual histidine moiety named hymenocardine-H (4). The isolated cyclopeptide alkaloids were tested for their antiplasmodial activity and cytotoxicity. All four compounds showed moderate antiplasmodial activity, with IC50 values ranging from 12.2 to 27.9 μM, the most active one being hymenocardine N-oxide (3), with an IC50 value of 12.2 ± 6.6 μM. Compounds 2-4 were found not to be cytotoxic against MRC-5 cells (IC50 > 64.0 μM), but hymenocardine (1) showed some cytotoxicity, with an IC50 value of 51.1 ± 17.2 μM. PMID:27351950

  9. Application of pH-zone refining hydrostatic countercurrent chromatography (hCCC) for the recovery of antioxidant phenolics and the isolation of alkaloids from Siberian barberry herb.

    PubMed

    Kukula-Koch, Wirginia; Koch, Wojciech; Angelis, Apostolis; Halabalaki, Maria; Aligiannis, Nektarios

    2016-07-15

    The development of a fast hCCC method tailored to recover phenolics of Siberian barberry (Berberis sibirica, Berberidaceae) responsible for the observed strong antioxidant activity was performed. Initially, the optimization of extraction procedure was evaluated based on the antiradical potential assessment (DPPH and Folin-Ciocalteu assays). 100 °C methanol ASE extract exhibited the highest antiradical activity (IC50=60 ± 4 μg/mL), and a significant TPC (159 ± 2 mgGAE/g). Thorough determination of phenolic content by UHPLC-DAD-ESI(-)HRMS revealed the presence of 10 phenolics as major constituents, and several groups of alkaloids. pH-zone refining hCCC was chosen as the most promising method for the extract's fractionation due to the ionizable character of its constituents. For this purpose a MtBE-H2O (1:1) system with 10mM TEA and HCl was applied leading to a phenolic fraction, free of alkaloids, with higher antioxidant capacity (IC50=25 μg/mL, TPC=178 mg GAE/g). Additionally, fractionation of alkaloids was achieved resulting isolation of pharmacologically important alkaloids: magnoflorine and berberine. PMID:26948630

  10. Berberine enhances antidiabetic effects and attenuates untoward effects of canagliflozin in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cai-Ming; Jiang, Xin; Ouyang, Xiao-Xi; Zhang, Ya-Ou; Xie, Wei-Dong

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed at determining whether berberine can enhance the antidiabetic effects and alleviate the adverse effects of canagliflozin in diabetes mellitus. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were introduced, and the combined effects of berberine and canagliflozin on glucose metabolism and kidney functions were investigated. Our results showed that berberine combined with canagliflozin (BC) increased reduction of fasting and postprandial blood glucose, diet, and water intake compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. Interestingly, BC showed greater decrease in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and lower total urine glucose excretion than canagliflozin alone. In addition, BC showed increased phosphorylated 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (pAMPK) expression and decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) levels in kidneys, compared with berberine or canagliflozin alone. These results indicated that BC was a stronger antidiabetic than berberine or canagliflozin alone with less negative side effects on the kidneys in the diabetic mice. The antidiabetic effect was likely to be mediated by synergically promoting the expression of pAMPK and reducing the expression of TNFα in kidneys. The present study represented the first report that canagliflozin combined with berberine was a promising treatment for diabetes mellitus. The exact underlying mechanisms of action should be investigated in future studies. PMID:27507202

  11. Effect of berberine on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and their mixtures as determined by isothermal microcalorimetry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wei-Jun; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Xiao, Xiao-He; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Wei, Jian-He; Wang, Jia-Bo; Yang, Rui-Chuang; Yang, Mei-Hua

    2012-10-01

    The strong toxicity of pathogenic bacteria has resulted in high levels of morbidity and mortality in the general population. Developing effective antibacterial agents with high efficacy and long activity is in great demand. In this study, the microcalorimetric technique based on heat output of bacterial metabolism was applied to evaluate the effect of berberine on Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, individually and in a mixture of both using a multi-channel microcalorimeter. The differences in shape of the power-time fingerprints and thermokinetic parameters of microorganism growth were compared. The results revealed that low concentration (20 μg/mL) of berberine began to inhibit the growth of E. coli and mixed microorganisms, while promoting the growth of B. subtilis; high concentration of berberine (over 100 μg/mL) inhibited B. subtilis. The endurance of E. coli to berberine was obviously lower than B. subtilis, and E. coli could decrease the endurance of B. subtilis to berberine. The sequence of half-inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of berberine was: B. subtilis (952.37 μg/mL) > mixed microorganisms (682.47 μg/mL) > E. coli (581.69 μg/mL). Berberine might be a good selection of antibacterial agent used in the future. The microcalorimetric method should be strongly suggested in screening novel antibacterial agents for fighting against pathogenic bacteria. PMID:22878842

  12. Berberine in Combination with Insulin Has Additive Effects on Titanium Implants Osseointegration in Diabetes Mellitus Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li; Zhijian, Huang; Lei, Li; Wenchuan, Chen; Zhimin, Zhu

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of berberine in combination with insulin on early osseointegration of implants in diabetic rats. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups: healthy rats were used as control (HC), and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with insulin, berberine, berberine + insulin (IB), or no treatment. Each rat received one machined-surface cp-Ti implant into the right tibia and was given insulin injection and/or gavage feeding with berberine daily for 8 weeks until being sacrificed. Serum levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-containing protein (BGP) were analyzed in each group. Peri-implant mineral apposition was marked by fluorochrome double-labeling and osseointegration was histomorphologically examined. The ALP and BGP levels decreased in diabetic rats but were successfully corrected by insulin and berberine combined treatment. Moreover, untreated diabetic rats had less labeled mineral apposition and impaired osseointegration. In contrast, Groups I, B, and IB were observed with increased peri-implant bone formation. The combination treatment of insulin and berberine was more effective than each administrated as a monotherapy. These results suggest that berberine combined with insulin could promote osseointegration in diabetic rats, thereby highlighting its potential application to patients, though further studies are needed. PMID:26783411

  13. Effects of berberine on acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vahdati Hassani, Faezeh; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud; Akbari, Edris; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: It has been shown that berberine, a major component of Berberis vulgaris extract, modulates the activity of several neurotransmitter systems including dopamine (Da) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) contributing to rewarding and reinforcing effects of morphine. Drug craving and relapsing even after a long time of abstinence therapy are the most important problems of addiction. In the present study, we investigated the alleviating effects of berberine on the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) in mice. Materials and Methods: In male NMRI mice, the acquisition of CPP was established by 40 mg/kg of morphine sulphate injection and extinguished after the extinction training and reinstated by a 10 mg/kg injection of morphine. The effects of different doses of berberine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) on the acquisition and reinstatement induced by morphine were evaluated in a conditioned place preference test. Results: The results showed that intraperitoneal administration of berberine (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) did not induce conditioned appetitive or aversive effects. Injection of berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg) 2 h before the morphine administration reduced acquisition of morphine-induced CPP. In addition, same doses of berberine significantly prevented the reinstatement of morphine-induced CPP. Conclusion: These results suggest that berberine can reduce the acquisition and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference and may be useful in treatment of morphine addiction. PMID:27222833

  14. Hormetic Effect of Berberine Attenuates the Anticancer Activity of Chemotherapeutic Agents.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jiaolin; Huang, Borong; Zou, Lidi; Chen, Shenghui; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yulin; Chen, Meiwan; Wan, Jian-Bo; Su, Huanxing; Wang, Yitao; He, Chengwei

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is a phenomenon of biphasic dose response characterized by exhibiting stimulatory or beneficial effects at low doses and inhibitory or toxic effects at high doses. Increasing numbers of chemicals of various types have been shown to induce apparent hormetic effect on cancer cells. However, the underlying significance and mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Berberine, one of the major active components of Rhizoma coptidis, has been manifested with notable anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate the hormetic effect of berberine and its influence on the anticancer activities of chemotherapeutic agents. Our results demonstrated that berberine at low dose range (1.25 ~ 5 μM) promoted cell proliferation to 112% ~170% of the untreated control in various cancer cells, while berberine at high dose rage (10 ~ 80 μM) inhibited cell proliferation. Further, we observed that co-treatment with low dose berberine could significantly attenuate the anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic agents, including fluorouracil (5-FU), camptothecin (CPT), and paclitaxel (TAX). The hormetic effect and thereby the attenuated anticancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs by berberine may attributable to the activated protective stress response in cancer cells triggered by berberine, as evidenced by up-regulated MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. These results provided important information to understand the potential side effects of hormesis, and suggested cautious application of natural compounds and relevant herbs in adjuvant treatment of cancer. PMID:26421434

  15. Berberine Ameliorates Cold and Mechanical Allodynia in a Rat Model of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si Oh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluated the antiallodynic properties of berberine on cold and mechanical allodynia after streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes using a rat model. Diabetic neuropathy was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of STZ. To measure cold and mechanical allodynia, a 4°C plate and von Frey filament were used, respectively. Cold and mechanical allodynia induced by diabetes were significantly decreased by single and repeated intraperitoneal treatment of amitriptyline at 10 mg/kg, and berberine at 10 and 20 mg/kg. The hepatic malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities were significantly increased in diabetic rats as compared with those in intact rats; however, in amitriptyline- and berberine-treated rats, they were significantly decreased as compared to the STZ control. The overall effects of berberine 20 mg/kg on cold and mechanical allodynia were quite similar to those of amitriptyline 10 mg/kg, and berberine exhibited similar antioxidant effects as the same dosage of amitriptyline. In conclusion, berberine (10 and 20 mg/kg) was observed to have antiallodynic effects against diabetes, which are presumed to be associated with antioxidative effects. It can be considered that the anti-inflammatory or antidepressant capacity of berberine could contribute to the antiallonynic effects shown in this study. PMID:23734996

  16. Immunoquantitative analysis for berberine and its related compounds using monoclonal antibodies in herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2004-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) against berberine, a bioactive constituent of Coptis japonica M., Phellodendron amurense R. and Hydrastis canadensis L., was produced and characterized. As immunogen, the derivative of berberine, 9-O-carboxymethyl berberrubine was synthesized and conjugated to carrier protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). In order to confirm its immunogenicity, the ratio of hapten in berberine-BSA conjugate was determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). After immunization, hybridomas secreting MAbs against berberine were produced by fusing splenocytes with mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8-653. After the screening, anti-berberine MAb 1D5-3B-7 was obtained. Subsequently, a quantitative ELISA system for berberine and its related compounds using the MAb was established and evaluated comparing with HPLC method. The ELISA method described in this study can be available as an analytical tool for quality control and standardization of medicinal plants and its prescriptions containing berberine and its related compounds. PMID:14737589

  17. Quorum quenching and antimicrobial activity of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Cech, Nadja B; Junio, Hiyas A; Ackermann, Laynez W; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2012-09-01

    The popular herbal remedy goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is traditionally used to treat skin infections. With this study, we show activity of H. canadensis extracts in vitro against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An extract from H. canadensis leaves demonstrated more potent antimicrobial activity than the alkaloid berberine alone (MICs of 75 µg/mL and 150 µg/mL, respectively). LC-MS detected alkaloids and efflux-pump inhibitory flavonoids in the extract, and the latter may explain the enhanced efficacy of the extract compared to berberine alone. We also show evidence of anti-virulence activity as a second mechanism by which H. canadensis acts against S. aureus. The H. canadensis leaf extract (but not the isolated alkaloids berberine, hydrastine, and canadine) demonstrated quorum quenching activity against several clinically relevant MRSA isolates (USA300 strains). Our data suggest that this occurs by attenuation of signal transduction through the AgrCA two-component system. Consistent with this observation, the extract inhibited toxin production by MRSA and prevented damage by MRSA to keratinocyte cells in vitro. Collectively, our results show that H. canadensis leaf extracts possess a mixture of constituents that act against MRSA via several different mechanisms. These findings lend support for the traditional application of crude H. canadensis extracts in the prevention of infection. PMID:22814821

  18. Considerable fluorescence enhancement upon supramolecular complex formation between berberine and p-sulfonated calixarenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megyesi, Mónika; Biczók, László

    2006-06-01

    Remarkably strong binding of berberine to 4-sulfonatocalix[8]arene was found in aqueous solution, which led to fluorescence quantum yield increase of a factor about 40 at pH 2. The hypsochromic shift of the fluorescence maximum implied that berberine sensed less polar microenvironment when confined to SCX8. The stability of the supramolecular complex significantly diminished when sulfocalixarenes of smaller ring size served as host compounds but the pH affected the association strength to a much lesser extent. All berberine complexes proved to be barely fluorescent at pH 12.2 because of excited state quenching by the hosts via electron transfer.

  19. Update on Berberine in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Song, Haiyan

    2013-01-01

    Berberine (BBR), an active ingredient from nature plants, has demonstrated multiple biological activities and pharmacological effects in a series of metabolic diseases including nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The recent literature points out that BBR may be a potential drug for NAFLD in both experimental models and clinical trials. This review highlights important discoveries of BBR in this increasing disease and addresses the relevant targets of BBR on NAFLD which links to insulin pathway, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, gut environment, hepatic lipid transportation, among others. Developing nuanced understanding of the mechanisms will help to optimize more targeted and effective clinical application of BBR for NAFLD. PMID:23843872

  20. Leaf herbivory and nutrients increase nectar alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lynn S; Wink, Michael; Distl, Melanie; Lentz, Amanda J

    2006-08-01

    Correlations between traits may constrain ecological and evolutionary responses to multispecies interactions. Many plants produce defensive compounds in nectar and leaves that could influence interactions with pollinators and herbivores, but the relationship between nectar and leaf defences is entirely unexplored. Correlations between leaf and nectar traits may be mediated by resources and prior damage. We determined the effect of nutrients and leaf herbivory by Manduca sexta on Nicotiana tabacum nectar and leaf alkaloids, floral traits and moth oviposition. We found a positive phenotypic correlation between nectar and leaf alkaloids. Herbivory induced alkaloids in nectar but not in leaves, while nutrients increased alkaloids in both tissues. Moths laid the most eggs on damaged, fertilized plants, suggesting a preference for high alkaloids. Induced nectar alkaloids via leaf herbivory indicate that species interactions involving leaf and floral tissues are linked and should not be treated as independent phenomena in plant ecology or evolution. PMID:16913940

  1. Imidazole alkaloids from Lepidium meyenii.

    PubMed

    Cui, Baoliang; Zheng, Bo Lin; He, Kan; Zheng, Qun Yi

    2003-08-01

    Two new imidazole alkaloids (lepidiline A and lepidiline B) have been isolated from a root extract of Lepidium meyenii with the common name Maca and identified as 1,3-dibenzyl-4,5-dimethylimidazolium chloride (1) and 1,3-dibenzyl-2,4,5-trimethylimidazolium chloride (2), respectively. The structures of these two new compounds were determined by spectroscopic methods, as well as single-crystal X-ray diffraction performed on compound 1. PMID:12932133

  2. Bacterial Alkaloids Prevent Amoebal Predation.

    PubMed

    Klapper, Martin; Götze, Sebastian; Barnett, Robert; Willing, Karsten; Stallforth, Pierre

    2016-07-25

    Bacterial defense mechanisms have evolved to protect bacteria against predation by nematodes, predatory bacteria, or amoebae. We identified novel bacterial alkaloids (pyreudiones A-D) that protect the producer, Pseudomonas fluorescens HKI0770, against amoebal predation. Isolation, structure elucidation, total synthesis, and a proposed biosynthetic pathway for these structures are presented. The generation of P. fluorescens gene-deletion mutants unable to produce pyreudiones rendered the bacterium edible to a variety of soil-dwelling amoebae. PMID:27294402

  3. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids in human diet.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A S; Pereira, T N; Reilly, P E; Seawright, A A

    1999-07-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are the leading plant toxins associated with disease in humans and animals. Upon ingestion, metabolic activation in liver converts the parent compounds into highly reactive electrophiles capable of reacting with cellular macromolecules forming adducts which may initiate acute or chronic toxicity. The pyrrolizidine alkaloids present a serious health risk to human populations that may be exposed to them through contamination of foodstuffs or when plants containing them are consumed as medicinal herbs. Some pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) adducts are persistent in animal tissue and the metabolites may be re-released and cause damage long after the initial period of ingestion. PAs are also known to act as teratogens and abortifacients. Chronic ingestion of plants containing PAs has also led to cancer in experimental animals and metabolites of several PAs have been shown to be mutagenic in the Salmonella typhimurium/mammalian microsome system. However, no clinical association has yet been found between human cancer and exposure to PAs. Based on the extensive reports on the outcome of human exposure available in the literature, we conclude that while humans face the risk of veno-occlusive disease and childhood cirrhosis PAs are not carcinogenic to humans. PMID:10415431

  4. Alkaloids from Glaucium flavum from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Petitto, Valentina; Serafini, Mauro; Gallo, Francesca Romana; Multari, Giuseppina; Nicoletti, Marcello

    2010-07-01

    Glaucium flavum collected in Sardinia was studied using a phytochemical approach in order to evaluate its alkaloid composition and obtain a comparison with the alkaloid contents of the same species in populations of other geographic proveniences. In fact, different chemoecotypes of G. flavum have been identified, on the basis of their particular content and composition in alkaloids, in accordance with the different distribution areas. The analysis showed that Sardinian G. flavum contains a homogeneous alkaloid pattern of aporphyne type, significantly different from those reported for populations from other parts of Europe. PMID:20552526

  5. Metabolomic and pharmacokinetic study on the mechanism underlying the lipid-lowering effect of oral-administrated berberine

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shenghua; Cao, Bei; Sun, Runbin; Tang, Yueqing; Paletta, Janice L.; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Linsheng; Zha, Weibin; Zhao, Chunyan; Li, Yan; Radlon, Jason M.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Zhou, Huiping; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2014-01-01

    Clinic and animal studies demonstrated that oral-administrated berberine had distinct lipid-lowering effect. However, pharmacokinetic studies showed berberine was poorly absorbed into the body so that the levels of berberine in the blood and target tissues were far below the effective concentrations revealed. To probe the underlying mechanism, the effect of berberine on biological system was studied on a high-fat-diet-induced hamster hyperlipidemia model. Our results showed that intragastric-administered berberine was poorly absorbed into circulation and most berberine accumulated in gut content. Although the bioavailability for intragastric-administered berberine was much lower than that of intraperitoneal-administered berberine, it had stronger lipid-lowing effect, indicating gastrointestinal is a potential target for hypolipidemic effect of berberine. Metabolomic study on both serum and gut content showed that oral-administrated berberine significantly regulated molecules involved in lipid metabolism, and increased the generation of bile acids in the hyperlipidemic model. DNA analysis revealed that the oral-administered berberine modulated the gut microbiota, and BBR showed a significant inhibition on the 7α-dehydroxylation conversion of cholic acid to deoxycholic acid, indicating a decreased elimination of bile acids in the gut. However, in model hamsters, elevated bile acids failed to down-regulate the expression and function of CYP7A1 in a negative feed-back way. It was suggested that the hypocholesterolemic effect for oral-administrated berberine is involved in its effect on modulating the turnover of bile acids and farnesoid X receptor signal pathway. PMID:25411028

  6. A simple fluorescence quenching method for berberine determination using water-soluble CdTe quantum dots as probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ming; Liu, Meigui; Cao, Chun; Xia, Yunsheng; Bao, Linjun; Jin, Yingqiong; Yang, Song; Zhu, Changqing

    2010-03-01

    A novel method for the determination of berberine has been developed based on quenching of the fluorescence of thioglycolic acid-capped CdTe quantum dots (TGA-CdTe QDs) by berberine in aqueous solutions. Under optimum conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity was linearly proportional to the concentration of berberine between 2.5 × 10 -8 and 8.0 × 10 -6 mol L -1 with a detection limit of 6.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1. The method has been applied to the determination of berberine in real samples, and satisfactory results were obtained. The mechanism of the proposed reaction was also discussed.

  7. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  8. The enhancement of cardiac toxicity by concomitant administration of Berberine and macrolides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Duo; Feng, Pan-Feng; Sun, Jia-Liang; Guo, Fengfeng; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Xin; Li, Bao-Xin

    2015-08-30

    As is well-known, hERG plays an essential role in phase III repolarization of cardiac action potentials. Blocking of hERG channels can lead to LQTS. Inhibition of the metabolism of CYPs activities may elevate plasma levels, to further increase accumulation of drug on cardiac. The elevated serum levels may however elicit unexpected toxicities. Therefore, the inhibition tests of hERG and CYP are central to the preclinical studies because they may lead to severe cardiac toxicity. Berberine is widely used as an antibacterial agent and often combined with macrolides to treat gastropathy. Our objective was to assess cardiac toxicity during the combined use of Berberine with macrolides. (1) Azithromycin reduced hERG currents by accelerated channel inactivation. (2) The combination of Berberine with Azithromycin reduced hERG currents, producing an inhibitive effect stronger than use of a single drug alone, due to the high binding affinity for the onset of inactivation. (3) When cells were perfused concomitantly with Berberine and Clarithromycin, they showed a stronger inhibitive effect on hERG currents by decreasing the time constant for the onset of inactivation. (4) The combined administration of Berberine with Clarithromycin had a powerful inhibitive effect on CYP3A activities than use of a single drug alone. Collectively, these results demonstrated that concomitant use of Berberine with macrolides may require close monitoring because of potential drug toxicities, especially cardiac toxicity. PMID:25976224

  9. The effect of Berberine on the secondary structure of human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; He, WenYing; Tian, Jianniao; Tang, Jianghong; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2005-05-01

    The presence of several high affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it a possible target for many drugs. This study is designed to examine the effect of Berberine (an ancient Chinese drug used for antimicrobial, antiplasmodial, antidiarrheal and cardiovascular) on the solution structure of HSA using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The fluorescence spectroscopic results show that the fluorescence intensity of HSA was significantly decreased in the presence of Berberine. The Scatchard's plots indicated that the binding of Berberine to HSA at 296, 303, 318 K is characterized by one binding site with the binding constant is 4.071(±0.128)×10 4, 3.741(±0.089)×10 4, 3.454(±0.110)×10 4 M -1, respectively. The protein conformation is altered (FT-IR and CD data) with reductions of α-helices from 54 to 47% for free HSA to 45-32% and with increases of turn structure5% for free HSA to 18% in the presence of Berberine. The binding process was exothermic, enthalpy driven and spontaneous, as indicated by the thermodynamic analyses, Berberine bound to HSA was mainly based on hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic interaction cannot be excluded from the binding. Furthermore, the displace experiments indicate that Berberine can bind to the subdomain IIA, that is, high affinity site (site II).

  10. New aspects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a novel carrier for berberine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Berberine was encapsulated in yeast cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as novel carriers to be used in different food and drug industries. The microcapsules were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), fourier transform infra red spectroscopy (FT-IR) and fluorescence microscopy. The encapsulation factors such as plasmolysis of yeast cells which affects the % encapsulation yield were studied. Results Fluorescence microscopy showed the yeast cells became fluorescent after encapsulation process. DSC diagram was representing of new peak for microcapsule which was not the same as berberine and the empty yeast cells peaks, separately. FTIR spectrums of microcapsules and yeast cells were almost the same. The plasmolysed and non plasmolysed microcapsules were loaded with berberine up to about 40.2 ± 0.2% w/w. Conclusion Analytical methods proved that berberine was encapsulated in the yeast cells. Fluorescence microscopy and FTIR results showed the entrance of berberine inside the yeasts. DSC diagram indicated the appearance of new peak which is due to the synthesis of new product. Although plasmolysis caused changes in yeast cell structure and properties, it did not enhance berberine loading in the cells. The results confirmed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae could be an efficient and safe carrier for active materials. PMID:24359687

  11. Two new acridone alkaloids from Glycosmis macrantha.

    PubMed

    Yahayu, Maizatul Akmal; Rahmani, Mawardi; Hashim, Najihah Mohd; Amin, Muhammad Aizat Mohd; Ee, Gwendoline Cheng Lian; Sukari, Mohd Aspollah; Akim, Abdah

    2011-01-01

    Extraction and chromatographic separation of the extracts of dried stem barks of Glycosmis macrantha lead to isolation of two new acridone alkaloids, macranthanine and 7-hydroxynoracronycine, and a known acridone, atalaphyllidine. The structures of these alkaloids were determined by detailed spectral analysis and also by comparison with reported data. PMID:21623311

  12. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Brucine alkaloid. 21.99 Section 21.99 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.99 Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification...

  13. Plant alkaloids of the polymethyleneamine series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogoza, Ludmila N.; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F.; Tolstikov, Genrikh A.

    2005-04-01

    The published data on the structures and biological activities of the plant alkaloids of the biogenic polymethyleneamine series, viz., putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), spermidine (1,8-diamino-4 -azaoctane), and spermine (1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane), are considered and systematised. The structures and biological activities of some synthetic analogues of these alkaloids are also presented.

  14. Glycoalkaloids and calystegine alkaloids in potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes contain two classes of alkaloids: the glycoalkaloids and the calystegines. The presence of glycoalkaloids in potatoes and their toxicity has been known for more than a century and much has been written about them. Discovery of the nortropane calystegine alkaloids is more recent, and the k...

  15. Ergot alkaloids: toxicokinetics and vascular effects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum)-infected tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) occupies nearly 15 million ha in the USA. Although this symbiosis is beneficial to the plant, it produces ergot alkaloids that are detrimental to livestock production. Livestock consuming the alkaloids elicit adverse ph...

  16. Iboga-Type Alkaloids from Ervatamia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ben-Qin; Wang, Wen-Jing; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Ren-Wang; Yang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-08-22

    Seven new iboga-type alkaloids, ervaoffines A-D (1-4), (7S)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine (5), ibogaine-5,6-dione (6), and 19-epi-5-oxovoacristine (7), and 10 known alkaloids were isolated from Ervatamia officinalis. The absolute configurations of 1-7 were determined through X-ray diffraction and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) analyses. Ervaoffines A and B represent the first iboga-type pseudoindoxyl alkaloids in which the C-2 spiro carbon configuration is opposite to that of other members of this class, such as iboluteine (8). The relationship between the absolute configuration of the spiro carbons and the Cotton effect in the ECD spectrum is established for the first time for iboga-type pseudoindoxyl and oxindole alkaloids. Additionally, a plausible biogenetic pathway for these alkaloids is proposed. PMID:25093992

  17. The examination of berberine excited state by laser flash photolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lingli; Wang, Mei; Zhao, Ping; Zhu, Hui; Zhu, Rongrong; Sun, Xiaoyu; Yao, Side; Wang, Shilong

    2009-07-01

    The property of the excited triplet state of berberine (BBR) was investigated by using time-resolved laser flash photolysis of 355 nm in acetonitrile. The transient absorption spectra of the excited triplet BBR were obtained in acetonitrile, which have an absorption maximum at 420 nm. And the ratio of excitation to ionization of BBR in acetonitrile solvent was calculated. The self-decay and self-quenching rate constants, and the absorption coefficient of 3BBR* were investigated and the excited state quantum yield was determined. Furthermore utilizing the benzophenone (BEN) as a triplet sensitizer, and the β-carotene (Car) as an excited energy transfer acceptor, the assignment of 3BBR* was further confirmed and the related energy transfer rate constants were also determined.

  18. Comparative analysis of transcription factor gene families from Papaver somniferum: identification of regulatory factors involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Parul; Pathak, Sumya; Lakhwani, Deepika; Gupta, Parul; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.), known for biosynthesis of several therapeutically important benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), has emerged as the premier organism to study plant alkaloid metabolism. The most prominent molecules produced in opium poppy include narcotic analgesic morphine, the cough suppressant codeine, the muscle relaxant papaverine and the anti-microbial agent sanguinarine and berberine. Despite several health benefits, biosynthesis of some of these molecules is very low due to tight temporal and spatial regulation of the genes committed to their biosynthesis. Transcription factors, one of the prime regulators of secondary plant product biosynthesis, might be involved in controlled biosynthesis of BIAs in P. somniferum. In this study, identification of members of different transcription factor gene families using transcriptome datasets of 10 cultivars of P. somniferum with distinct chemoprofile has been carried out. Analysis suggests that most represented transcription factor gene family in all the poppy cultivars is WRKY. Comparative transcriptome analysis revealed differential expression pattern of the members of a set of transcription factor gene families among 10 cultivars. Through analysis, two members of WRKY and one member of C3H gene family were identified as potential candidates which might regulate thebaine and papaverine biosynthesis, respectively, in poppy. PMID:26108744

  19. Effect of MDL-Type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x) than the MDL-type alka...

  20. Effect of MDL-type alkaloids on tall larkspur toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids which include the 7, 8-methylenedioxylycoctonine (MDL) -type alkaloids and the N-(methylsuccinimido) anthranoyllycoctonine (MSAL) -type alkaloids. The MSAL-type alkaloids are generally much more toxic (typically > 20x). Toxicity of many tal...

  1. [Vinca alkaloid and MDR1].

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Nagio; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2008-07-01

    Vinca alkaloids inhibit microtubule formation by binding to tubulin. There are four clinically available vinca alkaloids including vincristine, vinblastine, vindesine, and vinorelbine. P-glycoprotein(P-gp)is the one of the efflux adenosine triphosphate(ATP)-binding cassette family transporters and is the encoded product of MDR1 gene. P-gp is overexpressed not only in tumor cells resistant to multiple anticancer agents but also found in normal cells such as liver, gastrointestinal tract and kidney, working as a biological defense mechanism. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for MDR1 in exon 12(1236), exon 21(2677), and exon 26(3435)have been well studied. Although C1236T and C3435T do not change the amino acid, G2677T and G2677A result in amino acid substitution of Ala893Ser and Ala893Thr, respectively. In the use of haplotypes to predict vincristine pharmacokinetics, the correlation between the haplotypes and the elimination half-life was reported. Many studies of the relationship between polymorphism/haplotype for MDR1 and pharmacodynamics including efficacy and toxicity of chemotherapy have been explored. PMID:18633246

  2. Antioxidant action of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Ubeda, A; Montesinos, C; Payá, M; Terencio, C; Alcaraz, M J

    1993-01-01

    The antioxidant action of a series of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids has been investigated. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, anonaine, apomorphine, glaucine, boldine, bulbocapnine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine produced a dose-dependent inhibition of microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by Fe2+/ascorbate, CCl4/NADPH or by Fe3+ ADP/NADPH. Apomorphine exerted the highest inhibitory effects in the three systems of induction used, with a potency higher than propyl gallate. Laudanosoline was particularly effective in the first system, while bulbocapnine and anonaine were more potent when CCl4/NADPH or Fe3(+)-ADP/NADPH were used as inducers. Laudanosoline, protopapaverine, apomorphine, tetrahydroberberine and stepholidine were also potent inhibitors of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction. The presence of a free hydroxyl group or preferably of a catechol group is a feature relevant for inhibition of lipid peroxidation and NBT reduction, nevertheless the antioxidant activity of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids cannot be only ascribed to the formation of phenoxy radicals and other free radical species may be formed during aporphine and tetrahydroprotoberberine oxidation. The influence of this series of compounds on the time course of lipid peroxidation suggests that some of them, like apomorphine and boldine act as chain-breaking antioxidants. PMID:8319926

  3. Effects of dietary supplementations with the fibrous root of Rhizoma Coptidis and its main alkaloids on non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xia; Peng, Yaozong; Li, Ling; He, Kai; Huang, Tao; Mou, Shaoxia; Feng, Min; Han, Bing; Ye, Xiaoli; Li, Xuegang

    2016-05-01

    The effects of fibrous root of Rhizoma Coptidis (FRC) and its main alkaloids on non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp were investigated. The fish were randomly assigned to seven groups: normal control group (NC), groups treated with 12.5g/kg FRC (FRC-L), 25g/kg FRC (FRC-M), 50g/kg FRC (FRC-H), 0.78g/kg total alkaloids (TA), 0.78g/kg berberine (BBR), and 0.78g/kg coptisine (Cop), respectively. Results showed that the activities of myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and respiratory burst were significantly elevated after treated with FRC-M, FRC-H, TA, BBR and Cop, and the complement C3 level and phagocytic activity were significantly increased in FRC-M, TA and BBR treated groups compared with NC group. The real-time PCR analysis indicated that FRC, TA, BBR and Cop could up-regulate the mRNA expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, lysozyme-c and C3, but down-regulate that of IL-10 in the head kidney of common carp. Besides, FRC-M, FRC-H, TA, BBR and Cop significantly enhanced the survival rate of common carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila, when compared to NC group. It was concluded that the FRC could enhance the non-specific immunity and disease resistance of common carp and the main alkaloids might contribute to these effects. PMID:27090624

  4. Berberine in combination with cisplatin suppresses breast cancer cell growth through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuwan; Jing, Zuolei; Li, Yan; Mao, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from medicinal plants such as Hydrastis canadensis, Berberis aristata and Coptis chinensis. BBR displays a number of beneficial roles in the treatment of various types of cancers, yet the precise mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Cisplatin is an effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent and functions by generating DNA damage, promoting DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis; however, its efficacy is challenged by the resistance of tumor cells in clinical application. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of BBR in combination with cisplatin on human breast cancer cells. MTT assay showed that BBR inhibited breast cancer MCF-7 cell growth with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 52.178±1.593 µM and the IC50 value of cisplatin was 49.541±1.618 µM, while in combination with 26 µM BBR, the IC50 value of cisplatin was 5.759±0.76 µM. BBR sensitized the MCF-7 cells to cisplatin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After treatment of BBR and cisplatin, the cellular pro-apoptotic capase-3 and cleaved capspase-3 and caspase-9 were upregulated and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 was downregulated. Importantly, BBR restrained the expression of cellular PCNA, and immunofluoresence analysis of γH2AX showed that BBR increased the DNA damages induced by cisplatin. Taken together, the results demonstrated that BBR sensitized MCF-7 cells to cisplatin through induction of DNA breaks and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. PMID:27177238

  5. Effects of Berberine Against Radiation-Induced Intestinal Injury in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guanghui; Zhang Yaping; Tang Jinliang; Chen Zhengtang; Hu Yide; Wei Hong; Li Dezhi; Hao Ping; Wang Donglin

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced intestinal injury is a significant clinical problem in patients undergoing abdominal radiotherapy (RT). Berberine has been used as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antimotility agent. The present study investigated the protective effect of berberine against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: The mice were administrated berberine or distilled water. A total of 144 mice underwent 0, 3, 6, 12, or 16 Gy single session whole-abdominal RT and 16 mice underwent 3 Gy/fraction/d for four fractions of fractionated abdominal RT. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, interleukin-10, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein, malonaldehyde, and apoptosis were assayed in the mice after RT. The body weight and food intake of the mice receiving fractionated RT were recorded. Another 72 mice who had undergone 12, 16, or 20 Gy abdominal RT were monitored for mortality every 12 h. Results: The body weight and food intake of the mice administered with distilled water decreased significantly compared with before RT. After the same dose of abdominal RT, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, diamine oxidase, intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in plasma and malonalhehyde and apoptosis of the intestine were significantly greater in the control group than in the mice administered berberine (p < .05-.01). In contrast, interleukin-10 in the mice with berberine treatment was significantly greater than in the control group (p < .01). A similar result was found in the fractionated RT experiment and at different points after 16 Gy abdominal RT (p < .05-.01). Berberine treatment significantly delayed the point of death after 20 Gy, but not 16 Gy, abdominal RT (p < .01). Conclusion: Treatment with berberine can delay mortality and attenuated intestinal injury in mice undergoing whole abdominal RT. These findings could provide a useful therapeutic strategy for radiation-induced intestinal injury.

  6. Pretreatment with a combination of ligustrazine and berberine improves cardiac function in rats with coronary microembolization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Ma, Xiao-juan; Guo, Chun-yu; Wang, Ming-ming; Kou, Na; Qu, Hua; Mao, Hui-min; Shi, Da-zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We have shown that a combination of ligustrazine and berberine produces more effective inhibition on platelet activation and inflammatory reactions in rat acute myocardial infarction compared with either agent alone. In this study we evaluated the beneficial effects of a combination of ligustrazine and berberine in a rat model of coronary microembolization (CME). Methods: SD rats were treated with ligustrazine, berberine, ligustrazine+berberine, or clopidogrel for 2 weeks. When the treatment completed, CME was induced by injection of sodium laurate into the left ventricular, while obstructing the ascending aorta. All rats were intubated for hemodynamic measurements. Blood samples were collected for biochemical analyses, flow cytometry, and ELISAs. Heart tissues were isolated for histopathology and subsequent protein analyses. Results: Pretreatment with the combination of ligustrazine (27 mg·kg−1·d−1) and berberine (90 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly improved cardiac function, and decreased myocardial necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, microthrombosis and serum CK-MB levels in CME rats. In addition, this combination significantly decreased plasma ET-1 levels and von Willebrand factor, inhibited ADP-induced platelet activation, and reduced TNFα, IL-1β, ICAM-1 and RANTES levels in serum and heart tissues. The protective effects of this combination were more prominent than those of ligustrazine or berberine alone, but comparable to those of a positive control clopidogrel (6.75 mg·kg−1·d−1). Conclusion: The combination of ligustrazine and berberine significantly improved cardiac function in rat CME model via a mechanism involving antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26924290

  7. AB229. Effect of berberine on human sperm parameters in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liping; Wang, Tao; Liu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Berberine is a natural compound isolated from plants with multiple pharmacological activities, like antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was to assess the effect of berberine with different concentration and at different time on sperm motility, viability and sperm membrane integrity of humans. Methods Semen samples were obtained from 30 patients (22–30 years of age) enrolled in this study, 15 of which were normospermic and 15 were asthenozoospermic. Semen were aseptically obtained by masturbation and prepared by swim-up method. After that they were incubated in Ham’s F-10 medium for 30 min at 37 °C to mimic the temperature inside the female reproductive tract. Semen samples were divided into aliquots. The negative control condition was supplemented with no drugs while 0.4 mmol/L L-carnitine was used as positive control condition. The treatment condition was supplemented with berberine at a concentration of 10-4, 10-5, 10-6, 10-7 mol/L. Measurements of sperm viability and motility were carried out at 10, 30, 60 and 120 min after incubation in all semen samples by computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA). Results It showed that in both normal and asthenozoospermic samples, total and progressive sperm motility were maintained by in vitro treatment with berberine, whereas a significant decrease of these parameters occurred in parallel samples incubated in medium alone. Berberine also prevented the decrease of sperm kinetics but such an effect was highly significant only in asthenozoospermic samples. Moreover, berberine had similar effort as L-carnitine even at low concentration. Conclusions In vitro, berberine with suitable concentration exerted a direct protective effect on human sperm viability, motility rate and could modify plasma membrane functional integrity, especially in the asthenozoospermic patients. This could be a novel therapeutic drug for improving the function of sperm in vitro and treatment for male infertility.

  8. Neuroprotective effect of berberine is mediated by MAPK signaling pathway in experimental diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyin; Du, Xiaohuang; Long, Min; Zhang, Zuo; Zhou, Shiwen; Zhou, Jianyun; Qian, Guisheng

    2016-03-01

    The mechanisms leading to diabetic neuropathy are complex. As an active component in several traditional Chinese medicines, berberine has a beneficial effect in the treatment of diabetes with hyperlipidemia. This study evaluated the protective effects of berberine on diabetic neuropathy induced by streptozotocin and a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet in rats. Diabetic neuropathy was induced in rats by intraperitoneal injection of 35mg/kg streptozotocin and a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet. Two weeks after diabetes induction, rats were treated with berberine (100mg/kg) and rosiglitazone (4mg/kg) for 24 weeks. Rats were studied using evoked potentials, the Morris water maze, transmission electron microscopy, real-time PCR, and Western blotting. Blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile, body weight, evoked potentials, and memory were altered in diabetic rats, as was the hippocampal expression of neuritin mRNA, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mRNA, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) mRNA, extracellular signal-regulated kinase mRNA and the phospho-proteins of p38, JNK, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In diabetic rats, berberine decreased body weight and the blood levels of glucose, glycated hemoglobin, triglyceride, and total cholesterol, improved memory and affected evoked potential by decreasing latency. Berberine decreased the mRNA expression of neuritin, p38, and JNK and the protein expression of neuritin, p-p38, and p-JNK. Slight micropathological changes were observed in the hippocampus of berberine-treated diabetic rats. These findings suggest that berberine has a beneficial effect against diabetic neuropathy by improving micropathology and increasing neuritin expression via the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. PMID:26849937

  9. Berberine as a photosensitizing agent for antitumoral photodynamic therapy: Insights into its association to low density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Luiza Andreazza, Nathalia; Vevert-Bizet, Christine; Bourg-Heckly, Geneviève; Sureau, Franck; José Salvador, Marcos; Bonneau, Stephanie

    2016-08-20

    Recent years have seen a growing interest in Berberine, a phytochemical with multispectrum therapeutic activities, as anti-tumoral agent for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In this context, low density lipoproteins (LDL) play a key role in the delivery of the photosensitizer in tumor cells. We correlate the physicochemical parameters of the berberine association to LDL with the influence of LDL-delivery on its accumulation in a glioma cell line and on its photo-induced activity in view of antitumor PDT. Our results evidence an important binding of 400 berberine molecules per LDL. Changes in berberine and apoprotein fluorescence suggest different fixation types, involving various LDL compartments including the vicinity of the apoprotein. The berberine association to LDL does not affect their recognition by the specific B/E receptors, of which over-expression increases the cellular uptake of LDL-preloaded berberine. Fluorescence microscopy evidences the mitochondrial labeling of the glioma model cells, with no significant modification upon LDL-delivery. Moreover, the cellular delivery of berberine by LDL increases its photocytotoxic effects on such cells. So, this research illustrates the potential of berberine as a photosensitizing agent for PDT, in particular due to their behavior towards LDL as plasma vehicles, and gives insights into its mechanisms of cell uptake. PMID:27282536

  10. The Therapeutic Effect of Berberine in the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoyun; Wang, Chunyan; Hao, Shijun; Song, Haiyan; Yang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the efficacy of berberine in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through meta-analysis. Method. We searched Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and so forth, until March 2016 for randomized controlled trials using berberine to treat NAFLD. Result. Six randomized controlled trials involving 501 patients were included in this study. The results showed that the efficacy of reducing TC, LDL, ALT, 2hPG, and HbA1c in NAFLD patients of the berberine group were significantly higher than that of control group. The subgroup analyses on TG, AST, and FBG indicated that treatment combined with berberine decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. Compared with other drugs, berberine alone decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. We also conducted a descriptive analysis on insulin resistance and radiography results that berberine can improve NAFLD patients' insulin resistance and fatty liver. Conclusion. According to analysis result, berberine has positive efficacy on blood lipids, blood glucose, liver function, insulin resistance, and fatty liver condition of NAFLD patients. However, due to the limitation of number and quality of trials included, more clinical randomized controlled trials with high quality are needed for further verification of the efficacy of berberine on NAFLD patients. PMID:27446224

  11. The Therapeutic Effect of Berberine in the Treatment of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoyun; Wang, Chunyan; Hao, Shijun; Song, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To assess the efficacy of berberine in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through meta-analysis. Method. We searched Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane Library, and so forth, until March 2016 for randomized controlled trials using berberine to treat NAFLD. Result. Six randomized controlled trials involving 501 patients were included in this study. The results showed that the efficacy of reducing TC, LDL, ALT, 2hPG, and HbA1c in NAFLD patients of the berberine group were significantly higher than that of control group. The subgroup analyses on TG, AST, and FBG indicated that treatment combined with berberine decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. Compared with other drugs, berberine alone decreased TG level in NAFLD patients significantly. We also conducted a descriptive analysis on insulin resistance and radiography results that berberine can improve NAFLD patients' insulin resistance and fatty liver. Conclusion. According to analysis result, berberine has positive efficacy on blood lipids, blood glucose, liver function, insulin resistance, and fatty liver condition of NAFLD patients. However, due to the limitation of number and quality of trials included, more clinical randomized controlled trials with high quality are needed for further verification of the efficacy of berberine on NAFLD patients. PMID:27446224

  12. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism: a century of discovery and a brave new world.

    PubMed

    Hagel, Jillian M; Facchini, Peter J

    2013-05-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs) are a structurally diverse group of plant specialized metabolites with a long history of investigation. Although the ecophysiological functions of most BIAs are unknown, the medicinal properties of many compounds have been exploited for centuries. These include the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, the antimicrobial agents sanguinarine and berberine, and the antitussive and anticancer drug noscapine. BIA biosynthesis involves a restricted number of enzyme types that catalyze landmark coupling reactions and subsequent functional group modifications. A pathogenesis-related (PR)10/Bet v1 'Pictet-Spenglerase', several O-methyl-, N-methyl- and O-acetyltransferases, cytochromes P450, FAD-dependent oxidases, non-heme dioxygenases and NADPH-dependent reductases have been implicated in the multistep pathways leading to structurally diverse alkaloids. A small number of plant species, including opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and other members of the Ranunculales, have emerged as model systems to study BIA metabolism. The expansion of resources to include a wider range of plant species is creating an opportunity to investigate previously uncharacterized BIA pathways. Contemporary knowledge of BIA metabolism reflects over a century of research coupled with the development of key innovations such as radioactive tracing, enzyme isolation and molecular cloning, and functional genomics approaches such as virus-induced gene silencing. Recently, the emergence of transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics has expedited the discovery of new BIA biosynthetic genes. The growing repository of BIA biosynthetic genes is providing the parts required to apply emerging synthetic biology platforms to the development of production systems in microbes as an alternative to plants as a commecial source of valuable BIAs. PMID:23385146

  13. Identification of Plant-derived Alkaloids with Therapeutic Potential for Myotonic Dystrophy Type I.

    PubMed

    Herrendorff, Ruben; Faleschini, Maria Teresa; Stiefvater, Adeline; Erne, Beat; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Kern, Frances; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier; Kinter, Jochen; Sinnreich, Michael

    2016-08-12

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is a disabling neuromuscular disease with no causal treatment available. This disease is caused by expanded CTG trinucleotide repeats in the 3' UTR of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase gene. On the RNA level, expanded (CUG)n repeats form hairpin structures that sequester splicing factors such as muscleblind-like 1 (MBNL1). Lack of available MBNL1 leads to misregulated alternative splicing of many target pre-mRNAs, leading to the multisystemic symptoms in DM1. Many studies aiming to identify small molecules that target the (CUG)n-MBNL1 complex focused on synthetic molecules. In an effort to identify new small molecules that liberate sequestered MBNL1 from (CUG)n RNA, we focused specifically on small molecules of natural origin. Natural products remain an important source for drugs and play a significant role in providing novel leads and pharmacophores for medicinal chemistry. In a new DM1 mechanism-based biochemical assay, we screened a collection of isolated natural compounds and a library of over 2100 extracts from plants and fungal strains. HPLC-based activity profiling in combination with spectroscopic methods were used to identify the active principles in the extracts. The bioactivity of the identified compounds was investigated in a human cell model and in a mouse model of DM1. We identified several alkaloids, including the β-carboline harmine and the isoquinoline berberine, that ameliorated certain aspects of the DM1 pathology in these models. Alkaloids as a compound class may have potential for drug discovery in other RNA-mediated diseases. PMID:27298317

  14. Bioactive acridone alkaloids from Swinglea glutinosa.

    PubMed

    Weniger, B; Um, B H; Valentin, A; Estrada, A; Lobstein, A; Anton, R; Maillé, M; Sauvain, M

    2001-09-01

    A new prenylated acridone alkaloid, 1,3,5-trihydroxy-2,8-bis(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (1), was isolated from the stembark of Swinglea glutinosa, along with three known acridone alkaloids, 5-hydroxynoracronycine (2), 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-2-(3-methylbut-2-enyl)-10-methyl-9-acridone (3), and 1,3,5-trihydroxy-4-methoxy-10-methylacridone (4). The isolated alkaloids were assessed in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive and -resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains and for cytotoxicity using HeLa cells. PMID:11575960

  15. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges

    PubMed Central

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given. PMID:27070629

  16. Antioxidant Effect of Berberine and its Phenolic Derivatives Against Human Fibrosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Pongkittiphan, Veerachai; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Supabphol, Roongtawan

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (B1), isolated from stems of Coscinium fenestratum (Goetgh.) Colebr, was used as a principle structure to synthesize three phenolic derivatives: berberrubine (B2) with a single phenolic group, berberrubine chloride (B3) as a chloride counter ion derivative, and 2,3,9,10-tetra-hydroxyberberine chloride (B4) with four phenolic groups, to investigate their direct and indirect antioxidant activities. For DPPH assay, compounds B4, B3, and B2 showed good direct antioxidant activity (IC50 values=10.7±1.76, 55.2±2.24, and 87.4±6.65 μM, respectively) whereas the IC50 value of berberine was higher than 500 μM. Moreover, compound B4 exhibited a better DPPH scavenging activity than BHT as a standard antioxidant (IC50=72.7±7.22 μM) due to the ortho position of hydroxyl groups and its capacity to undergo intramolecular hydrogen bonding. For cytotoxicity assay against human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) using MTT reagent, the sequence of IC50 value at 7-day treatment stated that B1Berberine derivatives, B2 and B4, showed approximately the same level of CAT expression and significant up-regulation of SOD expression in a dose-dependent manner compared to berberine treatment for 7-day exposure using reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays. Our findings show a better direct-antioxidant activity of the derivatives containing phenolic groups than berberine in a cell-free system. For cell-based system, berberine was able to exert better cytotoxic activity than its derivatives. Berberine derivatives containing a single and four phenolic groups showed improved up-regulation of SOD gene expression. Cytotoxic action might not be the main effect of berberine derivatives. Other pharmacological targets of these derivatives should be further investigated to confirm the medical benefit of phenolic groups introduced into the berberine molecule. PMID:26225680

  17. Berberine as a natural source inhibitor for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Peng; Liang, Qiang; Hou, Baorong

    2005-12-01

    Berberine was abstracted from coptis chinensis and its inhibition efficiency on corrosion of mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 was investigated through weight loss experiment, electrochemical techniques and scanning electronic microscope (SEM) with energy disperse spectrometer (EDS). The weight loss results showed that berberine is an excellent corrosion inhibitor for mild steel immersed in 1 M H 2SO 4. Potentiodynamic curves suggested that berberine suppressed both cathodic and anodic processes for its concentrations higher than 1.0 × 10 -4 M and mainly cathodic reaction was suppressed for lower concentrations. The Nyquist diagrams of impedance for mild steel in 1 M H 2SO 4 containing berberine with different concentrations showed one capacitive loop, and the polarization resistance increased with the inhibitor concentration rising. A good fit to Flory-Huggins isotherm was obtained between surface coverage degree and inhibitor concentration. The surface morphology and EDS analysis for mild steel specimens in sulfuric acid in the absence and presence of the inhibitor also proved the results obtained by the weight loss and electrochemical experiments. The correlation of inhibition effect and molecular structure of berberine was then discussed by quantum chemistry study.

  18. Flavonols, alkaloids, and antioxidant capacity of edible wild berberis species from patagonia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Antonieta; Zapata, Moises; Sabando, Constanza; Bustamante, Luis; von Baer, Dietrich; Vergara, Carola; Mardones, Claudia

    2014-12-24

    There are 20 species of the Berberidaceae family described in Chile, whose fruits are edible and show high anthocyanin and hydroxycinnamic acid levels. Berberis microphylla G. Forst, commonly known as calafate, is the most extensively distributed. Flavonols and alkaloids in seed, pulp, skin, and whole calafate berry extracts and other Berberis were studied using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and HPLC with fluorescence detector. Berry samples from different locations in Chilean Patagonia, including different phenological stages, were systematically addressed. Results were compared with other organs of the plant and with other Berberis species. Total flavonol concentration in calafate (n = 65) was 1.33 ± 0.54 μmol/g. Glycosyl metabolites of quercetin and isorhamnetin were the most abundant. Similar profiles were observed in calafate from distinct locations, but important differences were observed for the other edible Berberis species. Calafate pulp and skin have higher flavonol concentrations than seeds, and the maturation process reduced its levels. TEACCUPRAC and TEACABTS of whole calafate extracts and fractions are also explored. Finally, only berberine was detected in the fruit (0.001%), mainly in seeds. Results contribute to the promotion of this berry as a superfruit from Patagonia. PMID:25495577

  19. Utilization of deep eutectic solvents as novel mobile phase additives for improving the separation of bioactive quaternary alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ting; Zhang, Mingliang; Wan, Yiqun; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-03-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were used as novel mobile phase additives to improve chromatographic separation of four quaternary alkaloids including coptisine chloride, sanguinarine, berberine chloride and chelerythrine on a C18 column. DESs as a new class of ionic liquids are renewably sourced, environmentally benign, low cost and easy to prepare. Seven DESs were obtained by mixing different hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. The effects of organic solvents, the concentration of DESs, the types of DESs and the pH values of the buffer solution on the separation of the analytes were investigated. The composition of acetonitrile and 1.0% deep eutectic solvents aqueous solution (pH 3.3, adjusted with hydrochloric acid) in a 32:68 (v/v) ratio was used as optimized mobile phase, with which four quaternary alkaloids were well separated. When a small amount of DESs was added in the mobile phase for the separation of alkaloids on the C18 column, noticeable improvements were distinctly observed such as decreasing peak tailing and improving resolution. The separation mechanism mediated by DESs as mobile phase additives can be attributed to combined effect of both hydrogen acceptors and hydrogen-bond donors. For example, choline chloride can effectively cover the residual silanols on silica surface and ethylene glycol can reduce the retention time of analytes. The proposed method has been applied to determine BerbC in Lanqin Chinese herbal oral solution and BerbC tablet. Utilization of DESs in mobile phase can efficiently improve separation and selectivity of analytes from complex samples. PMID:26717817

  20. Binding of the 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl Amino Carbonyl Methyl Substituted Berberine Analogs to tRNAphe

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anirban; Jaisankar, Parasuraman; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2013-01-01

    Background Three new analogs of berberine with aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituent at the 9-position of the isoquinoline chromophore along with berberrubine were studied for their binding to tRNAphe by wide variety of biophysical techniques like spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism, thermal melting, viscosity and isothermal titration calorimetry. Methodology/Principal Findings Scatchard binding isotherms revealed that the cooperative binding mode of berberine was propagated in the analogs also. Thermal melting studies showed that all the 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs stabilized the tRNAphe more in comparison to berberine. Circular dichroism studies showed that these analogs perturbed the structure of tRNAphe more in comparison to berberine. Ferrocyanide quenching studies and viscosity results proved the intercalative binding mode of these analogs into the helical organization of tRNAphe. The binding was entropy driven for the analogs in sharp contrast to the enthalpy driven binding of berberine. The introduction of the aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituent at the 9-position thus switched the enthalpy driven binding of berberine to entropy dominated binding. Salt and temperature dependent calorimetric studies established the involvement of multiple weak noncovalent interactions in the binding process. Conclusions/Significance The results showed that 9-O-N-aryl/arylalkyl amino carbonyl methyl substituted berberine analogs exhibited almost ten folds higher binding affinity to tRNAphe compared to berberine whereas the binding of berberrubine was dramatically reduced by about twenty fold in comparison to berberine. The spacer length of the substitution at the 9-position of the isoquinoline chromophore appears to be critical in modulating the binding affinities towards tRNAphe. PMID:23526972

  1. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  2. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  3. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  4. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg...

  5. Molecular pharmacokinetics of catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Levêque, Dominique; Jehl, François

    2007-05-01

    This review focuses on the published data regarding the molecular determinants (enzymes, transporters, orphan nuclear receptors) of Catharanthus (vinca) alkaloids pharmacokinetics in humans. The clinical impact of these determinants (drug disposition, drug-drug interactions) is also discussed. PMID:17442684

  6. In vitro anticholinesterase activity of various alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Ilkay; Naz, Qamar; Kartal, Murat; Tosun, Fatma; Sener, Bilge; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2007-01-01

    In the current study, a number of alkaloids including retamine, cytisine, and sparteine (quinolizidine-type), yohimbine and vincamine (indole-type), scopolamine and atropine (tropane-type), colchicine (tropolone-type), allantoin (imidazolidine-type), trigonelline (pyridine-type) as well as octopamine, synephrine, and capsaicin (exocyclic amine-type) were tested in vitro for their inhibitory activity against acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) at 1 mg/ml concentration by the Ellman method using an ELISA microplate reader. Among the alkaloids tested, only capsaicin exerted a remarkable inhibitory effect towards both AChE and BChE [(62.7 +/- 0.79)% and (75.3 +/- 0.98)%, respectively]. While the rest of the alkaloids did not show any significant inhibition against AChE, three of the alkaloids, namely retamine, sparteine, and yohimbine, exerted a noteworthy anti-BChE effect as compared to galanthamine, the reference drug. PMID:18069241

  7. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mei-Fen; Yan, Ju-Ming; Cheng, Gui-Guang; Li, Xing-Yao; Liu, Ya-Ping; Li, Yan; Cai, Xiang-Hai; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2013-08-23

    Five new vobasinyl-ibogan-type bisindole alkaloids, tabernaricatines A-E (1-5), two new monomers, tabernaricatines F and G (6 and 7), and 24 known indole alkaloids were isolated from the aerial parts of Tabernaemontana divaricata. Alkaloids 1 and 2 are the first vobasinyl-ibogan-type alkaloids possessing a six-membered ring via an ether linkage between C-17 and C-21. All compounds except for 3 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against five human cancer cell lines; conophylline showed significant bioactivity against HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 cells with IC₅₀ values of 0.17, 0.35, 0.21, 1.02, and 1.49 μM, respectively. PMID:23944995

  8. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    PubMed

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect. PMID:26468026

  9. Piperidine alkaloids: Human and food animal teratogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogen...

  10. Total Synthesis of the Akuammiline Alkaloid Picrinine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the first total synthesis of the complex akuammiline alkaloid picrinine, which was first isolated nearly five decades ago. Our synthetic approach features a concise assembly of the [3.3.1]-azabicyclic core, a key Fischer indolization reaction to forge the natural product’s carbon framework, and a series of delicate late-stage transformations to complete the synthesis. Our synthesis of picrinine also constitutes a formal synthesis of the related polycyclic alkaloid strictamine. PMID:24597784

  11. A novel alkaloid from Gaultheria nummularioides.

    PubMed

    Yang, M-F; Li, Y-Y; Li, B-G; Zhang, G-L

    2007-03-01

    A novel alkaloid, gaultherialine A (1), along with twenty-seven known compounds were isolated from the whole plants of Gaultheria nummularioides D. Don. The structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated as 7,8-dimethoxy-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4,5-dihydro-2H-benzo[e]indole-2-one N-oxide (1) on the basis of spectral evidence. PMID:17454316

  12. Seco-tabersonine alkaloids from Tabernaemontana corymbosa.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kuan-Hon; Thomas, Noel F; Abdullah, Zanariah; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2009-02-01

    Two seco-tabersonine alkaloids, jerantiphyllines A and B, in addition to a tabersonine hydroxyindolenine, jerantinine H, and a recently reported vincamine alkaloid 7, were isolated from the leaf extract of the Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa and the structures were established using NMR and MS analysis. Biomimetic conversion of jerantinines A and E to their respective vincamine and 16-epivincamine derivatives were also carried out. PMID:19217125

  13. New furocarbazole alkaloids from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Ali, Hazrat; Ullah, Hamid; Muhammad, Zia; Woodward, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Two new furocarbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole (1) and methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-furo[1,2]carbazole-3-carboxylate (2), along with two known carbazole alkaloids, 3-formyl-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole (3) and methyl 2,7-dimethoxycarbazole-3-carboxylate (4) were isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis. Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. PMID:26168923

  14. Berberine metabolites could induce low density lipoprotein receptor up-regulation to exert lipid-lowering effects in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Cao, Shijie; Wang, Ying; Xu, Peixiang; Yan, Jiankun; Bin, Wen; Qiu, Feng; Kang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid isolated from several Chinese herbal medicines, such as Coptis chinensis, Berberis aristata, and Coptis japonica. It exhibits a lipid-lowering effect by up-regulating the hepatic low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression. However, the plasma concentration of BBR is very low after oral administration for the reason that BBR is poorly absorbed and rapidly metabolized. Therefore, it is hard to explain the pharmacological effects of BBR in vivo. Here, RT-PCR, Western blotting and Oil Red O staining were used to investigate the effects of four BBR metabolites on LDLR expression and lipid accumulation in human hepatoma Hep G2 cells. Our results suggested that BBR increased the LDLR mRNA and protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Four metabolites of BBR, jatrorrhizine, columbamine, berberrubine and demethyleneberberine, were found to be able to up-regulate LDLR mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, almost all the metabolites had potent effects on inhibiting cellular lipid accumulation. These results suggest that both BBR and its metabolites exhibit lipid-lowering effects by up-regulating LDLR expression, and BBR and its metabolites might be the in vivo active forms of BBR produced after oral administration. This study provides information to help us understand the mechanisms underlying the hypolipidemic effects of BBR in vivo. PMID:24321576

  15. Berberine induces dedifferentiation by actin cytoskeleton reorganization via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Cho, Hongsik; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Chung, Ki-Wha; Seo, Sung-Yum; Kim, Song-Ja

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis is a nonrheumatologic joint disease characterized by progressive degeneration of the cartilage extracellular matrix. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid used in traditional Chinese medicine, the majority of which is extracted from Huang Lian (Coptis chinensis). Although numerous studies have revealed the anticancer activity of BBR, its effects on normal cells, such as chondrocytes, and the molecular mechanisms underlying its actions remain elusive. Therefore, we examined the effects of BBR on rabbit articular chondrocytes, and the underlying molecular mechanisms, focusing on actin cytoskeletal reorganization. BBR induced dedifferentiation by inhibiting activation of phosphoinositide-3(PI3)-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 kinase and PI3-kinase/Akt with SB203580 and LY294002, respectively, accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation. BBR also caused actin cytoskeletal architecture reorganization and, therefore, we investigated if these effects were involved in the dedifferentiation. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by cytochalasin D reversed the BBR-induced dedifferentiation by activating PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase. In contrast, the induction of actin filament aggregation by jasplakinolide accelerated the BBR-induced dedifferentiation via PI3-kinase/Akt inhibition and p38 kinase activation. Taken together, these data suggest that BBR strongly induces dedifferentiation, and actin cytoskeletal reorganization is a crucial requirement for this effect. Furthermore, the dedifferentiation activity of BBR appears to be mediated via PI3-kinase/Akt and p38 kinase pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes. PMID:26851252

  16. Berberine prevents nitric oxide-induced rat chondrocyte apoptosis and cartilage degeneration in a rat osteoarthritis model via AMPK and p38 MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Shi-Qing; Yu, Ling; He, Bin; Wu, Shi-Hao; Zhao, Qi; Xia, Shao-Qiang; Mei, Hong-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Chondrocyte apoptosis is an important mechanism involved in osteoarthritis (OA). Berberine (BBR), a plant alkaloid derived from Chinese medicine, is characterized by multiple pharmacological effects, such as anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. This study aimed to evaluate the chondroprotective effect and underlying mechanisms of BBR on sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-stimulated chondrocyte apoptosis and surgically-induced rat OA model. The in vitro results revealed that BBR suppressed SNP-stimulated chondrocyte apoptosis as well as cytoskeletal remodeling, down-regulated expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and caspase-3, and up-regulated Bcl-2/Bax ratio and Type II collagen (Col II) at protein levels, which were accompanied by increased adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and decreased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of BBR was blocked by AMPK inhibitor Compound C (CC) and adenosine-9-β-D-arabino-furanoside (Ara A), and enhanced by p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. In vivo experiment suggested that BBR ameliorated cartilage degeneration and exhibited an anti-apoptotic effect on articular cartilage in a rat OA model, as demonstrated by histological analyses, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemical analyses of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax expressions. These findings suggest that BBR suppresses SNP-stimulated chondrocyte apoptosis and ameliorates cartilage degeneration via activating AMPK signaling and suppressing p38 MAPK activity. PMID:26184498

  17. Berberine Hydrochloride Protects C2C12 Myoblast Cells Against Oxidative Stress-Induced Damage via Induction of Nrf-2-Mediated HO-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yung Hyun

    2016-09-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of berberine hydrochloride (BBH), an isoquinoline alkaloid that can be isolated from a variety of herbs, on hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 )-induced oxidative stress in C2C12 myoblasts and to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in this process, especially the expression of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. BBH preconditioning attenuated H2 O2 -induced growth inhibition and DNA damage as well as apoptosis in C2C12 cells via suppression of the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with BBHride alone effectively upregulated the expression of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and elevated HO-1 activity. However, the protective effects of BBH against H2 O2 -induced ROS generation and cell growth reduction were abolished by an HO-1 inhibitor. Moreover, BBH-mediated induction and activation of HO-1 were reduced by genetic silencing of Nrf2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, the effects of BBH against H2 O2 -induced ROS accumulation and growth inhibition were abrogated in C2C12 cells transfected with Nrf2 siRNA. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that BBH could protect C2C12 cells against oxidative stress-induced injury and this effect involved activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. Drug Dev Res, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27535021

  18. In vitro antitumor efficacy of berberine: solid lipid nanoparticles against human HepG2, Huh7 and EC9706 cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiang-Ping; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Huai-ling; Chen, Tong-sheng; Wang, Yi-fei; Wang, Zhi-ping

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas threaten human life badly. It is a current issue to seek the effective natural remedy from plant to treat cancer due to the resistance of the advanced hepatocarcinoma and esophageal carcinoma to chemotherapy. Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-hepatocarcinoma and antiesophageal carcinoma effects. However its low oral bioavailability restricts its wide application. In this report, Ber loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (Ber-SLN) was prepared by hot melting and then high pressure homogenization technique. The in vitro anti-hepatocarcinoma and antiesophageal carcinoma effects of Ber-SLN relative to efficacy of bulk Ber were evaluated. The particle size and zeta potential of Ber-SLN were 154.3 ± 4.1 nm and -11.7 ± 1.8 mV, respectively. MTT assay showed that Ber-SLN effectively inhibited the proliferation of human HepG2 and Huh7 and EC9706 cells, and the corresponding IC50 value was 10.6 μg/ml, 5.1 μg/ml, and 7.3 μg/ml (18.3μg/ml, 6.5μg/ml, and 12.4μg/ml μg/ml of bulk Ber solution), respectively. These results suggest that the delivery of Ber-SLN is a promising approach for treating tumors.

  19. Anti-hepatocarcinoma effects of berberine nanosuspension against human HepG2 and Huh7 cells as well as H22 tumor bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-ping; Wu, Jun-biao; Zhou, Qun; Wang, Yi-fei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-09-01

    Hepatocarcinoma, a malignant cancer, threaten human life badly. It is a current issue to seek the effective natural remedy from plant to treat cancer due to the resistance of the advanced hepatocarcinoma to chemotherapy. Berberine (Ber), an isoquinoline derivative alkaloid, has a wide range of pharmacological properties and is considered to have anti-hepatocarcinoma effects. However its low oral bioavailability restricts its wide application. In this report, Ber nanosuspension (Ber-NS) composed of Ber and D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was prepared by high pressure homogenization technique. Both in vitro and in vivo anti-hepatocarcinoma effects of Ber-NS relative to effcacy of bulk Ber were evaluated. The particle size and zeta potential of Ber-NS were 73.1 +/- 3.7 nm and 6.99 +/- 0.17 mV, respectively. Ber-NS exhibited significant inhibitory effects against human HepG2 and Huh7 cells, and the corresponding IC50 values were 8.1 and 4.7 μg/ml (18.3 and 6.5 μg/ml of Ber solution). In vivo studies also showed higher antitumor efficacy, and inhibition rates was 63.7% (41.4 % of Ber solution) at 100 mg/kg intragastric administration in the H22 solid tumor bearing mice. These results suggest that the delivery of Ber as a nanosuspension is a promising approach for treating hepatocarcinoma.

  20. Bioactive indole alkaloids isolated from Alstonia angustifolia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Terrazas, César; Muñoz Acuña, Ulyana; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a CHCl3-soluble extract of the stem bark of Alstonia angustifolia (Apocynaceae) collected in Vietnam using the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line, and led to the isolation of a new sarpagine-type indole alkaloid (1), together with nine known alkaloids, including four macroline-derived alkaloids (2–5), a sarpagine-type alkaloid (6), and four macroline-pleiocarpamine bisindole alkaloids (7–10). The structure of the new compound (1) was determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Compounds 1–10 were evaluated in vitro for their NF-κB (p65) inhibitory activity against the Hela cells in an ELISA assay. The new sarpagine alkaloid, N(4)-methyltalpinine (1), was found to show significant NF-κB inhibitory activity (ED50 = 1.2 µM). Furthermore, all the isolates (1–10) were evaluated in vitro for their antileishmanial activity, and compounds (1–4, 6 and 8–10) exhibited leishmaniacidal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. PMID:25584095

  1. Discovery of novel berberine imidazoles as safe antimicrobial agents by down regulating ROS generation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Si-Qi; Jeyakkumar, Ponmani; Avula, Srinivasa Rao; Zhang, Ling; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-06-15

    A series of novel berberine-based imidazole derivatives as new type of antimicrobial agents were developed and characterized. Most of them gave good antibacterial activity toward the Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Noticeably, imidazolyl berberine 3a exhibited low MIC value of 1μg/mL against Eberthella typhosa, which was even superior to reference drugs berberine, chloromycin and norfloxacin. The cell toxicity and ROS generation assay indicated that compound 3a showed low cell toxicity. The interactive investigation by UV-vis spectroscopic method revealed that compound 3a could effectively intercalate into calf thymus DNA to form 3a-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful antimicrobial activities. The binding behavior of compound 3a to DNA topoisomerase IB revealed that hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions played important roles in the association of compound 3a with DNA topoisomerase IB. PMID:27156777

  2. A new glucosyl feruloyl quinic acid as a potential marker for roots and rhizomes of goldenseal, Hydrastis canadensis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Catherine E; Perry, Nigel B; Follett, John M; Parmenter, Graeme A; Douglas, James A

    2004-11-01

    A new compound, 5-O-(4'-[beta-d-glucopyranosyl]-trans-feruloyl)quinic acid (GPFQ, 10), is reported from the medicinal plant goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis). A new HPLC method is described and used to show that GPFQ is a potential marker for goldenseal roots (1.0% w/w) and rhizomes (2.3%). GPFQ was found at much lower levels in stems (<0.1%) and could not be detected in leaves. Neochlorogenic acid (9), which has not previously been reported from goldenseal, and chlorogenic acid (6) reached their highest levels in leaves (0.9% 9 and 0.5% 6). The main alkaloids, hydrastine (1) and berberine (2), were highest in rhizomes (2.8% 1 and 4.6% 2), but palmatine (5) was not found in genuine goldenseal. PMID:15568768

  3. Berberine regulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and positive transcription elongation factor b expression in diabetic adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiyin; Zhou, Shiwen

    2010-12-15

    Berberine has hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects on diabetic rats. This study investigated the relationship between hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects of berberine and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) (including cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclin T1) in white adipose tissue of diabetic rats and RNA interference-treated 3T3-L1 cells. Berberine promoted differentiation and inhibited lipid accumulation of 3T3-L1 cells, further decreased PPARα/δ/γ, CDK9 and cyclin T1 mRNA and protein expression and decreased tumor necrosis factor α content in supernatants of both control and RNA interference-treated 3T3-L1 cells. After a 16-week induction with 35 mg/kg streptozotocin (i.p.) and high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet, diabetic rats were treated with 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg berberine and 100 mg/kg fenofibrate or 4 mg/kg rosiglitazone for another 16 weeks. Berberine decreased white adipose tissue to body weight ratio and adipocyte size and increased adipocyte number. Berberine upregulated PPARα/δ/γ, CDK9 and cyclin T1 mRNA and protein expression in adipose tissue, decreased tumor necrosis factor α and free fatty acid content and increased lipoprotein lipase activity in serum and adipose tissue. Berberine modulated metabolic related PPARs expression and differentiation related P-TEFb expression in adipocytes, which are associated with its hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic effects. PMID:20868663

  4. Interaction mechanism between berberine and the enzyme lysozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ling-Li; Wang, Mei; Wu, Ming-Hong; Yao, Si-De; Jiao, Zheng; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-11-01

    In the present paper, the interaction between model protein lysozyme (Lys) and antitumorigenic berberine (BBR) was investigated by spectroscopic methods, for finding an efficient and safe photosensitizer with highly active transient products using in photodynamic therapy study. The fluorescence data shows that the binding of BBR could change the environment of the tryptophan (Trp) residues of Lys, and form a new complex. Static quenching is the main fluorescence quenching mechanism between Lys and BBR, and there is one binding site in Lys for BBR and the type of binding force between them was determined to be hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, the possible interaction mechanism between BBR and Lys under the photoexcitation was studied by laser flash photolysis method, the results demonstrated that BBR neutral radicals (BBR(-H)•) react with Trp (K = 3.4 × 109 M-1 s-1) via electron transfer to give the radical cation (Trp/NH•+) and neutral radical of Trp (TrpN•). Additionally BBR selectively oxidize the Trp residues of Lys was also observed by comparing the transient absorption spectra of their reaction products. Through thermodynamic calculation, the reaction mechanisms between 3BBR∗ and Trp or Lys were determined to be electron transfer process.

  5. Application of Berberine on Treating Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Bing; Zhao, Lin-Hua; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Tian-Yu; Wang, Han; Gu, Cheng-Juan; Tong, Xiao-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) performs a good clinical practice and is showing a bright future in the treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM). TCM treatment has certain advantages of less toxicity and/or side effects, and herbs could provide multiple therapeutic effects. Berberine (BBR) is a classical natural medicine. In this review, we summarize the application of BBR in the treatment of DM from two aspects. First, modern pharmacological effects of BBR on glucose metabolism are summarized, such as improving insulin resistance, promoting insulin secretion, inhibiting gluconeogenesis in liver, stimulating glycolysis in peripheral tissue cells, modulating gut microbiota, reducing intestinal absorption of glucose, and regulating lipid metabolism. BBR is used to treat diabetic nephropathy (DPN), diabetic neuropathy (DN), and diabetic cardiomyopathy due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Second, the clinical application of BBR is reviewed, such as listing some clinical trials on the effectiveness and safety of BBR, explaining applicable stage and syndrome, the reasonable dose and dose formulation, and the toxicity and/or side effects. This review provides scientific evidence about BBR, as well as introducing some traditional Chinese medical theory and clinical experience, in order to guide clinician to use BBR more suitably and reasonably. PMID:25861268

  6. Fluconazole Assists Berberine To Kill Fluconazole-Resistant Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Dong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Da-Zhi; Quan, Hua; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hu, Dan-Dan; Li, Ming-Bang; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Zhu, Liang-Hua

    2013-01-01

    It was found in our previous study that berberine (BBR) and fluconazole (FLC) used concomitantly exhibited a synergism against FLC-resistant Candida albicans in vitro. The aim of the present study was to clarify how BBR and FLC worked synergistically and the underlying mechanism. Antifungal time-kill curves indicated that the synergistic effect of the two drugs was BBR dose dependent rather than FLC dose dependent. In addition, we found that BBR accumulated in C. albicans cells, especially in the nucleus, and resulted in cell cycle arrest and significant change in the transcription of cell cycle-related genes. Besides BBR, other DNA intercalators, including methylene blue, sanguinarine, and acridine orange, were all found to synergize with FLC against FLC-resistant C. albicans. Detection of intracellular BBR accumulation by fluorescence measurement showed that FLC played a role in increasing intracellular BBR concentration, probably due to its effect in disrupting the fungal cell membrane. Similar to the case with FLC, other antifungal agents acting on the cell membrane were able to synergize with BBR. Interestingly, we found that the efflux of intracellular BBR was FLC independent but strongly glucose dependent and associated with the drug efflux pump Cdr2p. These results suggest that BBR plays a major antifungal role in the synergism of FLC and BBR, while FLC plays a role in increasing the intracellular BBR concentration. PMID:24060867

  7. Berberine Blocks the Relapse of Clostridium difficile Infection in C57BL/6 Mice after Standard Vancomycin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhi; Peng, Guoli; Liu, Weihua; Xu, Hufeng

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin is a preferred antibiotic for treating Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and has been associated with a rate of recurrence of CDI of as high as 20% in treated patients. Recent studies have suggested that berberine, an alternative medical therapy for gastroenteritis and diarrhea, exhibits several beneficial effects, including induction of anti-inflammatory responses and restoration of the intestinal barrier function. This study investigated the therapeutic effects of berberine on preventing CDI relapse and restoring the gut microbiota in a mouse model. Berberine was administered through gavage to C57BL/6 mice with established CDI-induced intestinal injury and colitis. The disease activity index (DAI), mean relative weight, histopathology scores, and levels of toxins A and B in fecal samples were measured. An Illumina sequencing-based analysis of 16S rRNA genes was used to determine the overall structural change in the microbiota in the mouse ileocecum. Berberine administration significantly promoted the restoration of the intestinal microbiota by inhibiting the expansion of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and counteracting the side effects of vancomycin treatment. Therapy consisting of vancomycin and berberine combined prevented weight loss, improved the DAI and the histopathology scores, and effectively decreased the mortality rate. Berberine prevented CDIs from relapsing and significantly improved survival in the mouse model of CDI. Our data indicate that a combination of berberine and vancomycin is more effective than vancomycin alone for treating CDI. One of the possible mechanisms by which berberine prevents a CDI relapse is through modulation of the gut microbiota. Although this conclusion was generated in the case of the mouse model, use of the combination of vancomycin and berberine and represent a novel therapeutic approach targeting CDI. PMID:25824219

  8. Actions of Piperidine Alkaloid Teratogens at Fetal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Teratogenic alkaloids are found in many species of plants including Conium maculatum L., Nicotiana glauca, Nicotiana tabaccum, and multiple Lupinus spp. Fetal musculoskeletal defects produced by alkaloids from these plants include arthrogyropisis, scoliosis, torticollis, kyposis, lordosis, and clef...

  9. Benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is one of the world's oldest medicinal plants and remains the only commercial source for the narcotic analgesics morphine, codeine and semi-synthetic derivatives such as oxycodone and naltrexone. The plant also produces several other benzylisoquinoline alkaloids with potent pharmacological properties including the vasodilator papaverine, the cough suppressant and potential anticancer drug noscapine and the antimicrobial agent sanguinarine. Opium poppy has served as a model system to investigate the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in plants. The application of biochemical and functional genomics has resulted in a recent surge in the discovery of biosynthetic genes involved in the formation of major benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in opium poppy. The availability of extensive biochemical genetic tools and information pertaining to benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism is facilitating the study of a wide range of phenomena including the structural biology of novel catalysts, the genomic organization of biosynthetic genes, the cellular and sub-cellular localization of biosynthetic enzymes and a variety of biotechnological applications. In this review, we highlight recent developments and summarize the frontiers of knowledge regarding the biochemistry, cellular biology and biotechnology of benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in opium poppy. PMID:24671624

  10. Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Cultivated in Yunnan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-ying; Li, Qiong; Li, Dan; Liu, Va-ping; Luo, Xiao-dong

    2015-12-01

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, 15,20-dehydro-3α-(2-oxopropyl) coronaridine (1), along with sixteen analogues (2-17) were isolated from the leaves of Catharanthus roseus cultivated in Yunnan. The new alkaloid was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, and the known alkaloids were identified by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. Among them, alkaloid 16 was isolated from Catharanthus for the first time. PMID:26882670

  11. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  12. Role of berberine against arsenic induced oxidative damage in isolated rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Javadipour, Mansoureh; Keshtzar, Elham; Rezaei, Mohsen

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective role of berberine against toxicity induced by arsenic in mitochondria from liver of rat. The level of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential changes were evaluated spectrofluorometrically. 20, 40 and 100 μM arsenic concentration increased ROS level approximately by 13.5, 21.3 and 29 %. However, when pretreated mitochondria with berberine (10, 25, 50 μM) were exposed to arsenic (20, 40 and 100 μM), ROS production diminished. Also, for all arsenic concentration mitochondrial membrane damage was detected to be 2.5, 4.8 and 7.26 % respectively. Pretreatment with berberine even at highest concentration (50μM) was not able to retain membrane potential as compared to control. These results showed that mitochondria were significantly affected when exposed to arsenic, forcedly directed toward excess ROS production and mitochondrial membrane disruption. Pretreatment with berberine, reduced ROS generation but did not restore mitochondrial membrane integrity. PMID:27097449

  13. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  14. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  15. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  16. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  17. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  18. Alkaloid profiles of Mimosa tenuiflora and associated methods of analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The alkaloid contents of the leaves and seeds of M. tenuiflora collected from northeastern Brazil were studied. Alkaloids were isolated by classical acid/base extraction procedures and by cation exchange solid phase extraction. The crude alkaloid fractions were then analysed by thin layer chromatogr...

  19. Diterpenoid alkaloids from the roots of Aconitum brachypodum Diels.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Guo; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Xie, Jia-Ying; Xia, Wei-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Yuan; Tang, Meng-Yun; Mei, Shuang-Xi; Cui, Tao; Wang, Jing-Kun; Zhu, Zhao-Yun

    2016-09-01

    A new diterpenoid alkaloid, named bullatine H (1), along with 10 known diterpenoid alkaloids were isolated from the roots of Aconitum brachypodum Diels (Ranunculaceae). The structure of 1 was elucidated by analysis of its spectroscopic data. It should be noted that compound 1 is the first example with 11, 13-dioxygenated denudatine-type diterpenoid alkaloid isolated from Aconitum brachypodum. PMID:27268073

  20. Production, detection, and purification of clavine-type ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Wallwey, Christiane; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole derivatives with diverse structures and biological activities. This chapter describes the procedure from fungal cultivation to purified ergot alkaloids, as exemplified by fumigaclavine A in Penicillium commune. Furthermore, useful notes for working with purified ergot alkaloids are given. PMID:23065612

  1. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of liriodenine and related oxoaporphine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hufford, C D; Sharma, A S; Oguntimein, B O

    1980-10-01

    Liriodenine was evaluated for its antibacterial and antifungal activity against several microorganisms. Other related oxoaporphine alkaloids also were evaluated. Attempts to prepare oxoaporphine alkaloids from N-acetylnoraporphines were unsuccessful, but an unexpected phenanthrene alkaloid was obtained. A novel N-demethylation reaction was noted when oxogaucine methiodide and liriodenine methiodide were treated with alumina. PMID:7420287

  2. Rotational Investigation of Tropane Alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Lesarri, Alberto; Ecija, Patricia; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Fernández, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando

    2010-06-01

    We report an investigation of the rotational spectrum of several tropane alkaloids using the new Balle-Flygare-type FT-MW spectrometer built at the University of the Basque Country. The initial work focused on the azabicycles of tropinone, scopine and scopoline, vaporized using heating methods. For tropinone the spectrum confirmed the presence of equatorial and axial conformers originated by the inversion of the N-methyl group, with the tropane motif adopting a distorted chair configuration. The determination of substitution and effective structures for the two conformers included the 13C, 15N and 18O isotopomers observed in natural abundance. The structures revealed the flexibility and structural changes associated to the N-methyl inversion, mostly a flattening at the nitrogen atom and a simultaneous rising of the carbonyl group in the axial form. The investigation of scopine gave an intense spectrum, but it was inconsistent with the structural models expected for this molecule. The carrier of the new spectrum was later identified as scopoline, generated in situ by an intramolecular reaction at the moderate temperatures of the nozzle. A single conformation was detected for scopoline, with an ether bridge seriously distorting the tropane motif. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, in publication, 2010 E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, J.-U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández, F. Castaño, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys.,in press, 2010

  3. Ether bridge formation in loline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Juan; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Faulkner, Jerome R.; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Charlton, Nikki D.; Higashi, Richard M.; Miller, Anne-Frances; Young, Carolyn A.; Grossman, Robert B.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Lolines are potent insecticidal agents produced by endophytic fungi of cool-season grasses. These alkaloids are composed of a pyrrolizidine ring system and an uncommon ether bridge linking carbons 2 and 7. Previous results indicated that 1-aminopyrrolizidine was a pathway intermediate. We used RNA interference to knock down expression of lolO, resulting in the accumulation of a novel alkaloid identified as exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine based on high-resolution MS and NMR. Genomes of endophytes differing in alkaloid profiles were sequenced, revealing that those with mutated lolO accumulated exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine but no lolines. Heterologous expression of wild-type lolO complemented a lolO mutant, resulting in the production of N-acetylnorloline. These results indicated that the non-heme iron oxygenase, LolO, is required for ether bridge formation, probably through oxidation of exo-1-acetamidopyrrolizidine. PMID:24374065

  4. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  5. Analysis of toxic alkaloids in body samples.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jochen; Drummer, Olaf H; Maurer, Hans H

    2009-03-10

    Many plants contain toxic alkaloids which may be dangerous to humans. Despite the large number of poisonous plants, cases of fatal plant poisonings are relatively rare. The frequencies of poisonings and the plants involved are often regionally specific. Plant poisonings can be aggregated into three categories: unintended ingestions, intended ingestions, and poisoning due to abuse of plant material. Unintended ingestions often occur in children or from a mix-up of plants and mushrooms in adults. Intended ingestions are common in homicides and suicides. Increasingly common is the abuse of plants for hallucinogenic reasons. Toxicological analysis of such alkaloids may help in diagnosis of poisoning or abuse cases. This review describes the toxic alkaloids aconitine, atropine, coniine, colchicine, cytisine, dimethyltryptamine, harmine, harmaline, ibogaine, kawain, mescaline, scopolamine, and taxine, which are often involved in fatal and non-fatal poisonings. The paper summarizes the symptoms of the intoxications and reviews the methods of detection of their toxic constituents in biological fluids. PMID:19147309

  6. Antimicrobial hasubanalactam alkaloid from Stephania glabra.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Deepak Kumar; Rawat, Usha

    2009-03-01

    A novel hasubanalactam alkaloid, named glabradine, has been isolated from the tubers of Stephania glabra, together with three known quaternary protoberberine alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine and stepharanine. The structure of glabradine was assigned as 7-O-demethyl-N,O-dimethyloxostephinine, by means of rigorous spectroscopic analysis including 2 D NMR measurements. It was evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, S. mutans, Microsporum gypseum, M. canis and Trichophyton rubrum and displayed potent antimicrobial activity superior to those of novobiocin and erythromycin used as positive controls. PMID:19148860

  7. Optimization of mesoporous carbons for efficient adsorption of berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Fu, Jie; Deng, Shuguang; Lu, Xiuyang

    2014-06-15

    Sixteen mesoporous carbon adsorbents were synthesized by varying the ratio of soft to hard templates in order to optimize the pore textural properties of these adsorbents. The mesoporous carbon adsorbents have a high BET specific surface area (1590.3-2193.5 m(2)/g), large pore volume (1.72-2.56 cm(3)/g), and uniform pore size distribution with a median pore diameter ranging from 3.51 nm to 4.52 nm. It was observed that pore textural properties of the carbon adsorbents critically depend on the molar ratio of carbon sources to templates, and the hard template plays a more important role than the soft template in manipulating the pore textures. Adsorption isotherms of berberine hydrochloride at 303 K were measured to evaluate the adsorption efficacy of these adsorbents. The adsorption of berberine hydrochloride from aqueous solutions on the sixteen mesoporous carbon adsorbents synthesized in this work is very efficient, and the adsorption equilibrium capacities on all samples are more than double the adsorption capacities of berberine hydrochloride of the benchmark adsorbents (polymer resins and spherical activated carbons) at similar conditions. It was observed from the adsorption experiments that the equilibrium adsorption amounts of berberine hydrochloride are strongly correlated with the BET specific surface area and pore volume of the adsorbents. The adsorbent with the highest BET of 2193.5 m(2)/g displayed the largest adsorption capacity of 574 mg/g at an equilibrium concentration of 0.10mg/mL of berberine hydrochloride in an aqueous solution. PMID:24767505

  8. Dihydrofuro [2,3-b] quinolinium alkaloids in cultured cells of Ptelea trifoliata L. : Isolation of a new alkaloid, ptelecultinium.

    PubMed

    Petit-Paly, G; Montagu, M; Viel, C; Rideau, M; Chénieux, J C

    1987-07-01

    Two dihydrofuroquinoline alkaloids, ptelefolonium and another new alkaloid, ptelecultinium, have been isolated from callus strains of Ptelea trifoliata L.. Ptelecultinium was not known to occur in the mature plants. The structure of these two alkaloids were established by UV, MS and (1)H-NMR spectra. PMID:24248767

  9. Protective effects of berberine on high fat-induced kidney damage by increasing serum adiponectin and promoting insulin sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, ueyue; Cha, Ying; Huang, Xinmei; Liu, Jun; Chen, Zaoping; Wang, Fang; Xu, Jiong; Sheng, Li; Ding, Heyuan

    2015-01-01

    Berberine (BBR) has been reported in several studies in cell and animal models. However, the mechanism of actions is not fully understood. The present study was therefore aimed to explore the effects of berberine on insulin sensitivity and kidney damage in a high fat diet rat model. Impaired glucose tolerance rats induced by injection of berberine while fed with high fat laboratory chow. After rats were treated for 4 weeks, OGTT and IPITT were determined. Mass and PAS were used to study the kidney tissue. ELISA was used to detect the protein concentration of CRP and TNF-α. Western blot was used to detect the proteins adiponectin, adipoR1, adipoR2 and p-AMPK expression level. These encouraging findings suggest that berberine has excellent pharmacological potential to prevent kidney damage. PMID:26823767

  10. Synergistic Tumor-Killing Effect of Radiation and Berberine Combined Treatment in Lung Cancer: The Contribution of Autophagic Cell Death

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Peiling; Kuo, W.-H.; Tseng, H.-C.; Chou, F.-P.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy is the most efficacious strategies for lung cancer. The radiation-enhancing effects and the underlying mechanisms of berberine were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Materials: Clonogenic survival assays were used to evaluate the radio-sensitivity of berberine on non-small-cell lung cancer. Electron microscopic observation of the features of cell death, flow cytometry of acidic vascular organelles formation, mitochondria membrane potential and cell-cycle progression, and Western blotting of caspase 3, PARP, and LC3 were performed to identify the mechanisms underlying the enhancing effects. Lewis lung carcinoma model in mice was conducted to evaluate the possible application of berberine in synergistic treatment with irradiation. Results: Compared with radiation alone (SF2 = 0.423; D{sub 0} = 5.29 Gy), berberine at 5 and 10 {mu}M concentrations in combination with radiation showed significant enhancement on radiation-induced clonogenic inhibition (SF2 = 0.215: D{sub 0} = 2.70 Gy and SF2 = 0.099: D{sub 0} = 1.24 Gy) on A549 cells. The cellular ultrastructure showed the presence of autophagosome and an increased proportion of acridine orange stain-positive cells, demonstrating that berberine enhanced radiosensitivity via autophagy. The process involved LC3 modification and mitochondrial disruption. The animal model verified the synergistic cytotoxic effect of berberine and irradiation resulting in a substantial shrinkage of tumor volume. Conclusion: Supplement of berberine enhanced the cytotoxicity of radiation in both in vivo and in vitro models of lung cancer. The mechanisms underlying this synergistic effect involved the induction of autophagy. It suggests that berberine could be used as adjuvant therapy to treat lung cancer.

  11. Berberine cation: A fluorescent chemosensor for alkanes and other low-polarity compounds. An explanation of this phenomenon

    PubMed

    Cossio; Arrieta; Cebolla; Membrado; Vela; Garriga; Domingo

    2000-07-27

    Alkanes in the presence of berberine sulfate provide an enhancement of fluorescent signal, which depends on alkane concentration and structure, when the system is irradiated with monochromatic UV light. Computational analysis suggests that an ion-induced dipole between alkanes and berberine sulfate is responsible for this phenomenon. This interaction can properly model the experimentally obtained fluorescent response. The proposed explanation allows other interacting systems to be designed, which have been experimentally confirmed. PMID:10930271

  12. Amorphous solid dispersion of berberine with absorption enhancer demonstrates a remarkable hypoglycemic effect via improving its bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Zhaojie, Meng; Ming, Zhang; Shengnan, Wei; Xiaojia, Bi; Hatch, Grant M; Jingkai, Gu; Li, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Low oral bioavailability of berberine due to poor solubility and membrane permeability limits its clinical use for treatment of diabetes. We developed an amorphous solid dispersion of berberine with absorption enhancer sodium caprate, referred to as Huang-Gui Solid Dispersion (HGSD) preparations, and examined them for improvement of dissolution and oral bioavailability. HGSDs were prepared by solvent evaporation, and the formulations of amorphous solid dispersions were characterized by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. According to in vitro solubility and dissolution studies, P9, the 9th production of HGSDs based on orthogonal test, was sorted out. Then pharmacokinetic behavior of P9 was evaluated by in vitro membrane permeation, in situ intestinal perfusion, and in vivo bioavailability in rats. Furthermore, the anti-diabetic effect of P9 was examined in a type 2 diabetic rat model. It was found that majority of berberine in P9 existed in an amorphous form, and its solubility and dissolution rate were significantly increased. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated a 3-fold increase in in vitro membrane permeation, a 4-fold increase in in situ intestinal perfusion and a 5-fold increase in vivo bioavailability of P9 compared to berberine or berberine tablets. In addition, oral administration of P9 (100mg/kg) improved glucose and lipid metabolism in diabetic rats compared to pure berberine (100mg/kg), berberine tablets (100mg/kg) or metformin (300 mg/kg) treatment. These findings indicate that P9 enhances oral bioavailability of berberine and may be a potential candidate drug for treatment of diabetes. PMID:24607213

  13. Simultaneous determination of four phenolic acids and seven alkaloids in rat plasma after oral administration of traditional Chinese medicinal preparation Jinqi Jiangtang Tablet by LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-xu; Ge, Ai-hua; Yu, Xie-an; Jiao, Xiu-cheng; Li, Jin; He, Jun; Tian, Ji; Liu, Wei; Azietaku, John Teye; Zhang, Bo-li; Gao, Xiu-mei

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and selective high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of four phenolic acids (neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid and ferulic acid) and seven alkaloids (berberine, epiberberine, coptisine, magnoflorine, berberubine, palmatine and jatrorrhizine) in rat plasma. After mixing with the internal standards tetrahydropalmatine (IS1) and rosmarinic acid (IS2), plasma samples were pretreated by protein precipitation using acetonitrile. The HPLC analysis was performed on an Agilent Eclipse plus C18 (4.6 mm×100 mm, 1.8 μm) column with mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid aqueous solution and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.3 mL min(-1). The detection was accomplished for the analytes and internal standards using positive electrospray ionization for the alkaloids and negative electrospray ionization for the phenolic acids in multiple-reaction monitoring mode. The method showed a good linearity over a wide concentration range (r(2)>0.99). The lower limit of quantification of seven alkaloids was lower than 2 ng mL(-1) and that of four phenolic acids was less than 20 ng mL(-1). The developed method was applied to the pharmacokinetic study of 11 components after oral administration of traditional Chinese medicinal preparation Jinqi Jiangtang Tablet in rats. PMID:26340557

  14. The anti-atherogenic effects of berberine on foam cell formation are mediated through the upregulation of sirtuin 1.

    PubMed

    Chi, Liyi; Peng, Lijing; Pan, Na; Hu, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yanhai

    2014-10-01

    Berberine (BBR) is a botanical alkaloid that has been reported to have effects in cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanisms involved are not yet fully understood. In the present study, the protective effects of BBR were evaluated, and the underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated. The effects of a combination of atorvastatin and BBR on foam cell formation were also investigated. THP-1-derived macrophages were pre-treated with BBR (5, 10 and 20 mg/l) for 2 h prior to the addition of oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL; 50 mg/l). Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and the adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor, compound C, were used to investigate the mechanisms through which BBR exerts its effects. To determine the effect of a combination of atorvastatin and BBR, the macrophages were treated with atorvastatin and BBR separately or jointly for 2 h, and then treated with ox-LDL (50 mg/l) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 µM) for 12 h. Oil Red O staining was used to detect foam cell formation. Lipid amounts were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Gene and protein expression was evaluated by RT-qPCR, western blot analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) carried out separately or jointly. The results from Oil Red O staining and HPLC revealed that BBR effectively suppressed foam cell formation and lipid and cholesterol accumulation. Furthermore, BBR upregulated the expression of SIRT1 and AMPK and downregulated the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Pre-treatment of the cells with SIRT1-siRNA or compound C attenuated the anti-atherosclerotic effects of BBR. The results obtained in the present study demonstrate that the combination of atorvastatin and BBR is more effective in inhibiting foam cell formation than using atorvastatin alone. These data suggest that BBR suppresses foam cell formation by activating the AMPK-SIRT1-PPAR

  15. Berberine regulates proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts via AMPK-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Fen; Chen, Manhua; Yu, Bo; Yang, Yang; Xu, Guizhong; Gui, Feng; Liu, Zhenxing; Bai, Xiangyan; Chen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The traditional Chinese medicinal berberine has long been used to treat cardiovascular diseases; however, the mechanism underlying its effects remains unclear. Here, this study would to investigate the effects of berberine on proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion of cardiac fibroblasts. Methods: We assessed proliferation, collagen synthesis and cytokine secretion in cardiac fibroblasts subjected to angiotensin II (Ang II) subsequent to the consumption of berberine or a control treatment. And then we detected the role of AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway in berberine treatment of cardiac fibroblasts. Results: In the present study, the cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts induced by Ang II were significantly activated including proliferation, transformation into myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis. Additionally, the ability of cytokine secretion was enhanced obviously. It was demonstrated that treatment of cardiac fibroblasts with berberine resulted in deceased proliferation, and attenuated fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and collagen synthesis. And the protein secretion of TGFβ1 was inhibited; however, the protein secretion of IL-10 was increased in cardiac fibroblasts with berberine treatment. Mechanistically, the phosphorylation level of AMPK was increased; and the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and p70S6K were decreased in berberine treatment group. Conclusion: These results illustrated that the protective effects of berberine on cellular behaviors of cardiac fibroblasts were at least in part due to activate AMPK signaling pathway and downregulate mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway. Berberine might become a new strategy for treating cardiac fibrosis in the future. PMID:26722438

  16. Effects of Berberine on Amelioration of Hyperglycemia and Oxidative Stress in High Glucose and High Fat Diet-Induced Diabetic Hamsters In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cong; Wang, Zhuo; Song, Yulong; Wu, Dan; Zheng, Xuan; Li, Ping; Jin, Jin; Xu, Nannan; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of berberine on amelioration of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and the mechanism involved in high glucose and high fat diet-induced diabetic hamsters. Golden hamsters fed with high glucose and high fat diet were medicated with metformin, simvastatin, and low or high dose of berberine (50 and 100 mg·kg−1) for 6 weeks. The results showed that the body weights were significantly lower in berberine-treated groups than control group. Histological analyses revealed that the treatment of berberine inhibited hepatic fat accumulation. Berberine significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol, triglyceride, free fatty acid, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, malondialdehyde, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance, and 8-isoprostane level but significantly increased plasma superoxide dismutase activity. Glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in metformin and berberine-treated groups. Glucose tolerance tests documented that berberine-treated mice were more glucose tolerant. Berberine treatment increased expression of skeletal muscle glucose transporter 4 mRNA and significantly decreased liver low density lipoprotein receptor mRNA expression. The study suggested that berberine was effective in lowering blood glucose and lipids levels, reducing the body weight, and alleviating the oxidative stress in diabetic hamsters, which might be beneficial in reducing the cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes. PMID:25705654

  17. Berberine Protects Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells against LPS-Induced Apoptosis by Blocking JNK-Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Junping; Wang, Lijun; Wang, Linyao; Qian, Senmi; Fang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a critical factor during the initiation of atherosclerosis. Berberine has a beneficial effect on endothelial function; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of berberine on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect. The effects of berberine on LPS-induced cell apoptosis and viability were measured with 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine staining, flow cytometry, and Cell Counting Kit-8 assays. The expression and/or activation of proapoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins or signaling pathways, including caspase-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase, were determined with western blotting. The malondialdehyde levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and production of proinflammatory cytokines were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The results demonstrated that berberine pretreatment protected HUVECs from LPS-induced apoptosis, attenuated LPS-induced injury, inhibited LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation, increased MCL-1 expression and SOD activity, and decreased proinflammatory cytokine production. The effects of berberine on LPS-treated HUVECs were prevented by SP600125, a JNK-specific inhibitor. Thus, berberine might be a potential candidate in the treatment of endothelial cell injury-related vascular diseases. PMID:27478481

  18. Functional Cross-Talking between Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in Human Liver Cancer Cells Treated with Berberine

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Zhen; Sun, Yi; Zhu, Ruixin; Jiao, Na; Tang, Kailin; Cao, Zhiwei; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine has been identified with anti-proliferative effects on various cancer cells. Many researchers have been trying to elucidate the anti-cancer mechanisms of berberine based on differentially expressed genes. However, differentially alternative splicing genes induced by berberine might also contribute to its pharmacological actions and have not been reported yet. Moreover, the potential functional cross-talking between the two sets of genes deserves further exploration. In this study, RNA-seq technology was used to detect the differentially expressed genes and differentially alternative spliced genes in BEL-7402 cancer cells induced by berberine. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that these genes were mainly enriched in the p53 and cell cycle signalling pathway. In addition, it was statistically proven that the two sets of genes were locally co-enriched along chromosomes, closely connected to each other based on protein-protein interaction and functionally similar on Gene Ontology tree. These results suggested that the two sets of genes regulated by berberine might be functionally cross-talked and jointly contribute to its cell cycle arresting effect. It has provided new clues for further researches on the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine as well as the other botanical drugs. PMID:26606055

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases. PMID:25820039

  20. Pharmacokinetics of Hoasca alkaloids in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Callaway, J C; McKenna, D J; Grob, C S; Brito, G S; Raymon, L P; Poland, R E; Andrade, E N; Andrade, E O; Mash, D C

    1999-06-01

    N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine (THH) are the characteristic alkaloids found in Amazonian sacraments known as hoasca, ayahuasca, and yajè. Such beverages are characterized by the presence of these three harmala alkaloids, where harmine and harmaline reversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) while tetrahydroharmine weakly inhibits the uptake of serotonin. Together, both actions increase central and peripheral serotonergic activity while facilitating the psychoactivity of DMT. Though the use of such 'teas' has be known to western science for over 100 years, little is known of their pharmacokinetics. In this study, hoasca was prepared and administered in a ceremonial context. All four alkaloids were measured in the tea and in the plasma of 15 volunteers, subsequent to the ingestion of 2 ml hoasca/kg body weight, using gas (GC) and high pressure liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and peak times of psychoactivity coincided with high alkaloid concentrations, particularly DMT which had an average Tmax of 107.5 +/- 32.5 min. While DMT parameters correlated with those of harmine, THH showed a pharmacokinetic profile relatively independent of harmine's. PMID:10404423

  1. Fluorescence lifetimes of some Rauwolfia alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, J.; Arjona, D. Gonzalez; Roldan, E.; Sanchez, M.

    1986-03-01

    The natural fluorescence lifetimes of the following Rauwolfia alkaloids, Reserpine, Rescinnamine, Corynanthine, Yohimbine, --- Ajmalicine, Serpentine and Ajmaline, have been calculated from a modified form of the Strickler-Berg equation. The actual lifetimes were derived from the quantum yields and the calculated natural lifetimes.

  2. A novel alkaloid from Mitrephora maingayi.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Li, Bo-Gang; Ye, Qi; Zhang, Guo-Lin

    2005-06-01

    A novel alkaloid, maingayinine, together with dicentrinone, dicentrinene, L-2-O-methyl-chiro-inositol, allantoin, glaucine, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, terephthalic acid and ayanin, was isolated from the twigs of Mitrephora maingayi Hook (Annonaceae). Their structures were established predominantly by IR, MS and NMR spectral data. PMID:15938142

  3. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  4. A new indole alkaloid from Ervatamia yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong-Sheng; Du, Jing-Ling; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Jin, Li; Liang, Shuang

    2010-01-01

    The stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis have afforded a new indole alkaloid, ervataine (1), whose structure was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Five known compounds, ibogaine (2) coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), voacangine hydroxyindolenine (5) and coronaridine hydroxyindolenine (6), were also isolated. PMID:19647051

  5. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British ...

  6. The Interaction of Telomeric DNA and C-myc22 G-Quadruplex with 11 Natural Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaohui; Sun, Hongxia; Zhou, Huaxi; Xiang, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    Telomeric DNA and C-myc22 are DNA G-quadruplex (G4)-forming sequences associated with tumorigenesis. Ligands that can facilitate the formation and increase the stabilization of G4 can halt tumor cell proliferation and have been regarded as potential anti-cancer drugs. In the present study, we have investigated the interaction of 11 natural alkaloids with G4 formed by telomeric DNA and C-myc22 sequences. Our results indicated that sanguinarine (San), palmatine (Pal), and berberine (Beb) of the first series (S1) can induce the formation of G4 as well as increase the stabilization ability. Daurisoline (S2-1), O-methyldauricine (S2-2), O-diacetyldaurisoline (S2-3), daurinoline (S2-4), dauricinoline (S2-5), N,N′-dimethyldauricine iodide (S2-6), and N,N′-dimethyldaurisoline iodide (S2-7) of the second series (S2) showed similar stabilization ability. We found that unsaturated ring C, N+ positively charged centers, and conjugated aromatic rings are key factors to increase the stabilization ability of S1, and we gave some advice on structure modification to S2 through structure-activity study. Besides, we found San and Pal to be cell cycle blocker in G1. San was speculated to bind to G4 through intercalation or end stacking. PMID:22480315

  7. Development and evaluation of vitamin E d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-mixed polymeric phospholipid micelles of berberine as an anticancer nanopharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Shen, Roger; Kim, Jane J; Yao, Mingyi; Elbayoumi, Tamer A

    2016-01-01

    Berberine (Brb) is an active alkaloid occurring in various common plant species, with well-recognized potential for cancer therapy. Brb not only augments the efficacy of antineoplastic chemotherapy and radiotherapy but also exhibits direct antimitotic and proapoptotic actions, along with distinct antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities in a variety of tumors. Despite its low systemic toxicity, several pharmaceutical challenges limit the application of Brb in cancer therapy (ie, extremely low solubility and permeability, very poor pharmacokinetics (PKs), and oral bioavailability). Among lipid-based nanocarriers investigated recently for Brb, stealth amphiphilic micelles of polymeric phospholipid conjugates were studied here as a promising strategy to improve Brb delivery to tumors. Specifically, physicochemically stable micelles made of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-2000] (PEG-PE) mixed with d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) (PEG-succinate ester of vitamin E), in a 3:1 M ratio, increased Brb solubilization by 300%. Our PEG-PE/TPGS-mixed micelles firmly retained the incorporated Brb, displaying extended-release profile in simulated media, with up to 30-fold projected improvement in simulated PKs of Brb. Owing to the markedly better uptake of Brb-containing mixed micelles in vitro, our Brb-mixed micelles nanoformulation significantly amplified apoptosis and overall cytotoxic effectiveness against monolayer and spheroid cultures of human prostate carcinomas (16- to 18-fold lower half-maximal inhibitory concentration values in PC3 and LNPaC, respectively), compared to free Brb. Mixed PEG-PE/TPGS micelles represent a promising delivery platform for the sparingly soluble anticancer agent, Brb, encouraging further pharmaceutical development of this drug for cancer therapy. PMID:27217747

  8. Development and evaluation of vitamin E d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-mixed polymeric phospholipid micelles of berberine as an anticancer nanopharmaceutical

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Roger; Kim, Jane J; Yao, Mingyi; Elbayoumi, Tamer A

    2016-01-01

    Berberine (Brb) is an active alkaloid occurring in various common plant species, with well-recognized potential for cancer therapy. Brb not only augments the efficacy of antineoplastic chemotherapy and radiotherapy but also exhibits direct antimitotic and proapoptotic actions, along with distinct antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities in a variety of tumors. Despite its low systemic toxicity, several pharmaceutical challenges limit the application of Brb in cancer therapy (ie, extremely low solubility and permeability, very poor pharmacokinetics (PKs), and oral bioavailability). Among lipid-based nanocarriers investigated recently for Brb, stealth amphiphilic micelles of polymeric phospholipid conjugates were studied here as a promising strategy to improve Brb delivery to tumors. Specifically, physicochemically stable micelles made of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol)-2000] (PEG-PE) mixed with d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) (PEG-succinate ester of vitamin E), in a 3:1 M ratio, increased Brb solubilization by 300%. Our PEG-PE/TPGS-mixed micelles firmly retained the incorporated Brb, displaying extended-release profile in simulated media, with up to 30-fold projected improvement in simulated PKs of Brb. Owing to the markedly better uptake of Brb-containing mixed micelles in vitro, our Brb-mixed micelles nanoformulation significantly amplified apoptosis and overall cytotoxic effectiveness against monolayer and spheroid cultures of human prostate carcinomas (16- to 18-fold lower half-maximal inhibitory concentration values in PC3 and LNPaC, respectively), compared to free Brb. Mixed PEG-PE/TPGS micelles represent a promising delivery platform for the sparingly soluble anticancer agent, Brb, encouraging further pharmaceutical development of this drug for cancer therapy. PMID:27217747

  9. Preparation and evaluation of berberine alginate beads for stomach-specific delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, Yong-Shun; Pang, Hui; Munyendo, Were L L; Lv, Hui-Xia; Zhu, Sheng-Liang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to prepare floating calcium alginate beads of berberine for targeting the gastric mucosa and prolonging their gastric residence time. The floating beads were prepared by suspending octodecanol and berberine in sodium alginate (SA) solution. The suspension was then dripped into a solution of calcium chloride. The hydrophobic and low-density octodecanol enhanced the sustained-release properties and floating ability of the beads. The bead formulation was optimized for different weight ratios of octodecanol and SA and evaluated in terms of diameter, floating ability and drug loading, entrapment and release. In vitro release studies showed that the floating and sustained release time were effectively increased in gastric media by addition of octodecanol. In vivo studies with rats showed that a significant increase in gastric residence time of beads had been achieved. PMID:22169938

  10. Study on the Interaction of β-Cyclodextrin and Berberine Hydrochloride and Its Analytical Application

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baoxiu; Li, Yuqin; Wang, Decai; Duan, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The fluorescence enhancement of berberine hydrochloride (BBH) as a result of complex with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) is investigated. The mechanism of the inclusion was studied and discussed by spectrofluoremetry and infrared spectrograms. The results showed that a 1∶1 (β-CD: BBH) complex was formed with an apparent association constant of 4.23×102 L/mol. Based on the enhancement of the fluorescent intensity of berberine hydrochloride, a new spectrofluorimetric method for the determination of BBH in the presence of β-CD was developed. The linear range was 1.00∼4.00 µg/mL with the detection limit of 5.54 ng/mL. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of BBH in tablets. PMID:24810601

  11. The Anti-Apoptotic Role of Berberine in Preimplantation Embryo In Vitro Development through Regulation of miRNA-21

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ran; Cao, Yong-Chun; Zhen, Di; Jia, Zi-Ye; Jiang, Jin-Qi; Tian, Jian-Hui; Gao, Jian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicinal herbs containing berberine have been historically used to prevent miscarriage. Here, we investigated whether the anti-apoptotic effects of berberine on pre-implantation embryonic development are regulated by miRNA-21. Mouse pronuclear embryos were cultured in medium with or without berberine, and some were then microinjected with a miRNA-21 inhibitor. The in vitro developmental rates of 2- and 4-cell embryos and blastocysts, blastocyst cell numbers, apoptotic rates, and apoptotic cell numbers were measured in each group. Furthermore, we examined the transcription levels of miRNA-21 and its target genes (caspase-3, PTEN, and Bcl-2) and their translation levels. Comparisons were made with in vivo-developed and untreated embryos. We found that berberine significantly increased the developmental rates and cell numbers of mouse blastocysts and decreased apoptotic cell rates in vitro. Berberine also significantly increased miRNA-21 and Bcl-2 transcription levels and significantly decreased caspase-3 and PTEN transcription levels. In embryos treated with a miRNA-21 inhibitor, the results followed the opposite trend; PTEN and caspase-3 transcription levels increased significantly, while the transcription level of Bcl-2 decreased significantly. Additionally, berberine treatment significantly increased the Bcl-2 protein level and significantly decreased the caspase-3 and PTEN protein levels in blastocysts, but there were no significant differences observed in the levels of these proteins in 2- and 4-cell embryos. This study revealed that miRNA-21 is important for pre-implantation embryonic development, especially blastocyst development in vitro. Berberine elevates miRNA-21 expression, decreases PTEN and caspase-3 levels, increases Bcl-2 levels, and exerts anti-apoptotic and pro-growth effects. PMID:26042820

  12. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  13. Quinolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis: recent advances and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    Lys-derived alkaloids, including piperidine, quinolizidine, indolizidine, and lycopodium alkaloids, are widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. Several of these alkaloids have beneficial properties for humans and have been used in medicine. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of these alkaloids are not well understood. In the present article, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of Lys-derived alkaloids, especially the biochemistry, molecular biology, and biotechnology of quinolizidine alkaloid (QA) biosynthesis. We have also highlighted Lys decarboxylase (LDC), the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step of QA biosynthesis and answers a longstanding question about the molecular entity of LDC activity in plants. Further prospects using current advanced technologies, such as next-generation sequencing, in medicinal plants have also been discussed. PMID:23112802

  14. Alkaloid Changes in Tobacco Seeds during Germination 1

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, W. W.; Bush, L. P.

    1974-01-01

    Nicotine, nornicotine, anabasine, and anatabine, normally found in growing and mature tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants, were extracted and quantified from mature tobacco seeds and young tobacco seedlings. The rate of net alkaloid disappearance and accumulation in tobacco seedlings was related to phases of germination. In general, the increased rate of germination associated with higher temperatures also increased the rate of initial loss of alkaloids and the subsequent rate of accumulation of alkaloids. Maximum alkaloid accumulation in 144-hour-old seedlings cultured with 10-hour day occurred at 27 C. Following an 8-hour photoinduction period, seeds germinated in darkness accumulated greater amounts of alkaloids than seeds exposed to light each day. Seeds germinated in darkness for 96 hours, following the 8-hour photoinduction period, and then exposed to light each day accumulated the greatest amounts of alkaloids. PMID:16658655

  15. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  16. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  17. New quinoline alkaloids from Ruta chalepensis.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, K; Al-Said, M S; El-Feraly, F S; Ross, S A

    2000-07-01

    The roots of Ruta chalepensis, collected from the northern Saudi desert, yielded two new quinoline alkaloids, namely, 2-¿6'-(2H-benzo[d]1' ',3' '-dioxolen-5' '-yl)hexyl¿-hydroquinolin-4-one (1) and 2-¿6'-(2H-benzo[d]1' ',3' '-dioxolen-5' '-yl)hexyl¿-4-methoxy-quinoline (2). Nine previously reported alkaloids, dictamnine, pteleine, skimmianine, rutacridone, isogravacridonechlorine, maculosidine, graveoline, graveolinine, and 4-methoxy-1-methyl-2(1H)-quinolinone, and coumarins, chalepensin, and umbelliferone were also isolated. Structure elucidations were based primarily on 1D and 2D NMR analyses and chemical transformations. Antimicrobial activity of these compounds is discussed. PMID:10924184

  18. Metabolism and ecology of purine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Anaya, Ana Luisa; Cruz-Ortega, Rocio; Waller, George R

    2006-01-01

    In this review, the biosynthesis, catabolism, ecological significance, and modes of action of purine alkaloids particularly, caffeine, theobromine and theophylline in plants are discussed. In the biosynthesis of caffeine, progress has been made in enzymology, the amino acid sequence of the enzymes, and in the genes encoding N-methyltransferases. In addition, caffeine-deficient plants have been produced. The ecology of purine alkaloids has not proved to be particularly promising. However, advances have been made in insecticidal and allelopathic fields, and in the role of microorganisms play in the changes that these compounds undergo in the soil. Caffeine inhibits cell plate formation during telophase throughout the development of coffee plants and other species. PMID:16720319

  19. Protective effect of berberine chloride on Plasmodium chabaudi-induced hepatic tissue injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Al-Shamrany, Ahmed; Alazzouni, Ahmed S.; Lubbad, Mahmoud Y.; Al-Shaebi, Esam M.; Taib, Noory T.

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the protective role of berberine (BER) against Plasmodium chabaudi-induced infection in mice. Animals were divided into three groups. Group I served as a vehicle control. Group II and group III were infected with 1000 P. chabaudi infected erythrocytes. Group III was gavaged with 100 μl of 10 mg/kg berberine chloride for 10 days. All mice were sacrificed at day 10 post-infection. The percentage of parasitemia was significantly reduced more than 30%, after treatment of mice with BER. Infection caused marked hepatic injuries as indicated by histopathological alterations as evidenced by the presence of hepatic lobular inflammatory cellular infiltrations, dilated sinusoids, vacuolated hepatocytes, increased number of Kupffer cells and the malaria pigment, hemozoin. These changes in livers led to the increased histological score. Also, infection induced a significant increase in liver alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase and a significant increase in the total leucocytic count. Moreover, mice became anemic as proved by the significant decrease in erythrocyte number and haemoglobin content. BER showed a significant protective potential by improving the above mentioned parameters. Based on these results, it is concluded that berberine could offer protection against hepatic tissue damage. PMID:26288557

  20. Significant pharmacokinetic differences of berberine are attributable to variations in gut microbiota between Africans and Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Alolga, Raphael N.; Fan, Yong; Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Li-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Li, Jin; Chen, Yan; Lai, Mao-De; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of gut microbiotal metabolism on the pharmacokinetics of berberine in healthy male Africans and Chinese. The Cmax and AUC in the Africans were 2.67-fold and 2.0-fold higher than the Chinese, respectively. Microbiotal compositions by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing showed higher abundance of the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Megamonas (34.22, 13.88, and 10.68%, respectively) in the Chinese than the Africans (30.08, 9.43, and 0.48%, respectively). Scatter plot showed a strong negative correlation between the microbiotal abundance and the berberine AUC, especially for the genus Prevotella (r = −0.813) and its species. A more extensive metabolism was observed in Chinese with 1.83-fold higher metabolites, possibly contributing to the lower AUC than the Africans. In conclusion, significant PK differences of berberine were observed between Africans and Chinese, which is partly attributable to variations in gut microbiota and its corresponding metabolic capacity. PMID:27283523

  1. Activity of isoflavones and berberine on vasomotor symptoms and lipid profile in menopausal women.

    PubMed

    Cianci, Antonio; Cicero, Arrigo F G; Colacurci, Nicola; Matarazzo, Maria Grazia; De Leo, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a food supplement combination based on isoflavones and berberine (ISB) in the treatment of menopausal symptoms and dyslipidaemia. Isoflavones are extracted from soy and absorbed in the body after being activated by lactobacillus. Berberine, extracted from the plant Berberis aristata, lowers plasma cholesterol and triglycerides (TG) by increasing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors and reducing hepatic synthesis of TG. One hundred twenty women with a mean age of 54.8 ± 0.6 years were enrolled and randomized to treatment with ISB (estromineral lipid [EL] = 60 cases) or calcium and vitamin D(3) (CaD = 60 cases). Menopausal symptoms, plasma cholesterol, and TG were evaluated at baseline, and after 4 and 12 weeks. EL treatment significantly lowered plasma total cholesterol (-13.5% ± 0.7 vs -0.2% ± 0.5), LDL cholesterol (-12.4% ± 1.5 vs + 0.8 % ± 0.7) and TG (-18.9% ± 2.5 vs -1.3% ± 1.2) and improved menopausal symptoms compared with CaD treatment. Safety parameters were unchanged during the study. The combination of berberine and isoflavones was effective in lowering cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in menopausal women with moderate dyslipidaemia and in improving their quality of life. PMID:22313171

  2. Significant pharmacokinetic differences of berberine are attributable to variations in gut microbiota between Africans and Chinese.

    PubMed

    Alolga, Raphael N; Fan, Yong; Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Li-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Jing; Li, Jin; Chen, Yan; Lai, Mao-De; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of gut microbiotal metabolism on the pharmacokinetics of berberine in healthy male Africans and Chinese. The Cmax and AUC in the Africans were 2.67-fold and 2.0-fold higher than the Chinese, respectively. Microbiotal compositions by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing showed higher abundance of the genera Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Megamonas (34.22, 13.88, and 10.68%, respectively) in the Chinese than the Africans (30.08, 9.43, and 0.48%, respectively). Scatter plot showed a strong negative correlation between the microbiotal abundance and the berberine AUC, especially for the genus Prevotella (r = -0.813) and its species. A more extensive metabolism was observed in Chinese with 1.83-fold higher metabolites, possibly contributing to the lower AUC than the Africans. In conclusion, significant PK differences of berberine were observed between Africans and Chinese, which is partly attributable to variations in gut microbiota and its corresponding metabolic capacity. PMID:27283523

  3. Three new oxazoline alkaloids from Gymnotheca chinensis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shi-Ji; Guo, Da-Le; Zhang, Mao-Sheng; Chen, Fang; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Three novel oxazoline alkaloids, 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-2-ene-8-one (1), 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-2, 6-diene-8-one (2), and 1-oxa-3-azaspiro [4.5] dec-10-methoxy-2, 6-diene-8-one (3) were isolated from the methanol extract of the whole plant of Gymnotheca chinensis. The chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic analysis including one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. PMID:26949983

  4. Synthesis studies on the Melodinus alkaloid meloscine

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Ken S.; Antoline, Joshua F.

    2012-01-01

    The pentacyclic Melodinus alkaloid (±)-meloscine was synthesized in 19 chemical steps from 2-bromobenzaldehyde through a route featuring an allenyl azide cyclization cascade to deliver the core azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane substructure. Peripheral functionalization of this core included a Tollens-type aldol condensation to set the quaternary center at C(20) and a diastereoselective ring closing metathesis to forge the tetrahydropyridine ring. PMID:23316092

  5. Synthesis and SAR of vinca alkaloid analogues.

    PubMed

    Voss, Matthew E; Ralph, Jeffery M; Xie, Dejian; Manning, David D; Chen, Xinchao; Frank, Anthony J; Leyhane, Andrew J; Liu, Lei; Stevens, Jason M; Budde, Cheryl; Surman, Matthew D; Friedrich, Thomas; Peace, Denise; Scott, Ian L; Wolf, Mark; Johnson, Randall

    2009-02-15

    Versatile intermediates 12'-iodovinblastine, 12'-iodovincristine and 11'-iodovinorelbine were utilized as substrates for transition metal based chemistry which led to the preparation of novel analogues of the vinca alkaloids. The synthesis of key iodo intermediates, their transformation into final products, and the SAR based upon HeLa and MCF-7 cell toxicity assays is presented. Selected analogues 27 and 36 show promising anticancer activity in the P388 murine leukemia model. PMID:19147348

  6. Antimicrobial alkaloids from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum and caudatum.

    PubMed

    Nissanka, A P; Karunaratne, V; Bandara, B M; Kumar, V; Nakanishi, T; Nishi, M; Inada, A; Tillekeratne, L M; Wijesundara, D S; Gunatilaka, A A

    2001-04-01

    Two benzophenanthrene alkaloids, 8-acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine were isolated from Zanthoxylum tetraspermum stem bark along with liriodenine, sesamin, lichexanthone and (+)-piperitol-gamma,gamma-dimethylallylether. The species endemic to Sri Lanka, Z. caudatum, contained sesamin, savinin, liriodenine, decarine and 8-O-desmethyl-N-nornitidine. 8-Acetonyldihydronitidine and 8-acetonyldihydroavicine showed significant antibacterial activity while the former along with liriodenine was strongly antifungal. Savinin exhibited potent spermicidal activity. Both savinin and sesamin exhibited significant insecticidal activity. PMID:11324918

  7. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  8. A new cytotoxic carbazole alkaloid from Clausena excavata.

    PubMed

    Taufiq-Yap, Y H; Peh, T H; Ee, G C L; Rahmani, M; Sukari, M A; Ali, A M; Muse, R

    2007-07-20

    A new carbazole alkaloid, 3-carbomethoxy-2-hydroxy-7-methoxycarbazole, Clausine-TY (1), together with two known carbazole alkaloid, Clausine-H (2) and Clausine-B (3), were isolated from the ethyl acetate extract of the stem bark of the Malaysian Clausena excavata. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses. The new carbazole alkaloid shows significant cytotoxicity against CEM-SS cell line. PMID:17654285

  9. A potent antibacterial indole alkaloid from Psychotria pilifera.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Song, Chang-Wei; Khan, Afsar; Li, Xiao-Ning; Yang, Xing-Wei; Cheng, Gui-Guang; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-08-01

    A new strychnine alkaloid, 16,17,19,20-tetrahydro-2,16-dehydro-18-deoxyisostrychnine (1), and fourteen known alkaloids were isolated from the leaves of Psychotria pilifera. Their structures were identified on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, as well as by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. The new alkaloid (1) exhibited potent antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, equivalent to cefotaxime with MIC value of 0.781 μg/ml. PMID:26963582

  10. Recent Advances in the Synthesis of Stemona Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2015-06-01

    Stemona alkaloids, featuring polycyclic structures and interesting bioactivities, constitute a distinct class from the Stemonaceae family. In this review, recent advances in the synthesis of these unique alkaloids are briefly discussed, highlighting the application of novel synthetic strategies to access the core structures, as well as creative solutions to the installation of multiple stereogenic centers. The literature reviewed in this article covers the publications from 2010 to November 2014, a period that witnessed the prosperity of the synthesis of Stemona alkaloids. PMID:26197559

  11. A new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid from Hamelia patens micropropagated plantlets.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Vega, David; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2012-11-01

    Chemical studies on Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) micropropagated plantlets allowed production of a new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid, named (-)-hameline (7), together with eight known alkaloids, tetrahydroalstonine (1), aricine (2), pteropodine (3), isopteropodine (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), palmirine (8), and rumberine (9). The structure of the new alkaloid was assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling. PMID:23285803

  12. Drug Delivery Systems and Combination Therapy by Using Vinca Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  13. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shinji; Sato, Michio; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid), saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid), strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid), ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid). This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details. PMID:27548127

  14. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades. PMID:26821033

  15. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief. PMID:26220901

  16. Drug delivery systems and combination therapy by using vinca alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Ting; Huang, Yen-Wei; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Developing new methods for chemotherapy drug delivery has become a topic of great concern. Vinca alkaloids are among the most widely used chemotherapy reagents for tumor therapy; however, their side effects are particularly problematic for many medical doctors. To reduce the toxicity and enhance the therapeutic efficiency of vinca alkaloids, many researchers have developed strategies such as using liposome-entrapped drugs, chemical- or peptide-modified drugs, polymeric packaging drugs, and chemotherapy drug combinations. This review mainly focuses on the development of a vinca alkaloid drug delivery system and the combination therapy. Five vinca alkaloids (eg, vincristine, vinblastine, vinorelbine, vindesine, and vinflunine) are reviewed. PMID:25877096

  17. Biologically active indole and bisindole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Kam, Toh-Seok; Pang, Huey-Shen; Lim, Tuck-Meng

    2003-04-21

    The ethanol extract of the leaves of Tabernaemontana divaricata (double flower variety) provided a total of 23 alkaloids, including the new aspidosperma alkaloids, taberhanine, voafinine, N-methylvoafinine, voafinidine, voalenine and the new bisindole alkaloid, conophyllinine in addition to the previously known, biologically active bisindole, conophylline and its congener, conofoline. The structures of the new alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The preparation and characterization of the corresponding quinones of the biologically active bisindoles are also described in relation to a structure-activity study of these compounds with respect to their action in stimulating insulin expression. PMID:12929658

  18. Reduction of venom alkaloids in Solenopsis richteri×Solenopsis invicta hybrid: an attempt to identify new alkaloidal components.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Hu, Qiong-Bo; Fadamiro, Henry Y

    2010-11-24

    The alkaloid chemistry of the venom of hybrid fire ant, Solenopsis richteri × Solenopsis invicta, was investigated using silica gel chromatography and GC-MS techniques. In addition to most cis alkaloids of parental species, S. richteri Forel and S. invicta Buren, the cis alkaloid fraction of the body extract of hybrid fire ants also contains five significant new alkaloids. Hydrogenation of the cis alkaloid fraction yielded only five piperidines, 4', 12', 12, 20', and 20. Sodium borohydride and lithium aluminum hydride selectively reduced C═N double bond in piperideine alkaloids to give a mixture of cis and trans piperidines. However, reduction of the five new components yielded several new peaks with much longer retention times and increasing molecular weights over 30. It is evident that the chemical identities of the five new peaks are quite different from those known piperidines or piperideines found in Solenopsis fire ants. PMID:20964344

  19. Naturally occurring proteinaceous nanoparticles in Coptidis Rhizoma extract act as concentration-dependent carriers that facilitate berberine absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Bing-Liang; Yin, Chun; Zhang, Bo-Kai; Dai, Yan; Jia, Yi-Qun; Yang, Yan; Li, Qiao; Shi, Rong; Wang, Tian-Ming; Wu, Jia-Sheng; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Ge; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological activities of some natural products diminish and even disappear after purification. In this study, we explored the mechanisms underlying the decrease of acute oral toxicity of Coptidis Rhizoma extract after purification. The water solubility, in vitro absorption, and plasma exposure of berberine (the major active compound) in the Coptidis Rhizoma extract were much better than those of pure berberine. Scanning electron microscopy, laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM), and dynamic light scattering experiments confirmed that nanoparticles attached to very fine precipitates existed in the aqueous extract solution. The LSCM experiment showed that the precipitates were absorbed with the particles by the mouse intestine. High-speed centrifugation of the extract could not remove the nanoparticles and did not influence plasma exposure or acute oral toxicity. However, after extract dilution, the attached precipitates vanished, although the nanoparticles were preserved, and there were no differences in the acute oral toxicity and plasma exposure between the extract and pure berberine. The nanoparticles were then purified and identified as proteinaceous. Furthermore, they could absorb co-dissolved berberine. Our results indicate that naturally occurring proteinaceous nanoparticles in Coptidis Rhizoma extract act as concentration-dependent carriers that facilitate berberine absorption. These findings should inspire related studies in other natural products. PMID:26822920

  20. Resonance Rayleigh scattering study on the interaction of gold nanoparticles with berberine hydrochloride and its analytical application.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao Pu; Yang, Zhuo; Liu, Zhong Fang; Liu, Jiang Tao; Shi, Yan

    2006-07-21

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with berberine hydrochloride has been studied by using resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) spectra. In pH 3.8-5.5 aqueous solution, citrate acid ([H2L2-]) self-assembled on the surface of positively charged gold nanoparticles (average diameter is about 12.0 nm) to form a supermolecular complex with negative charges. By virtue of electrostatic attraction, hydrophobic force and charge transfer, the complex bound with berberine to form complex, which had bigger diameter (35 nm) than gold nanoparticles. The formation of the binding production not only resulted in the red shift of absorption of gold nanoparticles from 518 to 672 nm, but also led to the greatly enhancement of RRS intensity. At the same time, the intensities of second-order scattering (SOS) and frequency-doubling scattering (FDS) were also increased. Under definite condition, the increment of the RRS (DeltaI) were proportional to the concentration of berberine. A sensitive and simple method for the determination of berberine based on the RRS technique has been developed. The detection limit (3sigma) for berberine was 0.40 ng mL(-1) and the quantitative determination range was 1.33-240 ng mL(-1). In this work, the optimum conditions of reaction, the effect of foreign substances and the analytical application had been investigated. PMID:17723490

  1. [The effect of berberine administration of evaluation of the functional state of rat liver after ligation of common bile duct].

    PubMed

    Zverinskiĭ, I V; Mel'nichenko, N G; Poplavskiĭ, V A; Sut'ko, I P; Telegin, P G; Shliakhtun, A G

    2013-01-01

    On the eighth day after ligation of the common bile duct in rats a significant increase in the serum content of total lipids, cholesterol bilirubin and ALT, alkaline phosphatase, and gamma-glutamyltransferase was observed. In the microsomal fraction there was a marked decrease in the content and activity of microsomal monooxygenases. Introperitoneal injection of berberine (10 mg/kg) for 6 days caused a partial normalization of permeability of hepatocytes plasma membranes and activity microsomal flavin-containing monooxygenases. It is suggested that berberine is a substrate and inducer of flavin-containing monooxygenases. Membrane-stabilizing effect of berberine is probably realized at the level of inhibition of prooxidant status of liver cells. PMID:23650726

  2. Solution and Solid-State Analysis of Binding of 13-Substituted Berberine Analogues to Human Telomeric G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Ferraroni, Marta; Bazzicalupi, Carla; Papi, Francesco; Fiorillo, Gaetano; Guamán-Ortiz, Luis Miguel; Nocentini, Alessio; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Lombardi, Paolo; Gratteri, Paola

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between 13-phenylalkyl and 13-diphenylalkyl berberine derivatives (NAX) and human telomeric DNA G4 structures has been investigated by both spectroscopic and crystallographic methods. NAX042 and NAX053 are the best compounds improving the performance of the natural precursor berberine. This finding is in agreement with the X-ray diffraction result for the NAX053-Tel12 adduct, showing the ligand which interacts via π-stacking, sandwiched at the interface of two symmetry-related quadruplex units, with its benzhydryl group contributing to the overall stability of the adduct by means of additional π-stacking interactions with the DNA residues. The berberine derivatives were also investigated for their cytotoxic activity towards a panel of human cancer cell lines. Compounds NAX042 and NAX053 affect the viability of cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26865223

  3. Effect of Berberine on PPARα/NO Activation in High Glucose- and Insulin-Induced Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mingfeng; Wang, Jia; Tan, Rui; Wu, Qin; Qiu, Hongmei; Yang, Junqing; Jiang, Qingsong

    2013-01-01

    Rhizoma coptidis, the root of Coptis chinensis Franch, has been used in China as a folk medicine in the treatment of diabetes for thousands of years. Berberine, one of the active ingredients of Rhizoma coptidis, has been reported to improve symptoms of diabetes and to treat experimental cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential effect of berberine on cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in diabetes and its possible influence on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα)/nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway. The cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by high glucose (25.5 mmol/L) and insulin (0.1 μmol/L) (HGI) was characterized in rat primary cardiomyocyte by measuring the cell surface area, protein content, and atrial natriuretic factor mRNA expression level. Protein and mRNA expression were measured by western blot and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. The enzymatic activity of NO synthase (NOS) was measured using a spectrophotometric assay, and NO concentration was measured using the Griess assay. HGI significantly induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and decreased the expression of PPARα and endothelial NOS at the mRNA and protein levels, which occurred in parallel with declining NOS activity and NO concentration. The effect of HGI was inhibited by berberine (0.1 to 100 μmol/L), fenofibrate (0.3 μmol/L), or L-arginine (100 μmol/L). MK886 (0.3 μmol/L), a selective PPARα antagonist, could abolish the effects of berberine and fenofibrate. NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (100 μmol/L), a NOS inhibitor, could block the effects of L-arginine, but only partially blocked the effects of berberine. These results suggest that berberine can blunt HGI-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro, through the activation of the PPARα/NO signaling pathway. PMID:23573121

  4. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  5. Identification of the quinolizidine alkaloids in Sophora leachiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sophora is a diverse genus representing herbs, shrubs, and trees that occurs throughout the world, primarily in the northern hemisphere. Sophora species contain a variety of quinolizidine alkaloids that are toxic and potentially teratogenic. However, there are no previous reports on the alkaloid c...

  6. Tall fescue seed extraction and partial purification of ergot alkaloids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many substances in the tall fescue/endophyte association (Schedonorus arundinaceus/Epichloë coenophiala) have biological activity. Of these compounds only the ergot alkaloids are known to have significant mammalian toxicity and the predominant ergot alkaloids are ergovaline and ergovalinine. Because...

  7. In vitro antibacterial screening of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Paulo, A; Duarte, A; Gomes, E T

    1994-10-01

    The ethanol and aqueous crude extracts and five alkaloids isolated from the roots of Crytolepis sanguinolenta (Lindl.) Schlechter were screened for antibacterial activity against 7 reference strains by the twofold serial broth microdilution assay. The ethanol extract and the alkaloids cryptolepine and cryptoheptine inhibited the growth of all strains tested except that of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:7853864

  8. New monoterpenoid alkaloids from the aerial parts of Uncaria hirsuta.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Sheng-Yuan; Tian, Hai-Yan; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the chemical constituents of medicinal plant Uncaria hirsuta, three new monoterpenoid alkaloids, named hirsutanines A-C (1-3), were isolated. Their structures with absolute configurations were elucidated by means of NMR, X-ray diffraction and CD analysis. Compound 3 was the first dimeric monoterpenoid alkaloid obtained from genus Uncaria. PMID:24684175

  9. hERG Blockade by Iboga Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Alper, Kenneth; Bai, Rong; Liu, Nian; Fowler, Steven J; Huang, Xi-Ping; Priori, Silvia G; Ruan, Yanfei

    2016-01-01

    The iboga alkaloids are a class of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds, some of which modify drug self-administration and withdrawal in humans and preclinical models. Ibogaine, the prototypic iboga alkaloid that is utilized clinically to treat addictions, has been associated with QT prolongation, torsades de pointes and fatalities. hERG blockade as IKr was measured using the whole-cell patch clamp technique in HEK 293 cells. This yielded the following IC50 values: ibogaine manufactured by semisynthesis via voacangine (4.09 ± 0.69 µM) or by extraction from T. iboga (3.53 ± 0.16 µM); ibogaine's principal metabolite noribogaine (2.86 ± 0.68 µM); and voacangine (2.25 ± 0.34 µM). In contrast, the IC50 of 18-methoxycoronaridine, a product of rational synthesis and current focus of drug development was >50 µM. hERG blockade was voltage dependent for all of the compounds, consistent with low-affinity blockade. hERG channel binding affinities (K i) for the entire set of compounds, including 18-MC, ranged from 0.71 to 3.89 µM, suggesting that 18-MC binds to the hERG channel with affinity similar to the other compounds, but the interaction produces substantially less hERG blockade. In view of the extended half-life of noribogaine, these results may relate to observations of persistent QT prolongation and cardiac arrhythmia at delayed intervals of days following ibogaine ingestion. The apparent structure-activity relationships regarding positions of substitutions on the ibogamine skeleton suggest that the iboga alkaloids might provide an informative paradigm for investigation of the structural biology of the hERG channel. PMID:25636206

  10. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Movassaghi, Mohammad; Ondrus, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations in this convergent approach include a stereospecific palladium–catalyzed N-vinylation of a pyrrole with a vinyl triflate, a copper–catalyzed enantioselective conjugate reduction of a β-pyrrolyl enoate, and a regioselective Friedel-Crafts reaction. The synthesis of optically active and isomerically pure samples of (4aR)-myrmicarins 215A, 215B, and 217 in addition to their respective C4a-epimers is presented. PMID:16178549

  11. Antiproliferative Activity of Amathaspiramide Alkaloids and Analogs.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Jun; Chiyoda, Koji; Umihara, Hirotatsu; Fukuyama, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    Assisted by the total syntheses of all the amathaspiramides, six natural products and four synthetic intermediates with partially fluctuating structures were prepared and subjected to a growth inhibition assay in four human cancer cell lines. The results showed amathaspiramides A, C, and E had moderate antiproliferative activity. Examination of the structure-activity relationship revealed the importance of the amine or imine substructure on the pyrrolidine moiety and the 8R stereochemistry on the N-acyl hemiaminal moiety for the antiproliferative activity of amathaspiramide alkaloids. PMID:27169437

  12. Berberine induces mitochondrial apoptosis of EBV-transformed B cells through p53-mediated regulation of XAF1 and GADD45α.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Bin; Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Daejin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Yoon, Sung Ho; Hur, Dae Young

    2016-07-01

    Berberine exhibits antiproliferative or cytotoxic effects against various cancers. ROS and wild-type p53 play a critical role in berberine-induced cytotoxic effects. In this study, we investigated the correlation between XAF1 and functional p53 in EBV-transformed B cells or cancerous B cells after treatment with berberine. Berberine decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis through a mitochondria-dependent pathway in EBV-transformed B cells and cancerous B cells, but not in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Activated p53 and its downstream targets XAF1 and GADD45α interacted with PUMA, Bax, and Bim in mitochondria after treatment with berberine. Blocking phosphorylation of p38/JNK MAPK and treatment with PFT-α, a selective p53 inhibitor, effectively prevented apoptosis and the upregulation of phosphorylated p53, XAF1, and GADD45α. NAC, a ROS scavenger, also suppressed berberine-induced mitochondria disruption and the whole apoptotic process via restoration of p53-related proteins and proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that ROS generation might be a predisposing event in berberine-induced mitochondrial apoptosis in EBV-transformed B cells through the upregulation of XAF1 and GADD45α expression by MAPK and functional p53. PMID:27121748

  13. Metabolomics Profiling to Investigate the Pharmacologic Mechanisms of Berberine for the Treatment of High-Fat Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Liu, Zezhou; Xu, Kejia; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Aiping; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Berberine has been used to treat nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which has been addressed in many studies. In this study, we investigated the molecular pharmacology mechanisms of berberine using metabolomic techniques. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups (10 rats in each group): (i) normal control group; (ii) high-fat diet- (HFD-) induced NASH model group; and (iii) HFD berberine-treated group (i.d. 200 mg/kg). The handling procedure lasted eight weeks. Then, UPLC-Q-TOF/MS techniques coupled with histopathology and biochemical analyses were adopted to explore the mechanisms of berberine on the protective effects against NASH. Key Findings. (i) According to conventional test results, berberine treatment plays a fighting role in HFD-induced NASH due to its beneficial effects against insulin resistance, inflammation, and lipid metabolism. (ii) Based on UPLC-Q-TOF/MS techniques, metabolic profiles that involved sphingomyelin (SM), phosphatidylcholine (PC), lysophosphatidylcholine (LysoPC), 13-hydroperoxy-9, 11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HpODE), eicosatrienoic acid, docosatrienoic acid, and eicosenoic acid could provide potential metabolic biomarkers to address the pharmacological mechanisms of berberine. Conclusions. The parts of molecular pharmacological mechanisms of berberine for NASH treatment are related to the regulation of metabolic disruption involving phospholipid and unsaturated fatty acids in rats with NASH. PMID:25977701

  14. Neurotoxic effects of berberine on long-term L-DOPA administration in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Keon Sung; Choi, Hyun Sook; Zhao, Ting Ting; Suh, Kwang Hoon; Kwon, Ik Hyun; Choi, Soon Ok; Lee, Myung Koo

    2013-06-01

    The effects of berberine on long-term administration of L-DOPA in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) were investigated. Rat models of PD were prepared by 6-OHDA lesions in the ipsilateral sides, and then were treated with berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) and/or L-DOPA (10 mg/kg) once daily for 21 days. Treatments with either concentration of berberine (5 and 15 mg/kg) in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups decreased the numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum as compared to 6-OHDA-lesioned groups. In addition, dopaminergic neuronal cell death of the ipsilateral sides in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups was attenuated by L-DOPA administration. However, both concentrations of berberine in 6-OHDA-lesioned groups treated with L-DOPA aggravated the numbers of TH-immunopositive neurons in the substantia nigra and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, DOPAC and HVA in the striatum as compared to rats not treated with berberine. These results suggest that berberine leads to the degeneration of dopaminergic neuronal cells in the substantia nigra in the rat model of PD with chronic L-DOPA administration. Long-term L-DOPA therapy that may involve possibly neurotoxic isoquinoline agents including berberine should involve monitoring for adverse symptoms. PMID:23539311

  15. Berberine Prevents Intestinal Mucosal Barrier Damage During Early Phase of Sepsis in Rat through the Toll-Like Receptors Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-xun; Wang, Xi-mo; Jiang, Tao; Gong, Jian-feng; Niu, Ling-ying

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study has shown berberine prevents damage to the intestinal mucosal barrier during early phase of sepsis in rat through mechanisms independent of the NOD-like receptors signaling pathway. In this study, we explored the regulatory effects of berberine on Toll-like receptors during the intestinal mucosal damaging process in rats. Male Sprague-Dawlay (SD) rats were treated with berberine for 5 d before undergoing cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to induce polymicrobial sepsis. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR 2), TLR 4, TLR 9, the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), the levels of selected cytokines and chemokines, percentage of cell death in intestinal epithelial cells, and mucosal permeability were investigated at 0, 2, 6, 12 and 24 h after CLP. Results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level were significantly lower in berberine-treated rats compared to the control animals. Conversely, the expression level of tight junction proteins, percentage of cell death in intestinal epithelial cells and the mucosal permeability were significantly higher in berberine-treated rats. The mRNA expression of TLR 2, TLR 4, and TLR 9 were significantly affected by berberine treatment. Our results indicate that pretreatment with berberine attenuates tissue injury and protects the intestinal mucosal barrier in early phase of sepsis and this may possibly have been mediated through the TLRs pathway. PMID:25605990

  16. [Preparation characterization and antitumor activity in vitro of berberine hydrochloride polymeric micelles].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wen-zhuan; Wang, Jin-ling; Tu, Peng-fei

    2015-11-01

    With polyethylene glycol vitamin E succinate (TPGS) as the carrier materials, and berberine hydrochloride ( BER) as model drug, we formed berberine hydrochloride (BER) -loaded TPGS nanomicells (BER-PMs) using filming-rehydration method to improve its solubility and in vitro anti-tumor effect. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to observe the particle appearance; particle detector was used to detect the diameter and Zeta potential; and ultracentrifugation was utilized to determine the encapsulation efficiency (EE) and drug-loading (DD); dynamic dialysis method was used to study the in vitro release behavior of BER-PMs, and the anti-tumor activity against MCF-7 cells was determined by MTT method. Results showed that the average particle size of BER-PMs was (12.45 ± 1.46) nm; particle size was uniform and spherical; drug loading and encapsulation efficiency were (5.7 ± 0.22)% and (95.67 ± 5.35)%, respectively. Zeta potential was (-1.12 ± 0.23) mV; release rate within 24 h was 37.20% and 41.14% respectively in pH 7.4 and pH 6.5 phosphate buffer in vitro; compared with BER, BER-PMs can significantly inhibit MCF-7 cell proliferation (P < 0.05), promote cell apoptosis and improve the anti-tumor activity of BER in vitro. Therefore, the formed berberine hydrochloride micelle can more effectively promote the apoptosis of MCF-7 cell, and improve the drug's in vitro anti-tumor effect. PMID:27071253

  17. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Maria; D’Agostino, Paul M.; Mihali, Troco K.; Moffitt, Michelle C.; Neilan, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes) and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes), which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified in several cyanobacterial genera including Anabaena, Cylindrospermopsis, Aphanizomenon Planktothrix and Lyngbya. STX and its analogs can be structurally classified into several classes such as non-sulfated, mono-sulfated, di-sulfated, decarbamoylated and the recently discovered hydrophobic analogs—each with varying levels of toxicity. Biotransformation of the PSTs into other PST analogs has been identified within marine invertebrates, humans and bacteria. An improved understanding of PST transformation into less toxic analogs and degradation, both chemically or enzymatically, will be important for the development of methods for the detoxification of contaminated water supplies and of shellfish destined for consumption. Some PSTs also have demonstrated pharmaceutical potential as a long-term anesthetic in the treatment of anal fissures and for chronic tension-type headache. The recent elucidation of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in cyanobacteria and the identification of new PST analogs will present opportunities to further explore the pharmaceutical potential of these intriguing alkaloids. PMID:20714432

  18. Cyclodextrin assisted nanophase determination of alkaloid salts.

    PubMed

    Csernák, Orsolya; Buvári-Barcza, Agnes; Barcza, Lajos

    2006-04-15

    The poor water solubility of the free base and the high dissociation constant (K(a)) hinder mainly the assay of alkaloid salts. We have elaborated an environment friendly method that can be carried out in aqueous media. The stability difference of the cyclodextrin (CD) complexes of free and protonated bases were used for this purpose. The base is included into the hydrophobic cavity of the CD (which serves as an apolar solvent phase on molecular level) and its solubility in water is increased. Since the base forms more stable inclusion complex than its protonated species, the pK(a) is decreased and the potentiometric titration is promoted by this way, too. Six different hydrohalide alkaloid salts have been investigated and the most appropriate CDs were chosen (depending on the size of the molecules and/or substituents). The results of the assays agree well with those obtained by the direct nonaqueous titrations. The stability constants of the inclusion complexes have been also computed. PMID:18970584

  19. Chirality and numbering of substituted tropane alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Humam, Munir; Shoul, Tarik; Jeannerat, Damien; Muñoz, Orlando; Christen, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The strict application of IUPAC rules for the numbering of tropane alkaloids is not always applied by authors and there is hence a lot of confusion in the literature. In most cases, the notation of 3, 6/7-disubstituted derivatives has been chosen arbitrarily, based on NMR and MS data, without taking into account the absolute configuration of these two carbons. This paper discusses the problem and the relevance of CD and NMR to determine molecular configurations. We report on the use of (1)H-NMR anisochrony (Δδ) induced by the Mosher's chiral auxiliary reagents (R)-(-)- and (S)-(+)-α-methoxy-α-trifluoromethyl-phenylacetyl chlorides (MTPA-Cl), to determine the absolute configuration of (3R,6R)-3α-hydroxy-6β-senecioyloxytropane, a disubstituted tropane alkaloid isolated from the aerial parts of Schizanthus grahamii (Solanaceae). These analytical tools should help future works in correctly assigning the configuration of additional 3, 6/7 disubstituted tropane derivatives. PMID:21869748

  20. Antifungal Quinoline Alkaloids from Waltheria indica.

    PubMed

    Cretton, Sylvian; Dorsaz, Stéphane; Azzollini, Antonio; Favre-Godal, Quentin; Marcourt, Laurence; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Voinesco, Francine; Michellod, Emilie; Sanglard, Dominique; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2016-02-26

    Chemical investigation of a dichloromethane extract of the aerial parts of Waltheria indica led to the isolation and characterization of five polyhydroxymethoxyflavonoids, namely, oxyanin A (1), vitexicarpin (3), chrysosplenol E (4), flindulatin (5), 5-hydroxy-3,7,4'-trimethoxyflavone (6), and six quinolone alkaloids, waltheriones M-Q (2, 7, 8, 10, 11) and 5(R)-vanessine (9). Among these, compounds 2, 7, 8, 10, and 11 have not yet been described in the literature. Their chemical structures were established by means of spectroscopic data interpretation including (1)H and (13)C, HSQC, HMBC, COSY, and NOESY NMR experiments and UV, IR, and HRESIMS. The absolute configurations of the compounds were established by ECD. The isolated constituents and 10 additional quinoline alkaloids previously isolated from the roots of the plant were evaluated for their in vitro antifungal activity against the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, and 10 compounds (7, 9, 11-16, 18, 21) showed growth inhibitory activity on both planktonic cells and biofilms (MIC ≤ 32 μg/mL). Their spectrum of activity against other pathogenic Candida species and their cytotoxicity against human HeLa cells were also determined. In addition, the cytological effect of the antifungal isolated compounds on the ultrastructure of C. albicans was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:26848627

  1. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively. PMID:27002397

  2. Identification and determination of ergot alkaloids in Morning Glory cultivars.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Julia; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Klepacki, Piotr; Sowa, Anna; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2016-05-01

    Seeds of plants from Ipomoea genera contain numerous ergot alkaloids, including psychoactive ergine and ergometrine, and are often abused as so-called "legal highs." In this work, an analytical method for determination of ergine and ergometrine, and identification of other alkaloids was developed, optimized, and validated. Three extraction techniques, ultrasound-assisted extraction in bath, or with sonotrode, and microwave-assisted extraction were evaluated, and it was concluded that ultrasonic bath is the most suitable technique for extraction of ergot alkaloids. The extraction method was later optimized using a Doehlert experimental design with response surface methodology and used together with the optimized LC-Q-TOF-MS method. The analytical procedure was validated in terms of recovery and matrix effect, repeatability, and intermediate precision. Limits of detection and quantification were 1.0 and 3.0 ng mL(-1), respectively, and were sufficient for determination of ergot alkaloids in Ipomoea seeds. The analysis revealed that from five kinds of seeds purchased from different vendors, only three contained ergot alkaloids. Concentration of alkaloids and their relative abundance was similar in samples representative for whole seeds packs; however, when single seeds were analyzed, significant discrepancies in ergine and ergometrine concentrations were detected. Graphical Abstract Identification of six ergot alkaloids and determination of ergine and ergometrine in Morning glory seeds using the ultrasound-assisted extraction followed the LC-MS analysis. PMID:26873205

  3. Antiplasmodial activity of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta alkaloids from leaves and roots.

    PubMed

    Paulo, A; Gomes, E T; Steele, J; Warhurst, D C; Houghton, P J

    2000-02-01

    The roots of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta have been investigated for their chemical composition since 1931 but so far no studies on the leaves have been reported although they are used in traditional medicine in Guinea-Bissau. Two new alkaloids identified as cryptolepinoic acid (1) and methyl cryptolepinoate (2) and the known alkaloids cryptolepine (4), hydroxycryptolepine (5/5a) and quindoline (6), were isolated from the ethanolic and chlorophormic leaf extracts. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of the leaves and roots and seven alkaloids isolated from those extracts were tested in vitro against Plasmodium falciparum K1 (multidrug-resistant strain) and T996 (chloroquine-sensitive clone). All the extracts were shown to give 90% inhibition of P. falciparum K1 growth at concentrations < 23 micrograms/ml. Cryptolepine (4) was the most active alkaloid tested with IC50 values (0.23 microM to K1; 0.059 microM to T996) comparable with chloroquine (0.26 microM to K1; 0.019 microM to T996). The indolobenzazepine alkaloid cryptoheptine (7) was the second most active with IC50 values of 0.8 microM (K1) and 1.2 microM (T996). Cryptolepinoic acid (1) showed no significant activity while its ethyl ester derivative 3 was active against P. falciparum K1 (IC50 = 3.7 microM). All the indoloquinoline alkaloids showed cross-resistance with chloroquine but not the indolobenzazepine alkaloid 7. It was noticed that alkaloids with weakly basic characteristics were active whereas other structurally related alkaloids with different acid-base profiles were inactive. These observations are in agreement with the antimalarial mechanism of action for quinolines. PMID:10705730

  4. Renoprotective effect of berberine via intonation on apoptosis and mitochondrial-dependent pathway in renal ischemia reperfusion-induced mutilation.

    PubMed

    Visnagri, Asjad; Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2015-04-01

    Ischemic acute renal failure is a condition that extends subsequent to sudden and momentary fall in overall or regional blood flow to the kidney. The present investigation was deliberated to scrutinize the renoprotective potential of berberine in animal model of renal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) induced dent via assessment of various biochemical and molecular biomarkers. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and the right kidney was removed through a small flank incision. Renal ischemia reperfusion was persuaded in uni-nephrectomized rats by occlusion of left renal artery for 45 min and reperfusion for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks of treatment of berberine (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg, p.o.), hemodynamic and left ventricular function were evaluated. Induction of ischemia reperfusion resulted callous mutilation in kidney which was confirmed by alterations in oxidative stress (SOD, GSH, and MDA), membrane bound enzymes, kidney function markers (serum creatinine and BUN), and mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, RIR injury exhibited incredible alterations in mRNA expression of KIM-1, NGAL, Caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, and TNF-α levels. Conversely treatment of berberine (20 and 40 mg/kg) significantly (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001) restored ischemia reperfusion induced marring via intonation of biochemical and molecular biomarkers. To sum up, berberine demonstrated compelling renoprotective effect in RIR injury via caspase-mitochondria-dependent pathway. PMID:25598236

  5. Indole Alkaloids from the Leaves of Nauclea officinalis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Liao, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Qiang-Rong; Zheng, Kai; Jiang, Ying-Chun; He, Zhen-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named naucleamide G (1), and nauclealomide B and C (5 and 6), were isolated from the n-BuOH-soluble fraction of an EtOH extract of the leaves of Nauclea officinalis, together with three known alkaloids, paratunamide C (2), paratunamide D (3) and paratunamide A (4). The structures with absolute configurations of the new compounds were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS, acid hydrolysis and quantum chemical circular dichroism (CD) calculation. According to the structures of isolated indole alkaloids, their plausible biosynthetic pathway was deduced. PMID:27455233

  6. γ-Lactam alkaloids from the flower buds of daylily.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Nakamura, Seikou; Nakashima, Souichi; Ohta, Tomoe; Yano, Mamiko; Tsujihata, Junichiro; Tsukioka, Junko; Ogawa, Keiko; Fukaya, Masashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Hisashi

    2016-07-01

    Four new alkaloids, hemerocallisamines IV-VII, were isolated from the methanol extract of flower buds of daylily. The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The absolute stereochemistry of the hemerocallisamines IV-VI was elucidated by the application of the modified Mosher's method, HPLC analysis, and optical rotation. In the present study, the isolated alkaloids significantly inhibited the aggregation of Aβ42 in vitro. This is the first report about bioactive alkaloids with a γ-lactam ring from daylily. In addition, isolated nucleosides showed accelerative effects on neurite outgrowth under the non-fasting condition. PMID:26849229

  7. Cyclobutane-Containing Alkaloids: Origin, Synthesis, and Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sergeiko, Anastasia; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Hanuš, Lumir O; Dembitsky, Valery M

    2008-01-01

    Present review describes research on novel natural cyclobutane-containing alkaloids isolated from terrestrial and marine species. More than 60 biological active compounds have been confirmed to have antimicrobial, antibacterial, antitumor, and other activities. The structures, synthesis, origins, and biological activities of a selection of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids are reviewed. With the computer program PASS some additional biological activities are also predicted, which point toward new possible applications of these compounds. This review emphasizes the role of cyclobutane-containing alkaloids as an important source of leads for drug discovery. PMID:19696873

  8. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Stephania erecta.

    PubMed

    Likhitwitayawuid, K; Angerhofer, C K; Cordell, G A; Pezzuto, J M; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    (+)-2-N-Methyltelobine [1], a new alkaloid, together with twelve known bisbenzylisoquinolines, was isolated from the tubers of Stephania erecta. The structure determination and the complete 1H- and unambiguous 13C-nmr assignments of 1 were obtained through extensive use of several 1D and 2D nmr techniques. All alkaloids inhibited the growth of cultured Plasmodium falciparum strains D-6 and W-2 and displayed nonselective cytotoxicity with a battery of cultured mammalian cells. These data were used for the calculation of selectivity indices. Relative to known antimalarial agents, these bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids do not appear to be promising clinical candidates at the present time. PMID:8450319

  9. Ibogan, Aspidosperman, Vincamine, and Bisindole Alkaloids from a Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa: Iboga Alkaloids with C-20α Substitution.

    PubMed

    Nge, Choy-Eng; Chong, Kam-Weng; Thomas, Noel F; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2016-05-27

    Ten new indole alkaloids (1-10) comprising five ibogan, two aspidosperman, one vincamine, and two bisindole alkaloids, in addition to 32 known alkaloids, were isolated from the stem-bark extract of a Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa. The structures of these alkaloids were determined based on analysis of the NMR and MS data and, in five instances (1, 3, 5, 6, 8), confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Two of the iboga alkaloids, conodusines B (2) and C (3), and the iboga-containing bisindole tabernamidine B (10) are notable for the presence of an α-substituted acetyl group at C-20 of the iboga carbon skeleton. The iboga alkaloid (+)-conodusine E (5) had MS and NMR data that were identical to those of (-)-ervatamine I, recently isolated from Ervatamia hainanensis. Establishment of the absolute configuration of (+)-conodusine E (5) was based on analysis of the ECD data, correlation with (-)-heyneanine, and X-ray analysis, which showed that (+)-5 belongs to the same enantiomeric series as exemplified by (-)-coronaridine. The configuration at C-20' of the previously reported Tabernaemontana bisindole alkaloid 19'-oxotabernamine (renamed tabernamidine B) required revision based on the present results. Several of the bisindoles showed pronounced in vitro growth inhibitory activity against drug-sensitive and vincristine-resistant KB cells. PMID:27077800

  10. Label-free fluorescent aptasensor for potassium ion using structure-switching aptamers and berberine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanqing; Chen, Yanxia; Wei, Yanli; Li, Huanhuan; Dong, Chuan

    2015-02-01

    A simple, rapid and label-free fluorescent aptasensor was fabricated for the detection of potassium ion (K+ ion) in aqueous solution using K+ ion-stabilized single stranded DNA (ssDNA) with G-rich sequence as the recognition element and a fluorescent dye, berberine, as the fluorescence probe. In the presence of K+ ion, the G-rich ssDNA is promoted to form the aptamer-target complex with a G-quadruplex conformation, and berberine binding to the G-quadruplex structure results in the enhancement of its fluorescence. The fluorescence intensity of the sensing system displayed a calibration response for K+ ion in the range of 0-1600 μM with a detection limit of 31 nM (S/N = 3) and a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 0.45%. This label-free fluorescence aptasensor is conveniently and effectively applicable for analysis of K+ ion in blood serum samples with the recovery range of 81.7-105.3%. The assay for detection of potassium ion is easy, economical, robust, and stable in rough conditions.

  11. Renoprotective effect of berberine on type 2 diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Si-Fan; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Hao-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Zhang, Wei-Ku; Zhang, Lei; Yan, Mei-Hua; Dong, Xi; Wang, Hua; Wen, Yu-Min; Pan, Xin-Ping; Lan, Hui Yao; Li, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation, fibrosis, and lipid disorder are essential promoters in the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney injury in diabetes mellitus type 2. Berberine (BBR) has been reported to have beneficial effects on diabetic nephropathy, but its action mechanism is still unclear. The present study was designed to elucidate the therapeutic mechanism of BBR in a type 2 diabetic nephropathy rat model induced by a high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin injection. The diabetic rats were treated with or without BBR by gavage for 20 weeks and examined by serology, 24-h albuminuria, histology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular analyses. Results showed that treatment with BBR significantly reduced serum levels of blood glucose and lipids, inhibited urinary excretion of albumin, and attenuated renal histological injuries in diabetic rats. Berberine treatment also inhibited renal inflammation, which was associated with inactivation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B-cell signalling. As a result, the upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α) and chemokine (monocyte chemotactic protein-1) was blocked. In addition, BBR treatment also inactivated transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 signalling and suppressed renal fibrosis, including expression of fibronectin, collagen I, and collagen IV. The present study reveals that BBR is a therapeutic agent for attenuating type 2 diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell-driven renal inflammation and transforming growth factor-β/Smad3 signalling pathway. PMID:25867602

  12. Berberine Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer Cells via COX-2/PGE2 Mediated JAK2/STAT3 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuan; Ji, Qing; Ye, Naijing; Sui, Hua; Zhou, Lihong; Zhu, Huirong; Fan, Zhongze; Cai, Jianfeng; Li, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Berberin, extracted from Chinese herbal medicine Coptis chinensis, has been found to have anti-tumor activities. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Our current study demonstrated that berberin inhibited the in vitro and in vivo growth, migration/invasion of CRC cells, via attenuating the expression levels of COX-2/PGE2, following by reducing the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3, as well as the MMP-2/-9 expression. We further clarified that an increase of COX-2/PGE2 expression offset the repressive activity of Berberin on JAK2/STAT3 signaling, and a JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 blocked the effect of COX-2/PGE2 on MMP-2/-9 expression. In summary, Berberin inhibited CRC invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of COX-2/PGE2- JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25954974

  13. Berberine Inhibits Invasion and Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer Cells via COX-2/PGE2 Mediated JAK2/STAT3 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Naijing; Sui, Hua; Zhou, Lihong; Zhu, Huirong; Fan, Zhongze; Cai, Jianfeng; Li, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Berberin, extracted from Chinese herbal medicine Coptis chinensis, has been found to have anti-tumor activities. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Our current study demonstrated that berberin inhibited the in vitro and in vivo growth, migration/invasion of CRC cells, via attenuating the expression levels of COX-2/PGE2, following by reducing the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3, as well as the MMP-2/-9 expression. We further clarified that an increase of COX-2/PGE2 expression offset the repressive activity of Berberin on JAK2/STAT3 signaling, and a JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 blocked the effect of COX-2/PGE2 on MMP-2/-9 expression. In summary, Berberin inhibited CRC invasion and metastasis via down-regulation of COX-2/PGE2- JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. PMID:25954974

  14. Photofragmentation mechanisms in protonated chiral cinchona alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lucas, Bruno; Fayeton, Jacqueline; Scuderi, Debora; Alata, Ivan; Broquier, Michel; Barbu-Debus, Katia Le; Lepère, Valeria; Zehnacker, Anne

    2016-08-10

    The photo-stability of protonated cinchona alkaloids is studied in the gas phase by a multi-technique approach. A multi-coincidence technique is used to demonstrate that the dissociation is a direct process. Two dissociation channels are observed. They result from the C8-C9 cleavage, accompanied or not by hydrogen migration. The branching ratio between the two photo-fragments is different for the two pseudo-enantiomers quinine and quinidine. Mass spectrometry experiments coupling UV photo-dissociation of the reactants and structural characterization of the ionic photo-products by Infra-Red Multiple Photo-Dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy provide unambiguous information on their structure. In addition, quantum chemical calculations allow proposing a reactive scheme and discussing it in terms of the ground-state geometry of the reactant. PMID:27477216

  15. Non-alkaloid constituents of Vinca major.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gui-Guang; Zhao, Hai-Yun; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Yun-Li; Song, Chang-Wei; Gu, Ji; Sun, Wei-Bang; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the non-alkaloid compounds from the leaves and stems of Vinca major cultivated in Yunnan Province, China. The compounds were isolated using chromatographic techniques. The structures were elucidated by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods in combination with UV, IR, and MS analyses. The 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH)-scavenging activity of Compounds 1-7 were evaluated. One new iridoid glycoside (compound 1), together with 11 known compounds, were isolated from Vinca major. Compounds 1, 5, and 6 showed moderate DPPH-scavenging activity, with IC50 values being 70.6, 32.8, and 62.2 μmol·L(-1), respectively. In conclusion, compound 1 is a newly identified iridoid glycoside with moderate antioxidant activity. PMID:26850347

  16. Total Synthesis of Alkaloid 205B

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Concise and highly stereocontrolled total syntheses of racemic and enantiopure frog alkaloid 205B (1) were accomplished in 11 steps from 4-methoxypyridines 6 and 7 in overall yields of 8 and 8%, respectively. The assembly of the core of the natural product relies on a stereoselective Tsuji–Trost allylic amination reaction and a ring-closing metathesis. The synthesis features the use of an N-acylpyridinium salt reaction to introduce the first stereocenter and an unprecedented trifluoroacetic anhydride-mediated addition of an allylstannane to a vinylogous amide with complete facial selectivity. Deoxygenation of the C4 ketone proved difficult but was accomplished via a modified Barton–McCombie reaction in the presence of a catalytic amount of diphenyl diselenide. PMID:25180567

  17. Comparative pharmacokinetics of active alkaloids after oral administration of Rhizoma Coptidis extract and Wuji Wan formulas in rat using a UPLC-MS/MS method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Li, Yuejie; Wang, Yajie; Yang, Qing; Dong, Yu; Weng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Xiaoxin; Wang, Yiwei; Gong, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruijie

    2015-03-01

    Wuji Wan (WJW), containing Rhizoma Coptidis (Huanglian in Chinese, HL), Frutus Evodiae Rutaecarpae (Wuzhuyu, WZY) and Radix Paeoniae Alba (Baishao, BS), is a classical traditional Chinese medical formula employed in treating intestinal disorders. Berberine (BBR) and palmatine (PMT) are the major active alkaloids in HL and have analgesic and anti-microbial effects. A sensitive, specific and validated ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric method was developed to investigate the pharmacokinetic profiles of BBR and PMT in rat plasma and in situ intestinal perfusion solution. In comparison with the pharmacokinetic parameters of BBR and PMT, t(1/2), C(max), T(max), AUC, CL and MRT after intragastric (i.g.) administration with HL extract alone, those remarkably changed after i.g. administration with WJW formulas 1 and 2 (herb proportions are 12:2:3 and 12:1:12). Particularly, the oral bioavailability of PMT in WJW formula 1 was significantly increased. In rat intestinal perfusion experiments, the apparent permeability coefficient value of PMT was (1.45 ± 0.72) × 10(-5) cm/s when perfusion with HL was performed, and the value was significantly increased to (3.92 ± 0.52) × 10(-5) cm/s on perfusion with WJW formula 1. These results indicate that the pharmacokinetic parameters and absorption of BBR and PMT are affected by the other herbs or ingredients from WJW formulas. PMID:24577954

  18. Effects of berberine on the growth and immune performance in response to ammonia stress and high-fat dietary in blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Qing; Liu, Wen-Bin; Zhou, Man; Dai, Yong-Jun; Xu, Chao; Tian, Hong-Yan; Xu, Wei-Na

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to figure out the effects of berberine on growth performance, immunity, oxidative stress and hepatocyte apoptosis of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala) fed with high-fat diet. 320 fish (80.00 ± 0.90 g) were divided randomly into four trial groups (each with four replicates) and fed with 4 diets (normal diet, normal diet with 50 mg/kg berberine, high-fat diet, high-fat diet with 50 mg/kg berberine), respectively. At the end of the feeding trial, ammonia stress test was carried out for 5 days. The result showed the growth performance, immune parameters including plasm acid phosphatase (ACP) activities, lysozyme (LYZ) activities and alternative complement C3 and C4 contents were suppressed in fish fed with high-fat diets but improved in berberine diets compared with control (normal diet). Hepatopancreas oxidative status, the malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and lipid peroxide (LPO) were increased significantly (P < 0.05) when fish were fed with high-fat diets. Berberine could slow the progression of the oxidative stress induced by high-fat through increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities and total sulfydryl (T-SH) levels of fish. And the hepatocyte apoptosis in the high-fat group could also be alleviated by berberine. After the ammonia stress test, the accumulative mortality was extremely (P < 0.05) low in fish fed high-fat diet with berberine compared to other groups. It was concluded berberine as a functional feed additive significantly inhibited the progression of oxidative stress, reduced the apoptosis and enhanced the immunity of fish fed with high-fat diet. PMID:27235371

  19. Set9, NF-κB, and microRNA-21 mediate berberine-induced apoptosis of human multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-yan; Li, Kun-peng; Wang, Xiu-ju; Liu, Yuan; Lu, Zhi-gang; Dong, Rui-hong; Guo, Hong-bo; Zhang, Mei-xia

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms by which berberine suppressed the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells. Methods: Human U266 multiple myeloma cell line was tested. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, ultramicrostructure and secretion function were examined using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8), flow cytometry (FCM), electron and fluorescence microscopy, as well as ELISA assay. The microRNAs (miRs) and transcription factors in U266 cells were detected using arrays and verified by qRT-PCR. EMSA and luciferase assays were used to verify the p65-dependent transactivation of miR-21 gene. Results: Treatment of U266 cells with berberine (40−160 μmol/L) suppressed cell proliferation and IL-6 secretion in dose- and time-dependent manners. Meanwhile, berberine dose-dependently induced ROS generation, G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis in U266 cells, and decreased the levels of miR-21 and Bcl-2. Overexpression of miR-21 counteracted berberine-induced suppression of cell proliferation and IL-6 secretion. In U266 cells treated with berberine (80 μmol/L), the activity of NF-κB was decreased by approximately 50%, followed by significant reduction of miR-21 level. berberine (80−160 μmol/L) increased the level of Set9 (lysine methyltransferase) by more than 2-fold, caused methylation of the RelA subunit, which inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation and miR-21 transcription. In U266 cells treated with berberine (80 μmol/L), knockdown of Set9 with siRNAs significantly increased NF-κB protein level accompanying with a partial recovery of proliferation. Conclusion: In U266 cells, berberine suppresses NF-κB nuclear translocation via Set9-mediated lysine methylation, leads to decrease in the levels miR21 and Bcl-2, which induces ROS generation and apoptosis. PMID:23247593

  20. Ergot alkaloids induce vasoconstriction of bovine foregut vasculature

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alkaloids produced by the Neotyphodium coenophialum endophyte in association with tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) are imputed to cause peripheral symptoms of fescue toxicosis. We hypothesized that theses compounds could correspondingly affect foregut vasculature. The objective of this study was to...

  1. Alkaloids with Different Carbon Units from Myrioneuron faberi.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Sheng-Dian; Di, Ying-Tong; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Chen, Duo-Zhi; Li, Shun-Lin; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-11-25

    Three new Myrioneuron alkaloids, myrifamines A-C (1-3), with unique skeletons were isolated from Myrioneuron faberi. The absolute configuration of 1 was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, and the stereochemistry of the other two alkaloids was determined using a combination of ROESY experiments and calculated and experimental electronic circular dichroism spectra. Myrifamine C (3) is the first example of a symmetric dimer among the Myrioneuron alkaloids. Known alkaloids myrionamide (4) and schoberine (5) were also isolated, and experimental NMR and X-ray diffraction data suggest their structural revision. Compound 2 showed significant inhibitory activity toward the hepatitis C virus in vitro, with a therapeutic index (CC50/EC50) greater than 108.7. PMID:26551513

  2. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-01-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  3. Microcalorimetry studies of the antimicrobial actions of Aconitum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yan-bin; Liu, Lian; Shao, Wei; Wei, Ting; Lin, Gui-mei

    2015-08-01

    The metabolic activity of organisms can be measured by recording the heat output using microcalorimetry. In this paper, the total alkaloids in the traditional Chinese medicine Radix Aconiti Lateralis were extracted and applied to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The effect of alkaloids on bacteria growth was studied by microcalorimetry. The power-time curves were plotted with a thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter and parameters such as growth rate constant (μ), peak-time (Tm), inhibitory ratio (I), and enhancement ratio (E) were calculated. The relationships between the concentration of Aconitum alkaloids and μ of E. coli or S. aureus were discussed. The results showed that Aconitum alkaloids had little effect on E. coli and had a potentially inhibitory effect on the growth of S. aureus. PMID:26238544

  4. Total synthesis, biosynthesis and biological profiles of clavine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Stephanie R; Wipf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This review highlights noteworthy synthetic and biological aspects of the clavine subfamily of ergot alkaloids. Recent biosynthetic insights have laid the groundwork for a better understanding of the diverse biological pathways leading to these indole derivatives. Ergot alkaloids were among the first fungal-derived natural products identified, inspiring pharmaceutical applications in CNS disorders, migraine, infective diseases, and cancer. Pergolide, for example, is a semi-synthetic clavine alkaloid that has been used to treat Parkinson's disease. Synthetic activities have been particularly valuable to facilitate access to rare members of the Clavine family and empower medicinal chemistry research. Improved molecular target identification tools and a better understanding of signaling pathways can now be deployed to further extend the biological and medical utility of Clavine alkaloids. PMID:27215547

  5. New Lycopodine-Type Alkaloids from Lycopodium carinatum.

    PubMed

    Kogure, Noriyuki; Maruyama, Moe; Wongseripipatana, Sumphan; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2016-07-01

    The structures of new lycopodine-type alkaloids, lycopocarinamines A-F, which were isolated from Lycopodium carinatum, were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis and chemical conversions. The proposed structure of lycocarinatine A was revised. PMID:27020466

  6. Analysis of rye grains and rye meals for ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Lauber, U; Schnaufer, R; Gredziak, M; Kiesswetter, Y

    2005-12-01

    Due to the exceptionally hot and dry summer in 2003 the ergot of that harvest was rather small and could only be separated from normal grain with increased efforts. Based on a clean-up procedure of Wolffet al. (1) and of Kluget al. (2), a HPLC-FLD-method for the determination of 12 ergot alkaloids (6 "In"-, 6 "Inin"-forms) was established and modified. Actually reference substances are commercially available only for 5 selected alkaloids. Because of the instability of the alkaloids a new standard preparation procedure was tested and implemented. The maximum allowed impurity with ergot (0.05%=1000 μg alkaloids/kg) was exceeded in samples of harvest 2003. Except for one sample, all exceedings were detected in conventionally grown products, unlike organically grown products. PMID:23605398

  7. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  8. Structure-cardiac activity relationship of C19-diterpenoid alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xi-Xian; Tang, Pei; Liu, Xiu-Xiu; Chao, Ruo-Bing; Chen, Qiao-Hong; She, Xue-Ke; Chen, Dong-Lin; Wang, Feng-Peng

    2012-06-01

    Thirty three C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, twenty-two prepared from known C19-diterpenoid alkaloids and eleven isolated from Aconitum and Delphinium spp. were evaluated for their cardiac activity in the isolated bullfrog heart assay. Among them, eleven compounds exhibited cardiac activity, with average rate of amplitude increase in the range of 16-118%. Compound 7, mesaconine (17), hypaconine (25), and beiwutinine (26) exhibited strong cardiac activities relative to the reference drug. The structure-activity relationship data acquired indicated that an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-15, a hydroxyl group at C-8, an alpha-methoxyl or hydroxyl group at C-1, and a secondary amine or N-methyl group in ring A are important structure features necessary for the cardiac activities of the aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids without any ester groups. In addition, an alpha-hydroxyl group at C-3 is also helpful for the cardiac activity of these alkaloids. PMID:22816290

  9. A new phenanthridine alkaloid from Hymenocallis x festalis.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, J; Forgo, P; Szabó, P

    2002-12-01

    Investigation of the alkaloid fraction of the bulbs of Hymenocallis x festalis yielded a new natural product, 3-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxy-3,4-dihydrophenanthridine (1). The structure was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data. PMID:12490249

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of yaks: identification of the plants involved.

    PubMed

    Winter, H; Seawright, A A; Noltie, H J; Mattocks, A R; Jukes, R; Wangdi, K; Gurung, J B

    1994-02-01

    A search was undertaken in the most eastern part of the Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan for the plants which are causing severe losses of yaks due to pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning. Two Senecio and three Ligularia species were found on yak pastures at altitudes between 3000 and 4000 m, including one so far underscribed Ligularia species. None was previously known to contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Another Senecio species was found between 2500 and 3000 m, an altitude too low for yaks to be kept but significant for other cattle. The search was supported by field chemical tests for the alkaloids and the diagnosis was later confirmed by thin layer chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography. Two of the Senecio species had exceptionally high concentrations of pyrrolizidine alkaloids of about 0.5 per cent in the dry matter. PMID:8171783

  11. [Monomeric indole alkaloids from the aerial parts of Catharanthus roseus].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiang-Zhang; Wang, Guo-Cai; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Qi; Ye, Wen-Cai

    2010-04-01

    Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don is a plant of the Catharanthus genus of Apocynaceae which has been reported to have therapeutic effects of detoxication and anticancer. In order to further study the alkaloid constituents of C. roseus, the aerial parts of the plant were extracted with 95% EtOH, and then treated with 2% H2SO4 and NH3H2O to obtain total alkaloids. The total alkaloids were separated and purified by column chromatography over silica gel and prepared by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physicochemical properties and spectral data. A new alkaloid together with five known compounds were isolated and identified as vindolinine B (1), lochnericine (2), horhammericine (3), vindorosine (4), vindoline (5), and coronaridine (6). Compound 1 is a new compound and named as vindolinine B. PMID:21355212

  12. Activity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids against biofilm formation and Trichomonas vaginalis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crotalaria genus belongs to the subfamily Papilionoideae comprising about 600 species spread throughout tropical, neotropical and subtropical regions. In this study, seeds of Crolatalaria pallida were used to the isolation of usaramine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid. Thus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stap...

  13. Rhazinilam-Leuconolam-Leuconoxine Alkaloids from Leuconotis griffithii.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chew-Yan; Low, Yun-Yee; Thomas, Noel F; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2013-05-24

    Eight new indole alkaloids (1-8) belonging to the rhazinilam-leuconolam-leuconoxine group, in addition to 52 other alkaloids, were isolated from the stem-bark extract of Leuconotis griffithii, viz., nor-rhazinicine (1), 5,21-dihydrorhazinilam-N-oxide (2), 3,14-dehydroleuconolam (3), and leuconodines A-E (4-8). The structures of these alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS analyses and in some instances confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. Alkaloids 1, 5, and 7 showed only moderate to weak cytotoxicity toward KB cells (IC50 12-18 μg/mL), while 8 showed moderate activity in reversing MDR in vincristine-resistant KB cells. PMID:23647487

  14. Berberine protects rat heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury via activating JAK2/STAT3 signaling and attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-long; Yu, Li-ming; Gao, Wen-li; Duan, Wei-xun; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Xu-dong; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhen-hua; Zhai, Meng-en; Jin, Zhen-xiao; Yu, Shi-qiang; Wang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Berberine (BBR), an isoquinoline-derived alkaloid isolated from Rhizoma coptidis, exerts cardioprotective effects. Because endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays a pivotal role in myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R)-induced apoptosis, it was interesting to examine whether the protective effects of BBR resulted from modulating ER stress levels during MI/R injury, and to define the signaling mechanisms in this process. Methods: Male rats were treated with BBR (200 mg·kg−1·d−1, ig) for 2 weeks, and then subjected to MI/R surgery. Cardiac dimensions and function were assessed using echocardiography. Myocardial infarct size and apoptosis was examined. Total serum LDH levels and CK activities, superoxide production, MDA levels and the antioxidant SOD activities in heart tissue were determined. An in vitro study was performed on cultured rat embryonic myocardium-derived cells H9C2 exposed to simulated ischemia/reperfusion (SIR). The expression of apoptotic, ER stress-related and signaling proteins were assessed using Western blot analyses. Results: Pretreatment with BBR significantly reduced MI/R-induced myocardial infarct size, improved cardiac function, and suppressed myocardial apoptosis and oxidative damage. Furthermore, pretreatment with BBR suppressed MI/R-induced ER stress, evidenced by down-regulating the phosphorylation levels of myocardial PERK and eIF2α and the expression of ATF4 and CHOP in heart tissues. Pretreatment with BBR also activated the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in heart tissues, and co-treatment with AG490, a specific JAK2/STAT3 inhibitor, blocked not only the protective effects of BBR, but also the inhibition of BBR on MI/R-induced ER stress. In H9C2 cells, treatment with BBR (50 μmol/L) markedly reduced SIR-induced cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and ER stress, which were abolished by transfection with JAK2 siRNA. Conclusion: BBR ameliorates MI/R injury in rats by activating the AK2/STAT3 signaling pathway and attenuating ER

  15. Computational Studies on Cinchona Alkaloid-Catalyzed Asymmetric Organic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Gamze; Dedeoglu, Burcu; Catak, Saron; Aviyente, Viktorya

    2016-06-21

    Remarkable progress in the area of asymmetric organocatalysis has been achieved in the last decades. Cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives have emerged as powerful organocatalysts owing to their reactivities leading to high enantioselectivities. The widespread usage of cinchona alkaloids has been attributed to their nontoxicity, ease of use, stability, cost effectiveness, recyclability, and practical utilization in industry. The presence of tunable functional groups enables cinchona alkaloids to catalyze a broad range of reactions. Excellent experimental studies have extensively contributed to this field, and highly selective reactions were catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and their derivatives. Computational modeling has helped elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cinchona alkaloid catalyzed reactions as well as the origins of the selectivity they induce. These studies have complemented experimental work for the design of more efficient catalysts. This Account presents recent computational studies on cinchona alkaloid catalyzed organic reactions and the theoretical rationalizations behind their effectiveness and ability to induce selectivity. Valuable efforts to investigate the mechanisms of reactions catalyzed by cinchona alkaloids and the key aspects of the catalytic activity of cinchona alkaloids in reactions ranging from pharmaceutical to industrial applications are summarized. Quantum mechanics, particularly density functional theory (DFT), and molecular mechanics, including ONIOM, were used to rationalize experimental findings by providing mechanistic insights into reaction mechanisms. B3LYP with modest basis sets has been used in most of the studies; nonetheless, the energetics have been corrected with higher basis sets as well as functionals parametrized to include dispersion M05-2X, M06-2X, and M06-L and functionals with dispersion corrections. Since cinchona alkaloids catalyze reactions by forming complexes with substrates via hydrogen bonds and long

  16. The effects of Aconitum alkaloids on the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Ameri, A

    1998-10-01

    Preparations of Aconitum roots are employed in Chinese and Japanese medicine for analgesic, antirheumatic and neurological indications. The recent surge in use of phytomedicine derived from traditional Chinese medicine as well as increasing concerns about possible toxic effects of these compounds have inspired a great deal of research into the mechanisms by which certain Aconitum alkaloids may act on the central nervous system. The pharmacological effects of preparations of Aconitum roots are attributed to several diterpenoid alkaloids. The main alkaloid of these plants is aconitine, a highly toxic diterpenoid alkaloid which is known to suppress the inactivation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels by binding to neurotoxin binding site 2 of the alpha-subunit of the channel protein. In this article the pharmacology of several structurally related Aconitum alkaloids is highlighted and their therapeutic vs toxic potential is discussed. Neurochemical and neurophysiological studies will be reviewed with emphasis on the effects of the alkaloids in regions of the brain that have been implicated in pain transmission and generation of epileptic activity. Considering the chemical structure of the Aconitum alkaloids as well as their mechanism of action, a subdivision in three groups becomes obvious: the first group comprises such alkaloids which possess high toxicity due to two ester boundings at the diterpene skeleton. The members of this group activate voltage-dependent sodium channels already at resting potential and inhibit noradrenaline reuptake. Activation of sodium channels and in consequence excessive depolarization with final inexcitability and suppression of pain transmission account for their antinociceptive properties. The second group comprises less toxic monoesters which have been shown to possess strong antinociceptive, antiarrhythmic and antiepileptiform properties due to a blockade of the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Electrophysiological studies have

  17. Himalensines A and B, Alkaloids from Daphniphyllum himalense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Shyaula, Sajan L; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Yue, Jian-Min

    2016-03-01

    Chemical investigation into the alkaloidal constituents of the Nepalese Daphniphyllum himalense has returned two new compounds, himalensines A (1) and B (2), with unprecedented carbon skeletons. Structures of the two alkaloids have been characterized on the basis of spectroscopic methods, especially via 2D NMR data analysis. Himalensine B (2) showed marginal inhibitory activities against two kinases, PTP1B and IKK-β. PMID:26914844

  18. Elaboration of simplified vinca alkaloids and phomopsin hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quoc Anh; Roussi, Fanny; Thoret, Sylviane; Guéritte, Françoise

    2010-03-01

    Nine simplified vinca alkaloids and phomospin A hybrids, in which vindoline moiety has been replaced by a simpler scaffold, have been elaborated to evaluate their activity on the inhibition of tubulin polymerization. This article deals with the synthesis of various simplified vinca alkaloids, using a stereoselective coupling of catharantine with reactive aromatic compounds and methanol as well as their subsequent condensation with a large peptide chain mimicking those of phomopsin A. Biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies are also reported. PMID:20659111

  19. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Seaman, J T

    1987-06-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning of sheep in New South Wales was reviewed, based on the records of the New South Wales Department of Agriculture's Regional Veterinary Laboratories. The plant species causing significant mortalities were Echium plantagineum and Heliotropium europaeum. The syndrome of hepatogenous chronic copper poisoning was more frequently diagnosed than primary pyrrolizidine alkaloid poisoning, particularly when grazing E. plantagineum. The data indicated that adult crossbred ewes were the most commonly affected class of sheep. PMID:3632498

  20. Thalifaberidine, a cytotoxic aporphine-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Thalictrum faberi.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Hu, S F; Zaw, K; Angerhofer, C K; Chai, H; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Lin, J; Zheng, D M

    1994-10-01

    From Thalictrum faberi, thalifaberidine [1], a new aporphine-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, together with four known alkaloids, thalifaramine [2], thalifaricine [3], thalifarazine [4], and thalifaronine [5], were isolated. Thalifaberidine [1] was identified as 6',8-desmethylthalifaberine, and its 1H- and 13C-nmr data were completely assigned through the use of one- and two-dimensional nmr techniques. Thalifaberidine [1], thalifaberine [6], and thalifasine [7] showed cytotoxic activity against several human cancer cell lines, as well as antimalarial activity. PMID:7528786

  1. Bioinspired Collective Syntheses of Iboga-Type Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gaoyuan; Xie, Xingang; Sun, Haiyu; Yuan, Ziyun; Zhong, Zhuliang; Tang, Shouchu; She, Xuegong

    2016-05-20

    We present the application of a bioinspired collective synthesis strategy in the total syntheses of seven iboga-type indole alkaloids: (±)-tabertinggine, (±)-ibogamine, (±)-ibogaine, (±)-ibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-iboluteine, and (±)-ervaoffines D. In particular, tabertinggine and its congeners serve as iboga precursors for the subsequent biomimetic transformations into other iboga-type alkaloids. PMID:27160167

  2. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shun; Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Hai-Yuan; Feng, Yan; Ding, Xiao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Qing; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Eight indole alkaloids, melosines A-H, together with 13 known alkaloids, were isolated from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis. The structure elucidation of isolated secondary metabolites was based on comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis. Melosine B showed moderate cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 with IC50 values ranging from 1.6 to 8.1μM. PMID:25817833

  3. Cytotoxic and antimalarial bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Cyclea barbata.

    PubMed

    Lin, L Z; Shieh, H L; Angerhofer, C K; Pezzuto, J M; Cordell, G A; Xue, L; Johnson, M E; Ruangrungsi, N

    1993-01-01

    An alkaloid extract derived from the roots of Cyclea barbata demonstrated cytotoxic and antimalarial activities, and five bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids, (+)-tetrandrine [1], (-)-limacine [2], (+)-thalrugosine [3], (+)-homoaromoline [4], and (-)-cycleapeltine [5], were isolated as the active principles. The complete and unambiguous assignments of the 1H- and 13C-nmr data of these substances were made by 1D and 2D nmr techniques (COSY, phase-sensitive ROESY, HETCOR, and FLOCK). PMID:8450318

  4. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  5. Berberine Regulated Lipid Metabolism in the Presence of C75, Compound C, and TOFA in Breast Cancer Cell Line MCF-7

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Wen; Zhong, Zhangfeng; Wang, Shengpeng; Suo, Zhanwei; Yang, Xian; Hu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yitao

    2015-01-01

    Berberine interfering with cancer reprogramming metabolism was confirmed in our previous study. Lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were also the core parts in reprogramming metabolism. In the presence of some energy-related inhibitors, including C75, compound C, and TOFA, the discrete roles of berberine in lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function were elucidated. An altered lipid metabolism induced by berberine was observed under the inhibition of FASN, AMPK, and ACC in breast cancer cell MCF-7. And the reversion of berberine-induced lipid suppression indicated that ACC inhibition might be involved in that process instead of FASN inhibition. A robust apoptosis induced by berberine even under the inhibition of AMPK and lipid synthesis was also indicated. Finally, mitochondrial function regulation under the inhibition of AMPK and ACC might be in an ACL-independent manner. Undoubtedly, the detailed mechanisms of berberine interfering with lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function combined with energy-related inhibitors need further investigation, including the potential compensatory mechanisms for ATP production and the upregulation of ACL. PMID:26351511

  6. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Young, Carolyn A.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S.; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  7. Genetics, genomics and evolution of ergot alkaloid diversity.

    PubMed

    Young, Carolyn A; Schardl, Christopher L; Panaccione, Daniel G; Florea, Simona; Takach, Johanna E; Charlton, Nikki D; Moore, Neil; Webb, Jennifer S; Jaromczyk, Jolanta

    2015-04-01

    The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary) metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization). The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine. PMID:25875294

  8. Anticholinesterase inhibitory activity of quaternary alkaloids from Tinospora crispa.

    PubMed

    Yusoff, Mashitah; Hamid, Hazrulrizawati; Houghton, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary alkaloids are the major alkaloids isolated from Tinospora species. A previous study pointed to the necessary presence of quaternary nitrogens for strong acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in such alkaloids. Repeated column chromatography of the vine of Tinospora crispa extract led to the isolation of one new protoberberine alkaloid, 4,13-dihydroxy-2,8,9-trimethoxydibenzo[a,g]quinolizinium (1), along with six known alkaloids-dihydrodiscretamine (2), columbamine (3), magnoflorine (4), N-formylannonaine (5), N-formylnornuciferine (6), and N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7). The seven compounds were isolated and structurally elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Two known alkaloids, namely, dihydrodiscretamine and columbamine are reported for the first time for this plant. The compounds were tested for AChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's method. In the AChE inhibition assay, only columbamine (3) showed strong activity with IC50 48.1 µM. The structure-activity relationships derived from these results suggest that the quaternary nitrogen in the skeleton has some effect, but that a high degree of methoxylation is more important for acetylcholinesterase inhibition. PMID:24448061

  9. Alkaloids of Thalictrum XXVII. New hypotensive aporphine-benzylisoquinoline derived dimeric alkaloids from Thalictrum minus race B.

    PubMed

    Liao, W T; Beal, J L; Wu, W N; Doskotch, R W

    1978-01-01

    The roots of T. minus race B have yielded, in addition to adiantifoline (1) previously isolated from this source, two new related alkaloids, thaliadine (2) and thaliadanine (5). Both were assigned complete structures by spectral methods and by chemical interconversion to adiantifoline or its product. O-Desmethyladiantifoline should have structure 14, rather than the previously reported 5. All three isolated alkaloids show hypotensive activity in rabbits, and thaliadanine (5) has antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis. PMID:672464

  10. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Bioprotective Alkaloids in the Gramineae Endophytic Fungi with Implications for Herbivores Deterrents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Xie, Longxiang; Zeng, Jie; Xie, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Four kinds of bioprotective alkaloids-peramine, loline, ergot alkaloid, indole-diterpenes, produced by grass-fungal endophyte symbioses, are deterrents or toxic to vertebrate and invertebrate herbivores. Ergot alkaloids have pharmacological properties and widely are used clinically. The regulation of alkaloids biosynthesis is under intensive study to improve the yield for better agricultural and medicinal application. In this paper, we summarize the structure, related genes, regulation, and toxicity of alkaloids. We focus on the biosynthesis and the regulation network of alkaloids. PMID:26349576

  11. Astonishing diversity of natural surfactants: 6. Biologically active marine and terrestrial alkaloid glycosides.

    PubMed

    Dembitsky, Valery M

    2005-11-01

    This review article presents 209 alkaloid glycosides isolated and identified from plants, microorganisms, and marine invertebrates that demonstrate different biological activities. They are of great interest, especially for the medicinal and/or pharmaceutical industries. These biologically active glycosides have good potential for future chemical preparation of compounds useful as antioxidants, anticancer, antimicrobial, and antibacterial agents. These glycosidic compounds have been subdivided into several groups, including: acridone; aporphine; benzoxazinoid; ergot; indole; enediyne alkaloidal antibiotics; glycosidic lupine alkaloids; piperidine, pyridine, pyrrolidine, and pyrrolizidine alkaloid glycosides; glycosidic quinoline and isoquinoline alkaloids; steroidal glycoalkaloids; and miscellaneous alkaloid glycosides. PMID:16459921

  12. Effect of ion-pair formation with bile salts on the in vitro cellular transport of berberine.

    PubMed

    Chae, Hye-Won; Kim, In-Wha; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ion-pair complexation with endogenous bile salts on the transport of a quarternary ammonium organic cationic (OC) drug, berberine, across the Caco-2 and LLC-PK1 cell monolayers. The basolateral-to-apical (BL-AP) transport of berberine in Caco-2 cells was temperature dependent and 10-fold higher than that of the apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) transport. Similar results were observed for the transport of berberine across the LLC-PK1 cells. Moreover, the BL-AP transport in the Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced by the cis-presence of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors such as cyclosporine A, verapamil, and digoxin. These results suggest that an efflux transporter, probably P-gp, is involved in the Caco-2 cell transport. The Km and Vmax values for the carrier-mediated transport were estimated to be 83.4 mM and 7640 pmole/h/cm2, respectively. The apparent partition coefficient (APC) of berberine between n-octanol and a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) was increased by the presence of an organic anion (OA), taurodeoxycholate (TDC, a bile salt), suggesting the formation of a lipophilic ion-pair complex between an OC (berberine) and an OA (TDC). Despite the ion-pair complexation, however, the BL-AP transport of berberine across the Caco-2 and LLC-PK1 cells was not altered by the cis-presence of bile salts or the rat bile juice. This is consistent with the reportedly unaltered secretory transport of a quarternary ammonium compound, tributylmethylammonium (TBuMA), across the Caco-2 cell monolayers in the cis-presence of bile salts or the rat bile juice, but not with our previous report in which the secretory transport of TBuMA across the LLC-PK1 cell was increased in the cis-presence of TDC. Therefore, the effect of ion-pair formation with the bile components or bile salts on the secretory transport of OCs appears to depend on the molecular properties of OCs (e.g., molecular weight, lipophilicity and affinity to relevant

  13. Accumulation of ergot alkaloids during conidiophore development in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mulinti, Prashanthi; Allen, Natalie A; Coyle, Christine M; Gravelat, Fabrice N; Sheppard, Donald C; Panaccione, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Production of ergot alkaloids in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus is restricted to conidiating cultures. These cultures typically accumulate several pathway intermediates at concentrations comparable to that of the pathway end product. We investigated the contribution of different cell types that constitute the multicellular conidiophore of A. fumigatus to the production of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus the pathway end product, fumigaclavine C. A relatively minor share (11 %) of the ergot alkaloid yield on a molar basis was secreted into the medium, whereas the remainder was associated with the conidiating colonies. Entire conidiating cultures (containing hyphae, vesicle of conidiophore, phialides of conidiophore, and conidia) accumulated higher levels of the pathway intermediate festuclavine and lower levels of the pathway end product fumigaclavine C than did isolated, abscised conidia, indicating that conidiophores and/or hyphae have a quantitatively different ergot alkaloid profile compared to that of conidia. Differences in alkaloid accumulation among cell types also were indicated by studies with conidiophore development mutants. A ∆medA mutant, in which conidiophores are numerous but develop poorly, accumulated higher levels of pathway intermediates than did the wildtype or a complemented ∆medA mutant. A ∆stuA mutant, which grows mainly as hyphae and produces very few, abnormal conidiophores, produced no detectable ergot alkaloids. The data indicated heterogeneous spatial distribution of ergot alkaloid pathway intermediates versus pathway end product in conidiating cultures of A. fumigatus. This skewed distribution may reflect differences in abundance or activity of pathway enzymes among cell types of those conidiating cultures. PMID:23925951

  14. Alkaloids and athlete immune function: caffeine, theophylline, gingerol, ephedrine, and their congeners.

    PubMed

    Senchina, David S; Hallam, Justus E; Kohut, Marian L; Nguyen, Norah A; Perera, M Ann d N

    2014-01-01

    Plant alkaloids are found in foods, beverages, and supplements consumed by athletes for daily nutrition, performance enhancement, and immune function improvement. This paper examined possible immunomodulatory roles of alkaloids in exercise contexts, with a focus on human studies. Four representative groups were scrutinized: (a) caffeine (guaranine, mateine); (b) theophylline and its isomers, theobromine and paraxanthine; (c) ginger alkaloids including gingerols and shogaol; and (d) ephedra alkaloids such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. Emerging or prospective alkaloid sources (Goji berry, Noni berry, and bloodroot) were also considered. Human in vitro and in vivo studies on alkaloids and immune function were often conflicting. Caffeine may be immunomodulatory in vivo depending on subject characteristics, exercise characteristics, and immune parameters measured. Caffeine may exhibit antioxidant capacities. Ginger may exert in vivo anti-inflammatory effects in certain populations, but it is unclear whether these effects are due to alkaloids or other biochemicals. Evidence for an immunomodulatory role of alkaloids in energy drinks, cocoa, or ephedra products in vivo is weak to nonexistent. For alkaloid sources derived from plants, variability in the reviewed studies may be due to the presence of unrecognized alkaloids or non-alkaloid compounds (which may themselves be immunomodulatory), and pre-experimental factors such as agricultural or manufacturing differences. Athletes should not look to alkaloids or alkaloid-rich sources as a means of improving immune function given their inconsistent activities, safety concerns, and lack of commercial regulation. PMID:24974722

  15. Biogenic gold nanoparticles as fotillas to fire berberine hydrochloride using folic acid as molecular road map.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sunil; Mewada, Ashmi; Thakur, Mukeshchand; Shah, Ritu; Oza, Goldie; Sharon, Madhuri

    2013-10-01

    Use of biologically modified gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as molecular vehicle to ferry potential anti-cancer drug berberine hydrochloride (BHC) using folic acid (FA) as targeting molecule is reported in this work. A tropical fruit peel, Trapa bispinosa is used to fabricate highly monodispersed GNPs, passivated with essential functional groups which were used as linkers to attach FA and BHC via amide linkage. Flocculation Parameter (FP) of biologically synthesized GNPs was calculated under different salt concentrations which were found to be very ideal under a physiological condition. Various statistical models were used to find drug release profile out of which Higuchi was found to be the most ideal. GNP-FA-BHC complexes were found to be active against folic acid expressing HeLa cells. PMID:23910269

  16. Characterization of the transient species generated by the photoionization of Berberine: A laser flash photolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ling-Li; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Hui; Li, Kun; Zhu, Rong-Rong; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Yao, Si-De; Wu, Qing-Sheng; Wang, Shi-Long

    2009-09-01

    Using 266 nm laser flash photolysis it has been demonstrated that Berberine (BBR) in aqueous solution is ionized via a mono-photonic process giving a hydrated electron, anion radical that formed by hydrated electron react with steady state of BBR, and neutral radical that formed from rapid deprotonation of the radical cation of BBR. The quantum yield of photoionization is determined to be 0.03 at room temperature with KI solution used as a reference. Furthermore utilizing pH changing method and the SO 4rad - radical oxidation method, the assignment of radical cation of BBR was further confirmed, the p Ka value of it was calculated, and the related set up rate constant was also determined.

  17. The effect of berberine hydrochloride on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm formation and dispersion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihua; Bu, Qianqian; Xu, Huan; Liu, Yuan; She, Pengfei; Tan, Ruichen; Wu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) is one of the major causes of biofilm infections. Berberine hydrochloride (BBH) has diverse pharmacological effects; however, the effects and mechanisms of BBH on E. faecalis biofilm formation and dispersion have not been reported. In this study, 99 clinical isolates from the urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) were collected and identified. Ten strains of E. faecalis with biofilm formation ability were studied. BBH inhibited E. faecalis biofilm formation and promoted the biofilm dispersion of E. faecalis. In addition, sortase A and esp expression levels were elevated during early E. faecalis biofilm development, whereas BBH significantly reduced their expression levels. The results of this study indicated that BBH effectively prevents biofilm formation and promotes biofilm dispersion in E. faecalis, most likely by inhibiting the expressions of sortase A and esp. PMID:27242142

  18. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J J

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  19. Synthesis of Morphinan Alkaloids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Elena; Narcross, Lauren; Ekins, Andrew; Falgueyret, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Vincent J. J.

    2015-01-01

    Morphinan alkaloids are the most powerful narcotic analgesics currently used to treat moderate to severe and chronic pain. The feasibility of morphinan synthesis in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae starting from the precursor (R,S)-norlaudanosoline was investigated. Chiral analysis of the reticuline produced by the expression of opium poppy methyltransferases showed strict enantioselectivity for (S)-reticuline starting from (R,S)-norlaudanosoline. In addition, the P. somniferum enzymes salutaridine synthase (PsSAS), salutaridine reductase (PsSAR) and salutaridinol acetyltransferase (PsSAT) were functionally co-expressed in S. cerevisiae and optimization of the pH conditions allowed for productive spontaneous rearrangement of salutaridinol-7-O-acetate and synthesis of thebaine from (R)-reticuline. Finally, we reconstituted a 7-gene pathway for the production of codeine and morphine from (R)-reticuline. Yeast cell feeding assays using (R)-reticuline, salutaridine or codeine as substrates showed that all enzymes were functionally co-expressed in yeast and that activity of salutaridine reductase and codeine-O-demethylase likely limit flux to morphine synthesis. The results of this study describe a significant advance for the synthesis of morphinans in S. cerevisiae and pave the way for their complete synthesis in recombinant microbes. PMID:25905794

  20. Berberine treatment attenuates the palmitate-mediated inhibition of glucose uptake and consumption through increased 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol synthesis and accumulation in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wenguang; Chen, Li; Hatch, Grant M

    2016-04-01

    Dysfunction of lipid metabolism and accumulation of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (DAG) may be a key factor in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Berberine (BBR) is an isoquinoline alkaloid extract that has shown promise as a hypoglycemic agent in the management of diabetes in animal and human studies. However, its mechanism of action is not well understood. To determine the effect of BBR on lipid synthesis and its relationship to insulin resistance in H9c2 cardiomyocytes, we measured neutral lipid and phospholipid synthesis and their relationship to glucose uptake. Compared with controls, BBR treatment stimulated 2-[1,2-(3)H(N)]deoxy-D-glucose uptake and consumption in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells. The mechanism was though an increase in protein kinase B (AKT) activity and GLUT-4 glucose transporter expression. DAG accumulated in palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells and treatment with BBR reduced this DAG accumulation and increased accumulation of 1,2,3-triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) compared to controls. Treatment of palmitate-mediated insulin resistant H9c2 cells with BBR increased [1,3-(3)H]glycerol and [1-(14)C]glucose incorporation into TAG and reduced their incorporation into DAG compared to control. In addition, BBR treatment of these cells increased [1-(14)C]palmitic acid incorporation into TAG and decreased its incorporation into DAG compared to controls. BBR treatment did not alter phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis. The mechanism for the BBR-mediated decreased precursor incorporation into DAG and increased incorporation into TAG in palmitate-incubated cells was an increase in DAG acyltransferase-2 activity and its expression and a decrease in TAG hydrolysis. Thus, BBR treatment attenuates palmitate-induced reduction in glucose uptake and consumption, in part, through reduction in cellular DAG levels and accumulation of TAG in H9c2 cells. PMID:26774040

  1. Fe3O4@p-Naphtholbenzein as a novel nano-sorbent for highly effective removal and recovery of Berberine: Response surface methodology for optimization of ultrasound assisted dispersive magnetic solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Aghaie, Ali B G; Hadjmohammadi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-08-15

    A hydrophobic surface modified iron oxide magnetic nano-sorbent was successfully synthesized, characterized and utilized for highly effective removal and recovery of Berberine (Brb) by Ultrasound Assisted Dispersive Magnetic Solid Phase Extraction (UADM-SPE). Fabrication of p-Naphtholbenzein-coated magnetic nanoparticles (PNB-MNPs) was certified by characteristic analyses such as: Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characterized PNB-MNPs were utilized to develop a UADM-SPE method for Brb, a well-known isoquinoline alkaloid with a highlighted chemical skeleton for designing selective and powerful bioactive molecules. Affecting parameters on the extraction of Brb were optimized through an orthogonal rotatable central composite design (CCD). The optimum condition is obtained when the variables are set to: pH=4, amount of MNPs=20mg, sample volume=30ml, sonication time=1min at room temperature, and desorbing solvent=500µL of methanol. Under the mentioned condition, an extraction recovery of 98.2%, with relative standard deviation of 3.7%, was obtained via five replicated measurements on a 0.1mgL(-1) Brb standard solution. Finally, the method was successfully applied for determination of Brb in human plasma and urine samples. Regarding the method calibration graphs in plasma and urine matrices, spiked in the range of 0.01-200.00µgL(-1), pre-concentration factors of 134 and 122, method detection limit (MDL) of 0.17 and 0.19µgL(-1), and lower limit of quantification of 0.57 and 0.63µgL(-1) were obtained for plasma and urine samples, respectively. The method exhibits good potentials to be a fast, efficient and reliable method for determination of Brb in human biological samples. PMID:27260430

  2. Two-stage culture for producing berberine by cell suspension and shoot cultures of Berberis buxifolia Lam.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, María A; Eraso, Natalia Fernandez; Pitta-Alvarez, Sandra I; Marconi, Patricia L

    2009-03-01

    In vitro cultures of Berberis buxifolia were established using thidiazuron (4.5, 23 and 45 mM) or picloram (4 and 40 mM) as plant growth regulators for sustaining growth. For producing berberine, a two-stage culture was performed. In the first step, thidiazuron or picloram were used for biomass production followed by the production stage where benzylaminopurine (4.4 mM) was added as a plant growth regulator. Berberine yields (102 mg g(-1) DW) and in vitro shoot cultures (200 mg g(-1) DW) were significantly lower than those of whole plants in the field (416 mg g(-1) DW). The highest productivity (0.18 mg 1(-1) day(-1)) was attained using picloram (either 4 on 40 mM) in the first stage for producing biomass. PMID:18979211

  3. Addition of Berberine to 5-Aminosalicylic Acid for Treatment of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Chronic Colitis in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-hong; Zhang, Man; Xiao, Hai-tao; Fu, Hai-bo; Ho, Alan; Lin, Cheng-yuan; Huang, Yu; Lin, Ge; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common chronic remitting disease but without satisfactory treatment. Alternative medicine berberine has received massive attention for its potential in UC treatment. Conventional therapies with the addition of berberine are becoming attractive as novel therapies in UC. In the present study, we investigated the preclinical activity of a conventional oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy plus berberine in experimental colitis. A subclinical dose of 5-ASA (200 mg/kg/day) alone or 5-ASA plus berberine (20 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 30 days to C57BL/6 mice with colitis induced by three cycles of 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). The disease severity, inflammatory responses, drug accumulation and potential toxicity of colitis mice were examined. The results showed that comparing to 5-ASA alone, 5-ASA plus berberine more potently ameliorated DSS-induced disease severity, colon shortening, and colon histological injury. Further, the up-regulation in mRNA level of colonic TNF-α as well as NFκB and JAK2 phosphorylation caused by DSS were more pronouncedly reversed in animals treated with the combination therapy than those treated with 5-ASA alone. Moreover, the addition of berberine to 5-ASA more significantly inhibited lymphocyte TNF-α secretion of DSS mice than 5-ASA alone. In the meanwhile, no extra drug accumulation or potential toxicity to major organs of colitis mice was observed with this combination treatment. In summary, our studies provide preclinical rationale for the addition of berberine to 5-ASA as a promising therapeutic strategy in clinic by reducing dose of standard therapy. PMID:26642326

  4. A Single Arm Pilot Study of Effects of Berberine on the Menstrual Pattern, Ovulation Rate, Hormonal and Metabolic Profiles in Anovulatory Chinese Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ping; Chen, Xiaoli; Wu, Xiaoke; Ng, Ernest Hung Yu; Yang, Dongzi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of berberine on the menstrual pattern, ovulation rate, hormonal and metabolic profiles in anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Methods Berberine 0.4 g three times per day was given for four months to 102 anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The menstrual pattern, ovulation rate, hormonal and metabolic profiles were compared before and after the berberine treatment. Ovulation was confirmed by serum progesterone level ≥10ng/ml. Results A total of 98 of 102 subjects (96.1%) completed the four month treatment, including 69 (70.4%, 69/98) normal weight and 29 (29.6%, 29/98) overweight/obese. Fourteen women (14.3%, 14/98) had regained regular menses after berberine treatment and there was no significant difference between normal weight and overweight/obese groups. The ovulation rate was 25.0% over four months in the whole group, 22.5% in the normal weight group and 31.0% in the overweight/obese group. Sex hormone binding globulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, total triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased after berberine treatment in the normal weight group only. Conclusions Our study found that administration of berberine alone may improve the menstrual pattern and ovulation rate in anovulatory Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Berberine can also decrease sex hormone binding globulin, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in normal weight polycystic ovary syndrome women. Trial Registration Chictr.org ChiCTR-OO-13003943 PMID:26645811

  5. Addition of Berberine to 5-Aminosalicylic Acid for Treatment of Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Chronic Colitis in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan-hong; Zhang, Man; Xiao, Hai-tao; Fu, Hai-bo; Ho, Alan; Lin, Cheng-yuan; Huang, Yu; Lin, Ge; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a common chronic remitting disease but without satisfactory treatment. Alternative medicine berberine has received massive attention for its potential in UC treatment. Conventional therapies with the addition of berberine are becoming attractive as novel therapies in UC. In the present study, we investigated the preclinical activity of a conventional oral 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) therapy plus berberine in experimental colitis. A subclinical dose of 5-ASA (200 mg/kg/day) alone or 5-ASA plus berberine (20 mg/kg/day) was orally administered for 30 days to C57BL/6 mice with colitis induced by three cycles of 2% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). The disease severity, inflammatory responses, drug accumulation and potential toxicity of colitis mice were examined. The results showed that comparing to 5-ASA alone, 5-ASA plus berberine more potently ameliorated DSS-induced disease severity, colon shortening, and colon histological injury. Further, the up-regulation in mRNA level of colonic TNF-α as well as NFκB and JAK2 phosphorylation caused by DSS were more pronouncedly reversed in animals treated with the combination therapy than those treated with 5-ASA alone. Moreover, the addition of berberine to 5-ASA more significantly inhibited lymphocyte TNF-α secretion of DSS mice than 5-ASA alone. In the meanwhile, no extra drug accumulation or potential toxicity to major organs of colitis mice was observed with this combination treatment. In summary, our studies provide preclinical rationale for the addition of berberine to 5-ASA as a promising therapeutic strategy in clinic by reducing dose of standard therapy. PMID:26642326

  6. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form π-π interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  7. Berberine inhibits androgen synthesis by interaction with aldo-keto reductase 1C3 in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuantong; Zhao, Lijing; Wang, Ye; Zhang, Haitao; Xu, Duo; Zhao, Xuejian; Li, Yi; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 has recently been regarded as a potential therapeutic target in castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Herein, we investigated whether berberine delayed the progression of castrate-resistant prostate cancer by reducing androgen synthesis through the inhibition of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. Cell viability and cellular testosterone content were measured in prostate cancer cells. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 mRNA and protein level were detected by RT-PCR and Western bolt analyses, respectively. Computer analysis with AutoDock Tools explored the molecular interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3. We found that berberine inhibited 22Rv1 cells proliferation and decreased cellular testosterone formation in a dose-dependent manner. Berberine inhibited Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity, rather than influenced mRNA and protein expressions. Molecular docking study demonstrated that berberine could enter the active center of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 and form p-p interaction with the amino-acid residue Phe306 and Phe311. In conclusion, the structural interaction of berberine with Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 is attributed to the suppression of Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3 enzyme activity and the inhibition of 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell growth by decreasing the intracellular androgen synthesis. Our result provides the experimental basis for the design, research, and development of AKR1C3 inhibitors using berberine as the lead compound. PMID:26698234

  8. Berberine suppresses MEK/ERK-dependent Egr-1 signaling pathway and inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell regrowth after in vitro mechanical injury

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kae-Woei; Ting, Chih-Tai; Yin, Sui-Chu; Chen, Ying-Tsung; Lin, Shing-Jong; Liao, James K.; Hsu, Shih-Lan

    2009-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and post-angioplasty restenosis. Berberine is a well-known component of the Chinese herb medicine Huanglian (Coptis chinensis), and is capable of inhibiting SMC contraction and proliferation, yet the exact mechanism is unknown. We therefore investigated the effect of berberine on SMC growth after mechanic injury in vitro. DNA synthesis and cell proliferation assay were performed to show that berberine inhibited serum-stimulated rat aortic SMC growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injury with sterile pipette tip stimulated the regrowth of SMCs. Treatment with berberine prevented the regrowth and migration of SMCs into the denuded trauma zone. Western blot analysis showed that activation of the MEK1/2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and up-regulation of early growth response gene (Egr-1), c-Fos and Cyclin D1 were observed sequentially after mechanic injury in vitro. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR assay further confirmed the increase of Egr-1, c-Fos, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and Cyclin D1 expression in a transcriptional level. However, berberine significantly attenuated MEK/ERK activation and downstream target (Egr-1, c-Fos, Cyclin D1 and PDGF-A) expression after mechanic injury in vitro. Our study showed that berberine blocked injury-induced SMC regrowth by inactivation of ERK/Egr-1 signaling pathway thereby preventing early signaling induced by injury in vitro. The anti-proliferative properties of berberine may be useful in treating disorders due to inappropriate SMC growth. PMID:16448624

  9. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent and sustained contractile response in several different vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this contractile response differently. The objective wa...

  10. Bovine lateral saphenous veins exposed to ergopeptine alkaloids do not relax

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ergot alkaloid, ergovaline has demonstrated a persistent binding and sustained contractile response in several vascular models. It was hypothesized that different alkaloids isolated from tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) will contribute to this response differently. The objective was to compare ...

  11. Alkaloids of the Annonaceae: occurrence and a compilation of their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Lúcio, Ana Silvia Suassuna Carneiro; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva; Da-Cunha, Emídio Vasconcelos Leitão; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa Filho, Jos Maria

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of the chemistry and pharmacology of the alkaloids found in species of the Annonaceae family. The occurrence of alkaloids from Annonaceae species, as well as their chemical structures and pharmacological activities are summarized in informative and easy-to-understand tables. Within the Annonaceae family, the genera Annona, Duguetia, and Guatteria have led to many important publications. Valuable and comprehensive information about the structure of these alkaloids is provided. The alkaloids of the aporphine type represent the predominant group in this family. Many of the isolated alkaloids exhibit unique structures. In addition to the chemical structures, the pharmacological activities of some alkaloids are also presented in this chapter. Thus, the leishmanicidal, antimicrobial, antitumor, cytotoxic, and antimalarial activities observed for these alkaloids are highlighted. The chapter is presented as a contribution for the scientific community, mainly to enable the search for alkaloids in species belonging to the Annonaceae family. PMID:25845063

  12. The physiological effects and toxicokinetics of tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) alkaloids in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Norditerpenoid alkaloids of larkspur (Delphinium spp.) have a range of pharmacological and physiological properties. For example, the norditerpenoid alkaloid methyllycaconitine (MLA) can act as competitive antagonist at nicotinic cholinergic receptors. In this study, both dose-response and toxicok...

  13. Micelle assisted structural conversion with fluorescence modulation of benzophenanthridine alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Haque, Lucy; Tiwari, Richa; Das, Suman

    2017-01-01

    In this study we have reported the anionic surfactant (Sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) driven structural conversion of two benzophenanthridine plant alkaloids namely Chelerythrine (herein after CHL) and Sanguinarine (herein after SANG). Both the alkaloids exist in two forms: the charged iminium and the neutral alkanolamine form. The iminium form is stable at low pH (<6.5) and the alkanolamine form exists at higher pH (>10.1). The fluorescence intensity of the alkanolamine form is much stronger than the iminium form. The iminium form of both the alkaloids remains stable whereas the alkanolamine form gets converted to the iminium form in the SDS micelle environment. The iminium form possesses positive charge and it seems that electrostatic interaction between the positively charged iminium and negatively charged surfactant leads to the stabilization of the iminium form in the Stern layer of the anionic micelle. Whereas the conversion of the alkanolamine form into the iminium form takes place and that can be monitored in naked eye since the iminium form is orange in colour and the alkanolamine form has blue violet emission. Such a detail insight about the photophysical properties of the benzophenanthridine alkaloids would be a valuable addition in the field of alkaloid-surfactant interaction. PMID:27419642

  14. [Alkaloids of Vinca rosea L. introduced to Western Georgia].

    PubMed

    Vachnadze, N S; Kintsurashvili, L G; Suladze, T Sh; Bakuridze, A D; Vachnadze, V Iu

    2013-11-01

    Vinca roseae L. (Саtharanthus rosea (L.) G. Don) was introduced at Kobuleti experimental station of medical plants. The object of investigation was the plant material of Vinca roseae L. collected in May, 2005., September, 2006 and October, 2009. Total alkaloids were obtained in accordance with Atta- ur-Rachman method. The variability of the quantitative and qualitative composition of total alkaloids and vincaleikoblastin (VLB) fraction during vegetation was studied. It was established that the maximal content of total alkaloids and VLB fraction of Vinca roseae L. is accumulated in the phase of secondary flowering, hence the collecting of a plant material is recommended to be made during the aforesaid vegetation phase as for this period it is a rather high output of a raw material, alkaloid complex and VLB faction. Alkaloids vinkaleikoblastin, ajmalicine and new epimer tetrahydroalstonine with С3Н-α- orientation were yielded, separated and identified using modern physical-chemical and spectral methods (13С NMR). PMID:24323972

  15. Geographic distribution of three alkaloid chemotypes of Croton lechleri.

    PubMed

    Milanowski, Dennis J; Winter, Rudolph E K; Elvin-Lewis, Memory P F; Lewis, Walter H

    2002-06-01

    Three known alkaloids, isoboldine (2), norisoboldine (1), and magnoflorine (8), have been isolated for the first time from Croton lechleri, a source of the wound healing latex "sangre de grado". An HPLC system was developed, and a large number of latex and leaf samples of C. lechleri from 22 sites in northern Peru and Ecuador were analyzed to gain an understanding of the natural variation in alkaloid content for the species. Up to six alkaloids were found to occur in the leaves including, in addition to those listed above, thaliporphine (3), glaucine (4), and taspine (9), whereas the latex contained only 9. Taspine (9) is the component that has been previously found to be responsible for the wound healing activity of C. lechleri latex, and its mean concentration throughout the range examined was found to be 9% of the latex by dry weight. In addition, three chemotypes are defined based on the alkaloid content of the leaves, and the geographic distribution of these chemotypes is discussed along with a quantitative analysis of the alkaloid content as a function of chemotype. PMID:12088421

  16. 6,7-diepicastanospermine, a tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid inhibitor of amyloglucosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Molyneux, R.J.; Benson, M. ); Pan, Y.T.; Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Elbein, A.D. )

    1991-10-15

    A tetrahydroxyindolizidine alkaloid, 6,7-diepicastanospermine, was isolated from the seeds of Castanospermum australe by extraction with methanol and purified to homogeneity using ion-exchange, preparative thin-layer, and radial chromatography. A very low yield of a pyrrolidine alkaloid, N-(hydroxyethyl)-2-(hydroxymethyl)-3-hydroxypyrrolidine, was also obtained by analogous methods. The purity of both alkaloids was established by gas chromatography of their trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives as better than 99%. The molecular weight of each alkaloid was established as 189 and 161, respectively, by mass spectrometry, and the structure of each was deduced from their {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectra. The structure of the pyrrolidine alkaloids which co-occur in C. australe. 6,7-Diepicastanospermine was found to be a moderately good inhibitor of the fungal {alpha}-glucosidase, amyloglucosidase and a relatively weak inhibitor of {beta}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}-glucosidase. It failed to inhibit {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}-L-fucosidase. Comparison of its inhibitory activity toward amyloglucosidase with those of its isomers, castanospermine and 6-epicastanospermine, demonstrated that epimerization of a single hydroxyl group can produce significant alteration of such inhibitory properties.

  17. Post-genome research on the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Ming; Unsöld, Inge A

    2006-10-01

    Genome sequencing provides new opportunities and challenges for identifying genes for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. A putative biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C, an ergot alkaloid of the clavine type, was identified in the genome sequence of ASPERGILLUS FUMIGATUS by a bioinformatic approach. This cluster spans 22 kb of genomic DNA and comprises at least 11 open reading frames (ORFs). Seven of them are orthologous to genes from the biosynthetic gene cluster of ergot alkaloids in CLAVICEPS PURPUREA. Experimental evidence of the identified cluster was provided by heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of two ORFs, FgaPT1 and FgaPT2, in the cluster of A. FUMIGATUS, which show remarkable similarities to dimethylallyltryptophan synthase from C. PURPUREA and function as prenyltransferases. FgaPT2 converts L-tryptophan to dimethylallyltryptophan and thereby catalyzes the first step of ergot alkaloid biosynthesis, whilst FgaPT1 catalyzes the last step of the fumigaclavine C biosynthesis, i. e., the prenylation of fumigaclavine A at C-2 position of the indole nucleus. In addition to information obtained from the gene cluster of ergot alkaloids from C. PURPUREA, the identification of the biosynthetic gene cluster of fumigaclavine C in A. FUMIGATUS opens an alternative way to study the biosynthesis of ergot alkaloids in fungi. PMID:16902860

  18. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  19. Claviceps nigricans and Claviceps grohii: their alkaloids and phylogenetic placement.

    PubMed

    Pazoutová, Sylvie; Olsovská, Jana; Sulc, Miroslav; Chudícková, Milada; Flieger, Miroslav

    2008-06-01

    Claviceps purpurea, C. grohii, C. zizaniae, C. cyperi, and C. nigricans are closely related ergot fungi and form a monophyletic clade inside the genus Claviceps. Analysis of alkaloid content in C. nigricans sclerotia using UPLC detected ergocristine (1), ergosine (2), alpha-ergocryptine (3), and ergocristam (4). Alkaloids 1, 3, and 4 were found in the sclerotia of C. grohii. The content of 4 in the mixture of alkaloids from C. nigricans and C. grohii (over 8% and over 20%, respectively) was unusually high. Submerged shaken cultures of C. nigricans produced no alkaloids, whereas C. grohii culture formed small amounts (15 mg L (-1)) of extracellular clavines and 1. In the previously used HPLC method the ergocristam degradation product could have been obscured by the ergosine peak. Therefore sclerotia of a C. purpurea habitat-specific population G2 with the dominant production of 1 and 2 have been reanalyzed, but no 4 was detected. The phylogeny of the C. purpurea-related species group is discussed with regard to alkaloid-specific nonribosomal peptide synthetase duplication leading to the production of two main ergopeptines instead of a single product. PMID:18461998

  20. [Determination of berberine hydrochloride in traditional Chinese medicines containing Coptis chinensis Franch by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Guo, P; Li, Z; Hong, Z; Liu, S; Wu, T

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports a reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography method to determine berberine hydrochloride in Coptis chinensis Franch and in the traditional Chinese medicine containing Coptis chinensis Franch. The result shows that the mobile phase of 0.4mol/L ammonium nitratemethanol (52:48) can give a satisfactory separation. The extraction of sample with 1% H2SO4 solution using the ultrasonic vibration method is simple and easy to operate. PMID:1774045