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Sample records for alkane conversion chemistry

  1. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  2. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical—they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters.

  3. Conversion of alkanes to linear alkylsilanes using an iridium-iron-catalysed tandem dehydrogenation-isomerization-hydrosilylation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiangqing; Huang, Zheng

    2016-02-01

    The conversion of inexpensive, saturated hydrocarbon feedstocks into value-added speciality chemicals using regiospecific, catalytic functionalization of alkanes is a major goal of organometallic chemistry. Linear alkylsilanes represent one such speciality chemical-they have a wide range of applications, including release coatings, silicone rubbers and moulding products. Direct, selective, functionalization of alkanes at primary C-H bonds is difficult and, to date, methods for catalytically converting alkanes into linear alkylsilanes are unknown. Here, we report a well-defined, dual-catalyst system for one-pot, two-step alkane silylations. The system comprises a pincer-ligated Ir catalyst for alkane dehydrogenation and an Fe catalyst that effects a subsequent tandem olefin isomerization-hydrosilylation. This method exhibits exclusive regioselectivity for the production of terminally functionalized alkylsilanes. This dual-catalyst strategy has also been applied to regioselective alkane borylations to form linear alkylboronate esters. PMID:26791899

  4. Alkane metathesis by tandem alkane-dehydrogenation-olefin-metathesis catalysis and related chemistry.

    PubMed

    Haibach, Michael C; Kundu, Sabuj; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S

    2012-06-19

    Methods for the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels that are both efficient and economically viable could greatly enhance global security and prosperity. Currently, the major route to convert natural gas and coal to liquids is Fischer-Tropsch catalysis, which is potentially applicable to any source of synthesis gas including biomass and nonconventional fossil carbon sources. The major desired products of Fischer-Tropsch catalysis are n-alkanes that contain 9-19 carbons; they comprise a clean-burning and high combustion quality diesel, jet, and marine fuel. However, Fischer-Tropsch catalysis also results in significant yields of the much less valuable C(3) to C(8)n-alkanes; these are also present in large quantities in oil and gas reserves (natural gas liquids) and can be produced from the direct reduction of carbohydrates. Therefore, methods that could disproportionate medium-weight (C(3)-C(8)) n-alkanes into heavy and light n-alkanes offer great potential value as global demand for fuel increases and petroleum reserves decrease. This Account describes systems that we have developed for alkane metathesis based on the tandem operation of catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation and olefin metathesis. As dehydrogenation catalysts, we used pincer-ligated iridium complexes, and we initially investigated Schrock-type Mo or W alkylidene complexes as olefin metathesis catalysts. The interoperability of the catalysts typically represents a major challenge in tandem catalysis. In our systems, the rate of alkane dehydrogenation generally limits the overall reaction rate, whereas the lifetime of the alkylidene complexes at the relatively high temperatures required to obtain practical dehydrogenation rates (ca. 125 -200 °C) limits the total turnover numbers. Accordingly, we have focused on the development and use of more active dehydrogenation catalysts and more stable olefin-metathesis catalysts. We have used thermally

  5. Alkane Activation Initiated by Hydride Transfer: Co-conversion of Propane and Methanol over H-ZSM-5 Zeolite.

    PubMed

    Yu, Si-Min; Wu, Jian-Feng; Liu, Chong; Liu, Wei; Bai, Shi; Huang, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2015-06-15

    Co-conversion of alkane with another reactant over zeolite catalysts has emerged as a new approach to the long-standing challenge of alkane transformation. With the aid of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and GC-MS analysis, it was found that the co-conversion of propane and methanol can be readily initiated by hydride transfer at temperatures of ≥449 K over the acidic zeolite H-ZSM-5. The formation of (13)C-labeled methane and singly (13)C-labeled n-butanes in selective labeling experiments provided the first evidence for the initial hydride transfer from propane to surface methoxy intermediates. The results not only provide new insight into carbocation chemistry of solid acids, but also shed light on the low-temperature transformation of alkanes for industrial applications. PMID:25959356

  6. Products of Chemistry: Alkanes: Abundant, Pervasive, Important, and Essential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history and commercialization of alkanes. Examines the nomenclature and uses of alkanes. Studies polymerization and several types of polyethylenes: low-density, high-density, low-molecular-weight, cross-linked, linear low-density, and ultrahigh-molecular-weight. Includes a glossary of hydrocarbon terms. (MVL)

  7. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 5: Alkanes Preparations and Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  8. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 4: Alkanes-Nomenclature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  10. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes phase II. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    The Topical Report on Phase II of the project entitled, Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews work done between January 1, 1990 and September 30, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. This Topical Report documents our efforts to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. Research on the Cooperative Agreement is divided into three Phases relating to three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate. In this report we present our work on catalysts which have oxidation-active metals in polyoxoanions (PHASE II).

  11. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

  13. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  14. Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

  15. Chemistry of Energy Conversion and Storage.

    PubMed

    Su, Dang-Sheng; Schlögl, R

    2016-02-19

    Special Issue: Energy Conversion and Storage. Critical issues in current energy-based societies are its generation through methods utilizing alternatives to fossil fuels as well as its storage. Considering the scope, it is not surprising that the research becomes more and more multidisciplinary. Therefore, it is important to keep focused. The ChemEner symposia, the last one being highlighted in this Special Issue, achieve this by focusing on the state of the art and the newest development of the Chemistry of hydrogen generation, carbon dioxide reduction, and other related topics, exploring new concepts for clean future energy. PMID:26914171

  16. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 3. Topical report, January 1990--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-31

    The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in the first simple, economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to an alcohol-rich oxygenated product which can either be used as an environmentally friendly, high-performance liquid fuel, or a precursor to a liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. The authors have entered the proof-of-concept stage for converting isobutane to tert butyl alcohol in a practical process and are preparing to enter proof-of-concept of a propane to isopropyl alcohol process in the near future. Methane and ethane are more refractory and thus more difficult to oxidize than the C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons. Nonetheless, advances made in this area indicate that further research progress could achieve the goal of their direct conversion to alcohols. Progress in Phase 3 catalytic vapor phase methane and ethane oxidation over metals in regular oxidic lattices are the subject of this topical report.

  17. A Process for Microbial Hydrocarbon Synthesis: Overproduction of Fatty Acids in Escherichia coli and Catalytic Conversion to Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Lennen, Rebecca M.; Braden, Drew J.; West, Ryan M.; Dumesic, James A.; Pfleger, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    The development of renewable alternatives to diesel and jet fuels is highly desirable for the heavy transportation sector, and would offer benefits over the production and use of short-chain alcohols for personal transportation. Here, we report the development of a metabolically engineered strain of Escherichia coli that overproduces medium-chain length fatty acids via three basic modifications: elimination of β-oxidation, overexpression of the four subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and expression of a plant acyl–acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase from Umbellularia californica (BTE). The expression level of BTE was optimized by comparing fatty acid production from strains harboring BTE on plasmids with four different copy numbers. Expression of BTE from low copy number plasmids resulted in the highest fatty acid production. Up to a seven-fold increase in total fatty acid production was observed in engineered strains over a negative control strain (lacking β-oxidation), with a composition dominated by C12 and C14 saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. Next, a strategy for producing undecane via a combination of biotechnology and heterogeneous catalysis is demonstrated. Fatty acids were extracted from a culture of an overproducing strain into an alkane phase and fed to a Pd/C plug flow reactor, where the extracted fatty acids were decarboxylated into saturated alkanes. The result is an enriched alkane stream that can be recycled for continuous extractions. Complete conversion of C12 fatty acids extracted from culture to alkanes has been demonstrated yielding a concentration of 0.44 g L−1 (culture volume) undecane. PMID:20073090

  18. A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of gaseous alkanes in a barrier discharge and features of the reaction mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, S.; Ryabov, A.; Shchyogoleva, G.

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to the non-oxidative conversion of C1-C4 alkanes into gaseous and liquid products in a barrier discharge is proposed. It consists in inhibiting the formation of deposits on the reactor electrode surfaces due to the addition of distilled water into the flow of hydrocarbon gases. The energy consumption on hydrocarbon conversion decreases from methane to n-butane from ~46 to 35 eV molecule-1. The main gaseous products of the conversion of light alkanes are hydrogen and C2-C4 hydrocarbons. The liquid reaction products contain C5+ alkanes with a predominantly isomeric structure. The results of modeling the kinetics of chemical reactions show that an increase in the molecular weight of the reaction products is mainly due to processes involving CH2 radical and the recombination of alkyl radicals.

  19. Conversion of raw lignocellulosic biomass into branched long-chain alkanes through three tandem steps.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunrui; Ding, Daqian; Xia, Qineng; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-07-01

    Synthesis of branched long-chain alkanes from renewable biomass has attracted intensive interest in recent years, but the feedstock for this synthesis is restricted to platform chemicals. Here, we develop an effective and energy-efficient process to convert raw lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., corncob) into branched diesel-range alkanes through three tandem steps for the first time. Furfural and isopropyl levulinate (LA ester) were prepared from hemicellulose and cellulose fractions of corncob in toluene/water biphasic system with added isopropanol, which was followed by double aldol condensation of furfural with LA ester into C15 oxygenates and the final hydrodeoxygenation of C15 oxygenates into branched long-chain alkanes. The core point of this tandem process is the addition of isopropanol in the first step, which enables the spontaneous transfer of levulinic acid (LA) into the toluene phase in the form of LA ester through esterification, resulting in LA ester co-existing with furfural in the same phase, which is the basis for double aldol condensation in the toluene phase. Moreover, the acidic aqueous phase and toluene can be reused and the residues, including lignin and humins in aqueous phase, can be separated and carbonized to porous carbon materials. PMID:27241180

  20. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  1. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 3: Alkanes-Homologous Series and Isomerism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet, one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland, provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The entire series…

  2. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Final report, January 1, 1990--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement (Phase I-III), we uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of fight alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of fight hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane>propane>ethane>methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase V). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases IV, VI), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases VII through IX). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phases V and VI so that further work is not anticipated. We made excellent progress during 1994 in generating a class of less costly new materials which have the potential for high catalytic activity. New routes were developed for replacing costly perfluorophenyl groups in the meso-position of metalloporphyrin catalysts with far less expensive and lower molecular weight perfluoromethyl groups.

  3. Gas-Phase Tropospheric Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds: 1. Alkanes and Alkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, R. |

    1997-03-01

    Literature data (through mid-1996) concerning the gas-phase reactions of alkanes and alkenes (including isoprene and monoterpenes) leading to their first generation products are reviewed and evaluated for tropospheric conditions. The recommendations of the most recent IUPAC evaluation [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, {bold 26}, No. 3 (1997)] are used for the {le}C{sub 3} organic compounds, unless more recent data necessitates reevaluation. The most recent review and evaluation of Atkinson [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data, Monograph {bold 2}, 1 (1994)] concerning the kinetics of the reactions of OH radicals, NO{sub 3} radicals, and O{sub 3} is also updated for these two classes of volatile organic compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society.} {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital American Institute of Physics and American Chemical Society}

  4. [Sources, Migration and Conversion of Dissolved Alkanes, Dissolved Fatty Acids in a Karst Underground River Water, in Chongqing Area].

    PubMed

    Liang, Zuo-bing; Sun, Yu-chuan; Wang, Zun-bo; Shi, Yang; Jiang, Ze-li; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Zheng-Lan; Liao, Yu

    2015-09-01

    Dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids were collected from Qingmuguan underground river in July, October 2013. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS), alkanes and fatty acids were quantitatively analyzed. The results showed that average contents of alkanes and fatty acids were 1 354 ng.L-1, 24203 ng.L-1 in July, and 667 ng.L-1, 2526 ng.L-1 in October respectively. With the increasing migration distance of dissolved alkanes and dissolved fatty acids in underground river, their contents decreased. Based on the molecular characteristic indices of alkanes, like CPI, OEP, Paq and R, dissolved alkanes were mainly originated from microorganisms in July, and aquatic plants in October. Saturated straight-chain fatty acid had the highest contents in all samples with the dominant peak in C16:0, combined with the characteristics of carbon peak, algae or bacteria might be the dominant source of dissolved fatty acids. PMID:26717680

  5. Oxidative conversion of C1-C3 alkanes by vanadium oxide catalysts. DFT results and their accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanska, Xavier; Sauer, Joachim

    Elementary steps in the oxidative conversion of methane, ethane, and propane by supported vanadium oxide species are studied by density functional theory, specifically B3LYP. Two models are adopted, namely O dbond V(OH)3 and O dbond VSi7O12H7, which yield similar energy profiles. The initial and rate-determining step is hydrogen abstraction. Within the C1-C3 series, energy barriers and reaction energies follow the same trend as the C bond H bond strength in the different alkanes. For methane, only methanol formation is possible whereas for ethane and propane, oxidative dehydrogenation yields the corresponding alkenes. Single point CCSD(T)/TZVP calculations are used to assess the B3LYP error. For the barrier of the initial hydrogen abstraction the B3LYP error is larger than usual, -40 to -60 kJ/mol. With the non-hybrid BP86 and PBE functionals even larger errors occur and the potential energy surface is qualitatively different.

  6. Nanoparticle conversion chemistry: Kirkendall effect, galvanic exchange, and anion exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bryan D.; Tracy, Joseph B.

    2014-10-01

    Conversion chemistry is a rapidly maturing field, where chemical conversion of template nanoparticles (NPs) into new compositions is often accompanied by morphological changes, such as void formation. The principles and examples of three major classes of conversion chemical reactions are reviewed: the Kirkendall effect for metal NPs, galvanic exchange, and anion exchange, each of which can result in void formation in NPs. These reactions can be used to obtain complex structures that may not be attainable by other methods. During each kind of conversion chemical reaction, NPs undergo distinct chemical and morphological changes, and insights into the mechanisms of these reactions will allow for improved fine control and prediction of the structures of intermediates and products. Conversion of metal NPs into oxides, phosphides, sulphides, and selenides often occurs through the Kirkendall effect, where outward diffusion of metal atoms from the core is faster than inward diffusion of reactive species, resulting in void formation. In galvanic exchange reactions, metal NPs react with noble metal salts, where a redox reaction favours reduction and deposition of the noble metal (alloying) and oxidation and dissolution of the template metal (dealloying). In anion exchange reactions, addition of certain kinds of anions to solutions containing metal compound NPs drives anion exchange, which often results in significant morphological changes due to the large size of anions compared to cations. Conversion chemistry thus allows for the formation of NPs with complex compositions and structures, for which numerous applications are anticipated arising from their novel catalytic, electronic, optical, magnetic, and electrochemical properties.

  7. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage -- Phase 6. Final report, February 1--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement, the authors uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of light alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of light hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane > propane > ethane > methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of-concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase 5). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases 4, 6), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases 7 through 9). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phase 5 and 6 so that further work is not anticipated. 72 refs.

  8. Oxygen-free conversion of methane to higher alkanes through an isothermal two-step reaction on ruthenium

    SciTech Connect

    Belgued, M.; Amariglio, A.; Lefort, L.; Amariglio, H.

    1996-06-01

    Ruthenium dispersed on silica is able to chemisorb CH{sub 4} at temperatures significantly lower than EUROPT-1. At the temperatures used ({ge}80{degrees}C), H{sub 2} desorption parallels CH{sub 4} chemisorption but no C{sub 2}H{sub 6} is observed. During the following temperature programmed desorption under flowing argon, CH{sub 4} is removed through a wide range of temperature (from room temperature to 300{degrees}C) with a first contribution peaking at less than 100{degrees}C. Very small amounts of CH{sub 4} are desorbed after an adsorption carried out at T{ge} 180{degrees}C, due to strong dehydrogenation of the adspecies. Subsequent temperature programmed surface reaction of the remaining adspecies with hydrogen displays upto four CH{sub 4} peaks at well defined temperatures (ranging from {approx} 60 to {approx} 340{degrees}C), accompanied by a negligible formation of ethane. No C{sub {gamma}} was formed. The total amount of adsorbed CH{sub 4} and the average H/C ratio of the corresponding adspecies can be derived from these experiments. In a separate set of experiments, CH{sub 4} is switched to H{sub 2} at the end of the exposure step, the temperature being fixed. An immediate formation of alkanes ranging from C{sub 1} to C{sub 6} is then evidenced. A sizeable fraction of the chemisorbed layer can so be homologated to higher alkanes. The influences of the various operating factors are reported. In particular a neat maximum of the C{sub 2+} production versus temperature (at 160{degrees}C) is evidenced and is clearly due to the adverse hydrogenolysis reactions, efficiently catalyzed by Ru. All the results can be interpreted in complete similarity with the Pt case. 5 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes-proof-of-concept stage - Phase IV. Topical report, February 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    This report details the research performed on Phase IV of the extended Cooperative Agreement. This Phase, entitled C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} Research, provides the research support which accompanies the C{sub 4} Proof-of-Concept Phase (Phase V) as the two major activities of the Cooperative Agreement during calendar 1993. It is the objective of this phase to understand the nature of the catalysts and catalytic activity of perhaloporphyrin complexes uncovered during Phases I-III in order that superior catalytic materials can be made and tested which meet commercial criteria for the oxidation of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} light alkane gases found in natural gas and other available hydrocarbon streams. During Phase IV, we have examined the physical and electronic structures of the very active perhaloporphyrin catalysts which we have developed, and have gained an understanding of the properties which make them active. This has led us to design and synthesize materials which are cheaper, more active, more robust and, in general superior for carrying out practical catalysis. Our early generation perhaloporphyrin catalysts, while exhibiting unprecedented catalytic activity, were far too expensive for use in converting natural gas or its C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} components.

  10. Reducing the Degrees of Freedom in Chemistry Classroom Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criswell, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    Five high-school chemistry teachers were asked to enact a lesson in which they posed a problem for which students were likely to generate solutions based on reasoning that was not aligned with accepted principles of chemistry. Four teachers selected a problem related to the stoichiometry of a reaction; the fifth chose a problem associated with…

  11. Dehydrogenation of n-alkanes catalyzed by iridium ``pincer`` complexes: Regioselective formation of {alpha}-olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Singh, B.; Goldman, A.S.; Pak, E.B.; Jensen, C.M.

    1999-04-28

    The development of methods for the functionalization of alkanes is of cardinal importance in catalytic chemistry. A specific functionalization of particularly great potential value is the conversion of n-alkanes to the corresponding 1-alkenes ({alpha}-olefins) since these serve as precursors for a wide range of commodity-scale chemicals (>2 {times} 10{sup 9} kg/yr). Such a conversion is also an intriguing challenge as viewed from a fundamental perspective. n-Alkanes are the simplest organic molecules with the potential to undergo regioselective transformations; {alpha}-olefins are the thermodynamically least stable of the corresponding double-bond isomers and any mechanism for their formation must presumably involve activation of the strongest bond (primary C-{single_bond}H) in the molecule.

  12. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    Metal-organic supramolecular chemistry on surfaces has matured to a point where its underlying growth mechanisms are well understood and structures of defined coordination environments of metal atoms can be synthesized in a controlled and reproducible procedure. With surface-confined molecular self-assembly, scientists have a tool box at hand which can be used to prepare structures with desired properties, as for example a defined oxidation number and spin state of the transition metal atoms within the organic matrix. From a structural point of view, these coordination sites in the supramolecular structure resemble the catalytically active sites of metallo-enzymes, both characterized by metal centers coordinated to organic ligands. Several chemical reactions take place at these embedded metal ions in enzymes and the question arises whether these reactions also take place using metal-organic networks as catalysts. Mimicking the active site of metal atoms and organic ligands of enzymes in artificial systems is the key to understanding the selectivity and efficiency of enzymatic reactions. Their catalytic activity depends on various parameters including the charge and spin configuration in the metal ion, but also on the organic environment, which can stabilize intermediate reaction products, inhibits catalytic deactivation, and serves mostly as a transport channel for the reactants and products and therefore ensures the selectivity of the enzyme. Charge and spin on the transition metal in enzymes depend on the one hand on the specific metal element, and on the other hand on its organic coordination environment. These two parameters can carefully be adjusted in surface confined metal-organic networks, which can be synthesized by virtue of combinatorial mixing of building synthons. Different organic ligands with varying functional groups can be combined with several transition metals and spontaneously assemble into ordered networks. The catalytically active metal

  13. Gas-phase chemistry of transition-metal ions with alkanes: do initial electrostatic interaction control final product distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, D.J.; Allison, J.

    1987-09-24

    There are features of the dynamics of gas-phase ion/molecule reactions that make them unique when compared to neutral/neutral reactions and solution processes. Exceedingly rich and complex chemistry can be observed in gas-phase systems in which a reactant is charged, due, in part, to the relatively long lifetime of the ion/molecule complex that is initially formed. Here possible correlations between final reaction products and geometry-specific complexes that are initially formed are discussed. The chemistry under study is that for univalent first-row transition-metal ions with n-butane, in which cleavage of C-H and C-C bonds is observed for some metals.

  14. Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion, Indianapolis American Chemical Society Meetings, Fall 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Tianquan

    2013-09-20

    The Symposium on the Physical Chemistry of Solar Energy Conversion at the Fall ACS Meeting in Indianapolis, IN (Sept. 8-12) featured the following sessions (approx. 6 speakers per session): (1) Quantum Dots and Nanorods for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (2) Artificial Photosynthesis: Water Oxidation; (3) Artificial Photosynthesis: Solar Fuels (2 half-day sessions); (4) Organic Solar Cells; (5) Novel Concepts for Solar Energy Conversion (2 half-day sessions); (6) Emerging Techniques for Solar Energy Conversion; (7) Interfacial Electron Transfer

  15. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY OF POTENTIAL EMISSIONS FROM FUEL CONVERSION FACILITIES. A SMOG CHAMBER STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The atmospheric chemistry of chemical species that may be emitted from fuel conversion facilities were studied in smog chambers. Of 17 compounds assessed for ozone-forming potential, 6 compounds were selected along with a control species, propylene, for testing in the presence of...

  16. EDITORIAL: Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry Non-thermal plasma-assisted fuel conversion for green chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Gutsol, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    This special issue is based on the symposium on Non-thermal Plasma Assisted Fuel Conversion for Green Chemistry, a part of the 240th ACS National Meeting & Exposition held in Boston, MA, USA, 22-26 August 2010. Historically, the Division of Fuel Chemistry of the American Chemical Society (ACS) has featured three plasma-related symposia since 2000, and has launched special issues in Catalysis Today on three occasions: 'Catalyst Preparation using Plasma Technologies', Fall Meeting, Washington DC, USA, 2000. Special issue in Catalysis Today 72 (3-4) with 12 peer-reviewed articles. 'Plasma Technology and Catalysis', Spring Meeting, New Orleans, LA, USA, 2003. Special issue in Catalysis Today 89 (1-2) with more than 30 peer-reviewed articles. 'Utilization of Greenhouse Gases II' (partly focused on plasma-related technologies), Spring Meeting, Anaheim, CA, USA, 2004. Special issue in Catalysis Today 98 (4) with 25 peer-reviewed articles. This time, selected presentations are published in this Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics special issue. An industrial material and energy conversion technology platform is established on thermochemical processes including various catalytic reactions. Existing industry-scale technology is already well established; nevertheless, further improvement in energy efficiency and material saving has been continuously demanded. Drastic reduction of CO2 emission is also drawing keen attention with increasing recognition of energy and environmental issues. Green chemistry is a rapidly growing research field, and frequently highlights renewable bioenergy, bioprocesses, solar photocatalysis of water splitting, and regeneration of CO2 into useful chemicals. We would also like to emphasize 'plasma catalysis' of hydrocarbon resources as an important part of the innovative next-generation green technologies. The peculiarity of non-thermal plasma is that it can generate reactive species almost independently of reaction temperature. Plasma

  17. Identification and Characterization of the CYP52 Family of Candida tropicalis ATCC 20336, Important for the Conversion of Fatty Acids and Alkanes to α,ω-Dicarboxylic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Craft, David L.; Madduri, Krishna M.; Eshoo, Mark; Wilson, C. Ron

    2003-01-01

    Candida tropicalis ATCC 20336 excretes α,ω-dicarboxylic acids as a by-product when cultured on n-alkanes or fatty acids as the carbon source. Previously, a β-oxidation-blocked derivative of ATCC 20336 was constructed which showed a dramatic increase in the production of dicarboxylic acids. This paper describes the next steps in strain improvement, which were directed toward the isolation and characterization of genes encoding the ω-hydroxylase enzymes catalyzing the first step in the ω-oxidation pathway. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (CYP) and the accompanying NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase (NCP) constitute the hydroxylase complex responsible for the first and rate-limiting step of ω-oxidation of n-alkanes and fatty acids. 10 members of the alkane-inducible P450 gene family (CYP52) of C. tropicalis ATCC20336 as well as the accompanying NCP were cloned and sequenced. The 10 CYP genes represent four unique genes with their putative alleles and two unique genes for which no allelic variant was identified. Of the 10 genes, CYP52A13 and CYP52A14 showed the highest levels of mRNA induction, as determined by quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR during fermentation with pure oleic fatty acid (27-fold increase), pure octadecane (32-fold increase), and a mixed fatty acid feed, Emersol 267 (54-fold increase). The allelic pair CYP52A17 and CYP52A18 was also induced under all three conditions but to a lesser extent. Moderate induction of CYP52A12 was observed. These results identify the CYP52 and NCP genes as being involved in α,ω-dicarboxylic acid production by C. tropicalis and provide the foundation for biocatalyst improvement. PMID:14532053

  18. Superacid catalyzed coal conversion chemistry. Final technical report, September 1, 1983-September 1, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    This research project involved the study of a raw comparatively mild coal conversion process. The goal of the project was to study model systems to understand the basic chemistry involved and to provide a possible effective pretreatment of coal which significantly improves liquefaction-depolymerization under mild conditions. The conversion process operates at relatively low temperatues (170/sup 0/C) and pressures and uses an easily recyclable, stable superacid catalysts (HF-BF/sub 3/). It consequently offers an attractive alternative to currently available processes. From the present studies it appears that the modification of coal structure by electrophilic alkylation and subsequent reaction of alkylated coal with HF-BF/sub 3/-H/sub 2/ system under mild conditions considerably improves the extractability of coal in pyridine and cyclohexane. On the other hand, nitration of coal and its subsequent reaction with HF-BF/sub 3/H/sub 2/ decreases the pyridine and cyclohexane extractability. Study of model compounds under conditions identical with the superacidic HF/BF/sub 3//H/sub 2/ system provided significant information about the basic chemistry of the involved cleavage-hydrogenation reactions.

  19. Superacid Catalyzed Coal Conversion Chemistry. Final Technical Report, September 1, 1983-September 1, 1986

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Olah, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    This research project involved the study of a raw comparatively mild coal conversion process. The goal of the project was to study model systems to understand the basic chemistry involved and to provide a possible effective pretreatment of coal which significantly improves liquefaction-depolymerization under mild conditions. The conversion process operates at relatively low temperatures (170 degrees C) and pressures and uses an easily recyclable, stable superacid catalysts (HF-BF{sub 3}). It consequently offers an attractive alternative to currently available processes. From the present studies it appears that the modification of coal structure by electrophilic alkylation and subsequent reaction of alkylated coal with HF-BF{sub 3}-H{sub 2} system under mild conditions considerably improves the extractability of coal in pyridine and cyclohexane. On the other hand, nitration of coal and its subsequent reaction with HF-BF{sub 3}H{sub 2} decreases the pyridine and cyclohexane extractability. Study of model compounds under conditions identical with the superacidic HF/BF{sub 3}/H{sub 2} system provided significant information about the basic chemistry of the involved cleavage-hydrogenation reactions.

  20. Gas-to-Particle Conversion in Surface Discharge Nonthermal Plasmas and Its Implications for Atmospheric Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Ha; Ogata, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents some experimental data on gas-to-particle conversion of benzene using nonthermal plasma (NTP) technology and discusses the possibility of its technical application in atmospheric chemistry. Aerosol measurement using a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) revealed that the parts of benzene molecules were converted into a nanometer-sized aerosol. Aerosol formation was found to be highly related with the missing part in carbon balance. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that the aerosols formed in synthetic humid air are the collection of nanoparticles. The carbonyl band (C=O) was found to be an important chemical constituent in the aerosol. The potential of the NTP as an accelerated test tool in studying secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from VOCs will be also addressed. PMID:22163781

  1. Metathesis of alkanes and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Basset, Jean-Marie; Copéret, Christophe; Soulivong, Daravong; Taoufik, Mostafa; Cazat, Jean Thivolle

    2010-02-16

    The transformation of alkanes remains a difficult challenge because of the relative inertness of the C-H and C-C bonds. The rewards for asserting synthetic control over unfunctionalized, saturated hydrocarbons are considerable, however, because converting short alkanes into longer chain analogues is usually a value-adding process. Alkane metathesis is a novel catalytic and direct transformation of two molecules of a given alkane into its lower and higher homologues; moreover, the process proceeds at relatively low temperature (ambient conditions or higher). It was discovered through the use of a silica-supported tantalum hydride, ([triple bond]SiO)(2)TaH, a multifunctional catalyst with a single site of action. This reaction completes the story of the metathesis reactions discovered over the past 40 years: olefin metathesis, alkyne metathesis, and ene-yne cyclizations. In this Account, we examine the fundamental mechanistic aspects of alkane metathesis as well as the novel reactions that have been derived from its study. The silica-supported tantalum hydride catalyst was developed as the result of systematic and meticulous studies of the interaction between oxide supports and organometallic complexes, a field of study denoted surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). A careful examination of this surface-supported tantalum hydride led to the later discovery of alumina-supported tungsten hydride, W(H)(3)/Al(2)O(3), which proved to be an even better catalyst for alkane metathesis. Supported tantalum and tungsten hydrides are highly unsaturated, electron-deficient species that are very reactive toward the C-H and C-C bonds of alkanes. They show a great versatility in various other reactions, such as cross-metathesis between methane and alkanes, cross-metathesis between toluene and ethane, or even methane nonoxidative coupling. Moreover, tungsten hydride exhibits a specific ability in the transformation of isobutane into 2,3-dimethylbutane as well as in the metathesis

  2. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Andrew D.; Waldie, Fraser D.; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; ‘Pete' Silks, Louis A.; Gordon, John C.

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons.

  3. The hydrodeoxygenation of bioderived furans into alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Waldie, Fraser D; Wu, Ruilian; Schlaf, Marcel; Silks, Louis A Pete; Gordon, John C

    2013-05-01

    The conversion of biomass into fuels and chemical feedstocks is one part of a drive to reduce the world's dependence on crude oil. For transportation fuels in particular, wholesale replacement of a fuel is logistically problematic, not least because of the infrastructure that is already in place. Here, we describe the catalytic defunctionalization of a series of biomass-derived molecules to provide linear alkanes suitable for use as transportation fuels. These biomass-derived molecules contain a variety of functional groups, including olefins, furan rings and carbonyl groups. We describe the removal of these in either a stepwise process or a one-pot process using common reagents and catalysts under mild reaction conditions to provide n-alkanes in good yields and with high selectivities. Our general synthetic approach is applicable to a range of precursors with different carbon content (chain length). This allows the selective generation of linear alkanes with carbon chain lengths between eight and sixteen carbons. PMID:23609095

  4. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 4, February 19-May 18, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; McMillen, D.F.; Ogier, W.C.; Fleming, R.H.; Hum, G.P.

    1982-06-01

    SRI is conducting a program on the chemistry of the conversion of coal to liquid fuels: Task A deals with mechanisms of donor solvent liquefaction; Task B is a study of the conversion of coal and model compounds in the CO/H/sub 2/O system. In Task A, determination of the products, rates, and mechanisms of central bond scission of diphenyl ether and 1,2-dinaphthylmethane in tetralin, 9,10-dihydroanthracene, and 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene allows us to determine the predominant mechanism of hydrogen transfer to these substrates. Diphenyl ether decomposes in the above three solvents by a radical addition-elimination mechanism, with defined first-order rate constants of approx. 1 x 10/sup -7/, 2 x 10/sup -6/, and 2 x 10/sup -7/ s/sup -1/, respectively. The relative reactivity of the two substrates, the relative reactivity in the three solvents, and the positional preference for hydrogen transfer provide compelling evidence for the previously unreported single-step transfer of hydrogen from a radical to a closed-shell ..pi..-system. Efforts in Task B were concentrated on the conversion of anisole in D/sub 2/O and in tetralin at 400/sup 0/C. Experiments were conducted in two different reactor systems, small glass ampoules and 1/4-in. 316 stainless steel tubes. Benzene and phenol were the major products with the rates of product formation affected by the reaction medium and the reactor walls. The rate of benzene formation was found to be more rapid in D/sub 2/O than tetralin, and somewhat greater in glass ampoules than in stainless steel reactors for 20 min. We also studied the conversion of bibenzyl in D/sub 2/O and in tetralin in stainless steel tubes at 400/sup 0/C. In tetralin, toluene was the major product. In D/sub 2/O, the products were toluene, benzene, diphenylmethane, stilbene, and phenanthrene. A novel hydration scheme is suggested for the reactions of bibenzyl in water.

  5. Defect chemistry and defect engineering of TiO2-based semiconductors for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Alim, Mohammad Abdul; Bak, Tadeusz; Idris, Mohammad Asri; Ionescu, Mihail; Prince, Kathryn; Sahdan, Mohd Zainizan; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Sigmund, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    This tutorial review considers defect chemistry of TiO2 and its solid solutions as well as defect-related properties associated with solar-to-chemical energy conversion, such as Fermi level, bandgap, charge transport and surface active sites. Defect disorder is discussed in terms of defect reactions and the related charge compensation. Defect equilibria are used in derivation of defect diagrams showing the effect of oxygen activity and temperature on the concentration of both ionic and electronic defects. These defect diagrams may be used for imposition of desired semiconducting properties that are needed to maximize the performance of TiO2-based photoelectrodes for the generation of solar hydrogen fuel using photo electrochemical cells (PECs) and photocatalysts for water purification. The performance of the TiO2-based semiconductors is considered in terms of the key performance-related properties (KPPs) that are defect related. It is shown that defect engineering may be applied for optimization of the KPPs in order to achieve optimum performance. PMID:26446476

  6. Developing new synthetic methods for colloidal hybrid nanoparticles: Conversion chemistry and chemoselectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Matthew

    Colloidal hybrid nanoparticles contain multiple domains, and through their solidsolid interfaces, can facilitate synergistic relationships between domains, resulting in the incorporation of multiple functionalities as well as modification of the intrinsic properties of each domain. Although there is a growing number of materials and applications associated with these unique types of particles, new synthetic methods must be investigated in order to realize the full potential of this new class of particles. To address this need, we demonstrate that the concepts used in total synthesis of complex organic molecules, can be applied to the synthesis of colloidal hybrid nanoparticles. Site selective growth, conversion chemistry, condensation chemistry, and protection/deprotection reactions are examined as ways to add complexity to colloidal hybrid nanoparticles. First, we will discuss the synthesis of PtPb-Fe3O4 and Pt3Sn-Fe3O4 heterodimer particles via a solution mediated conversion chemistry process. These types of reactions are known to be useful for nanoparticle systems but had not been explored as a method for adding complexity to colloidal heterodimers. Pt-Fe3O 4 heterodimers react with Pb(acac)2 and Sn(acac)2 at 180-200°C in a mixture of benzyl ether, oleylamine, oleic acid, and tert-butylamine borane to form PtPb-Fe3O4 and Pt3Sn-Fe3O4 heterodimers, respectively. This chemical transformation reaction introduces intermetallic and alloy components into the heterodimers, proceeds with morphological retention, and preserves the solid-solid interface that characterizes these hybrid nanoparticle systems. In addition, the PtPb-Fe3O4 heterodimers spontaneously aggregate to form colloidally stable (PtPb-Fe3O4) n nanoflowers via a process that is conceptually analogous to a molecular condensation reaction. Next, we will discuss the methanol oxidation activity of PtPb-Fe 3O4 and Pt3Sn- Fe3O4 heterodimers as well as examine the role of ligand exchange in this process. Before

  7. Organic Chemistry and the Native Plants of the Sonoran Desert: Conversion of Jojoba Oil to Biodiesel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daconta, Lisa V.; Minger, Timothy; Nedelkova, Valentina; Zikopoulos, John N.

    2015-01-01

    A new, general approach to the organic chemistry laboratory is introduced that is based on learning about organic chemistry techniques and research methods by exploring the natural products found in local native plants. As an example of this approach for the Sonoran desert region, the extraction of jojoba oil and its transesterification to…

  8. More than a Conversation: Using Cogenerative Dialogues in the Professional Development of High School Chemistry Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sonya N.; Scantlebury, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on content-based and pedagogical instructors' use of cogenerative dialogues to improve instructional practice and to evaluate program effectiveness in a professional development program for high school chemistry teachers. We share our research findings from using cogenerative dialogues as an evaluative tool for general…

  9. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, Manoj V.; Bierl, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  10. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOEpatents

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  11. Potential and challenges of zeolite chemistry in the catalytic conversion of biomass.

    PubMed

    Ennaert, Thijs; Van Aelst, Joost; Dijkmans, Jan; De Clercq, Rik; Schutyser, Wouter; Dusselier, Michiel; Verboekend, Danny; Sels, Bert F

    2016-02-01

    Increasing demand for sustainable chemicals and fuels has pushed academia and industry to search for alternative feedstocks replacing crude oil in traditional refineries. As a result, an immense academic attention has focused on the valorisation of biomass (components) and derived intermediates to generate valuable platform chemicals and fuels. Zeolite catalysis plays a distinct role in many of these biomass conversion routes. This contribution emphasizes the progress and potential in zeolite catalysed biomass conversions and relates these to concepts established in existing petrochemical processes. The application of zeolites, equipped with a variety of active sites, in Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, or multifunctional catalysed reactions is discussed and generalised to provide a comprehensive overview. In addition, the feedstock shift from crude oil to biomass involves new challenges in developing fields, like mesoporosity and pore interconnectivity of zeolites and stability of zeolites in liquid phase. Finally, the future challenges and perspectives of zeolites in the processing of biomass conversion are discussed. PMID:26691750

  12. Exploratory study of coal conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, September 20, 1979-December 19, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-03-05

    The objective of this task is to determine the mechanism of cleavage of key bond types in coal under nominal donor solvent coal conversion conditions. This is to be done by using selected model compounds as well as coals themselves under conditions comparable to those used in current donor solvent liquefaction processes. The specific model compounds have been chosen because i) they represent linkages and heteratom functionalities that are important in coals and ii) because their reported conversion rates are substantially greater than can be accounted for by the traditionally invoked free radical mechanism. Initially, we are focusing on a particular class of model compounds: hydroxylated diphenylmethanes. This class of compounds is important for two reasons: first, because the linkage and ring substituents are common in bituminous coals, and second, because it has been reported by Collins et al. that substitution of an -OH group on diphenylmethane makes the rate of conversion of hydroxy-diphenylmethanes to toluene and phenol (in Tetralin at 400/sup 0/C) roughly as fast as that of bibenzyl. The phenyl-CH/sub 2/ bond strength of hydroxyl diphenylmethane is at least 15 kcal/mole greater than the central bond in bibenzyl. Thus, if hydroxydiphenylmethane underwent conversion in tetralin by homolytic bond scission, its conversion at 400/sup 0/C would be slower by almost five orders of magnitude. In this report we discuss a possible mechanism that could account for this rapid conversion. Simple homolytic cleavage of the indicated bond in an intermediate would be fast, since it is at least 20 kcal/mole weaker than the central bond in bibenzyl.

  13. Catalytic, mild, and selective oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes: current challenges.

    PubMed

    Bordeaux, Mélanie; Galarneau, Anne; Drone, Jullien

    2012-10-22

    Selective catalysts for sustainable oxidation of alkanes are highly demanded because of the abundance of these molecules in the environment, the possibility to transform them into higher-value compounds, such as chemicals or synthetic fuels, and the fact that, kinetically speaking, this is a difficult reaction. Numerous chemical and biological catalysts have been developed in the lasts decades for this purpose, rendering the overview over this field of chemistry difficult. After giving a definition of the ideal catalyst for alkane oxyfunctionalization, this review aims to present the catalysts available today that are closest to ideal. PMID:22996726

  14. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 6, August 19, 1982-November 18, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; McMillen, D.F.; Fleming, R.H.; Hum, G.P.; Mansani, R.; Green, T.K.

    1982-01-01

    Initial experiments combining compound-class (HPLC) separation of coal liquefaction products and field ionization mass spectrometric (FIMS) analysis of the various fractions to obtain improved correlations between donor-solvent structure and coal-conversion effectiveness have been performed. These experiments have used a very low-fluidity bituminous coal (PSOC-1116, Sunnyside, Utah) and tetralin and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline (THQ) as donor solvents. Apart from indicating ways in which the chromatography procedure needs to be adjusted to achieve better separation on the basis of functional groups (compound-class separation), FIMS analysis of the various fractions has allowed us to conclude that the observed THQ incorporation (a 100%) is comprised less than 2% physical or hydrogen bonded incorporation, less than 30% by self-polymerization reactions of THQ, and at least 70% by covalent incorporation of the entire THQ molecule into coal structures. This incorporation apparently takes place by way of electrophilic substitution on coal structures, notwithstanding THQ's obvious nucleophilic properties. The conversion of bibenzyl in D/sub 2/O/CO systems at 400/sup 0/C was also studied. The experiments were conducted in stainless steel tubes. The products of the conversion of neat bibenzyl were in accord with previously reported chemistry, with toluene and stilbene the major products. D/sub 2/O had no effect on the product distributions. The addition of CO in the system reduced the amount of stilbene observed, and under basic conditions, stilbene was observed only as a minor product. The disappearance of stilbene paralleled the water-gas shift reaction. It is suggested that molecular hydrogen reacts with thermally produced benzyl radicals to give toluene and/or that stilbene is hydrogenated to give bibenzyl. The implications of this reaction in the conversion of coals in the CO/D/sub 2/O system are briefly discussed.

  15. High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2011-03-01

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

  16. Internal conversion and intersystem crossing pathways in UV excited, isolated uracils and their implications in prebiotic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Jose A; Pollum, Marvin; Crespo-Hernández, Carlos E; Mai, Sebastian; Marquetand, Philipp; González, Leticia; Ullrich, Susanne

    2016-07-27

    The photodynamic properties of molecules determine their ability to survive in harsh radiation environments. As such, the photostability of heterocyclic aromatic compounds to electromagnetic radiation is expected to have been one of the selection pressures influencing the prebiotic chemistry on early Earth. In the present study, the gas-phase photodynamics of uracil, 5-methyluracil (thymine) and 2-thiouracil-three heterocyclic compounds thought to be present during this era-are assessed in the context of their recently proposed intersystem crossing pathways that compete with internal conversion to the ground state. Specifically, time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements evidence femtosecond to picosecond timescales for relaxation of the singlet (1)ππ* and (1)nπ* states as well as for intersystem crossing to the triplet manifold. Trapping in the excited triplet state and intersystem crossing back to the ground state are investigated as potential factors contributing to the susceptibility of these molecules to ultraviolet photodamage. PMID:27189184

  17. Superacid Catalyzed Coal Conversion Chemistry. 1st and 2nd Quarterly Technical Progress Reports, September 1, 1983-March 30, 1984.

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Olah, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    In our laboratories we have previously developed a mild coal conversion process. This involves the use of a superacid system consisting of HF and BF{sub 3} in presence of hydrogen and/or a hydrogen donor solvent. In order to understand the chemistry involved in the process of depolymerization of coal by the HF:BF{sub 3}:H{sub 2} system we are carrying out a systematic study of a number of coal model compounds. The model compounds selected for present study have two benzene rings connected with various bridging units such as alkylidene, ether, sulfide etc. From studies so far carried out it appears that high pyridine extractibilities achieved by treating coal at temperature below 100 degrees C results from the cleavage of bridges such as present in bibenzyl, diphenyl methane, dibenzyl ether, dibenzyl sulfide etc. On the other hand the increased cyclohexane extractibility and distillability observed at relatively higher temperatures and hydrogen pressures reflects the hydrogenation and cleavage of the aromatic backbone in coal structure similar to what is seen in the conversion of model compounds such as biphenyl, diphenyl ether, diphenyl sulfide, anthracene, etc.

  18. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of aluminum-copper systems: Air-formed films to complex conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    Understanding the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by carcinogenic chromates is critical to the development of environmentally safe coatings containing benign chromate substitutes. An integrated approach to correlate the surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of a wide range of systems has been undertaken. Electrochemical behavior was studied by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Surface chemistry was studied using variable-angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VAXPS), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron infrared micro spectroscopy (SIRMS) and Raman spectroscopy. Using SIRMS, the ASTM recommended acetone degreasing was shown to initiate pitting of AA2024-T3 via photochemical formation of acetic acid. Due to the known tendency for photoreduction of Cr6+(3d0) following soft X-ray dosage during XPS, a novel method has been developed to prevent this reduction. This method yields, for the first time, an accurate determination of the Cr6+ content of a CCC. The pretreatment of the alloy prior to conversion coating has been shown to have significant influence on the surface intermetallic distribution, composition and corrosion resistance of the initial oxide film and subsequent conversion coating. AlconoxRTM pretreatment was found to result in a highly protective surface film that inhibits the subsequent formation of CCC. The study also shows that coupling of the alloy to platinum during the bromate pretreatment increases the corrosion resistance of the subsequently formed CCC by over an order of magnitude due to reduction in surface copper content. Adsorption of chromate ion on the passive oxide film formed on the metal surface was observed to induce fixed negative charges that inhibit chloride ingress on planar surfaces. While deprotonation of the aluminum hydroxide film by chromate was

  19. Liquid-liquid interfaces of semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers with water, alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Perahia, Dvora, Dr.; Pierce, Flint; Tsige, Mesfin; Grest, Gary Stephen, Dr.

    2008-08-01

    The liquid-liquid interface between semifluorinated alkane diblock copolymers of the form F3C(CF2)n-1-(CH2)m-1CH3 and water, protonated alkanes, and perfluorinated alkanes are studied by fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. A modified version of the OPLS-AA (Optimized Parameter for Liquid Simulation All-Atom) force field of Jorgensen et al. has been used to study the interfacial behavior of semifluorinated diblocks. Aqueous interfaces are found to be sharp, with correspondingly large values of the interfacial tension. Due to the reduced hydrophobicity of the protonated block compared to the fluorinated block, hydrogen enhancement is observed at the interface. Water dipoles in the interfacial region are found to be oriented nearly parallel to the liquid-liquid interface. A number of protonated alkanes and perfluorinated alkanes are found to be mutually miscible with the semifluorinated diblocks. For these liquids, interdiffusion follows the expected Fickian behavior, and concentration-dependent diffusivities are determined.

  20. Integrated process for preparing a carboxylic acid from an alkane

    DOEpatents

    Benderly, Abraham; Chadda, Nitin; Sevon, Douglass

    2011-12-20

    The present invention relates to an integrated process for producing unsaturated carboxylic acids from the corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane. The process begins with performance of thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions which convert a C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkane to its corresponding C.sub.2-C.sub.4 alkene, and which involve exothermically converting a portion of an alkane to its corresponding alkene by oxidative dehydrogenation in an exothermic reaction zone, in the presence of oxygen and a suitable catalyst, and then feeding the products of the exothermic reaction zone to an endothermic reaction zone wherein at least a portion of the remaining unconverted alkane is endothermically dehydrogenated to form an additional quantity of the same corresponding alkene, in the presence of carbon dioxide and an other suitable catalyst. The alkene products of the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions are then provided to a catalytic vapor phase partial oxidation process for conversion of the alkene to the corresponding unsaturated carboxylic acid or nitrile. Unreacted alkene and carbon dioxide are recovered from the oxidation product stream and recycled back to the thermally integrated dehydrogenation reactions.

  1. Modular and selective biosynthesis of gasoline-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Micah J; Kunjapur, Aditya M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2016-01-01

    Typical renewable liquid fuel alternatives to gasoline are not entirely compatible with current infrastructure. We have engineered Escherichia coli to selectively produce alkanes found in gasoline (propane, butane, pentane, heptane, and nonane) from renewable substrates such as glucose or glycerol. Our modular pathway framework achieves carbon-chain extension by two different mechanisms. A fatty acid synthesis route is used to generate longer chains heptane and nonane, while a more energy efficient alternative, reverse-β-oxidation, is used for synthesis of propane, butane, and pentane. We demonstrate that both upstream (thiolase) and intermediate (thioesterase) reactions can act as control points for chain-length specificity. Specific free fatty acids are subsequently converted to alkanes using a broad-specificity carboxylic acid reductase and a cyanobacterial aldehyde decarbonylase (AD). The selectivity obtained by different module pairings provides a foundation for tuning alkane product distribution for desired fuel properties. Alternate ADs that have greater activity on shorter substrates improve observed alkane titer. However, even in an engineered host strain that significantly reduces endogenous conversion of aldehyde intermediates to alcohol byproducts, AD activity is observed to be limiting for all chain lengths. Given these insights, we discuss guiding principles for pathway selection and potential opportunities for pathway improvement. PMID:26556131

  2. Secondary organic aerosol composition from C12 alkanes.

    PubMed

    Schilling Fahnestock, Katherine A; Yee, Lindsay D; Loza, Christine L; Coggon, Matthew M; Schwantes, Rebecca; Zhang, Xuan; Dalleska, Nathan F; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-05-14

    The effects of structure, NOx conditions, relative humidity, and aerosol acidity on the chemical composition of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are reported for the photooxidation of three C12 alkanes: n-dodecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane. Acidity was modified through seed particle composition: NaCl, (NH4)2SO4, and (NH4)2SO4 + H2SO4. Off-line analysis of SOA was carried out by solvent extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry. We report here 750 individual masses of SOA products identified from these three alkane systems and 324 isomers resolved by GC/MS analysis. The chemical compositions for each alkane system provide compelling evidence of particle-phase chemistry, including reactions leading to oligomer formation. Major oligomeric species for alkane SOA are peroxyhemiacetals, hemiacetals, esters, and aldol condensation products. Furans, dihydrofurans, hydroxycarbonyls, and their corresponding imine analogues are important participants in these oligomer-producing reactions. Imines are formed in the particle phase from the reaction of the ammonium sulfate seed aerosol with carbonyl-bearing compounds present in all the SOA systems. Under high-NO conditions, organonitrate products can lead to an increase of aerosol volume concentration by up to a factor of 5 over that in low-NO conditions. Structure was found to play a key role in determining the degree of functionalization and fragmentation of the parent alkane, influencing the mean molecular weight of the SOA produced and the mean atomic O:C ratio. PMID:24814371

  3. Photocatalytic acceptorless alkane dehydrogenation: scope, mechanism, and conquering deactivation with carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Julis, Jennifer; Grabow, Kathleen; Hannebauer, Bernd; Bentrup, Ursula; Adam, Martin; Franke, Robert; Jackstell, Ralf; Beller, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Alkane dehydrogenation is of special interest for basic science but also offers interesting opportunities for industry. The existing dehydrogenation methodologies make use of heterogeneous catalysts, which suffer from harsh reaction conditions and a lack of selectivity, whereas homogeneous methodologies rely mostly on unsolicited waste generation from hydrogen acceptors. Conversely, acceptorless photochemical alkane dehydrogenation in the presence of trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl can be regarded as a more benign and atom efficient alternative. However, this methodology suffers from catalyst deactivation over time. Herein, we provide a detailed investigation of the trans-Rh(PMe3 )2 (CO)Cl-photocatalyzed alkane dehydrogenation using spectroscopic and theoretical investigations. These studies inspired us to utilize CO2 to prevent catalyst deactivation, which leads eventually to improved catalyst turnover numbers in the dehydrogenation of alkanes that include liquid organic hydrogen carriers. PMID:25346450

  4. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Han

    2011-09-30

    This project was undertaken in response to the Department of Energy's call to research and develop technologies 'that will reduce energy consumption, enhance economic competitiveness, and reduce environmental impacts of the domestic chemical industry.' The current technology at the time for producing 140 billion pounds per year of propylene from naphtha and Liquified Petroleum Gas (LPG) relied on energy- and capital-intensive steam crackers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) units. The propylene is isolated from the product stream in a costly separation step and subsequently converted to acrylic acid and other derivatives in separate production facilities. This project proposed a Short Contact Time Reactor (SCTR)-based catalytic oxydehydrogenation process that could convert propane to propylene and acrylic acid in a cost-effective and energy-efficient fashion. Full implementation of this technology could lead to sizeable energy, economic and environmental benefits for the U. S. chemical industry by providing up to 45 trillion BTUs/year, cost savings of $1.8 billion/year and a combined 35 million pounds/year reduction in environmental pollutants such as COx, NOx, and SOx. Midway through the project term, the program directive changed, which approval from the DOE and its review panel, from direct propane oxidation to acrylic acid at millisecond contact times to a two-step process for making acrylic acid from propane. The first step was the primary focus, namely the conversion of propane to propylene in high yields assisted by the presence of CO2. The product stream from step one was then to be fed directly into a commercially practiced propylene-to-acrylic acid tandem reactor system.

  5. Alkane biohydroxylation: Interests, constraints and future developments.

    PubMed

    Soussan, Laurence; Pen, Nakry; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Marcano, José Sanchez; Paolucci-Jeanjean, Delphine

    2016-03-20

    Alkanes constitute one of the vastest reserves of raw materials for the production of fine chemicals. This paper focuses on recent advances in alkane biohydroxylation, i.e. the bioactivation of alkanes into their corresponding alcohols. Enzyme and whole-cell biocatalysts have been reviewed. Process considerations to implement such biocatalysts in bioreactors at large scale by coupling the bioconversion with cofactor regeneration and product removal are also discussed. PMID:26853477

  6. Modeling SOA production from the oxidation of intermediate volatility alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapour pressure. This process was investigated using the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Results for the C8-C24 n-alkane series show the expected trends, i.e. (i) SOA yield grows with the carbon backbone of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yields decreases with the decreasing pre-existing organic aerosol concentration, (iii) the number of generations required to describe SOA production increases when the pre-existing organic aerosol concentration decreases. Most SOA contributors were found to be not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA). Branched alkanes are more prone to fragment in the early stage of the oxidation than their corresponding linear analogues. Fragmentation is expected to alter both the yield and the mean oxidation state of the SOA. Here, GECKO-A is applied to generate highly detailed oxidation schemes for various series of branched and cyclised alkanes. Branching and cyclisation effects on SOA yields and oxidation states will be examined.

  7. Oxidation Products of Semi-volatile Alkanes by Hydroxyl Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Worton, D. R.; Nah, T.; Goldstein, A. H.; Wilson, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Alkanes are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and are important components that influence atmospheric chemistry. Semi-volatile alkanes are partitioned between the gas- and the particle-phases and can be readily oxidized in both phases. Previous studies have demonstrated that reaction rates and the products of OH oxidation are very different for organic compounds in the gas- and particle phases. In the present study, n-octadecane (C18H38), n-eicosane (C20H42), n-docosane (C22H46), n-tricosane (C24H50), and n-pentadecylcyclohexane (C21H42) were chosen as model compounds for semi-volatile alkanes to examine their OH-initiated oxidation reactions in a flow tube reactor. OH exposure was varied in the experiments, equivalent to oxidation of up to one week in the atmosphere. Oxidation products were collected on filters and analyzed using two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to a high-resolution time-of-flight electron impact ionization and vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer. Most of the oxygenated higher molecular weight isomers were separated and quantified. Our results suggest that aerosol samples formed in the n-octadecane experiment were more oxidized than the other model compounds (i.e., functionalization products with three oxygen atoms per molecule compared to two oxygen atoms per molecule) at similar OH exposures and aerosol mass loadings. This is likely due to the concentration of n-octadecane in the gas phase where oxidation is more rapid. We find that the first-generation gas-phase oxidation products quickly partition to the particle phase after which higher-generation oxidation likely occurs in the particle phase. Interestingly, functionalized carbonyl isomers for the normal alkanes were only observed on the 4 carbon positions closest to the molecule end in all cases, which is in contrast to structure-reactivity relationship (SRR) predictions for gas-phase reactions. For n-octadecane, the concentrations of first-generation functionalization

  8. Gas-phase reactions of the bare Th2+ and U2+ ions with small alkanes, CH4, C2H6, and C3H8: experimental and theoretical study of elementary organoactinide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Di Santo, Emanuela; Santos, Marta; Michelini, Maria C; Marçalo, Joaquim; Russo, Nino; Gibson, John K

    2011-02-16

    The gas-phase reactions of two dipositive actinide ions, Th(2+) and U(2+), with CH(4), C(2)H(6), and C(3)H(8) were studied by both experiment and theory. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to study the bimolecular ion-molecule reactions; the potential energy profiles (PEPs) for the reactions, both observed and nonobserved, were computed by density functional theory (DFT). The experiments revealed that Th(2+) reacts with all three alkanes, including CH(4) to produce ThCH(2)(2+), whereas U(2+) reacts with C(2)H(6) and C(3)H(8), with different product distributions than for Th(2+). The comparative reactivities of Th(2+) and U(2+) toward CH(4) are well explained by the computed PEPs. The PEPs for the reactions with C(2)H(6) effectively rationalize the observed reaction products, ThC(2)H(2)(2+) and UC(2)H(4)(2+). For C(3)H(8) several reaction products were experimentally observed; these and additional potential reaction pathways were computed. The DFT results for the reactions with C(3)H(8) are consistent with the observed reactions and the different products observed for Th(2+) and U(2+); however, several exothermic products which emerge from energetically favorable PEPs were not experimentally observed. The comparison between experiment and theory reveals that DFT can effectively exclude unfavorable reaction pathways, due to energetic barriers and/or endothermic products, and can predict energetic differences in similar reaction pathways for different ions. However, and not surprisingly, a simple evaluation of the PEP features is insufficient to reliably exclude energetically favorable pathways. The computed PEPs, which all proceed by insertion, were used to evaluate the relationship between the energetics of the bare Th(2+) and U(2+) ions and the energies for C-H and C-C activation. It was found that the computed energetics for insertion are entirely consistent with the empirical model which relates insertion efficiency to the

  9. Reaction pathway for alkane dehydrocyclization

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Buchang; Davis, B.H.

    1996-08-01

    Naphtha reforming to produce high octane gasoline is an important process. Many reaction mechanisms are involved in this process. For example, the study of the fundamentals of this process led to the concept of bi- or poly-functional catalysis. The results of this study provide additional mechanistic information about the dehydrocyclization of an n-alkane to produce aromatics. The reaction coordinate diagram advanced to account for the observation of irreversible adsorption should be modified to account for the present results. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Alkane-Based Urethane Potting Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    New low viscosity urethanes easily mixed, molded, and outgassed. Alkane-based urethanes resist hydrolysis and oxidation and have excellent dielectric properties. Low-viscosity alkane-based urethane prepolymer prepared by one-step reaction of either isophorone diisocyanate or methyl-bis (4-cyclohexyl isocyanate) with hydrogenated, hydroxy-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD).

  11. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, December 20, 1979-March 19, 1980. [Ortho and para-hydroxydiphenylmethanes

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, Donald F.; Ogier, Walter C.; Ross, David S.; Nguyen, Quyen Cu

    1980-06-18

    This report describes work accomplished under two tasks: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond Types Present in Coals and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, the mechanism of the anomalously rapid donor solvent conversion of ortho- and para-hydroxydiphenylmethanes to phenol and toluene has been shown to involve an ionically established enol-keto equilibrium followed by rate limiting homolytic scission of the weakly bonded keto form. Consistent with a rate-limiting second step, the overall conversion rate is not subject to catalysis of acids, bases, or radical initiators, substances which could increase the rate at which the tautomeric pre-equilibrium is achieved. The rate of conversion, however, is markedly enhanced by the addition of iron oxides, with the mixed oxide Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ being roughly ten times more active than Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/. Addition of crushed fused silica was also found to significantly enhance the conversion rates. Under Task B, the conversion of coal to 50% benzene soluble coal products in CO/H/sub 2/O systems displays a striking dependence on the pH of the starting aqueous phase (measured at room temperature). Thus below a starting pH of 12.6, the product benzene solubility is about 10% and steeply climbs to the 50% level under more basic conditions. The operation of the water-gas shift reaction parallels the conversion, with CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/ formed as product gases and CO consumed in the basic systems where conversion is effective. Hydrogen used in place of CO is ineffective. In a test of the intermediacy of formate in the system the use of potassium formate with nitrogen as the charge gas was similarly ineffective. Formate thus cannot be an intermediate in the conversion. The use of Mo(VI) (as molybdate) was effective, and a pH dependence on its operation was also observed.

  12. A Conversion of Methyl Ketones into Acetylenes: A Project for a Problem-Oriented or Microscale Organic Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silveira, Augustine, Jr.; Orlando, Steven C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a process for producing terminal or internal alkynes from ketones. Recommends using the experiment to aid in understanding acid-base strength, enolate anion chemistry, reaction at carbon versus oxygen, use of polar aprotic solvents, and elimination and nucleophilic substitution reactions. (ML)

  13. Dielectric barrier discharges used for the conversion of greenhouse gases: modeling the plasma chemistry by fluid simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bie, Christophe; Martens, Tom; van Dijk, Jan; Paulussen, Sabine; Verheyde, Bert; Corthals, Steven; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2011-04-01

    The conversion of methane to value-added chemicals and fuels is considered to be one of the challenges of the 21st century. In this paper we study, by means of fluid modeling, the conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons or oxygenates by partial oxidation with CO2 or O2 in a dielectric barrier discharge. Sixty-nine different plasma species (electrons, ions, molecules, radicals) are included in the model, as well as a comprehensive set of chemical reactions. The calculation results presented in this paper include the conversion of the reactants and the yields of the reaction products as a function of residence time in the reactor, for different gas mixing ratios. Syngas (i.e. H2 + CO) and higher hydrocarbons (C2Hx) are typically found to be important reaction products.

  14. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 9, March 20, 1980-June 19, 1980. [Hydroxydiphenylmethane, diphenylether, diphenymethane

    SciTech Connect

    McMillen, Donald F.; Ogier, Walter C.

    1980-11-19

    This report describes work accomplished under two tasks: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond Types Present in Coals, and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, the very effective catalysis of carbon-carbon bond cleavage by iron oxides in hydroxydiphenylmethane structures has been further characterized. An electron-transfer mechanism offers the most likely explanation of the observations that (1) alumina and silica-alumina surfaces are less active catalysts than Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/, (2) meta-hydroxydiphenylmethane is almost as subject to catalysis as para-hydroxydiphenylmethane, (3) diphenyl ether is less subject to Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ catalysis than diphenylmethane, and (4) ortho-methoxydiphenylmethane exhibits the same susceptibility to Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ catalysis as ortho-hydroxydiphenylmethane. Under Task B, this quarter we have completed the survey of possible metal catalysts present in the Hastelloy C autoclave. We have found that coal conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O systems is effective when metal oxides such as MoO/sub 4//sup =/, Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7//sup =/, and MnO/sub 4//sup -/ are used as catalysts, but there is less or no coal conversion with FeCl/sub 3/ or Ni(CH/sub 3/COO)/sub 2/. While studying the fate of the catalyst after the reaction, we have isolated formate in the water-soluble fraction. This important information could help us in studying the role of formate in coal conversion. During this quarter, we have also studied the influence of reaction time and fresh CO on coal conversion in the presence of a catalyst. A striking result of 67% of benzene-soluble materials was obtained with an equivalent of 6000 ppM of Cr as sodium dichromate.

  15. Chemical analog-to-digital signal conversion based on robust threshold chemistry and its evaluation in the context of microfluidics-based quantitative assays.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Toan; Sun, Bing; Li, Liang; Nichols, Kevin P; Koyner, Jay L; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we describe a nonlinear threshold chemistry based on enzymatic inhibition and demonstrate how it can be coupled with microfluidics to convert a chemical concentration (analog input) into patterns of ON or OFF reaction outcomes (chemical digital readout). Quantification of small changes in concentration is needed in a number of assays, such as that for cystatin C, where a 1.5-fold increase in concentration may indicate the presence of acute kidney injury or progression of chronic kidney disease. We developed an analog-to-digital chemical signal conversion that gives visual readout and applied it to an assay for cystatin C as a model target. The threshold chemistry is based on enzymatic inhibition and gives sharper responses with tighter inhibition. The chemistry described here uses acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and produces an unambiguous color change when the input is above a predetermined threshold concentration. An input gives a pattern of ON/OFF responses when subjected to a monotonic sequence of threshold concentrations, revealing the input concentration at the point of transition from OFF to ON outcomes. We demonstrated that this threshold chemistry can detect a 1.30-fold increase in concentration at 22 °C and that it is robust to experimental fluctuations: it provided the same output despite changes in temperature (22-34 °C) and readout time (10-fold range). We applied this threshold chemistry to diagnostics by coupling it with a traditional sandwich immunoassay for serum cystatin C. Because one quantitative measurement comprises several assays, each with its own threshold concentration, we used a microfluidic SlipChip device to process 12 assays in parallel, detecting a 1.5-fold increase (from 0.64 (49 nM) to 0.96 mg/L (74 nM)) of cystatin C in serum. We also demonstrated applicability to analysis of patient serum samples and the ability to image results using a cell phone camera. This work indicates that combining developments in nonlinear

  16. The anaerobic degradation of gaseous, nonmethane alkanes — From in situ processes to microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Musat, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The short chain, gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, n- and iso-butane are released in significant amounts into the atmosphere, where they contribute to tropospheric chemistry and ozone formation. Biodegradation of gaseous alkanes by aerobic microorganisms, mostly bacteria and fungi isolated from terrestrial environments, has been known for several decades. The first indications for short chain alkane anaerobic degradation were provided by geochemical studies of deep-sea environments around hydrocarbon seeps, and included the uncoupling of the sulfate-reduction and anaerobic oxidation of methane rates, the consumption of gaseous alkanes in anoxic sediments, or the enrichment in 13C of gases in interstitial water vs. the source gas. Microorganisms able to degrade gaseous alkanes were recently obtained from deep-sea and terrestrial sediments around hydrocarbon seeps. Up to date, only sulfate-reducing pure or enriched cultures with ethane, propane and n-butane have been reported. The only pure culture presently available, strain BuS5, is affiliated to the Desulfosarcina–Desulfococcus cluster of the Deltaproteobacteria. Other phylotypes involved in gaseous alkane degradation have been identified based on stable-isotope labeling and whole-cell hybridization. Under anoxic conditions, propane and n-butane are activated similar to the higher alkanes, by homolytic cleavage of the C—H bond of a subterminal carbon atom, and addition of the ensuing radical to fumarate, yielding methylalkylsuccinates. An additional mechanism of activation at the terminal carbon atoms was demonstrated for propane, which could in principle be employed also for the activation of ethane. PMID:25904994

  17. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  18. Direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woody biomass into liquid alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Qineng; Chen, Zongjia; Shao, Yi; Gong, Xueqing; Wang, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaohui; Parker, Stewart F.; Han, Xue; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2016-01-01

    Being the only sustainable source of organic carbon, biomass is playing an ever-increasingly important role in our energy landscape. The conversion of renewable lignocellulosic biomass into liquid fuels is particularly attractive but extremely challenging due to the inertness and complexity of lignocellulose. Here we describe the direct hydrodeoxygenation of raw woods into liquid alkanes with mass yields up to 28.1 wt% over a multifunctional Pt/NbOPO4 catalyst in cyclohexane. The superior performance of this catalyst allows simultaneous conversion of cellulose, hemicellulose and, more significantly, lignin fractions in the wood sawdust into hexane, pentane and alkylcyclohexanes, respectively. Investigation on the molecular mechanism reveals that a synergistic effect between Pt, NbOx species and acidic sites promotes this highly efficient hydrodeoxygenation of bulk lignocellulose. No chemical pretreatment of the raw woody biomass or separation is required for this one-pot process, which opens a general and energy-efficient route for converting raw lignocellulose into valuable alkanes. PMID:27025898

  19. Catalytic dehydroaromatization of n-alkanes by pincer-ligated iridium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Ritu; Punji, Benudhar; Findlater, Michael; Supplee, Carolyn; Schinski, William; Brookhart, Maurice; Goldman, Alan S.

    2011-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most important building blocks in the chemical industry. Benzene, toluene and xylenes are obtained from the high temperature thermolysis of alkanes. Higher alkylaromatics are generally derived from arene-olefin coupling, which gives branched products—that is, secondary alkyl arenes—with olefins higher than ethylene. The dehydrogenation of acyclic alkanes to give alkylaromatics can be achieved using heterogeneous catalysts at high temperatures, but with low yields and low selectivity. We present here the first catalytic conversion of n-alkanes to alkylaromatics using homogeneous or molecular catalysts—specifically ‘pincer’-ligated iridium complexes—and olefinic hydrogen acceptors. For example, the reaction of n-octane affords up to 86% yield of aromatic product, primarily o-xylene and secondarily ethylbenzene. In the case of n-decane and n-dodecane, the resulting alkylarenes are exclusively unbranched (that is, n-alkyl-substituted), with selectivity for the corresponding o-(n-alkyl)toluene.

  20. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    DOEpatents

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  1. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report, June 20, 1980-September 19, 1980. [Diphenylmethane, diphenyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-04

    This report describes work accomplished under two task: Task A, Mechanism of Cleavage of Key Bond types Present in Coals, and Task B, Catalysis of Conversion in CO-H/sub 2/O Systems. Under Task A, we have made additional measurements of catalytic carbon-carbon and carbon-oxygen bond cleavage in coal-related diphenylmethane and diphenyl ether structures. The results provide further support for, but do not definitely confirm, the tentative conclusion that the highly effective iron oxide catalysts involves oxidation to radical cation species. The homogeneous scission of carbon-oxygen bonds in diphenyl ether structure has also been studied. In the Task B studies of CO-H/sub 2/O systems, we typically obtain 50% benzene-soluble product material from 20 min. reaction of beneficiated Illinois No. 6 coal. This conversion level is obtained with aqueous solutions either at a starting pH above 12.6 or in neutral solutions with water-soluble catalysts present. We have studied a number of catalysts, including the potassium or sodium salts of molybdate, chromate, manganate, and tungstate; all are effective in the 3000 to 6000 ppM range. A striking result is that sodium nitrate at 6000 ppM is as effective as the metal salts. We found that the nitrate was converted to ammonium ion; also, formate was detected in the product aqueous phase. Finally, we find that catalytic quantities of sodium formate in CO/H/sub 2/O at pH 7 are effective in the conversion. However, in a control run in N/sub 2//H/sub 2/O, with a quantity of sodium formate equivalent to twice the molar quantity of hydrogen transferred to the coal in a successful run, the coal was converted to a product totally insoluble in benzene and with a lower hydrogen content than the starting coal.

  2. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion.

    PubMed

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H; MacDonnell, Frederick M

    2016-03-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180-200 °C) and pressures (1-6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical-thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  3. Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion

    PubMed Central

    Chanmanee, Wilaiwan; Islam, Mohammad Fakrul; Dennis, Brian H.; MacDonnell, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    A one-step, gas-phase photothermocatalytic process for the synthesis of hydrocarbons, including liquid alkanes, aromatics, and oxygenates, with carbon numbers (Cn) up to C13, from CO2 and water is demonstrated in a flow photoreactor operating at elevated temperatures (180–200 °C) and pressures (1–6 bar) using a 5% cobalt on TiO2 catalyst and under UV irradiation. A parametric study of temperature, pressure, and partial pressure ratio revealed that temperatures in excess of 160 °C are needed to obtain the higher Cn products in quantity and that the product distribution shifts toward higher Cn products with increasing pressure. In the best run so far, over 13% by mass of the products were C5+ hydrocarbons and some of these, i.e., octane, are drop-in replacements for existing liquid hydrocarbons fuels. Dioxygen was detected in yields ranging between 64% and 150%. In principle, this tandem photochemical–thermochemical process, fitted with a photocatalyst better matched to the solar spectrum, could provide a cheap and direct method to produce liquid hydrocarbons from CO2 and water via a solar process which uses concentrated sunlight for both photochemical excitation to generate high-energy intermediates and heat to drive important thermochemical carbon-chain-forming reactions. PMID:26903631

  4. Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

    1995-07-01

    The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

  5. Exploratory study of coal conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 2, August 19, 1981-November 18, 1981. [Hydroxydipnenylmethanes, triphenylmethane, diphenylether

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-29

    This report describes work accomplished under two tasks: Task A, mechanisms of donor-solvent coal liquefaction, and Task B, CO/H/sub 2/O conversion systems. Under Task A, we describe additional evidence relating to the question of the mechanism of the iron oxide catalyzed cleavage of hydroxydiphenylmethanes. o-Hydroxydiphenylmethane is relatively more sensitive to catalysis by Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/, a possible one electron oxidant, and triphenylmethane is relatively more sensitive to catalyzed cleavage by SiO/sub 2//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, a strong Bronsted acid catalyst. This provides further evidence that in the former case the reactions of radical cations are important in the cleavage mechanism. Tests with Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/ show it to be ineffective under our reaction conditions as a catalyst for hydroxydiphenylmethane cleavage. We have also used the decomposition of diphenylether in tetralin, which we have previously shown to occur by a radical displacement reaction, as an indicator of steady state radical concentration in tetralin. The results of these experiments indicate that radical concentrations in tetralin are not significantly increased by spiking the tetralin with 1,2-dihydronaphthalene. This in turn suggests that rapid disproportionation of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene to tetralin and naphthalene takes place by way of a concerted reaction, in addition to a slower radical disproportionation process that may provide the steady state radical concentration supported by the equilibrium concentration of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene. Under Task B1, we have found a correlation between initial pH and CO pressure on the conversion of PSOC-26 coal to toluene soluble products. A pH dependence was also observed for PSOC-233 coal, similar to results with PSOC-26. Under Task B2, we have studied anisole as a model oxygen containing structure in coal.

  6. Structural insights into diversity and n-alkane biodegradation mechanisms of alkane hydroxylases

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yurui; Mao, Guannan; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Environmental microbes utilize four degradation pathways for the oxidation of n-alkanes. Although the enzymes degrading n-alkanes in different microbes may vary, enzymes functioning in the first step in the aerobic degradation of alkanes all belong to the alkane hydroxylases. Alkane hydroxylases are a class of enzymes that insert oxygen atoms derived from molecular oxygen into different sites of the alkane terminus (or termini) depending on the type of enzymes. In this review, we summarize the different types of alkane hydroxylases, their degrading steps, and compare typical enzymes from various classes with regard to their three-dimensional structures, in order to provide insights into how the enzymes mediate their different roles in the degradation of n-alkanes and what determines their different substrate ranges. Through the above analyzes, the degrading mechanisms of enzymes can be elucidated and molecular biological methods can be utilized to expand their catalytic roles in the petrochemical industry or in bioremediation of oil-contaminated environments. PMID:23519435

  7. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 5, May 19, 1982-August 18, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; McMillen, D.F.; Ogier, W.C.; Fleming, R.H.; Hum, G.P.

    1982-10-01

    Initial runs of coal liquefaction products through the automatically switched, multicolumn, solvent-extraction/high-pressure liquid chromatography systems have been performed. This separation was followed by field ionization mass spectrometric analysis of the volatile portions of each of the separated fractions. The separation scheme is described, and results of one of the initial separations are summarized. The FIMS spectrum of one of the fractions (lower molecular weight nitrogen heterocycles) is presented and the types of information available from this less-than-ideal case (i.e., broad HPLC fraction) are discussed in the context of the objective of this subtask. We studied the thermolysis of bibenzyl in D/sub 2/O at 400/sup 0/C. The major products were toluene and stilbene. Minor products were benzene, ethylbenzene, styrene, diphenylmethane, and phenanthrene. The recovered bibenzyl and products contained significant quantities of deuterium. From the degree of deuterium incorporation, a statistical determination for a simple series of consecutive exchange reactions was derived. The reaction scheme involves an initial slow homolysis of the starting bibenzyl to yield benzyl radical, which, in turn, reacts with D/sub 2/O to form OD. OD then rapidly reacts with bibenzyl to yield bibenzyl radical, and the formed bibenzyl radical abstracts deuterium from the medium to form products. The chemistry suggested here demonstrates that water can act as an H-donor because it readily transfers hydrogen to organic free radicals. We further suggest that water can generate hydrogen atoms if CO is present.

  8. Role of precursor chemistry in the direct fluorination to form titanium based conversion anodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adcock, Jamie; Dai, Sheng; Veith, Gabriel M.; Bridges, Craig A.; Powell, Jonathan M.

    2015-10-13

    In this study, a new synthetic route for the formation of titanium oxydifluoride (TiOF2) through the process of direct fluorination via a fluidized bed reactor system and the associated electrochemical properties of the powders formed from this approach are reported. The flexibility of this synthetic route was demonstrated using precursor powders of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, as well as a reduced TiOxNy. An advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to directly control the extent of fluorination as a function of reaction temperature and time. The reversible capacity of TiOF2 anodes was found to depend greatly upon the precursormore » employed. The TiOF2 synthesized from TiO2 and TiOxNy showed reversible capacities of 300 mAh g-1 and 440 mAh g-1, respectively, over 100 cycles. The higher reversible capacity of the TiOF2 powders derived from TiOxNy likely relate to the partial reduction of the Ti in the fluorinated electrode material, highlighting a route to optimize the properties of conversion electrode materials.« less

  9. Role of precursor chemistry in the direct fluorination to form titanium based conversion anodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Adcock, Jamie; Dai, Sheng; Veith, Gabriel M.; Bridges, Craig A.; Powell, Jonathan M.

    2015-10-13

    In this study, a new synthetic route for the formation of titanium oxydifluoride (TiOF2) through the process of direct fluorination via a fluidized bed reactor system and the associated electrochemical properties of the powders formed from this approach are reported. The flexibility of this synthetic route was demonstrated using precursor powders of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, as well as a reduced TiOxNy. An advantage of this synthetic method is the ability to directly control the extent of fluorination as a function of reaction temperature and time. The reversible capacity of TiOF2 anodes was found to depend greatly upon the precursor employed. The TiOF2 synthesized from TiO2 and TiOxNy showed reversible capacities of 300 mAh g-1 and 440 mAh g-1, respectively, over 100 cycles. The higher reversible capacity of the TiOF2 powders derived from TiOxNy likely relate to the partial reduction of the Ti in the fluorinated electrode material, highlighting a route to optimize the properties of conversion electrode materials.

  10. Enzymes and genes involved in aerobic alkane degradation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes are major constituents of crude oil. They are also present at low concentrations in diverse non-contaminated because many living organisms produce them as chemo-attractants or as protecting agents against water loss. Alkane degradation is a widespread phenomenon in nature. The numerous microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic, capable of utilizing alkanes as a carbon and energy source, have been isolated and characterized. This review summarizes the current knowledge of how bacteria metabolize alkanes aerobically, with a particular emphasis on the oxidation of long-chain alkanes, including factors that are responsible for chemotaxis to alkanes, transport across cell membrane of alkanes, the regulation of alkane degradation gene and initial oxidation. PMID:23755043

  11. Cool-flame Extinction During N-Alkane Droplet Combustion in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent droplet combustion experiments onboard the International Space Station (ISS) have revealed that large n-alkane droplets can continue to burn quasi-steadily following radiative extinction in a low-temperature regime, characterized by negative-temperaturecoefficient (NTC) chemistry. In this study we report experimental observations of n-heptane, n-octane, and n-decane droplets of varying initial sizes burning in oxygen/nitrogen/carbon dioxide and oxygen/helium/nitrogen environments at 1.0, 0.7, and 0.5 atmospheric pressures. The oxygen concentration in these tests varied in the range of 14% to 25% by volume. Large n-alkane droplets exhibited quasi-steady low-temperature burning and extinction following radiative extinction of the visible flame while smaller droplets burned to completion or disruptively extinguished. A vapor-cloud formed in most cases slightly prior to or following the "cool flame" extinction. Results for droplet burning rates in both the hot-flame and cool-flame regimes as well as droplet extinction diameters at the end of each stage are presented. Time histories of radiant emission from the droplet captured using broadband radiometers are also presented. Remarkably the "cool flame" extinction diameters for all the three n-alkanes follow a trend reminiscent of the ignition delay times observed in previous studies. The similarities and differences among the n-alkanes during "cool flame" combustion are discussed using simplified theoretical models of the phenomenon

  12. Modeling the influence of alkane molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Aumont, Bernard; Camredon, Marie; Mouchel-Vallon, Camille; La, Stéphanie; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) emitted to the atmosphere are expected to be a substantial source of SOA. These emitted IVOC constitute a complex mixture including linear, branched and cyclic alkanes. The explicit gas-phase oxidation mechanisms are here generated for various linear and branched C10-C22 alkanes using the GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) and SOA formation is investigated for various homologous series. Simulation results show that both the size and the branching of the carbon skeleton are dominant factors driving the SOA yield. However, branching appears to be of secondary importance for the particle oxidation state and composition. The effect of alkane molecular structure on SOA yields appears to be consistent with recent laboratory observations. The simulated SOA composition shows, however, an unexpected major contribution from multifunctional organic nitrates. Most SOA contributors simulated for the oxidation of the various homologous series are far too reduced to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). On a carbon basis, the OOA yields never exceeded 10% regardless of carbon chain length, molecular structure or ageing time. This version of the model appears clearly unable to explain a large production of OOA from alkane precursors. PMID:24600999

  13. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering. PMID:25971893

  14. In situ detection of anaerobic alkane metabolites in subsurface environments

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akhil; Gieg, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Alkanes comprise a substantial fraction of crude oil and refined fuels. As such, they are prevalent within deep subsurface fossil fuel deposits and in shallow subsurface environments such as aquifers that are contaminated with hydrocarbons. These environments are typically anaerobic, and host diverse microbial communities that can potentially use alkanes as substrates. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation has been reported to occur under nitrate-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Elucidating the pathways of anaerobic alkane metabolism has been of interest in order to understand how microbes can be used to remediate contaminated sites. Alkane activation primarily occurs by addition to fumarate, yielding alkylsuccinates, unique anaerobic metabolites that can be used to indicate in situ anaerobic alkane metabolism. These metabolites have been detected in hydrocarbon-contaminated shallow aquifers, offering strong evidence for intrinsic anaerobic bioremediation. Recently, studies have also revealed that alkylsuccinates are present in oil and coal seam production waters, indicating that anaerobic microbial communities can utilize alkanes in these deeper subsurface environments. In many crude oil reservoirs, the in situ anaerobic metabolism of hydrocarbons such as alkanes may be contributing to modern-day detrimental effects such as oilfield souring, or may lead to more beneficial technologies such as enhanced energy recovery from mature oilfields. In this review, we briefly describe the key metabolic pathways for anaerobic alkane (including n-alkanes, isoalkanes, and cyclic alkanes) metabolism and highlight several field reports wherein alkylsuccinates have provided evidence for anaerobic in situ alkane metabolism in shallow and deep subsurface environments. PMID:23761789

  15. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10163 - Chloro fluoro alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). 721... Substances § 721.10163 Chloro fluoro alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as chloro fluoro alkane (PMN...

  17. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  18. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1994-01-01

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  19. Reflectance spectroscopy of organic compounds: 1. Alkanes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Curchin, J.M.; Hoefen, T.M.; Swayze, G.A.

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectra of the organic compounds comprising the alkane series are presented from the ultraviolet to midinfrared, 0.35 to 15.5 /??m. Alkanes are hydrocarbon molecules containing only single carbon-carbon bonds, and are found naturally on the Earth and in the atmospheres of the giant planets and Saturn's moon, Titan. This paper presents the spectral properties of the alkanes as the first in a series of papers to build a spectral database of organic compounds for use in remote sensing studies. Applications range from mapping the environment on the Earth, to the search for organic molecules and life in the solar system and throughout the. universe. We show that the spectral reflectance properties of organic compounds are rich, with major diagnostic spectral features throughout the spectral range studied. Little to no spectral change was observed as a function of temperature and only small shifts and changes in the width of absorption bands were observed between liquids and solids, making remote detection of spectral properties throughout the solar system simpler. Some high molecular weight organic compounds contain single-bonded carbon chains and have spectra similar to alkanes even ' when they fall into other families. Small spectral differences are often present allowing discrimination among some compounds, further illustrating the need to catalog spectral properties for accurate remote sensing identification with spectroscopy.

  20. Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1994-01-18

    Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  1. Modeling of Alkane Oxidation Using Constituents and Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Jasette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    2010-01-01

    It is currently not possible to perform simulations of turbulent reactive flows due in particular to complex chemistry, which may contain thousands of reactions and hundreds of species. This complex chemistry results in additional differential equations, making the numerical solution of the equation set computationally prohibitive. Reducing the chemical kinetics mathematical description is one of several important goals in turbulent reactive flow modeling. A chemical kinetics reduction model is proposed for alkane oxidation in air that is based on a parallel methodology to that used in turbulence modeling in the context of the Large Eddy Simulation. The objective of kinetic modeling is to predict the heat release and temperature evolution. This kinetic mechanism is valid over a pressure range from atmospheric to 60 bar, temperatures from 600 K to 2,500 K, and equivalence ratios from 0.125 to 8. This range encompasses diesel, HCCI, and gas-turbine engines, including cold ignition. A computationally efficient kinetic reduction has been proposed for alkanes that has been illustrated for n-heptane using the LLNL heptane mechanism. This model is consistent with turbulence modeling in that scales were first categorized into either those modeled or those computed as progress variables. Species were identified as being either light or heavy. The heavy species were decomposed into defined 13 constituents, and their total molar density was shown to evolve in a quasi-steady manner. The light species behave either in a quasi-steady or unsteady manner. The modeled scales are the total constituent molar density, Nc, and the molar density of the quasi-steady light species. The progress variables are the total constituent molar density rate evolution and the molar densities of the unsteady light species. The unsteady equations for the light species contain contributions of the type gain/loss rates from the heavy species that are modeled consistent with the developed mathematical

  2. Comprehensive chemical kinetic modeling of the oxidation of C8 and larger n-alkanes and 2-methylalkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Togbe, C; Dagaut, P; Wang, H; Oehlschlaeger, M; NIemann, U; Seshadri, K; Veloo, P S; Ji, C; Egolfopoulos, F; Lu, T

    2011-03-16

    Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for singly methylated iso-alkanes (i.e., 2-methylalkanes) ranging from C{sub 8} to C{sub 20}. The mechanism also includes an updated version of our previously published C{sub 8} to C{sub 16} n-alkanes model. The complete detailed mechanism contains approximately 7,200 species 31,400 reactions. The proposed model is validated against new experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices including premixed and nonpremixed flames, perfectly stirred reactors and shock tubes. This new model is used to show how the presence of a methyl branch affects important combustion properties such as laminar flame propagation, ignition, and species formation.

  3. Application of the homogeneous oxidation of alkanes: Synthesis and characterization of metal complexes of a linked aryloxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Benjamin Willis Franklin

    Methane is the main component of natural gas, largely left behind due to cost of transportation. There are vast stores of natural gas outweighing the known reserves of liquid petroleum. A chemical process by which methane can be transformed into a usable transportable product is very important. The selective transformation of methane into a transportable product, such as methanol or formaldehyde, would be a large step forward in utilizing a vast resource. Research on transforming methane selectively has been met with several obstacles based on poor conversion and selectivity. Several methods exist for transforming methane to methanol or formaldehyde through heterogeneous metal catalyzed oxidation. Currently, these metal catalyzed processes are energy intensive and result in low conversion and selectivity. Methanol, the desired product, tends to react preferentially. In many cases, methanol is transformed to another product at a fast rate before recovery. This work describes new techniques for preventing the over oxidation using a homogeneous catalyst system under mild temperature conditions and employing solvents that react with methanol. The solvent effectively removes methanol in a reversible process protecting it from further oxidation. The selective oxidation of higher weight alkanes, such as propane and butane, is also discussed where unusual primary carbon selectivity is observed. The transition metal atoms, tantalum and niobium, have received attention for the interesting chemical reactions, such as metathesis and living polymerization, that they are known to mediate. Aryloxide complexes of these metals undergo unusual chemical transformations especially in the presence of bulky ligand substituents. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of tantalum and niobium complexes of a linked aryloxide ligand. The metal complexes of this ligand are unusual and this dissertation provides the foundation for important future studies of the complexes of

  4. Density Functional Steric Analysis of Linear and Branched Alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Ess, Daniel H.; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-11-18

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (Ee[[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (Ee[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (Eq[[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes.

  5. Density functional steric analysis of linear and branched alkanes.

    PubMed

    Ess, Daniel H; Liu, Shubin; De Proft, Frank

    2010-12-16

    Branched alkane hydrocarbons are thermodynamically more stable than straight-chain linear alkanes. This thermodynamic stability is also manifest in alkane bond separation energies. To understand the physical differences between branched and linear alkanes, we have utilized a novel density functional theory (DFT) definition of steric energy based on the Weizäcker kinetic energy. Using the M06-2X functional, the total DFT energy was partitioned into a steric energy term (E(s)[ρ]), an electrostatic energy term (E(e)[ρ]), and a fermionic quantum energy term (E(q)[ρ]). This analysis revealed that branched alkanes have less (destabilizing) DFT steric energy than linear alkanes. The lower steric energy of branched alkanes is mitigated by an equal and opposite quantum energy term that contains the Pauli component of the kinetic energy and exchange-correlation energy. Because the steric and quantum energy terms cancel, this leaves the electrostatic energy term that favors alkane branching. Electrostatic effects, combined with correlation energy, explains why branched alkanes are more stable than linear alkanes. PMID:21086970

  6. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, Harold H.; Chaar, Mohamed A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M.sub.3 (VO.sub.4).sub.2 and MV.sub.2 O.sub.6, M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  7. Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Kung, H.H.; Chaar, M.A.

    1988-10-11

    Oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes to unsaturated hydrocarbons is carried out over metal vanadate catalysts under oxidizing conditions. The vanadate catalysts are represented by the formulas M[sub 3](VO[sub 4])[sub 2] and MV[sub 2]O[sub 6], M representing Mg, Zn, Ca, Pb, or Cd. The reaction is carried out in the presence of oxygen, but the formation of oxygenate by-products is suppressed.

  8. Enthalpy difference between conformations of normal alkanes: effects of basis set and chain length on intramolecular basis set superposition error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabin, Roman M.

    2011-03-01

    The quantum chemistry of conformation equilibrium is a field where great accuracy (better than 100 cal mol-1) is needed because the energy difference between molecular conformers rarely exceeds 1000-3000 cal mol-1. The conformation equilibrium of straight-chain (normal) alkanes is of particular interest and importance for modern chemistry. In this paper, an extra error source for high-quality ab initio (first principles) and DFT calculations of the conformation equilibrium of normal alkanes, namely the intramolecular basis set superposition error (BSSE), is discussed. In contrast to out-of-plane vibrations in benzene molecules, diffuse functions on carbon and hydrogen atoms were found to greatly reduce the relative BSSE of n-alkanes. The corrections due to the intramolecular BSSE were found to be almost identical for the MP2, MP4, and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Their cancelation is expected when CCSD(T)/CBS (CBS, complete basis set) energies are evaluated by addition schemes. For larger normal alkanes (N > 12), the magnitude of the BSSE correction was found to be up to three times larger than the relative stability of the conformer; in this case, the basis set superposition error led to a two orders of magnitude difference in conformer abundance. No error cancelation due to the basis set superposition was found. A comparison with amino acid, peptide, and protein data was provided.

  9. Oxidation of Alkyl-substituted Cyclic Hydrocarbons by a Nocardia during Growth on n-Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J. B.; Raymond, R. L.

    1961-01-01

    Nocardia 107-332, a soil isolate, oxidizes short-chain alkyl-substituted cyclic hydrocarbons to cyclic acids while growing on n-alkanes. Cyclic acids are produced also from relatively long-chain alkyl-substituted cyclics such as n-nonylbenzene or n-dodecylbenzene which alone support growth in a mineral-salts medium. ω-Oxidation of the alkyl substituents is followed by β-oxidation. It is of particular interest that cyclic acids such as cyclohexaneacetic and phenylacetic with C2 residual carboxylic acid substituents are resistant to further oxidation by the nocardia but cyclic acids with C1 or C3 substituents are readily oxidized and utilized for growth. The specificity of microbial oxidations is demonstrated by the conversion of p-isopropyltoluene (p-cymene) to p-isopropylbenzoic acid in n-alkane, growth-supported nocardia cultures. PMID:13720182

  10. Chemistry of secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Lindsay Diana

    The photooxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere can lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), a major component of fine particulate matter. Improvements to air quality require insight into the many reactive intermediates that lead to SOA formation, of which only a small fraction have been measured at the molecular level. This thesis describes the chemistry of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from several atmospherically relevant hydrocarbon precursors. Photooxidation experiments of methoxyphenol and phenolic compounds and C12 alkanes were conducted in the Caltech Environmental Chamber. These experiments include the first photooxidation studies of these precursors run under sufficiently low NOx levels, such that RO2 + HO2 chemistry dominates, an important chemical regime in the atmosphere. Using online Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometery (CIMS), key gas-phase intermediates that lead to SOA formation in these systems were identified. With complementary particle-phase analyses, chemical mechanisms elucidating the SOA formation from these compounds are proposed. Three methoxyphenol species (phenol, guaiacol, and syringol) were studied to model potential photooxidation schemes of biomass burning intermediates. SOA yields (ratio of mass of SOA formed to mass of primary organic reacted) exceeding 25% are observed. Aerosol growth is rapid and linear with the organic conversion, consistent with the formation of essentially non-volatile products. Gas and aerosol-phase oxidation products from the guaiacol system show that the chemical mechanism consists of highly oxidized aromatic species in the particle phase. Syringol SOA yields are lower than that of phenol and guaiacol, likely due to unique chemistry dependent on methoxy group position. The photooxidation of several C12 alkanes of varying structure n-dodecane, 2-methylundecane, cyclododecane, and hexylcyclohexane) were run under extended OH exposure to investigate the

  11. Stimulation of Lipase Production During Bacterial Growth on Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Breuil, Colette; Shindler, D. B.; Sijher, J. S.; Kushner, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Acinetobacter lwoffi strain O16, a facultative psychrophile, can grow on crude oil, hexadecane, octadecane, and most alkanes when tested at 20 but not at 30°C. Growth occurred on a few alkanes at 30°C but after a longer lag than at 20°C. Cells grown on alkanes as sole carbon sources had high levels of cell-bound lipase. In contrast, previous work has shown that those grown on complex medium produced cell-free lipase and those grown on defined medium without alkanes produced little or no lipase. Low concentrations of the detergent Triton X-100 caused the liberation of most of the lipase activity of alkane-grown cells and increased total lipase activity. When ethanol and hexadecane were both present in a mineral medium, diauxic growth occurred; until the ethanol was completely used up, hexadecane was not utilized, and the lipase activity was very low. When growth on hexadecane began, lipase activity increased, reaching a level 50- to 100-fold higher than that of cells growing on ethanol. A similar pattern of lipase formation and hexadecane utilization was observed with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Whenever A. lwoffi and other bacteria degraded alkanes they exhibited substantial lipase activity. Not all bacteria that produced lipase, however, could attack alkanes. Bacteria that could not produce lipase did not attack alkanes. The results suggest that a correlation may exist between lipase formation and alkane utilization. PMID:627533

  12. The Conversion of Starch and Sugars into Branched C10 and C11 Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Andrew D; Kim, Jin K; Wu, Ruilian; Hoyt, Caroline B; Kimball, David B; Silks, Louis A; Gordon, John C

    2016-09-01

    Oligosaccharides, such as starch, cellulose, and hemicelluloses, are abundant and easily obtainable bio-derived materials that can potentially be used as precursors for fuels and chemical feedstocks. To access the pertinent molecular building blocks (i.e., 5- or 6-carbon containing sugar units) located within these biopolymers and transform them into useful fuel precursors, oligosaccharide depolymerization followed by chain extension is required. This chain extension can readily be performed via a Garcia-Gonzalez-like approach using β-diketones under mild conditions to provide fuel precursors containing an increased carbon atom content that meets fuel requirements. In a subsequent step, ring opening and hydrodeoxygenation chemistry of these species allows for the preparation of branched alkanes under relatively mild conditions. This approach can be applied to monomeric sugars (glucose and xylose), oligosaccharides (starch), and potentially to hydrolyzed dedicated energy crops to allow the conversion of real biomass into fuel type molecules. PMID:27428812

  13. Conformation of liquid N-alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Goodsaid-Zalduondo, F; Engelman, D M

    1981-01-01

    The conformations of liquid n-alkanes have been studied using neutron scattering techniques to better understand the conformational forces present in membrane lipid interiors. We have studied hydrocarbon chains having lengths comparable to those found for esterified membrane lipid fatty acids, and find that the steric constraints of packing in the liquid state do not change the conformational distributions of hydrocarbon chains from those imposed by the intrachain forces present in the gas phase. It follows that the central region of membranes containing lipids in the disordered state should contain hydrocarbon chain conformations determined primarily by intrachain forces. PMID:7272453

  14. Structural and Kinetic Studies of Novel Cytochrome P450 Small-Alkane Hydroxylases

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-02-27

    The goals of this project are to investigate (1) the kinetics and stabilities of engineered cytochrome P450 (P450) small alkane hydroxylases and their evolutionary intermediates, (2) the structural basis for catalytic proficiency on small alkanes of these engineered P450s, and (3) the changes in redox control resulting from protein engineering. To reach these goals, we have established new methods for determining the kinetics and stabilities of multicomponent P450s such as CYP153A6. Using these, we were able to determine that CYP153A6 is proficient for hydroxylation of alkanes as small as ethane, an activity that has never been observed previously in any natural P450. To elucidate the structures of the engineered P450s, we obtained x-ray diffraction data for two variants in the P450PMO (propane monooxygenase) lineage and a preliminary structure for the most evolved variant. This structure shows changes in the substrate binding regions of the enzyme and a reduction in active site volume that are consistent with the observed changes in substrate specificity from fatty acids in the native enzyme to small alkanes in P450PMO. We also constructed semi-rational designed libraries mutating only residues in the enzyme active site that in one round of mutagenesis and screening produced variants that achieved nearly half of the activity of the most evolved enzymes of the P450PMO lineage. Finally, we found that changes in redox properties of the laboratory-evolved P450 alkane hydroxylases did not reflect the improvement in their electron transfer efficiency. The heme redox potential remained constant throughout evolution, while activity increased and coupling efficiency improved from 10% to 90%. The lack of correlation between heme redox potential and enzyme activity and coupling efficiency led us to search for other enzyme properties that could be better predictors for activity towards small alkanes, specifically methane. We investigated the oxidation potential of the radical

  15. Release of alkanes from sedimentary organic matter via sequential degradation involving catalytic hydropyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Love, G.D.; McAulay, A.; Snape, C.E.

    1996-12-31

    Fixed-bed pyrolysis of petroleum source rocks (type I and II kerogens) and high-volatile coals (type III ketogens) at high hydrogen pressures (> 10 MN, hydropyrolysis) in the presence of a dispersed sulphided molydenum catalyst gives rise to extremely high oil (dichloromethane-soluble) yields (>60%) with overall conversions of the organic matter being greater than 90%. The yields and conformations of the hopanes and steranes released from a selection of petroleum source rocks and coals by sequential dichloromethane and pyridine extraction, catalytic hydrogenation and hydropyrolysis will be presented, together with the influence of hydrogen pressure and heating rate on alkane yields and sterochemistry. The aim of the hydrogenation step (conducted at 300{degrees}C cf. 520{degrees}C for hydropyrolysis) in this sequential degradation scheme is to cleave only the weaker covalent bonds. The findings have demonstrated the unique ability of hydropyrolysis to mainline the yields of covalently-bound alkanes while maintaining the biologically-inherited 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H) stereochemistries of the hopanes, largely intact, even for coals. The total alkane yields from hydropyrolysis represented ca 30% w/w of the organic matter remaining in immature type I kerogens with yields of the C{sub 29}-C{sub 35} 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H) hopanes being much higher than from both normal pyrolysis and the hydrogenation step.

  16. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  17. 40 CFR 721.536 - Halogenated phenyl alkane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.536 Halogenated phenyl alkane. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated phenyl alkane (PMN P-89-867)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.535 - Halogenated alkane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.535 Halogenated alkane (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halogenated alkane (PMN P-01-433) is...

  19. Thomas Reiche Kuhn populations in alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Caputo, M. C.; Ferraro, M. B.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic populations in a molecule have been defined via the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule for oscillator strengths written within the acceleration gauge. These atomic populations are related to nuclear electric shieldings, i.e., to geometrical derivatives of electric dipole moment, and can therefore be connected with observable infrared intensities. A number of relationships can be considered to test a priori the quality of calculated electronic charges and to assess their physical meaning. It is shown via extended numerical tests on the first members of the alkane series that the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn populations are consistent with a (small) polarity C +-H - of carbon-hydrogen bond in methane, for which a bond dipole moment can be exactly defined. Although the idea of bond dipole cannot be extended to the C-H fragments belonging to other alkane molecules in the absence of local C3 v symmetry, the calculations prove that the same electron charge polarization should characterize the whole homologous series.

  20. Alkanes in benthic organisms from the Buccaneer oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.

    1980-06-01

    About 200 g per day of alkanes are present in brine discharged from each of two production platforms in the Buccaneer oil field in the NW Gulf of Mexico. These alkanes disperse rapidly in the water column, so that seawater concentrations of petroleum alkanes in this region are generally very low. They can be taken up to some extent by plankton, fish, and barnacles, but the petroleum alkane concentrations in these organisms are also relatively low. The largest pool of petroleum alkanes is in the surficial sediments, where concentrations of up to 25 ppM are observed, with concentration gradients extending more than 20 m from the production platforms. Organisms are examined which are exposed to these sediments and, for comparison, other specimens from control sites around structures from which there are no discharges.

  1. Utilization of n-Alkanes by Cladosporium resinae

    PubMed Central

    Teh, J. S.; Lee, K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Four different isolates of Cladosporium resinae from Australian soils were tested for their ability to utilize liquid n-alkanes ranging from n-hexane to n-octadecane under standard conditions. The isolates were unable to make use of n-hexane, n-heptane, and n-octane for growth. In fact, these hydrocarbons, particularly n-hexane, exerted an inhibitory effect on spore germination and mycelial growth. All higher n-alkanes from n-nonane to n-octadecane were assimilated by the fungus, although only limited growth occurred on n-nonane and n-decane. The long chain n-alkanes (C14 to C18) supported good growth of all isolates, but there was no obvious correlation between cell yields and chain lengths of these n-alkanes. Variation in growth responses to individual n-alkane among the different isolates was also observed. The cause of this variation is unknown. PMID:4735447

  2. Sophorolipids from Torulopsis bombicola: possible relation to alkane uptake.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, S; Inoue, S

    1982-01-01

    Torulopsis bombicola produces extracellular sophorolipids when it is grown on water-insoluble alkanes. Sophorolipids and related model compounds, which were not themselves used for growth, were found to stimulate markedly the growth of T. bombicola on alkanes. This stimulatory effect was restricted to growth on C10 to C20 alkanes, whereas no significantly influence was observed for growth on fatty alcohols, fatty acids, glucose, or glycerol. The nonionic methyl ester of the glycolipid supported the greatest cell yield. However, a number of synthetic nonionic surfactants were unable to replace the glycolipid. When organisms were grown on hexadecane, stimulation of growth by sophorolipids was observed almost exclusively with strains of Torulopsis yeasts. In contrast, the growth of other typical alkane-utilizing yeasts, such as candida and Pichia strains, was inhibited or not affected. It appears that sophorolipids are involved in alkane dissimilation by T. bombicola through an undetermined mechanism. PMID:7201782

  3. Spectroscopy of the tilde A state of NO-alkane complexes (alkane = methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Gardner, Adrian M.; Harris, Joe P.; McDaniel, Jodie; Wright, Timothy G.

    2012-12-01

    We have recorded (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of complexes formed between NO and the alkanes: CH4, C2H6, C3H8, and n-C4H10. The spectra correspond to the tilde A ← tilde X transition, which is a NO-localized 3s ← 2pπ* transition. In line with previous work, the spectrum for NO-CH4 has well-defined structure, but this is only partially resolved for the other complexes. The spectra recorded in the NO+-alkane mass channels all show a slowly rising onset, followed by a sharp offset, which is associated with dissociation of NO-alkane, from which binding energies in the tilde X and tilde A states are deduced. Beyond this sharp offset, there is a further rise in signal, which is attributed to fragmentation of higher complexes, NO-(alkane)n. Analysis of these features allows binding energies for (NO-alkane) ... alkane to be estimated, and these suggest that in the NO-(alkane)2 complexes, the second alkane molecule is bound to the first, rather than to NO. Calculated structures for the 1:1 complexes are reported, as well as binding energies.

  4. Kinetic study of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Permsukarome, P.; Chang, C.; Fogler, H.S.

    1997-09-01

    The kinetics of dissolution of pentane-insoluble solid asphaltene precipitates by amphiphile/alkane solutions were investigated using a differential reactor flow system. Two amphiphiles, dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid and nonylphenol, and five alkane solvents, ranging from hexane to hexadecane, were used. Results showed that the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids could be approximated with a first-order kinetics with respect to the undissolved asphaltene mass in solution. The specific dissolution rate constant, k, varied with the concentration of amphiphiles, the type of alkane solvents, the temperature, and the fluid flow rate. The rate of asphaltene dissolution displayed a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics with respect to the concentration of amphiphiles. Increasing the temperature of amphiphile/alkane fluids also enhanced the rate of asphaltene dissolution. The apparent activation energy for asphaltene dissolution was approximated to be 4--7 kcal/mol. The rate of asphaltene dissolution was also greater in amphiphile solutions containing lighter alkanes, such as hexane, with lower viscosities. These trends suggest that both surface reaction and mass transfer processes are important to the rate of asphaltene dissolution in amphiphile/alkane fluids.

  5. Long-chain alkane production by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhou, Yongjin J; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-06-01

    In the past decade industrial-scale production of renewable transportation biofuels has been developed as an alternative to fossil fuels, with ethanol as the most prominent biofuel and yeast as the production organism of choice. However, ethanol is a less efficient substitute fuel for heavy-duty and maritime transportation as well as aviation due to its low energy density. Therefore, new types of biofuels, such as alkanes, are being developed that can be used as drop-in fuels and can substitute gasoline, diesel, and kerosene. Here, we describe for the first time the heterologous biosynthesis of long-chain alkanes by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that elimination of the hexadecenal dehydrogenase Hfd1 and expression of a redox system are essential for alkane biosynthesis in yeast. Deletion of HFD1 together with expression of an alkane biosynthesis pathway resulted in the production of the alkanes tridecane, pentadecane, and heptadecane. Our study provides a proof of principle for producing long-chain alkanes in the industrial workhorse S. cerevisiae, which was so far limited to bacteria. We anticipate that these findings will be a key factor for further yeast engineering to enable industrial production of alkane based drop-in biofuels, which can allow the biofuel industry to diversify beyond bioethanol. PMID:25545362

  6. Alkanes-filled photonic crystal fibers as sensor transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marć, P.; Przybysz, N.; Stasiewicz, K.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we propose alkanes-filled PCFs as the new class of transducers for optical fiber sensors. We investigated experimentally thermo-optic properties of a commercially available LMA8 partially filled with different alkanes with a higher number of carbon atoms. A partially filled PCF spliced with standard SMFs constitutes one of the newest type transducer. We have selected a group of eight alkanes which have melting points in different temperatures. An analysis of temperature spectral characteristics of these samples will allow to design an optical fiber sensor with different temperature thresholds at specific wavelengths.

  7. Abnormal carbon and hydrogen isotopes of alkane gases from the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China, suggesting abiogenic alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Quanyou; Dai, Jinxing; Jin, Zhijun; Li, Jian; Wu, Xiaoqi; Meng, Qingqiang; Yang, Chun; Zhou, Qinghua; Feng, Zihui; Zhu, Dongya

    2016-01-01

    It is great debate that the alkane gases of abiogenic origin would constitute a major portion of the commercial accumulation of the Qingshen gas field, Songliao Basin, China. In this study, abiogenic gases characterized by heavy δ13C1 values, reversal of the usual carbon isotopic trend of C1-C5 alkanes, very narrow variation in δ2HC1 values, and low CH4/3He ratios associated with high R/Ra values (>1) were identified. The hydrocarbon gas in the Qingshen gas field is a mixture of thermogenic alkanes derived from Cretaceous mudstone (type I kerogen) or Jurassic coal (type III kerogen) and abiogenic alkanes (mainly CH4) from mantle degassing. A quantitative estimation of abiogenic alkanes contribution to the Qingshen gas field is made based on a δ13C1 vs. δ13C2 plot: about 30-40% of alkane gases in the Qingshen gas field, along with its helium, are estimated to be derived from the mantle via magmatic activity. Particularly, the abiogenic formation of CH4 generated from the reduction of CO2 by hydrothermal activity may contribute. Our study suggests that abiogenic alkane gases in certain geological settings could be more widespread than previously thought, and may accumulate into economic reservoirs.

  8. How large are post-CCSD(T) contributions to the total atomization energies of medium-sized alkanes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karton, Amir

    2016-02-01

    The CCSD(T) method is often considered as the gold standard in quantum chemistry for single-reference systems. Using W4 and W4lite theories, we calculate post-CCSD(T) contributions to the total atomization energies (TAEs) of n-alkanes and show that they reach up to 0.65 kcal/mol for n-hexane. Furthermore, we find that post-CCSD(T) contributions increase linearly with the size of the n-alkane, indicating that they will reach ∼1 kcal/mol for n-decane (C10H22) and ∼2 kcal/mol for n-icosane (C20H42). These results are significant since today CCSD(T)/CBS-type methods are being applied to hydrocarbons of increasing size and are assumed to give TAEs with chemical accuracy for these systems.

  9. Process for converting light alkanes to higher hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Noceti, Richard P.; Taylor, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of aromatic-rich, gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons from the lower alkanes, particularly from methane. The process is carried out in two stages. In the first, alkane is reacted with oxygen and hydrogen chloride over an oxyhydrochlorination catalyst such as copper chloride with minor proportions of potassium chloride and rare earth chloride. This produces an intermediate gaseous mixture containing water and chlorinated alkanes. The chlorinated alkanes are contacted with a crystalline aluminosilicate catalyst in the hydrogen or metal promoted form to produce gasoline range hydrocarbons with a high proportion of aromatics and a small percentage of light hydrocarbons (C.sub.2 -C.sub.4). The light hydrocarbons can be recycled for further processing over the oxyhydrochlorination catalyst.

  10. Pd/NbOPO₄ multifunctional catalyst for the direct production of liquid alkanes from aldol adducts of furans.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qi-Neng; Cuan, Qian; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Gong, Xue-Qing; Lu, Guan-Zhong; Wang, Yan-Qin

    2014-09-01

    Great efforts have been made to convert renewable biomass into transportation fuels. Herein, we report the novel properties of NbO(x)-based catalysts in the hydrodeoxygenation of furan-derived adducts to liquid alkanes. Excellent activity and stability were observed with almost no decrease in octane yield (>90% throughout) in a 256 h time-on-stream test. Experimental and theoretical studies showed that NbO(x) species play the key role in C-O bond cleavage. As a multifunctional catalyst, Pd/NbOPO4 plays three roles in the conversion of aldol adducts into alkanes: 1) The noble metal (in this case Pd) is the active center for hydrogenation; 2) NbO(x) species help to cleave the C-O bond, especially of the tetrahydrofuran ring; and 3) a niobium-based solid acid catalyzes the dehydration, thus enabling the quantitative conversion of furan-derived adducts into alkanes under mild conditions. PMID:25045056

  11. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  12. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  13. Superacid catalyzed coal conversion chemistry. 1st and 2nd quarterly technical progress reports, September 1, 1983-March 30, 1984. [Model compound consisting of 2 benzene rings connected with various bridging units such as alkylidene, ether, sulfide, etc

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    In our laboratories we have previously developed a mild coal conversion process. This involves the use of a superacid system consisting of HF and BF/sub 3/ in presence of hydrogen and/or a hydrogen donor solvent. In order to understand the chemistry involved in the process of depolymerization of coal by the HF:BF/sub 3/:H/sub 2/ system we are carrying out a systematic study of a number of coal model compounds. The model compounds selected for present study have two benzene rings connected with various bridging units such as alkylidene, ether, sulfide etc. From studies so far carried out it appears that high pyridine extractibilities achieved by treating coal at temperature below 100/sup 0/C results from the cleavage of bridges such as present in bibenzyl, diphenyl methane, dibenzyl ether, dibenzyl sulfide etc. On the other hand the increased cyclohexane extractibility and distillability observed at relatively higher temperatures and hydrogen pressures reflects the hydrogenation and cleavage of the aromatic backbone in coal structure similar to what is seen in the conversion of model compounds such as biphenyl, diphenyl ether, diphenyl sulfide, anthracene, etc.

  14. Hydrogen isotopic compositions of n-alkanes from terrestrial plants correlate with their ecological life forms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weiguo; Yang, Hong; Li, Liwu

    2006-11-01

    Stable hydrogen isotopic compositions (deltaD) of compound-specific biomarkers, such as n-alkanes from plant leaf waxes, can be used as a proxy for paleoclimatic change. However, the relationship between hydrogen isotopes of plant leaf wax and plant ecological life forms is not well understood. Here, we report the deltaD of n-alkanes from 34 modern terrestrial plants, including twenty-one C(3) plants and thirteen C(4) plants from northwestern China, determined using gas chromatography/thermal conversion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Our data show that the stable hydrogen isotopes are poorly correlated with the plant photosynthetic pathway (C(3) vs. C(4)) and that they do not give clear regional precipitation signals. Together with a comparative analysis of published deltaD values from plant leaf waxes in other regions, we believe that the stable hydrogen isotope of plant leaf waxes is more closely related to ecological life forms of these terrestrial plants (i.e. tree, shrub, and grass). In general, the grasses have more negative deltaD values than the co-occurring trees and shrubs. Our findings suggest that the deltaD values of sedimentary leaf waxes from higher plants may record changes of a plant ecosystem under the influence of environmental alteration and imply that reconstruction of the paleoclimate using deltaD values from plant n-alkanes should be based upon specific plant taxa, and comparison should be made among plants with similar ecological life forms. PMID:16977462

  15. Exploratory study of coal-conversion chemistry. Quarterly report No. 3, November 19, 1981-February 18, 1982. [Dihydronaphthalene, 1,2'-dinaphthylmethane, methoxynaphthalene diphenyl ether

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, D.S.; McMillen, D.F.; Ogier, W.C.; Bunnell, R.; Hum, G.P.

    1982-03-01

    Work in Task A has provided additional data on the rate and mechanisms of radical-induced cleavage of strong C-C and C-0 bonds in coal structures. This work has shown that even resonance-stabilized radicals, which form relatively weak C-C bonds, can displace other resonance-stabilized radicals from methylene-bridged coal structures. Kinetic studies reveal that either the self-disproportionation of 1,2-dihydronaphthalene is much faster than previously reported or that the 1,2-dihydronaphthalene-tetralin disproportionation is much less important as a radical initiation process than thermochemical estimates had suggested. 1,2'-Dinaphthylmethane undergoes radical-induced CH/sub 2/-Ar bond scission ten times faster than diphenyl ether. This factor is shown to be consistent with the thermochemistry of displacement by tetralyl radical. In Task B we studied CO/H/sub 2/O conversion of a second, high volatile bituminous coal, PSOC-233. We found that, as with PSOC-026, the initial pH did affect the conversion rate, increasing with higher pH. We also conducted experiments with several oxygen-containing model compounds in CO/D/sub 2/O at 400/sup 0/C for 20 min. We had shown earlier in preliminary control experiments that simple aromatics, such as toluene, did not incorporate deuterium under these conditions. This quarter we found that anisole (Ph-O-CH/sub 3/) was converted to several products, with benzene as the most prominent. About 60% of the anisole was recovered in several experiments with mass balances at about 85%. There was a net incorporation of deuterium in the product benzene. The corresponding conversion in tetralin under the same conditions was two orders of magnitude slower and yielded phenol as the major product. We conclude that in the aqueous medium a chain process can occur that yields phenyl radical, which can then receive protium from a starting anisole or deuterium from the mineral medium.

  16. Selective hydroxylation of alkanes by an extracellular fungal peroxygenase.

    PubMed

    Peter, Sebastian; Kinne, Matthias; Wang, Xiaoshi; Ullrich, René; Kayser, Gernot; Groves, John T; Hofrichter, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Fungal peroxygenases are novel extracellular heme-thiolate biocatalysts that are capable of catalyzing the selective monooxygenation of diverse organic compounds, using only H(2)O(2) as a cosubstrate. Little is known about the physiological role or the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. We have found that the peroxygenase secreted by Agrocybe aegerita catalyzes the H(2)O(2)-dependent hydroxylation of linear alkanes at the 2-position and 3-position with high efficiency, as well as the regioselective monooxygenation of branched and cyclic alkanes. Experiments with n-heptane and n-octane showed that the hydroxylation proceeded with complete stereoselectivity for the (R)-enantiomer of the corresponding 3-alcohol. Investigations with a number of model substrates provided information about the route of alkane hydroxylation: (a) the hydroxylation of cyclohexane mediated by H(2)(18)(2) resulted in complete incorporation of (18)O into the hydroxyl group of the product cyclohexanol; (b) the hydroxylation of n-hexane-1,1,1,2,2,3,3-D(7) showed a large intramolecular deuterium isotope effect [(k(H)/k(D))(obs)] of 16.0 ± 1.0 for 2-hexanol and 8.9 ± 0.9 for 3-hexanol; and (c) the hydroxylation of the radical clock norcarane led to an estimated radical lifetime of 9.4 ps and an oxygen rebound rate of 1.06 × 10(11) s(-1). These results point to a hydrogen abstraction and oxygen rebound mechanism for alkane hydroxylation. The peroxygenase appeared to lack activity on long-chain alkanes (> C(16)) and highly branched alkanes (e.g. tetramethylpentane), but otherwise exhibited a broad substrate range. It may accordingly have a role in the bioconversion of natural and anthropogenic alkane-containing structures (including alkyl chains of complex biomaterials) in soils, plant litter, and wood. PMID:21812933

  17. One Instructor's Approach to Computer Assisted Instruction in General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLorenzo, Ronald

    1982-01-01

    Discusses advantages of using computer-assisted instruction in a college general chemistry course. Advantages include using programs which generate random equations with double arrows (equilibrium systems) or generate alkane structural formula, asking for the correct IUPAC name of the structure. (Author/JN)

  18. Variation in n-Alkane Distributions of Modern Plants: Questioning Applications of n-Alkanes in Chemotaxonomy and Paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, R. T.; McInerney, F. A.

    2010-12-01

    Long chain n-alkanes (n-C21 to n-C37) are synthesized as part of the epicuticular leaf wax of terrestrial plants and are among the most recognizable and widely used plant biomarkers. n-Alkane distributions have been utilized in previous studies on modern plant chemotaxonomy, testing whether taxa can be identified based on characteristic n-alkane profiles. Dominant n-alkanes (e.g. n-C27 or n-C31) have also been ascribed to major plant groups (e.g. trees or grasses respectively) and have been used in paleoecology studies to reconstruct fluctuations in plant functional types. However, many of these studies have been based on relatively few modern plant data; with the wealth of modern n-alkane studies, a more comprehensive analysis of n-alkanes in modern plants is now possible and can inform the usefulness of n-alkane distributions as paleoecological indicators. The work presented here is a combination of measurements made using plant leaves collected from the Chicago Botanic Garden and a compilation of published literature data from six continents. We categorized plants by type: angiosperms, gymnosperms, woody plants, forbs, grasses, ferns and pteridophytes, and mosses. We then quantified n-alkane distribution parameters such as carbon preference index (CPI), average chain length (ACL), and dispersion (a measure of the spread of the profile over multiple chain lengths) and used these to compare plant groups. Among all plants, one of the emergent correlations is a decrease in dispersion with increasing CPI. Within and among plant groups, n-alkane distributions show a very large range of variation, and the results show little or no correspondence between broad plant groups and a single dominant n-alkane or a ratio of n-alkanes. These findings are true both when data from six continents are combined and when plants from a given region are compared (North America). We also compared the n-alkane distributions of woody angiosperms, woody gymnosperms, and grasses with one

  19. Metabolism of Hydrocarbons in n-Alkane-Utilizing Anaerobic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Heinz; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Rabus, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The glycyl radical enzyme-catalyzed addition of n-alkanes to fumarate creates a C-C-bond between two concomitantly formed stereogenic carbon centers. The configurations of the two diastereoisomers of the product resulting from n-hexane activation by the n-alkane-utilizing denitrifying bacterium strain HxN1, i.e. (1-methylpentyl)succinate, were assigned as (2S,1'R) and (2R,1'R). Experiments with stereospecifically deuterated n-(2,5-2H2)hexanes revealed that exclusively the pro-S hydrogen atom is abstracted from C2 of the n-alkane by the enzyme and later transferred back to C3 of the alkylsuccinate formed. These results indicate that the alkylsuccinate-forming reaction proceeds with an inversion of configuration at the carbon atom (C2) of the n-alkane forming the new C-C-bond, and thus stereochemically resembles a SN2-type reaction. Therefore, the reaction may occur in a concerted manner, which may avoid the highly energetic hex-2-yl radical as an intermediate. The reaction is associated with a significant primary kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ≥3) for hydrogen, indicating that the homolytic C-H-bond cleavage is involved in the first irreversible step of the reaction mechanism. The (1-methylalkyl)succinate synthases of n-alkane-utilizing anaerobic bacteria apparently have very broad substrate ranges enabling them to activate not only aliphatic but also alkyl-aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, two denitrifiers and one sulfate reducer were shown to convert the nongrowth substrate toluene to benzylsuccinate and further to the dead-end product benzoyl-CoA. For this purpose, however, the modified β-oxidation pathway known from alkylbenzene-utilizing bacteria was not employed, but rather the pathway used for n-alkane degradation involving CoA ligation, carbon skeleton rearrangement and decarboxylation. Furthermore, various n-alkane- and alkylbenzene-utilizing denitrifiers and sulfate reducers were found to be capable of forming benzyl alcohols from diverse alkylbenzenes

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  1. Tropospheric Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohnen, V.

    1984-01-01

    The fundamental processes that control the chemical composition and cycles of the global troposphere and how these processes and properties affect the physical behavior of the atmosphere are examined. The long-term information needs for tropospheric chemistry are: to be able to predict tropospheric responses to perturbations, both natural and anthropogenic, of these cycles, and to provide the information required for the maintenance and effective future management of the atmospheric component of our global life support system. The processes controlling global tropospheric biogeochemical cycles include: the input of trace species into the troposphere, their long-range transport and distribution as affected by the mean wind and vertical venting, their chemical transformations, including gas to particle conversion, leading to the appearance of aerosols or aqueous phase reactions inside cloud droplets, and their removal from the troposphere via wet (precipitation) and dry deposition.

  2. Diffusion of Benzene and Alkylbenzenes in n-Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Register, Paul M

    2015-10-01

    The translational diffusion constants, D, of benzene and a series of alkylbenzenes have been determined in four n-alkanes at room temperature using capillary flow techniques. The alkylbenzenes are toluene, ethylbenzene, 1-phenylpropane, 1-phenylpentane, 1-phenyloctane, 1-phenylundecane, 1-phenyltetradecane, and 1-phenylheptadecane. The n-alkanes are n-nonane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane. Ratios of the solutes' D values are independent of solvent and in general agreement with the predictions of diffusion models for cylinders and lollipops. For the latter, an alkylbenzene's phenyl ring is the lollipop's candy; the alkyl chain is its handle. A model that considers the solutes to be spheres with volumes determined by the van der Waals increments of their constituent atoms is not in agreement with experiment. The diffusion constants of 1-alkene and n-alkane solutes in n-alkane solvents also are compared with the cylinder model; reasonably good agreement is found. The n-alkanes are relatively extended, and this appears to be the case for the alkyl chains of the 1-alkenes and alkylbenzenes as well. PMID:26417941

  3. Alkane inducible proteins in Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Initial step of β-oxidation is catalyzed by acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in prokaryotes and mitochondria, while acyl-CoA oxidase primarily functions in the peroxisomes of eukaryotes. Oxidase reaction accompanies emission of toxic by-product reactive oxygen molecules including superoxide anion, and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities are essential to detoxify them in the peroxisomes. Although there is an argument about whether primitive life was born and evolved under high temperature conditions, thermophilic archaea apparently share living systems with both bacteria and eukaryotes. We hypothesized that alkane degradation pathways in thermophilic microorganisms could be premature and useful to understand their evolution. Results An extremely thermophilic and alkane degrading Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23 was previously isolated from a deep subsurface oil reservoir in Japan. In the present study, we identified novel membrane proteins (P16, P21) and superoxide dismutase (P24) whose production levels were significantly increased upon alkane degradation. Unlike other bacteria acyl-CoA oxidase and catalase activities were also increased in strain B23 by addition of alkane. Conclusion We first suggested that peroxisomal β-oxidation system exists in bacteria. This eukaryotic-type alkane degradation pathway in thermophilic bacterial cells might be a vestige of primitive living cell systems that had evolved into eukaryotes. PMID:19320977

  4. One-step hydrotreatment of vegetable oil to produce high quality diesel-range alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congxin; Tian, Zhijian; Wang, Lei; Xu, Renshun; Liu, Qianhe; Qu, Wei; Ma, Huaijun; Wang, Bingchun

    2012-10-01

    A one-step hydrotreatment of vegetable oil combining deoxygenation and isomerization to directly produce low cloud point, high quality diesel is devised. The Pt/zeolite bifunctional catalysts prepared by using SAPO-11 and ZSM-22 zeolites as supports are used in this process. Catalytic reactions are conducted in a fixed-bed reactor under a hydrogen atmosphere. Over the bifunctional catalyst, 100 % conversion of soybean oil is obtained at 357 °C, 4 MPa, and 1 h(-1), and 80 % organic liquid yield is achieved, which is close to the maximum theoretical liquid yield. In the organic products, the alkanes selectivity is 100 % with an i-alkanes selectivity above 63 %. NH(3)-temperature programmed desorption (TPD), pyridine IR spectroscopy, and other characterization techniques are used to study the effect of the support acidity on the reaction pathway. Over the Pt/zeolite bifunctional catalyst with less strong Lewis acid sites, the reaction proceeds via the decarboxylation plus decarbonylation pathway. This one-step method provides a new strategy to produce low cloud point, high quality diesel from biomass feedstock in a more economic and attractive way. PMID:22764086

  5. Structure, Energetics, and Dynamics of Screw Dislocations in Even n-Alkane Crystals.

    PubMed

    Olson, Isabel A; Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Hakobyan, Gagik; Rohl, Andrew L; Raiteri, Paolo; Ward, Michael D; Kahr, Bart

    2016-08-18

    Spiral hillocks on n-alkane crystal surfaces were observed immediately after Frank recognized the importance of screw dislocations for crystal growth, yet their structures and energies in molecular crystals remain ill-defined. To illustrate the structural chemistry of screw dislocations that are responsible for plasticity in organic crystals and upon which the organic electronics and pharmaceutical industries depend, molecular dynamics was used to examine heterochiral dislocation pairs with Burgers vectors along [001] in n-hexane, n-octane, and n-decane crystals. The cores were anisotropic and elongated in the (110) slip plane, with significant local changes in molecular position, orientation, conformation, and energy. This detailed atomic level picture produced a distribution of strain consistent with linear elastic theory, giving confidence in the simulations. Dislocations with doubled Burgers vectors split into pairs with elementary displacements. These results suggest a pathway to understanding the mechanical properties and failure associated with elastic and plastic deformation in soft crystals. PMID:27478906

  6. Alkanes in shrimp from the Buccaneer Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Middleditch, B.S.; Basile, B.; Chang, E.S.

    1982-07-01

    A total of 36 samples of shrimp were examined from the region of the Buccaneer oil field, eighteen of which were representatives of the commercial species Penaeus aztecus and the rest were various other species: Penaeus duorarum (pink shrimp), Trachypenaeus duorarum (sugar shrimp), Squilla empusa (mantis shrimp), and Sicyonia dorsalis (chevron shrimp). The alkanes and deuteriated alkanes were completely separated by GC, so a mass spectrometer was not required for their detection and quantitation. To confirm the identities of individual compounds, however, some samples were examined by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results show that only thirteen of the forty shrimp collected from the region of the Buccaneer oil field contained petroleum alkanes, and the majority of these were obtained from trawls immediately adjacent to the production platforms. It appears that shrimp caught in the region of the Buccaneer oil field are not appreciably tainted with hydrocarbons discharged from the production platforms. (JMT)

  7. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Amy V.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) via “reverse methanogenesis” and is catalyzed by a homolog of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and SRB, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, “intra-aerobic” pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appear to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase). Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an “intra-aerobic” denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ PMID:23717304

  8. Oxaloacetate-to-malate conversion by mineral photoelectrochemistry: implications for the viability of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Martin, Scot T.

    2008-10-01

    The carboxylic acids produced by the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle are possibly a biosynthetic core of initial life, although several steps such as the reductive kinetics of oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate (MA) are problematic by conventional chemical routes. In this context, we studied the kinetics of this reaction as promoted by ZnS mineral photoelectrochemistry. The quantum efficiency φMA of MA production from the photoelectrochemical reduction of OAA followed φMA=0.13 [OAA] (2.1×10-3+[OAA])-1 and was independent of temperature (5 to 50°C). To evaluate the importance of this forward rate under a prebiotic scenario, we also studied the temperature-dependent rate of the backward thermal decarboxylation of OAA to pyruvate (PA), which followed an Arrhenius behavior as log (k-2)=11.74 4956/T, where k-2 is in units of s-1. These measured rates were employed in conjunction with the indirectly estimated carboxylation rate of PA to OAA to assess the possible importance of mineral photoelectrochemistry in the conversion of OAA to MA under several scenarios of prebiotic conditions on early Earth. As an example, our analysis shows that there is 90% efficiency with a forward velocity of 3 yr/cycle for the OAA→MA step of the rTCA cycle at 280 K. Efficiency and velocity both decrease for increasing temperature. These results suggest high viability for mineral photoelectrochemistry as an enzyme-free engine to drive the rTCA cycle through the early aeons of early Earth, at least for the investigated OAA→MA step.

  9. Nitrogen Oxide Atom-Transfer Redox Chemistry; Mechanism of NO(g) to Nitrite Conversion Utilizing μ-oxo Heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) Constructs.

    PubMed

    Hematian, Shabnam; Kenkel, Isabell; Shubina, Tatyana E; Dürr, Maximilian; Liu, Jeffrey J; Siegler, Maxime A; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-05-27

    While nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen monoxide) is a critically important signaling agent, its cellular concentrations must be tightly controlled, generally through its oxidative conversion to nitrite (NO2(-)) where it is held in reserve to be reconverted as needed. In part, this reaction is mediated by the binuclear heme a3/CuB active site of cytochrome c oxidase. In this report, the oxidation of NO(g) to nitrite is shown to occur efficiently in new synthetic μ-oxo heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) constructs (L being a tridentate or tetradentate pyridyl/alkylamino ligand), and spectroscopic and kinetic investigations provide detailed mechanistic insights. Two new X-ray structures of μ-oxo complexes have been determined and compared to literature analogs. All μ-oxo complexes react with 2 mol equiv NO(g) to give 1:1 mixtures of discrete [(L)Cu(II)(NO2(-))](+) plus ferrous heme-nitrosyl compounds; when the first NO(g) equiv reduces the heme center and itself is oxidized to nitrite, the second equiv of NO(g) traps the ferrous heme thus formed. For one μ-oxo heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) compound, the reaction with NO(g) reveals an intermediate species ("intermediate"), formally a bis-NO adduct, [(NO)(porphyrinate)Fe(II)-(NO2(-))-Cu(II)(L)](+) (λmax = 433 nm), confirmed by cryo-spray ionization mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy, along with the observation that cooling a 1:1 mixture of [(L)Cu(II)(NO2(-))](+) and heme-Fe(II)(NO) to -125 °C leads to association and generation of the key 433 nm UV-vis feature. Kinetic-thermodynamic parameters obtained from low-temperature stopped-flow measurements are in excellent agreement with DFT calculations carried out which describe the sequential addition of NO(g) to the μ-oxo complex. PMID:25974136

  10. BIODEGRADATION AND GAS-EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS ALKANES IN MODEL ESTUARINE ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas exchange-biodegradation experiments conducted in model estuarine ecosystems indicate that the ease of degradation of gaseious normal alkanes increases with chain length. The behavior of gaseous perhalogenated alkanes can be explained by gas exchange alone with no degradation....

  11. A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics study of the rheology of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.A.; Cui, S.T.; Cummings, P.T.; Cochran, H.D. |

    1996-05-01

    We examine the rheological properties of four different alkanes: n-decane, n-hexadecane, n-tetracosane, and squalane. Simulations of Couette flow are performed for a range of shear rates with 100 molecules in each case using a replicated data version of our code. Number of interaction sites ranges from 1000 to 3000. We have performed extremely long simulations required to obtain acceptable statistics at low shear rates. The alkanes show a transition from non-Newtonian to Newtonian behavior as the shear rate decreases to low values. 1 tab, 1 fig, 17 refs.

  12. Modeling of alkane emissions from a wood stain

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, J.C.S.; Guo, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a function of time after the application of the wood stain. It was found that the test house concentrations can be simulated by an integrated IAQ model which takes into consideration source, sink, and ventilation effects. The alkane emissions were controlled by an evaporation-like process.

  13. Assimilation of chlorinated alkanes by hydrocarbon-utilizing fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.L.; Perry, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    The fatty acid compositions of two filamentous fungi (Cunninghamella elegans and Penicillium zonatum) and a yeast (Candida lipolytica) were determined after the organisms were grown on 1-chlorohexadecane or 1-chlorooctadecane. These organisms utilized the chlorinated alkanes as sole sources of carbon and energy. Analyses of the fatty acids present after growth on the chlorinated alkanes indicated that 60 to 70% of the total fatty acids in C. elegans were chlorinated. Approximately 50% of the fatty acids in C. lipolytica were also chlorinated. P. zonatum contained 20% 1-chlorohexadecanoic acid after growth on either substrate but did not incorporate C/sub 18/ chlorinated fatty acids.

  14. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  15. Iron-phthalocyanine immobilized on activated carbon black: A selective catalyst for alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Parton, R.F.; Neys, P.E.; Jacobs, P.A.

    1996-12-01

    Carbon black is tested as a support for iron-phthalocyanine within the frame of the oxidation of hydrocarbons with t-butyl-hydroperoxide as oxygen donor. The increased hydrophobicity of the carrier surface, with respect to zeolite Y, changes the adsorption behavior of the components in the reaction mixture towards the alkane. A major improvement in the oxidation conversion and efficiency of cyclohexane has been established. Furthermore, the kinetic isotope effect and the reactivity order of secondary and tertiary carbon atoms measured with adamantane provide evidence for an {open_quotes}oxygen rebound{close_quotes} reaction mechanism, a non-free-radical oxidation pathway where the metallo-complex is responsible for the hydrogen abstraction. 40 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Nitrogen Oxide Atom-Transfer Redox Chemistry; Mechanism of NO(g) to Nitrite Conversion Utilizing µ-oxo Heme-FeIII−O−CuII(L) Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Shabnam; Kenkel, Isabell; Shubina, Tatyana E.; Dürr, Maximilian; Liu, Jeffrey J.; Siegler, Maxime A.; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    While nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen monoxide) is a critically important signaling agent, its cellular concentrations must be tightly controlled, generally through its oxidative conversion to nitrite (NO2−) where it is held in reserve to be reconverted as needed. In part, this reaction is mediated by the binuclear heme a3/CuB active site of cytochrome c oxidase. In this report, the oxidation of NO(g) to nitrite is shown to occur efficiently in new synthetic µ-oxo heme-FeIII−O−CuII(L) constructs (L being a tridentate or tetradentate pyridyl/alkylamino ligand), and spectroscopic and kinetic investigations provide detailed mechanistic insights. Two new X-ray structures of µ-oxo complexes have been determined and compared to literature analogs. All µ-oxo complexes react with 2 mol equiv NO(g) to give 1:1 mixtures of discrete [(L)CuII(NO2−)]+ plus ferrous heme-nitrosyl compounds; when the first NO(g) equiv reduces the heme center and itself is oxidized to nitrite, the second equiv of NO(g) traps the ferrous heme thus formed. For one µ-oxo heme-FeIII−O−CuII(L) compound, the reaction with NO(g) reveals an intermediate species (“intermediate”), formally a bis-NO adduct, [(NO)(porphyrinate)FeII-(NO2−)−CuII(L)]+ (λmax = 433 nm), confirmed by cryo-spray ionization mass spectrometry and EPR spectroscopy, along with the observation that cooling a 1:1 mixture of [(L)CuII(NO2−)]+ and heme-FeII(NO) to −125 °C leads to association and generation of the key 433 nm UV–vis feature. Kinetic-thermodynamic parameters obtained from low-temperature stopped-flow measurements are in excellent agreement with DFT calculations carried out which describe the sequential addition of NO(g) to the µ-oxo complex. PMID:25974136

  17. Radiation-initiated conversion of paraffins to engine fuel: Direct and indirect initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metreveli, A. K.; Ponomarev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    Formation of gasoline and diesel fuel has been investigated using three various radiation-induced ways: (1) cracking of wax, (2) synthesis from methane, (3) high-temperature conversion of wax dilute solution in methane. The wax, synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch method, initially contained a mixture of C17-C120 linear paraffins. The yield of wax conversion to liquid mixture (C4-C27 alkenes and 61.5% alkanes) via mode (1) was 0.83±0.09 μmole/J, whereas yield of gas conversion to liquid mixture (C5-C13 alkanes) via mode (2) was 0.95±0.02 μmole/J. In the dilute solution wax underwent indirect action of radiation. In comparison with (1) the mode (3) produces similar amount of lighter fuel containing 80% of alkanes (C5-C15). At the same time degree of methane fixation is almost three times higher.

  18. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  19. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  20. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  1. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  2. 40 CFR 721.785 - Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Halogenated alkane aromatic compound... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.785 Halogenated alkane aromatic compound (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a halogenated alkane aromatic compound (PMN P-94-1747) is subject to reporting under this...

  3. Analysis of the vibrational bandwidths of alkane-urea clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Kurt A.; Snyder, Robert G.; Strauss, Herbert L.

    1989-11-01

    The only large amplitude motion possible for an n-alkane molecule in urea-inclusion compounds is libration-torsion about the long axis of the chain. We present a quantitative model that incorporates the effect of this motion on the widths of the alkane vibrational bands. This model explains the difference in the widths of the different vibrations of the alkanes and their temperature dependence. Two effects are combined: (1) a modulation of the angles between the components of the polarizability in the space and the molecule-fixed frames for Raman spectra or between the components of the dipole moment for the infrared spectra, and (2) a modulation of the frequency of the alkane vibration via anharmonic coupling terms with the libration-torsion. The first effect gives rise to a distinctly non-Lorentzian band shape, which is convoluted with the approximately Lorentzian band of the second effect to produce the final result. The libration-torsional motion is modeled as that of a Brownian harmonic oscillator. Most of the parameters that enter the calculation are obtained from data other than that involving the bandwidths themselves. The libration-torsion relaxation time of about 1 ps obtained from fitting the observed bandwidths agrees with the value obtained from recent quasielastic neutron scattering experiments. Other bandwidth mechanisms that have been proposed are evaluated and it is shown that site hopping is too slow to account for the observations.

  4. Diverse alkane hydroxylase genes in microorganisms and environments

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Yong; Chi, Chang-Qiao; Fang, Hui; Liang, Jie-Liang; Lu, She-Lian; Lai, Guo-Li; Tang, Yue-Qin; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2014-01-01

    AlkB and CYP153 are important alkane hydroxylases responsible for aerobic alkane degradation in bioremediation of oil-polluted environments and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Since their distribution in nature is not clear, we made the investigation among thus-far sequenced 3,979 microbial genomes and 137 metagenomes from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine environments. Hundreds of diverse alkB and CYP153 genes including many novel ones were found in bacterial genomes, whereas none were found in archaeal genomes. Moreover, these genes were detected with different distributional patterns in the terrestrial, freshwater, and marine metagenomes. Hints for horizontal gene transfer, gene duplication, and gene fusion were found, which together are likely responsible for diversifying the alkB and CYP153 genes adapt to the ubiquitous distribution of different alkanes in nature. In addition, different distributions of these genes between bacterial genomes and metagenomes suggested the potentially important roles of unknown or less common alkane degraders in nature. PMID:24829093

  5. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  6. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product. PMID:26476644

  7. Cyano- and polycyanometalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1992-01-01

    Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been substituted with one or more cyano groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

  8. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). he test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fun...

  9. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1993-05-18

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso- and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  10. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1993-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  11. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

    1995-01-17

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

  12. Cyano- and polycyanometallo-porphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Ellis, Jr., Paul E.; Lyons, James E.

    1995-01-01

    New compositions of matter comprising cyano-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has cyano groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

  13. MODELING OF ALKANE EMISSIONS FROM A WOOD STAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses full-scale residential house tests to evaluate the effects of organic emissions from a wood finishing product--wood stain--on indoor air quality (IAQ). The test house concentrations of three alkane species, nonane, decane, and undecane, were measured as a fu...

  14. Diffusion of squalene in n-alkanes and squalane.

    PubMed

    Kowert, Bruce A; Watson, Michael B; Dang, Nhan C

    2014-02-27

    Squalene, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, has a 24-carbon backbone with six methyl groups and six isolated double bonds. Capillary flow techniques have been used to determine its translational diffusion constant, D, at room temperature in squalane, n-C16, and three n-C8-squalane mixtures. The D values have a weaker dependence on viscosity, η, than predicted by the Stokes-Einstein relation, D = kBT/(6πηr). A fit to the modified relation, D/T = ASE/η(p), gives p = 0.820 ± 0.028; p = 1 for the Stokes-Einstein limit. The translational motion of squalene appears to be much like that of n-alkane solutes with comparable chain lengths; their D values show similar deviations from the Stokes-Einstein model. The n-alkane with the same carbon chain length as squalene, n-C24, has a near-equal p value of 0.844 ± 0.018 in n-alkane solvents. The values of the hydrodynamic radius, r, for n-C24, squalene, and other n-alkane solutes decrease as the viscosity increases and have a common dependence on the van der Waals volumes of the solute and solvent. The possibility of studying squalene in lipid droplets and membranes is discussed. PMID:24528091

  15. A superoleophobic textile repellent towards impacting drops of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artus, Georg R. J.; Zimmermann, Jan; Reifler, Felix A.; Brewer, Stuart A.; Seeger, Stefan

    2012-02-01

    A commercially available polyester fabric has been rendered superoleophobic by coating with silicone nanofilaments and subsequent plasma fluorination. The treated samples show outstanding oil-repellency. They achieve the highest possible oil-repellency grade of 8, repel impacting drops of alkanes and show a plastron layer in hexadecane. The oil repellency is shown to depend on the topography of the silicone nanofilament coating.

  16. Integrated two-liquid phase bioconversion and product-recovery processes for the oxidation of alkanes: Process design and economic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathys, R.G.; Schmid, A.; Witholt, B.

    1999-08-20

    Pseudomonas oleovorans and recombinant strains containing the alkane oxidation genes can product alkane oxidation genes can produce alkane oxidation products in two-liquid phase bioreactor systems. In these bioprocesses the cells, which grow in the aqueous phase, oxidize apolar, non-water soluble substrates. The apolar products typically accumulate in the emulsified apolar phase. The authors have studied both the bioconversion systems and several downstream processing systems to separate and purify alkanols from these two-liquid phase media. Based on the information generated in these studies, the authors have now designed bioconversion and downstream processing systems for the production of 1-alkanols from n-alkanes on a 10 kiloton/yr scale, taking the conversion of n-octane to 1-octanol as a model system. Here, the authors describe overall designs of fed-batch and continuous-fermentation processes for the oxidation of octane to 1-octanol by Pseudomonas oleovoran, and the authors discuss the economics of these processes. The overall performance of each of these two systems has been modeled with Aspen software. Although the continuous process is about 10% more expensive than the fed-batch process, improvements to reduce overall cost can be achieved more easily for continuous than for fed-batch fermentation by decreasing the dilution rate while maintaining near constant productivity. Improvements relevant to both processes can be achieved by increasing the biocatalyst performance, which results in improved overall efficiency, decreased capital investment, and hence, decreased production cost.

  17. Isolating the non-polar contributions to the intermolecular potential for water-alkane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballal, Deepti; Venkataraman, Pradeep; Fouad, Wael A.; Cox, Kenneth R.; Chapman, Walter G.

    2014-08-01

    Intermolecular potential models for water and alkanes describe pure component properties fairly well, but fail to reproduce properties of water-alkane mixtures. Understanding interactions between water and non-polar molecules like alkanes is important not only for the hydrocarbon industry but has implications to biological processes as well. Although non-polar solutes in water have been widely studied, much less work has focused on water in non-polar solvents. In this study we calculate the solubility of water in different alkanes (methane to dodecane) at ambient conditions where the water content in alkanes is very low so that the non-polar water-alkane interactions determine solubility. Only the alkane-rich phase is simulated since the fugacity of water in the water rich phase is calculated from an accurate equation of state. Using the SPC/E model for water and TraPPE model for alkanes along with Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rules for the cross parameters produces a water solubility that is an order of magnitude lower than the experimental value. It is found that an effective water Lennard-Jones energy ɛW/k = 220 K is required to match the experimental water solubility in TraPPE alkanes. This number is much higher than used in most simulation water models (SPC/E—ɛW/k = 78.2 K). It is surprising that the interaction energy obtained here is also higher than the water-alkane interaction energy predicted by studies on solubility of alkanes in water. The reason for this high water-alkane interaction energy is not completely understood. Some factors that might contribute to the large interaction energy, such as polarizability of alkanes, octupole moment of methane, and clustering of water at low concentrations in alkanes, are examined. It is found that, though important, these factors do not completely explain the anomalously strong attraction between alkanes and water observed experimentally.

  18. Impacts of Conformational Geometries in Fluorinated Alkanes

    PubMed Central

    Brandenburg, Tim; Golnak, Ronny; Nagasaka, Masanari; Atak, Kaan; Sreekantan Nair Lalithambika, Sreeju; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Aziz, Emad F.

    2016-01-01

    Research of blood substitute formulations and their base materials is of high scientific interest. Especially fluorinated microemulsions based on perfluorocarbons, with their interesting chemical properties, offer opportunities for applications in biomedicine and physical chemistry. In this work, carbon K-edge absorption spectra of liquid perfluoroalkanes and their parent hydrocarbons are presented and compared. Based on soft X-ray absorption, a comprehensive picture of the electronic structure is provided with the aid of time dependent density functional theory. We have observed that conformational geometries mainly influence the chemical and electronic interactions in the presented liquid materials, leading to a direct association of conformational geometries to the dissolving capacity of the presented perfluorocarbons with other solvents like water and possibly gases like oxygen. PMID:27527753

  19. Impacts of Conformational Geometries in Fluorinated Alkanes.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Tim; Golnak, Ronny; Nagasaka, Masanari; Atak, Kaan; Sreekantan Nair Lalithambika, Sreeju; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Aziz, Emad F

    2016-01-01

    Research of blood substitute formulations and their base materials is of high scientific interest. Especially fluorinated microemulsions based on perfluorocarbons, with their interesting chemical properties, offer opportunities for applications in biomedicine and physical chemistry. In this work, carbon K-edge absorption spectra of liquid perfluoroalkanes and their parent hydrocarbons are presented and compared. Based on soft X-ray absorption, a comprehensive picture of the electronic structure is provided with the aid of time dependent density functional theory. We have observed that conformational geometries mainly influence the chemical and electronic interactions in the presented liquid materials, leading to a direct association of conformational geometries to the dissolving capacity of the presented perfluorocarbons with other solvents like water and possibly gases like oxygen. PMID:27527753

  20. Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Priyank

    In order to enhance the fuel efficiency of an engine and to control pollutant formation, an improved understanding of the combustion chemistry of the fuels at a fundamental level is paramount. This knowledge can be gained by developing detailed reaction mechanisms of the fuels for various combustion processes and by studying combustion analytically employing reduced-chemistry descriptions. There is a need for small detailed reaction mechanisms for alkane and alcohol fuels with reduced uncertainties in their combustion chemistry that are computationally cheaper in multidimensional CFD calculations. Detailed mechanisms are the starting points in identifying reduced-chemistry descriptions of combustion processes to study problems analytically. This research includes numerical, experimental and analytical studies. The first part of the dissertation consists of numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames. Although ethanol has gained popularity as a possible low-pollution source of renewable energy, significant uncertainties remain in its combustion chemistry. To begin to address ethanol combustion, first a relatively small detailed reaction mechanism, commonly known as the San Diego Mech, is developed for the combustion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, methane, methanol, ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, in air or oxygen-inert mixtures. This mechanism is tested for autoignition, premixed-flame burning velocities, and structures and extinction of diffusion flames and of partially premixed flames of many of these fuels. The reduction in uncertainties in the combustion chemistry can best be achieved by consistently updating a reaction mechanism with reaction rate data for the elementary steps based on newer studies in literature and by testing it against as many experimental conditions as available. The results of such a testing for abovementioned fuels are reported here along with the modifications of reaction-rate parameters of the most important

  1. [Carbon isotopic compositions of n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in the smoke from combustion of rice straw].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Sun, Li-Na; Li, Jiu-Hai; Xu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    In order to investigate the carbon isotopic fractionation in n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in smoke from rice straw combustion, six types of rice straw were burned in laboratory under flaming and smoldering conditions, and the compound specific isotopic compositions for the two classes of biomarkers in the smoke were determined. The results showed that the delta13C values of individual n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids released from flaming burns of all the rice species ranged from -28.6 per thousand to -38.8 per thousand and from -29.6 per thousand to -41.9per thousand, respectively, and that the mean delta13C values for the two compound classes in the flaming smoke for the six types of rice straw were in the range of -32.6 per thousand to -36. 4per thousand and -34.0 per thousand to -36.2 per thousand, respectively. Moreover, the n-alkanes in the smoke from the most straws were more depleted in 13C in general than the identical substances with equal carbon number in corresponding unburned biomass. The magnitude of the isotopic discrimination (delta) was up to 4.1per thousand. Conversely, the n-alkanoic acids in the smoke tended to be more enriched in 13C than the corresponding biomarkers in the unburned straw for all of the species, and the delta was up to 6.3 per thousand. The delta13C values of the individual n-alkanes and n-alkanoic acids in the smoke from smoldering burns of the six species varied between -31.7 per thousand and -39.0 per thousand and between -31.3 per thousand and -38.8 per thousand, respectively. The average values for the two compound classes in the smoke for a species were in the range of -35.1 per thousand to -36.4 per thousand and -34.4 per thousand to -35.6 per thousand, respectively. The compound specific delta13C values of the n-alkanes in the smoke for most species were smaller than those of the same substances in the corresponding rice straw, and the greatest delta was 6.1 per thousand. However, the delta13C values of n-alkanoic acids

  2. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in glaucous and non-glaucous varieties of wheat (Triticum spp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Eley, Yvette; Frizell-Armitage, Amelia; Uauy, Cristobal

    2015-04-01

    The use of the 2H/1H composition of terrestrial plants in climate and ecology studies depends on fundamental understanding of the processes within the plant that control fractionation of these two isotopes. Little is currently known about the extent of 2H/1H fractionation at different steps of biosynthesis, after the initial H uptake following leaf water photolysis. Knowing this effect is particularly important when seeking to interpret the 2H/1H composition of leaf wax biomarkers from plants that differ in the amount and type of individual compound classes in their leaf waxes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the link between the quantity and distribution of n-alkyl lipids in leaf waxes and their isotopic composition. We used a genetic approach to suppress glaucousness in 2 varieties of wheat (Alchemy and Malacca), which resulted in glaucous and non-glaucous phenotypes of both varieties. Both phenotypes were then grown outdoors under identical environmental conditions in central Norfolk, UK. At the end of the growing season, the plants were sampled for soil water, leaf water, and leaf wax isotopic measurements. Comparison of the leaf wax composition of the non-glaucous and glaucous phenotypes revealed that the non-glaucous varieties were characterised by the absence of diketones and a greater concentration of n-alkanes and primary alcohols.. Our results showed very small differences between glaucous and non-glaucous varieties with regard to soil (mean values, <2 per mil) and leaf (<1 per mil) water 2H/1H. Conversely, there was 15-20 and 10-15 per mil 2H-depletion in the C29 and C31 n-alkanes, respectively, from the non-glaucous phenotype. This 2H-depletion in the non-glaucous phenotype demonstrated that the suppression of diketone production and the increase in n-alkane and primary alcohol concentrations are linked with a shift in the 2H/1H composition of n-alkanes. The initial results of this work suggest that plants using the same environmental water

  3. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  4. Adsorption of n-alkane vapours at the water surface.

    PubMed

    Biscay, Frédéric; Ghoufi, Aziz; Malfreyt, Patrice

    2011-06-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are reported here to predict the surface tension of the liquid-vapour interface of water upon adsorption of alkane vapours (methane to hexane). A decrease of the surface tension has been established from n-pentane. A correlation has been evidenced between the decrease of the surface tension and the absence of specific arrangement at the water surface for n-pentane and n-hexane. The thermodynamic stability of the adsorption layer and the absence of film for longer alkanes have been checked through the calculation of a potential of mean force. This complements the work recently published [Ghoufi et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 5203] concerning the adsorption of methane at the water surface. The decrease of the surface tension has been interpreted in terms of the degree of hydrogen bonding of water molecules at the liquid-vapour interface upon adsorption. PMID:21584320

  5. The vibrational spectrum of water in liquid alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, M P; Strauss, H L

    1985-01-01

    The water wire hypothesis of hydrogen-ion transport in lipid bilayers has prompted a search for water aggregates in bulk hydrocarbons. The asymmetric stretching vibration of the water dissolved in n-decane and in a number of other alkanes and alkenes has been observed. The water band in the alkanes is very wide and fits to the results of a J-diffusion calculation for the water rotation. This implies that the water is freely rotating between collisions with the solvent and certainly not hydrogen bonded to anything. The existence of water aggregates is thus most unlikely. In contrast, water in an alkene is hydrogen bonded to the solvent molecules (although not to other water molecules) and shows an entirely different spectrum. PMID:4016205

  6. Site isolation in vanadium phosphorus oxide alkane oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M R; Ebner, J R

    1991-06-01

    Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of vanadyl pyrophosphate indicate that at least two polytypical structures exists for this active and selective alkane oxidation catalyst. The crystal structures of these materials differ with respect to the symmetry and direction of columns of vanadyl groups within the unit cell. Single crystals of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been generated at extreme temperatures not often experienced by microcrystalline catalysts. The crystallography of the system suggests that other crystalline modifications or disordered phases might also exist. Zeroth-order models of crystal surface termination of vanadyl pyrophosphate have been constructed which conceptually illustrate the ability of vanadyl pyrophosphate to accommodate varying amounts of surface phosphorus parallel to (1,0,0), (0,1,0) and (0,2,4). Pyrophosphate termination of surfaces parallel to (1,0,0) likely results in the isolation of clusters of reactive centers and limits overoxidation of the alkane substrate. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  8. Hydroxylation of alkanes using sodium hypochlorite catalyzed by iron porphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.B.; Khenkin, A.M.

    1988-10-01

    This communication presents data about the oxidation of alkanes to alcohols with hypochlorite in the presence of Fe(III) phenylporphyrin derivatives in the system water-benzene. We used as catalysts the following compounds: tetraphenylporphyrin iron chloride, tetramesitylporphyrin iron chloride, tetra(2-fluorophenyl)porphyrin from chloride, and tetra (2-ntrophenyl)porphyrin iron chloride. The reaction products were analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography. The efficiency of the reaction was determined by the structure of the porphyrin used.

  9. Alkane Biosynthesis Genes in Cyanobacteria and Their Transcriptional Organization

    PubMed Central

    Klähn, Stephan; Baumgartner, Desirée; Pfreundt, Ulrike; Voigt, Karsten; Schön, Verena; Steglich, Claudia; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2014-01-01

    In cyanobacteria, alkanes are synthesized from a fatty acyl-ACP by two enzymes, acyl–acyl carrier protein reductase and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase. Despite the great interest in the exploitation for biofuel production, nothing is known about the transcriptional organization of their genes or the physiological function of alkane synthesis. The comparison of 115 microarray datasets indicates the relatively constitutive expression of aar and ado genes. The analysis of 181 available genomes showed that in 90% of the genomes both genes are present, likely indicating their physiological relevance. In 61% of them they cluster together with genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxyl transferase and a short-chain dehydrogenase, strengthening the link to fatty acid metabolism and in 76% of the genomes they are located in tandem, suggesting constraints on the gene arrangement. However, contrary to the expectations for an operon, we found in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 specific promoters for the two genes, sll0208 (ado) and sll0209 (aar), which give rise to monocistronic transcripts. Moreover, the upstream located ado gene is driven by a proximal as well as a second, distal, promoter, from which a third transcript, the ~160 nt sRNA SyR9 is transcribed. Thus, the transcriptional organization of the alkane biosynthesis genes in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is of substantial complexity. We verified all three promoters to function independently from each other and show a similar promoter arrangement also in the more distant Nodularia spumigena, Trichodesmium erythraeum, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, Prochlorococcus MIT9313, and MED4. The presence of separate regulatory elements and the dominance of monocistronic mRNAs suggest the possible autonomous regulation of ado and aar. The complex transcriptional organization of the alkane synthesis gene cluster has possible metabolic implications and should be considered when manipulating the expression of these genes in cyanobacteria. PMID

  10. Dielectric constant of liquid alkanes and hydrocarbon mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.; Arakelian, T.

    1992-01-01

    The complex dielectric constants of n-alkanes with two to seven carbon atoms have been measured. The measurements were conducted using a slotted-line technique at 1.2 GHz and at atmospheric pressure. The temperature was varied from the melting point to the boiling point of the respective alkanes. The real part of the dielectric constant was found to decrease with increasing temperature and correlate with the change in the molar volume. An upper limit to all the loss tangents was established at 0.001. The complex dielectric constants of a few mixtures of liquid alkanes were also measured at room temperature. For a pentane-octane mixture the real part of the dielectric constant could be explained by the Clausius-Mosotti theory. For the mixtures of n-hexane-ethylacetate and n-hexane-acetone the real part of the dielectric constants could be explained by the Onsager theory extended to mixtures. The dielectric constant of the n-hexane-acetone mixture displayed deviations from the Onsager theory at the highest fractions of acetone. The dipole moments of ethylacetate and acetone were determined for dilute mixtures using the Onsager theory and were found to be in agreement with their accepted gas-phase values. The loss tangents of the mixtures exhibited a linear relationship with the volume fraction for low concentrations of the polar liquids.

  11. Alkane production from biomass: chemo-, bio- and integrated catalytic approaches.

    PubMed

    Deneyer, Aron; Renders, Tom; Van Aelst, Joost; Van den Bosch, Sander; Gabriëls, Dries; Sels, Bert F

    2015-12-01

    Linear, branched and cyclic alkanes are important intermediates and end products of the chemical industry and are nowadays mainly obtained from fossil resources. In search for alternatives, biomass feedstocks are often presented as a renewable carbon source for the production of fuels, chemicals and materials. However, providing a complete market for all these applications seems unrealistic due to both financial and logistic issues. Despite the very large scale of current alkane-based fuel applications, biomass definitely has the potential to offer a partial solution to the fuel business. For the smaller market of chemicals and materials, a transition to biomass as main carbon source is more realistic and even probably unavoidable in the long term. The appropriate use and further development of integrated chemo- and biotechnological (catalytic) process strategies will be crucial to successfully accomplish this petro-to-bio feedstock transition. Furthermore, a selection of the most promising technologies from the available chemo- and biocatalytic tool box is presented. New opportunities will certainly arise when multidisciplinary approaches are further explored in the future. In an attempt to select the most appropriate biomass sources for each specific alkane-based application, a diagram inspired by van Krevelen is applied, taking into account both the C-number and the relative functionality of the product molecules. PMID:26360875

  12. Nanoscale Trapping and Squeeze-Out of Confined Alkane Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Gosvami, N N; O'Shea, S J

    2015-12-01

    We present combined force curve and conduction atomic force microscopy (AFM) data for the linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n = 10, 12, 14, 16) confined between a gold-coated AFM tip and a graphite surface. Solvation layering is observed in the force curves for all liquids, and conduction AFM is used to study in detail the removal of the confined (mono)layer closest to the graphite surface. The squeeze-out behavior of the monolayer can be very different depending upon the temperature. Below the monolayer melting transition temperatures the molecules are in an ordered state on the graphite surface, and fast and complete removal of the confined molecules is observed. However, above the melting transition temperature the molecules are in a disordered state, and even at large applied pressure a few liquid molecules are trapped within the tip-sample contact zone. These findings are similar to a previous study for branched alkanes [ Gosvami Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 100, 076101 ], but the observation for the linear alkane homologue series demonstrates clearly the dependence of the squeeze-out and trapping on the state of the confined material. PMID:26529283

  13. Biochemical studies on the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes.

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, K H; Albano, E F; Tomasi, A; Slater, T F

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews recent investigations by Slater and colleagues into the metabolic activation of halogenated alkanes in general and carbon tetrachloride in particular. It is becoming increasingly accepted that free radical intermediates are involved in the toxicity of many such compounds through mechanisms including lipid peroxidation, covalent binding, and cofactor depletion. Here we describe the experimental approaches that are used to establish that halogenated alkanes are metabolized in animal tissues to reactive free radicals. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy is used to identify free-radical products, often using spin-trapping compounds. The generation of specific free radicals by radiolytic methods is useful in the determination of the precise reactivity of radical intermediates postulated to be injurious to the cell. The enzymic mechanism of the production of such free radicals and their subsequent reactions with biological molecules is studied with specific metabolic inhibitors and free-radical scavengers. These combined techniques provide considerable insight into the process of metabolic activation of halogenated compounds. It is readily apparent, for instance, that the local oxygen concentration at the site of activation is of crucial importance to the subsequent reactions; the formation of peroxy radical derivatives from the primary free-radical product is shown to be of great significance in relation to carbon tetrachloride and may be of general importance. However, while these studies have provided much information on the biochemical mechanisms of halogenated alkane toxicity, it is clear that many problems remain to be solved. PMID:3007102

  14. Energy conversion and storage program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemical and chemical engineering principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels; (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy storage; (4) characterization of complex chemical processes; and (5) the application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, and advanced methods of analysis. The following five areas are discussed: electrochemical energy storage and conversion; microstructured materials; biotechnology; fossil fuels; and high temperature superconducting processing. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Additional chain-branching pathways in the low-temperature oxidation of branched alkanes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhandong; Zhang, Lidong; Moshammer, Kai; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Shankar, Vijai Shankar Bhavani; Lucassen, Arnas; Hemken, Christian; Taatjes, Craig A.; Leone, Stephen R.; Kohse-Hoinghaus, Katharina; et al

    2015-12-31

    Chain-branching reactions represent a general motif in chemistry, encountered in atmospheric chemistry, combustion, polymerization, and photochemistry; the nature and amount of radicals generated by chain-branching are decisive for the reaction progress, its energy signature, and the time towards its completion. In this study, experimental evidence for two new types of chain-branching reactions is presented, based upon detection of highly oxidized multifunctional molecules (HOM) formed during the gas-phase low-temperature oxidation of a branched alkane under conditions relevant to combustion. The oxidation of 2,5-dimethylhexane (DMH) in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) was studied using synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet photoionization molecular beam mass spectrometry (SVUV-PI-MBMS).more » Specifically, species with four and five oxygen atoms were probed, having molecular formulas of C8H14O4 (e.g., diketo-hydroperoxide/keto-hydroperoxy cyclic ether) and C8H16O5 (e.g., keto-dihydroperoxide/dihydroperoxy cyclic ether), respectively. The formation of C8H16O5 species involves alternative isomerization of OOQOOH radicals via intramolecular H-atom migration, followed by third O2 addition, intramolecular isomerization, and OH release; C8H14O4 species are proposed to result from subsequent reactions of C8H16O5 species. The mechanistic pathways involving these species are related to those proposed as a source of low-volatility highly oxygenated species in Earth's troposphere. At the higher temperatures relevant to auto-ignition, they can result in a net increase of hydroxyl radical production, so these are additional radical chain-branching pathways for ignition. Furthermore, the results presented herein extend the conceptual basis of reaction mechanisms used to predict the reaction behavior of ignition, and have implications on atmospheric gas-phase chemistry and the oxidative stability of organic substances.« less

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental chemistry is applied to estimating the exposure of ecosystems and humans to various chemical environmental stressors. Among the stressors of concern are mercury, pesticides, and arsenic. Advanced analytical chemistry techniques are used to measure these stressors ...

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  20. Modeling the role of alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and their oligomers in secondary organic aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Pye, Havala O T; Pouliot, George A

    2012-06-01

    A computationally efficient method to treat secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from various length and structure alkanes as well as SOA from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is implemented in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to predict aerosol concentrations over the United States. Oxidation of alkanes is predicted to produce more aerosol than oxidation of PAHs driven by relatively higher alkane emissions. SOA from alkanes and PAHs, although small in magnitude, can be a substantial fraction of the SOA from anthropogenic hydrocarbons, particularly in winter, and could contribute more if emission inventories lack intermediate volatility alkanes (>C(13)) or if the vehicle fleet shifts toward diesel-powered vehicles. The SOA produced from oxidation of alkanes correlates well with ozone and odd oxygen in many locations, but the lower correlation of anthropogenic oligomers with odd oxygen indicates that models may need additional photochemically dependent pathways to low-volatility SOA. PMID:22568386

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  2. Mononuclear Nonheme High-Spin Iron(III)-Acylperoxo Complexes in Olefin Epoxidation and Alkane Hydroxylation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Lee, Yong-Min; Clémancey, Martin; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Latour, Jean-Marc; Nam, Wonwoo

    2016-02-24

    Mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes bearing an N-methylated cyclam ligand were synthesized, spectroscopically characterized, and investigated in olefin epoxidation and alkane hydroxylation reactions. In the epoxidation of olefins, epoxides were yielded as the major products with high stereo-, chemo-, and enantioselectivities; cis- and trans-stilbenes were oxidized to cis- and trans-stilbene oxides, respectively. In the epoxidation of cyclohexene, cyclohexene oxide was formed as the major product with a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 1.0, indicating that nonheme iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes prefer C═C epoxidation to allylic C-H bond activation. Olefin epoxidation by chiral iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes afforded epoxides with high enantioselectivity, suggesting that iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not high-valent iron-oxo species, are the epoxidizing agent. In alkane hydroxylation reactions, iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes hydroxylated C-H bonds as strong as those in cyclohexane at -40 °C, wherein (a) alcohols were yielded as the major products with high regio- and stereoselectivities, (b) activation of C-H bonds by the iron(III)-acylperoxo species was the rate-determining step with a large KIE value and good correlation between reaction rates and bond dissociation energies of alkanes, and (c) the oxygen atom in the alcohol product was from the iron(III)-acylperoxo species, not from molecular oxygen. In isotopically labeled water (H2(18)O) experiments, incorporation of (18)O from H2(18)O into oxygenated products was not observed in the epoxidation and hydroxylation reactions. On the basis of mechanistic studies, we conclude that mononuclear nonheme high-spin iron(III)-acylperoxo complexes are strong oxidants capable of oxygenating hydrocarbons prior to their conversion into iron-oxo species via O-O bond cleavage. PMID:26816269

  3. Synthesis of chiral 2-alkanols from n-alkanes by a P. putida whole-cell biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Tieves, Florian; Erenburg, Isabelle N; Mahmoud, Osama; Urlacher, Vlada B

    2016-09-01

    The cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP154A8 from Nocardia farcinica was previously found to catalyze hydroxylation of linear alkanes (C7 -C9 ) with a high regio- and stereoselectivity. The objective of this study was to integrate CYP154A8 along with suitable redox partners into a whole-cell system for the production of chiral 2-alkanols starting from alkanes. Both recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida whole-cell biocatalysts tested for this purpose showed the ability to produce chiral alkanols, but a solvent tolerant P. putida strain demonstrated several advantages in the applied biphasic reaction system. The optimized P. putida whole-cell system produced ∼16 mM (S)-2-octanol with 87% ee from octane, which is more than sevenfold higher than the previously described system with isolated enzymes. The achieved enantiopurity of the product could further be increased up to 99% ee by adding an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) to the alkane-oxidizing P. putida whole-cell systems. By using this setup for the individual conversions of heptane, octane or nonane, 2.6 mM (S)-2-heptanol with 91% ee, 5.4 mM (S)-2-octanol with 97% ee, or 5.5 mM (S)-2-nonanol with 97% ee were produced, respectively. The achieved concentrations of chiral 2-alkanols are the highest reported for a P450-based whole-cell system so far. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1845-1852. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26887569

  4. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes - phase V. Topical report, February 1993--October 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-31

    We have made excellent progress toward a practical route from field butanes to MTBE, the oxygenate of choice for high-octane, clean-burning, environmentally acceptable reformulated gasoline. We have evaluated two proprietary process possibilities with a potential commercial partner and have conducted a joint catalyst evaluation program. The first of the two potential processes considered during the past quarter utilizes a two-step route from isobutane to tert-butyl alcohol, TBA. Not only is TBA an intermediate for MTBE production but is equally applicable for ETBE-an oxygenate which utilizes renewable ethanol in its` manufacture. In the two-step process, isobutane is oxidized in a non-catalytic reaction to a roughly equal mixture of TBA and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. TBHP, eq. 1. We have developed an inexpensive new catalyst system based on an electron-deficient macrocyclic metal complex that selectively converts TBHP to TBA, eq. 2, and meets or exceeds all of the process criteria that we have set.

  5. Fundamental Flame Velocities of Pure Hydrocarbons I : Alkanes, Alkenes, Alkynes Benzene, and Cyclohexane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstein, Melvin; Levine, Oscar; Wong, Edgar L

    1950-01-01

    The flame velocities of 37 pure hydrocarbons including normal and branched alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes; as well as benzene and cyclohexane, together with the experimental technique employed are presented. The normal alkanes have about the same flame velocity from ethane through heptane with methane being about 16 percent lower. Unsaturation increases the flame velocity in the order of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes. Branching reduces the flame velocity.

  6. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, Robert H.; Brown, Stephen H.

    1988-01-01

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  7. Photochemical dimerization and functionalization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and silanes

    DOEpatents

    Crabtree, R.H.; Brown, S.H.

    1988-02-16

    The space-time yield and/or the selectivity of the photochemical dimerization of alkanes, ethers, primary alcohols and tertiary silanes with Hg and U.V. light is enhanced by refluxing the substrate in the irradiated reaction zone at a temperature at which the dimer product condenses and remains condensed promptly upon its formation. Cross-dimerization of the alkanes, ethers and silanes with primary alcohols is disclosed, as is the functionalization to aldehydes of the alkanes with carbon monoxide.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Gordonia sihwensis Strain 9, a Branched Alkane-Degrading Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lisa M.; Gunasekera, Thusitha S.; Striebich, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Gordonia sihwensis strain 9 is a Gram-positive bacterium capable of efficient aerobic degradation of branched and normal alkanes. The draft genome of G. sihwensis S9 is 4.16 Mb in size, with 3,686 coding sequences and 68.1% G+C content. Alkane monooxygenase and P-450 cytochrome genes required for alkane degradation are predicted in G. sihwensis S9. PMID:27340079

  9. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  10. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  11. Forensic Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-07-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  12. Hydrocarbons. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit O1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on hydrocarbons is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit is divided into sections dealing with alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, arenes, and several aspects of the petroleum industry. Two experiments, exercises (with answers), and pre- and post-tests are included.…

  13. Digital biology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Witters, Daan; Sun, Bing; Begolo, Stefano; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Robles, Whitney; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2014-09-01

    This account examines developments in "digital" biology and chemistry within the context of microfluidics, from a personal perspective. Using microfluidics as a frame of reference, we identify two areas of research within digital biology and chemistry that are of special interest: (i) the study of systems that switch between discrete states in response to changes in chemical concentration of signals, and (ii) the study of single biological entities such as molecules or cells. In particular, microfluidics accelerates analysis of switching systems (i.e., those that exhibit a sharp change in output over a narrow range of input) by enabling monitoring of multiple reactions in parallel over a range of concentrations of signals. Conversely, such switching systems can be used to create new kinds of microfluidic detection systems that provide "analog-to-digital" signal conversion and logic. Microfluidic compartmentalization technologies for studying and isolating single entities can be used to reconstruct and understand cellular processes, study interactions between single biological entities, and examine the intrinsic heterogeneity of populations of molecules, cells, or organisms. Furthermore, compartmentalization of single cells or molecules in "digital" microfluidic experiments can induce switching in a range of reaction systems to enable sensitive detection of cells or biomolecules, such as with digital ELISA or digital PCR. This "digitizing" offers advantages in terms of robustness, assay design, and simplicity because quantitative information can be obtained with qualitative measurements. While digital formats have been shown to improve the robustness of existing chemistries, we anticipate that in the future they will enable new chemistries to be used for quantitative measurements, and that digital biology and chemistry will continue to provide further opportunities for measuring biomolecules, understanding natural systems more deeply, and advancing molecular and

  14. Molecular screening for alkane hydroxylase genes in Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains.

    PubMed

    Smits, T H; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B; van Beilen, J B

    1999-08-01

    We have developed highly degenerate oligonucleotides for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of genes related to the Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1 and Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 alkane hydroxylases, based on a number of highly conserved sequence motifs. In all Gram-negative and in two out of three Gram-positive strains able to grow on medium- (C6-C11) or long-chain n-alkanes (C12-C16), PCR products of the expected size were obtained. The PCR fragments were cloned and sequenced and found to encode peptides with 43.2-93.8% sequence identity to the corresponding fragment of the P. oleovorans GPo1 alkane hydroxylase. Strains that were unable to grow on n-alkanes did not yield PCR products with homology to alkane hydroxylase genes. The alkane hydroxylase genes of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus EB104 and Pseudomonas putida P1 were cloned using the PCR products as probes. The two genes allow an alkane hydroxylase-negative mutant of Acinetobacter sp. ADP1 and an Escherichia coli recombinant containing all P. oleovorans alk genes except alkB, respectively, to grow on n-alkanes, showing that the cloned genes do indeed encode alkane hydroxylases. PMID:11207749

  15. Gas-Phase Reactions of Atomic Gold Cations with Linear Alkanes (C2-C9).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Mei-Qi; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-06-30

    To develop proper ionization methods for alkanes, the reactivity of bare or ligated transition metal ions toward alkanes has attracted increasing interests. In this study, the reactions of the gold cations with linear alkanes from ethane up to nonane (CnH2n+2, n = 2-9) under mild conditions have been characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. When reacting with Au(+), small alkanes (n = 2-6) were confirmed to follow specific reaction channels of dehydrogenation for ethane and hydride transfer for others to generate product ions characteristic of the original alkanes, which indicates that Au(+) can act as a reagent ion to ionize alkanes from ethane to n-hexane. Strong dependence of the chain length of alkanes was observed for the rate constants and reaction efficiencies. Extensive fragmentation took place for larger alkanes (n > 6). Theoretical results show that the fragmentation induced by the hydride transfer occurs after the release of AuH. Moreover, the fragmentation of n-heptane was successfully avoided when the reaction took place in a high-pressure reactor. This implies that Au(+) is a potential reagent ion to ionize linear and even the branched alkanes. PMID:27266670

  16. Identification and use of an alkane transporter plug-in for applications in biocatalysis and whole-cell biosensing of alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Chris; Deszcz, Dawid; Wei, Yu-Chia; Martínez-Torres, Rubéns Julio; Morris, Phattaraporn; Folliard, Thomas; Sreenivasan, Rakesh; Ward, John; Dalby, Paul; Woodley, John M.; Baganz, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Effective application of whole-cell devices in synthetic biology and biocatalysis will always require consideration of the uptake of molecules of interest into the cell. Here we demonstrate that the AlkL protein from Pseudomonas putida GPo1 is an alkane import protein capable of industrially relevant rates of uptake of C7-C16 n-alkanes. Without alkL expression, native E.coli n-alkane uptake was the rate-limiting step in both the whole-cell bioconversion of C7-C16 n-alkanes and in the activation of a whole-cell alkane biosensor by C10 and C11 alkanes. By coexpression of alkL as a transporter plug-in, specific yields improved by up to 100-fold for bioxidation of >C12 alkanes to fatty alcohols and acids. The alkL protein was shown to be toxic to the host when overexpressed but when expressed from a vector capable of controlled induction, yields of alkane oxidation were improved a further 10-fold (8 g/L and 1.7 g/g of total oxidized products). Further testing of activity on n-octane with the controlled expression vector revealed the highest reported rates of 120 μmol/min/g and 1 g/L/h total oxidized products. This is the first time AlkL has been shown to directly facilitate enhanced uptake of C10-C16 alkanes and represents the highest reported gain in product yields resulting from its use.

  17. Metric Conversion

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-12

    ... 1,000,000 1,000,000 micrometers nano- 1,000,000,000 1,000,000,000 nanometers ... conversions, see the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publications: NIST Guide to SI Units: ...

  18. Analysis of Pseudomonas putida alkane-degradation gene clusters and flanking insertion sequences: evolution and regulation of the alk genes.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, J B; Panke, S; Lucchini, S; Franchini, A G; Röthlisberger, M; Witholt, B

    2001-06-01

    The Pseudomonas putida GPo1 (commonly known as Pseudomonas oleovorans GPo1) alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters, which encode proteins involved in the conversion of n-alkanes to fatty acids, are located end to end on the OCT plasmid, separated by 9.7 kb of DNA. This DNA segment encodes, amongst others, a methyl-accepting transducer protein (AlkN) that may be involved in chemotaxis to alkanes. In P. putida P1, the alkBFGHJKL and alkST gene clusters are flanked by almost identical copies of the insertion sequence ISPpu4, constituting a class 1 transposon. Other insertion sequences flank and interrupt the alk genes in both strains. Apart from the coding regions of the GPo1 and P1 alk genes (80-92% sequence identity), only the alkB and alkS promoter regions are conserved. Competition experiments suggest that highly conserved inverted repeats in the alkB and alkS promoter regions bind ALKS: PMID:11390693

  19. Optimization of H3O+/O2+ Dual-mode Ionization in PTR-MS for Simultaneous Detection of Alkanes, Olefins and Aromatic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador-Muñoz, O.; Misztal, P. K.; Weber, R.; Drozd, G.; Worton, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of VOC composition from fossil fuels are analytically challenging because of the complex mixture of hydrocarbons (saturated, unsaturated, aromatics, etc). Speciated chemical measurements typically rely on relatively slow GC separation. Proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) is advantageous due to its fast response and high sensitivity. The most common ionization mechanism applied to VOC detection by PTR-MS is proton transfer from hydronium ion (H3O+). However, alkanes cannot be detected using H3O+ ionization chemistry because their proton affinities are too low. Ionization of alkanes is possible via electron transfer and/or hydride abstraction using O2+ or NO+. We used PTR-MS to analyze aromatic, alkene and alkane (linear, branched and cyclic) compounds simultaneously not by switching the ionization agents, but by adjusting the drift tube voltage and optimizing the ratio of H3O+/O2+ produced in the instrument's ion source. The highest detection sensitivity for aromatic and alkene compounds was produced by proton transfer from H3O+, while hydride abstraction by O2+ allowed detection of alkanes. For alkanes, sensitivities ranged from 1.1±0.01 cps/ppbv for n-decane to 74.7±0.25 cps/ppbv for decalin. Sensitivities in O2+ mode were from 6 (Adamantane) to 146 (4-Methyl nonane) times higher than those obtained in H3O+ mode under the same ion source and drift tube voltage conditions. Sensitivities for butyl benzene and 1-decene were 157±0.57 and 66.8±0.21 cps/ppbv, respectively. Sensitivity differences among C10 hydrocarbons are related to their structure, which affects their ionization energies (IE) and hence ease of hydride abstraction. Sensitivities at the parent ion mass were inversely correlated with IE (142 cps/ppbv/eV). This suggests higher electronic stability for cyclic non substituted compounds, followed by cyclic substituted, branch linear and linear C10 hydrocarbons. Although selectivity is a known shortcoming of quadrupole

  20. Developing Educational Specifications for Academic Chemistry Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chlad, Frank L.

    1985-01-01

    Provides information related to the design of chemistry classrooms and laboratories. Project cost estimates, space assignment by function, generation of space requirements, educational specifications, and space conversion formulas (considering net assignable square feet) are among the topics discussed. (JN)

  1. Preliminary assessment of halogenated alkanes as vapor-phase tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Michael C.; Moore, Joseph N.; Hirtz, Paul

    1991-01-01

    New tracers are needed to evaluate the efficiency of injection strategies in vapor-dominated environments. One group of compounds that seems to meet the requirements for vapor-phase tracing are the halogenated alkanes (HCFCs). HCFCs are generally nontoxic, and extrapolation of tabulated thermodynamic data indicate that they will be thermally stable and nonreactive in a geothermal environment. The solubilities and stabilities of these compounds, which form several homologous series, vary according to the substituent ratios of fluorine, chlorine, and hydrogen. Laboratory and field tests that will further define the suitability of HCFCs as vapor-phase tracers are under way.

  2. Energy Conversion & Storage Program, 1993 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in: production of new synthetic fuels; development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; and the study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  3. Energy conversion & storage program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, E.J.

    1995-04-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program investigates state-of-the-art electrochemistry, chemistry, and materials science technologies for: (1) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (2) development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; (3) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; (4) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  4. Transporter engineering for improved tolerance against alkane biofuels in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydrocarbon alkanes, components of major fossil fuels, are considered as next-generation biofuels because their biological production has recently been shown to be possible. However, high-yield alkane production requires robust host cells that are tolerant against alkanes, which exhibit cytotoxicity. In this study, we aimed to improve alkane tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key industrial microbial host, by harnessing heterologous transporters that potentially pump out alkanes. Results To this end, we attempted to exploit ABC transporters in Yarrowia lipolytica based on the observation that it utilizes alkanes as a carbon source. We confirmed the increased transcription of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters upon exposure to a range of alkanes in Y. lipolytica. We then showed that the heterologous expression of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters significantly increased tolerance against decane and undecane in S. cerevisiae through maintaining lower intracellular alkane level. In particular, ABC2 transporter increased the tolerance limit of S. cerevisiae about 80-fold against decane. Furthermore, through site-directed mutagenesis for glutamate (E988 for ABC2, and E989 for ABC3) and histidine (H1020 for ABC2, and H1021 for ABC3), we provided the evidence that glutamate was essential for the activity of ABC2 and ABC3 transporters, with ATP most likely to be hydrolyzed by a catalytic carboxylate mechanism. Conclusions Here, we demonstrated that transporter engineering through expression of heterologous efflux pumps led to significantly improved tolerance against alkane biofuels in S. cerevisiae. We believe that our results laid the groundwork for developing robust alkane-producing yeast cells through transporter engineering, which will greatly aid in next-generation alkane biofuel production and recovery. PMID:23402697

  5. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-08-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  6. Assessment of the GECKO-A modeling tool using chamber observations for C12 alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; La, S.; Ouzebidour, F.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Madronich, S.; Yee, L. D.; Loza, C. L.; Craven, J. S.; Zhang, X.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) production and ageing is the result of atmospheric oxidation processes leading to the progressive formation of organic species with higher oxidation state and lower volatility. Explicit chemical mechanisms reflect our understanding of these multigenerational oxidation steps. Major uncertainties remain concerning the processes leading to SOA formation and the development, assessment and improvement of such explicit schemes is therefore a key issue. The development of explicit mechanism to describe the oxidation of long chain hydrocarbons is however a challenge. Indeed, explicit oxidation schemes involve a large number of reactions and secondary organic species, far exceeding the size of chemical schemes that can be written manually. The chemical mechanism generator GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) is a computer program designed to overcome this difficulty. GECKO-A generates gas phase oxidation schemes according to a prescribed protocol assigning reaction pathways and kinetics data on the basis of experimental data and structure-activity relationships. In this study, we examine the ability of the generated schemes to explain SOA formation observed in the Caltech Environmental Chambers from various C12 alkane isomers and under high NOx and low NOx conditions. First results show that the model overestimates both the SOA yields and the O/C ratios. Various sensitivity tests are performed to explore processes that might be responsible for these disagreements.

  7. Modeling SOA formation from the oxidation of intermediate volatility n-alkanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumont, B.; Valorso, R.; Mouchel-Vallon, C.; Camredon, M.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical mechanism leading to SOA formation and ageing is expected to be a multigenerational process, i.e. a successive formation of organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. This process is here investigated with the explicit oxidation model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere). Gas phase oxidation schemes are generated for the C8-C24 series of n-alkanes. Simulations are conducted to explore the time evolution of organic compounds and the behavior of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for various preexisting organic aerosol concentration (COA). As expected, simulation results show that (i) SOA yield increases with the carbon chain length of the parent hydrocarbon, (ii) SOA yield decreases with decreasing COA, (iii) SOA production rates increase with increasing COA and (iv) the number of oxidation steps (i.e. generations) needed to describe SOA formation and evolution grows when COA decreases. The simulated oxidative trajectories are examined in a two dimensional space defined by the mean carbon oxidation state and the volatility. Most SOA contributors are not oxidized enough to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA) but reduced enough to be categorized as hydrocarbon like organic aerosols (HOA), suggesting that OOA may underestimate SOA. Results show that the model is unable to produce highly oxygenated aerosols (OOA) with large yields. The limitations of the model are discussed.

  8. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  9. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  10. Effect of alkane chain length and counterion on the freezing transition of cationic surfactant adsorbed film at alkane mixture - water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yuhei; Sakamoto, Hiroyasu; Takiue, Takanori; Aratono, Makoto; Matsubara, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    Penetration of alkane molecules into the adsorbed film gives rise to a surface freezing transition of cationic surfactant at the alkane-water interface. To examine the effect of the alkane chain length and counterion on the surface freezing, we employed interfacial tensiometry and ellipsometry to study the interface of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium chloride aqueous solutions against dodecane, tetradecane, hexadecane, and their mixtures. Applying theoretical equations to the experimental results obtained, we found that the alkane molecules that have the same chain length as the surfactant adsorb preferentially into the surface freezing film. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the freezing transition temperature of cationic surfactant adsorbed film was independent of the kind of counterion. PMID:25932500

  11. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4464 - Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrofluoro alkene. 721.4464 Section 721.4464 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4464 Mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene. (a) Chemical... as a mixture of hydrofluoro alkanes and hydrofluoro alkene (PMNs P-96-945/946/947/948) are subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  17. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  19. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  20. 40 CFR 721.2625 - Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2625 Reaction product of alkane-diol and epichlorohydrin. (a) Chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of alkane-diol...

  1. The Doctorate in Chemistry. Carnegie Essays on the Doctorate: Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslow, Ronald

    The Carnegie Foundation commissioned a collection of essays as part of the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate (CID). Essays and essayists represent six disciplines that are part of the CID: chemistry, education, English, history, mathematics, and neuroscience. Intended to engender conversation about the conceptual foundation of doctoral…

  2. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  3. Measurement of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Holley, A E; Walker, M K; Cheeseman, K H; Slater, T F

    1993-09-01

    A modified method was developed to measure nM levels of a range of n-alkanals and hydroxyalkenals in biological samples such as blood plasma and tissue homogenates and also in Folch lipid extracts of these samples. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) and desferrioxamine (Desferal) were added to samples to prevent artifactual peroxidation. Aldehydes were reacted with 1,3-cyclohexanedione (CHD), cleaned up by solid-phase extraction on a Sep-Pak C18 cartridge and the fluorescent decahydroacridine derivatives resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with gradient elution. A wider range of aldehydes was detected in lipid extracts of plasma and liver homogenate compared to whole (unextracted) samples. Human plasma contained nM levels of acetaldehyde, propanal, butanal, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal. 4-Hydroxynonenal (0.93 nmol/g) and alkanals with two to six carbons (up to 7.36 nmol/g) were detected in rat liver. Recovery of aldehydes added to whole plasma or to lipid extracts of plasma was dependent on carbon chain length, varying from 95% for acetaldehyde to 8% for decanal. Recovery from biological samples was significantly less than that of standards taken through the Sep-Pak clean-up procedure, suggesting that aldehydes can bind to plasma protein and lipid components. PMID:8406128

  4. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  5. Geomicrobiological linkages between short-chain alkane consumption and sulfate reduction rates in seep sediments

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Arpita; Rogers, Daniel R.; Adams, Melissa M.; Joye, Samantha B.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are ecosystems that are rich in methane, and, in some cases, short-chain (C2–C5) and longer alkanes. C2–C4 alkanes such as ethane, propane, and butane can be significant components of seeping fluids. Some sulfate-reducing microbes oxidize short-chain alkanes anaerobically, and may play an important role in both the competition for sulfate and the local carbon budget. To better understand the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain n-alkanes coupled with sulfate-reduction, hydrocarbon-rich sediments from the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) were amended with artificial, sulfate-replete seawater and one of four n-alkanes (C1–C4) then incubated under strict anaerobic conditions. Measured rates of alkane oxidation and sulfate reduction closely follow stoichiometric predictions that assume the complete oxidation of alkanes to CO2 (though other sinks for alkane carbon likely exist). Changes in the δ13C of all the alkanes in the reactors show enrichment over the course of the incubation, with the C3 and C4 incubations showing the greatest enrichment (4.4 and 4.5‰, respectively). The concurrent depletion in the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) implies a transfer of carbon from the alkane to the DIC pool (−3.5 and −6.7‰ for C3 and C4 incubations, respectively). Microbial community analyses reveal that certain members of the class Deltaproteobacteria are selectively enriched as the incubations degrade C1–C4 alkanes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that distinct phylotypes are enriched in the ethane reactors, while phylotypes in the propane and butane reactors align with previously identified C3–C4 alkane-oxidizing sulfate-reducers. These data further constrain the potential influence of alkane oxidation on sulfate reduction rates (SRRs) in cold hydrocarbon-rich sediments, provide insight into their contribution to local carbon cycling, and illustrate the extent to which short-chain alkanes can serve as electron donors and govern microbial

  6. To Form a Favorable Idea of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    "To confess the truth, Mrs. B., I am not disposed to form a very favorable idea of chemistry, nor do I expect to derive much entertainment from it." That 200-year-old statement by Caroline to Mrs. Bryan, her teacher, appeared on the first page of Jane Marcet's pioneering secondary school textbook, "Conversations on Chemistry". It was published 17…

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  8. Structure-property relationships of BaCeO perovskites for the oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, T.M.; Jackson, N.B.; Miller, J.E.; Sault, A.G.; Trudell, D.

    1997-12-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) reactions for the formation of two important organic feedstocks ethylene and propylene are of great interest because of the potential in capital and energy savings associated with these reactions. Theoretically, ODH can achieve high conversions of the starting materials (ethane and propane) at lower temperatures than conventional dehydrogenation reactions. The important focus in this study of ODH catalysts is the development of a structure-property relationship for catalyst with respect to selectivity, so as to avoid the more thermodynamically favorable combustion reaction. Catalysts for the ODH reaction generally consist of mixed metal oxides. Since for the most selective catalyst lattice oxygen is known to participate in the reaction, catalysts are sought with surface oxygen atoms that are labile enough to perform dehydrogenation, but not so plentiful or weakly bound as to promote complete combustion. Also, catalysts must be able to replenish surface oxygen by transport from the bulk. Perovskite materials are candidates to fulfill these requirements. The authors are studying BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites doped with elements such as Ca, Mg, and Sr. During the ODH of the alkanes at high temperatures, the perovskite structure is not retained and a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed, as revealed by XRD. While the Ca doped materials showed enhanced total combustion activity below 600 C, they only showed enhanced alkene production at 700 C. Bulk structural and surface changes, as monitored by powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are being correlated with activity in order to understand the factors affecting catalyst performance, and to modify catalyst formulations to improve conversion and selectivity.

  9. Conversation Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xia, Jiang

    1998-01-01

    Describes an activity for use in the conversational English-as-a-foreign-language classroom. The activity involves having each student say one or two sentences that continues a story being made up as the activity goes along. Students were positive about the activity, because saying only one or two sentences helped them not to feel pressured or…

  10. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, E. J.

    1993-06-01

    This report is the 1992 annual progress report for the Energy Conversion and Storage Program, a part of the Energy and Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Work described falls into three broad areas: electrochemistry; chemical applications; and materials applications. The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies principles of chemistry and materials science to solve problems in several areas: (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species, and (5) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Chemical applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing product and waste streams from synfuel plants, coal gasifiers, and biomass conversion processes. Materials applications research includes evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as development of novel preparation techniques. For example, techniques such as sputtering, laser ablation, and poised laser deposition are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.