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Sample records for alkane conversion chemistry

  1. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  2. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally stable solid metal oxides as the olefin-metathesis catalysts. Both the pincer complexes and the alkylidene complexes have been supported on alumina via adsorption through basic para-substituents. This process does not significantly affect catalyst activity, and in some cases it increases both the catalyst lifetime and the compatibility of the co-catalysts. These molecular catalysts are the first systems that effect alkane metathesis with molecular-weight selectivity, particularly for the conversion of C(n)n-alkanes to C(2n-2)n-alkanes plus ethane. This molecular-weight selectivity offers a critical advantage over the few previously reported alkane metathesis systems. We have studied the factors that determine molecular-weight selectivity in depth, including the isomerization of the olefinic intermediates and the regioselectivity of the pincer-iridium catalyst for dehydrogenation at the terminal position of the n-alkane. Our continuing work centers on the development of co-catalysts with improved interoperability, particularly olefin-metathesis catalysts that are more robust at high temperature and dehydrogenation catalysts that are more active at low temperature. We are also designing dehydrogenation catalysts based on metals other than iridium. Our ongoing mechanistic studies are focused on the apparently complex combination of factors that determine molecular-weight selectivity. PMID:22584036

  3. OXIDATION OF ALKANES WITH AIR USING IRON AND MANGANESE CATALYSTS. AN OVERALL GREEN CHEMISTRY APPROACH INCLUDING THE USE OF ALTERNATIVE SOLVENT SYSTEMS GENERATED BY PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The selective oxidation of alkanes is an industrially important process that is often plagued by low conversions and the formation of unwanted by-products. Research being conducted at the USEPA, implements a Green chemistry approach which is utilized to improve these difficult o...

  4. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  5. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  7. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

  8. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 3. Topical report, January 1990--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in the first simple, economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to an alcohol-rich oxygenated product which can either be used as an environmentally friendly, high-performance liquid fuel, or a precursor to a liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. The authors have entered the proof-of-concept stage for converting isobutane to tert butyl alcohol in a practical process and are preparing to enter proof-of-concept of a propane to isopropyl alcohol process in the near future. Methane and ethane are more refractory and thus more difficult to oxidize than the C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons. Nonetheless, advances made in this area indicate that further research progress could achieve the goal of their direct conversion to alcohols. Progress in Phase 3 catalytic vapor phase methane and ethane oxidation over metals in regular oxidic lattices are the subject of this topical report.

  10. Highly selective catalytic conversion of phenolic bio-oil to alkanes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Kou, Yuan; Lemonidou, Angeliki A; Li, Xuebing; Lercher, Johannes A

    2009-01-01

    Oil and water: A new energy-efficient and atom-economical catalytic route for the production of alkanes and methanol by upgrading the phenolic fraction of bio-oil has been developed. The one-pot aqueous-phase hydrodeoxygenation process is based on two catalysts facilitating consecutive hydrogenation, hydrolysis, and dehydration reactions. PMID:19405059

  11. Experimental investigation of the atmospheric chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons and long-chain alkanes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R.; Arey, J.; Tuazon, E.C.; Aschmann, S.M.; Bridier, I.

    1994-08-01

    The interaction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and oxides of nitrogen in the presence of sunlight leads to the formation of ozone and other manifestations of photochemical air pollution. There are, however, significant uncertainties in our knowledge of the products and mechanisms of the atmospheric reactions of alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons, important constituents of ambient air in urban areas, with the hydroxyl (OH) radical. A series of product studies of the OH radical-initiated reactions of selected alkanes, ketones and alcohols have been carried out to obtain further insights into alkoxy radical isomerization. Product studies of the OH radical reaction with 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanone, 2,4-dimethyl-2-pentanol and 3,5-dimethyl-3-hexanol in the presence of NOx have provided unambiguous evidence for alkoxy radical isomerization and these studies have provided rate constant ratios for the isomerization reaction versus alkoxy radical decomposition and reaction with O2.

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Final report, January 1, 1990--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement (Phase I-III), we uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of fight alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of fight hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane>propane>ethane>methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase V). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases IV, VI), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases VII through IX). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phases V and VI so that further work is not anticipated. We made excellent progress during 1994 in generating a class of less costly new materials which have the potential for high catalytic activity. New routes were developed for replacing costly perfluorophenyl groups in the meso-position of metalloporphyrin catalysts with far less expensive and lower molecular weight perfluoromethyl groups.

  13. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  14. An Acid-Base Chemistry Example: Conversion of Nicotine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, John H.

    1999-10-01

    The current government interest in nicotine conversion by cigarette companies provides an example of acid-base chemistry that can be explained to students in the second semester of general chemistry. In particular, the conversion by ammonia of the +1 form of nicotine to the easier-to-assimilate free-base form illustrates the effect of pH on acid-base equilibrium. The part played by ammonia in tobacco smoke is analogous to what takes place when cocaine is "free-based".

  15. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage -- Phase 6. Final report, February 1--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement, the authors uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of light alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of light hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane > propane > ethane > methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of-concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase 5). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases 4, 6), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases 7 through 9). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phase 5 and 6 so that further work is not anticipated. 72 refs.

  17. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage - Phase IV. Topical report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report details the research performed on Phase IV of the extended Cooperative Agreement. This Phase, entitled C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} Research, provides the research support which accompanies the C{sub 4} Proof-of-Concept Phase (Phase V) as the two major activities of the Cooperative Agreement during calendar 1993. It is the objective of this phase to understand the nature of the catalysts and catalytic activity of perhaloporphyrin complexes uncovered during Phases I-III in order that superior catalytic materials can be made and tested which meet commercial criteria for the oxidation of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} light alkane gases found in natural gas and other available hydrocarbon streams. During Phase IV, we have examined the physical and electronic structures of the very active perhaloporphyrin catalysts which we have developed, and have gained an understanding of the properties which make them active. This has led us to design and synthesize materials which are cheaper, more active, more robust and, in general superior for carrying out practical catalysis. Our early generation perhaloporphyrin catalysts, while exhibiting unprecedented catalytic activity, were far too expensive for use in converting natural gas or its C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} components.

  18. Role of ozone in SOA formation from alkane photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; Coggon, M. M.; Loza, C. L.; Schilling, K. A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    Long-chain alkanes, which can be categorized as intermediate volatile organic compounds (IVOCs), are an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Mechanisms for the gas-phase OH-initiated oxidation of long-chain alkanes have been well documented; particle-phase chemistry, however, has received less attention. The ?-hydroxycarbonyl, which is generated from the isomerization of alkoxy radicals, can undergo heterogeneous cyclization to form substituted dihydrofuran. Due to the presence of C=C bonds, the substituted dihydrofuran is predicted to be highly reactive with OH, and even more so with O3 and NO3, thus opening a reaction pathway that is not usually accessible to alkanes. This work focuses on the role of substituted dihydrofuran formation and its subsequent reaction with OH, and more importantly ozone, in SOA formation from the photooxidation of long-chain alkanes. Experiments were carried out in the Caltech Environmental Chamber using dodecane as a representative alkane to investigate the difference in aerosol composition generated from "OH-oxidation dominating" vs. "ozonolysis dominating" environments. A detailed mechanism incorporating the specific gas-phase photochemistry, together with the heterogeneous formation of substituted dihydrofuran and its subsequent gas-phase OH/O3 oxidation, is presented to evaluate the importance of this reaction channel in the dodecane SOA formation. We conclude that: (1) the formation of ?-hydroxycarbonyl and its subsequent heterogeneous conversion to substituted dihydrofuran is significant in the presence of NOx; (2) the ozonolysis of substituted dihydrofuran dominates over the OH-initiated oxidation under conditions prevalent in urban and rural air; and (3) a spectrum of highly-oxygenated products with carboxylic acid, ester, and ether functional groups are produced from the substituted dihydrofuran chemistry, thereby affecting the average oxidation state of the SOA.

  19. Role of ozone in SOA formation from alkane photooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; Coggon, M. M.; Loza, C. L.; Schilling, K. A.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-02-01

    Long-chain alkanes, which can be categorized as intermediate volatility organic compounds, are an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Mechanisms for the gas-phase OH-initiated oxidation of long-chain alkanes have been well documented; particle-phase chemistry, however, has received less attention. The ?-hydroxycarbonyl, which is generated from the isomerization of alkoxy radicals, can undergo heterogeneous cyclization and dehydration to form substituted dihydrofuran. Due to the presence of C=C bonds, the substituted dihydrofuran is predicted to be highly reactive with OH, and even more so with O3 and NO3, thereby opening a reaction pathway that is not usually accessible to alkanes. This work focuses on the role of substituted dihydrofuran formation and its subsequent reaction with OH, and more importantly ozone, in SOA formation from the photooxidation of long-chain alkanes. Experiments were carried out in the Caltech Environmental Chamber using dodecane as a representative alkane to investigate the difference in aerosol composition generated from "OH-oxidation-dominating" vs. "ozonolysis-dominating" environments. A detailed mechanism incorporating the specific gas-phase photochemistry, together with the heterogeneous formation of substituted dihydrofuran and its subsequent gas-phase OH/O3 oxidation, is used to evaluate the importance of this reaction channel in dodecane SOA formation. We conclude that (1) the formation of ?-hydroxycarbonyl and its subsequent heterogeneous conversion to substituted dihydrofuran is significant in the presence of NOx; (2) the ozonolysis of substituted dihydrofuran dominates over the OH-initiated oxidation under conditions prevalent in urban and rural air; and (3) a spectrum of highly oxygenated products with carboxylic acid, ester, and ether functional groups are produced from the substituted dihydrofuran chemistry, thereby affecting the average oxidation state of the SOA.

  20. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal centers are adequately separated by the linking molecules and constitute promising candiates for heterogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of metal-organic networks are highlighted in this Account. Experimental results like structure determination of the networks, charge and spin distribution in the metal centers, and catalytic mechanisms for electrochemical reactions are presented. In particular, we describe the activity of two networks for the oxygen reduction reaction in a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and electrochemical study. The similarities and differences of the networks compared to metallo-enzymes will be discussed, such as the metal surface that operates as a geometric template and concomitantly functions as an electron reservoir, and how this leads to a new class of bioinspired catalysts. The possibility to create functional two-dimensional coordination complexes at surfaces taking inspiration from nature opens up a new route for the design of potent nanocatalyst materials for energy conversion. PMID:26121410

  1. Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion, Indianapolis American Chemical Society Meetings, Fall 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2013-09-20

    The Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion at the Fall ACS Meeting in Indianapolis, IN (Sept. 8-12) featured the following sessions (approx. 6 speakers per session): (1) Quantum Dots and Nanorods for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (2) Artificial Photosynthesis: Water Oxidation; (3) Artificial Photosynthesis: Solar Fuels (2 half-day sessions); (4) Organic Solar Cells; (5) Novel Concepts for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (6) Emerging Techniques for Solar Energy Conversion; (7) Interfacial Electron Transfer

  2. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma-generated reactive species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than conventional thermochemical reactions, leading to non-equilibrium product distribution or creating unconventional reaction pathways. When non-thermal plasma is combined with catalysts, a synergistic effect is frequently observed. Such unique properties of non-thermal plasma are expected to contribute excellent control over process parameters that meet the need for energy saving, environment protection, and material preservation. This special issue consists of eleven peer-reviewed papers including two invited publications. Professors Alexander Fridman and Alexander Rabinovich from Drexel University, and Dr Gutsol from the Chevron Energy Technology Company present a critical review of various industry-oriented practical plasma fuel conversion processes. Professor Richard Mallinson from University of Oklahoma describes his recent project on E85 (85%-ethanol/15%-gasoline) upgrading using non-thermal plasma and catalyst hybrid reactor, and highlights the synergistic effect on fuel conversion processes. Other papers focus on plasma/catalyst hybrid reactions for methane dry (CO2) reforming, plasma synthesis of carbon suboxide polymer from CO, the gas-to-liquid (GTL) process using a non-thermal plasma-combined micro-chemical reactor, and molecular beam characterization of plasma-generated reactive species. Much research regarding plasma catalysis is ongoing worldwide, but there is plenty of room for further development of plasma fuel processing, which could eventually provide a viable and flexible solution in future energy and material use. Finally, we would like to thank all symposium participants for their active discussion. We appreciate the sponsorship of the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society. We express special thanks to the program chair of the Fuel Chemistry Division, Professor Chang-jun Liu at Tianjin University, for his dedication to the success of the symposium. We particularly express our appreciation to the Editorial Board of Journal

  3. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  4. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  5. Alkane oxidation catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Suld, G.; Langdale, W.A

    1989-02-07

    This invention involves HPA and POA catalyzed, selective oxidation of alkanes with oxygen in the liquid phase at relatively mild conditions (usually under 200/sup 0/C) to a product rich in alcohol and with little or no burn of alkane to carbon oxides. The HPAs and POAs are promoted with certain metals and/or with an azide and may possess certain other modifications from a conventional HPA or POA.

  6. Gas-to-Particle Conversion in Surface Discharge Nonthermal Plasmas and Its Implications for Atmospheric Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental data on gas-to-particle conversion of benzene using nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology and discusses the possibility of its technical application in atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol measurement using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) revealed that the parts of benzene molecules were converted into a nanometer-sized aerosol. Aerosol formation was found to be highly related with the missing part in carbon balance. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the aerosols formed in synthetic humid air are the collection of nanoparticles. The carbonyl band (C=O) was found to be an important chemical constituent in the aerosol. The potential of the NTP as an accelerated test tool in studying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from VOCs will be also addressed. PMID:22163781

  7. Gas-to-particle conversion in surface discharge nonthermal plasmas and its implications for atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental data on gas-to-particle conversion of benzene using nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology and discusses the possibility of its technical application in atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol measurement using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) revealed that the parts of benzene molecules were converted into a nanometer-sized aerosol. Aerosol formation was found to be highly related with the missing part in carbon balance. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the aerosols formed in synthetic humid air are the collection of nanoparticles. The carbonyl band (C=O) was found to be an important chemical constituent in the aerosol. The potential of the NTP as an accelerated test tool in studying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from VOCs will be also addressed. PMID:22163781

  8. Defect chemistry and defect engineering of TiO2-based semiconductors for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad Abdul; Bak, Tadeusz; Idris, Mohammad Asri; Ionescu, Mihail; Prince, Kathryn; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    This tutorial review considers defect chemistry of TiO2 and its solid solutions as well as defect-related properties associated with solar-to-chemical energy conversion, such as Fermi level, bandgap, charge transport and surface active sites. Defect disorder is discussed in terms of defect reactions and the related charge compensation. Defect equilibria are used in derivation of defect diagrams showing the effect of oxygen activity and temperature on the concentration of both ionic and electronic defects. These defect diagrams may be used for imposition of desired semiconducting properties that are needed to maximize the performance of TiO2-based photoelectrodes for the generation of solar hydrogen fuel using photo electrochemical cells (PECs) and photocatalysts for water purification. The performance of the TiO2-based semiconductors is considered in terms of the key performance-related properties (KPPs) that are defect related. It is shown that defect engineering may be applied for optimization of the KPPs in order to achieve optimum performance. PMID:26446476

  9. Drugs in the Chemistry Laboratory: The Conversion of Acetaminophen into Phenacetin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volker, Eugene J.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which acetaminophen is converted into phenacetin, that has been used at Shepherd College in an introductory chemistry course for nurses and in the organic chemistry laboratory. (BT)

  10. Towards a practical development of light-driven acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Weding, Nico; Julis, Jennifer; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2014-06-16

    The efficient catalytic dehydrogenation of alkanes to olefins is one of the most investigated reactions in organic synthesis. In the coming years, an increased supply of shorter-chain alkanes from natural and shale gas will offer new opportunities for inexpensive carbon feedstock through such dehydrogenation processes. Existing methods for alkane dehydrogenation using heterogeneous catalysts require harsh reaction conditions and have a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous catalysis methods result in significant waste generation. A strong need exists for atom-efficient alkane dehydrogenations on a useful scale. Herein, we have developed improved acceptorless catalytic systems under optimal light transmittance conditions using trans-[Rh(PMe3)2(CO)Cl] as the catalyst with different additives. Unprecedented catalyst turnover numbers are obtained for the dehydrogenation of cyclic and linear (from C4) alkanes and liquid organic hydrogen carriers. These reactions proceed with unique conversion, thereby providing a basis for practical alkane dehydrogenations. PMID:24829085

  11. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA); Bierl, Thomas W. (West Chester, PA)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  12. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  13. Organic Chemistry and the Native Plants of the Sonoran Desert: Conversion of Jojoba Oil to Biodiesel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daconta, Lisa V.; Minger, Timothy; Nedelkova, Valentina; Zikopoulos, John N.

    2015-01-01

    A new, general approach to the organic chemistry laboratory is introduced that is based on learning about organic chemistry techniques and research methods by exploring the natural products found in local native plants. As an example of this approach for the Sonoran desert region, the extraction of jojoba oil and its transesterification to…

  14. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal. PMID:22996726

  15. Conversion of CO2 to Polycarbonates and Other Materials: Insights through Computational Chemistry 

    E-print Network

    Yeung, Andrew D

    2014-09-25

    -monomer instead of cyclic carbonate due to angle strain for alkoxide backbiting. Conversely, glycerol carbonate only yields glycidol instead of the isomeric 3-hydroxyoxetane because formation of the latter has a higher barrier. The (salen)Cr(III)- and (salen...

  16. Multi-scale chemistry modeling of the thermochemical conversion of biomass in a fluidized bed gasifier

    E-print Network

    Stark, Addison Killean

    2015-01-01

    The thermochemical conversion of biomass to fuels via syn-gas offers a promising approach to producing fungible substitutes for petroleum derived fuels and chemicals. In order for these fuels to be adopted, they must be ...

  17. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  18. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-?-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  19. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    DOEpatents

    Benderly, Abraham (Elkins Park, PA); Chadda, Nitin (Radnor, PA); Sevon, Douglass (Fairless Hills, PA)

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  20. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  1. Theoretical study of the rhenium–alkane interaction in transition metal–alkane ?-complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cobar, Erika A.; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Bergman, Robert G.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Metal–alkane binding energies have been calculated for [CpRe(CO)2](alkane) and [(CO)2M(C5H4)CC(C5H4)M(CO)2](alkane), where M = Re or Mn. Calculated binding energies were found to increase with the number of metal–alkane interaction sites. In all cases examined, the manganese–alkane binding energies were predicted to be significantly lower than those for the analogous rhenium–alkane complexes. The metal (Mn or Re)–alkane interaction was predicted to be primarily one of charge transfer, both from the alkane to the metal complex (70–80% of total charge transfer) and from the metal complex to the alkane (20–30% of the total charge transfer). PMID:17442751

  2. Alkane C-H functionalization and oxidation with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Munz, Dominik; Strassner, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The application of environmentally benign, cheap, and economically viable oxidation procedures is a key challenge of homogeneous, oxidative alkane functionalization. The typically harsh reaction conditions and the propensity of dioxygen for radical reactivity call for extraordinary robust catalysts. Mainly three strategies have been applied. These are (1) the combination of a catalyst responsible for C-H activation with a cocatalyst responsible for dioxygen activation, (2) transition-metal catalysts, which react with both hydrocarbons and molecular oxygen, and (3) the introduction of very robust main-group element catalysts for C-H functionalization chemistry. Herein, these three approaches will be assessed and exemplified by the reactivity of chelated palladium (N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts in combination with a vanadium cocatalyst, the methane functionalization by cobalt catalysts, and the reaction of group XVII compounds with alkanes. PMID:25822853

  3. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  4. Theoretical Description of the STM Images of Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes Adsorbed on Graphite

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Theoretical Description of the STM Images of Alkanes and Substituted Alkanes Adsorbed on Graphite the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images of molecules adsorbed on graphite. The model is applicable the STM images of alkanes on graphite surfaces. The computations correlate well with the STM data

  5. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  6. Microsomal preparation from an animal tissue catalyzes release of carbon monoxide from a fatty aldehyde to generate an alkane.

    PubMed

    Cheesbrough, T M; Kolattukudy, P E

    1988-02-25

    Alkanes are widely distributed in nature and impaired alkane synthesis was implicated in certain neurological disorders. However, the mechanism of synthesis of alkanes in animals is unknown. Our search to find a convenient animal tissue to study alkane biosynthesis resulted in the finding that the uropygial gland (a modified sebaceous gland) of the eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) produces large amounts of alkanes. These alkanes, which constitute 35-41% of the total lipid produced, are mainly C21, C23, C25, and C27 n-alkanes. Cell free homogenates of this tissue synthesized alkanes from both fatty acid and aldehyde in the absence of O2. Differential centrifugation of the homogenates indicated that this activity was located in the microsomal fraction. With isolated microsomes conversion of fatty acid to alkane required CoA, ATP, and NADH whereas conversion of an aldehyde to alkane did not require the addition of cofactors. That the final step in alkane synthesis is a decarbonylation was shown by the stoichiometric production of heptadecane and CO from octadecanal. CO was identified by adsorption to RhCl [(C6H6)3P]3 and oxidation of the trapped CO to CO2 by watergas shift reaction. The enzyme preparation also catalyzed incorporation of 14C from 14CO into octadecanal showing the reversible nature of the decarbonylase. This decarbonylase had a sharp pH optimum at 7.0, a Kapp of 180 microM and a V1/2 of 90 rho mol/min/mg protein for octadecanal. The enzyme was inhibited by the metal chelators EDTA, O-phenanthroline, and 8-hydroxyquinoline, but not by KCN. It was stimulated nearly 3-fold by 5 microM 2-mercaptoethanol and inhibited by the presence of O2. During the conversion of [1-3H]octadecanal to heptadecane, 3H was lost to water and 3H from 3H2O was incorporated into the alkane generated from unlabeled octadecanal. The mechanism of the decarbonylation and the nature of the enzyme remain to be elucidated. PMID:3343228

  7. Alkane activation on crystalline metal oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jason F; Hakanoglu, Can; Antony, Abbin; Asthagiri, Aravind

    2014-11-21

    Advances in the fundamental understanding of alkane activation on oxide surfaces are essential for developing new catalysts that efficiently and selectively promote chemical transformations of alkanes. In this tutorial review, we discuss the current understanding of alkane activation on crystalline metal oxide surfaces, and focus mainly on summarizing our findings on alkane adsorption and C-H bond cleavage on the PdO(101) surface as determined from model ultrahigh vacuum experiments and theoretical calculations. These studies show that alkanes form strongly-bound ?-complexes on PdO(101) by datively bonding with coordinatively-unsaturated Pd atoms and that these molecularly adsorbed species serve as precursors for C-H bond activation on the oxide surface. In addition to discussing the binding and properties of alkane ?-complexes on PdO(101), we also summarize recent advances in kinetic models to predict alkane dissociation rates on solid surfaces. Lastly, we highlight computations which predict that the formation and facile C-H bond activation of alkane ?-complexes also occurs on RuO2 and IrO2 surfaces. PMID:24480977

  8. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  9. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  10. The role of structure and surface chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in catalytic conversion of 1,2-dichloroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tveritinova, Evgenya A.; Zhitnev, Yury N.; Kulakova, Inna I.; Cherkasov, Nikolay; Maslakov, Konstantin I.; Nesterova, Ekaterina A.; Ivanov, Anton S.; Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V.

    2015-11-01

    Catalytic activity of several graphene- and diamond-based carbon nanomaterials was compared in the reaction of the 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) conversion using the impulse microcatalytic method. Only nanodiamonds and Ni-doped nanodiamonds were active in the reaction. A comparison of XRD, XPS, DRIFTS, and BET studies suggested that nitrogen or oxygen-containing groups could be responsible for the catalytic activity in the DCE reaction. However, nitrogen-doped carbon nanoflakes, which contain much more nitrogen-containing groups, showed no activity in the DCE conversion; hence, it is unlikely that nitrogen-containing groups of nanodiamond surface are active centers in DCE conversion. The role of oxygen-containing groups was studied in a test reaction of 2-propanol dehydrogenation/dehydration - both nanotubes and nanodiamonds were active in the reaction; however, no activity of carbon nanotubes in the DCE conversion suggests that oxygen-containing groups are not active in the DCE conversion. As a result, we suggest that the carbon surface of nanodiamonds might be catalytically active in the DCE reaction.

  11. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  12. A Conversion of Methyl Ketones into Acetylenes: A Project for a Problem-Oriented or Microscale Organic Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira, Augustine, Jr.; Orlando, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a process for producing terminal or internal alkynes from ketones. Recommends using the experiment to aid in understanding acid-base strength, enolate anion chemistry, reaction at carbon versus oxygen, use of polar aprotic solvents, and elimination and nucleophilic substitution reactions. (ML)

  13. Pd/NbOPO? multifunctional catalyst for the direct production of liquid alkanes from aldol adducts of furans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qi-Neng; Cuan, Qian; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Gong, Xue-Qing; Lu, Guan-Zhong; Wang, Yan-Qin

    2014-09-01

    Great efforts have been made to convert renewable biomass into transportation fuels. Herein, we report the novel properties of NbO(x)-based catalysts in the hydrodeoxygenation of furan-derived adducts to liquid alkanes. Excellent activity and stability were observed with almost no decrease in octane yield (>90% throughout) in a 256?h time-on-stream test. Experimental and theoretical studies showed that NbO(x) species play the key role in C-O bond cleavage. As a multifunctional catalyst, Pd/NbOPO4 plays three roles in the conversion of aldol adducts into alkanes: 1)?The noble metal (in this case Pd) is the active center for hydrogenation; 2)?NbO(x) species help to cleave the C-O bond, especially of the tetrahydrofuran ring; and 3)?a niobium-based solid acid catalyzes the dehydration, thus enabling the quantitative conversion of furan-derived adducts into alkanes under mild conditions. PMID:25045056

  14. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  15. The effect of environmental factors on stable isotopic composition of n-alkanes in Mediterranean olive oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Mihailova, Alina; Abbado, Dimitri

    2014-05-01

    Traceability of the geographic origin of olive oils is an important issue from both commercial and health perspectives. This study evaluates the impact of environmental factors on stable C and H isotope compositions of n-alkanes in extra virgin olive oils from Croatia, France, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Portugal, Slovenia, and Spain. The data are used to investigate the applicability of stable isotope methodology for olive oil regional classification in the Mediterranean region. Analysis of stable C isotope composition of n-C29 alkane showed that extra virgin olive oils from Portugal and Spain have the most positive n-C29 alkane delta13C values. Conversely, olive oils from Slovenia, northern and central Italy are characterized by the most negative values. Overall, the n-C29 alkane delta13C values show a positive correlation with the mean air temperature during August-December and a negative correlation with the mean relative humidity during these months. Analysis of stable H isotope composition of n-C29 alkane revealed that the deltaD values are the most positive in olive oils from Greece and Morocco and the most negative in oils from northern Italy. The deltaD values of oils show significant correlation with all the analyses geographical parameters: the mean air temperature and relative humidity during August-December, the total amount of rainfall (the same months) and the annual deltaD values of precipitation. As predictor variables in the Categorical Data Analysis, the n-C29 alkane deltaD values show the most significant discriminative power, followed by the n-C29 alkane delta13C values. Overall, 93.4% of olive oil samples have been classified correctly into one of the production regions. Our findings suggest that an integrated analysis of C and H isotope compositions of n-alkanes extracted from extra virgin olive oil could become a useful tool for geographical provenancing of this highly popular food commodity.

  16. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  17. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  18. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  19. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  20. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  1. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  2. Comprehensive chemical kinetic modeling of the oxidation of C8 and larger n-alkanes and 2-methylalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Togbe, C; Dagaut, P; Wang, H; Oehlschlaeger, M; NIemann, U; Seshadri, K; Veloo, P S; Ji, C; Egolfopoulos, F; Lu, T

    2011-03-16

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for singly methylated iso-alkanes (i.e., 2-methylalkanes) ranging from C{sub 8} to C{sub 20}. The mechanism also includes an updated version of our previously published C{sub 8} to C{sub 16} n-alkanes model. The complete detailed mechanism contains approximately 7,200 species 31,400 reactions. The proposed model is validated against new experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices including premixed and nonpremixed flames, perfectly stirred reactors and shock tubes. This new model is used to show how the presence of a methyl branch affects important combustion properties such as laminar flame propagation, ignition, and species formation.

  3. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical forms for the total constituent molar density rate evolution; indeed, examination of these gain/loss rates shows that they also have a good quasi-steady behavior with a functional form resembling that of the constituent rate. This finding highlights the fact that the fitting technique provides a methodology that can be repeatedly used to obtain an accurate representation of full or skeletal kinetic models. Assuming success with the modified reduced model, the advantage of the modeling approach is clear. Because this model is based on the Nc rate rather than on that of individual heavy species, even if the number of species increases with increased carbon number in the alkane group, providing that the quasi-steady rate aspect persists, then extension of this model to higher alkanes should be conceptually straightforward, although it remains to be seen if the functional fits would remain valid or would require reconstruction.

  4. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shubin; Ess, Daniel H

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E{sub s}[?]), an electrostatic energy term (E{sub e}[?]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E{sub q}[?]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  5. Enumeration of the Staggered Conformers of Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyvin, S. J.; Brunvoll, J.; Cyvin, B. N.; Lüttke, W.

    1995-09-01

    Alkanoid systems are chemical graphs which can be embedded in the diamond lattice. They correspond to the staggered conformers of alkanes. Non-overlapping and overlapping systems are defined. The previously deduced algebraic solution for the numbers of unbranched alkanoids is revisited and reformulated in terms of generating functions. Computerized enumerations for non-overlapping alkanoids, both unbranched and branched, are reported. Some of the smallest overlap­ ping unbranched alkanoids are generated by a method called combinatorial constructions.

  6. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  7. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H. (Wilmette, IL); Chaar, Mohamed A. (Homs, SY)

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  8. Adsorption characteristics of alkanes onto carbon nanotube bundles: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulation

    E-print Network

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Adsorption characteristics of alkanes onto carbon nanotube bundles: Grand Canonical Monte Carlo alkane adsorption and separation. Rather than remaining isolated however, nanotubes tend to bundle together, and the adsorption properties of such bundles and subsequent potential for practical alkane

  9. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic...721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic...generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic...721.10148 Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic...generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (PMN...

  11. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). 721.785 Section...721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical...generically as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject...

  12. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Novel Cytochrome P450 Small-Alkane Hydroxylases

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-02-27

    The goals of this project are to investigate (1) the kinetics and stabilities of engineered cytochrome P450 (P450) small alkane hydroxylases and their evolutionary intermediates, (2) the structural basis for catalytic proficiency on small alkanes of these engineered P450s, and (3) the changes in redox control resulting from protein engineering. To reach these goals, we have established new methods for determining the kinetics and stabilities of multicomponent P450s such as CYP153A6. Using these, we were able to determine that CYP153A6 is proficient for hydroxylation of alkanes as small as ethane, an activity that has never been observed previously in any natural P450. To elucidate the structures of the engineered P450s, we obtained x-ray diffraction data for two variants in the P450PMO (propane monooxygenase) lineage and a preliminary structure for the most evolved variant. This structure shows changes in the substrate binding regions of the enzyme and a reduction in active site volume that are consistent with the observed changes in substrate specificity from fatty acids in the native enzyme to small alkanes in P450PMO. We also constructed semi-rational designed libraries mutating only residues in the enzyme active site that in one round of mutagenesis and screening produced variants that achieved nearly half of the activity of the most evolved enzymes of the P450PMO lineage. Finally, we found that changes in redox properties of the laboratory-evolved P450 alkane hydroxylases did not reflect the improvement in their electron transfer efficiency. The heme redox potential remained constant throughout evolution, while activity increased and coupling efficiency improved from 10% to 90%. The lack of correlation between heme redox potential and enzyme activity and coupling efficiency led us to search for other enzyme properties that could be better predictors for activity towards small alkanes, specifically methane. We investigated the oxidation potential of the radical oxidants of various P450s directly using a chemical approach to generate the radical in situ. This resulted in the first report of direct methane to methanol conversion by a heme porphyrin catalyst using the soluble P450 from Mycobacterium sp, CYP153A6.

  13. Alkane Coordination Selectivity in Hydrocarbon Activation by [TpRh(CNneopentyl)]: The Role of Alkane Complexes

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    . K.; McMaster, A. D.; Graham, W. A. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1983, 105, 7190. (e) Jones, W. D.; Feher, F of Alkane Complexes Andrew J. Vetter, Christine Flaschenriem, and William D. Jones* Contribution from.; Bergman, R. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1982, 104, 352. (b) Hoyano, J. K.; Graham, W. A. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc

  14. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  15. Heterogeneity of Alkane Chain Length in Freshwater and Marine Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Shakeel, Tabinda; Fatma, Zia; Fatma, Tasneem; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2015-01-01

    The potential utilization of cyanobacteria for the biological production of alkanes represents an exceptional system for the next generation of biofuels. Here, we analyzed a diverse group of freshwater and marine cyanobacterial isolates from Indian culture collections for their ability to produce both alkanes and alkenes. Among the 50 cyanobacterial isolates screened, 32 isolates; 14 freshwater and 18 marine isolates; produced predominantly alkanes. The GC-MS/MS profiles revealed a higher percentage of pentadecane and heptadecane production for marine and freshwater strains, respectively. Oscillatoria species were found to be the highest producers of alkanes. Among the freshwater isolates, Oscillatoria CCC305 produced the maximum alkane level with 0.43??g/mg dry cell weight, while Oscillatoria formosa BDU30603 was the highest producer among the marine isolates with 0.13??g/mg dry cell weight. Culturing these strains under different media compositions showed that the alkane chain length was not influenced by the growth medium but was rather an inherent property of the strains. Analysis of the cellular fatty acid content indicated the presence of predominantly C16 chain length fatty acids in marine strains, while the proportion of C18 chain length fatty acids increased in the majority of freshwater strains. These results correlated with alkane chain length specificity of marine and freshwater isolates indicating that alkane chain lengths may be primarily determined by the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Moreover, the phylogenetic analysis showed clustering of pentadecane-producing marine strains that was distinct from heptadecane-producing freshwater strains strongly suggesting a close association between alkane chain length and the cyanobacteria habitat. PMID:25853127

  16. A Toolkit to Enable Hydrocarbon Conversion in Aqueous Environments

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, Eva K.; Schipper, Kira; Bongaerts, Nadine; Voges, Mathias J.; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S. Aljoscha

    2012-01-01

    This work puts forward a toolkit that enables the conversion of alkanes by Escherichia coli and presents a proof of principle of its applicability. The toolkit consists of multiple standard interchangeable parts (BioBricks)9 addressing the conversion of alkanes, regulation of gene expression and survival in toxic hydrocarbon-rich environments. A three-step pathway for alkane degradation was implemented in E. coli to enable the conversion of medium- and long-chain alkanes to their respective alkanols, alkanals and ultimately alkanoic-acids. The latter were metabolized via the native ?-oxidation pathway. To facilitate the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes (C5-C13) and cycloalkanes (C5-C8), four genes (alkB2, rubA3, rubA4and rubB) of the alkane hydroxylase system from Gordonia sp. TF68,21 were transformed into E. coli. For the conversion of long-chain alkanes (C15-C36), theladA gene from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was implemented. For the required further steps of the degradation process, ADH and ALDH (originating from G. thermodenitrificans) were introduced10,11. The activity was measured by resting cell assays. For each oxidative step, enzyme activity was observed. To optimize the process efficiency, the expression was only induced under low glucose conditions: a substrate-regulated promoter, pCaiF, was used. pCaiF is present in E. coli K12 and regulates the expression of the genes involved in the degradation of non-glucose carbon sources. The last part of the toolkit - targeting survival - was implemented using solvent tolerance genes, PhPFD? and ?, both from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3. Organic solvents can induce cell stress and decreased survivability by negatively affecting protein folding. As chaperones, PhPFD? and ? improve the protein folding process e.g. under the presence of alkanes. The expression of these genes led to an improved hydrocarbon tolerance shown by an increased growth rate (up to 50%) in the presences of 10% n-hexane in the culture medium were observed. Summarizing, the results indicate that the toolkit enables E. coli to convert and tolerate hydrocarbons in aqueous environments. As such, it represents an initial step towards a sustainable solution for oil-remediation using a synthetic biology approach. PMID:23052445

  17. A toolkit to enable hydrocarbon conversion in aqueous environments.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Eva K; Schipper, Kira; Bongaerts, Nadine; Voges, Mathias J; Abate, Alessandro; Wahl, S Aljoscha

    2012-01-01

    This work puts forward a toolkit that enables the conversion of alkanes by Escherichia coli and presents a proof of principle of its applicability. The toolkit consists of multiple standard interchangeable parts (BioBricks)(9) addressing the conversion of alkanes, regulation of gene expression and survival in toxic hydrocarbon-rich environments. A three-step pathway for alkane degradation was implemented in E. coli to enable the conversion of medium- and long-chain alkanes to their respective alkanols, alkanals and ultimately alkanoic-acids. The latter were metabolized via the native ?-oxidation pathway. To facilitate the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes (C5-C13) and cycloalkanes (C5-C8), four genes (alkB2, rubA3, rubA4and rubB) of the alkane hydroxylase system from Gordonia sp. TF6(8,21) were transformed into E. coli. For the conversion of long-chain alkanes (C15-C36), theladA gene from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans was implemented. For the required further steps of the degradation process, ADH and ALDH (originating from G. thermodenitrificans) were introduced(10,11). The activity was measured by resting cell assays. For each oxidative step, enzyme activity was observed. To optimize the process efficiency, the expression was only induced under low glucose conditions: a substrate-regulated promoter, pCaiF, was used. pCaiF is present in E. coli K12 and regulates the expression of the genes involved in the degradation of non-glucose carbon sources. The last part of the toolkit - targeting survival - was implemented using solvent tolerance genes, PhPFD? and ?, both from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3. Organic solvents can induce cell stress and decreased survivability by negatively affecting protein folding. As chaperones, PhPFD? and ? improve the protein folding process e.g. under the presence of alkanes. The expression of these genes led to an improved hydrocarbon tolerance shown by an increased growth rate (up to 50%) in the presences of 10% n-hexane in the culture medium were observed. Summarizing, the results indicate that the toolkit enables E. coli to convert and tolerate hydrocarbons in aqueous environments. As such, it represents an initial step towards a sustainable solution for oil-remediation using a synthetic biology approach. PMID:23052445

  18. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mar?, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  19. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy ?13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in ?2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a ?13C1 vs. ?13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  20. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  1. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ?308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  2. The heterogeneous partial oxidation of light alkanes

    E-print Network

    Su, Yee San, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) With this approach, an upper bound on the yield for OCM was computed. Results showed that even with optimal surface chemistry, strict limits existed on the attainable yield. Surface energetics necessary for superior ...

  3. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science

    E-print Network

    Levine, Alex J.

    Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science ...........................................................................................................................................4 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office..............................................................................................6 Majors in Chemistry & Biochemistry

  4. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T.; Hofrichter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H2O2 as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H2O2-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H218O2 resulted in complete incorporation of 18O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D7 showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(kH/kD)obs] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 1011 s?1. These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C16) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  5. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  6. Fabrication of Supported AuPt Alloy Nanocrystals with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for Formic Acid Oxidation through Conversion Chemistry of Layer-Deposited Pt(2+) on Au Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hyeon; Jeong, Hwakyeung; Kim, Jongwon; Lee, In Su

    2015-10-01

    The exploitation of nanoconfined conversion of Au- and Pt-containing binary nanocrystals for developing a controllable synthesis of surfactant-free AuPt nanocrystals with enhanced formic acid oxidation (FAO) activity is reported, which can be stably and evenly immobilized on various support materials to diversify and optimize their electrocatalytic performance. In this study, an atomic layer of Pt(2+) species is discovered to be spontaneously deposited in situ on the Au nanocrystal generated from a reverse-microemulsion solution. The resulting Au/Pt(2+) nanocrystal thermally transforms into a reduced AuPt alloy nanocrystal during the subsequent solid-state conversion process within the SiO2 nanosphere. The alloy nanocrystals can be isolated from SiO2 in a surfactant-free form and then dispersedly loaded on the carbon sphere surface, allowing for the production of a supported electrocatalyst that exhibits much higher FAO activity than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Furthermore, by involving Fe3O4 nanocrystals in the conversion process, the AuPt alloy nanocrystals can be grown on the oxide surface, improving the durability of supported metal catalysts, and then uniformly loaded on a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) layer with high electroconductivity. This produces electrocatalytic AuPt/Fe3O4/RGO nanocomposites whose catalyst-oxide-graphene triple-junction structure provides improved electrocatalytic properties in terms of both activity and durability in catalyzing FAO. PMID:26136254

  7. One-step hydrotreatment of vegetable oil to produce high quality diesel-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congxin; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Lei; Xu, Renshun; Liu, Qianhe; Qu, Wei; Ma, Huaijun; Wang, Bingchun

    2012-10-01

    A one-step hydrotreatment of vegetable oil combining deoxygenation and isomerization to directly produce low cloud point, high quality diesel is devised. The Pt/zeolite bifunctional catalysts prepared by using SAPO-11 and ZSM-22 zeolites as supports are used in this process. Catalytic reactions are conducted in a fixed-bed reactor under a hydrogen atmosphere. Over the bifunctional catalyst, 100 % conversion of soybean oil is obtained at 357 °C, 4 MPa, and 1 h(-1), and 80 % organic liquid yield is achieved, which is close to the maximum theoretical liquid yield. In the organic products, the alkanes selectivity is 100 % with an i-alkanes selectivity above 63 %. NH(3)-temperature programmed desorption (TPD), pyridine IR spectroscopy, and other characterization techniques are used to study the effect of the support acidity on the reaction pathway. Over the Pt/zeolite bifunctional catalyst with less strong Lewis acid sites, the reaction proceeds via the decarboxylation plus decarbonylation pathway. This one-step method provides a new strategy to produce low cloud point, high quality diesel from biomass feedstock in a more economic and attractive way. PMID:22764086

  8. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one another in order to test whether n-C27 and n-C29 represent trees and shrubs while n-C31 represents grasses as previously proposed. The average group profiles are not distinguishable from one another due to their large standard deviations. Although n-C31 is the predominant chain length in many (but not all) grasses, other chain lengths such as n-C29 are also abundant. For grasses as a group one chain length does not dominate significantly over the other. In mosses, while the genus Sphagnum appears to be typified by n-C23 and n-C25 alkanes, the same cannot be said for other moss genera which were more dominated by n-C27 and n-C29. Differences in n-alkane distributions may relate more to environmental changes such as temperature and precipitation than to shifts in dominant plant types.

  9. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial step of ?-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21) and superoxide dismutase (P24) whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal ?-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes. PMID:19320977

  10. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  11. Surface freezing in binary alkane-alcohol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ofer, E.; Sloutskin, E.; Tamam, L.; Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B. M.

    2006-08-15

    Surface freezing was detected and studied in mixtures of alcohol and alkane molecules, using surface tensiometry and surface-specific x-ray scattering methods. Considering that surface freezing in pure alkanes forms an ordered monolayer and in alcohols it forms an ordered bilayer, the length mismatch repulsion was minimized by varying the carbon number of the alkane component around 2n, where n is the carbon number of the alcohol molecule. A solutionlike behavior was found for all mixtures, where the ideal liquid mixture phase-separates upon freezing both in the bulk and the surface. The solid exhibits a herringbone crystalline phase below an alkane mole fraction {phi}{sub t}{approx_equal}0.8 and a rotator phase above it. The surface frozen film below {phi}{sub t} is an alkane monolayer exhibiting a next-nearest neighbor molecular tilt of a composition-dependent magnitude. Above {phi}{sub t}, no diffraction peaks were observed. This could be explained by the intrinsically shorter-range order of the rotator phase and a possible proliferation of defects.

  12. CHEMISTRY 521 GRADUATE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

    E-print Network

    Findley, Gary L.

    CHEMISTRY 521 GRADUATE PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Fall Term, 1999 INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION Instructor: Dr in Physical Chemistry. Goals/ Objectives: Introduction to quantum mechanics. Topics covered include (second semester of undergraduate Physical Chemistry) or equivalent. Text: Quantum Chemistry, Ira N

  13. Mechanistic interpretation of the effects of acid strength on alkane isomerization turnover rates and selectivity

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Mechanistic interpretation of the effects of acid strength on alkane isomerization turnover rates Keywords: Keggin polyoxometalates Heteropolyacids Skeletal isomerization Bifunctional catalysis Acid on alkane isomerization turnover rates and selectivities are probed using hexene isomers as reactants

  14. Effects of conformational isomerism on the desorption kinetics of n-alkanes from graphite

    E-print Network

    Gellman, Andrew J.

    Effects of conformational isomerism on the desorption kinetics of n-alkanes from graphite Kris R-alkane with the minimum free energy at the desorption temperature. These results reveal that conformational isomerism

  15. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  16. Surface crystallization in normal-alkanes and alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Deutsch, M.; Ocko, B.M.; Wu, X.Z. |; Sirota, E.B.; Sinha, S.K.

    1995-06-01

    A new, rare surface freezing, phenomenon is observed in molten normal-alkanes and their derivatives (alcohols, thiols, etc.). X-ray and surface tension measurements show the formation of a crystalline monolayer on the surface of the liquid alkane at temperatures up to 3 C above the bulk solidification temperature, T{sub f}. For alcohols, a single bilayer is formed. In both cases, the molecules in the layer are hexagonally packed and oriented normal to the surface for short chain lengths, and tilted for long ones. In both cases the single layer persists down to T{sub f}. In terms of wetting theory, this constitutes a very limited partial wetting of the liquid surface by the crystalline layer. The new surface phase is obtained only for chain lengths 14 < n {le} 50 in alkanes, and 16 < n < 30 in alcohols. The measurements are satisfactorily accounted for within a simple theory based on surface energy considerations.

  17. Spreading and two-dimensional mobility of long-chain alkanes at solid/gas interfaces.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Paul; Schollmeyer, H; Riegler, H

    2005-03-25

    Long-chain n alkanes on solid surfaces can form partially wetting liquid alkane droplets coexisting with solid multilayer terraces. We propose a diffusivelike alkane flow between terrace edge and droplet perimeter through a molecularly thin "precursorlike" film. Depending on the (uniform!) sample temperature, either droplet or terrace edge are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. This leads to a chemical potential gradient, which drives the reversible alkane flow. The gradient can be adjusted and calculated independently from the phenomenological diffusion coefficient. PMID:15903872

  18. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  19. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  20. Epitaxial Nucleation and Growth of n-Alkane Crystals on Graphite (0001)

    E-print Network

    Leunissen, Mirjam

    Epitaxial Nucleation and Growth of n-Alkane Crystals on Graphite (0001) Mirjam E. Leunissen, W graphite (HOPG). It was found that both n-alkanes display epitaxial crystal growth. The hexagonal symmetry of n-alkane molecules on the graphite surface is assumed to be one of the well-known monolayer

  1. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  6. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  7. Session: Energy Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, David; LaSala, Raymond J.; Kukacka, Lawrence E.; Bliem, Carl J.; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Weare, John H.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology'' by David Robertson and Raymond J. LaSala; ''Materials for Geothermal Production'' by Lawrence E. Kukacka; ''Supersaturated Turbine Expansions for Binary Geothermal Power Plants'' by Carl J. Bliem; ''Geothermal Waster Treatment Biotechnology: Progress and Advantages to the Utilities'' by Eugen T. Premuzic; and ''Geothermal Brine Chemistry Modeling Program'' by John H. Weare.

  8. Johari-Goldstein secondary relaxation in methylated alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngai, K. L.

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric relaxation measurements of the methylated alkanes, 3-methylpentane, 3-methylheptane, 4-methylheptane, 2,3-dimethylpentane, and 2,4,6-trimethylheptane by S. Shahriari, A. Mandanici, L-M Wang, and R. Richert [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 8960 (2004)] have found a primary ? relaxation of these glass-forming liquids and a slow secondary ? relaxation that are in close proximity to each other on the frequency scale. These glass formers have one or more methyl groups individually attached to various carbons on the alkane chain. They cannot contribute to such a slow secondary relaxation. Hence the observed secondary relaxations is not intramolecular in origin and, similar to secondary relaxations found in rigid molecules by Johari and Goldstein, they are potentially important in the consideration of a mechanism for the glass transition. These secondary relaxations in the methylated alkanes are special and belong to the class of Johari-Goldstein in a generalized sense. The coupling model has predicted that its primitive relaxation time should be approximately the same as the relaxation time of the secondary relaxation if the latter is of the Johari-Goldstein kind. This prediction has been shown to hold in many other glass formers. The published data of the methylated alkanes provide an opportunity to test this prediction once more. The results of this work confirm the prediction.

  9. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  10. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  11. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    E-print Network

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-10-05

    cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 to 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have...

  12. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  13. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  14. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  15. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  16. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  17. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, ?, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6??r). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/?(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  18. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  19. Crystallization features of normal alkanes in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Su, Yunlan; Liu, Guoming; Xie, Baoquan; Fu, Dongsheng; Wang, Dujin

    2014-01-21

    How polymers crystallize can greatly affect their thermal and mechanical properties, which influence the practical applications of these materials. Polymeric materials, such as block copolymers, graft polymers, and polymer blends, have complex molecular structures. Due to the multiple hierarchical structures and different size domains in polymer systems, confined hard environments for polymer crystallization exist widely in these materials. The confined geometry is closely related to both the phase metastability and lifetime of polymer. This affects the phase miscibility, microphase separation, and crystallization behaviors and determines both the performance of polymer materials and how easily these materials can be processed. Furthermore, the size effect of metastable states needs to be clarified in polymers. However, scientists find it difficult to propose a quantitative formula to describe the transition dynamics of metastable states in these complex systems. Normal alkanes [CnH2n+2, n-alkanes], especially linear saturated hydrocarbons, can provide a well-defined model system for studying the complex crystallization behaviors of polymer materials, surfactants, and lipids. Therefore, a deeper investigation of normal alkane phase behavior in confinement will help scientists to understand the crystalline phase transition and ultimate properties of many polymeric materials, especially polyolefins. In this Account, we provide an in-depth look at the research concerning the confined crystallization behavior of n-alkanes and binary mixtures in microcapsules by our laboratory and others. Since 2006, our group has developed a technique for synthesizing nearly monodispersed n-alkane containing microcapsules with controllable size and surface porous morphology. We applied an in situ polymerization method, using melamine-formaldehyde resin as shell material and nonionic surfactants as emulsifiers. The solid shell of microcapsules can provide a stable three-dimensional (3-D) confining environment. We have studied multiple parameters of these microencapsulated n-alkanes, including surface freezing, metastability of the rotator phase, and the phase separation behaviors of n-alkane mixtures using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), temperature-dependent X-ray diffraction (XRD), and variable-temperature solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Our investigations revealed new direct evidence for the existence of surface freezing in microencapsulated n-alkanes. By examining the differences among chain packing and nucleation kinetics between bulk alkane solid solutions and their microencapsulated counterparts, we also discovered a mechanism responsible for the formation of a new metastable bulk phase. In addition, we found that confinement suppresses lamellar ordering and longitudinal diffusion, which play an important role in stabilizing the binary n-alkane solid solution in microcapsules. Our work also provided new insights into the phase separation of other mixed system, such as waxes, lipids, and polymer blends in confined geometry. These works provide a profound understanding of the relationship between molecular structure and material properties in the context of crystallization and therefore advance our ability to improve applications incorporating polymeric and molecular materials. PMID:23947401

  20. Functional analysis of alkane hydroxylases from gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smits, Theo H M; Balada, Stefanie B; Witholt, Bernard; van Beilen, Jan B

    2002-03-01

    We have cloned homologs of the Pseudomonas putida GPo1 alkane hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, Alcanivorax borkumensis AP1, Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and Prauserella rugosa NRRL B-2295. Sequence comparisons show that the level of protein sequence identity between the homologs is as low as 35%, and that the Pseudomonas alkane hydroxylases are as distantly related to each other as to the remaining alkane hydroxylases. Based on the observation that rubredoxin, an electron transfer component of the GPo1 alkane hydroxylase system, can be replaced by rubredoxins from other alkane hydroxylase systems, we have developed three recombinant host strains for the functional analysis of the novel alkane hydroxylase genes. Two hosts, Escherichia coli GEc137 and P. putida GPo12, were equipped with pGEc47 Delta B, which encodes all proteins necessary for growth on medium-chain-length alkanes (C(6) to C(12)), except a functional alkane hydroxylase. The third host was an alkB knockout derivative of P. fluorescens CHA0, which is no longer able to grow on C(12) to C(16) alkanes. All alkane hydroxylase homologs, except the Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 AlkM, allowed at least one of the three hosts to grow on n-alkanes. PMID:11872725

  1. Genetically assembled fluorescent biosensor for in situ detection of bio-synthesized alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Zhang, Lei; Yao, Lun; Tan, Xiaoming; Liu, Xufeng; Lu, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    Construction of highly efficient microbial cell factories producing drop-in biofuel alkanes is severely limited due to the lack of a fast detection method against alkanes. Here we first developed a sensitive fluorescent biosensor for rapid and in situ monitoring of intracellular alkane synthesis. Using GFP as reporter, the biosensor could actively respond to the intracellular alkane products, especially for the mid- and long-chain alkanes synthesized in the recombinant Escherichia coli and give a concentration-dependent fluorescence response. Our results also suggested the feasibility of developing high-throughput strategies basing on the alkane biosensor device in E. coli, and thus will greatly facilitate the application of directed evolution strategies to further improve the alkane-producing microbial cell factories. PMID:26039923

  2. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in glaucous and non-glaucous varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Eley, Yvette; Frizell-Armitage, Amelia; Uauy, Cristobal

    2015-04-01

    The use of the 2H/1H composition of terrestrial plants in climate and ecology studies depends on fundamental understanding of the processes within the plant that control fractionation of these two isotopes. Little is currently known about the extent of 2H/1H fractionation at different steps of biosynthesis, after the initial H uptake following leaf water photolysis. Knowing this effect is particularly important when seeking to interpret the 2H/1H composition of leaf wax biomarkers from plants that differ in the amount and type of individual compound classes in their leaf waxes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the link between the quantity and distribution of n-alkyl lipids in leaf waxes and their isotopic composition. We used a genetic approach to suppress glaucousness in 2 varieties of wheat (Alchemy and Malacca), which resulted in glaucous and non-glaucous phenotypes of both varieties. Both phenotypes were then grown outdoors under identical environmental conditions in central Norfolk, UK. At the end of the growing season, the plants were sampled for soil water, leaf water, and leaf wax isotopic measurements. Comparison of the leaf wax composition of the non-glaucous and glaucous phenotypes revealed that the non-glaucous varieties were characterised by the absence of diketones and a greater concentration of n-alkanes and primary alcohols.. Our results showed very small differences between glaucous and non-glaucous varieties with regard to soil (mean values, <2 per mil) and leaf (<1 per mil) water 2H/1H. Conversely, there was 15-20 and 10-15 per mil 2H-depletion in the C29 and C31 n-alkanes, respectively, from the non-glaucous phenotype. This 2H-depletion in the non-glaucous phenotype demonstrated that the suppression of diketone production and the increase in n-alkane and primary alcohol concentrations are linked with a shift in the 2H/1H composition of n-alkanes. The initial results of this work suggest that plants using the same environmental water, subjected to the same effects of evapotranspiration, but which differ in the amount and composition of leaf wax compounds, can exhibit large variation in their n-alkane 2H/1H. Our current work on determining the 2H/1H composition of other n-alkyl lipids from these plants will provide further details regarding the role of biosynthesis in controlling 2H/1H fractionation within leaf waxes.

  3. Radical autoxidation and autogenous O2 evolution in manganese-porphyrin catalyzed alkane oxidations with chlorite.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, LeGrande M; Collman, James P; Eberspacher, Todd A; Brauman, John I

    2004-08-23

    A manganese porphyrin catalyst employing chlorite (ClO(2)(-)) as a "shunt" oxidant displays remarkable activity in alkane oxidation, oxidizing cyclohexane to cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone with >800 turnover numbers. The ketone is apparently formed without the intermediacy of alcohol and accounts for an unusually large fraction of the product ( approximately 40%). Radical scavenging experiments indicate that the alkane oxidation mechanism involves both carbon-centered and oxygen-centered radicals. The carbon-radical trap CBrCl(3) completely suppresses cyclohexanone formation and reduces cyclohexanol turnovers, while the oxygen-radical trap Ph(2)NH inhibits all oxidation until it is consumed. These observations are indicative of an autoxidation mechanism, a scenario further supported by TEMPO inhibition and (18)O(2) incorporation into products. However, similar cyclohexane oxidation activity occurs when air is excluded. This is explained by mass spectrometric and volumetric measurements showing catalyst-dependent O(2) evolution from the reaction mixture. The catalytic disproportionation of ClO(2)(-) into Cl(-) and O(2) provides sufficient O(2) to support an autoxidation mechanism. A two-path oxidation scheme is proposed to explain all of the experimental observations. The first pathway involves manganese-porphyrin catalyzed decomposition of ClO(2)(-) into both O(2) and an unidentified radical initiator, leading to classical autoxidation chemistry providing equal amounts of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. The second pathway is a "rebound" oxygenation involving a high-valent manganese-oxo intermediate, accounting for the excess of alcohol over ketone. This system highlights the importance of mechanistic studies in catalytic oxidations with highly reactive oxidants, and it is unusual in its ability to sustain autoxidation even under apparent exclusion of O(2). PMID:15310195

  4. Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by FeO

    E-print Network

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Electronic spectroscopy of intermediates involved in the conversion of methane to methanol by Fe.1063/1.1448489 I. INTRODUCTION The direct oxidation of methane to an easily transport- able liquid such as methanol process and as the simplest model for alkane oxidation.1,2 Although no direct, efficient methane­methanol

  5. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  7. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  8. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  9. Cold-tolerant alkane-degrading Rhodococcus species from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Bej, A.K.; Saul, D.; Aislabie, J.

    2000-07-01

    Bioremediation is a possible mechanism for clean-up of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils in the Antarctic. Microbes indigenous to the Antarctic are required that degrade the hydrocarbon contaminants found in the soil, and that are able to survive and maintain activity under in situ conditions. Alkane-degrading bacteria previously isolated from oil-contaminated soil from around Scott Base, Antarctica, grew on a number of n-alkanes from hexane (C6) through to eicosane (C20) and the branched alkane pristane. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-dodecane was demonstrated with four strains. Representative isolates were identified as Rhodococcus species using 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 grew at -2 C but numbers of viable cells declined when incubated t 37 C. Both strains appear to have the major cold-shock gene cspA. Partial nucleotide sequence analyses of the PCR-amplified cspA open reading frame from Rhodococcus spp. strains 5/14 and 7/1 were approximately 60% identical to cspA from Escherichia coli.

  10. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008 , 100 , 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material. PMID:26529283

  11. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  12. Strategic Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Robyn R.

    2009-01-01

    Strategic conversations are a series of targeted, individualized interactions with teachers that are designed to help them significantly improve their instruction. Unlike typical supervisory feedback, strategic conversations move in two directions. Together, the leader and the teacher identify problems and develop solutions to instructional…

  13. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H. (Bethany, CT); Brown, Stephen H. (East Haven, CT)

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  14. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  15. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  16. Systematic study of aggregation structure and thermal behavior of a series of unique H-shape alkane molecules.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hiroko; Tashiro, Kohji; Nemoto, Norio; Motoyama, Yukihiro; Takahashi, Yoshiaki

    2011-08-11

    The H-shape alkanes of various arm lengths have been synthesized successfully through the Grignard reaction. The detailed investigation of these novel compounds may allow us to widen the topological chemistry field furthermore. The molecular form and molecular packing structure in the crystal lattice have been revealed successfully on the basis of X-ray structure analysis as well as the analysis of Raman longitudinal acoustic modes (LAM) sensitive to the alkyl zigzag chain segments. The molecular conformation in the crystal lattice is deformed markedly from the originally imagined H-shape. In the cases of C3HOH to C6HOH, for example, the molecules are packed in a complicated manner and the OH···O hydrogen bonds govern the whole intermolecular interactions mainly. Since the alkyl segmental length is not very long, the conformational change is not very drastic, i.e., the small configurational entropy. Synergic effect of the hydrogen bonds and the small configurational entropy gives the higher melting point as known from the thermal data. On the other hand, in the cases of C10HOH and C12HOH, one of the long alkyl chain arms is found to be bent by 90° so that all of the alky chain segments of planar-zigzag conformation can be packed as closely as possible, and the intermolecular OH···O hydrogen bonds are also formed effectively without any mistake. As a result, the contribution of nonbonded intra- and intermolecular van der Waals interactions between the trans-zigzag alkyl chain segments become major, and the coupling of this enthalpy effect with the larger configurational entropy effect of the molecular shape results in the decrement of the melting point which approaches gradually that of longer n-alkane compound. In this way a sensitive balance between the nonbonded van der Waals interactions, the OH···O hydrogen bonds, as well as the configurational entropy effect gives the characteristic thermal behavior of the H-shape compounds. The thus-newly synthesized H-shape alkane compounds should give us new insight into the packing topology of complicated molecules, leading to the development of new functionality unexpected for normal linear alkane compounds. PMID:21671573

  17. Hydrocarbons. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit O1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on hydrocarbons is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit is divided into sections dealing with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, and several aspects of the petroleum industry. Two experiments, exercises (with answers), and pre- and post-tests are included.…

  18. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 ?mol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  19. Chemistry & Biology Conversion of Red Fluorescent Protein

    E-print Network

    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    resonance energy transfer applications. INTRODUCTION Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequoria victoria, and yellow mutants of GFP have also been developed (Shaner et al., 2005). While the cyan and yellow variants in photostability compared with original BFP (GFP with Y66H/Y145F substitu- tions) and EBFP (GFP with F64L/Y66H/Y145

  20. Energy conversion & storage program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program investigates state-of-the-art electrochemistry, chemistry, and materials science technologies for: (1) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (2) development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; (3) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; (4) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  1. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  2. Two novel alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion genes isolated from a Dietzia bacterium and the functions of fused rubredoxin domains in long-chain n-alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong; Liang, Jieliang; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2011-10-01

    Two alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene homologs (alkW1 and alkW2) were cloned from a Dietzia strain, designated DQ12-45-1b, which can grow on crude oil and n-alkanes ranging in length from 6 to 40 carbon atoms as sole carbon sources. Both AlkW1 and AlkW2 have an integral-membrane alkane monooxygenase (AlkB) conserved domain and a rubredoxin (Rd) conserved domain which are fused together. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these two AlkB-fused Rd domains formed a novel third cluster with all the Rds from the alkane hydroxylase-rubredoxin fusion gene clusters in Gram-positive bacteria and that this third cluster was distant from the known AlkG1- and AlkG2-type Rds. Expression of the alkW1 gene in DQ12-45-1b was induced when cells were grown on C(8) to C(32) n-alkanes as sole carbon sources, but expression of the alkW2 gene was not detected. Functional heterologous expression in an alkB deletion mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2?1 suggested the alkW1 could restore the growth of KOB2?1 on C(14) and C(16) n-alkanes and induce faster growth on C(18) to C(32) n-alkanes than alkW1?Rd, the Rd domain deletion mutant gene of alkW1, which also caused faster growth than KOB2?1 itself. In addition, the artificial fusion of AlkB from the Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and the Rds from both Gram-negative P. fluorescens CHA0 and Gram-positive Dietzia sp. DQ12-45-1b significantly increased the degradation of C(32) alkane compared to that seen with AlkB itself. In conclusion, the alkW1 gene cloned from Dietzia species encoded an alkane hydroxylase which increased growth on and degradation of n-alkanes up to C(32) in length, with its fused rubredoxin domain being necessary to maintain the functions. In addition, the fusion of alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin genes from both Gram-positive and -negative bacteria can increase the degradation of long-chain n-alkanes (such as C(32)) in the Gram-negative bacterium. PMID:21873474

  3. Leaf wax n-alkane ?D values reflect the evaporative deuterium enrichment of leaf water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, A.; Arndt, S. K.; Cernusak, L. A.; Hoffmann, B.; Schefuss, E.; West, J. B.; Sachse, D.

    2011-12-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes are long-chained lipids that are vital components of plant cuticles. What makes leaf wax n-alkanes unique is that their stable hydrogen isotope composition (?D) contains ecohydrological information that can persist over millions of years. With these exceptional properties, leaf wax n-alkanes and their ?D values are now being celebrated as the much-needed ecohydrological proxy that could provide new ecohydrological information across spatial and temporal scales that range from leaves to biomes and from weeks to millions of years. Critical mechanisms that determine the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes are, however, not understood. The exact type of hydrological information that is recorded in the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes remains therefore unclear and prevents the robust application of this promising new proxy. In particular the influence of leaf water evaporative deuterium enrichment on the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes has not been resolved. Here we present a study where we test if and to what degree leaf water evaporative enrichment influences the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes. Based on modeling exercises, experimental data and observational investigations we show that deuterium enriched leaf water has a critically important influence on the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes. This finding has important implications for the interpretation of leaf wax n-alkane ?D values as it indicates that leaf wax n-alkanes ?D values do not simply reflect the ?D values of precipitation as has previously assumed. Instead our data show that the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes reflect deuterium enriched leaf water and reflect therefore a plant-shaped signal such as evapotranspiration.

  4. [Normal alkanes characteristic parameters of Jinzhou Bay surface sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Ze-Li; Ma, Qi-Min; Cheng, Hai-Ou; Xu, Shao-Qing

    2011-11-01

    The concentration, composition and characteristic parameters of 18 surface sediment samples collected from Jinzhou Bay were studied. The samples were soxhlet-extracted with a mixture of 1: 1 (V/V) dichloromethane-hexane and analyzed by GC-MS after purification and concentration. Concentrations of n-alkanes vary from 1.9 to 4.2 microg x g(-1) with an average value of 2.6 microg x g(-1) dry weight. n-Alkanes distribution patterns of all positions were characterized by double peak-cluster, which means double sources from terrestrial and marine origin. The sum of nC25 to nC31 accounts for 20%-32% of the total n-alkanes, while the average value of L/H, C31/C19, TAR ratio are 0.67, 3.06, 2.02, respectively. All of these three indices suggest that the terrestrial contributions are higher than marine sources, especially for No. 2, 3 and 7 stations, which were influenced by riverinput nearby. Carbon Preference Index (CPI) ranges from 1.19 to 2.63 with an average value of 1.73, which is close to 1; the ratio of Pristane/Phytane (Pr/Ph) and unresolved/resolved compounds (U/R) range from 0.91 to 1.28, 2.2 to 4.3, respectively. All of these three parameters indicate that No. 13 and 15 stations are influenced by petroleum pollution. Comprehensive analysis of various parameters shows that Jinzhou Bay is threatened by both terrestrial inputs and petroleum hydrocarbons contaminations, which may relate to river discharging and port shipping in Jinzhou Bay. PMID:22295627

  5. Assessment of the GECKO-A modeling tool using chamber observations for C12 alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; La, S.; Ouzebidour, F.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Yee, L. D.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zhang, X.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production and ageing is the result of atmospheric oxidation processes leading to the progressive formation of organic species with higher oxidation state and lower volatility. Explicit chemical mechanisms reflect our understanding of these multigenerational oxidation steps. Major uncertainties remain concerning the processes leading to SOA formation and the development, assessment and improvement of such explicit schemes is therefore a key issue. The development of explicit mechanism to describe the oxidation of long chain hydrocarbons is however a challenge. Indeed, explicit oxidation schemes involve a large number of reactions and secondary organic species, far exceeding the size of chemical schemes that can be written manually. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is a computer program designed to overcome this difficulty. GECKO-A generates gas phase oxidation schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In this study, we examine the ability of the generated schemes to explain SOA formation observed in the Caltech Environmental Chambers from various C12 alkane isomers and under high NOx and low NOx conditions. First results show that the model overestimates both the SOA yields and the O/C ratios. Various sensitivity tests are performed to explore processes that might be responsible for these disagreements.

  6. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  7. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  8. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  9. Evolution of tricyclic alkanes in the Espirito Santo Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquino Neto, F. R.; Cardoso, J. N.; Rodrigues, R.; Trindade, L. A. F.

    1986-09-01

    The distributions of tricyclic isoprenoid alkanes were characterized in the Neocomian sequence from the Espirito Santo Basin, Brazil, by high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and co-injection with synthetic standards where available. A suite of homologous components ranging from C 20 to C 28 were present throughout the sequence as a mixture of stereoisomers whose relative abundance changed with depth. The epimerization rates were similar for the various tricyclic compounds irrespective of side-chain length, achieving equilibrium ratios before the main stage of oil generation. This new maturity parameter should be useful as a supplement to sterane/hopane measurements.

  10. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol and... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... as reaction product of alkanediol and epichlorohydrin (PMN P-89-760) is subject to reporting...

  15. Surfactant-induced phases in water-supported alkane monolayers: I. Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Yefet, Shai; Sloutskin, Eli; Tamam, Lilach; Sapir, Zvi; Cohen, Asaf; Deutsch, Moshe; Ocko, Benjamin M

    2014-07-15

    Alkanes longer than n = 6 carbons do not spread on the water surface, but condense in a macroscopic lens. However, adding trimethylammonium-based surfactants, C(m)TAB, in submillimolar concentrations causes the alkanes to spread and form a single Langmuir-Gibbs (LG) monolayer of mixed alkanes and surfactant tails, which coexists with the alkane lenses. Upon cooling, this LG film surface-freezes at a temperature T(s) above the bulk freezing temperature T(b). The thermodynamics of surface freezing (SF) of these LG films is studied by surface tension measurements for a range of alkanes (n = 12-21) and surfactant alkyl lengths (m = 14, 16, 18), at several concentrations c. The surface freezing range T(s)-T(b) observed is up to 25 °C, an order of magnitude larger than the temperature range of SF monolayers on the surface of pure alkane melts. The measured (n,T) surface phase diagram is accounted for well by a model based on mixtures' theory, which includes an interchange energy term ?. ? is found to be negative, implying attraction between unlike species, rather than the repulsion found for SF of binary alkane mixtures. Thus, the surfactant/alkane mixing is a necessary condition for the occurrence of SF in these LG films. The X-ray derived structure of the films is presented in an accompanying paper. PMID:24918482

  16. Identity and mechanisms of alkane-oxidizing metalloenzymes from deep-sea hydrothermal vents

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Erin M.; Keddis, Ramaydalis; Groves, John T.; Vetriani, Costantino; Austin, Rachel Narehood

    2013-01-01

    Six aerobic alkanotrophs (organism that can metabolize alkanes as their sole carbon source) isolated from deep-sea hydrothermal vents were characterized using the radical clock substrate norcarane to determine the metalloenzyme and reaction mechanism used to oxidize alkanes. The organisms studied were Alcanivorax sp. strains EPR7 and MAR14, Marinobacter sp. strain EPR21, Nocardioides sp. strains EPR26w, EPR28w, and Parvibaculum hydrocarbonoclasticum strain EPR92. Each organism was able to grow on n-alkanes as the sole carbon source and therefore must express genes encoding an alkane-oxidizing enzyme. Results from the oxidation of the radical-clock diagnostic substrate norcarane demonstrated that five of the six organisms (EPR7, MAR14, EPR21, EPR26w, and EPR28w) used an alkane hydroxylase functionally similar to AlkB to catalyze the oxidation of medium-chain alkanes, while the sixth organism (EPR92) used an alkane-oxidizing cytochrome P450 (CYP)-like protein to catalyze the oxidation. DNA sequencing indicated that EPR7 and EPR21 possess genes encoding AlkB proteins, while sequencing results from EPR92 confirmed the presence of a gene encoding CYP-like alkane hydroxylase, consistent with the results from the norcarane experiments. PMID:23825470

  17. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the ?13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the ?13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (?3.5 and ?6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial community composition and density. PMID:24376442

  18. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  19. Adopting SI Units in Introductory Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, William G.; Moore, John W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses advantages to the use of SI units in dealing with proportionality problems, with particular emphasis on stoichiometric relationships. A table lists conversion relationships commonly used in chemistry, and a single-step "roadmap" is provided for each relationship. (CS)

  20. 40 CFR 721.10626 - 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted methylene biscarbomonocycle, 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted... § 721.10626 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted...identified generically as 1,4-butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10626 - 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted methylene biscarbomonocycle, 2...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted... § 721.10626 1,4-Butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and substituted...identified generically as 1,4-butanediol, polymer with substituted alkane and...

  2. Structure-property relationships of BaCeO perovskites for the oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, T.M.; Jackson, N.B.; Miller, J.E.; Sault, A.G.; Trudell, D.

    1997-12-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions for the formation of two important organic feedstocks ethylene and propylene are of great interest because of the potential in capital and energy savings associated with these reactions. Theoretically, ODH can achieve high conversions of the starting materials (ethane and propane) at lower temperatures than conventional dehydrogenation reactions. The important focus in this study of ODH catalysts is the development of a structure-property relationship for catalyst with respect to selectivity, so as to avoid the more thermodynamically favorable combustion reaction. Catalysts for the ODH reaction generally consist of mixed metal oxides. Since for the most selective catalyst lattice oxygen is known to participate in the reaction, catalysts are sought with surface oxygen atoms that are labile enough to perform dehydrogenation, but not so plentiful or weakly bound as to promote complete combustion. Also, catalysts must be able to replenish surface oxygen by transport from the bulk. Perovskite materials are candidates to fulfill these requirements. The authors are studying BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites doped with elements such as Ca, Mg, and Sr. During the ODH of the alkanes at high temperatures, the perovskite structure is not retained and a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed, as revealed by XRD. While the Ca doped materials showed enhanced total combustion activity below 600 C, they only showed enhanced alkene production at 700 C. Bulk structural and surface changes, as monitored by powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are being correlated with activity in order to understand the factors affecting catalyst performance, and to modify catalyst formulations to improve conversion and selectivity.

  3. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemistry is applied to estimating the exposure of ecosystems and humans to various chemical environmental stressors. Among the stressors of concern are mercury, pesticides, and arsenic. Advanced analytical chemistry techniques are used to measure these stressors ...

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  10. Biochemistry chemistry &

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Stephen L.

    Biochemistry chemistry & A n A ly t i c A l B i o l o g i c A l i n o r g A n i c o r g A n i c P h of South Carolina..........................1 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry....2 The Graduate Program in Chemistry and Biochemistry.........................................................3 Ph

  11. Adsorption of proteins at the aqueous solution/alkane interface: Co-adsorption of protein and alkane.

    PubMed

    Miller, R; Aksenenko, E V; Zinkovych, I I; Fainerman, V B

    2015-08-01

    The equations of state, adsorption isotherms and functions of the distribution of protein molecules in liquid interfacial layers with respect to molar area and the equations for their viscoelastic behavior are presented. This theory was used to determine the adsorption characteristics of ?-casein and ?-lactoglobulin at water/oil interfaces. The experimental results are shown to be describable quite adequately by the proposed theory with consistent model parameters. The data analysis demonstrated that the ?-casein molecule adsorbed at equilibrium conditions is more unfolded as compared with dynamic conditions, and this fact causes the significant increase of the adsorption equilibrium constant. The theory assumes the adsorption of protein molecules from the aqueous solution and a competitive adsorption of alkane molecules from the alkane phase. The comparison of the experimental equilibrium interfacial tension isotherms for ?-lactoglobulin at the solution/hexane interface with data calculated using the proposed theoretical model demonstrates that the assumption of a competitive adsorption is essential, and the influence of the hexane molecules on the shape of the adsorption isotherm does in fact exist. PMID:25813359

  12. Compassionate Conversations

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Sharryn; Bray, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Staff engagement is much more than just a bonus in any organisation. CQC data shows that it is very clearly linked to positive results in both patient and staff outcomes (fewer complaints, improved safety, reduced sickness, fewer accidents, and more as per Michael West). Staff engagement may seem nebulous but is in fact measured routinely annually in the National Staff Survey. The problem is that often Trust Boards with poor Staff Survey results may struggle to increase staff engagement as staff see management initiatives as ‘management fads’ or ‘tick-box exercises’ purely for targets, not their own benefit. Compassionate Conversations are a ground-level initiative focused primarily on supporting and motivating individual staff as the primary focus. This allows the benefits to patients and in Human Resources to be an unspoken anticipated benefit. They are led by a Psychologist and Consultant in a coaching supportive atmosphere in an open or selected group. The Conversations have been rated 9/10 or higher by 64% of participants, while 75% of all participants voluntarily provided feedback. Feedback initially was that Conversations were too clinically-focused and further Conversations were more wide-ranging in topic and included departmental roadshows.

  13. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  14. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  15. Copper-Catalyzed Intermolecular Amidation and Imidation of Unactivated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C–H bonds over tertiary C–H bonds and even occur at primary C–H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from ?-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C–H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C–H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product. PMID:24405209

  16. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular amidation and imidation of unactivated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ba L; Li, Bijie; Driess, Matthias; Hartwig, John F

    2014-02-12

    We report a set of rare copper-catalyzed reactions of alkanes with simple amides, sulfonamides, and imides (i.e., benzamides, tosylamides, carbamates, and phthalimide) to form the corresponding N-alkyl products. The reactions lead to functionalization at secondary C-H bonds over tertiary C-H bonds and even occur at primary C-H bonds. [(phen)Cu(phth)] (1-phth) and [(phen)Cu(phth)2] (1-phth2), which are potential intermediates in the reaction, have been isolated and fully characterized. The stoichiometric reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with alkanes, alkyl radicals, and radical probes were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of the amidation. The catalytic and stoichiometric reactions require both copper and tBuOOtBu for the generation of N-alkyl product. Neither 1-phth nor 1-phth2 reacted with excess cyclohexane at 100 °C without tBuOOtBu. However, the reactions of 1-phth and 1-phth2 with tBuOOtBu afforded N-cyclohexylphthalimide (Cy-phth), N-methylphthalimide, and tert-butoxycyclohexane (Cy-OtBu) in approximate ratios of 70:20:30, respectively. Reactions with radical traps support the intermediacy of a tert-butoxy radical, which forms an alkyl radical intermediate. The intermediacy of an alkyl radical was evidenced by the catalytic reaction of cyclohexane with benzamide in the presence of CBr4, which formed exclusively bromocyclohexane. Furthermore, stoichiometric reactions of [(phen)Cu(phth)2] with tBuOOtBu and (Ph(Me)2CO)2 at 100 °C without cyclohexane afforded N-methylphthalimide (Me-phth) from ?-Me scission of the alkoxy radicals to form a methyl radical. Separate reactions of cyclohexane and d12-cyclohexane with benzamide showed that the turnover-limiting step in the catalytic reaction is the C-H cleavage of cyclohexane by a tert-butoxy radical. These mechanistic data imply that the tert-butoxy radical reacts with the C-H bonds of alkanes, and the subsequent alkyl radical combines with 1-phth2 to form the corresponding N-alkyl imide product. PMID:24405209

  17. Identification of an amino acid position that determines the substrate range of integral membrane alkane hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Smits, Theo H M; Roos, Franz F; Brunner, Tobias; Balada, Stefanie B; Röthlisberger, Martina; Witholt, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Selection experiments and protein engineering were used to identify an amino acid position in integral membrane alkane hydroxylases (AHs) that determines whether long-chain-length alkanes can be hydroxylated by these enzymes. First, substrate range mutants of the Pseudomonas putida GPo1 and Alcanivorax borkumensis AP1 medium-chain-length AHs were obtained by selection experiments with a specially constructed host. In all mutants able to oxidize alkanes longer than C13, W55 (in the case of P. putida AlkB) or W58 (in the case of A. borkumensis AlkB1) had changed to a much less bulky amino acid, usually serine or cysteine. The corresponding position in AHs from other bacteria that oxidize alkanes longer than C13 is occupied by a less bulky hydrophobic residue (A, V, L, or I). Site-directed mutagenesis of this position in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AH, which oxidizes C10 to C16 alkanes, to introduce more bulky amino acids changed the substrate range in the opposite direction; L69F and L69W mutants oxidized only C10 and C11 alkanes. Subsequent selection for growth on longer alkanes restored the leucine codon. A structure model of AHs based on these results is discussed. PMID:15601691

  18. Study of the Thermal Diffusion Behavior of Alkane/Benzene Mixtures by Thermal Diffusion Forced Rayleigh Scattering Experiments and Lattice Model Calculations

    E-print Network

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    Study of the Thermal Diffusion Behavior of Alkane/Benzene Mixtures by Thermal Diffusion Forced mixtures of linear alkanes (heptane, nonane, undecane, tridecane, pentadecane, heptadecane) in benzene has and temperatures. The Soret coefficient ST of the alkane was found to be negative for these n-alkane/benzene

  19. n-alkane profiles of engine lubricating oil and particulate matter by molecular sieve extraction.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Gianni A; Charland, Jean-Pierre; Macdonald, Penny; Graham, Lisa

    2007-05-15

    As part of the Canadian Atmospheric Fine Particle Research Program to obtain reliable primary source emission profiles, a molecular sieve method was developed to reliably determine n-alkanes in lubricating oils, vehicle emissions, and mobile source dominated ambient particulate matter (PM). This work was also initiated to better calculate carbon preference index values (CPI: the ratio of the sums of odd over even n-alkanes), a parameter for estimating anthropogenic versus biogenic contributions in PM. n-Alkanes in lubricating oil and mobile source dominated PM are difficult to identify and quantify by gas chromatography due to the presence of similar components that cannot be fully resolved. This results in a hump, the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) that leads to incorrect n-alkane concentrations and CPI values. The sieve method yielded better chromatography, unambiguous identification of n-alkanes and allowed examination of differences between n-alkane profiles in light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) lubricating oils that would have been otherwise difficult. These profile differences made it possible to relate the LDV profile to that of the PM samples collected during a tunnel study in August 2001 near Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada). The n-alkane PM data revealed that longer sampling times result in a negative artifact, i.e., the desorption of the more volatile n-alkanes from the filters. Furthermore, the sieve procedure yielded n-alkane data that allowed calculation of accurate CPI values for lubricating oils and PM samples. Finally, this method may prove helpful in estimating the respective diesel and gasoline contributions to ambient PM. PMID:17547199

  20. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1989-10-17

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  1. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H. (Bethany, CT); Brown, Stephen H. (East Haven, CT)

    1989-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary and secondary alcohols, phosphine oxides and primary, secondary and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  2. Effect of n-alkanes on asphaltene structuring in petroleum oils.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, Christian; Viguié, Jean-Romain; Grolier, Jean-Pierre E; Rogalski, Marek

    2005-05-24

    The interactions between asphaltenes and short- to medium-chain n-alkanes were studied using titration microcalorimetry and inverse chromatography. The exothermic heat effects observed upon mixing of asphaltenes and n-alkanes were interpreted in terms of assembling of the two types of compounds into mixed structures. We show that the energy of the interactions between n-alkanes and the asphaltene hydrocarbon chains is close to the energy of the interactions between the asphaltene chains. We propose that the latter interactions are responsible for the formation of the asphaltene aggregates and are the driving force of the aggregate assembly into higher structures. PMID:15896019

  3. Conversational sensemaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  4. Conversational sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  5. Characterization of the Medium- and Long-Chain n-Alkanes Degrading Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain SJTD-1 and Its Alkane Hydroxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huan; Xu, Jing; Liang, Rubing; Liu, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A gram-negative aliphatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium SJTD-1 isolated from oil-contaminated soil was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa by comparative analyses of the 16S rRNA sequence, phenotype, and physiological features. SJTD-1 could efficiently mineralize medium- and long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C30) as its sole carbon source within seven days, showing the most optimal growth on n-hexadecane, followed by n-octadecane, and n-eicosane. In 36 h, 500 mg/L of tetradecane, hexadecane, and octadecane were transformed completely; and 2 g/L n-hexadecane was degraded to undetectable levels within 72 h. Two putative alkane-degrading genes (gene 3623 and gene 4712) were characterized and our results indicated that their gene products were rate-limiting enzymes involved in the synergetic catabolism of C12–C16 alkanes. On the basis of bioinformatics and transcriptional analysis, two P450 monooxygenases, along with a putative AlmA-like oxygenase, were examined. Genetically defective mutants lacking the characteristic alkane hydroxylase failed to degrade n-octadecane, thereby suggesting a different catalytic mechanism for the microbial transformation of alkanes with chain lengths over C18. PMID:25165808

  6. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  7. Computer Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, Aleksandr A.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    1986-04-01

    The state, problems, and prospects of a new branch of chemistry, computer chemistry, associated with the application of computers to the solution of chemical problems is described. The application of computers in quantum chemistry, in solution theory, in the search for new medicinal drugs, in the identification of chemical compounds from spectroscopic data, and in the development of the syntheses of new chemical compounds is examined. The level of the problems solved in the above fields of computer chemistry is demonstrated for specific examples. The bibliography includes 64 references.

  8. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  9. Second NASA Conference on Laser Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W. (editor)

    1976-01-01

    The possible transmission of high power laser beams over long distances and their conversion to thrust, electricity, or other useful forms of energy is considered. Specific topics discussed include: laser induced chemistry; developments in photovoltaics, including modification of the Schottky barrier devices and generation of high voltage emf'sby laser radiation of piezoelectric ceramics; the thermo electronic laser energy converter and the laser plasmadynamics converters; harmonic conversion of infrared laser radiation in molecular gases; and photon engines.

  10. Flow reactor studies of non-equilibrium plasma-assisted oxidation of n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Tsolas, Nicholas; Lee, Jong Guen; Yetter, Richard A

    2015-08-13

    The oxidation of n-alkanes (C1-C7) has been studied with and without the effects of a nanosecond, non-equilibrium plasma discharge at 1?atm pressure from 420 to 1250?K. Experiments have been performed under nearly isothermal conditions in a flow reactor, where reactive mixtures are diluted in Ar to minimize temperature changes from chemical reactions. Sample extraction performed at the exit of the reactor captures product and intermediate species and stores them in a multi-position valve for subsequent identification and quantification using gas chromatography. By fixing the flow rate in the reactor and varying the temperature, reactivity maps for the oxidation of fuels are achieved. Considering all the fuels studied, fuel consumption under the effects of the plasma is shown to have been enhanced significantly, particularly for the low-temperature regime (T<800?K). In fact, multiple transitions in the rates of fuel consumption are observed depending on fuel with the emergence of a negative-temperature-coefficient regime. For all fuels, the temperature for the transition into the high-temperature chemistry is lowered as a consequence of the plasma being able to increase the rate of fuel consumption. Using a phenomenological interpretation of the intermediate species formed, it can be shown that the active particles produced from the plasma enhance alkyl radical formation at all temperatures and enable low-temperature chain branching for fuels C3 and greater. The significance of this result demonstrates that the plasma provides an opportunity for low-temperature chain branching to occur at reduced pressures, which is typically observed at elevated pressures in thermal induced systems. PMID:26170423

  11. Temperature dependence of the structure of Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on liquid mercury

    E-print Network

    Pershan, Peter S.

    with the water and with each other. How- ever, the dominant effect, invariably present for organic monolayers films of fatty acids,8­10 alcohols,11 and alkanes12 on mercury, using x-ray and surface tension methods

  12. Increased stability of mercapto alkane functionalized Au nanoparticles towards DNA sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jans, H.; Stakenborg, T.; Jans, K.; Van de Broek, B.; Peeters, S.; Bonroy, K.; Lagae, L.; Borghs, G.; Maes, G.

    2010-07-01

    The use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in bioassays is often hampered by their colloidal stability. In this study, gold nanoparticles coated with different mercapto alkanes were investigated towards their stability. Hereto, the effects of the alkane chain length (5-11 methylene groups), the type of functional end-group (-OH or -COOH) and the amount of incorporated poly-ethylene oxide units (none, 3 or 6) on the GNP stabilization was evaluated. Based on these results, an optimal mercapto alkane (HS(CH2)11PEO6COOH) was selected to increase the colloidal stability up to 2 M NaCl. Furthermore, it was proved that this mercapto alkane is ideally suited to enhance the stability of DNA functionalized GNPs in high electrolytic hybridization buffers. The effectiveness of these DNA functionalized GNPs was demonstrated in a sandwich assay using a surface plasmon resonance biosensor. The superior stability of these nanoparticles during hybridization may lead to enhanced biosensor technologies.

  13. Experimental proof for resonant diffusion of normal alkanes in LTL and ZSM-12 zeolites

    E-print Network

    Yoo, K; Smirniotis, P G

    2015-01-01

    The intra-crystalline diffusion of normal alkanes in LTL and ZSM-12 zeolite was experimentally studied via gravimetric measurements performed at different temperatures. A periodic dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the number of carbon atoms in alkane was detected, which is an experimental proof for resonant diffusion. The present observations were described on the base of the existing theory of the resonant diffusion and several important parameters of the alkane-zeolite interaction and zeolite vibrations were obtained. In the considered temperature region the diffusion coefficient follows the Arrhenius law with periodic dependences of the pre-exponential factor and activation energy on the number of carbon atoms in alkanes. A compensation effect of simultaneous increases of the pre-exponential factor and the activation energy was also established.

  14. The Atomistic Structure for SelfAssembled Monolayers of Alkane Thiols on Au (111) Surfaces

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    ) Surfaces James J. Gerdy and William A. Goddard III* Materials and Process Simulation Center, Beckman Structure for Self­Assembled Monolayers of Alkane Thiols on Au (111) Surfaces James J. Gerdy and William A

  15. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, T.; Lyons, J.E.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Bhinde, M.V.

    1998-06-23

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins are disclosed, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides. 7 figs.

  16. Leaf-wax n-alkanes record the plantwater environment at leaf flush

    E-print Network

    Ehleringer, Jim

    ­5), mountain building events (6, 7), and floral transitions (8). However, critical questions re- lated-alkanes, carefully designed and controlled biologic experiments are needed that consider plant physiology

  17. Modeling the Role of Alkanes, Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Their Oligomers in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations ...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol...epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol...epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol...epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol...epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  2. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol...epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical substance and significant...reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as reaction product of...

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of the Versatile Alkane-Degrading Bacterium Aquabacterium sp. Strain NJ1

    PubMed Central

    Shiwa, Yuh; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Zylstra, Gerben J.

    2014-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of a soil bacterium, Aquabacterium sp. strain NJ1, capable of utilizing both liquid and solid alkanes, was deciphered. This is the first report of an Aquabacterium genome sequence. PMID:25477416

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of an Alkane Degrader, Alcanivorax sp. Strain NBRC 101098

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Takamasa; Tsuchikane, Keiko; Numata, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Maiko; Hosoyama, Akira; Ohji, Shoko; Yamazoe, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Alcanivorax sp. strain NBRC 101098 was isolated from seawater in Japan. Strain NBRC 101098 is able to degrade various types of n-alkanes. Here, we report the complete genome of strain NBRC 101098. PMID:25125640

  5. Liquid alkanes with targeted molecular weights from biomass-derived carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    West, Ryan M; Liu, Zhen Y; Peter, Maximilian; Dumesic, James A

    2008-01-01

    Liquid transportation fuels must burn cleanly and have high energy densities, criteria that are currently fulfilled by petroleum, a non-renewable resource, the combustion of which leads to increasing levels of atmospheric CO(2). An attractive approach for the production of transportation fuels from renewable biomass resources is to convert carbohydrates into alkanes with targeted molecular weights, such as C(8)-C(15) for jet-fuel applications. Targeted n-alkanes can be produced directly from fructose by an integrated process involving first the dehydration of this C(6) sugar to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, followed by controlled formation of C-C bonds with acetone to form C(9) and C(15) compounds, and completed by hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation reactions to form the corresponding n-alkanes. Analogous reactions are demonstrated starting with 5-methylfurfural or 2-furaldehyde, with the latter leading to C(8) and C(13) n-alkanes. PMID:18702136

  6. Alkane oxidation with porphyrins and metal complexes thereof having haloalkyl side chains

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA)

    1998-01-01

    Transition metal complexes of meso-haloalkylporphyrins, wherein the haloalkyl groups contain 2 to 8 carbon atoms have been found to be highly effective catalysts for oxidation of alkanes and for the decomposition of hydroperoxides.

  7. The Number of High-Energy Bands in the Photoelectron Spectrum of Alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merris, Russell; Gutman, Ivan

    2000-12-01

    It was observed that within the Bieri-Dill-Heilbronner-Schmelzer model for the calculation of the ion-ization energies of alkanes CnH2n+2, there are exactly n C2s -electron energy levels lying below the degenerate ?-ß manifold. We now show that, indeed, this regularity is obeyed by practically all alkane species. Exceptions do exist, but they must possess a (chemically infeasible) group of more than six mutually connected quaternary carbon atoms.

  8. Diesel and alkane fuels from biomass by organocatalysis and metal-acid tandem catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dajiang; Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2013-12-01

    Combo deal: Biomass furaldehydes are upgraded into oxygenated diesel and high-quality C10-12 linear alkane fuels. The first of two steps involves solvent-free self-condensation (Umpolung) through organocatalysis using an N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC), yielding C10 -C12 furoin intermediates. In the metal-acid tandem catalysis step, in water, the furoin intermediates are converted into oxygenated biodiesel by hydrogenation, etherification or esterification; or into premium alkane jet fuels by hydrodeoxygenation. PMID:23939751

  9. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 and the involvement of an alkane hydroxylase system in the metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus opacus R7 is a Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminated soil for its versatile metabolism; indeed the strain is able to grow on naphthalene, o-xylene, and several long- and medium-chain n-alkanes. In this work we determined the degradation of n-alkanes in Rhodococcus opacus R7 in presence of n-dodecane (C12), n-hexadecane (C16), n-eicosane (C20), n-tetracosane (C24) and the metabolic pathway in presence of C12. The consumption rate of C12 was 88%, of C16 was 69%, of C20 was 51% and of C24 it was 78%. The decrement of the degradation rate seems to be correlated to the length of the aliphatic chain of these hydrocarbons. On the basis of the metabolic intermediates determined by the R7 growth on C12, our data indicated that R. opacus R7 metabolizes medium-chain n-alkanes by the primary alcohol formation. This represents a difference in comparison with other Rhodococcus strains, in which a mixture of the two alcohols was observed. By GC-MSD analysis we also identified the monocarboxylic acid, confirming the terminal oxidation. Moreover, the alkB gene cluster from R. opacus R7 was isolated and its involvement in the n-alkane degradation system was investigated by the cloning of this genomic region into a shuttle-vector E. coli-Rhodococcus to evaluate the alkane hydroxylase activity. Our results showed an increased biodegradation of C12 in the recombinant strain R. erythropolis AP (pTipQT1-alkR7) in comparison with the wild type strain R. erythropolis AP. These data supported the involvement of the alkB gene cluster in the n-alkane degradation in the R7 strain. PMID:25401074

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  11. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida?AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3–4?h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5??M), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis. PMID:25874658

  12. Combustion Characteristics of Liquid Normal Alkane Fuels in a Model Combustor of Supersonic Combustion Ramjet Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ??, ?; ??, ??; ??, ??; ??, ???; ??, ??; ??, ??; ??, ??

    Effect of kinds of one-component n-alkane liquid fuels on combustion characteristics was investigated experimentally using a model combustor of scramjet engine. The inlet condition of a model combustor is 2.0 of Mach number, up to 2400K of total temperature, and 0.38MPa of total pressure. Five kinds of n-alkane are tested, of which carbon numbers are 7, 8, 10, 13, and 16. They are more chemically active and less volatile with an increase of alkane carbon number. Fuels are injected to the combustor in the upstream of cavity with barbotage nitrogen gas and self-ignition performance was investigated. The result shows that self-ignition occurs with less equivalence ratio when alkane carbon number is smaller. This indicates that physical characteristic of fuel, namely volatile of fuel, is dominant for self-ignition behavior. Effect on flame-holding performance is also examined with adding pilot hydrogen and combustion is kept after cutting off pilot hydrogen with the least equivalence ratio where alkane carbon number is from 8 to 10. These points are discussed qualitatively from the conflict effect of chemical and physical properties on alkane carbon number.

  13. Alkanes in flower surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis influence attraction to Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Sarkar, N; Barik, A

    2013-08-01

    Extraction, thin-layer chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry analyses revealed 15 alkanes representing 97.14% of the total alkanes in the surface waxes of Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng flowers. Nonacosane was the prevailing alkane followed by hexatriacontane, nonadecane, heptacosane, and hentriacontane, accounting for 39.08%, 24.24%, 13.52%, 6.32%, and 5.12%, respectively. The alkanes from flower surface waxes followed by a synthetic mixture of alkanes mimicking alkanes of flower surface waxes elicited attraction of the female insect, Aulacophora foveicollis Lucas (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) between 2 and 10-?g/mL concentrations in a Y-shaped glass tube olfactometer bioassay under laboratory conditions. Synthetic nonadecane from 178.28-891.37 ng, heptacosane from 118.14-590.72 ng, and nonacosane at 784.73 ng showed attraction of the insect. A synthetic mixture of 534.82 ng nonadecane, 354.43 ng heptacosane, and 2,354.18 ng nonacosane elicited highest attraction of A. foveicollis. PMID:23949856

  14. Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria as whole-cell biosensors for n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Emma; Yuste, Luis; Rojo, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    Whole-cell biosensors offer potentially useful, cost-effective systems for the in-situ monitoring of seawater for hydrocarbons derived from accidental spills. The present work compares the performance of a biosensor system for the detection of alkanes in seawater, hosted in either Escherichia coli (commonly employed in whole-cell biosensors but not optimized for alkane assimilation) or different marine bacteria specialized in assimilating alkanes. The sensor system was based on the Pseudomonas putida?AlkS regulatory protein and the PalkB promoter fused to a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein. While the E. coli sensor provided the fastest response to pure alkanes (25-fold induction after 2 h under the conditions used), a sensor based on Alcanivorax borkumensis was slower, requiring 3-4?h to reach similar induction values. However, the A. borkumensis sensor showed a fourfold lower detection threshold for octane (0.5??M), and was also better at sensing the alkanes present in petrol. At petrol concentrations of 0.0125%, the A. borkumensis sensor rendered a sevenfold induction, while E. coli sensor showed no response. We discuss possible explanations to this behaviour in terms of the cellular adaptations to alkane uptake and the basal fluorescence produced by each bacterial strain, which was lowest for A. borkumensis. PMID:25874658

  15. Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry**

    E-print Network

    Falvo, Michael

    Nanoscience and chemistry Nanoscience, Nanotechnology, and Chemistry** George M. Whitesides* Keywords: · chemistry · devices · nanoscience · nanotechnology What is Nanoscience? "Nanoscience- est dimensions ranging from a few nanometers to less than 100 nanometers.[1­3] In chemistry

  16. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  17. Impact of chamber wall loss of gaseous organic compounds on secondary organic aerosol formation: explicit modeling of SOA formation from alkane and alkene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Y. S.; Camredon, M.; Ziemann, P. J.; Valorso, R.; Matsunaga, A.; Lannuque, V.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that low volatility gas-phase species can be lost onto the smog chamber wall surfaces. Although this loss of organic vapors to walls could be substantial during experiments, its effect on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation has not been well characterized and quantified yet. Here the potential impact of chamber walls on the loss of gaseous organic species and SOA formation has been explored using the Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of the Organics in the Atmosphere (GECKO-A) modeling tool which explicitly represents SOA formation and gas/wall partitioning. The model was compared with 41 smog chamber experiments of SOA formation under OH oxidation of alkane and alkene series (linear, cyclic and C12-branched alkanes and terminal, internal and 2-methyl alkenes with 7 to 17 carbon atoms) under high NOx conditions. Simulated trends match observed trends within and between homologous series. The loss of organic vapors to the chamber walls is found to affect SOA yields as well as the composition of the gas and the particle phases. Simulated distributions of the species in various phases suggest that nitrates, hydroxynitrates and carbonylesters could substantially be lost onto walls. The extent of this process depends on the rate of gas/wall mass transfer, the vapor pressure of the species and the duration of the experiments. This work suggests that SOA yields inferred from chamber experiments could be underestimated up to 0.35 yield unit due to the loss of organic vapors to chamber walls.

  18. Fatty Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Multigene Family Involved in the Assimilation of n-Alkanes in Yarrowia lipolytica*

    PubMed Central

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2014-01-01

    In the n-alkane assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, n-alkanes are oxidized to fatty acids via fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes, after which they are utilized as carbon sources. Here, we show that four genes (HFD1–HFD4) encoding fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) are involved in the metabolism of n-alkanes in Y. lipolytica. A mutant, in which all of four HFD genes are deleted (?hfd1–4 strain), could not grow on n-alkanes of 12–18 carbons; however, the expression of one of those HFD genes restored its growth on n-alkanes. Production of Hfd2Ap or Hfd2Bp, translation products of transcript variants generated from HFD2 by the absence or presence of splicing, also supported the growth of the ?hfd1–4 strain on n-alkanes. The FALDH activity in the extract of the wild-type strain was increased when cells were incubated in the presence of n-decane, whereas this elevation in FALDH activity by n-decane was not observed in ?hfd1–4 strain extract. Substantial FALDH activities were detected in the extracts of Escherichia coli cells expressing the HFD genes. Fluorescent microscopic observation suggests that Hfd3p and Hfd2Bp are localized predominantly in the peroxisome, whereas Hfd1p and Hfd2Ap are localized in both the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisome. These results suggest that the HFD multigene family is responsible for the oxidation of fatty aldehydes to fatty acids in the metabolism of n-alkanes, and raise the possibility that Hfd proteins have diversified by gene multiplication and RNA splicing to efficiently assimilate or detoxify fatty aldehydes in Y. lipolytica. PMID:25315778

  19. Alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB) phylotype composition and diversity in northern Gulf of Mexico bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Conor B.; Tolar, Bradley B.; Hollibaugh, James T.; King, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic activities introduce alkanes into marine systems where they are degraded by alkane hydroxylases expressed by phylogenetically diverse bacteria. Partial sequences for alkB, one of the structural genes of alkane hydroxylase, have been used to assess the composition of alkane-degrading communities, and to determine their responses to hydrocarbon inputs. We present here the first spatially extensive analysis of alkB in bacterioplankton of the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGoM), a region that experiences numerous hydrocarbon inputs. We have analyzed 401 partial alkB gene sequences amplified from genomic extracts collected during March 2010 from 17 water column samples that included surface waters and bathypelagic depths. Previous analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences for these and related samples have shown that nGoM bacterial community composition and structure stratify strongly with depth, with distinctly different communities above and below 100 m. Although we hypothesized that alkB gene sequences would exhibit a similar pattern, PCA analyses of operational protein units (OPU) indicated that community composition did not vary consistently with depth or other major physical-chemical variables. We observed 22 distinct OPUs, one of which was ubiquitous and accounted for 57% of all sequences. This OPU clustered with AlkB sequences from known hydrocarbon oxidizers (e.g., Alcanivorax and Marinobacter). Some OPUs could not be associated with known alkane degraders, however, and perhaps represent novel hydrocarbon-oxidizing populations or genes. These results indicate that the capacity for alkane hydrolysis occurs widely in the nGoM, but that alkane degrader diversity varies substantially among sites and responds differently than bulk communities to physical-chemical variables. PMID:24376439

  20. Proteomic insights into metabolic adaptations in Alcanivorax borkumensis induced by alkane utilization.

    PubMed

    Sabirova, Julia S; Ferrer, Manuel; Regenhardt, Daniela; Timmis, Kenneth N; Golyshin, Peter N

    2006-06-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is a ubiquitous marine petroleum oil-degrading bacterium with an unusual physiology specialized for alkane metabolism. This "hydrocarbonoclastic" bacterium degrades an exceptionally broad range of alkane hydrocarbons but few other substrates. The proteomic analysis presented here reveals metabolic features of the hydrocarbonoclastic lifestyle. Specifically, hexadecane-grown and pyruvate-grown cells differed in the expression of 97 cytoplasmic and membrane-associated proteins whose genes appeared to be components of 46 putative operon structures. Membrane proteins up-regulated in alkane-grown cells included three enzyme systems able to convert alkanes via terminal oxidation to fatty acids, namely, enzymes encoded by the well-known alkB1 gene cluster and two new alkane hydroxylating systems, a P450 cytochrome monooxygenase and a putative flavin-binding monooxygenase, and enzymes mediating beta-oxidation of fatty acids. Cytoplasmic proteins up-regulated in hexadecane-grown cells reflect a central metabolism based on a fatty acid diet, namely, enzymes of the glyoxylate bypass and of the gluconeogenesis pathway, able to provide key metabolic intermediates, like phosphoenolpyruvate, from fatty acids. They also include enzymes for synthesis of riboflavin and of unsaturated fatty acids and cardiolipin, which presumably reflect membrane restructuring required for membranes to adapt to perturbations induced by the massive influx of alkane oxidation enzymes. Ancillary functions up-regulated included the lipoprotein releasing system (Lol), presumably associated with biosurfactant release, and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis enzymes associated with carbon storage under conditions of carbon surfeit. The existence of three different alkane-oxidizing systems is consistent with the broad range of oil hydrocarbons degraded by A. borkumensis and its ecological success in oil-contaminated marine habitats. PMID:16707669

  1. Urine chemistry

    MedlinePLUS

    Chemistry - urine ... For this test, a clean catch (midstream) urine sample is needed. Some tests require that you collect all of your urine for 24 hours. Your doctor will order certain tests, which ...

  2. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  3. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  4. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  7. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  8. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  9. Effect of Different Types of Small-Group Activities on Students' Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Krista K.; Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Teaching reform efforts in chemistry education often involve engaging students in small-group activities of different types. This study focused on the analysis of how activity type affected the nature of group conversations. In particular, we analyzed the small-group conversations of students enrolled in a chemistry course for nonscience majors.…

  10. Leaf wax n-alkane distributions in and across modern plants: Implications for paleoecology and chemotaxonomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Rosemary T.; McInerney, Francesca A.

    2013-09-01

    Long chain (C21 to C37) n-alkanes are among the most long-lived and widely utilized terrestrial plant biomarkers. Dozens of studies have examined the range and variation of n-alkane chain-length abundances in modern plants from around the world, and n-alkane distributions have been used for a variety of purposes in paleoclimatology and paleoecology as well as chemotaxonomy. However, most of the paleoecological applications of n-alkane distributions have been based on a narrow set of modern data that cannot address intra- and inter-plant variability. Here, we present the results of a study using trees from near Chicago, IL, USA, as well as a meta-analysis of published data on modern plant n-alkane distributions. First, we test the conformity of n-alkane distributions in mature leaves across the canopy of 38 individual plants from 24 species as well as across a single growing season and find no significant differences for either canopy position or time of leaf collection. Second, we compile 2093 observations from 86 sources, including the new data here, to examine the generalities of n-alkane parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and chain-length ratios for different plant groups. We show that angiosperms generally produce more n-alkanes than do gymnosperms, supporting previous observations, and furthermore that CPI values show such variation in modern plants that it is prudent to discard the use of CPI as a quantitative indicator of n-alkane degradation in sediments. We also test the hypotheses that certain n-alkane chain lengths predominate in and therefore can be representative of particular plant groups, namely, C23 and C25 in Sphagnum mosses, C27 and C29 in woody plants, and C31 in graminoids (grasses). We find that chain-length distributions are highly variable within plant groups, such that chemotaxonomic distinctions between grasses and woody plants are difficult to make based on n-alkane abundances. In contrast, Sphagnum mosses are marked by their predominance of C23 and C25, chain lengths which are largely absent in terrestrial vascular plants. The results here support the use of C23 as a robust proxy for Sphagnum mosses in paleoecological studies, but not the use of C27, C29, and C31 to separate graminoids and woody plants from one another, as both groups produce highly variable but significant amounts of all three chain lengths. In Africa, C33 and C35 chain lengths appear to distinguish graminoids from some woody plants, but this may be a reflection of the differences in rainforest and savanna environments. Indeed, variation in the abundances of long n-alkane chain lengths may be responding in part to local environmental conditions, and this calls for a more directed examination of the effects of temperature and aridity on plant n-alkane distributions in natural environments.

  11. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grazis, B.M.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  12. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Grazis, B.M.

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  13. Hydrogen isotope ratios of recent lacustrine sedimentary n-alkanes record modern climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachse, D.; Radke, J.; Gleixner, G.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios were measured on n-alkanes (n-C 12 to n-C 31) extracted from recent lake surface sediments along a N-S European transect to test if modern climate variability is recorded in these biomarkers. ?D values of the n-alkanes are compared to ?D values of meteoric water from the IAEA-GNIP database spanning a range from -119‰ in northern Sweden to -41‰ in southern Italy, to lake water ?D values, and to mean annual temperatures, varying between -2.0°C in the north and 13.7°C in the south. ?D values of the short-chained n-alkanes n-C 12 to n-C 20, excluding algal derived n-C 17 and n-C 19, are higher in the north and lower in the south. The isotopic fractionation ? for hydrogen between meteoric water and the short-chained n-alkanes is increasing from N to S by more than 100‰ and is significantly correlated to mean annual temperature for n-C 16 and n-C 18. This suggests that these n-alkanes may originate from a different source in the northern lakes, possibly due to petroleum contamination, or are synthesized using a different biochemical pathway. The n-C 17 and n-C 19 alkanes of algal origin, the n-C 21 and n-C 23 alkanes originating from water plants, and the long-chain n-alkanes n-C 25, n-C 27, n-C 29, and n-C 31 of terrestrial origin, clearly correlate with ?D values of meteoric water, lake water, and mean annual temperature, indicating that they excellently record the ?D value of meteoric water. The mean hydrogen isotope fractionation ? C17/w of -157‰ (SD = 13) between n-C 17 and meteoric water is fairly constant over the wide range of different climates and lake environments, suggesting only minor influence of environmental factors on this biochemical fractionation. This suggests that ?D values of n-C 17 are suitable to reconstruct the isotopic composition of source water. The mean fractionation between the long-chain n-alkanes and water is -128‰ (SD = 12). The mean difference of 31‰ between both ? values is likely due to evaporative enrichment of deuterium in the leaf water. If this is the only influence on the enrichment, the difference between the ?D values of terrestrial and aquatic compounds might be suitable to reconstruct terrestrial evapotranspiration of the lake environment.

  14. Ubiquitous Presence and Novel Diversity of Anaerobic Alkane Degraders in Cold Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Gittel, Antje; Donhauser, Johanna; Røy, Hans; Girguis, Peter R.; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Kjeldsen, Kasper U.

    2015-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil and are released to the marine environment by natural seepage and from anthropogenic sources. Due to their chemical inertness, their removal from anoxic marine sediments is primarily controlled by the activity of anaerobic alkane-degrading microorganisms. To facilitate comprehensive cultivation-independent surveys of the diversity and distribution of anaerobic alkane degraders, we designed novel PCR primers that cover all known diversity of the 1-methylalkyl succinate synthase gene (masD/assA), which catalyzes the initial activation of alkanes. We studied masD/assA gene diversity in pristine and seepage-impacted Danish coastal sediments, as well as in sediments and alkane-degrading enrichment cultures from the Middle Valley (MV) hydrothermal vent system in the Pacific Northwest. MasD/assA genes were ubiquitously present, and the primers captured the diversity of both known and previously undiscovered masD/assA gene diversity. Seepage sediments were dominated by a single masD/assA gene cluster, which is presumably indicative of a substrate-adapted community, while pristine sediments harbored a diverse range of masD/assA phylotypes including those present in seepage sediments. This rare biosphere of anaerobic alkane degraders will likely increase in abundance in the event of seepage or accidental oil spillage. Nanomolar concentrations of short-chain alkanes (SCA) were detected in pristine and seepage sediments. Interestingly, anaerobic alkane degraders closely related to strain BuS5, the only SCA degrader in pure culture, were found in mesophilic MV enrichments, but not in cold sediments from Danish waters. We propose that the new masD/assA gene lineages in these sediments represent novel phylotypes that are either fueled by naturally occurring low levels of SCA or that metabolize medium- to long-chain alkanes. Our study highlights that masD/assA genes are a relevant diagnostic marker to identify seepage and microseepage, e.g., during prospecting for oil and gas, and may act as an indicator of anthropogenic oil spills in marine sediments.

  15. Enhanced biodegradation of alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil by mixed strains and bacterial community analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Li, Chen; Zhou, Zhengxi; Wen, Jianping; You, Xueyi; Mao, Youzhi; Lu, Chunzhe; Huo, Guangxin; Jia, Xiaoqiang

    2014-04-01

    In this study, two strains, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 and Pseudomonas sp. XM-01, were isolated from soil samples polluted by crude oil at Bohai offshore. The former one could degrade alkane hydrocarbons (crude oil and diesel, 1:4 (v/v)) and crude oil efficiently; the latter one failed to grow on alkane hydrocarbons but could produce rhamnolipid (a biosurfactant) with glycerol as sole carbon source. Compared with pure culture, mixed culture of the two strains showed higher capability in degrading alkane hydrocarbons and crude oil of which degradation rate were increased from 89.35 and 74.32?±?4.09 to 97.41 and 87.29?±?2.41 %, respectively. In the mixed culture, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 grew fast with sufficient carbon source and produced intermediates which were subsequently utilized for the growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01 and then, rhamnolipid was produced by Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. Till the end of the process, Acinetobacter sp. XM-02 was inhibited by the rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. XM-01. In addition, alkane hydrocarbon degradation rate of the mixed culture increased by 8.06 to 97.41 % compared with 87.29 % of the pure culture. The surface tension of medium dropping from 73.2?×?10(-3) to 28.6?×?10(-3) N/m. Based on newly found cooperation between the degrader and the coworking strain, rational investigations and optimal strategies to alkane hydrocarbons biodegradation were utilized for enhancing crude oil biodegradation. PMID:24532465

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  17. Metal-Catalyzed C-C Bond Cleavage in Alkanes: Effects of Methyl Substitution on Transition-State Structures and Stability

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    increase fuel octane values by converting n-alkanes into arenes, cycloalkanes, and branched acyclic alkanes more substituted (rates decrease as 1 C 2 C > 3 C > 4 C, where superscripts denote the number of C

  18. n-Alkanes in surficial sediments of Visakhapatnam harbour, east coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punyu, V. R.; Harji, R. R.; Bhosle, N. B.; Sawant, S. S.; Venkat, K.

    2013-04-01

    Surface sediments collected from 19 stations along Visakhapatnam harbour were analysed for organic carbon (OC), ? 13Coc, total lipids (TL), total hydrocarbon (THC), n-alkane concentration and composition. OC, ? 13Coc, TL and THC ranged from 0.6% to 7.6%, -29.3 to -23.8‰, 300 to 14,948 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, and 0.2 to 2,277 \\upmu g g - 1 dw, respectively. Predominance of even carbon numbers n-alkanes C12-C21 with carbon preference index (CPI) of <1 suggests major microbial influence. Fair abundance of odd carbon number n-alkanes in the range of C15-C22 and C23-C33 indicates some input from phytoplankton and terrestrial sources, respectively. Petrogenic input was evident from the presence of hopanes and steranes. The data suggest that organic matter (OM) sources varied spatially and were mostly derived from mixed source.

  19. Distribution, activity and function of short-chain alkane degrading phylotypes in hydrothermal vent sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. M.; Joye, S. B.; Hoarfrost, A.; Girguis, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    Global geochemical analyses suggest that C2-C4 short chain alkanes are a common component of the utilizable carbon pool in deep-sea sediments worldwide and have been found in diverse ecosystems. From a thermodynamic standpoint, the anaerobic microbial oxidation of these aliphatic hydrocarbons is more energetically yielding than the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Therefore, the preferential degradation of these hydrocarbons may compete with AOM for the use of oxidants such as sulfate, or other potential oxidants. Such processes could influence the fate of methane in the deep-sea. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) from hydrocarbon seep sediments of the Gulf of Mexico and Guaymas Basin have previously been enriched that anaerobically oxidize short chain alkanes to generate CO2 with the preferential utilization of 12C-enriched alkanes (Kniemeyer et al. 2007). Different temperature regimens along with multiple substrates were tested and a pure culture (deemed BuS5) was isolated from mesophilic enrichments with propane or n-butane as the sole carbon source. Through comparative sequence analysis, strain BuS5 was determined to cluster with the metabolically diverse Desulfosarcina / Desulfococcus cluster, which also contains the SRB found in consortia with anaerobic, methane-oxidizing archaea in seep sediments. Enrichments from a terrestrial, low temperature sulfidic hydrocarbon seep also corroborated that propane degradation occurred with most bacterial phylotypes surveyed belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Desulfobacteraceae (Savage et al. 2011). To date, no microbes capable of ethane oxidation or anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation at thermophilic temperature have been isolated. The sediment-covered, hydrothermal vent systems found at Middle Valley (Juan de Fuca Ridge, eastern Pacific Ocean) are a prime environment for investigating mesophilic to thermophilic anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. These systems are also characterized by sharp physicochemical gradients that have been shown to have a pronounced effect on microbial ecology and activity. Sediments were collected from a Middle Valley field with relatively high concentrations of short-chain alkanes and incubated in anaerobic batch reactors with each individual alkane (C1, C2, C3 and C4, respectively) at a range of temperatures (25, 55 and 75 °C) to mimic environmental physico-chemical conditions in a closed system. Stable carbon isotope ratios and radiotracer incubations provide clear evidence for C2-C4 alkane oxidation in the sediments over time. Upon identifying sediments with anaerobic alkane oxidation activity, microbial communities were screened via 16S rRNA pyrosequencing, and key phylotypes were then quantified using both molecular and microscopic methods. There were shifts in overall community composition and putative alkane-oxidizing phylotypes after the incubation period with the alkane substrates. These are the first evidence to date indicating that anaerobic C2-C4 alkane oxidation occurs across a broad range of temperatures in metalliferous sediments.

  20. The low temperature phase transition in octane and its possible generalisation to other n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. A.; Johnson, M. R.; Radaelli, P. G.

    2001-05-01

    A neutron powder diffraction study of three n-alkanes, octane, nonane and pentadecane, down to 2 K is presented. The temperature dependence of the octane diffraction pattern reveals a solid state phase transition between 40 and 55 K, which involves a doubling of the unit cell in the b direction, the space group remaining P 1¯. Confirmation of the phase transition, which results in a doubling of the number of crystallographically inequivalent methyl groups, is sought in the published NMR, tunnelling data and neutron scattering, vibrational data. Density functional theory and force field techniques are used to simulate spectroscopic data based on the measured structures. While no unequivocal evidence is found in spectroscopic data, the published data does not rule out the existence of energetically inequivalent methyl groups. Indeed close inspection of the spectroscopic data for other n-alkanes suggests that the phase transition may be common to many alkanes.

  1. Monitoring alkane degradation by single BioBrick integration to an optimal cellular framework.

    PubMed

    Santala, Suvi; Karp, Matti; Santala, Ville

    2012-02-17

    Synthetic biology enables rewiring and reconstruction of desirable biochemical routes using well-characterized BioBricks. One goal is to optimize these biological systems in terms of robustness, functionality, and simplicity. Thus, in addition to optimizing the molecular level of the metabolic network, choosing an optimal "chassis" can have a great significance in the constructed system. As an example, this study presents a simplified system for monitoring and studying long-chain n-alkane degradation in Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 online, provided by a single BioBrick insertion, bacterial luciferase luxAB. The system exploits the natural alkane degradation machinery of ADP1 and a sensitive response of bacterial luciferase to a specific intermediate, providing important aspects to natural alkane degradation kinetics. The study suggests the monitoring system to be applicable in the field of environmental biotechnology and emphasizes the utility of ADP1 as a host in both model systems and applications. PMID:23651046

  2. Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric

    E-print Network

    Mark, James E.

    Department of Chemistry "Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems: From Nanoassemblies Colloquium Friday, May 15, 2009 3:00 p.m. 502 Rieveschl #12;Supramolecular Chemistry in Polymeric Systems.rowan@case.edu The utilization of supramolecular chemistry, the chemistry of the non-covalent bond, in the polymeric realm has

  3. FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY CHEMISTRY & PHARMACY

    E-print Network

    Schubart, Christoph

    FACULTY OF CHEMISTRY AND PHARMACY Faculty of CHEMISTRY & PHARMACY People and their research #12;PD Dr. Denis Usvyat Theoretical Chemistry PD Dr. Sabine Amslinger Organic Chemistry Dr. Ferdinand Brandl Pharmaceutical Technology Dr. Robert Kretschmer Inorganic Chemistry Dr. Christoph Dorn Clinical Pharmacy Our

  4. Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681

    E-print Network

    Chem 681 Quantum Chemistry Chemistry 681 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry Fall 2003 BIBLIOGRAPHY]. The physical chemistry text by McQuarrie & Simon [3] (used in Chem 390) also has relevant material. The thirdQuarrie, Quantum Chemistry (University Science Books). [2] P.W. Atkins, Molecular Quantum Mechanics (Oxford). [3

  5. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10145 - Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Modified reaction products of alkyl... Modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane, substituted epoxide, and amino compound... identified generically as modified reaction products of alkyl alcohol, halogenated alkane,...

  10. Solvent-free synthesis of C10 and C11 branched alkanes from furfural and methyl isobutyl ketone.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinfan; Li, Ning; Li, Guangyi; Wang, Wentao; Wang, Aiqin; Wang, Xiaodong; Cong, Yu; Zhang, Tao

    2013-07-01

    Our best results jet: C10 and C11 branched alkanes, with low freezing points, are synthesized through the aldol condensation of furfural and methyl isobutyl ketone from lignocellulose, which is then followed by hydrodeoxygenation. These jet-fuel-range alkanes are obtained in high overall yields (?90%) under solvent-free conditions. PMID:23757334

  11. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Distillation bottoms, alkylated... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10625 - Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Distillation bottoms, alkylated... Distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane (generic). (a... generically as distillation bottoms, alkylated benzene by-product, brominated and bromo diphenyl alkane...

  13. Disk Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Wing-Fai

    2015-09-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals with gas-phase chemistry and the second part introduces chemical reactions occurring on grain surfaces. Several terms pertaining to astrochemistry are introduced. 11th Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  14. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  15. Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Priyank

    In order to enhance the fuel efficiency of an engine and to control pollutant formation, an improved understanding of the combustion chemistry of the fuels at a fundamental level is paramount. This knowledge can be gained by developing detailed reaction mechanisms of the fuels for various combustion processes and by studying combustion analytically employing reduced-chemistry descriptions. There is a need for small detailed reaction mechanisms for alkane and alcohol fuels with reduced uncertainties in their combustion chemistry that are computationally cheaper in multidimensional CFD calculations. Detailed mechanisms are the starting points in identifying reduced-chemistry descriptions of combustion processes to study problems analytically. This research includes numerical, experimental and analytical studies. The first part of the dissertation consists of numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames. Although ethanol has gained popularity as a possible low-pollution source of renewable energy, significant uncertainties remain in its combustion chemistry. To begin to address ethanol combustion, first a relatively small detailed reaction mechanism, commonly known as the San Diego Mech, is developed for the combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, methane, methanol, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, in air or oxygen-inert mixtures. This mechanism is tested for autoignition, premixed-flame burning velocities, and structures and extinction of diffusion flames and of partially premixed flames of many of these fuels. The reduction in uncertainties in the combustion chemistry can best be achieved by consistently updating a reaction mechanism with reaction rate data for the elementary steps based on newer studies in literature and by testing it against as many experimental conditions as available. The results of such a testing for abovementioned fuels are reported here along with the modifications of reaction-rate parameters of the most important elementary steps and the addition and deletion of a few key steps relevant to these tests. A mechanism developed in such a hierarchical way starting with simpler fuels such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide to the fuels with one and two carbon atoms has reduced uncertainties in the combustion chemistry of a fuel. This reaction mechanism, consisting of 137 reactions among 30 species, provides a robust building block upon which an ethanol mechanism is developed. The San Diego Mech is extended for ethanol combustion by adding 55 new reactions and 6 new species. Specifically, 33 reactions are added that involve C 2H5OH or one of the three isomers produced by abstraction of an H atom from it, CH3CHOH, CH2CH2OH and CH3CH2O, and 22 reactions are added that involve acetaldehyde or one of the two isomers produced by abstraction of H from it, CH2CHO and CH3CO. Ethanol combustion is investigated on the basis of a new reaction mechanism, thus developed, consisting of 192 elementary steps among 36 species, augmented by 53 additional steps and 14 additional species to address the formation of the oxides of nitrogen and 43 steps and 7 species to address formation of compounds involving three carbon atoms. The mechanism is tested against shock-tube autoignition-delay data, laminar burning velocities, counterflow diffusion-flame extinction and measurements of structures of counterflow partially premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements on ethanol-air flames at a strain rate of 100 s-1, employing prevaporized ethanol with a mole fraction of 0.3 in a nitrogen carrier stream, were made for the pure diffusion flame and for a partially premixed flame with a fuel-side equivalence ratio of 2.3 and involved thermocouple measurements of temperature profiles and determination of concentration profiles of C2H5OH, CO, CO2, H2, H2O, O2, N2, CH4, C2H6 and C2H2+C 2H4 by gas chromatographic analysis of samples withdrawn through fine quartz probes. Computational investigations also were made of profiles of oxides of nitrogen and other potential pollutants in similar partially premixed flames of etha

  16. Modeling SOA formation from alkanes and alkenes in chamber experiments: effect of gas/wall partitioning of organic vapors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stéphanie La, Yuyi; Camredon, Marie; Ziemann, Paul; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Hodzic, Alma; Aumont, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    Oxidation products of Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) are expected to be the major precursors of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Laboratory experiments were conducted this last decade in the Riverside APRC chamber to study IVOC oxidative mechanisms and SOA formation processes for a large set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons (Ziemann, 2011). This dataset are used here to assess the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) (Aumont et al., 2005). The simulated SOA yields agree with the general trends observed in the chamber experiments. They are (i) increasing with the increasing carbon number; (ii) decreasing with increasing methyl branch number; and (iii) increasing for cyclic compounds compared to their corresponding linear analogues. However, simulated SOA yields are systematically overestimated regardless of the precursors, suggesting missing processes in the model. In this study, we assess whether gas-to-wall partitioning of organic vapors can explain these model/observation mismatches (Matsunaga and Ziemann, 2010). First results show that GECKO-A outputs better match the observations when wall uptake of organic vapors is taken into account. Effects of gas/wall partitioning on SOA yields and composition will be presented. Preliminary results suggest that wall uptake is a major process influencing SOA production in the Teflon chambers. References Aumont, B., Szopa, S., Madronich, S.: Modelling the evolution of organic carbon during its gas-phase tropospheric oxidation: development of an explicit model based on a self generating approach. Atmos.Chem.Phys., 5, 2497-2517 (2005). P. J. Ziemann: Effects of molecular structure on the chemistry of aerosol formation from the OH-radical-initiated oxidation of alkanes and alkenes, Int. Rev.Phys.Chem., 30:2, 161-195 (2011). Matsunaga, A., Ziemann, P. J.: Gas-wall partitioning of organic compounds in a Teflon film chamber and potential effects on reaction product and aerosol yield measurements, Aerosol Sci. Technol., 44:10, 881-892 (2010).

  17. 2014 WEEKLY BULLETIN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    systems (transition metal complexes, conducting polymers and hybrid systems) in solar energy conversion in undergraduate teaching, research, and university service. The chemistry department is home to 140 majors, 18

  18. Mass effect on the Soret coefficient in n-alkane mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso de Mezquia, David; Mounir Bou-Ali, M.; Madariaga, J. Antonio; Santamaría, Carlos

    2014-02-28

    We have determined the Soret coefficient of different equimolar and non equimolar n-alkane mixtures from measurements of the molecular diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients. It is shown that equimolar mixtures behave as isotopic-like mixtures in which only the mass effect contributes to the Soret effect. In non equimolar mixtures, a small linear dependence with the molar fraction is observed. Finally, we have obtained a new correlation, which allows the determination of the Soret coefficient of n-alkane mixtures using the data of viscosity, the thermal expansion coefficient of the pure components, and the density of the equimolar mixture.

  19. Toxics release inventory: List of toxic chemicals within the polychlorinated alkanes category and guidance for reporting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires certain facilities manufacturing, processing, or otherwise using listed toxic chemicals to report their environmental releases of such chemicals annually. On November 30, 1994 EPA added 286 chemicals and chemical categories. Six chemical categories (nicotine and salts, strychnine and salts, polycyclic aromatic compounds, water dissociable nitrate compounds, diisocyanates, and polychlorinated alkanes) are included in these additions. At the time of the addition, EPA indicated that the Agency would develop, as appropriate, interpretations and guidance that the Agency determines are necessary to facilitate accurate reporting for these categories. This document constitutes such guidance for the polychlorinated alkanes category.

  20. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  1. Characterization of two alkane hydroxylase genes from the marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Marín, Mercedes M; Smits, Theo H M; Röthlisberger, Martina; Franchini, Alessandro G; Witholt, Bernard; Rojo, Fernando

    2004-03-01

    The marine gamma-Proteobacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis is highly specialized in the assimilation of aliphatic hydrocarbons, and makes up a large part of the biomass in oil-polluted marine environments. In addition to the previously identified alkane hydroxylase AlkB1, a second alkane hydroxylase (AlkB2) showing 65% identity to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlkB2 alkane hydroxylase was identified. Unlike alkB1, alkB2 is not flanked by genes involved in alkane metabolism. Heterologous expression of the A. borkumensis AP1 alkB1 and alkB2 genes showed that they encode functional alkane hydroxylases with substrate ranges similar to those of their P. putida and P. aeruginosa homologues. The transcription initiation sites and levels of the alkB1, alkB2 and alkS mRNA transcripts were determined. Expression of both alkB1 and alkB2 was induced by alkanes, but transcripts corresponding to alkB1 were much more abundant than those of alkB2. An inverted repeat similar to the binding site for the P. putida GPo1 transcriptional activator AlkS was present upstream of the promoters for alkB1 and alkB2, although that of alkB2 was less well conserved, and only the transcriptional fusion of promoter PalkB1 to the reporter gene lacZ efficiently responded to n-octane. Contrary to what has been found for the P. putida GPo1 alkane degradation pathway, expression of the A. borkumensis AP1 alkS gene was not induced by alkanes, and an AlkS binding site was not present upstream of the promoter for alkS. This indicates that, in spite of the clear similarities, the A. borkumensis alk-genes are regulated by a strategy different from that of the P. putida GPo1 alk genes. PMID:14871210

  2. Increase of translatable mRNA for major microsomal proteins in n-alkane-grown Candida maltosa

    SciTech Connect

    Sunairi, M.; Watabe, K.; Takagi, M.; Yano, K.

    1984-12-01

    In an n-alkane-assimilating Candida sp., transfer from glucose- to n-alkane-containing medium induced changes in the microsomal proteins, and several distinctive polypeptides were demonstrated in the solubilized microsomal fraction derived from n-alkane-grown cells. Long-term-labeling and pulse-labeling experiments in vivo demonstrated the synthesis of the specific microsomal polypeptides. The polypeptides were synthesized as in vitro translation products directed by polyadenylated RNA extracted from n-alkane-grown cells. Two major polypeptides were partially purified from the microsomal fraction from n-alkane-grown cells, and antiserum was prepared in a rabbit. Immunoprecipitation of these two polypeptides was accompanied by an increase in the amount of translatable mRNA. The molecular weights of the polypeptides derived from long-term-labeling, pulse-labeling and in vitro translation experiments appeared to be identical.

  3. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C21 to C30 at T ) 298.15 K by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-print Network

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C21 to C30 at T ) 298.15 K pressures of these n-alkanes from T ) 298.15 to 575 K. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results-alkanes exhibit very low vapor pressures at ambient temperatures, vapor pressure measurement for most

  4. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2009-03-09

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  6. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  7. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  8. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  9. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  11. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  12. Reprint of "Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2013-06-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (?D and ?13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 ?g/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1?, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their ?13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift ?D records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the ?13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (?Dn-alkene - ?Dn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the ?13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (?13Cn-alkene - ?13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  13. Stable hydrogen and carbon isotopic compositions of long-chain (C21-C33) n-alkanes and n-alkenes in insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Kaneko, Masanori; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    We report the molecular and stable isotopic (?D and ?13C) compositions of long-chain n-alkanes in common insects including the cabbage butterfly, swallowtail, wasp, hornet, grasshopper, and ladybug. Insect n-alkanes are potential candidates of the contamination of soil and sedimentary n-alkanes that are believed to be derived from vascular plant waxes. Long-chain n-alkanes (range C21-33; maximum C23-C29) are found to be abundant in the insects (31-781 ?g/dry g), with a carbon preference index (CPI) of 5.1-31.5 and an average chain length (ACL) of 24.9-29.3. The isotopic compositions (mean ± 1?, n = 33) of the n-alkanes are -195 ± 16‰ for hydrogen and -30.6 ± 2.4‰ for carbon. The insect n-alkanes are depleted in D by approximately 30-40‰ compared with wax n-alkanes from C3 (-155 ± 25‰) and C4 vascular plants (-167 ± 13‰), whereas their ?13C values fall between those of C3 (-36.2 ± 2.4‰) and C4 plants (-20.3 ± 2.4‰). Thus, the contribution of insect-derived n-alkanes to soil and sediment could potentially shift ?D records of n-alkanes toward more negative values and potentially muddle the assumed original C3/C4 balance in the ?13C records of the soil and sedimentary n-alkanes. n-Alkenes are also found in three insects (swallowtail, wasp and hornet). They are more depleted in D relative to the same carbon numbered n-alkanes (?Dn-alkene - ?Dn-alkane = -17 ± 16‰), but the ?13C values are almost identical to those of the n-alkanes (?13Cn-alkene - ?13Cn-alkane = 0.1 ± 0.2‰). These results suggest that these n-alkenes are desaturated products of the same carbon numbered n-alkanes.

  14. Chemistry of sumanene.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Toru; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2015-02-01

    Sumanene (C21 H12 ) is a bowl-shaped ?-conjugated molecule with C3v symmetry, consisting of alternating benzene rings and cyclopentadiene rings around the central benzene ring. The structure corresponds to the smallest C3v-symmetric fragment for the structural motifs of fullerenes or end-caps of carbon nanotubes. The presence of three sp(3)-hybridized benzylic sites is one of the most characteristic structural features in sumanene, which allows the different chemistry from that of corannulene. Since our first synthesis in 2003, we have engaged in the study of sumanene. This article summarizes our continuous study, including the synthesis, structure, dynamics, derivatization, complexation with transition metals, charge carrier mobility, and conversion to nitrogen-doped graphitic carbon, of sumanene. PMID:25474759

  15. Water Chemistry Alters Gene Expression and Physiological End

    E-print Network

    McClelland, Grant B.

    with the Cu only treatment, while Ca + Cu treatment restored some of the genes to control levels. ConverselyWater Chemistry Alters Gene Expression and Physiological End Points of Chronic Waterborne Copper to ascertainbothtranscriptionalandfunctionalendpointsofchronic Cu toxicity in fish associated with experimentally manipulated water chemistries. Over 21 d

  16. Study on gas phase collisional deactivation of O2(a1?g) by alkanes and alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junhui; Leng, Jing; Yang, Heping; Sha, Guohe; Zhang, Cunhao

    2013-01-01

    Systematic measurements were made on the deactivation rate constants (k?) of O2(a1?) by homologous series of gaseous n-alkanes and 1-alkenes by using our recently developed quasi-static method. The results indicate that the k? values for alkanes are in direct proportion to the number of C-H bonds (NCH) in the molecules, while those for alkenes are not, but being still linear with NCH, which is in good agreement with Schmidt's E-V energy transfer model. The direct proportion and linearity relationship, respectively, for alkanes and alkenes were well explained in terms of the type and number of their C-H stretching vibrational modes, together with their corresponding vibrational constants. The physical mechanism for the linearity and additivity in Schmidt's model was also discussed in detail. In addition, the k? values for alkanes were found to be evidently smaller than those for alkenes with the same number of carbon atoms (n) for n < 4, while the situation is quite the contrary for n > 4, which was also rationalized in terms of E-V energy transfer mechanism, together with their respective C-H stretching vibrational modes.

  17. Anaerobic biodegradation of long-chain n-alkanes under sulfate-reducing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, M.E.; Suflita, J.M.; Garrett, R.M.; Prince, R.C.

    1998-07-15

    The ability of anaerobic microorganisms to degrade a wide variety of crude oil components was investigated using chronically hydrocarbon-contaminated marine sediments as the source of inoculum. When sulfate reduction was the predominant electron-accepting process, gas chromatographic analysis revealed almost complete n-alkane removal (C{sub 15}-C{sub 34}) from a weathered oil within 201 d of incubation. No alteration of the oil was detected in sterile control incubations or when nitrate served as an alternate electron acceptor. The amount of sulfate reduced in the oil-amended nonsterile incubations was more than enough to account for the complete mineralization of the n-alkane fraction of the oil; no loss of this anion was observed in sterile control incubations. The mineralization of the alkanes was confirmed using {sup 14}C-14,15-octacosane (C{sub 28}H{sub 58}), with 97% of the radioactivity recovered as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. These findings extend the range of hydrocarbons known to be amenable to anaerobic biodegradation. Moreover, the rapid and extensive alteration in the n-alkanes can no longer be considered a defining characteristic of aerobic oil biodegradation processes alone.

  18. Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite Teng Yang,1

    E-print Network

    Tománek, David

    Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite Teng Yang,1 Savas Berber,1 acid molecules on graphite. For each system, we identify the optimum adsorption geometry and explain species on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite HOPG have attracted much attention, since the formation

  19. Regio-and Enantioselective Alkane Hydroxylation with Engineered Cytochromes P450 BM-3

    E-print Network

    Arnold, Frances H.

    Regio- and Enantioselective Alkane Hydroxylation with Engineered Cytochromes P450 BM-3 Matthew W was engineered using a combination of directed evolution and site-directed mutagenesis to hydroxylate linear hydroxylates octane at the 2-position to form S-2-octanol (40% ee). Another variant, 1-12G, also hydroxylates

  20. Femtosecond IR Studies of Alkane C-H Bond Activation by Organometallic Compounds: Direct

    E-print Network

    Harris, Charles B.

    Femtosecond IR Studies of Alkane C-H Bond Activation by Organometallic Compounds: Direct and its solvated forms in the liquefied rare gases Kr and Xe6 detected by microsecond time-resolved IR quantum yield (1%) for loss of CO in the well-studied model compounds Cp*M(CO)2 (M ) Rh, Ir)7 has hindered

  1. METHYL-BRANCHED ALKANES OF THE ADULT FLEA BEETLES, APHTHONA LACERTOSA AND APHTHONA NIGRISCUTIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An analysis was conducted of the hydrocarbon fraction of the cuticular waxes from two introduced biocontrol agents of leafy spurge, Aphthona lacertosa and A. nigriscutis. The adult beetles had a complex mixture of hydrocarbons on their cuticular surface consisting of alkanes, methylalkanes, alkenes...

  2. Ruthenium-Immobilized Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Application for Selective Oxidation of Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ishito, Nobuhiro; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Inagaki, Shinji; Hara, Kenji; Fukuoka, Atsushi

    2015-10-26

    Invited for the cover of this issue is the group of Kenji Hara and Atsushi Fukuoka at Hokkaido University (Japan). The image depicts the catalytic oxidation of alkanes over isolated Ru complexes formed on periodic mesoporous organosilica. Read the full text of the article at 10.1002/chem.201502638. PMID:26365565

  3. Adsorption Dynamics of Alkanes on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Beam Scattering Study

    E-print Network

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Adsorption Dynamics of Alkanes on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Beam Scattering Study S, 2007 The adsorption dynamics of n-/isobutane on "closed"-end (as-prepared, c-CNTs) and open-end (vacuum- annealed) carbon nanotubes (o-CNTs) have been studied by molecular beam scattering adsorption probability

  4. Pseudosolubilized n-alkanes analysis and optimization of biosurfactants production by Pseudomonas sp. DG17.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fei; Wang, Hong Qi; Zhao, Yi Cun; Yang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The pseudosolubilized medium-chain-length n-alkanes during biodegradation process, and optimization of medium composition and culture conditions for rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas sp. DG17 using Plackett-Burman design and Box-Behnken design, were examined in this study. The results showed that pseudosolubilized concentration of C14 to C20 n-alkanes was higher than that of C24 to C26. After incubation for 120 h, pseudosolubilized C16H34 increased to 2.63?±?0.21 mg. Meanwhile, biodegradation rates of n-alkanes decreased along with the increase of carbon chain length. Carbon-14 assay suggested that nonlabeled C14H30, C16H34, and C20H42 inhibited the biodegradation of (14)C n-octadecane, and Pseudomonas sp. DG17 utilized different alkanes simultaneously. Three significant variables (substrate concentration, salinity, and C/N) that could influence rhamnolipid production were screened by Plackett-Burman design. Results of Box-Behnken design suggested that rhamnolipid concentration could be achieved at 91.24 mg L(-1) (observed value) or 87.92 mg L(-1) (predicted value) with the optimal levels of concentration, salinity, and C/N of 400 mg L(-1), 1.5 %, and 45, respectively. PMID:25414034

  5. ALKANES, METHYLALKANES, ALKENES AND ALKADIENES OF ADULT FLEA BEETLES, APHTHONA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The adult beetles, Aphthona lacertosa and Aphthona nigriscutis, used as biocontrol agents for leafy spurge, had a complex mixture of hydrocarbons on their cuticular surface consisting of alkanes, methylalkanes, alkenes and alkadienes as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A trace ...

  6. Alcanivorax which prevails in oil-contaminated seawater exhibits broad substrate specificity for alkane degradation.

    PubMed

    Hara, Akihiro; Syutsubo, Kazuaki; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2003-09-01

    Alcanivorax is an alkane-degrading marine bacterium which propagates and becomes predominant in crude-oil-containing seawater when nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients are supplemented. In order to understand why Alcanivorax overcomes other bacteria under such cultural conditions, competition experiments between Alcanivorax indigenous to seawater and the exogenous alkane-degrading marine bacterium, Acinetobacter venetianus strain T4, were conducted. When oil-containing seawater supplemented with nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients was inoculated with A. venetianus strain T4, this bacterium was the dominant population at the early stage of culture. However, its density began to decrease after day 6, and Alcanivorax predominated in the culture after day 20. The crude-oil-degrading profiles of both bacteria were therefore investigated. Alcanivorax borkumensis strain ST-T1 isolated from the Sea of Japan exhibited higher ability to degrade branched alkanes (pristane and phytane) than A. venetianus strain T4. It seems that this higher ability of Alcanivorax to degrade branched alkanes allowed this bacterium to predominate in oil-containing seawater. It is known that some marine zooplanktons produce pristane and Alcanivorax may play a major role in the biodegradation of pristane in seawater. PMID:12919410

  7. Cloning and expression of alkane hydroxylase-1 from Alcanivorax borkumensis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eidani, Simin Zadehgan; Shahraki, Mahvash Khodabandeh; Gasemisakha, Fatemeh; Hahsemi, Mehrdad; Bambai, Bijan

    2012-07-01

    Enzymes with hydroxylating activity on alkanes have potential application as biotransformation catalysts in chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Genome of Alcanivorax borkumensis, a marine bacterium with hydrocarbon dissimilation activity, contains at least two P450 monooxygenases and two nonheme monooxygenases, AlkB1 and AlkB2, respectively. Presumably, all these enzymes possess alkane hydroxylating activity. Both AlkB1 and AlkB2 are membrane proteins. Two accessory proteins, rubredoxin and rubredoxin reductase, supply the reducing equivalent from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced (NADPH to hydroxylases. Rubredoxin reductase catalyses the reduction of rubredoxin by oxidation of NADPH, and rubredoxin transfers the electrons to the alkane hydroxylase to complete the hydroxylation reaction. Here, we sought to investigate the expression of alkB1 gene in Escherichia coli. Therefore, we amplified alkB1 gene from A. borkumensis genome by polymerase chain reaction and cloned it in the expression vector pET26 upstream of His-tag sequence. Predisposed BL21 (DE3) cells were transformed by the recombinant vector. At last, expression of recombinant enzyme was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. Regarding the potential ability of this enzyme in hydroxylation of long-chained alkanes, the application of it would be studied in petroleum downstream industries. PMID:22064680

  8. Improved GC/MS method for quantitation of n-Alkanes in plant and fecal material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method for the quantitation of n-alkanes (carbon backbones ranging from 21 to 36 carbon atoms) in forage and fecal samples has been developed. Automated solid-liquid extraction using elevated temperature and pressure minimized extraction time to 30 min...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10148 Section 721.10148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10148 - Acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed metal oxides (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with mixed metal oxides (generic). 721.10148 Section 721.10148 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... mixed metal oxides (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as acryloxy alkanoic alkane derivative with mixed...

  11. n-Alkane lipid biomarkers in loess: post-sedimentary or syn-sedimentary?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Michael; Kreutzer, Sebastian; Goslar, Tomasz; Meszner, Sascha; Krause, Tobias; Faust, Dominik; Fuchs, Markus

    2013-04-01

    There is an ongoing discussion whether n-alkane biomarkers - and organic matter (OM) from loess in general - reflect a syn-sedimentary paleoenvironmental and paleoclimate signal or whether they are significantly a post-sedimentary feature contaminated by root-derived OM (Zech et al., 2012, 2013; Wiesenberg and Gocke, 2013). We present first radiocarbon data for the n-alkane fraction of lipid extracts and for the first time luminescence ages for the Middle to Late Weichselian loess-paleosol sequence of Gleina in Saxony, Germany. Comparison of these biomarker ages with sedimentation ages as assessed by optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating shows that one n-alkane sample features a syn-sedimentary age (14C: 29.2 ± 1.4 kyr calBP versus OSL: 27.3 ± 3.0 kyr). By contrast, the 14C ages derived from the other n-alkane samples are clearly younger (20.3 ± 0.7 kyr calBP, 22.1 ± 0.7 kyr calBP and 29.8 ± 1.4 kyr calBP) than the corresponding OSL ages (26.6 ± 3.1 kyr, 32.0 ± 3.5 kyr and 45.6 ± 5.3 kyr). This finding suggests that a post-sedimentary n-alkane contamination presumably by roots has occurred. In order to estimate the post-sedimentary n-alkane contamination more quantitatively, we applied a 14C mass balance calculation based on the measured pMC (percent modern carbon) values, the calculated syn-sedimentary pMC values and pMC values suspected to reflect likely time points of post-sedimentary contamination (modern, last decades, 3 kyr, 6 kyr and 9 kyr). Accordingly, modern and last decadal root-contamination would account for up to 7%, a 3 kyr old root-contamination for up to 10%, and an Early and Middle Holocene root-contamination for up to 20% of the total sedimentary n-alkane pool. We acknowledge and encourage that these first radiocarbon results need further confirmation both from other loess-paleosol sequences and for different biomarkers, e.g. carboxylic acids or alcohols as further lipid biomarkers. Zech, M., Kreutzer, S., Goslar, T., Meszner, S., Krause, T., Faust, D. and Fuchs, M., 2012: Technical Note: n-Alkane lipid biomarkers in loess: post-sedimentary or syn-sedimentary? Biogeosciences Discussions 9, 9875-9896. Wiesenberg, G. and Gocke, M., 2013. Comment of G. Wiesenberg and M. Gocke on "Reconstruction of the late Quaternary paleoenvironments of the Nussloch loess paleosol sequence, Germany, using n-alkane biomarkers. Quaternary Research, in press. Zech, M., Rass, S., Buggle, B., Löscher, M. and Zöller, L.. 2013. Response to the comment of G. Wiesenberg and M. Gocke on "Reconstruction of the late Quaternary paleoenvironments of the Nussloch loess paleosol sequence, Germany, using n-alkane biomarkers". Quaternary Research, in press.

  12. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32?±?13 %) or Proteobacteria (29?±?7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes. PMID:26547568

  13. Patterns of phase behavior in ternary ethoxylated alcohol-n-alkane-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, P.K.; Gorman, C.A.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.; Miller, W.G.

    1986-10-09

    Certain ternary mixtures of ethoxylated alcohols, n-alkanes, and water at 25/sup 0/C separate at equilibrium into three liquid phases. The development of an amphiphile-rich middle phase is sensitive to alcohol molecular weight, alkane carbon number (ACN), and temperature. A middle phase arises when all three variables are adjusted such that the alcohol has no preference to partition into either an oleic or aqueous phase. A change in one of these variables yields a sequence of ternary phase diagrams in which the range of the three phases is from one critical tie line to a second. There are two distinct patterns, however, in which the critical tie lines arise. With a low molecular weight ethoxylated alcohol, both critical tie lines lie in the miscibility gap between water-rich and alkane-rich phases. With larger ethoxylated alcohols, however, one of the critical tie lines arises from the fusion of that miscibility gap with the critical point on a second one between water-rich and alcohol-rich phases. Both patterns are modeled well by modifying the Flory-Huggins equation of state to account for the tendency of amphiphile to concentrate between water-rich and alkane-rich domains, thereby attenuating or screening the enthalpic repulsion between water and alkane. The screening is expressed by a factor which is exponential in amphiphile concentration. The type of three-phase equilibria which arises from fusion of two miscibility gaps requires a pair of screening factors. Other available thermodynamic models appear incapable of approximating this second pattern of three-phase equilibria.

  14. CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32 CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (66 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  15. SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    SYLLABUS for CHEMISTRY 2310 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 1 Lectures: Monday, Wednesday and Friday 8:35 AM-9 · Highly Recommended Equipment: Turning Point Clicker · Highly Recommended: (1) "Organic Chemistry I Homework. · Class Objective: To study and begin to understand organic chemistry · Methods: Lectures

  16. Adaptation of the Hydrocarbonoclastic Bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 to Alkanes and Toxic Organic Compounds: a Physiological and Transcriptomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Naether, Daniela J.; Slawtschew, Slavtscho; Stasik, Sebastian; Engel, Maria; Olzog, Martin; Wick, Lukas Y.; Timmis, Kenneth N.

    2013-01-01

    The marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis is able to degrade mixtures of n-alkanes as they occur in marine oil spills. However, investigations of growth behavior and physiology of these bacteria when cultivated with n-alkanes of different chain lengths (C6 to C30) as the substrates are still lacking. Growth rates increased with increasing alkane chain length up to a maximum between C12 and C19, with no evident difference between even- and odd-numbered chain lengths, before decreasing with chain lengths greater than C19. Surface hydrophobicity of alkane-grown cells, assessed by determination of the water contact angles, showed a similar pattern, with maximum values associated with growth rates on alkanes with chain lengths between C11 and C19 and significantly lower values for cells grown on pyruvate. A. borkumensis was found to incorporate and modify the fatty acid intermediates generated by the corresponding n-alkane degradation pathway. Cells grown on distinct n-alkanes proved that A. borkumensis is able to not only incorporate but also modify fatty acid intermediates derived from the alkane degradation pathway. Comparing cells grown on pyruvate with those cultivated on hexadecane in terms of their tolerance toward two groups of toxic organic compounds, chlorophenols and alkanols, representing intensely studied organic compounds, revealed similar tolerances toward chlorophenols, whereas the toxicities of different n-alkanols were significantly reduced when hexadecane was used as a carbon source. As one adaptive mechanism of A. borkumensis to these toxic organic solvents, the activity of cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids was proven. These findings could be verified by a detailed transcriptomic comparison between cultures grown on hexadecane and pyruvate and including solvent stress caused by the addition of 1-octanol as the most toxic intermediate of n-alkane degradation. PMID:23645199

  17. Adaptation of the hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 to alkanes and toxic organic compounds: a physiological and transcriptomic approach.

    PubMed

    Naether, Daniela J; Slawtschew, Slavtscho; Stasik, Sebastian; Engel, Maria; Olzog, Martin; Wick, Lukas Y; Timmis, Kenneth N; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2013-07-01

    The marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis is able to degrade mixtures of n-alkanes as they occur in marine oil spills. However, investigations of growth behavior and physiology of these bacteria when cultivated with n-alkanes of different chain lengths (C6 to C30) as the substrates are still lacking. Growth rates increased with increasing alkane chain length up to a maximum between C12 and C19, with no evident difference between even- and odd-numbered chain lengths, before decreasing with chain lengths greater than C19. Surface hydrophobicity of alkane-grown cells, assessed by determination of the water contact angles, showed a similar pattern, with maximum values associated with growth rates on alkanes with chain lengths between C11 and C19 and significantly lower values for cells grown on pyruvate. A. borkumensis was found to incorporate and modify the fatty acid intermediates generated by the corresponding n-alkane degradation pathway. Cells grown on distinct n-alkanes proved that A. borkumensis is able to not only incorporate but also modify fatty acid intermediates derived from the alkane degradation pathway. Comparing cells grown on pyruvate with those cultivated on hexadecane in terms of their tolerance toward two groups of toxic organic compounds, chlorophenols and alkanols, representing intensely studied organic compounds, revealed similar tolerances toward chlorophenols, whereas the toxicities of different n-alkanols were significantly reduced when hexadecane was used as a carbon source. As one adaptive mechanism of A. borkumensis to these toxic organic solvents, the activity of cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids was proven. These findings could be verified by a detailed transcriptomic comparison between cultures grown on hexadecane and pyruvate and including solvent stress caused by the addition of 1-octanol as the most toxic intermediate of n-alkane degradation. PMID:23645199

  18. Transcriptional profiling of the marine oil-degrading bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis during growth on n-alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sabirova, Julia S; Becker, Anke; Lünsdorf, Heinrich; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Timmis, Kenneth N; Golyshin, Peter N

    2011-06-01

    The marine oil-degrading bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2 has attracted significant interest due to its hydrocarbonoclastic lifestyle, its alkane-centered metabolism, and for playing an important ecological role in cleaning up marine oil spills. In this study, we used microarray technology to characterize the transcriptional responses of A. borkumensis to n-hexadecane exposure as opposed to pyruvate, which led to the identification of a total of 220 differentially expressed genes, with 109 genes being upregulated and 111 genes being downregulated. Among the genes upregulated on alkanes are systems predicted to be involved in the terminal oxidation of alkanes, biofilm formation, signal transduction, and regulation. PMID:21470299

  19. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  20. Biotechnology of biomass conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Wayman, M.; Parekh, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book covers: An introduction to biomass crops; The microbiology of fermentation processes; The production of ethanol from biomass crops, such as sugar cane and rubbers; The energy of biomass conversion; and The economics of biomass conversion.

  1. Stories in Conversation

    E-print Network

    Hofer, Roberta Senner

    1991-01-01

    Because conversational stories can be used for different purposes, they enter conversations in different ways. Sometimes they have a preface, sometimes not; sometimes a story fits smoothly into the ongoing talk, but other times it changes the topic...

  2. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  3. Interstellar chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Klemperer, William

    2006-01-01

    In the past half century, radioastronomy has changed our perception and understanding of the universe. In this issue of PNAS, the molecular chemistry directly observed within the galaxy is discussed. For the most part, the description of the molecular transformations requires specific kinetic schemes rather than chemical thermodynamics. Ionization of the very abundant molecular hydrogen and atomic helium followed by their secondary reactions is discussed. The rich variety of organic species observed is a challenge for complete understanding. The role and nature of reactions involving grain surfaces as well as new spectroscopic observations of interstellar and circumstellar regions are topics presented in this special feature. PMID:16894148

  4. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  5. Energy conversion & storage program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1996-06-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Energy Conversion and Storage (EC&S) Program. The report is divided into three categories: electrochemistry, chemical applications, and material applications. Research performed in each category during 1995 is described. Specific research topics relate to the development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, the development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion, the characterization of new chemical processes and complex chemical species, and the study and application of novel materials related to energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials and deposition technologies, and advanced methods of analysis.

  6. Changes in the concentration and relative abundance of alkanes and PAHs from the Deepwater Horizon oiling of coastal marshes.

    PubMed

    Turner, R E; Overton, E B; Meyer, B M; Miles, M S; Hooper-Bui, L

    2014-09-15

    We determined changes of 28 alkanes and 43 different PAHs in 418 wetland soil samples collected on ten sampling trips to three Louisiana estuaries before and after they were oiled from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster. There was a significant decline in 22 of the 28 alkane analytes (0.42% day(-1)), no change in 6, over 2.5 years. The concentration of five aromatic petroleum hydrocarbons (PAHs) increased (range 0.25-0.70% day(-1)), whereas the total PAH pool did not change. Of these five, naphthalene and C-1-naphthalenes are suggested to be of higher toxicity than the other three because of their relatively higher volatility or solubility. The relative proportions of alkane analytes, but not PAHs, does not yet resemble that in the pre-oiled marshes after 3 years, The trajectories of nine indicators for degradation/weathering were either inconclusive or misleading (alkanes) or confirmed the relatively meager degradation of PAHs. PMID:25127500

  7. 40 CFR 721.10381 - Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl ether, hydroxy substituted alkane and carboxylic acid anhydride, methacrylate terminated polyester...Substances § 721.10381 Cyclic carboxylic acid, polymer with dihydroxy dialkyl...

  8. n-Alkane biosynthetic hydrogen isotope fractionation is not constant throughout the growing season in the riparian tree Salix viminalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, Sarah L.; Kahmen, Ansgar; Dennis, Paul; Grant, Alastair

    2015-09-01

    Compound-specific ?2H values of leaf wax n-alkanes have emerged as a potentially powerful paleohydrological proxy. Research suggests terrestrial plant n-alkane ?2H values are strongly correlated with meteoric water ?2H values, and may provide information on temperature, relative humidity, evaporation, and precipitation. This is based upon several assumptions, including that biosynthetic fractionation of n-alkanes during synthesis is constant within a single species. Here we present a multi-isotope study of the n-alkanes of riparian Salix viminalis growing in Norwich, UK. We measured n-alkane ?2H, leaf water ?2H, xylem water ?2H, and bulk foliar ?13C and evaluated the variability of n-alkane ?2H values and net biosynthetic fractionation (?lw-wax) over a whole growing season. S. viminalis n-alkane ?2H values decreased by 40‰ between the start of the growing season in April and the time when they stabilized in July. Variation in leaf and xylem water ?2H did not explain this variability. ?lw-wax varied from -116‰ during leaf expansion in April to -156‰ during the stable phase. This suggests that differential biosynthetic fractionation was responsible for the strong seasonal trends in S. viminalis n-alkane ?2H values. We suggest that variability in ?lw-wax is driven by seasonal differences in the carbohydrate source and thus the NADPH used in n-alkane biosynthesis, with stored carbohydrates utilized during spring and recent occurring growing season assimilates used later in the season. This is further supported by bulk foliar ?13C values, which are 13C-enriched during the period of leaf flush, relative to the end of the growing season. Our results challenge the assumption that biosynthetic fractionation is constant for a given species, and suggest that 2H-enriched stored assimilates are an important source for n-alkane biosynthesis early in the growing season. These findings have implications for the interpretation of sedimentary n-alkanes and call for a careful design of calibration studies using contemporary samples.

  9. Iterated multidimensional wave conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Johnston, D.; Kaufman, A. N.; Richardson, A. S.; Zobin, N.

    2011-12-23

    Mode conversion can occur repeatedly in a two-dimensional cavity (e.g., the poloidal cross section of an axisymmetric tokamak). We report on two novel concepts that allow for a complete and global visualization of the ray evolution under iterated conversions. First, iterated conversion is discussed in terms of ray-induced maps from the two-dimensional conversion surface to itself (which can be visualized in terms of three-dimensional rooms). Second, the two-dimensional conversion surface is shown to possess a symplectic structure derived from Dirac constraints associated with the two dispersion surfaces of the interacting waves.

  10. The air-water exchange of C{sub 15}-C{sub 31} n-alkanes in a precipitation-dominated seepage lake.

    SciTech Connect

    Doskey, P. V.; Environmental Research

    2000-01-01

    The air-water exchange of semivolatile n-alkanes in Crystal Lake, a small precipitation-dominated seepage lake in northern Wisconsin, was investigated with modeling and mass balance approaches. The results suggest that atmospheric deposition contributes approximately 80% of the allochthonous input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake. Atmospheric deposition accounts for about 50% of the total annual input of n-alkanes to Crystal Lake, and an additional 30% is contributed by in situ production of planktonic n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 15}, C{sub 17}, C{sub 19}). Contributions to the particle dry flux of terrestrial n-alkanes ({Sigma}C{sub 25}, C{sub 27}, C{sub 29}, C{sub 31}) by pine pollen dispersal and by dry deposition of particles containing leaf waxes are similar in magnitude and constitute about 60% of the atmospheric input, with particle wet deposition being responsible for the remainder. Approximately 30% of the atmospheric input of the n-alkanes occurs during a two-week episode of pine pollen dispersal in spring. Concentration gradients between gaseous n-alkanes in the atmosphere and dissolved n-alkanes in the water column of Crystal Lake favor volatilization of n-alkanes from the lake surface; however, distributions of dissolved n-alkanes are characteristic of bacteria, and therefore are contained in organic matter and not available for air-water exchange. The estimated net atmospheric input of terrestrial n-alkanes is about 20% less than the settling sediment flux. Additional allochthonous sources of the terrestrial n-alkanes might include diffuse surface runoff or episodes of coarse-particle deposition. The discrepancies in the results from the modeling and mass balance approaches indicate that direct measurements of air-water exchange rates and measurements of the seasonal variations of particle size distributions in air and rain would greatly improve our ability to quantify air-water exchange rates of n-alkanes.

  11. C and dD compositions of n-alkanes from modern angiosperms and conifers: An experimental set up

    E-print Network

    d13 C and dD compositions of n-alkanes from modern angiosperms and conifers: An experimental set up n-alkanes from 3 angiosperm and 2 conifer species from a semi-desert natural environment. The d13 C-enriched (À162 to À178) relative to the conifer species. However, its d13 C values were more similar to those

  12. Stable Isotope Labeled n-Alkanes to Assess Digesta Passage Kinetics through the Digestive Tract of Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Daniel; Ferreira, Luis M. M.; Breuer, Michel J. H.; Dijkstra, Jan; Pellikaan, Wilbert F.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of carbon stable isotope (13C) labeled n-alkanes as a potential internal tracer to assess passage kinetics of ingested nutrients in ruminants. Plant cuticular n-alkanes originating from intrinsically 13C labeled ryegrass plants were pulse dosed intraruminally in four rumen-cannulated lactating dairy cows receiving four contrasting ryegrass silage treatments that differed in nitrogen fertilization level (45 or 90 kg nitrogen ha?1) and maturity (early or late). Passage kinetics through the gastrointestinal tract were derived from the ?13C (i.e. the ratio 13C:12C) in apparently undigested fecal material. Isotopic enrichment was observed in a wide range of long-chain n-alkanes (C27–C36) and passage kinetics were determined for the most abundant C29, C31 and C33 n-alkanes, for which a sufficiently high response signal was detected by combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Basal diet treatment and carbon chain length of n-alkanes did not affect fractional passage rates from the rumen (K1) among individual n-alkanes (3.71–3.95%/h). Peak concentration time and transit time showed a quantitatively small, significant (p?0.002) increase with carbon chain length. K1 estimates were comparable to those of the 13C labeled digestible dry matter fraction (3.38%/h; r?=?0.61 to 0.71; p?0.012). A literature review has shown that n-alkanes are not fermented by microorganisms in the rumen and affirms no preferential depletion of 13C versus 12C. Our results suggest that 13C labeled n-alkanes can be used as nutrient passage tracers and support the reliability of the ?13C signature of digestible feed nutrients as a tool to measure nutrient-specific passage kinetics. PMID:24124493

  13. Molecular adsorption of small alkanes on a PdO(101) thin film: Evidence of ?-complex formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Jason F.; Hakanoglu, Can; Hawkins, Jeffery M.; Asthagiri, Aravind

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the molecular adsorption of methane, ethane, and propane on a PdO(101) thin film using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The TPD data reveal that each of the alkanes adsorbs into a low-coverage molecular state on PdO(101) in which the binding is stronger than that for alkanes physically adsorbed on Pd(111). Analysis of the TPD data using limiting values of the desorption prefactors predicts that the alkane binding energies on PdO(101) increase linearly with increasing chain length, but that the resulting line extrapolates to a nonzero value between about 22 and 26 kJ/mol at zero chain length. This constant offset implies that a roughly molecule-independent interaction contributes to the alkane binding energies for the molecules studied. DFT calculations predict that the small alkanes bind on PdO(101) by forming dative bonds with coordinatively unsaturated Pd atoms. The resulting adsorbed species are analogous to alkane ?-complexes in that the bonding involves electron donation from C-H ? bonds to the Pd center as well as backdonation from the metal, which weakens the C-H bonds. The binding energies predicted by DFT lie in a range from 16 to 24 kJ/mol, in good agreement with the constant offsets estimated from the TPD data. We conclude that both the dispersion interaction and the formation of ?-complexes contribute to the binding of small alkanes on PdO(101), and estimate that ?-complex formation accounts for between 30% and 50% of the total binding energy for the molecules studied. The predicted weakening of C-H bonds resulting from ?-complex formation may help to explain the high activity of PdO surfaces toward alkane activation.

  14. Alkane distribution and carbon isotope composition in fossil leaves: An interpretation of plant physiology in the geologic past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    The relative chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of n-alkanes extracted from sedimentary rocks are important geochemical tools for investigating past terrestrial ecosystems. Alkanes preserved in ancient sediments are assumed to be contemporaneous, derived from the same ecosystem, and integrated from the biomass present on the landscape at the time of deposition. Further, there is an underlying assumption that ancient plants exhibited the same metabolic and physiological responses to climate conditions that are observed for modern plants. Interpretations of alkane abundances and isotopic signatures are complicated by the strong influence of phylogenetic affiliation and ecological factors, such as canopy structure. A better understanding of how ecosystem and taxa influence alkane properties, including homologue abundance patterns and leaf-lipid carbon isotope fractionation would help strengthen paleoecological interpretations based on these widely employed plant biomarkers. In this study, we analyze the alkane chain-length distribution and carbon-isotope composition of phytoleim and alkanes (d13Cleaf and d13Clipid) extracted from a selection of Cretaceous and Paleocene fossil leaves from the Guaduas and Cerrejon Formations of Colombia. These data were compared with data for the same families in a modern analogue biome. Photosynthetic and biosynthetic fractionation (?leaf and elipid) values determined from the fossil material indicate carbon metabolism patterns were similar to modern plants. Fossil data were incorporated in a biomass-weighted mixing model to represent the expected lipid complement of sediment arising from this ecosystem and compared with alkane measurements from the rock matrix. Modeled and observed isotopic and abundance patterns match well for alkane homologs most abundant in plants (i.e., n-C27 to n-C33). The model illustrates the importance of understanding biases in litter flux and taphonomic pressures inherent in the fossil lipid record, and it highlights the influence of community composition and forest structure on sedimentary lipids.

  15. Hydrocarbons disposition, lipid content, and fatty acid composition in trout after long-term dietary exposure to n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Cravedi, J.P.; Tulliez, J.E.

    1983-12-01

    Uptake, distribution, and storage of n-alkanes was studied in rainbow trout receiving a diet containing 1% normal paraffins in the C/sub 13/-C/sub 22/ range. After 3 months, the concentration of hydrocarbons deposited in the whole body reached a steady equilibrium value in the range 700-900 ppm. The most pronounced deposition occurred in the adipose tissue. The n-alkane pattern in the whole body exhibited a profile different from that of the alkane mixture ingested. The alkanes around C/sub 20/ were not retained to any great extent, but as the chain length decreased, the relative amount stored increased. In the liver a marked predominance of even-carbon chain length was observed while in whole fish and in other organs such a phenomenon did not occur. After 5 months, total lipids in the carcass were significantly lower in the test group than in the control group. At the end of the accumulation period, a significant enhancement in the proportion of odd- and even-chain saturated fatty acids from C/sub 14:0/ to C/sub 18:0/ was noted in carcasses of hydrocarbon-fed fish. Myristic, pentadecanoic, and heptadecanoic acids were also significantly more abundant in the liver and adipose tissue of contaminated fish. This increase is attributed to the terminal oxidation of the predominant n-alkanes in the diet into the corresponding fatty acids. During the depuration period, one-half of the trout in each group were fed a hydrocarbon-free diet, while the others were starved. After 2 months, both starved and fed trout had lost approximately 50% of the amount of total n-alkanes stored. The n-alkanes longer than C/sub 16/ were well retained, while short-chain alkane concentration decreased rapidly. 41 references.

  16. Maximal oil recovery by simultaneous condensation of alkane and steam.

    PubMed

    Bruining, J; Marchesin, D

    2007-03-01

    This paper deals with the application of steam to enhance the recovery from petroleum reservoirs. We formulate a mathematical and numerical model that simulates coinjection of volatile oil with steam into a porous rock in a one-dimensional setting. We utilize the mathematical theory of conservation laws to validate the numerical simulations. This combined numerical and analytical approach reveals the detailed mechanism for thermal displacement of oil mixtures discovered in laboratory experiments. We study the structure of the solution, determined by the speeds and amplitudes of the several nonlinear waves involved. Thus we show that the oil recovery depends critically on whether the boiling-point of the volatile oil is around the water boiling temperature, or much below or above it. These boiling-point ranges correspond to three types of wave structures. When the boiling point of the volatile oil is near the boiling point of water, the striking result is that the speed of the evaporation front is equal or somewhat larger than the speed of the steam condensation front. Thus the volatile oil condenses at the location where the steam condenses too, yielding virtually complete oil recovery. Conversely, if the boiling point is too high or too low, there is incomplete recovery. The condensed volatile oil stays at the steam condensation location because the steam condensation front is a physical shock. PMID:17500796

  17. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  18. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  19. Seasonal variation of leaf wax n-alkane production and ?(2)H values from the evergreen oak tree, Quercus agrifolia.

    PubMed

    Sachse, Dirk; Dawson, Todd E; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the timing of leaf wax synthesis in higher plants, we analysed the variability in leaf wax n-alkane concentration, composition (expressed as average chain length (ACL)), and ?(2)Hwax values as well as plant source water ?(2)H values (xylem and leaf water) in the evergreen tree Quercus agrifolia over a period of 9 months, beginning with leaf flush. We identified three distinct periods of leaf development with the first month following leaf flush being characterized by de novo synthesis and possibly removal of n-alkanes. During the following 3 months, n-alkane concentrations increased sevenfold and ?(2)Hwax and ACL values increased, suggesting this period was the major leaf wax n-alkane formation period. During the remaining 4 months of the experiment, stable values suggest cessation of leaf wax n-alkane formation. We find that n-alkane synthesis in Q. agrifolia takes place over 4 months, substantially longer than that observed for deciduous trees. PMID:25704898

  20. Fossil Leaves and Fossil Leaf n-Alkanes: Reconstructing the First Closed Canopied Rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, H. V.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Although the age and location is disputed, the rise of the first closed-canopy forest is likely linked with the expansion of angiosperms in the late Cretacous or early Cenozoic. The carbon isotope 'canopy effect' reflects the extent of canopy closure, and is well documented in ?13C values of the leaves and leaf lipids in modern forests. To test the extent of canopy closure among the oldest documented angiosperm tropical forests, we analyzed isotopic characteristics of leaf fossils and leaf waxes from the Guaduas and Cerrejón Formations. The Guaduas Fm. (Maastrichtian) contains some of the earliest angiosperm fossils in the Neotropics, and both leaf morphology and pollen records at this site suggest an open-canopy structure. The Cerrejón Fm. (Paleocene) contains what are believed to be the first recorded fossil leaves from a closed-canopy forest. We analyzed the bulk carbon isotope content (?13Cleaf) of 199 fossil leaves, as well as the n-alkane concentration and chain-length distribution, and ?13C of alkanes (?13Clipid) of 73 fossil leaves and adjacent sediment samples. Fossil leaves are dominated by eudicots and include ten modern plant families (Apocynaceae, Bombaceae, Euphorbaceae, Fabaceae, Lauraceae, Malvaceae, Meliaceae, Menispermaceae, Moraceae, Sapotaceae). We interpreted extent of canopy coverage based on the range of ?13Cleaf values. The narrow range of ?13C values in leaves from the Guaduas Fm (2.7‰) is consistent with an open canopy. A significantly wider range in values (6.3‰) suggests a closed-canopy signature for site 0315 of the Cerrejón Fm,. In contrast, at Site 0318, a lacustrine deposit, leaves had a narrow range (3.3‰) in ?13C values, and this is not consistent with a closed-canopy, but is consistent with leaf assemblages from a forest edge. Leaves that accumulate in lake sediments tend to be biased toward plants living at the lake edge, which do not experience closed-canopy conditions, and do not express the isotopic characteristics associated with canopy effect. A biomass flux-weighted model of alkane chain-length distribution and ?13Cleaf indicate n-alkanes extracted from bulk rock are consistent with inputs integrated over time from plants represented by fossil leaves. In a modern rainforest, we found leaf lipid amounts markedly higher in the shaded and moist understory, consistent with studies that show alkanes proffer fungal protection. Shade tolerance is associated with higher plant orders and, consistent with this, literature data for modern plants from 30 plant orders shows alkane production in asterids and rosids is 2 to 3 times greater than in basal angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lower clades tend to contain greater amounts of terpenoids and novel benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, rather than alkanes. For our three fossil floras, alkane abundance is strongly influenced by depositional setting, with preservation best in the lacustrine setting. Within each site, abundance patterns are potentially influenced by both taxonomic affiliation and by canopy structure as measured by ?13Cleaf values, and such relationships shed light on the combined influences of plant evolution, canopy structure and the function of biochemical resources on the geochemical record of the first rainforests.

  1. Transferability and Nonbond Functional Form of Coarse Grained Force Field - Tested on Linear Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fenglei; Sun, Huai

    2015-10-13

    Whether or not a coarse grained force field (CGFF) can be made to be transferrable is an important question to be addressed. By comparing potential energy with potential of mean force (PMF) of a molecular dimer, we proposed to use a free energy function (FE-12-6) with the parameters in entropic and energetic terms explicitly to represent the nonbond interactions in CGFF. Although the FE-12-6 function cannot accurately describe the PMF curves, a cancelation of short radii and strong repulsion makes the function a good approximation. For nonpolar molecules represented by linear alkanes, FE-12-6 is demonstrated to be highly effective in representing the nonbond interactions in CGFF. The force field parameters are well transferrable among different alkane molecules, in different thermodynamic states and for predicting various thermodynamic properties including heats of vaporization, vapor-liquid-equilibrium coexistence curves, surface tensions, and liquid densities. PMID:26574265

  2. Crossed-beam DC slice imaging of fluorine atom reactions with linear alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Joalland, Baptiste; Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-05-14

    We report the reaction dynamics of F atom with selected alkanes studied by crossed beam scattering with DC slice ion imaging. The target alkanes are propane, n-butane, and n-pentane. The product alkyl radicals are probed by 157 nm single photon ionization following reaction at a collision energy of ?10 kcal mol{sup ?1}. The analyzed data are compared with the corresponding theoretical studies. Reduced translational energy distributions for each system show similar trends with little of the reaction exoergicity appearing in translation. However, the pentane reaction shows a somewhat smaller fraction of available energy in translation than the other two, suggesting greater energy channeled into pentyl internal degrees of freedom. The center-of-mass angular distributions all show backscattering as well as sharp forward scattering that decreases in relative intensity with the size of the molecule. Possible reasons for these trends are discussed.

  3. Crossed-beam DC slice imaging of fluorine atom reactions with linear alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Joalland, Baptiste; Suits, Arthur G.

    2015-05-01

    We report the reaction dynamics of F atom with selected alkanes studied by crossed beam scattering with DC slice ion imaging. The target alkanes are propane, n-butane, and n-pentane. The product alkyl radicals are probed by 157 nm single photon ionization following reaction at a collision energy of ˜10 kcal mol-1. The analyzed data are compared with the corresponding theoretical studies. Reduced translational energy distributions for each system show similar trends with little of the reaction exoergicity appearing in translation. However, the pentane reaction shows a somewhat smaller fraction of available energy in translation than the other two, suggesting greater energy channeled into pentyl internal degrees of freedom. The center-of-mass angular distributions all show backscattering as well as sharp forward scattering that decreases in relative intensity with the size of the molecule. Possible reasons for these trends are discussed.

  4. Catalytic total hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived polyfunctionalized substrates to alkanes.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Liu, Sibao; Tamura, Masazumi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-04-13

    The total hydrodeoxygenation of carbohydrate-derived molecules to alkanes, a key reaction in the production of biofuel, was reviewed from the aspect of catalysis. Noble metals (or Ni) and acid are the main components of the catalysts, and group?6 or 7 metals such as Re are sometimes added as modifiers of the noble metal. The main reaction route is acid-catalyzed dehydration plus metal-catalyzed hydrogenation, and in some systems metal-catalyzed direct C?O dissociation is involved. The appropriate active metal, acid strength, and reaction conditions depend strongly on the reactivity of the substrate. Reactions that use Pt or Pd catalysts supported on Nb-based acids or relatively weak acids are suitable for furanic substrates. Carbohydrates themselves and sugar alcohols undergo C?C dissociation easily. The systems that use metal-catalyzed direct C?O dissociations can give a higher yield of the corresponding alkane from carbohydrates and sugar alcohols. PMID:25711481

  5. Possible room temperature superconductivity in conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Electrical resistances of conductors obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface have been investigated at room temperatures. Ring current in a ring-shaped container into which n-octane-soaked thin graphite flakes were compressed did not decay for 50 days at room temperature. After two HOPG plates were immersed into n-heptane and n-octane at room temperature, changes in resistances of the two samples were measured by four terminal technique. The measurement showed that the resistances of these samples decrease to less than the smallest resistance that can be measured with a high resolution digital voltmeter (0.1?V). The observation of persistent currents in the ring-shaped container suggests that the HOPG plates immersed in n-heptane and n-octane really entered zero-resistance state at room temperature. These results suggest that room temperature superconductor may be obtained by bringing alkanes into contact with a graphite surface. PMID:23826513

  6. Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on the surface of liquid mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraack, H.; Ocko, B. M.; Pershan, P. S.; Sloutskin, E.; Deutsch, M.

    2003-11-01

    The coverage dependent phase behavior of molecular films of n-alkanes (CH3CHn-2CH3, denote Cn) on mercury was studied for lengths 10?n?50, using surface tensiometry and surface x-ray diffraction methods. In contrast with Langmuir films on water, where roughly surface-normal molecular orientation is invariably found, alkanes on mercury are always oriented surface-parallel, and show no long-range in-plane order at any surface pressure. At a low coverage a two-dimensional gas phase is found, followed, upon increasing the coverage, by a single condensed layer (n?18), a sequence of single and double layers (19?n?20; n?26), or a sequence of single, double, and triple layers (22?n?24). The thermodynamical and structural properties of these layers, as determined from the measurements, are discussed.

  7. Metabolism of n-alkanes and their incorporation into lipids in the rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Cravedi, J.P.; Tulliez, J.

    1986-02-01

    The metabolic utilization by fish of n-alkanes was investigated in Salmo gairdneri R. receiving per os a single dose of (14C)heptadecane. This alkane was largely absorbed and radioactivity in the intestinal content was entirely in heptadecane. No elimination of the hydrocarbon was observed in urine. One week after dosing, ca. 50% of the ingested radioactivity was stored in the carcass and two-thirds of this radioactivity was due to heptadecane. The highest concentration of 14C was found in adipose tissue and liver, in which 77 and 22%, respectively, of the radioactivity originated from hydrocarbon. The rest was omega-oxidized to heptadecanoic acid. This fatty acid was incorporated into neutral lipids (mainly as free fatty acid) and phospholipids.

  8. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  9. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  10. Physiological adaptations involved in alkane assimilation at a low temperature by Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15.

    PubMed

    Whyte, L G; Slagman, S J; Pietrantonio, F; Bourbonnière, L; Koval, S F; Lawrence, J R; Inniss, W E; Greer, C W

    1999-07-01

    We examined physiological adaptations which allow the psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 to assimilate alkanes at a low temperature (alkanes are contaminants which are generally insoluble and/or solid at low temperatures). During growth at 5 degrees C on hexadecane or diesel fuel, strain Q15 produced a cell surface-associated biosurfactant(s) and, compared to glucose-acetate-grown cells, exhibited increased cell surface hydrophobicity. A transmission electron microscopy examination of strain Q15 grown at 5 degrees C revealed the presence of intracellular electron-transparent inclusions and flocs of cells connected by an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) when cells were grown on a hydrocarbon and morphological differences between the EPS of glucose-acetate-grown and diesel fuel-grown cells. A lectin binding analysis performed by using confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM) showed that the EPS contained a complex mixture of glycoconjugates, depending on both the growth temperature and the carbon source. Two glycoconjugates [beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-D-GlcNAc and alpha-L-fucose] were detected only on the surfaces of cells grown on diesel fuel at 5 degrees C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed strain Q15 cells on the surfaces of octacosane crystals, and using CSLM, we observed strain Q15 cells covering the surfaces of diesel fuel microdroplets; these findings indicate that this organism assimilates both solid and liquid alkane substrates at a low temperature by adhering to the alkane phase. Membrane fatty acid analysis demonstrated that strain Q15 adapted to growth at a low temperature by decreasing the degree of saturation of membrane lipid fatty acids, but it did so to a lesser extent when it was grown on hydrocarbons at 5 degrees C; these findings suggest that strain Q15 modulates membrane fluidity in response to the counteracting influences of low temperature and hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:10388690

  11. Angiosperm n-alkane distribution patterns and the geologic record of C4 grassland evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, A.; Graham, H. V.; Patzkowsky, M.; Fox, D. L.; Freeman, K. H.

    2012-12-01

    n-Alkane average chain-length (ACL) patterns vary regionally with community composition and climate. To clarify the influence of phylogenetic and community patterns, we compiled and analyzed a global database of published n-alkane abundance for n-C27 to C35 homologs in modern plant specimens (n=205). ACL for waxes in C4 non-woody plants are longer than for woody plants, suggesting ACL can serve as an indicator of the three-dimensional structure of local vegetation. Further, these findings suggest compound-specific isotopic data for longer alkane homologs (C31, C33, C35) will proportionately represent non-woody vegetation and isotope measurements of C29 are more representative of woody vegetation. Thus, the combination of ACL and carbon isotope compositions should allow us to disentangle C3 woody, C3 non-woody, and C4 non-woody signals in terrestrial paleorecords. Application of this approach to the geologic record of Miocene C4 grassland expansion in the US Great Plains and the Siwaliks in Pakistan illustrate two very different transition scenarios. Alkane-specific isotopic data indicate C4 grasslands appeared 2.5 Ma in the Great Plains and 6.5 Ma in the Siwaliks, and ACL analysis indicates that this transition involved the replacement of woody vegetation in the US and the replacement of C3 grasses in Pakistan. Our analysis illustrates that, consistent with differences in the timing of C4 grassland, the drivers of change were likely not the same in these regions. Oxygen isotope records suggest that the more recent transition in the Great Plains was associated with climate cooling and possibly changes in disturbance regimes and that the transition in the Siwaliks was likely associated with warming and drying.

  12. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  13. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  14. Isochoric thermal conductivity of solid n-alkanes: Hexane C6H14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, V. A.; Revyakin, V. P.; Sagan, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    The isochoric thermal conductivity of solid n-hexane C6H14 is studied using three samples with different densities for temperatures ranging from 100 K to the onset of melting. In all cases, the isochoric thermal conductivity varies more weakly than ??1/T. The present results are compared with the thermal conductivities of other representatives of the n-alkanes. The contributions of low-frequency phonons and "diffuse modes" to the thermal conductivity are calculated.

  15. Separation and molecular-level segregation of complex alkane mixtures in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dubbeldam, David; Galvin, Casey J; Walton, Krista S; Ellis, Donald E; Snurr, Randall Q

    2008-08-20

    In this computational work we explore metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for separating alkanes according to the degree of branching. We show that the structure MOF-1 shows an adsorption hierarchy for a 13-component light naphtha mixture precisely as desired for increasing the research octane number of gasoline. In addition we report an unusual molecular-level segregation of molecules based on their degree of branching. PMID:18651737

  16. Fidelity of fossil n-alkanes from leaf to paleosol and applications to the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.; Baczynski, A. A.; Wing, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (C21-C35) are well-known as biomarkers of terrestrial plants. They can be preserved across a wide range of terrestrial and marine environments, survive in the sedimentary record for millions of years, and can serve as proxies for ancient environments. Most n-alkane records are derived from sediments rather than directly from fossil leaves. However, little is known about the fidelity of the n-alkane record: how and where leaf preservation relates to n-alkane preservation and how patterns of n-alkane carbon isotope ratios (?13C) compare to living relatives. To examine these questions, we analyzed n-alkanes from fluvial sediments and individual leaf fossils collected in the Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, across the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) carbon isotope excursion. We assessed the fidelity of the n-alkane signature from individual fossil leaves via three separate means. 1) Spatial variations were assessed by comparing n-alkane concentrations on a fossil leaf and in sediments both directly adjacent to the leaf and farther away. Absolute concentrations were greater within the compression fossil than in the directly adjacent sediment, which were in turn greater than in more distant sediment. 2) n-Alkane abundances and distributions were examined in fossil leaves having a range of preservational quality, from fossils with intact cuticle to carbonized fossils lacking cuticle and higher-order venation. The best preserved fossils preserved a higher concentration of n-alkanes and showed the most similar n-alkane distribution to living relatives. However, a strong odd over even predominance suggests a relatively unmodified plant source occurred in all samples regardless of preservation state. 3) n-Alkane ?13C values were measured for both fossil leaves and their living relatives. Both the saw-tooth pattern of ?13C values between odd and even chain lengths and the general decrease in ?13C values with increasing chain length are consistent with modern plant data. These results suggest that n-alkanes extracted directly from a fossil leaf provide a true signature of an individual leaf fossil rather than a mixture from the entire plant community. Therefore, comparisons between fossil morphotypes and between fossil and related modern taxa should be robust. Furthermore, by placing fossil leaf data within the context of the chemostratigraphy of Bighorn Basin sediments across the P-E boundary, fossil leaf n-alkanes can be used to bridge the gap between our understanding of modern plant lipids and bulk lipid data from sediments across the PETM. It has been hypothesized that changes in the both the molecular distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes across the PETM were due to changes in the local plant community, which included a large proportion of deciduous gymnosperms before and after-but not during-the PETM. Analysis of fossils such as Ginkgo and angiosperms provides the opportunity to compare and distinguish the molecular and isotopic signatures of gymnosperms and angiosperms. These comparisons shed light on the dynamics of climate and ecosystem changes as they are recorded in the signatures of lipid biomarkers.

  17. Ozone-driven photochemical formation of carboxylic acid groups from alkane groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Day, D. A.; Shields, J. E.; Russell, L. M.

    2011-03-01

    Carboxylic acids are ubiquitous in atmospheric particles, and they play an important role in the physical and chemical properties of aerosol particles. During measurements in coastal California in the summer of 2009, carboxylic acid functional groups were highly associated with trajectories from an industrial region with high organic mass (OM), likely from fossil fuel combustion emissions. The concentration of carboxylic acid groups peaked during daytime, suggesting a photochemical secondary formation mechanism. This daytime increase in concentration was tightly correlated with O3 mixing ratio, indicating O3 was the likely driver in acid formation. Based on the diurnal cycles of carboxylic acid and alkane groups, the covariation of carboxylic acid groups with O3, and the composition of the Combustion factor resulted from the factor analyses, gas-phase alkane oxidation by OH radicals to form dihyfrofuran followed by further oxidation of dihydrofuran by O3 is the likely acid formation mechanism. Using the multi-day average of the daytime increase of carboxylic acid group concentrations and m/z 44-based Aged Combustion factor, we estimated the lower-bound contributions of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed in 12-h daytime of processing in a single day to be 30% of the carboxylic acid groups and 25-45% of the Combustion factor concentration. These unique ambient observations of photochemically-driven acid formation suggest that gas-phase alkanes might be important sources of SOA formation in this coastal region.

  18. Diffusion of methane and other alkanes in metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    SciTech Connect

    Borah, B; Zhang, HD; Snurr, RQ

    2015-03-03

    Diffusion of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane was studied within the micropores of several metal organic frameworks (MOFs) of varying topologies, including the MOFs PCN-14, NU-125, NU-1100 and DUT-49. Diffusion coefficients of the pure components, as well as methane/ethane, methane/ propane and methane/butane binary mixtures, were calculated using molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of the longer alkanes on uptake of natural gas in MOB. The calculated self diffusion coefficients of all four components are on the order of 10(-8) m(2)/s. The diffusion coefficients of the pure components decrease as a function of chain length in all of the MOFs studied and show different behaviour as a function of loading in different MOB. The self-diffusivities follow the trend DPCN-14 < DNU-125 approximate to DNU-1100 < DDUT-49, which is exactly the reverse order of the densities of the MOFs: PCN-14 > NU-125 approximate to NU-1100 > DUT-49. By comparing the diffusion of pure methane and methane mixtures vvith the higher alkancs, it is observed that the diffusivity of methane is unaffected by the presence of the higher alkanes in the MOFs considered, indicating that the diffusion path of methane is not blocked by the higher alkanes present in natural gas. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Line tension of alkane lenses on aqueous surfactant solutions at phase transitions of coexisting interfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Ushijima, Baku; Law, Bruce M; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Alkane droplets on aqueous solutions of surfactants exhibit a first-order wetting transition as the concentration of surfactant is increased. The low-concentration or "partial wetting" state corresponds to an oil lens in equilibrium with a two-dimensional dilute gas of oil and surfactant molecules. The high-concentration or "pseudo-partial wetting" state consists of an oil lens in equilibrium with a mixed monolayer of surfactant and oil. Depending on the combination of surfactant and oil, these mixed monolayers undergo a thermal phase transition upon cooling, either to a frozen mixed monolayer or to an unusual bilayer structure in which the upper leaflet is a solid layer of pure alkane with hexagonal packing and upright chains while the lower leaflet remains a disordered liquid-like mixed monolayer. Additionally, certain long-chain alkanes exhibit a surface freezing transition at the air-oil interface where the top monolayer of oil freezes above its melting point. In this review, we summarize our previous studies and discuss how these wetting and surface freezing transitions influence the line tension of oil lenses from both an experimental and theoretical perspective. PMID:24007861

  20. Temperature dependence of the structure of Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on liquid mercury.

    PubMed

    Kraack, H; Ocko, B M; Pershan, P S; Tamam, L; Deutsch, M

    2004-10-22

    The temperature dependent phase behavior of Langmuir films of n-alkanes [CH3(CH2)(n-2)CH3, denote Cn] on mercury was studied for chain lengths 19< or =n< or =22 and temperatures 15< or =T< or =44 degrees C, using surface tensiometry and surface x-ray diffraction methods. In contrast with Langmuir films on water, where molecules invariably orient roughly surface normal, alkanes on mercury are always oriented surface parallel and show no long-range in-plane order at any surface pressure. A gas and several condensed phases of single, double, and triple layers of lying-down molecules are found, depending on n and T. At high coverages, the alkanes studied here show transitions from a triple to a double to a single layer with increasing temperature. The transition temperature from a double to a single layer is found to be approximately 5 degrees C, lower than the bulk rotator-to-liquid melting temperature, while the transition from a triple to a double layer is about as much below the double-to-single layer transition. Both monolayer and bulk transition temperatures show a linear increase with n with identical slopes of approximately 4.5 degrees C/CH2 within the range of n values addressed here. It is suggested that the film and bulk transitions are both driven by a common cause: the proliferation of gauche defects in the chain with increasing temperature. PMID:15485263

  1. Diffusion of Trace Alkanes in Polyethylene: Spin-Echo Measurements and Monte-Carlo Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Meerwall, E.; Lin, H.; Mattice, W. L.

    2006-03-01

    We have performed pulsed-gradient NMR diffusion (D) measurements on five n-alkanes (24, 28, 36, 44, and 60 carbons) in a polyethylene (PE) host (M = 33 kDa) as function of concentration c (2-10 wt.%) at 180 deg. C. Monte-Carlo simulations on the second-nearest-neighbor diamond lattice (38, 46, 62, and 78 carbons) at c between 2 and 15 wt.% in a host of PE (M = 4.5 kDa) explored static and dynamic properties. The bridging method uses beads combining adjacent moieties and incorporates two-bead moves; it permits detailed reconstruction of the chain molecules at any stage. It uses discretized short-range rotational isomeric state and long-range intra- and interchain Lennard-Jones potentials. For both experiment and simulation, trace D was obtained by extrapolating D(c) to c = 0 using the Fujita-Doolittle equation with known chain-end free-volume parameters. A ratio of 330 Monte-Carlo steps per picosecond brings simulation into congruence with experiment; this factor is identical to that required for PE melts. The applicability of the Rouse model is approached only for the largest alkanes, but the M(alkane)-dependence of trace D is seen to be in transition from the Rouse-like 1/M-scaling to a steeper value characteristic of reptation with constraint release.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of the molar volumes and solubility parameters of straight alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinjian; Rao, Zhonghao; Huo, Yutao

    2014-12-01

    The straight chain n-alkanes used as core materials to fabricate nanoencapsulated and microencapsulated phase change of materials (PCM) have received much attention in recent years. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulation method has been emerged to investigate the encapsulated PCM from the perspective of mesoscopic. To obtain the Flory-Huggins and repulsion parameters, which is essential for the DPD study, the molar volume and solubility parameter of straight alkanes are investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The results showed that a linear relationship of molar volume (V) with carbon atom number (n) and simulation temperature (T) can be obtained as: V = -31.73 + 0.26T + 14.82n. A nonlinear relationship of solubility parameter (?) with carbon atom number and simulation temperature can be described as: ? = 18.45-3.66 ×10-2n + 1.07T - 1.20 ×10-5n2 - 9.60 ×10-2T2 - 2.49 ×10-3nT. The equations can be used as a reference for the further DPD simulation in n-alkanes based PCM system.

  3. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  4. Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory

    E-print Network

    Simons, Jack

    Biology 3515/Chemistry 3515 Biological Chemistry Laboratory Spring 2013 (Draft Syllabus, 23 August 2012) Course Description and Objectives: This course is intended for students who have taken Biology and function, particularly for enzymes. Prerequisites: Biology 3510 or Chemistry 3510 Instructor: David P

  5. Environmental swap energy and role of configurational entropy in transfer of small molecules from water into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smejtek, Pavel; Word, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effect of segmented solvent molecules on the free energy of transfer of small molecules from water into alkanes (hexane, heptane, octane, decane, dodecane, tetradecane, and hexadecane). For these alkanes we measured partition coefficients of benzene, 3-methylindole (3MI), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (TeCP), and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TriBP) at 3, 11, 20, 3, and 47 °C. For 3MI, TeCP, and TriBP the dependence of free energy of transfer on length of alkane chains was found to be very different from that for benzene. In contrast to benzene, the energy of transfer for 3MI, TeCP, and TriBP was independent of the number of carbons in alkanes. To interpret data, we used the classic Flory-Huggins (FH) theory of concentrated polymer solutions for the alkane phase. For benzene, the measured dependence of energy of transfer on the number of carbons in alkanes agreed well with predictions based on FH model in which the size of alkane segments was obtained from the ratio of molar volumes of alkanes and the solute. We show that for benzene, the energy of transfer can be divided into two components, one called environmental swap energy (ESE), and one representing the contribution of configurational entropy of alkane chains. For 3MI, TeCP, and TriBP the contribution of configurational entropy was not measurable even though the magnitude of the effect predicted from the FH model for short chain alkanes was as much as 20 times greater than experimental uncertainties. From the temperature dependence of ESE we obtained enthalpy and entropy of transfer for benzene, 3MI, TeCP, and TriBP. Experimental results are discussed in terms of a thermodynamic cycle considering creation of cavity, insertion of solute, and activation of solute-medium attractive interactions. Our results suggest that correcting experimental free energy of transfer by Flory-Huggins configurational entropy term is not generally appropriate and cannot be applied indiscriminately.

  6. Conversing with Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    I/NET, Inc., is making the dream of natural human-computer conversation a practical reality. Through a combination of advanced artificial intelligence research and practical software design, I/NET has taken the complexity out of developing advanced, natural language interfaces. Conversational capabilities like pronoun resolution, anaphora and ellipsis processing, and dialog management that were once available only in the laboratory can now be brought to any application with any speech recognition system using I/NET s conversational engine middleware.

  7. Solar thermal conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the fundamentals of the conversion of solar energy into mechanical work (or electricity via generators) is given. Both past and present work on several conversion concepts are discussed. Solar collectors, storage systems, energy transport, and various types of engines are examined. Ongoing work on novel concepts of collectors, energy storage and thermal energy conversion are outlined and projections for the future are described. Energy costs for various options are predicted and margins and limitations are discussed.

  8. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and, in addition, of the pressure, temperature, and velocity. A near term goal of the experimental program should be to confirm the nonlinear effects of sulfur speciation, and if present, to provide an explanation for them. It is also desirable to examine if the particulate matter retains any sulfur. The recommendation is to examine the effects on SOx production of variations in fuel-bound sulfur and aromatic content (which may affect the amount of particulates formed). These experiments should help us to understand if there is a coupling between particulate formation and SO, concentration. Similarly, any coupling with NOx can be examined either by introducing NOx into the combustion air or by using fuel-bound nitrogen. Also of immediate urgency is the need to establish and validate a detailed mechanism for sulfur oxidation/aerosol formation, whose chemistry is concluded to be homogeneous, because there is not enough surface area for heterogeneous effects. It is envisaged that this work will involve both experimental and theoretical programs. The experimental work will require, in addition to the measurements described above, fundamental studies in devices such as flow reactors and shock tubes. Complementing this effort should be modeling and theoretical activities. One impediment to the successful modeling of sulfur oxidation is the lack of reliable data for thermodynamic and transport properties for several species, such as aqueous nitric acid, sulfur oxides, and sulfuric acid. Quantum mechanical calculations are recommended as a convenient means of deriving values for these properties. Such calculations would also help establish rate constants for several important reactions for which experimental measurements are inherently fraught with uncertainty. Efforts to implement sufficiently detailed chemistry into computational fluid dynamic codes should be continued. Zero- and one-dimensional flow models are also useful vehicles for elucidating the minimal set of species and reactions that must be included in two- and three-dimensional modeling studies.

  9. PEROXYNITRITE CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lymar, S.V.

    2000-11-29

    This century old area of research has been experiencing a renaissance during the last decade, with the annual number of publications on the subject increasing from only one in 1990 to nearly 200 in the late-1990s. This renewed interest is stimulated by the discovery of biological roles of nitric oxide, distinguished by the 1998 Nobel prize, and the recognition that the conversion of nitric oxide into peroxynitrite may play major roles in human diseases associated with oxidative stress and in cellular defense against invading pathogens. Peroxynitrite (ONOO{sup {minus}})is a structural isomer of nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) that contains a peroxo bond. The physiological route to ONOO{sup {minus}} is provided by the combination of nitric oxide ({center_dot}NO) with superoxide ({center_dot}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}), an extremely rapid reaction occurring upon every encounter of these radicals (the upper dot denotes radical species). Both {center_dot}NO and {center_dot}O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} are the oxygen metabolic products simultaneously generated in a number of cell types within a human body. Compared to its precursors, peroxynitrite is a much stronger oxidant capable of oxidizing proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids.

  10. Anaerolineaceae and Methanosaeta turned to be the dominant microorganisms in alkanes-dependent methanogenic culture after long-term of incubation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Wang, Li-Ying; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-12-01

    The methanogenic alkanes-degrading enrichment culture which had been incubated for over 1,300 days amended with n-alkanes (C15-C20) was investigated through clone libraries of bacteria, archaea and assA, mcrA functional genes. These enrichment cultures were obtained from oily sludge after an initial incubation of the oily sludge without any carbon source and then an enrichment transfer with n-alkanes (C15-C20) for acclimation. Activation of alkanes, methane precursor generation and methanogenic pathways are considered as three pivotal stages for the continuous methanogenesis from degradation of alkanes. The presence of functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase ?-subunit indicated that fumarate addition is most likely the one of initial activation step for degradation of n-alkanes. Degradation intermediates of n-alkanes were octadecanoate, hexadecanoate, butyrate, isobutyrate, acetate and propionate, which could provide the appropriate substrates for acetate formation. Both methyl coenzyme M reductase gene and 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that microorganisms of Methanoseata were the most dominant methanogens, capable of using acetate as the electron donor to produce methane. Bacterial clone libraries showed organisms of Anaerolineaceae (within the phylum of Chloroflexi) were predominant (45.5%), indicating syntrophically cooperation with Methanosaeta archaea was likely involved in the process of methanogenic degradation of alkanes. Alkanes may initially be activated via fumarate addition and degraded to fatty acids, then converted to acetate, which was further converted to methane and carbon dioxide by methanogens. PMID:26080793

  11. Evaluating the potential of long chain n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids as biomarkers for past vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanny, Verena; Zech, Roland; Eglinton, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Leaf waxes, such as long chain n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids, may have a great potential for the reconstruction of past environmental and climate conditions (e.g. (Zech R. et al., 2013). While n-C27 and n-C29 alkanes often predominantly occur in trees and shrubs, n-C31 and n-C33 are more abundant in grasses and herbs. However, little is known about chain-length distributions of n-carboxylic acids, and very few studies have systematically investigated leaf waxes in top soils. We analyzed n-alkanes and n-carboxylic acids in ~100 litter and topsoil samples from Southern Germany to Sweden. Our results show that sites under deciduous trees often contain a lot of C27 n-alkanes and C28 n-carboxylic acids. Coniferous sites are characterized by dominance in n-alkanes C29 and C31 and have relatively high concentrations of n-carboxylic acids C22 and C24. Grass sites show a Cmax at C31 for n-alkanes and at C24 or C26 for n-carboxylic acids. Differences in homologue patterns are most pronounced in the litter samples, but are well preserved also in the topsoils (0-3 cm depth, a little less in the lower topsoils from 3-10 cm). Our results illustrate the potential of combining n-alkane and n-carboxylic acid analyses for paleo-vegetation reconstructions, yet indicate that the degree of degradation may have to be taken into consideration (Zech M. et al., 2013). References: Zech, M. et al. (2013) Quat. Int. 296, 108-116. Zech, R. et al. (2013) Palaeo3, 387, 165-175.

  12. Assessment of Gaussian-3 and Density Functional Theories for Enthalpies of Formation of C1-C16 Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Redfern, Paul C.; Zapol, Peter; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2000-06-22

    We have examined the performance of Gaussian-3 (G3) theory and six related methods for the calculation of enthalpies of formation of n-alkanes of up to 16 carbons and isoalkanes of up to 10 carbons. We have also examined the accuracy of the B3LYP density functional theory for the n-alkanes. The G3 enthalpies of formation of the n-alkanes have errors of less than 2 kcal/mol compared to experiment. There is a small accumulation of error (0.04 kcal/mol per bond) that increases the deviation with chain length. The effects of conformational averaging on the G3 enthalpies of the n-alkanes are estimated to be small, but are in the direction to reduce the error. The branched alkanes have errors of less than 1 kcal/mol. Four of the variations of G3 theory [G3(MP3), G3(MP2), G3(MP2)//B3LYP, and G3(MP2,CCSD)//B3LYP] also have errors similar to or smaller than G3 theory while two of the variations [G3(CCSD) and G3(MP2,CCSD)] have maximum errors for the n-alkanes of about 2.5 kcal/mol. The B3LYP method does very poorly for the calculation of enthalpies of formation of the larger n-alkanes with an error of over 30 kcal/mol for hexadecane. This suggests that B3LYP has a significant problem with accumulation of errors as the molecular size increases. Several schemes for correcting systematic errors in B3LYP calculations for large molecules are also explored.

  13. Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry UCLA Chemistry, Biochemistry & Chemistry Material Science

    E-print Network

    New & Transfer Student Handbook 2015-2016 #12;Welcome..................................................................................................................................................................1 Chemistry & Biochemistry Undergraduate Office....................................................................................................................................15 Tentative Course Offerings for 2015-2016

  14. CHEMISTRY IN EVAPORATING ICES-UNEXPLORED TERRITORY

    SciTech Connect

    Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Rawlings, Jonathan M. C.; Viti, Serena; Williams, David A. E-mail: jcr@star.ucl.ac.u E-mail: daw@star.ucl.ac.u

    2010-12-20

    We suggest that three-body chemistry may occur in warm high-density gas evaporating in transient co-desorption events on interstellar ices. Using a highly idealized computational model we explore the chemical conversion from simple species of the ice to more complex species containing several heavy atoms, as a function of density and of adopted three-body rate coefficients. We predict that there is a wide range of densities and rate coefficients in which a significant chemical conversion may occur. We discuss the implications of this idea for the astrochemistry of hot cores.

  15. CHEMISTRY 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    1 CHEMISTRY 499 UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH Chemistry 499 provides a mechanism whereby undergraduate chemistry majors may participate in the research of the faculty and receive academic credit for the instructor, and one to be kept on file in the Chemistry Office (specified by the American Chemical Society

  16. From molecular chemistry to supramolecular chemistry to superdupermolecular chemistry. Controlling covalent bond formation

    E-print Network

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    From molecular chemistry to supramolecular chemistry to superdupermolecular chemistry. Controlling covalent bond formation through non-covalent and magnetic interactions Nicholas J. Turro Chemistry. Introduction Carbon centered radicals are among the most reactive species encountered in organic chemistry

  17. Energy conversion Subject Information

    E-print Network

    Greff, Isabelle

    Energy conversion Subject Information Code UE5 S2 Credits (ECTS) 7 Semester 1 (mid-September ­ mid The purpose of this course is to study the different ways of converting energy resources into useful energy of nuclear power plants. Cycles for energy conversion in coal power plants, technologies for coal combustion

  18. Marathi Conversational Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berntsen, Maxine; Nimbkar, Jai

    This volume is an elementary Marathi conversation text for adult learners of Marathi, both foreign and Indian. Designed to be used in conjunction with "Marathi Structural Patterns. Book One," the volume presents over 80 conversations that include material required in everyday situations. Each section contains basic and more difficult…

  19. Retrospective Conversion: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed-Scott, Jutta

    1985-01-01

    This review of the process of retrospective conversion (recon)--conversion of existing bibliographic records into machine-readable form--notes options and services (bibliographic utilities, commercial vendors); new technologies (microcomputer and optical-disc-based systems); collaboration and a coordinated recon strategy; cooperative efforts; and…

  20. Energy conversion alternatives study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. T.

    1979-01-01

    Comparison of coal based energy systems is given. Study identifies and compares various advanced energy conversion systems using coal or coal derived fuels for baselaoad electric power generation. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS) reports provede government, industry, and general public with technically consistent basis for comparison of system's options of interest for fossilfired electric-utility application.

  1. Undergraduate Internship in Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laroche, Jacques M.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the undergraduate internship in conversation at New Mexico State University, a course which attempts to improve the oral communication of basic language classes. The course offers undergraduates opportunities to hold conversations with more advanced undergraduates in weekly meetings. In order to make the class nonthreatening, neither…

  2. Cloning and heterologous expression of a gene encoding an alkane-induced extracellular protein involved in alkane assimilation from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Hardegger, M; Koch, A K; Ochsner, U A; Fiechter, A; Reiser, J

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PG201 produces a 16-kDa extracellular protein in media containing n-hexadecane as a carbon source but not in media containing glycerol or glucose. This protein was purified, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. The amino acid composition of the protein was found to be very similar to that of the so-called protein-like activator for n-alkane oxidation (PA) from P. aeruginosa S7B1. This extracellular protein was previously characterized (K. Hisatsuka, T. Nakahara, Y. Minoda, and K. Yamada, Agric. Biol. Chem. 41:445-450, 1977) and found to stimulate the growth of P. aeruginosa on n-hexadecane and to possess emulsifying activity. To study the role(s) of the PA protein and to make it accessible for possible future applications, we have cloned the PA-encoding (pra) gene and determined its nucleotide sequence. This analysis revealed a protein-coding region of 162 amino acids, with the first 25 residues being reminiscent of those of a typical bacterial signal sequence. The pra gene was inactivated by insertional mutagenesis, and the resulting strain was found to lack extracellular PA protein and to be retarded in its growth in n-hexadecane-containing media. These results are consistent with the growth stimulatory role of the PA protein. The pra gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and substantial amounts of the recombinant protein were found in the extracellular growth medium. The recombinant protein was purified by metal chelate affinity chromatography. The ability to produce secreted PA protein by E. coli provides a simple and safe means to analyze its function(s) in alkane assimilation in the future. Images PMID:7986042

  3. Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A

    E-print Network

    Ronis, David M.

    Legendre Functions Quantum Chemistry: Chemistry 180-345A In class we showed that the the angular Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -2- Chemistry 180-345A which is divergent at x = ±1 (i.e., at = 0 Chemistry -3- Chemistry 180-345A Hydrogen orbitals for l = 0, 1 Fall 2003 #12;Quantum Chemistry -4

  4. Chemistry 161 The Chemistry Department offers three distinct programs --

    E-print Network

    Chemistry · 161 Chemistry The Chemistry Department offers three distinct programs -- Chemistry Honours, Chemistry Major, and Chemistry Minor. All of our programs provide students with a balanced, rich, and prac- tical education in all sub-disciplines of Chemistry (Analytical, Biochemical, Environmental

  5. School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level

    E-print Network

    Rzepa, Henry S.

    School of Chemistry CHEM3100: Chemistry at a Molecular Level Tutorial Groups 2014/15 Name Programme Tutor Arif, Saboor Chemistry Armstrong, Sam W. Chemistry Beaumont, Jack P. Chemistry Dwayne Heard Bennett, Niall C. Chemistry Room 1.28a Betts, Samuel A. Chemistry D.E.Heard@leeds.ac.uk Booth, Natalie L

  6. Industrial Chemistry and School Chemistry: Making Chemistry Studies More Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstein, Avi; Kesner, Miri

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the development and implementation over the period of more than 15 years of learning materials focusing on industrial chemistry as the main theme. The work was conducted in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel. The project's general goal was to teach chemistry concepts in the…

  7. Long-Term Incubation Reveals Methanogenic Biodegradation of C5 and C6 iso-Alkanes in Oil Sands Tailings.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Tariq; Mohamad Shahimin, Mohd Faidz; Zamir, Saima; Semple, Kathleen; Li, Carmen; Foght, Julia M

    2015-12-15

    iso-Alkanes are major components of petroleum and have been considered recalcitrant to biodegradation under methanogenic conditions. However, indigenous microbes in oil sands tailings ponds exposed to solvents rich in 2-methylbutane, 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane, n-pentane, and n-hexane produce methane in situ. We incubated defined mixtures of iso- or n-alkanes with mature fine tailings from two tailings ponds of different ages historically exposed to different solvents: one, ?10 years old, receiving C5-C6 paraffins and the other, ?35 years old, receiving naphtha. A lengthy incubation (>6 years) revealed iso-alkane biodegradation after lag phases of 900-1800 and ?280 days, respectively, before the onset of methanogenesis, although lag phases were shorter with n-alkanes (?650-1675 and ?170 days, respectively). 2-Methylpentane and both n-alkanes were completely depleted during ?2400 days of incubation, whereas 2-methylbutane and 3-methylpentane were partially depleted only during active degradation of 2-methylpentane, suggesting co-metabolism. In both cases, pyrotag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed codominance of Peptococcaceae with acetoclastic (Methanosaeta) and hydrogenotrophic (Methanoregula and Methanolinea) methanogens. These observations are important for predicting long-term greenhouse-gas emissions from oil sands tailings ponds and extend the known range of hydrocarbons susceptible to methanogenic biodegradation in petroleum-impacted anaerobic environments. PMID:26571341

  8. Characterization of a Novel Rieske-Type Alkane Monooxygenase System in Pusillimonas sp. Strain T7-7

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The cold-tolerant bacterium Pusillimonas sp. strain T7-7 is able to utilize diesel oils (C5 to C30 alkanes) as a sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, bioinformatics, proteomics, and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR approaches were used to identify the alkane hydroxylation system present in this bacterium. This system is composed of a Rieske-type monooxygenase, a ferredoxin, and an NADH-dependent reductase. The function of the monooxygenase, which consists of one large (46.711 kDa) and one small (15.355 kDa) subunit, was further studied using in vitro biochemical analysis and in vivo heterologous functional complementation tests. The purified large subunit of the monooxygenase was able to oxidize alkanes ranging from pentane (C5) to tetracosane (C24) using NADH as a cofactor, with greatest activity on the C15 substrate. The large subunit also showed activity on several alkane derivatives, including nitromethane and methane sulfonic acid, but it did not act on any aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal reaction condition of the large subunit is pH 7.5 at 30°C. Fe2+ can enhance the activity of the enzyme evidently. This is the first time that an alkane monooxygenase system belonging to the Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase family has been identified in a bacterium. PMID:23417490

  9. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  10. Dependence on chain length of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed, Denise E.

    2007-05-01

    Many naturally occurring fluids, such as crude oils, consist of a very large number of components. It is often of interest to determine the composition of the fluids in situ. Diffusion coefficients and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation times can be measured in situ and depend on the size of the molecules. It has been shown [D. E. Freed et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 067602 (2005)] that the diffusion coefficient of each component in a mixture of alkanes follows a scaling law in the chain length of that molecule and in the mean chain length of the mixture, and these relations were used to determine the chain length distribution of crude oils from NMR diffusion measurements. In this paper, the behavior of NMR relaxation times in mixtures of chain molecules is addressed. The author explains why one would expect scaling laws for the transverse and longitudinal relaxation times of mixtures of short chain molecules and mixtures of alkanes, in particular. It is shown how the power law dependence on the chain length can be calculated from the scaling laws for the translational diffusion coefficients. The author fits the literature data for NMR relaxation in binary mixtures of alkanes and finds that its dependence on chain length agrees with the theory. Lastly, it is shown how the scaling laws in the chain length and the mean chain length can be used to determine the chain length distribution in crude oils that are high in saturates. A good fit is obtained between the NMR-derived chain length distributions and the ones from gas chromatography.

  11. Mass dependence of the activation enthalpy and entropy of unentangled linear alkane chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Cheol; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-10-01

    The mass scaling of the self-diffusion coefficient D of polymers in the liquid state, D ˜ M?, is one of the most basic characteristics of these complex fluids. Although traditional theories such as the Rouse and reptation models of unentangled and entangled polymer melts, respectively, predict that ? is constant, this exponent for alkanes has been estimated experimentally to vary from -1.8 to -2.7 upon cooling. Significantly, ? changes with temperature T under conditions where the chains are not entangled and at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg where dynamic heterogeneity does not complicate the description of the liquid dynamics. Based on atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on unentangled linear alkanes in the melt, we find that the variation of ? with T can be directly attributed to the dependence of the enthalpy ?Ha and entropy ?Sa of activation on the number of alkane backbone carbon atoms, n. In addition, we find a sharp change in the melt dynamics near a "critical" chain length, n ? 17. A close examination of this phenomenon indicates that a "buckling transition" from rod-like to coiled chain configurations occurs at this characteristic chain length and distinct entropy-enthalpy compensation relations, ?Sa ? ?Ha, hold on either side of this polymer conformational transition. We conclude that the activation free energy parameters exert a significant influence on the dynamics of polymer melts that is not anticipated by either the Rouse and reptation models. In addition to changes of ?Ha and ?Sa with M, we expect changes in these free energy parameters to be crucial for understanding the dynamics of polymer blends, nanocomposites, and confined polymers because of changes of the fluid free energy by interfacial interactions and geometrical confinement.

  12. Isochoric thermal conductivity of solid n-alkanes: propane C3H8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinov, V. A.; Revyakin, V. P.; Sagan, V. V.

    2009-07-01

    The isochoric thermal conductivity of solid propane C3H8 is investigated on three samples of different densities in the temperature interval from 50K to the onset of melting. In all cases the isochoric thermal conductivity exhibits dependences that are weaker than ? ?1/T. The results obtained are compared with those for other representatives of n-alkanes. The experimental data are discussed within a model in which the heat is transported by low-frequency phonons and by "diffusive" modes above the phonon mobility edge.

  13. The radiolysis of simple gas mixtures—II. The production of lower alkanes and alkenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Alan; Moores, Graham E.

    Carbon dioxide based gas mixtures, similar to those used as coolants in the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors (AGR), have been radiolysed in stainless steel capsules at a dose rate of 3 Gy s -1 using ? radiation from a 60C source. The concentrations of the lower alkanes and alkenes, so produced, have been determined under different conditions of temperature, pressure, gas composition and surface area. Observations showed that organic compounds were produced in concentrations of the order of {1}/{500} of the methane concentration and that the production of these "trace organics" varied in a complex way with the experimental parameters. Mechanisms for the production of these organics have been proposed.

  14. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked to explain the reason for this decoupling. Our current work that also includes leaf water isotopic measurements will provide further details regarding the role of transpiration in controlling the deltaD values of leaf lipids.

  15. Model predictions of higher-order normal alkane ignition from dilute shock-tube experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotavera, B.; Petersen, E. L.

    2013-07-01

    Shock-induced oxidation of two higher-order linear alkanes was measured using a heated shock tube facility. Experimental overlap in stoichiometric ignition delay times obtained under dilute (99 % Ar) conditions near atmospheric pressure was observed in the temperature-dependent ignition trends of n-nonane ( n-C9H20) and n-undecane ( n-C11H24). Despite the overlap, model predictions of ignition using two different detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms show discrepancies relative to both the measured data as well as to one another. The present study therefore focuses on the differences observed in the modeled, high-temperature ignition delay times of higher-order n-alkanes, which are generally regarded to have identical ignition behavior for carbon numbers above C7. Comparisons are drawn using experimental data from the present study and from recent work by the authors relative to two existing chemical kinetics mechanisms. Time histories from the shock-tube OH* measurements are also compared to the model predictions; a double-peaked structure observed in the data shows that the time response of the detector electronics is crucial for properly capturing the first, incipient peak near time zero. Calculations using the two mechanisms were carried out at the dilution level employed in the shock-tube experiments for lean {({?} = 0.5)}, stoichiometric, and rich {({?} = 2.0)} equivalence ratios, 1230-1620 K, and for both 1.5 and 10 atm. In general, the models show differing trends relative to both measured data and to one another, indicating that agreement among chemical kinetics models for higher-order n-alkanes is not consistent. For example, under certain conditions, one mechanism predicts the ignition delay times to be virtually identical between the n-nonane and n-undecane fuels (in fact, also for all alkanes between at least C8 and C12), which is in agreement with the experiment, while the other mechanism predicts the larger fuels to ignite progressively more slowly.

  16. Synthesis, conformational and theoretical studies of 1,n-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachander, R.; Manimekalai, A.

    2016-01-01

    1,n-di(2-Formyl-4-phenylazophenoxy)alkanes 1 and 2 and 1,3-di(2-formyl-4-phenylazophenoxymethyl)benzene 3 were synthesis and characterized by FT-IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C NMR and mass spectral studies. The stable conformations of 1-3 were predicted theoretically and selected geometrical parameters were derived from optimized structures. The molecular parameters of HOMO-LUMO energies, polarizability, hyperpolarizability, natural bond orbital (NBO), atom in molecule (AIM) analysis and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surfaces were determined by the density functional theory (DFT) method and analysed.

  17. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  18. Upgrading light hydrocarbons via tandem catalysis: a dual homogeneous Ta/Ir system for alkane/alkene coupling.

    PubMed

    Leitch, David C; Lam, Yan Choi; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2013-07-17

    Light alkanes and alkenes are abundant but are underutilized as energy carriers because of their high volatility and low energy density. A tandem catalytic approach for the coupling of alkanes and alkenes has been developed in order to upgrade these light hydrocarbons into heavier fuel molecules. This process involves alkane dehydrogenation by a pincer-ligated iridium complex and alkene dimerization by a Cp*TaCl2(alkene) catalyst. These two homogeneous catalysts operate with up to 60/30 cooperative turnovers (Ir/Ta) in the dimerization of 1-hexene/n-heptane, giving C13/C14 products in 40% yield. This dual system can also effect the catalytic dimerization of n-heptane (neohexene as the H2 acceptor) with cooperative turnover numbers of 22/3 (Ir/Ta). PMID:23799786

  19. Axial Chiral Bisbenzophenazines: Solid-State Self-Assembly via Halide Hydrogen Bonds Triggered by Linear Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An axial chiral tetrachlorinated bisbenzo[a]phenazine has been discovered that undergoes an alkane-induced shift in the solid state from a disordered amorphous form to an ordered polycrystalline form. This phase transition is caused by the formation of pores that accommodate linear alkanes of varying lengths with a very strong affinity as judged by differential scanning calorimetry. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis revealed that a series of weak phenolic OH···Cl hydrogen bonds dictates the pore structure. These weak interactions can be disrupted mechanically, causing the material to revert to the amorphous form. Notably, the interchange between the amorphous and crystalline forms is readily reversible and is easily observed by characteristic colorimetric changes. Measurements via photoimage processing reveal that the degree of color change is dictated by the type of alkane employed. PMID:25019179

  20. The Renaissance of Non-Aqueous Uranium Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-20

    Prior to the year 2000, non-aqueous uranium chemistry mainly involved metallocene and classical alkyl, amide, or alkoxide compounds as well as established carbene, imido, and oxo derivatives. Since then, there has been a resurgence of the area, and dramatic developments of supporting ligands and multiply bonded ligand types, small-molecule activation, and magnetism have been reported. This Review 1)?introduces the reader to some of the specialist theories of the area, 2)?covers all-important starting materials, 3)?surveys contemporary ligand classes installed at uranium, including alkyl, aryl, arene, carbene, amide, imide, nitride, alkoxide, aryloxide, and oxo compounds, 4)?describes advances in the area of single-molecule magnetism, and 5)?summarizes the coordination and activation of small molecules, including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, dinitrogen, white phosphorus, and alkanes. PMID:26079536

  1. Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on the surface of liquid mercury Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel

    E-print Network

    Pershan, Peter S.

    Langmuir films of normal-alkanes on the surface of liquid mercury H. Kraack Department of Physics). The thermodynamical and structural properties of these layers, as determined from the measurements, are discussed films of n-alkanes (CH3CHn 2CH3 , denote Cn) on mercury was studied for lengths 10 n 50, using surface

  2. Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C31 to C38 at T ) 298.15 K by Correlation Gas Chromatography

    E-print Network

    Chickos, James S.

    Vapor Pressures and Vaporization Enthalpies of the n-Alkanes from C31 to C38 at T ) 298.15 K with other literature values to evaluate the vaporization enthalpies and vapor pressures of these n-alkanes from T ) 298.15 to 575 K. The vapor pressure and vaporization enthalpy results obtained are compared

  3. RNAi silencing of a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase disrupts the ability of a filamentous fungus, Graphium sp. to grow on short-chain gaseous alkanes and ethers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Graphium sp. (ATCC 58400), a filamentous fungus, is one of the few eukaryotes that grows on short-chain alkanes and ethers. In this study, we investigated the genetic underpinnings that enable this fungus to catalyze the first step in the alkane and ether oxidation pathway. A gene, CYP52L1, was iden...

  4. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    SciTech Connect

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, Sasha; Aumont, B.; Baker, A.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, Alma; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, Eric; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-12-21

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 ug m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 ?g m-3 during mid-day. The majority (> 75%) of the model SOA stems from the large n-alkanes, with the remainder mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by *- hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  5. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Baker, A.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, E.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 ?g m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 ?g m-3 during mid-day. The majority (?75%) of the model SOA stems from reaction products of the large n-alkanes, used here as surrogates for all emitted hydrocarbons of similar volatility, with the remaining SOA originating mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by ?-hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  6. Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Hodzic, A.; Tyndall, G. S.; Apel, E.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of organic aerosols (OA) in Mexico City and its outflow is investigated with the nearly explicit gas phase photochemistry model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), wherein precursor hydrocarbons are oxidized to numerous intermediate species for which vapor pressures are computed and used to determine gas/particle partitioning in a chemical box model. Precursor emissions included observed C3-10 alkanes, alkenes, and light aromatics, as well as larger n-alkanes (up to C25) not directly observed but estimated by scaling to particulate emissions according to their volatility. Conditions were selected for comparison with observations made in March 2006 (MILAGRO). The model successfully reproduces the magnitude and diurnal shape for both primary (POA) and secondary (SOA) organic aerosols, with POA peaking in the early morning at 15-20 ?g m-3, and SOA peaking at 10-15 ?g m-3 during mid-day. The majority (?75 %) of the model SOA stems from the large n-alkanes, with the remainder mostly from the light aromatics. Simulated OA elemental composition reproduces observed H/C and O/C ratios reasonably well, although modeled ratios develop more slowly than observations suggest. SOA chemical composition is initially dominated by ?-hydroxy ketones and nitrates from the large alkanes, with contributions from peroxy acyl nitrates and, at later times when NOx is lower, organic hydroperoxides. The simulated plume-integrated OA mass continues to increase for several days downwind despite dilution-induced particle evaporation, since oxidation chemistry leading to SOA formation remains strong. In this model, the plume SOA burden several days downwind exceeds that leaving the city by a factor of >3. These results suggest significant regional radiative impacts of SOA.

  7. Isolation of an alkane-degrading Alcanivorax sp. strain 2B5 and cloning of the alkB gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chen; Li, Ling-Zhi; Wu, Ying; Tian, Wei; Zhang, Li-Ping; Xu, Lian; Shen, Qi-Rong; Shen, Biao

    2010-01-01

    A Gram-negative coccus, strain 2B5, was isolated from the sea mud of the crude oil-polluted Donghai area in China and identified as Alcanivorax sp. based on its physiological characteristics and analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. Strain 2B5 was able to degrade C(13)-C(30)n-alkanes and branched alkanes (pristane and phytane) from crude oil as the sole carbon source. The optimal temperature and pH for strain 2B5 growth and octadecane degradation were 30-37 degrees C and pH 6.0-7.0, respectively. NaCl is required for strain 2B5 growth and octadecane degradation were highest at NaCl concentrations of 20 to 90 g L(-1). A novel alkane hydroxylase gene (alkB), obtained by self-formed adaptor PCR (SEFA-PCR), displays 41.9% deduced amino acid sequence identity with alkB1 of Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2. Functional heterologous expression of the alkB gene was achieved in Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2delta1. Recombinant Pseudomonas containing the alkB gene of Alcanivorax sp. strain 2B5 recovered the ability to grow on C(14) and C(16)n-alkanes. RT-PCR analysis showed that expression of the alkB gene was induced by octadecane. There could be other alkane hydroxylases in Alcanivorax sp. 2B5 that could be involved in the degradation of short- and long-chain alkanes. PMID:19733061

  8. n-hydrocarbons conversions over metal-modified solid acid catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarubica, A.; Ran?elovi?, M.; Mom?ilovi?, M.; Radulovi?, N.; Putanov, P.

    2013-12-01

    The quality of a straight-run fuel oil can be improved if saturated n-hydrocarbons of low octane number are converted to their branched counterparts. Poor reactivity of traditional catalysts in isomerization reactions imposed the need for the development of new catalysts among which noble metal promoted acid catalysts, liquid and/or solid acid catalysts take a prominent place. Sulfated zirconia and metal promoted sulfated zirconia exhibit high activity for the isomerization of light alkanes at low temperatures. The present paper highlights the original results which indicate that the modification of sulfated zirconia by incorporation of metals (platinum and rhenium) significantly affects catalytic performances in n-hydrocarbon conversion reactions. Favourable activity/selectivity of the promoted sulfated zirconia depends on the crystal phase composition, critical crystallites sizes, platinum dispersion, total acidity and type of acidity. Attention is also paid to the recently developed solid acid catalysts used in other conversion reactions of hydrocarbons.

  9. Avatar augmented online conversation

    E-print Network

    Vilhjálmsson, Hannes Högni

    2003-01-01

    One of the most important roles played by technology is connecting people and mediating their communication with one another. Building technology that mediates conversation presents a number of challenging research and ...

  10. Responsive Teaching through Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Cheryl; Garnett, Susan; Tabatabai, Simeen

    2011-01-01

    Conversations are the heart of responsive teaching. By talking with struggling learners, teachers can find out about their interests in order to design effective, personalized instruction; build relationships; work through complexities in teaching and learning; and celebrate successes.

  11. MINING CONVERSATIONAL SOCIAL VIDEO

    E-print Network

    MINING CONVERSATIONAL SOCIAL VIDEO THIS IS A TEMPORARY TITLE PAGE It will be replaced for the final that contributed to make of v #12;Acknowledgements 305 the best office at Idiap. Thank you to Radu for not killing

  12. Growth factor controls on the distribution and carbon isotope composition of n-alkanes in leaf wax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, C.; Xie, S.; Huang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Cuticular wax plays pivotal physiological and ecological roles in the interactions between plants and the environments in which they grow. Plant-derived long-chain alkanes are more resistant to decay than other biochemical polymers. n-Alkane distributions (Carbon Preference Index (CPI) values and Average Chain Length (ACL) values) and carbon isotopic values are used widely in palaeoenvironmental reconstruction. However, there is little information available on how growth stages of the plant might influence the abundance of n-alkanes in the natural environment. In this study, we analyzed n-alkane distributions and carbon isotope data from two tree species (Cinnamomum camphora (L.) Presl. and Liquidambar formosana Hance) collected monthly from 2009 to 2011 in Nanwang Shan, Wuhan, Hubei Province. CPI values for n-alkanes from C. camphora remained stable in autumn and winter but fluctuated dramatically during spring and autumn each year. Positive correlations between CPI values and the relative content of (C27+C29) were observed in both sun and shade leaves of C. camphora from April to July. In L. formosana, CPI values decreased gradually from April to December. A similar trend was observed in all three years suggesting that growth stages rather than temperature or relative humidity affected the CPI values on a seasonal timescale. In the samples of L. formosana ACL values were negatively correlated with CPI values in the growing season (from April to July) and positively correlated with CPI values in the other seasons. The ?13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes displayed more negative carbon isotopic values in autumn and winter compared with leaves sampled at the start of the growing season from both trees. The ?13C values of C29 and C31 n-alkanes of L. formosana decreased from April to December. These results demonstrate the importance of elucidating the growing factors that influence the distribution and ?13C values of alkanes in modern leaves prior to using CPI, ACL, and isotopic shifts as indicators of palaeoenvironmental changes on short timescales.

  13. Surface tensions of linear and branched alkanes from Monte Carlo simulations using the anisotropic united atom model.

    PubMed

    Biscay, F; Ghoufi, A; Goujon, F; Lachet, V; Malfreyt, P

    2008-11-01

    The anisotropic united atoms (AUA4) model has been used for linear and branched alkanes to predict the surface tension as a function of temperature by Monte Carlo simulations. Simulations are carried out for n-alkanes ( n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, and n-C10) and for two branched C7 isomers (2,3-dimethylpentane and 2,4-dimethylpentane). Different operational expressions of the surface tension using both the thermodynamic and the mechanical definitions have been applied. The simulated surface tensions with the AUA4 model are found to be consistent within both definitions and in good agreement with experiments. PMID:18847235

  14. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOEpatents

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  15. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  16. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  17. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  18. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  19. Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics

    E-print Network

    Heller, Barbara

    Geoenvironmental Engineering Geotechnical Engineering Health Physics Industrial Technology & Operations Information Science Manufacturing Engineering Materials Chemistry Materials Science & Engineering Mathematical FinanceAnalytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture

  20. Reactions of C2(a 3?u) with selected saturated alkanes: A temperature dependence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Renzhi; Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yang

    2010-04-01

    We present a temperature dependence study on the gas phase reactions of the C2(a?3u) radical with a selected series of saturated alkanes (C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, i-C4H10, and n-C6H14) by means of pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. The bimolecular rate constants for these reactions were obtained between 298 and 673 K. A pronounced negative temperature effect was observed for n-C4H10, i-C4H10, and n-C6H14 and interpreted in terms of steric hindrance of the more reactive secondary or tertiary C-H bonds by less reactive CH3 groups. Detailed analysis of our experimental results reveals quantitatively the temperature dependence of reactivities for the primary, secondary, and tertiary C-H bonds in these saturated alkanes and further lends support to a mechanism of hydrogen abstraction.

  1. Influence of alkane chain length on adsorption on an ?-alumina surface by MD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, C.; Pandiyan, S.; Mether, L.; Belmahi, M.; Nordlund, K.; Philipp, P.

    2015-06-01

    Plasma surface techniques provide both an efficient and ecological tool for the functionalization of surfaces. Hence, a proper understanding of the plasma-surface interactions of precursors and radicals during the deposition process is of great importance. Especially during the initial deposition process, the deposition of molecules and fragments is difficult to investigate by experimental techniques and import insights can be obtained by molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, the reactive force field developed by the group of Kieffer at the University of Michigan was used to study the adsorption of single linear alkane chains on an ?-alumina surface. The chain length was changed from 6 backbone carbon atoms to 16 carbon atoms, the deposition energy from 0.01 to 10 eV and the incidence angle from 0° to 60° with respect to the surface normal. Results show that the adsorption depends a lot on the ratio of deposition energy to alkane chain length and the incidence angle. More grazing incidence reduces the adsorption probability and a low ratio of energy to chain length increases it.

  2. Modeling Study of Hydrogen/Oxygen and n-alkane/Oxygen Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-wei; Cai, Guo-biao; Yang, Vigor

    2011-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of hydrogen/oxygen and hydrocarbon/oxygen counterflow diffusion flames has been conducted using corresponding detailed reaction mechanisms. The hydrocarbon fuels contain n-alkanes from CH4 to C16H34. The basic diffusion flame structures are demonstrated, analyzed, and compared. The effects of pressure, and strain rate on the flame behavior and energy-release rate for each fuel are examined systematically. The detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are employed, and the largest one of them contains 2115 species and 8157 reversible reactions. The results indicate for all of the fuels the flame thickness and heat release rate correlate well with the square root of the pressure multiplied by the strain rate. Under the condition of any strain rate and pressure, H2 has thicker flame than hydrocarbons, while the hydrocarbons have the similar temperature and main products distributions and almost have the same flame thickness and heat release rate. The result indicates that the fuels composed with these hydrocarbons will still have the same flame properties as any pure n-alkane fuel.

  3. The idiosyncrasies of (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 MIMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabari; Chaudhuri, Tandrima; Padmanaban, E.; Mukhopadhyay, Chhanda

    2015-10-01

    In this present study we explore the mechanically interlocked molecules (MIMs) resulting from the combination of the BBIM(bis-benzimidazolium)-alkane systems with DB30C10 (Dibenzo-30-crown-10) in solvent acetonitrile. The (BBIM-alkane)DB30C10 systems chosen for the study are (BBIM)DB30C10, (BBIM-methane)DB30C10, (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10. 1H NMR, 2D-NMR (COSY and NOESY), Monte Carlo calculations and HRMS have been done on the studied assemblies. Even though (BBIM)DB30C10 and (BBIM-methane)DB30C10 form normal threaded structures, in (BBIM-ethane)DB30C10, (BBIM-propane)DB30C10 and (BBIM-butane)DB30C10 systems the respective axles are cradled inside the crown ether. That is, the axles BBIM-ethane, BBIM-propane and BBIM-butane are cradled inside the boat-like cavity of DB30C10.

  4. n-Alkanes and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh-forzen and precooked-frozen mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, J.E.; Machado, L.T.; Corbella, R.

    1995-09-01

    Heavy oil pollution has been found in sea water and coastal environments not only near industrial petroleum districts and places of oil spillage but also in other places where crude oil and/or refined products can be carried to by winds, streams, etc. Marine oil pollution may not only affect productivity and quality of marine organisms but may ultimately affect the health of the human population as there is a possible health risk from consumption of sea food contaminated by oil-derived carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In the marine habitat, many organisms readily accumulate n-alkanes and PAHs from the environment and store them at a relatively high level in their tissues, and studies have been carried out on the accumulation and depuration of toxic organic pollutants in marine organisms. As a part of a continuous monitoring program of the foods imported to the Canary Islands this paper presents the results obtained in the determination of n-alkanes and PAHs in fresh-frozen and precooked-frozen mussels, Perna canaliculus, commercialized in these islands. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Molecular dynamics insight to phase transition in n-alkanes with carbon nanofillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul

    2015-05-01

    The present work aims to investigate the phase transition, dispersion and diffusion behavior of nanocomposites of carbon nanotube (CNT) and straight chain alkanes. These materials are potential candidates for organic phase change materials(PCMs) and have attracted flurry of research recently. Accurate experimental evaluation of the mass, thermal and transport properties of such composites is both difficult as well as economically taxing. Additionally it is crucial to understand the factors that results in modification or enhancement of their characteristic at atomic or molecular level. Classical molecular dynamics approach has been extended to elucidate the same. Bulk atomistic models have been generated and subjected to rigorous multistage equilibration. To reaffirm the approach, both canonical and constant-temperature, constant- pressure ensembles were employed to simulate the models under consideration. Explicit determination of kinetic, potential, non-bond and total energy assisted in understanding the enhanced thermal and transport property of the nanocomposites from molecular point of view. Crucial parameters including mean square displacement and simulated self diffusion coefficient precisely define the balance of the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic interactions. Radial distribution function also reflected the density variation, strength and mobility of the nanocomposites. It is expected that CNT functionalization could improve the dispersion within n-alkane matrix. This would further ameliorate the mass and thermal properties of the composite. Additionally, the determined density was in good agreement with experimental data. Thus, molecular dynamics can be utilized as a high throughput technique for theoretical investigation of nanocomposites PCMs.

  6. Cyanobacterial Alkanes Modulate Photosynthetic Cyclic Electron Flow to Assist Growth under Cold Stress.

    PubMed

    Berla, Bertram M; Saha, Rajib; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2015-01-01

    All cyanobacterial membranes contain diesel-range C15-C19 hydrocarbons at concentrations similar to chlorophyll. Recently, two universal but mutually exclusive hydrocarbon production pathways in cyanobacteria were discovered. We engineered a mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that produces no alkanes, which grew poorly at low temperatures. We analyzed this defect by assessing the redox kinetics of PSI. The mutant exhibited enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF), especially at low temperature. CEF raises the ATP:NADPH ratio from photosynthesis and balances reductant requirements of biosynthesis with maintaining the redox poise of the electron transport chain. We conducted in silico flux balance analysis and showed that growth rate reaches a distinct maximum for an intermediate value of CEF equivalent to recycling 1 electron in 4 from PSI to the plastoquinone pool. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the lack of membrane alkanes causes higher CEF, perhaps for maintenance of redox poise. In turn, increased CEF reduces growth by forcing the cell to use less energy-efficient pathways, lowering the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis. This study highlights the unique and universal role of medium-chain hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes: they regulate redox balance and reductant partitioning in these oxygenic photosynthetic cells under stress. PMID:26459862

  7. Structural and thermodynamic behavior of alkane chains at the liquid/vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David Alejandro; Domínguez, Hector

    2013-04-01

    Computer simulations for several alkane fluids were carried out to study thermodynamics and structural behavior of the molecules at the liquid-vapor interface. Three different models were used to simulate the fluids, one of them was proposed in this work and we obtained a slightly better agreement than the other models with experimental data. The fluid structure at the interface was analyzed at temperatures close to the melting point using the new model and it was found that molecules at the free surface present more order than those at the bulk liquid phase. By calculating the order of the hydrocarbon chains a strong structure of molecules was observed at the interface than those in bulk, moreover, some of those molecules at the interface were aligned perpendicular to the interface. Previous simulations report stronger structures at the interface by the formation of a monolayer of alkane chains, however, those simulations started at very low temperatures and they did not reproduce thermodynamic properties such as the interfacial tension correctly. The model proposed in the present work not only presents good agreement with surface tension data but also shows evidence that the fluid structured as experiments indicated at temperatures close to the melting temperature.

  8. On droplet combustion of biodiesel fuel mixed with diesel/alkanes in microgravity condition

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kuo-Long; Li, Je-Wei; Chen, Chien-Pei; Wang, Ching-Hua

    2009-10-15

    The burning characteristics of a biodiesel droplet mixed with diesel or alkanes such as dodecane and hexadecane were experimentally studied in a reduced-gravity environment so as to create a spherically symmetrical flame without the influence of natural convection due to buoyancy. Small droplets on the order of 500 {mu}m in diameter were initially injected via a piezoelectric technique onto the cross point intersected by two thin carbon fibers; these were prepared inside a combustion chamber that was housed in a drag shield, which was freely dropped onto a foam cushion. It was found that, for single component droplets, the tendency to form a rigid soot shell was relatively small for biodiesel fuel as compared to that exhibited by the other tested fuels. The soot created drifted away readily, showing a puffing phenomenon; this could be related to the distinct molecular structure of biodiesel leading to unique soot layers that were more vulnerable to oxidative reactivity as compared to the soot generated by diesel or alkanes. The addition of biodiesel to these more traditional fuels also presented better performance with respect to annihilating the soot shell, particularly for diesel. The burning rate generally follows that of multi-component fuels, by some means in terms of a lever rule, whereas the mixture of biodiesel and dodecane exhibits a somewhat nonlinear relation with the added fraction of dodecane. This might be related to the formation of a soot shell. (author)

  9. Cyanobacterial Alkanes Modulate Photosynthetic Cyclic Electron Flow to Assist Growth under Cold Stress

    PubMed Central

    Berla, Bertram M.; Saha, Rajib; Maranas, Costas D.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2015-01-01

    All cyanobacterial membranes contain diesel-range C15-C19 hydrocarbons at concentrations similar to chlorophyll. Recently, two universal but mutually exclusive hydrocarbon production pathways in cyanobacteria were discovered. We engineered a mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that produces no alkanes, which grew poorly at low temperatures. We analyzed this defect by assessing the redox kinetics of PSI. The mutant exhibited enhanced cyclic electron flow (CEF), especially at low temperature. CEF raises the ATP:NADPH ratio from photosynthesis and balances reductant requirements of biosynthesis with maintaining the redox poise of the electron transport chain. We conducted in silico flux balance analysis and showed that growth rate reaches a distinct maximum for an intermediate value of CEF equivalent to recycling 1 electron in 4 from PSI to the plastoquinone pool. Based on this analysis, we conclude that the lack of membrane alkanes causes higher CEF, perhaps for maintenance of redox poise. In turn, increased CEF reduces growth by forcing the cell to use less energy-efficient pathways, lowering the quantum efficiency of photosynthesis. This study highlights the unique and universal role of medium-chain hydrocarbons in cyanobacterial thylakoid membranes: they regulate redox balance and reductant partitioning in these oxygenic photosynthetic cells under stress. PMID:26459862

  10. Removal of chlorinated and non-chlorinated alkanes in a trickle-bed biofilter

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Davison, B.H.; Barton, J.W.; Jacobs, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Increasing restrictions in emissions from a variety of industrial settings demand low cost removal of dilute contaminants in air. Many of these contaminants such as volatile organic components (VOCs) and sulfur compounds are biodegradable and can be removed from air streams via biofiltration. The simplest form of biofiltration consists of compost-based systems. More advanced systems designed for unique contaminants are biofilters with bioactive structured packing operating in trickle-bed mode. These advanced systems rely on a microbial consortium capable of degrading the contaminants of concern and the consortium usually is isolated or enriched from a more complex microbial mixture. This paper describes the use of a trickle-bed reactor seeded with a microbial consortium enriched from a methanotrophic culture. The microbial consortium has been found to degrade chlorinated alkanes as the sole carbon source. Degradation rates of alkane mixtures are presented for the trickle-bed as well as results from batch cultures experiments designed to study degradation of various chlorinated and non-chlorinated VOCs.

  11. Use of thermodynamic integration to calculate the hydration free energies of n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wescott, J. T.; Fisher, L. R.; Hanna, S.

    2002-02-01

    Explicit atom molecular dynamics simulations were used in conjunction with the thermodynamic integration method to calculate hydration free energies for short n-alkane molecules, up to C5H12. The OPLS all-atom parameter set [Kaminski et al., J. Phys. Chem. 98, 13077 (1994)] was used to represent the n-alkanes, together with the TIP3P water model [Jorgensen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 79, 926 (1983)]. The approach of Beutler et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett. 222, 529 (1994)] was used to avoid singularities in nonbonded interaction potentials that can otherwise be problematical with this technique. Electrostatic interactions were treated using a cutoff radius of 0.9 nm, and a functional form that was shifted and scaled smoothly to zero. The values obtained for the solvation free energies were of similar accuracy to those from previously published simulations, but were systematically about 2 kJ mol-1 higher than experimental values. However, the calculated free energies of transformation for the reaction CnH2n+1(aq)?Cn+1H2n+4(aq), show a considerably improved agreement over previous values, and reproduce well the experimental trend versus n. The merits of the thermodynamic integration technique are discussed in relation to the popular thermodynamic perturbation method.

  12. The anesthetic effect of alcohols and alkanes in caenorhabditis elegans (C. E. )

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, A.H.; Berk, A.I.; Nicholls, C.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The authors colleagues reported that the non-parasitic roundworm, C.E., was reversibly immobilized by volatile anesthetics, whose potencies were directly related to their lipid solubilities as in other animals. In further studies on this phenomenon, they tested a homologous series of organic solvents, to determine whether they also had a reversible anesthetic effect in C.E. as in other animals. Synchronized 3-1/2 day-old cultures of about 100 worms each were exposed to increasing concentrations of the alcohols (C{sub 1} - C{sub 14}) and alkanes (C{sub 5} -C{sub 10}) in 15 ml sealed bottles in a volume of 0.5 ml. The dose that reversibly immobilized 50% of the worms was determined and a straight line was plotted against the octanol/water partition coefficient (K) of each series. As with other animals, potency was directly related to the lipid solubility of these agents so that, for example, the ID{sub 50} for methanol was 1,000 mmol (K=0.12) whereas it was 0.17 mmol for heptanol (K=3,000). The alcohols were about 20 times more potent than the alkanes even though the latter were about 10 times more lipid soluble than the alcohols. In spite of these differences, the cut-off point was at C{sub 9} in the two series.

  13. Production of a recombinant alkane hydroxylase (AlkB2) from Alcanivorax borkumensis.

    PubMed

    Miri, Mandana; Bambai, Bijan; Tabandeh, Fatemeh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Kamali, Nasrin

    2010-04-01

    Alcanivorax borkumensis is an oil-degrading marine bacterium. Its genome contains genes coding for three cytochrome P450s and two integral membrane alkane hydroxylases (AlkB1 & AlkB2), all assumed to perform hydroxylation of different linear or branched alkanes. Although, the sequence of alkB2 has been determined, the molecular characterization and the substrate specificity of AlkB2 require more precise investigation. In this study, AlkB2 from A. borkumensis SK2 was expressed in Escherichia coli to examine the functionality of AlkB2 as a hydroxylating enzyme. Furthermore, the activity of the enzyme in the presence of the accessory proteins, rubredoxin (RubA) and rubredoxin reductase (RubB), produced in E. coli BL21(DE3)plysS cells, was determined. Recombinant AlkB2 is produced in an active form and rubredoxin is the intermediate electron donor to AlkB2 and can replace AlkG function, when NADH is the prime electron donor. PMID:19953301

  14. Evaluated Kinetics of the Reactions of H and CH3 with n-Alkanes: Experiments with n-Butane and a Combustion Model Reaction Network Analysis.

    PubMed

    Manion, Jeffrey A; Sheen, David A; Awan, Iftikhar A

    2015-07-16

    Presented is a combined experimental and modeling study of the kinetics of the reactions of H and CH3 with n-butane, a representative aliphatic fuel. Abstraction of H from n-alkane fuels creates alkyl radicals that rapidly decompose at high temperatures to alkenes and daughter radicals. In combustion and pyrolysis, the branching ratio for attack on primary and secondary hydrogens is a key determinant of the initial olefin and radical pool, and results propagate through the chemistry of ignition, combustion, and byproduct formation. Experiments to determine relative and absolute rate constants for attack of H and CH3 have been carried out in a shock tube between 859 and 1136 K for methyl radicals and 890 to 1146 K for H atoms. Pressures ranged from 140 to 410 kPa. Appropriate precursors are used to thermally generate H and CH3 in separate experiments under dilute and well-defined conditions. A mathematical design algorithm has been applied to select the optimum experimental conditions. In conjunction with postshock product analyses, a network analysis based on the detailed chemical kinetic combustion model JetSurf 2 has been applied. Polynomial chaos expansion techniques and Monte Carlo methods are used to analyze the data and assess uncertainties. The present results provide the first experimental measurements of the branching ratios for attack of H and CH3 on primary and secondary hydrogens at temperatures near 1000 K. Results from the literature are reviewed and combined with the present data to generate evaluated rate expressions for attack on n-butane covering 300 to 2000 K for H atoms and 400 to 2000 K for methyl radicals. Values for generic n-alkanes and related hydrocarbons are also recommended. The present experiments and network analysis further demonstrate that the C-H bond scission channels in butyl radicals are an order of magnitude less important than currently indicated by JetSurf 2. Updated rate expressions for butyl radical fragmentation reactions are provided. PMID:25871634

  15. Research Highlights Nature Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Apeloig, Yitzhak

    Research Highlights Nature Chemistry Published online: 23 May 2008 | doi:10.1038/nchem.15 Subject Category: Inorganic chemistry Silicon chemistry: Come on silene Neil Withers Abstract Thermal rearrangement-silene -- a molecule with two Si=C bonds -- to be isolated. The crystal structure of the bis-silene reveals

  16. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  17. SEDIMENT AND POREWATER CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reviews sediment chemistry, its effect on porewater chemistry and how this chemistry changes from place to place. We focus on the overall chemical environment of the sediments, for which a great deal is known from studies on sediment diagenesis and from which some pr...

  18. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  19. Engineering Materials and Chemistry

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    /Prof Stephen Colbran (SC) (Chemistry) Lecturer Room 225 Dalton Building (F12) Phone: 9385 4737 s Mr Steve Yannoulatos (Chemistry) Chemistry Tutorial Room 104 Dalton Building Phone: 9385 4651 Location Monday 17:00 ­ 18:00 Sir John Clancy Auditorium Wednesday 14:00 ­ 15:00 Mathews Theatre A Friday

  20. Engineering Materials and Chemistry

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    ................................................................................................. 10 #12;3 Course staff Dr John Daniels (Materials) Course Coordinator & Lecturer Room 342, School: by appointment A/Prof Stephen Colbran (Chemistry) Lecturer Room 225 Dalton Building (F12) Phone: 9385 4737 s: by appointment Ms Anne Ayres (Chemistry) Chemistry Tutorial and Laboratory Administrator Room 105 Dalton Building

  1. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  2. Laser applications in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kompa, K.L.; Wanner, J.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents information on laser and related light sources, laser applications to analytical chemistry, spectroscopic and dynamical studies, and approaches to laser synthesis. Topics on these subjects include: laser sources for chemical experiments, high power optically pumped mid-infrared molecular gas lasers, analytical chemistry methods based on absorption of laser light, laser excited fluorescence methods in analytical chemistry, nonlinear spectroscopic techniques and their applications to analytical chemistry, and VUV laser spectroscopy of atomic and molecular hydrogen. Laser spectroscopy of molecular ions is discussed along with photodissociation dynamics experiments with NO/sub 2/, multiphoton selective ionization and fragmentation of polyatomic molecules, and laser initiated free radical chemistry.

  3. Isomolybdate conversion coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minevski, Zoran (Inventor); Maxey, Jason (Inventor); Nelson, Carl (Inventor); Eylem, Cahit (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A conversion coating solution and process forms a stable and corrosion-resistant layer on metal substrates or layers or, more preferably, on a boehmite layer or other base conversion coating. The conversion coating process involves contacting the substrate, layer or coating with an aqueous alkali metal isomolybdate solution in order to convert the surface of the substrate, layer or coating to a stable conversion coating. The aqueous alkali metal molybdates are selected from sodium molybdate (Na.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), lithium molybdate (Li.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), potassium molybdate (K.sub.2 MoO.sub.4), or combinations thereof, with the most preferred alkali metal molybdate being sodium molybdate. The concentration of alkali metal molybdates in the solution is preferably less than 5% by weight. In addition to the alkali metal molybdates, the conversion coating solution may include alkaline metal passivators selected from lithium nitrate (LiNO.sub.3), sodium nitrate (NaNO.sub.3), ammonia nitrate (NH.sub.4 NO.sub.3), and combinations thereof; lithium chloride, potassium hexafluorozirconate (K.sub.2 ZrF.sub.6) or potassium hexafluorotitanate (K.sub.2 TiF.sub.6).

  4. Laser energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  5. Charting an Alternate Pathway to Reaction Orders and Rate Laws in Introductory Chemistry Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Criswell, Brett A.; McAllister, Nicole D.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Moore, Lamesha A.; Pierre, Michelle S.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction kinetics is an axiomatic topic in chemistry that is often addressed as early as the high school course and serves as the foundation for more sophisticated conversations in college-level organic, physical, and biological chemistry courses. Despite the fundamental nature of reaction kinetics, students can struggle with transforming their…

  6. Use of cuticular wax alkanes to estimate digestibility and intake of cows as pasture with a view to estimating efficiency.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of feed efficiency requires estimates of intake and digestibility of the diet, but they are difficult to measure on pasture. The objective of this research was to determine if plants cuticular alkanes were suitable as markers to estimate intake and diet digestibility of grazing cows wi...

  7. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  8. Quantitative Vapor-phase IR Intensities and DFT Computations to Predict Absolute IR Spectra based on Molecular Structure: I. Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Yavelak, Veronica; Oats, R. P.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

    2013-11-13

    Recently recorded quantitative IR spectra of a variety of gas-phase alkanes are shown to have integrated intensities in both the C-H stretching and C-H bending regions that depend linearly on the molecular size, i.e. the number of C-H bonds. This result is well predicted from CH4 to C15H32 by DFT computations of IR spectra at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of DFT theory. A simple model predicting the absolute IR band intensities of alkanes based only on structural formula is proposed: For the C-H stretching band near 2930 cm-1 this is given by (in km/mol): CH¬_str = (34±3)*CH – (41±60) where CH is number of C-H bonds in the alkane. The linearity is explained in terms of coordinated motion of methylene groups rather than the summed intensities of autonomous -CH2- units. The effect of alkyl chain length on the intensity of a C-H bending mode is explored and interpreted in terms of conformer distribution. The relative intensity contribution of a methyl mode compared to the total C-H stretch intensity is shown to be linear in the number of terminal methyl groups in the alkane, and can be used to predict quantitative spectra a priori based on structure alone.

  9. Lyomesophases of C3-symmetrical bipyridine-based discs in alkanes: an X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rapún, Rafael; Byelov, Dmytro; Palmans, Anja R A; de Jeu, Wim H; Meijer, E W

    2009-08-01

    The importance of the role of alkane solvents in the self-assembly process of pi-conjugated molecules is well recognized but hardly understood. Here we present our results on the X-ray diffraction studies that we conducted to gain insight into the supramolecular structure of mixtures of a bipyridine-based molecule (1) with alkanes. Independent of the alkane used (linear or branched), above x(w) > 0.06 (with x(w) being the weight fraction of 1) the mixtures show lyotropic liquid-crystalline behavior. The nature of the lyomesophase depends only on x(w) and not on the nature of the alkane (linear or branched). A columnar rectangular phase is present when x(w) > 0.66. Upon dilution of 1, a columnar hexagonal phase is assigned first (0.50 < x(w) < 0.65), and finally a columnar nematic phase is observed when x(w) < 0.50. Concentration-dependent SAXD measurements revealed that the dilution of 1 can be viewed as a swelling process. First, solvent molecules occupy space between the columns formed by 1, which are not disrupted. This process can quantitatively be described by a 2D swelling model. Only at lower concentrations does 3D swelling start as the columns start breaking into shorter fragments. PMID:20050050

  10. Solid-supported cross-metathesis and a formal alkane metathesis for the generation of biologically relevant molecules.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Luciana; Mata, Ernesto G

    2015-02-01

    Solid-phase synthetic strategies toward the generation of libraries of biologically relevant molecules were developed using olefin cross-metathesis as a key step. It is remarkably the formal alkane metathesis based on a one-pot, microwave-assisted, ruthenium-catalyzed cross-metathesis and reduction to obtain Csp3-Csp3 linkages. PMID:25569690

  11. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  12. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition.

  13. Isolation of the alkane inducible cytochrome P450 (P450alk) gene from the yeast Candida tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a ?gt11 library. Isolation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. Transcripts of this gene were i...

  14. ISOLATION OF THE ALKANE INDUCIBLE CYTOCHROME P450 (P450ALK) GENE FROM THE YEAST CANDIDA TROPICALIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gene for the alkane-inducible cytochrome P450, P450alk, has been isolated from the yeast Candida tropicalis by immunoscreening a gtll library. solation of the gene has been identified on the basis of its inducibility and partial DNA sequence. ranscripts of this gene were indu...

  15. Isolation and characterization of alkane degrading bacteria from petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran (Kerman and Tehran provenances).

    PubMed

    Hassanshahian, Mehdi; Ahmadinejad, Mohammad; Tebyanian, Hamid; Kariminik, Ashraf

    2013-08-15

    Petroleum products spill and leakage have become two major environmental challenges in Iran. Sampling was performed in the petroleum reservoir waste water of Tehran and Kerman Provinces of Iran. Alkane degrading bacteria were isolated by enrichment in a Bushnel-Hass medium, with hexadecane as sole source of carbon and energy. The isolated strains were identified by amplification of 16S rDNA gene and sequencing. Specific primers were used for identification of alkane hydroxylase gene. Fifteen alkane degrading bacteria were isolated and 8 strains were selected as powerful degradative bacteria. These 8 strains relate to Rhodococcus jostii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter piechaudii, Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Rhodococcus erythropolis, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa genera. The optimum concentration of hexadecane that allowed high growth was 2.5%. Gas chromatography results show that all strains can degrade approximately half of hexadecane in one week of incubation. All of the strains have alkane hydroxylase gene which are important for biodegradation. As a result, this study indicates that there is a high diversity of degradative bacteria in petroleum reservoir waste water in Iran. PMID:23790464

  16. Light energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, S.

    1985-06-25

    A semiconductor photoelectric conversion structure having a PIN junction is assembled as a unitary structure with a redox reaction chamber, with the P (or N) type semiconductor layer of the former being heavily doped and held in contact with an electrolytic solution contained in a second cell with an electrolytic solution contained in a second cell of the redox reaction chamber. By interconnecting a second electrode connected to the N (or P) type semiconductor structure and a first electrode in contact with an electrolytic solution contained in a first cell of the redox reaction chamber, the electrolytic solutions in the first and second cells store chemical energy converted from electrical energy obtained from light energy by means of the semiconductor photoelectric conversion structure. Furthermore, electric power may be obtained across the first electrode and a third electrode connected with the P (or N) type semiconductor layer of the semiconductor photoelectric conversion structure.

  17. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  18. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Waarts, Robert G. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A frequency conversion system comprises first and second gain sources providing first and second frequency radiation outputs where the second gain source receives as input the output of the first gain source and, further, the second gain source comprises a Raman or Brillouin gain fiber for wave shifting a portion of the radiation of the first frequency output into second frequency radiation output to provided a combined output of first and second frequencies. Powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  19. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, Paul F.; Bankston, C. P.; Williams, R.; Underwood, M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Fabris, G.

    1989-12-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC), and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal Magnetohydrodynamic Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1989. Research on these concepts was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain discussions on the following other direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (nitinol heat engines); and also, more complete discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  20. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  1. Direct conversion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massier, P. F.; Back, L. H.; Ryan, M. A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period 1 Jan. 1991 - 31 Dec. 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during Oct. 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  2. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K. (North Shelley, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

    1991-02-26

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer.

  3. Digital optical conversion module

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  4. Source apportionment of PAHs and n-alkanes in respirable particles in Tehran, Iran by wind sector and vertical profile.

    PubMed

    Moeinaddini, Mazaher; Esmaili Sari, Abbas; Riyahi bakhtiari, Alireza; Chan, Andrew Yiu-Chung; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Hawker, Darryl; Connell, Des

    2014-06-01

    The vertical concentration profiles and source contributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and n-alkanes in respirable particle samples (PM4) collected at 10, 100, 200 and 300-m altitude from the Milad Tower of Tehran, Iran during fall and winter were investigated. The average concentrations of total PAHs and total n-alkanes were 16.7 and 591 ng/m(3), respectively. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was applied to the chemical composition and wind data to apportion the contributing sources. The five PAH source factors identified were: 'diesel' (56.3% of total PAHs on average), 'gasoline' (15.5%), 'wood combustion, and incineration' (13%), 'industry' (9.2%), and 'road soil particle' (6.0%). The four n-alkane source factors identified were: 'petrogenic' (65% of total n-alkanes on average), 'mixture of petrogenic and biomass burning' (15%), 'mixture of biogenic and fossil fuel' (11.5%), and 'biogenic' (8.5%). Source contributions by wind sector were also estimated based on the wind sector factor loadings from PMF analysis. Directional dependence of sources was investigated using the conditional probability function (CPF) and directional relative strength (DRS) methods. The calm wind period was found to contribute to 4.4% of total PAHs and 5.0% of total n-alkanes on average. Highest average concentrations of PAHs and n-alkanes were found in the 10 and 100 m samples, reflecting the importance of contributions from local sources. Higher average concentrations in the 300 m samples compared to those in the 200 m samples may indicate contributions from long-range transport. The vertical profiles of source factors indicate the gasoline and road soil particle-associated PAHs, and the mixture from biogenic and fossil fuel source-associated n-alkanes were mostly from local emissions. The smaller average contribution of diesel-associated PAHs in the lower altitude samples also indicates that the restriction of diesel-fueled vehicle use in the central area of Tehran has been effective in reducing the PAHs concentration. PMID:24638832

  5. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  6. Energy Conversion and Storage Program: 1992 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1993-06-01

    This report is the 1992 annual progress report for the Energy Conversion and Storage Program, a part of the Energy and Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Work described falls into three broad areas: electrochemistry; chemical applications; and materials applications. The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies principles of chemistry and materials science to solve problems in several areas: (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species, and (5) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Chemical applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing product and waste streams from synfuel plants, coal gasifiers, and biomass conversion processes. Materials applications research includes evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as development of novel preparation techniques. For example, techniques such as sputtering, laser ablation, and poised laser deposition are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  7. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  8. Engineering chemistry of ionic exchange (status and prospects)

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, N.N.

    1993-12-31

    Ionic exchange processes are very important in nuclear fuel technology, irradiated fuel conversion, deactivation of wastes, refining of contour waters in reactors. The objective of this work was to show the contemporary state and prospects of development of ionic exchange chemistry which is very important to industrial improvement.

  9. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    ScienceCinema

    Omar Yaghi

    2013-06-24

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  10. 2014 WEEKLY BULLETIN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    (transition metal complexes, conducting polymers and hybrid systems) in solar energy conversion. This work position opening in Chen Group: Conducts basic research on structural dynamics of photoactive systems in undergraduate teaching, research, and university service. The chemistry department is home to 140 majors, 18

  11. 2015 WEEKLY BULLETIN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    or carbon dioxide activation would be a plus. This position will likely be funded through a collaborative or organometallic chemistry would be considered, but candidates with backgrounds in electrochemical catalysis NSF funded Center for Carbon Capture and Conversions (C4) (http://www

  12. Omar Yaghi on Chemistry and Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Omar Yaghi

    2012-07-23

    In this edited version of the hour long talk, Omar Yaghi, director of the Molecular Foundry, sat down in conversation with Jeff Miller, head of Public Affairs, on July 11th, 2012 to discuss his fascination with the hidden world of chemistry and his work on Metal Organic Frameworks.

  13. 2015 WEEKLY BULLETIN DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

    E-print Network

    . The successful candidate will enable next generation solar energy conversion through new intermediate band solar (lectures and labs), general chemistry courses, and additional courses such as a freshman learning community are encouraged to apply. An appropriate level of university/professional/community service is also required (e

  14. Calorific values and combustion chemistry of animal manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Combustion chemistry and calorific value analyses are the fundamental information for evaluating different biomass waste-to-energy conversion operations. Specific chemical exergy of manure and other biomass feedstock will provide a measure for the theoretically maximum attainable energy. The specifi...

  15. Biodiesel from Seeds: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can store the chemical energy required by their developing offspring in the form of triglycerides. These lipids can be isolated from seeds and then converted into biodiesel through a transesterification reaction. This second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment exemplifies the conversion of an agricultural energy…

  16. Progressive degradation of crude oil n-alkanes coupled to methane production under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, "Shengli Cluster" and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes. PMID:25409013

  17. Novel Alkane Hydroxylase Gene (alkB) Diversity in Sediments Associated with Hydrocarbon Seeps in the Timor Sea, Australia?

    PubMed Central

    Wasmund, Kenneth; Burns, Kathryn A.; Kurtböke, D. Ipek; Bourne, David G.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps provide inputs of petroleum hydrocarbons to widespread areas of the Timor Sea. Alkanes constitute the largest proportion of chemical components found in crude oils, and therefore genes involved in the biodegradation of these compounds may act as bioindicators for this ecosystem's response to seepage. To assess alkane biodegradation potential, the diversity and distribution of alkane hydroxylase (alkB) genes in sediments of the Timor Sea were studied. Deduced AlkB protein sequences derived from clone libraries identified sequences only distantly related to previously identified AlkB sequences, suggesting that the Timor Sea maybe a rich reservoir for novel alkane hydroxylase enzymes. Most sequences clustered with AlkB sequences previously identified from marine Gammaproteobacteria though protein sequence identities averaged only 73% (with a range of 60% to 94% sequence identities). AlkB sequence diversity was lower in deep water (>400 m) samples off the continental slope than in shallow water (<100 m) samples on the continental shelf but not significantly different in response to levels of alkanes. Real-time PCR assays targeting Timor Sea alkB genes were designed and used to quantify alkB gene targets. No correlation was found between gene copy numbers and levels of hydrocarbons measured in sediments using sensitive gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques, probably due to the very low levels of hydrocarbons found in most sediment samples. Interestingly, however, copy numbers of alkB genes increased substantially in sediments exposed directly to active seepage even though only low or undetectable concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured in these sediments in complementary geochemical analyses due to efficient biodegradation. PMID:19820158

  18. Progressive Degradation of Crude Oil n-Alkanes Coupled to Methane Production under Mesophilic and Thermophilic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lei; Shi, Shengbao; Li, Qiang; Chen, Jianfa; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Yahai

    2014-01-01

    Although methanogenic degradation of hydrocarbons has become a well-known process, little is known about which crude oil tend to be degraded at different temperatures and how the microbial community is responded. In this study, we assessed the methanogenic crude oil degradation capacity of oily sludge microbes enriched from the Shengli oilfield under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions. The microbial communities were investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes combined with cloning and sequencing. Enrichment incubation demonstrated the microbial oxidation of crude oil coupled to methane production at 35 and 55°C, which generated 3.7±0.3 and 2.8±0.3 mmol of methane per gram oil, respectively. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis revealed that crude oil n-alkanes were obviously degraded, and high molecular weight n-alkanes were preferentially removed over relatively shorter-chain n-alkanes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the concurrence of acetoclastic Methanosaeta and hydrogenotrophic methanogens but different methanogenic community structures under the two temperature conditions. Candidate divisions of JS1 and WWE 1, Proteobacteria (mainly consisting of Syntrophaceae, Desulfobacteraceae and Syntrophorhabdus) and Firmicutes (mainly consisting of Desulfotomaculum) were supposed to be involved with n-alkane degradation in the mesophilic conditions. By contrast, the different bacterial phylotypes affiliated with Caldisericales, “Shengli Cluster” and Synergistetes dominated the thermophilic consortium, which was most likely to be associated with thermophilic crude oil degradation. This study revealed that the oily sludge in Shengli oilfield harbors diverse uncultured microbes with great potential in methanogenic crude oil degradation over a wide temperature range, which extend our previous understanding of methanogenic degradation of crude oil alkanes. PMID:25409013

  19. Phase separation in the organic solid state : the influence of quenching protocol in unstable ?-alkane blends

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E. P.; Nelson, A.; Sutton, D.; Terrill, N.; Martin, C.; Lal, J.; Lang, E.; Intense Pulsed Neutron Source; Bragg Inst.; Rutherford App. Lab.; Daresbury Lab.

    2005-01-01

    Blends of normal alkanes form lamellar structures, when quenched from the melt, in which the separation of the individual chains may be controlled by the chain-length mismatch, molar composition, isotopic substitution and confinement. 2:1 C{sub 28}H{sub 58}:C{sub 36}D{sub 74} mixtures have been investigated after subjection to a cooling rate varying over three orders of magnitude and intermediate annealing prior to reaching ambient. Quenching at 100 C/min yields similar behavior to intermediate annealing between the pure components' melting points. Slow cooling at 0.1 C/min generates significantly greater ordering and behavior comparable to that obtained from annealing mid-way between the mixing transition and the C{sub 28}H{sub 58} melting point.

  20. Environmental and biosynthetic influences on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInerney, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Polissar, P. J.; Feakins, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Both carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf-wax n-alkanes are influenced by the availability of water in a plant's growth environment. Carbon isotope ratios of bulk tissues in C3 plants demonstrate a strong inverse relationship with measures of available moisture (e.g. mean annual precipitation and precipitation/evaporation). Similarly, hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (?Dl) can be enriched relative to precipitation (?Dw) by transpiration, which is related to relative humidity and the leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit. Thus, D-enrichment of leaf-wax n-alkanes relative to precipitation, termed the apparent fractionation (2?l/w), becomes more positive with increasing aridity. In theory, more positive values of leaf-wax ?13C (?13Cl) and 2?l/w of leaf-wax n-alkanes should both correspond to more arid conditions in C3 plants. Here we review published and unpublished data on over 100 plants to examine this relationship. Contrary to expectations, C3 dicots show no clear relationship between ?13Cl and 2?l/w. This global lack of correlation is surprising given our understanding of aridity related isotopic effects in C3 plants. One possibility is that the implicit assumption of constant fractionation between lipid and bulk tissue is flawed due to the effects of different biosynthetic carriers and reaction pathways. We explore this possibility by examining the offset of leaf-wax carbon isotopes from the bulk leaf tissue (13?l/bulk). Different offsets would indicate additional biosynthetic processes are affecting ?13Cl in addition to any direct effects from aridity. We find that 13?l/bulk is highly variable, ranging from -1 to -16‰, which could explain the lack of correlation between ?13Cl and 2?l/w. In addition, 13?l/bulk values for C3 and C4 monocots (averages of -10.6 and -11.4‰ respectively) represent significantly greater offset between leaf wax and bulk tissue than in C3 dicots (average of -4.3‰), which is consistent with previous studies. Notably, 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk are positively correlated for all C3 plants, as well as for sub-divided C3 plant groups of dicots, monocots and gymnosperms. The positive relationship of 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk for C3 plants suggests co-varying influences of environmental properties on biosynthetic fractionation, such as root carbon storage use and water isotopes at the time of lipid synthesis. In contrast, C4 plants showed no correlation between 2?l/w and 13?l/bulk, which could signify differences in biosynthetic pathways or resource strategies between C3 and C4 plants. Paired leaf-wax carbon and hydrogen isotopic measurements have potential to elucidate isotope effects associated with ecohydrology and biosynthesis, which can strengthen paleoenvironmental interpretations of molecular isotopic data. Our analysis suggests both effects may be important determinants of plant-lipid isotope values.

  1. Alkanes from Bioderived Furans by using Metal Triflates and Palladium-Catalyzed Hydrodeoxygenation of Cyclic Ethers.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai-Jie; Deng, Jin; Cui, Min-Shu; Li, Xing-Long; Liu, Xin-Xin; Zhu, Rui; Wu, Wei-Peng; Fu, Yao

    2015-12-01

    Using a metal triflate and Pd/C as catalysts, alkanes were prepared from bioderived furans in a one-pot hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process. During the reaction, the metal triflate plays a crucial role in the ring-opening HDO of furan compounds. The entire reaction process has goes through two major phases: at low temperatures, saturation of the exocyclic double bond and furan ring are catalyzed by Pd/C; at high temperatures, the HDO of saturated furan compounds is catalyzed by the metal triflate. The reaction mechanism was verified by analyzing the changes of the intermediates during the reaction. In addition, different metal triflates, solvents, and catalyst recycling were also investigated. PMID:26611542

  2. Solubility of gold nanoparticles as a function of ligand shell and alkane solvent.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Brandon C; Powell, Jeffrey A; Cingarapu, Sreeram; Aakeroy, Christer B; Chakrabarti, Amit; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Law, Bruce M; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2012-05-14

    The solubility of ca. 5.0 nm gold nanoparticles was studied systematically as a function of ligand shell and solvent. The ligands were octane-, decane-, dodecane- and hexadecanethiols; the solvents were the n-alkanes from hexane to hexadecane and toluene. Supernatant concentrations in equilibrium with precipitated superclusters of nanoparticles were measured at room temperature (23 °C) with UV-Vis spectrophotometry. The solubility of nanoparticles ligated with decane- and dodecanethiol was greatest in n-decane and n-dodecane, respectively. In contrast, the solubility of nanoparticles ligated with octane- and hexadecanethiol showed decreasing solubility with increasing solvent chain length. In addition the solubility of the octanethiol ligated system showed a nonmonotonic solvent carbon number functionality with even numbered solvents being better solvents than neighboring odd numbered solvents. PMID:22456604

  3. A continuum approach to microscopic surface tension for the n-alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Y.Z.; Flumerfelt, R.W.

    1996-10-01

    Microscopic surface tensions of cavities in liquids or of droplets with radii down to about 0.5 nm have been predicted. Surface energies of small clusters are calculated from the unretarded dispersion forces at a spherical interface. The resulting expression for surface tension is a function of basic intermolecular properties and cluster size, with predictions for macroscopic surface tensions being in good agreement with experimental data (flat surface). The surface tension is found to decrease with decreasing radius, and for n-alkanes, such size effects occur below 2 nm; above this size, the predicted results closely approximate the planar values. Knowledge of microcluster surface properties is of great significance in understanding of microemulsion systems and in industrial applications of microemulsions such as tertiary oil recovery.

  4. Structural investigation of Langmuir and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers of semifluorinated alkanes.

    PubMed

    Dynarowicz ?atka, Patrycja; Pérez-Morales, Marta; Muñoz, Eulogia; Broniatowski, Marcin; Martín-Romero, María T; Camacho, Luis

    2006-03-30

    The behavior of a semi-fluorinated alkane (C(10)F(21)C(19)H(39)) has been studied at the air-water interface by using surface pressure and surface potential-area isotherms as well as infrared spectroscopy for the Langmuir-Blodgett films. In addition, based on the quantum chemical PM3 semiempirical approach, the dimer structure was investigated, and the double helix was found to be the most stable conformation of the dimer. The obtained results allow us to imply that the phase transition observed in the course of the surface pressure/area isotherm is due to a conformational change originating from the double helix to a vertical, single helix configuration. PMID:16553421

  5. Method for oxidizing alkanes using novel porphyrins synthesized from dipyrromethanes and aldehydes

    DOEpatents

    Wijesekera, Tilak (Glen Mills, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA)

    1999-01-01

    The invention comprises a method for the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols and for decomposition of hydroperoxides to alcohols utilizing new compositions of matter, which are metal complexes of porphyrins. Preferred complexes have hydrogen, haloalkyl or haloaryl groups in meso positions, two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloaryl, and two of the opposed meso atoms or groups being hydrogen or haloalkyl, but not all four of the meso atoms or groups being hydrogen. Other preferred complexes are ones in which all four of the meso positions are substituted with haloalkyl groups and the beta positions are substituted with halogen atoms. A new method of synthesizing porphyrinogens is also disclosed.

  6. Cryogenic ion chemistry and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolk, Arron B; Leavitt, Christopher M; Garand, Etienne; Johnson, Mark A

    2014-01-21

    The use of mass spectrometry in macromolecular analysis is an incredibly important technique and has allowed efficient identification of secondary and tertiary protein structures. Over 20 years ago, Chemistry Nobelist John Fenn and co-workers revolutionized mass spectrometry by developing ways to non-destructively extract large molecules directly from solution into the gas phase. This advance, in turn, enabled rapid sequencing of biopolymers through tandem mass spectrometry at the heart of the burgeoning field of proteomics. In this Account, we discuss how cryogenic cooling, mass selection, and reactive processing together provide a powerful way to characterize ion structures as well as rationally synthesize labile reaction intermediates. This is accomplished by first cooling the ions close to 10 K and condensing onto them weakly bound, chemically inert small molecules or rare gas atoms. This assembly can then be used as a medium in which to quench reactive encounters by rapid evaporation of the adducts, as well as provide a universal means for acquiring highly resolved vibrational action spectra of the embedded species by photoinduced mass loss. Moreover, the spectroscopic measurements can be obtained with readily available, broadly tunable pulsed infrared lasers because absorption of a single photon is sufficient to induce evaporation. We discuss the implementation of these methods with a new type of hybrid photofragmentation mass spectrometer involving two stages of mass selection with two laser excitation regions interfaced to the cryogenic ion source. We illustrate several capabilities of the cryogenic ion spectrometer by presenting recent applications to peptides, a biomimetic catalyst, a large antibiotic molecule (vancomycin), and reaction intermediates pertinent to the chemistry of the ionosphere. First, we demonstrate how site-specific isotopic substitution can be used to identify bands due to local functional groups in a protonated tripeptide designed to stereoselectively catalyze bromination of biaryl substrates. This procedure directly reveals the particular H-bond donor and acceptor groups that enforce the folded structure of the bare ion as well as provide contact points for noncovalent interaction with substrates. We then show how photochemical hole-burning involving only vibrational excitations can be used in a double-resonance mode to systematically disentangle overlapping spectra that arise when several conformers of a dipeptide are prepared in the ion source. Finally, we highlight our ability to systematically capture reaction intermediates and spectroscopically characterize their structures. Through this method, we can identify the pathway for water-network-mediated, proton-coupled transformation of nitrosonium, NO(+) to HONO, a key reaction controlling the cations present in the ionosphere. Through this work, we reveal the critical role played by water molecules occupying the second solvation shell around the ion, where they stabilize the emergent product ion in a fashion reminiscent of the solvent coordinate responsible for the barrier to charge transfer in solution. Looking to the future, we predict that the capture and characterization of fleeting intermediate complexes in the homogeneous catalytic activation of small molecules like water, alkanes, and CO2 is a likely avenue rich with opportunity. PMID:23972279

  7. Conversations: Identity Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthey, Sarah J.; Moje, Elizabeth Birr

    2002-01-01

    Presents a "conversation" between the authors that discusses various theories of identity, the relationship between identity and literacy, and how identities and literacies are constructed and practiced within relationships of race, gender, class, and space. Addresses findings of recent studies and the authors' thoughts about what these findings…

  8. Electromechanical Energy Conversion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text on electromechanical energy conversion (motors and generators) was developed under contract with the U.S. Office of Education as Number 12 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series. (DH)

  9. Leadership is a conversation.

    PubMed

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate. PMID:22741420

  10. Planetary image conversion task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. D.; Stanley, C. L.; Laughlin, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Planetary Image Conversion Task group processed 12,500 magnetic tapes containing raw imaging data from JPL planetary missions and produced an image data base in consistent format on 1200 fully packed 6250-bpi tapes. The output tapes will remain at JPL. A copy of the entire tape set was delivered to US Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz. A secondary task converted computer datalogs, which had been stored in project specific MARK IV File Management System data types and structures, to flat-file, text format that is processable on any modern computer system. The conversion processing took place at JPL's Image Processing Laboratory on an IBM 370-158 with existing software modified slightly to meet the needs of the conversion task. More than 99% of the original digital image data was successfully recovered by the conversion task. However, processing data tapes recorded before 1975 was destructive. This discovery is of critical importance to facilities responsible for maintaining digital archives since normal periodic random sampling techniques would be unlikely to detect this phenomenon, and entire data sets could be wiped out in the act of generating seemingly positive sampling results. Reccomended follow-on activities are also included.

  11. Economics of Grassland Conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we provide an overview of economic factors that contribute to changes in grassland area including the relative profitability of crop and livestock production, effects of land productivity, and effects of conversion costs. We also identify other potential socio-economic influences on gr...

  12. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  13. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  14. A Conversation about Observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, John C.; Mao, Minnie Yuan

    2012-01-01

    In the spirit of the Lindau Meeting, we present a dialogue between a Nobel laureate and a young researcher. This interchange started online, where it continues to unfold. Here is a digest of this conversation, which has developed across time and space.

  15. Conversation with Copland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Music Educators Journal, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Records a conversation between American composer Aaron Copland and Malcolm E. Besson, editor of Music Educators Journal. Mr. Copland discusses teaching, American music, and notes the greater number of composers writing today, and the livelier atmosphere of college music departments. (DS)

  16. Clinical Linguistics: Conversational Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crystal, David

    2013-01-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference…

  17. Teaching Conversation with Trivia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a rationale for utilizing trivia to teach conversation. Shows how trivia-based materials fit into communicative language teaching approaches and provides examples of trivia-based activities and explains how to use them in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  18. Evaluating Energy Conversion Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1983-01-01

    Devices that convert solar radiation directly into storable chemical or electrical energy, have characteristic energy absorption spectrum; specifically, each of these devices has energy threshold. The conversion efficiency of generalized system that emcompasses all threshold devices is analyzed, resulting in family of curves for devices of various threshold energies operating at different temperatures.

  19. Leaf water deuterium enrichment shapes leaf wax n-alkane ?D values of angiosperm plants I: Experimental evidence and mechanistic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Schefuß, Enno; Sachse, Dirk

    2013-06-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes of terrestrial plants are long-chain hydrocarbons that can persist in sedimentary records over geologic timescales. Since meteoric water is the primary source of hydrogen used in leaf wax synthesis, the hydrogen isotope composition (?D value) of these biomarkers contains information on hydrological processes. Consequently, leaf wax n-alkane ?D values have been advocated as powerful tools for paleohydrological research. The exact kind of hydrological information that is recorded in leaf wax n-alkanes remains, however, unclear because critical processes that determine their ?D values have not yet been resolved. In particular the effects of evaporative deuterium (D)-enrichment of leaf water on the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes have not yet been directly assessed and quantified. Here we present the results of a study where we experimentally tested if and by what magnitude evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the ?D of leaf wax n-alkanes in angiosperm C3 and C4 plants. Our study revealed that n-alkane ?D values of all plants that we investigated were affected by evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water. For dicotyledonous plants we found that the full extent of leaf water evaporative D-enrichment is recorded in leaf wax n-alkane ?D values. For monocotyledonous plants we found that between 18% and 68% of the D-enrichment in leaf water was recorded in the ?D values of their n-alkanes. We hypothesize that the different magnitudes by which evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants is the result of differences in leaf growth and development between these plant groups. Our finding that the evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants - albeit at different magnitudes - has important implications for the interpretation of leaf wax n-alkane ?D values from paleohydrological records. In addition, our finding opens the door to employ ?D values of leaf wax n-alkanes as new ecohydrological proxies for evapotranspiration that can be applied in contemporary plant and ecosystem research.

  20. Band-selective ballistic energy transport in alkane oligomers: toward controlling the transport speed.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuankai; Qasim, Layla N; Kurnosov, Arkady A; Rubtsova, Natalia I; Mackin, Robert T; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Boyu; Zhou, Xiao; Jayawickramarajah, Janarthanan; Burin, Alexander L; Rubtsov, Igor V

    2015-05-28

    Intramolecular transport of vibrational energy in two series of oligomers featuring alkane chains of various length was studied by relaxation-assisted two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. The transport was initiated by exciting various end-group modes (tags) such as different modes of the azido (?(N?N) and ?(N?N)), carboxylic acid (?(C?O)), and succinimide ester (?as(C?O)) with short mid-IR laser pulses. It is shown that the transport via alkane chains is ballistic and the transport speed is dependent on the type of the tag mode that initiates the transport. The transport speed of 8.0 Å/ps was observed when initiated by either ?(C?O) or ?as(C?O). When initiated by ?(N?N) and ?(N?N), the transport speed of 14.4 ± 2 and 11 ± 4 Å/ps was observed. Analysis of the vibrational relaxation channels of different tags, combined with the results for the group velocity evaluation, permits identification of the chain bands predominantly contributing to the transport for different cases of the transport initiation. For the transport initiated by ?(N?N) the CH2 twisting and wagging chain bands were identified as the major energy transport channels. For the transport initiated by ?(C?O), the C-C stretching and CH2 rocking chain bands served as major energy transporters. The transport initiated by ?(N?N) results in direct formation of the wave packet within the CH2 twisting and wagging chain bands. These developments can aid in designing molecular systems featuring faster and more controllable energy transport in molecules. PMID:25936983

  1. Spontaneous ignition delays as a diagnostic of the propensity of alkanes to cause engine knock

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, J.F.; Halford-Maw, P.A.; Mohamed, C.

    1997-12-01

    The spontaneous ignition of a range of alkanes (C{sub 4}-C{sub 8}) and of the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane + i-octane (2,2,4 trimethylpentane), have been investigated. Autoignition (or spontaneous ignition) delays were measured over a wide range of compressed gas temperatures (T{sub c}) at gas densities of 131 mol/m{sup 3} in a rapid compression machine. In the first instance, a reference temperature, which is typical of that reached in the end gas of spark ignition engines under violent knocking conditions (T{sub c} = 900 K), was used as a basis of comparison of ignition delay of the single fuels with the comparable PRF mixtures with respect to the research octane number (RON). A broad qualitative agreement was found to exist between the ignition delay of single-component fuels and the PRF mixtures of corresponding RON, but the quantitative agreement became increasingly less satisfactory for some fuels at high RON, especially above 85. A major contributing factor appears to be that, whereas for the binary PRF mixtures quite considerable extents of reaction can occur during the course of compression, which leads to a sensitization of the mixture in the postcompression period at higher temperature, not all of the single-component alkanes are similarly reactive. These features are tied to the relative activities of the fuels and to the characteristics of the negative temperature dependence of reaction rate in the temperature range 750--850 K. However, even throughout a wide range of compressed gas temperatures, ignition delay does not appear to offer a quantitative basis for assessing the relative sensitivity of fuels to cause engine knock. It is suggested that the minimum temperature at which autoignition occurs in a given system may give a closer correlation than ignition delay for the relationship between reactivity and octane number.

  2. Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet

    SciTech Connect

    Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter; Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

  3. Solar energy conversion.

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, G. W.; Lewis, N. S.

    2008-03-01

    If solar energy is to become a practical alternative to fossil fuels, we must have efficient ways to convert photons into electricity, fuel, and heat. The need for better conversion technologies is a driving force behind many recent developments in biology, materials, and especially nanoscience. The Sun has the enormous untapped potential to supply our growing energy needs. The barrier to greater use of the solar resource is its high cost relative to the cost of fossil fuels, although the disparity will decrease with the rising prices of fossil fuels and the rising costs of mitigating their impact on the environment and climate. The cost of solar energy is directly related to the low conversion efficiency, the modest energy density of solar radiation, and the costly materials currently required. The development of materials and methods to improve solar energy conversion is primarily a scientific challenge: Breakthroughs in fundamental understanding ought to enable marked progress. There is plenty of room for improvement, since photovoltaic conversion efficiencies for inexpensive organic and dye-sensitized solar cells are currently about 10% or less, the conversion efficiency of photosynthesis is less than 1%, and the best solar thermal efficiency is 30%. The theoretical limits suggest that we can do much better. Solar conversion is a young science. Its major growth began in the 1970s, spurred by the oil crisis that highlighted the pervasive importance of energy to our personal, social, economic, and political lives. In contrast, fossil-fuel science has developed over more than 250 years, stimulated by the Industrial Revolution and the promise of abundant fossil fuels. The science of thermodynamics, for example, is intimately intertwined with the development of the steam engine. The Carnot cycle, the mechanical equivalent of heat, and entropy all played starring roles in the development of thermodynamics and the technology of heat engines. Solar-energy science faces an equally rich future, with nanoscience enabling the discovery of the guiding principles of photonic energy conversion and their use in the development of cost-competitive new technologies.

  4. Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Instructor Position / General Chemistry Program

    E-print Network

    Virginia Tech Department of Chemistry Instructor Position / General Chemistry Program The Department of Chemistry is seeking an Instructor to teach classes in its General Chemistry Program to start entail teaching courses in analytical or physical chemistry lecture or lab as needed. Applicants should

  5. B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK)

    E-print Network

    Doyle, Robert

    B.A. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY (CHEMISTRY TRACK) Requirements include 36 credits in chemistry core courses, 32 of which are taken in specific courses. Each student's course of study includes the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses CHE 106: General Chemistry Lecture I (3) CHE 116: General

  6. CHEMISTRY, B.S.C. CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHEC)

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S.C. CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHEC) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements of the American Chemical Society (ACS), and B.S.C. graduates are certified. ______ 1 CHM 19400 Freshman Chemistry Orientation ______ 4 CHM 11500 General Chemistry ______ 4 CHM 11600 General Chemistry ______ 4 CHM 24100 Intro

  7. CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT)

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW- or above in Gen Ed Courses CHEMISTRY BS COURSES (62 credits) *Note: 3.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses ______ 1 CHM 19400 Freshman Chemistry Orientation ______ 4 CHM 11500 General Chemistry ______ 4

  8. FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry

    E-print Network

    FNH 301 FOOD CHEMISTRY I Principles of Food Chemistry Instructor: Dr. David Kitts Department-822-5143; Email: david.kitts@ubc.ca Evaluation: Distribution of marks for final grade in Food Chemistry: Midterm Science [301] ­ Food Chemistry Course Objectives: To teach students the principles of food chemistry

  9. CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT)

    E-print Network

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B. S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE CHEMISTRY OPTION (CHMT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW- or above in Gen Ed Chemistry BS Courses (62 credits) *Note: 3.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses ______ 1 CHM 19400 Freshman Chemistry Orientation ______ 4 CHM 11500 General Chemistry ______ 4

  10. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  11. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  12. Chemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core

    E-print Network

    Gilchrist, James F.

    301* 1 Undergraduate seminar CHM 307 3 Advanced inorganic chemistry Total = 25 credits CollateralChemflex Overview: Common Chemistry core CHM 40, 41 (or CHM 30, 31) 8 Introductory chemistry CHM 110,111,112,113 8 Organic chemistry CHM 332 3 Analytical chemistry CHM 201*** 2 Technical writing CHM

  13. Teaching Assistants Department of Chemistry

    E-print Network

    Guide for Teaching Assistants Department of Chemistry The University of Chicago #12;© 2012 Department of Chemistry, The University of Chicago (2nd edition) #12;i Preface Welcome to the Chemistry to familiarize you with your teaching responsibilities for General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry and to provide

  14. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

    2007-09-25

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

  15. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-02-08

    Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

  16. Entropy effects in hydrocarbon conversion reactions: free-energy integrations and transition-path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucko, T.; Hafner, J.

    2010-09-01

    The standard approach to ab initio simulations of activated chemical processes is based on the harmonic-oscillator/rigid-rotor approximation to transition state theory. However, there is increasing evidence that these approximations fail for reactions involving loosely bound reactant and/or transitions states where entropy makes a significant contribution to the free-energy reaction barrier. Examples are provided by the conversion (proton exchange, dehydrogenation, monomolecular cracking) of short alkanes over acidic zeolites. For proton exchange and monomolecular cracking the reaction path may be described reasonably well by simple vectorial reaction coordinates and the free energy of activation may be derived by free-energy integration schemes such as the Blue-Moon ensemble technique in combination with constrained ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. For alkane dehydrogenation, however, several reaction scenarios are in competition and techniques such as transition-path sampling must be used to determine the dominant reaction mechanism. In our paper we describe the fundamental aspects of these techniques and discuss their application to compute free-energy barriers for proton exchange between isobutane and acidic chabazite and for monomolecular cracking of propane. Dehydrogenation of propane has been studied using transition-path sampling. In this case the static approach based on harmonic transition state theory not only fails in producing accurate reaction barriers but even leads to incorrect predictions of reaction intermediates and products.

  17. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  18. Wind energy conversion system

    DOEpatents

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  19. Frequency conversion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Steven (Inventor); Lang, Robert J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Laser diode pumped mid-IR wavelength sources include at least one high power, near-IR wavelength, injection and/or sources wherein one or both of such sources may be tunable providing a pump wave output beam to a quasi-phase matched (QPM) nonlinear frequency mixing (NFM) device. The NFM device may be a difference frequency mixing (DFM) device or an optical parametric oscillation (OPO) device. Wavelength tuning of at least one of the sources advantageously provides the ability for optimizing pump or injection wavelengths to match the QPM properties of the NFM device enabling a broad range of mid-IR wavelength selectivity. Also, pump powers are gain enhanced by the addition of a rare earth amplifier or oscillator, or a Raman/Brillouin amplifier or oscillator between the high power source and the NFM device. Further, polarization conversion using Raman or Brillouin wavelength shifting is provided to optimize frequency conversion efficiency in the NFM device.

  20. Oxygen-independent alkane formation by non-heme iron-dependent cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase: investigation of kinetics and requirement for an external electron donor.

    PubMed

    Eser, Bekir E; Das, Debasis; Han, Jaehong; Jones, Patrik R; Marsh, E Neil G

    2011-12-13

    Cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (cAD) is, structurally, a member of the di-iron carboxylate family of oxygenases. We previously reported that cAD from Prochlorococcus marinus catalyzes the unusual hydrolysis of aldehydes to produce alkanes and formate in a reaction that requires an external reducing system but does not require oxygen [Das et al. (2011) Angew. Chem. 50, 7148-7152]. Here we demonstrate that cADs from divergent cyanobacterial classes, including the enzyme from N. puntiformes that was reported to be oxygen dependent, catalyze aldehyde decarbonylation at a much faster rate under anaerobic conditions and that the oxygen in formate derives from water. The very low activity (<1 turnover/h) of cAD appears to result from inhibition by the ferredoxin reducing system used in the assay and the low solubility of the substrate. Replacing ferredoxin with the electron mediator phenazine methosulfate allowed the enzyme to function with various chemical reductants, with NADH giving the highest activity. NADH is not consumed during turnover, in accord with the proposed catalytic role for the reducing system in the reaction. With octadecanal, a burst phase of product formation, k(prod) = 3.4 ± 0.5 min(-1), is observed, indicating that chemistry is not rate-determining under the conditions of the assay. With the more soluble substrate, heptanal, k(cat) = 0.17 ± 0.01 min(-1) and no burst phase is observed, suggesting that a chemical step is limiting in the reaction of this substrate. PMID:22074177