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Sample records for all-atom molecular dynamics

  1. Coupling all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of ions in water with Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of ions (K+, Na+, Ca2+ and Cl−) in aqueous solutions are investigated. Water is described using the SPC/E model. A stochastic coarse-grained description for ion behaviour is presented and parametrized using MD simulations. It is given as a system of coupled stochastic and ordinary differential equations, describing the ion position, velocity and acceleration. The stochastic coarse-grained model provides an intermediate description between all-atom MD simulations and Brownian dynamics (BD) models. It is used to develop a multiscale method which uses all-atom MD simulations in parts of the computational domain and (less detailed) BD simulations in the remainder of the domain. PMID:27118886

  2. Human Inducible Hsp70: Structures, Dynamics, and Interdomain Communication from All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Nicolaï, Adrien; Senet, Patrick; Delarue, Patrice; Ripoll, Daniel R

    2010-08-10

    The 70 kDa human heat shock protein is a major molecular chaperone involved in de novo folding of proteins in vivo and refolding of proteins under stress conditions. Hsp70 is related to several "misfolding diseases" and other major pathologies, such as cancer, and is a target for new therapies. Hsp70 is comprised of two main domains: an N-terminal nucleotide binding domain (NBD) and a C-terminal substrate protein binding domain (SBD). The chaperone function of Hsp70 is based on an allosteric mechanism. Binding of ATP in NBD decreases the affinity of the substrate for SBD, and hydrolysis of ATP is promoted by binding of polypeptide segments in the SBD. No complete structure of human Hsp70 is known. Here, we report two models of human Hsp70, constructed by homology with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cochaperone protein Hsp110 (open model) and with Escherichia coli 70 kDa DnaK (closed model) and relaxed for several tens to hundreds of nanoseconds by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. We obtain two stable states, Hsp70 with SBD open and SBD closed, which agree with experimental and structural information for ATP-Hsp70 and ADP-Hsp70, respectively. The dynamics of the transition from the open to closed states is investigated with a coarse-grained model and normal-mode analysis. The results show that the conformational change between the two states can be represented by a relatively small number of collective modes which involved major conformational changes in the two domains. These modes provide a mechanistic representation of the communication between NBD and SBD and allow us to identify subdomains and residues that appear to have a critical role in the conformational change mechanism that guides the chaperoning cycle of Hsp70. PMID:26613502

  3. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Perilla, Juan R; Hadden, Jodi A; Goh, Boon Chong; Mayne, Christopher G; Schulten, Klaus

    2016-05-19

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid-protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid-drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  4. All-Atom Molecular Dynamics of Virus Capsids as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Virus capsids are protein shells that package the viral genome. Although their morphology and biological functions can vary markedly, capsids often play critical roles in regulating viral infection pathways. A detailed knowledge of virus capsids, including their dynamic structure, interactions with cellular factors, and the specific roles that they play in the replication cycle, is imperative for the development of antiviral therapeutics. The following Perspective introduces an emerging area of computational biology that focuses on the dynamics of virus capsids and capsid–protein assemblies, with particular emphasis on the effects of small-molecule drug binding on capsid structure, stability, and allosteric pathways. When performed at chemical detail, molecular dynamics simulations can reveal subtle changes in virus capsids induced by drug molecules a fraction of their size. Here, the current challenges of performing all-atom capsid–drug simulations are discussed, along with an outlook on the applicability of virus capsid simulations to reveal novel drug targets. PMID:27128262

  5. Picosecond infrared laser-induced all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of dissociation of viruses.

    PubMed

    Hoang Man, Viet; Van-Oanh, Nguyen-Thi; Derreumaux, Philippe; Li, Mai Suan; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste; Nguyen, Phuong H

    2016-04-28

    Since the discovery of the plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus as the first viral entity in the late 1800s, viruses traditionally have been mainly thought of as pathogens for disease-resistances. However, viruses have recently been exploited as nanoplatforms with applications in biomedicine and materials science. To this aim, a large majority of current methods and tools have been developed to improve the physical stability of viral particles, which may be critical to the extreme physical or chemical conditions that viruses may encounter during purification, fabrication processes, storage and use. However, considerably fewer studies are devoted to developing efficient methods to degrade or recycle such enhanced stability biomaterials. With this in mind, we carry out all-atom nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation, inspired by the recently developed mid-infrared free-electron laser pulse technology, to dissociate viruses. Adopting the poliovirus as a representative example, we find that the primary step in the dissociation process is due to the strong resonance between the amide I vibrational modes of the virus and the tuned laser frequencies. This process is determined by a balance between the formation and dissociation of the protein shell, reflecting the highly plasticity of the virus. Furthermore, our method should provide a feasible approach to simulate viruses, which is otherwise too expensive for conventional equilibrium all-atom simulations of such very large systems. Our work shows a proof of concept which may open a new, efficient way to cleave or to recycle virus-based materials, provide an extremely valuable tool for elucidating mechanical aspects of viruses, and may well play an important role in future fighting against virus-related diseases. PMID:27071540

  6. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Okazaki, S.; Fujimoto, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.

    2014-10-28

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 10{sup 6} all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  7. All-atom molecular dynamics calculation study of entire poliovirus empty capsids in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Y.; Yoshii, N.; Yamada, A.; Fujimoto, K.; Kojima, H.; Mizutani, K.; Nakagawa, A.; Nomoto, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2014-10-01

    Small viruses that belong, for example, to the Picornaviridae, such as poliovirus and foot-and-mouth disease virus, consist simply of capsid proteins and a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome. The capsids are quite stable in solution to protect the genome from the environment. Here, based on long-time and large-scale 6.5 × 106 all-atom molecular dynamics calculations for the Mahoney strain of poliovirus, we show microscopic properties of the viral capsids at a molecular level. First, we found equilibrium rapid exchange of water molecules across the capsid. The exchange rate is so high that all water molecules inside the capsid (about 200 000) can leave the capsid and be replaced by water molecules from the outside in about 25 μs. This explains the capsid's tolerance to high pressures and deactivation by exsiccation. In contrast, the capsid did not exchange ions, at least within the present simulation time of 200 ns. This implies that the capsid can function, in principle, as a semipermeable membrane. We also found that, similar to the xylem of trees, the pressure of the solution inside the capsid without the genome was negative. This is caused by coulombic interaction of the solution inside the capsid with the capsid excess charges. The negative pressure may be compensated by positive osmotic pressure by the solution-soluble ssRNA and the counter ions introduced into it.

  8. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation studies of fully hydrated gel phase DPPG and DPPE bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimthon, Jutarat; Willumeit, Regine; Lendlein, Andreas; Hofmann, Dieter

    2009-03-01

    Here in silico lipid membranes are described providing a structural background of the organization of the lipid components of membranes and aiding further biological or biophysical studies. An all-atom molecular dynamics simulations has been performed to investigate structural and dynamical properties of two fully hydrated gel-phase bilayers of 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DPPG) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine (DPPE) bilayers at 303 K. The respective starting configuration of lipids in the simulation bilayer unit cells were taken on the basis of scattering data. In both simulations, we found overall reasonably good agreement with the available experimental data (area per lipid, phosphorus-phosphorus distance). The distribution of the water/counterions at the membrane interface, interactions/orientations of lipid headgroups, and hydrocarbon chain organization were extensively studied in terms of pair distribution functions between main structural components of the system. Intra/intermolecular hydrogen bond formation was discussed in detail. The water orientation at the lipid membrane interface was explored thoroughly in terms of dipole moment as a function of the water molecule positions along the membrane, where we found that the counterions changed the orientation of the water at the interface. Special attention has been devoted to the distribution of the sodium counterions around the DPPG headgroup. We found preferential binding of Na + ions to the phosphate oxygen species.

  9. Dissociation of a Dynamic Protein Complex Studied by All-Atom Molecular Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liqun; Borthakur, Susmita; Buck, Matthias

    2016-02-23

    The process of protein complex dissociation remains to be understood at the atomic level of detail. Computers now allow microsecond timescale molecular-dynamics simulations, which make the visualization of such processes possible. Here, we investigated the dissociation process of the EphA2-SHIP2 SAM-SAM domain heterodimer complex using unrestrained all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations. Previous studies on this system have shown that alternate configurations are sampled, that their interconversion can be fast, and that the complex is dynamic by nature. Starting from different NMR-derived structures, mutants were designed to stabilize a subset of configurations by swapping ion pairs across the protein-protein interface. We focused on two mutants, K956D/D1235K and R957D/D1223R, with attenuated binding affinity compared with the wild-type proteins. In contrast to calculations on the wild-type complexes, the majority of simulations of these mutants showed protein dissociation within 2.4 μs. During the separation process, we observed domain rotation and pivoting as well as a translation and simultaneous rolling, typically to alternate and weaker binding interfaces. Several unsuccessful recapturing attempts occurred once the domains were moderately separated. An analysis of protein solvation suggests that the dissociation process correlates with a progressive loss of protein-protein contacts. Furthermore, an evaluation of internal protein dynamics using quasi-harmonic and order parameter analyses indicates that changes in protein internal motions are expected to contribute significantly to the thermodynamics of protein dissociation. Considering protein association as the reverse of the separation process, the initial role of charged/polar interactions is emphasized, followed by changes in protein and solvent dynamics. The trajectories show that protein separation does not follow a single distinct pathway, but suggest that the mechanism of dissociation is common in

  10. On Using Atomistic Solvent Layers in Hybrid All-Atom/Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Alexander B; Gopal, Srinivasa M; Schäfer, Lars V

    2015-09-01

    Hybrid all-atom/coarse-grained (AA-CG) simulations in which AA solutes are embedded in a CG environment can provide a significant computational speed-up over conventional fully atomistic simulations and thus alleviate the current length and time scale limitations of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of large biomolecular systems. On one hand, coarse graining the solvent is particularly appealing, since it typically constitutes the largest part of the simulation system and thus dominates computational cost. On the other hand, retaining atomic-level solvent layers around the solute is desirable for a realistic description of hydrogen bonds and other local solvation effects. Here, we devise and systematically validate fixed resolution AA-CG schemes, both with and without atomistic water layers. To quantify the accuracy and diagnose possible pitfalls, Gibbs free energies of solvation of amino acid side chain analogues were calculated, and the influence of the nature of the CG solvent surrounding (polarizable vs nonpolarizable CG water) and the size of the AA solvent region was investigated. We show that distance restraints to keep the AA solvent around the solute lead to too high of a density in the inner shell. Together with a long-ranged effect due to orientational ordering of water molecules at the AA-CG boundary, this affects solvation free energies. Shifting the onset of the distance restraints slightly away from the central solute significantly improves solvation free energies, down to mean unsigned errors with respect to experiment of 2.3 and 2.6 kJ/mol for the polarizable and nonpolarizable CG water surrounding, respectively. The speed-up of the nonpolarizable model renders it computationally more attractive. The present work thus highlights challenges, and outlines possible solutions, involved with modeling the boundary between different levels of resolution in hybrid AA-CG simulations. PMID:26575936

  11. Lipid receptor S1P₁ activation scheme concluded from microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Wu, Rongliang; Latek, Dorota; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Filipek, Slawomir

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid mediator which activates G protein-coupled sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors and thus evokes a variety of cell and tissue responses including lymphocyte trafficking, endothelial development, integrity, and maturation. We performed five all-atom 700 ns molecular dynamics simulations of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P₁) based on recently released crystal structure of that receptor with an antagonist. We found that the initial movements of amino acid residues occurred in the area of highly conserved W269⁶·⁴⁸ in TM6 which is close to the ligand binding location. Those residues located in the central part of the receptor and adjacent to kinks of TM helices comprise of a transmission switch. Side chains movements of those residues were coupled to the movements of water molecules inside the receptor which helped in the gradual opening of intracellular part of the receptor. The most stable parts of the protein were helices TM1 and TM2, while the largest movement was observed for TM7, possibly due to the short intracellular part starting with a helix kink at P⁷·⁵⁰, which might be the first helix to move at the intracellular side. We show for the first time the detailed view of the concerted action of the transmission switch and Trp (W⁶·⁴⁸) rotamer toggle switch leading to redirection of water molecules flow in the central part of the receptor. That event is a prerequisite for subsequent changes in intracellular part of the receptor involving water influx and opening of the receptor structure. PMID:24098103

  12. Application of principal component analysis in protein unfolding: An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Atanu; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali

    2007-10-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the thermal denaturation of one protein and one peptide—ubiquitin and melittin. To identify the correlation in dynamics among various secondary structural fragments and also the individual contribution of different residues towards thermal unfolding, principal component analysis method was applied in order to give a new insight to protein dynamics by analyzing the contribution of coefficients of principal components. The cross-correlation matrix obtained from MD simulation trajectory provided important information regarding the anisotropy of backbone dynamics that leads to unfolding. Unfolding of ubiquitin was found to be a three-state process, while that of melittin, though smaller and mostly helical, is more complicated.

  13. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-01-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA+ ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named ‘the ADP model’ and ‘the ATP model’, where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA+ ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  14. Elastic properties of dynein motor domain obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Narutoshi; Mashimo, Tadaaki; Takano, Yu; Kon, Takahide; Kurisu, Genji; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    Dyneins are large microtubule motor proteins that convert ATP energy to mechanical power. High-resolution crystal structures of ADP-bound cytoplasmic dynein have revealed the organization of the motor domain, comprising the AAA(+) ring, the linker, the stalk/strut and the C sequence. Recently, the ADP.vanadate-bound structure, which is similar to the ATP hydrolysis transition state, revealed how the structure of dynein changes upon ATP binding. Although both the ADP- and ATP-bound state structures have been resolved, the dynamic properties at the atomic level remain unclear. In this work, we built two models named 'the ADP model' and 'the ATP model', where ADP and ATP are bound to AAA1 in the AAA(+) ring, respectively, to observe the initial procedure of the structural change from the unprimed to the primed state. We performed 200-ns molecular dynamics simulations for both models and compared their structures and dynamics. The motions of the stalk, consisting of a long coiled coil with a microtubule-binding domain, significantly differed between the two models. The elastic properties of the stalk were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. PMID:27334455

  15. Assembling a xylanase-lichenase chimera through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Oliveira, Leandro C; Damásio, André R L; Citadini, Ana P; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Alvarez, Thabata M; Codima, Carla A; Leite, Vitor B P; Pastore, Glaucia; de Oliveira-Neto, Mario; Murakami, Mario T; Ruller, Roberto; Squina, Fabio M

    2013-08-01

    Multifunctional enzyme engineering can improve enzyme cocktails for emerging biofuel technology. Molecular dynamics through structure-based models (SB) is an effective tool for assessing the tridimensional arrangement of chimeric enzymes as well as for inferring the functional practicability before experimental validation. This study describes the computational design of a bifunctional xylanase-lichenase chimera (XylLich) using the xynA and bglS genes from Bacillus subtilis. In silico analysis of the average solvent accessible surface area (SAS) and the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) predicted a fully functional chimera, with minor fluctuations and variations along the polypeptide chains. Afterwards, the chimeric enzyme was built by fusing the xynA and bglS genes. XylLich was evaluated through small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, resulting in scattering curves with a very accurate fit to the theoretical protein model. The chimera preserved the biochemical characteristics of the parental enzymes, with the exception of a slight variation in the temperature of operation and the catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The absence of substantial shifts in the catalytic mode of operation was also verified. Furthermore, the production of chimeric enzymes could be more profitable than producing a single enzyme separately, based on comparing the recombinant protein production yield and the hydrolytic activity achieved for XylLich with that of the parental enzymes. PMID:23459129

  16. All-atom molecular dynamics analysis of multi-peptide systems reproduces peptide solubility in line with experimental observations

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yutaka; Suenaga, Atsushi; Sato, Yuji; Kosuda, Satoshi; Taiji, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the contribution of individual amino acids to protein and peptide solubility, we carried out 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 106 Å3 cubic boxes containing ~3 × 104 water molecules and 27 tetra-peptides regularly positioned at 23 Å from each other and composed of a single amino acid type for all natural amino acids but cysteine and glycine. The calculations were performed using Amber with a standard force field on a special purpose MDGRAPE-3 computer, without introducing any “artificial” hydrophobic interactions. Tetra-peptides composed of I, V, L, M, N, Q, F, W, Y, and H formed large amorphous clusters, and those containing A, P, S, and T formed smaller ones. Tetra-peptides made of D, E, K, and R did not cluster at all. These observations correlated well with experimental solubility tendencies as well as hydrophobicity scales with correlation coefficients of 0.5 to > 0.9. Repulsive Coulomb interactions were dominant in ensuring high solubility, whereas both Coulomb and van der Waals (vdW) energies contributed to the aggregations of low solubility amino acids. Overall, this very first all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a multi-peptide system appears to reproduce the basic properties of peptide solubility, essentially in line with experimental observations. PMID:26817663

  17. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  18. Insights into the Tunnel Mechanism of Cholesteryl Ester Transfer Protein through All-atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Dongsheng; Rames, Matthew; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Shengli; Ren, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) mediates cholesteryl ester (CE) transfer from the atheroprotective high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol to the atherogenic low density lipoprotein cholesterol. In the past decade, this property has driven the development of CETP inhibitors, which have been evaluated in large scale clinical trials for treating cardiovascular diseases. Despite the pharmacological interest, little is known about the fundamental mechanism of CETP in CE transfer. Recent electron microscopy (EM) experiments have suggested a tunnel mechanism, and molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the flexible N-terminal distal end of CETP penetrates into the HDL surface and takes up a CE molecule through an open pore. However, it is not known whether a CE molecule can completely transfer through an entire CETP molecule. Here, we used all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to evaluate this possibility. The results showed that a hydrophobic tunnel inside CETP is sufficient to allow a CE molecule to completely transfer through the entire CETP within a predicted transfer time and at a rate comparable with those obtained through physiological measurements. Analyses of the detailed interactions revealed several residues that might be critical for CETP function, which may provide important clues for the effective development of CETP inhibitors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27143480

  19. Non-equilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of free and tethered DNA molecules in nanochannel shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guan M.; Sandberg, William C.

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the mechanical and dynamical behaviour of free and tethered short chains of ss/ds DNA molecules in flow, and in parallel to investigate the properties of long chain molecules in flow fields, we have developed a series of quantum and molecular methods to extend the well developed equilibrium software CHARMM to handle non-equilibrium dynamics. These methods have been applied to cases of DNA molecules in shear flows in nanochannels. Biomolecules, both free and wall-tethered, have been simulated in the all-atom style in solvent-filled nanochannels. The new methods were demonstrated by carrying out NEMD simulations of free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules of 21 bases as well as double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules of 21 base pairs tethered on gold surfaces in an ionic water shear flow. The tethering of the linker molecule (6-mercapto-1-hexanol) to perfect Au(111) surfaces was parametrized based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Force field parameters were incorporated into the CHARMM database. Gold surfaces are simulated in a Lennard-Jones style model that was fitted to the Morse potential model of bulk gold. The bonding force of attachment of the DNA molecules to the gold substrate linker molecule was computed to be up to a few nN when the DNA molecules are fully stretched at high shear rates. For the first time, we calculated the relaxation time of DNA molecules in picoseconds (ps) and the hydrodynamic force up to a few nanoNewtons (nN) per base pair in a nanochannel flow. The velocity profiles in the solvent due to the presence of the tethered DNA molecules were found to be nonlinear only at high shear flow rates. Free ssDNA molecules in a shear flow were observed to behave differently from each other depending upon their initial orientation in the flow field. Both free and tethered DNA molecules are clearly observed to be stretching, rotating and relaxing. Methods developed in this initial work can be incorporated

  20. A coarse-graining approach for molecular simulation that retains the dynamics of the all-atom reference system by implementing hydrodynamic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Markutsya, Sergiy; Lamm, Monica H

    2014-11-07

    We report on a new approach for deriving coarse-grained intermolecular forces that retains the frictional contribution that is often discarded by conventional coarse-graining methods. The approach is tested for water and an aqueous glucose solution, and the results from the new implementation for coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation show remarkable agreement with the dynamics obtained from reference all-atom simulations. The agreement between the structural properties observed in the coarse-grained and all-atom simulations is also preserved. We discuss how this approach may be applied broadly to any existing coarse-graining method where the coarse-grained models are rigorously derived from all-atom reference systems.

  1. Evaluation of protein-protein docking model structures using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Guo, Hao; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2012-12-01

    We propose a method to evaluate binding free energy differences among distinct protein-protein complex model structures through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water using the solution theory in the energy representation. Complex model structures are generated from a pair of monomeric structures using the rigid-body docking program ZDOCK. After structure refinement by side chain optimization and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water, complex models are evaluated based on the sum of their conformational and solvation free energies, the latter calculated from the energy distribution functions obtained from relatively short molecular dynamics simulations of the complex in water and of pure water based on the solution theory in the energy representation. We examined protein-protein complex model structures of two protein-protein complex systems, bovine trypsin/CMTI-1 squash inhibitor (PDB ID: 1PPE) and RNase SA/barstar (PDB ID: 1AY7), for which both complex and monomer structures were determined experimentally. For each system, we calculated the energies for the crystal complex structure and twelve generated model structures including the model most similar to the crystal structure and very different from it. In both systems, the sum of the conformational and solvation free energies tended to be lower for the structure similar to the crystal. We concluded that our energy calculation method is useful for selecting low energy complex models similar to the crystal structure from among a set of generated models.

  2. Free-energy analysis of lysozyme-triNAG binding modes with all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Burri, Raghunadha Reddy; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Ishikura, Takakazu; Sakuraba, Shun; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kuwata, Kazuo; Kitao, Akio

    2013-02-01

    We propose a method for calculating the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with the solution theory in the energy representation. Four distinct modes for the binding of tri-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (triNAG) to hen egg-white lysozyme were investigated, one from the crystal structure and three generated by docking predictions. The proposed method was demonstrated to be used to distinguish the most plausible binding mode (crystal model) as the lowest binding energy mode.

  3. Effect of water on structure and dynamics of [BMIM][PF6] ionic liquid: An all-atom molecular dynamics simulation investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anirban; Ghorai, Pradip Kr.

    2016-03-01

    Composition dependent structural and dynamical properties of aqueous hydrophobic 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF6]) ionic liquid (IL) have been investigated by using all-atom molecular dynamics simulation. We observe that addition of water does not increase significant number of dissociated ions in the solution over the pure state. As a consequence, self-diffusion coefficient of the cation and anion is comparable to each other at all water concentration similar to that is observed for the pure state. Voronoi polyhedra analysis exhibits strong dependence on the local environment of IL concentration. Void and neck distributions in Voronoi tessellation are approximately Gaussian for pure IL but upon subsequent addition of water, we observe deviation from the Gaussian behaviour with an asymmetric broadening with long tail of exponential decay at large void radius, particularly at higher water concentrations. The increase in void space and neck size at higher water concentration facilitates ionic motion, thus, decreasing dynamical heterogeneity and IL reorientation time and increases self-diffusion coefficient significantly.

  4. Collision-Induced Dissociation of Electrosprayed Protein Complexes: An All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Model with Mobile Protons.

    PubMed

    Popa, Vlad; Trecroce, Danielle A; McAllister, Robert G; Konermann, Lars

    2016-06-16

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) has become an indispensable technique for examining noncovalent protein complexes. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of these multiply protonated gaseous ions usually culminates in ejection of a single subunit with a disproportionately large amount of charge. Experiments suggest that this process involves subunit unfolding prior to separation from the residual complex, as well as H(+) migration onto the unravelling chain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are a promising avenue for gaining detailed insights into these CID events. Unfortunately, typical MD algorithms do not allow for mobile protons. Here we address this limitation by implementing a strategy that combines atomistic force fields (such as OPLS/AA and CHARMM36) with a proton hopping algorithm, focusing on the tetrameric complexes transthyretin and streptavidin. Protons are redistributed over all acidic and basic sites in 20 ps intervals, subject to an energy function that reflects electrostatic interactions and proton affinities. Our simulations predict that nativelike conformers at the onset of collisional heating contain multiple salt bridges. Collisional heating initially causes subtle structural changes that lead to a gradual decline of these zwitterionic patterns. Many of the MD runs show gradual unfolding of a single subunit in conjunction with H(+) migration, culminating in subunit separation from the complex. However, there are also instances where two or more chains start to unfold simultaneously, giving rise to charge competition. The scission point where the "winning" subunit separates from the complex can be attained for different degrees of unfolding, giving rise to product ions in various charge states. The simulated product ion distributions are in close agreement with experimental CID data. Proton enrichment in the departing subunit is driven by charge-charge repulsion, but the combination of salt bridge depletion, charge migration

  5. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  6. Insight into the Properties of Cardiolipin Containing Bilayers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Using a Hybrid All-Atom/United-Atom Force Field.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Chipot, Christophe

    2012-05-01

    Simulation of three models of cardiolipin (CL) containing membranes using a new set of parameters for tetramyristoyl and tetraoleoyl CLs has been developed in the framework of the united-atom CHARMM27-UA and the all-atom CHARMM36 force fields with the aim of performing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of cardiolipin-containing mixed-lipid membranes. The new parameters use a hybrid representation of all-atom head groups in conjunction with implicit-hydrogen united-atom (UA) to describe the oleoyl and myristoyl chains of the CLs, in lieu of the fully atomistic description, thereby allowing longer simulations to be undertaken. The physicochemical properties of the bilayers were determined and compared with previously reported data. Furthermore, using tetramyristoyl CL mixed with POPG and POPE lipids, a mitochondrial membrane was simulated. The results presented here show the different behavior of the bilayers as a result of the lipid composition, where the length of the acyl chain and the conformation of the headgroup can be associated with the mitochondrial membrane properties. The new hybrid CL parameters prove to be well suited for the simulation of the molecular structure of CL-containing bilayers and can be extended to other lipid bilayers composed of CLs with different acyl chains or alternate head groups. PMID:26593668

  7. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems. PMID:25612718

  8. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-01

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH3CONH2) and urea (NH2CONH2) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH3CONH2 + (1 - f)NH2CONH2] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ˜120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (˜207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (˜70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α2) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  9. Density relaxation and particle motion characteristics in a non-ionic deep eutectic solvent (acetamide + urea): Time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Anuradha; Das, Suman; Biswas, Ranjit

    2015-01-21

    Temperature dependent relaxation dynamics, particle motion characteristics, and heterogeneity aspects of deep eutectic solvents (DESs) made of acetamide (CH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2}) and urea (NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}) have been investigated by employing time-resolved fluorescence measurements and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Three different compositions (f) for the mixture [fCH{sub 3}CONH{sub 2} + (1 − f)NH{sub 2}CONH{sub 2}] have been studied in a temperature range of 328-353 K which is ∼120-145 K above the measured glass transition temperatures (∼207 K) of these DESs but much lower than the individual melting temperature of either of the constituents. Steady state fluorescence emission measurements using probe solutes with sharply different lifetimes do not indicate any dependence on excitation wavelength in these metastable molten systems. Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy measurements reveal near-hydrodynamic coupling between medium viscosity and rotation of a dissolved dipolar solute. Stokes shift dynamics have been found to be too fast to be detected by the time-resolution (∼70 ps) employed, suggesting extremely rapid medium polarization relaxation. All-atom simulations reveal Gaussian distribution for particle displacements and van Hove correlations, and significant overlap between non-Gaussian (α{sub 2}) and new non-Gaussian (γ) heterogeneity parameters. In addition, no stretched exponential relaxations have been detected in the simulated wavenumber dependent acetamide dynamic structure factors. All these results are in sharp contrast to earlier observations for ionic deep eutectics with acetamide [Guchhait et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104514 (2014)] and suggest a fundamental difference in interaction and dynamics between ionic and non-ionic deep eutectic solvent systems.

  10. Molecular dynamics study of human carbonic anhydrase II in complex with Zn(2+) and acetazolamide on the basis of all-atom force field simulations.

    PubMed

    Wambo, Thierry O; Chen, Liao Y; McHardy, Stanton F; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) represents an ultimate example of the perfectly efficient metalloenzymes, which is capable of catalyzing the hydration of carbon dioxide with a rate approaching the diffusion controlled limit. Extensive experimental studies of this physiologically important metalloprotein have been done to elucidate the fundamentals of its enzymatic actions: what residues anchor the Zn(2+) (or another divalent cation) at the bottom of the binding pocket; how the relevant residues work concertedly with the divalent cation in the reversible conversions between CO2 and HCO3(-); what are the protonation states of the relevant residues and acetazolamide, an inhibitor complexed with hCAII, etc. In this article, we present a detailed computational study on the basis of the all-atom CHARMM force field where Zn(2+) is represented with a simple model of divalent cation using the transferrable parameters available from the current literature. We compute the hydration free energy of Zn(2+), the characteristics of hCAII-Zn(2+) complexation, and the absolute free energy of binding acetazolamide to the hCAII-Zn(2+) complex. In each of these three problems, our computed results agree with the experimental data within the known margin of error without making any case-by-case adjustments to the parameters. The quantitatively accurate insights we gain in this all-atom molecular dynamics study should be helpful in the search and design of more specific inhibitors of this and other carbonic anhydrases. PMID:27232456

  11. Poly(Ethylene Glycol) in Drug Delivery, Why Does it Work, and Can We do Better? All Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation Provides Some Answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Alex

    We summarize our recent work, using all atom molecular dynamics simulation to study the role of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in drug delivery. We have simulated the drug delivery liposome membrane, in both the Gel and Liquid crystalline states. The simulations of the PEGylated membrane have been carried out in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaCl, and two other salts encountered in physiological conditions, KCL and CaCl2. We also simulated targeting moieties on the PEGylated membrane, comparing the behavior of two targeting moieties. We also simulated PEG with three drug molecules for which it is used as a delivery aid: paclitaxel, piroxicam, and hematoporphyrin. We found that the specific properties of PEG, its solubility in both polar and non-polar solvents, and its acting as a polymer electrolyte, have a significant e_ect on its behavior when used in drug delivery.

  12. Energetics of nonpolar and polar compounds in cationic, anionic, and nonionic micelles studied by all-atom molecular dynamics simulation combined with a theory of solutions.

    PubMed

    Date, Atsushi; Ishizuka, Ryosuke; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-21

    Energetic analysis was conducted for nonpolar and polar solutes bound in a cationic micelle of dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (DTAB), an anionic micelle of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and a nonionic micelle of tetraethylene glycol monododecyl ether (Brij30). All-atom molecular dynamics simulation was performed, and the free energies of binding the solutes in the hydrophobic-core and headgroup regions of the micelles were computed using the energy-representation method. It was found in all the micelles examined that aromatic naphthalene is preferably located more outward than aliphatic propane and that the polar solutes are localized at the interface of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. The roles of the surfactant and water were then elucidated by decomposing the free energy into the contributions from the respective species. Water was observed to play a decisive role in determining the binding location of the solute, while the surfactant was found to be more important for the overall stabilization of the solute within the micelle. The effects of attractive and repulsive interactions of the solute with the surfactant and water were further examined, and their competition was analyzed in connection with the preferable location of the solute in the micellar system. PMID:27117093

  13. Free energetics of carbon nanotube association in aqueous inorganic NaI salt solutions: Temperature effects using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-06-15

    In this study, we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association using graphical processing unit-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion, and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intratube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and

  14. Free Energetics of Carbon Nanotube Association in Aqueous Inorganic NaI Salt Solutions: Temperature Effects using All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Shu-Ching; Cui, Di; Wezowicz, Matthew; Taufer, Michela; Patel, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    In this study we examine the temperature dependence of free energetics of nanotube association by using GPU-enabled all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (FEN ZI) with two (10,10) single-walled carbon nanotubes in 3 m NaI aqueous salt solution. Results suggest that the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes for the association process are all reduced at the high temperature, in agreement with previous investigations using other hydrophobes. Via the decomposition of free energy into individual components, we found that solvent contribution (including water, anion and cation contributions) is correlated with the spatial distribution of the corresponding species and is influenced distinctly by the temperature. We studied the spatial distribution and the structure of the solvent in different regions: intertube, intra-tube and the bulk solvent. By calculating the fluctuation of coarse-grained tube-solvent surfaces, we found that tube-water interfacial fluctuation exhibits the strongest temperature dependence. By taking ions to be a solvent-like medium in the absence of water, tube-anion interfacial fluctuation also shows similar but weaker dependence on temperature, while tube-cation interfacial fluctuation shows no dependence in general. These characteristics are discussed via the malleability of their corresponding solvation shells relative to the nanotube surface. Hydrogen bonding profiles and tetrahedrality of water arrangement are also computed to compare the structure of solvent in the solvent bulk and intertube region. The hydrophobic confinement induces a relatively lower concentration environment in the intertube region, therefore causing different intertube solvent structures which depend on the tube separation. This study is relevant in the continuing discourse on hydrophobic interactions (as they impact generally a broad class of phenomena in biology, biochemistry, and materials science and soft condensed matter research), and interpretations of

  15. Quantum and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of protonation and divalent ion binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2).

    PubMed

    Slochower, David R; Huwe, Peter J; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A

    2013-07-18

    Molecular dynamics calculations have been used to determine the structure of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) at the quantum level and to quantify the propensity for PIP2 to bind two physiologically relevant divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+). We performed a geometry optimization at the Hartree-Fock 6-31+G(d) level of theory in vacuum and with a polarized continuum dielectric to determine the conformation of the phospholipid headgroup in the presence of water and its partial charge distribution. The angle between the headgroup and the acyl chains is nearly perpendicular, suggesting that in the absence of other interactions the inositol ring would lie flat along the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane. Next, we employed hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the protonation state of PIP2 and its interactions with magnesium or calcium. We test the hypothesis suggested by prior experiments that binding of magnesium to PIP2 is mediated by a water molecule that is absent when calcium binds. These results may explain the selective ability of calcium to induce the formation of PIP2 clusters and phase separation from other lipids. PMID:23786273

  16. Quantum and All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protonation and Divalent Ion Binding to Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PIP2)

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Huwe, Peter J.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations have been used to determine the structure of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) at the quantum level and to quantify the propensity for PIP2 to bind two physiologically relevant divalent cations, Mg2+ and Ca2+. We performed a geometry optimization at the Hartree-Fock 6-31+G(d) level of theory in vacuum and with a polarized continuum dielectric to determine the conformation of the phospholipid headgroup in the presence of water and its partial charge distribution. The angle between the headgroup and the acyl chains is nearly perpendicular, suggesting that in the absence of other interactions, the inositol ring would lie flat along the cytoplasmic surface of the plasma membrane. Next, we employed hybrid quantum mechanics / molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to investigate the protonation state of PIP2 and its interactions with magnesium or calcium. We test the hypothesis suggested by prior experiments that binding of magnesium to PIP2 is mediated by a water molecule that is absent when calcium binds. These results may explain the selective ability of calcium to induce the formation of PIP2 clusters and phase separation from other lipids. PMID:23786273

  17. All-atom simulations of crowding effects on ubiquitin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abriata, Luciano A.; Spiga, Enrico; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that crowded environments affect the stability of proteins, with strong biological and biotechnological implications; however, beyond this, crowding is also expected to affect the dynamic properties of proteins, an idea that is hard to probe experimentally. Here we report on a simulation study aimed at evaluating the effects of crowding on internal protein dynamics, based on fully all-atom descriptions of the protein, the solvent and the crowder. Our model system consists of ubiquitin, a protein whose dynamic features are closely related to its ability to bind to multiple partners, in a 325 g L-1 solution of glucose in water, a condition widely employed in in vitro studies of crowding effects. We observe a slight reduction in loop flexibility accompanied by a dramatic restriction of the conformational space explored in the timescale of the simulations (˜0.5 µs), indicating that crowding slows down collective motions and the rate of exploration of the conformational space. This effect is attributed to the extensive and long-lasting interactions observed between protein residues and glucose molecules throughout the entire protein surface. Potential implications of the observed effects are discussed.

  18. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  19. ALMOST: an all atom molecular simulation toolkit for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Fu, Biao; Sahakyan, Aleksandr B; Camilloni, Carlo; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano; Paci, Emanuele; Caflisch, Amedeo; Vendruscolo, Michele; Cavalli, Andrea

    2014-05-30

    Almost (all atom molecular simulation toolkit) is an open source computational package for structure determination and analysis of complex molecular systems including proteins, and nucleic acids. Almost has been designed with two primary goals: to provide tools for molecular structure determination using various types of experimental measurements as conformational restraints, and to provide methods for the analysis and assessment of structural and dynamical properties of complex molecular systems. The methods incorporated in Almost include the determination of structural and dynamical features of proteins using distance restraints derived from nuclear Overhauser effect measurements, orientational restraints obtained from residual dipolar couplings and the structural restraints from chemical shifts. Here, we present the first public release of Almost, highlight the key aspects of its computational design and discuss the main features currently implemented. Almost is available for the most common Unix-based operating systems, including Linux and Mac OS X. Almost is distributed free of charge under the GNU Public License, and is available both as a source code and as a binary executable from the project web site at http://www.open-almost.org. Interested users can follow and contribute to the further development of Almost on http://sourceforge.net/projects/almost. PMID:24676684

  20. Molecular jamming—The cystine slipknot mechanical clamp in all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepłowski, Łukasz; Sikora, Mateusz; Nowak, Wiesław; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-02-01

    A recent survey of 17 134 proteins has identified a new class of proteins which are expected to yield stretching induced force peaks in the range of 1 nN. Such high force peaks should be due to forcing of a slip-loop through a cystine ring, i.e., by generating a cystine slipknot. The survey has been performed in a simple coarse grained model. Here, we perform all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulations on 15 cystine knot proteins and determine their resistance to stretching. In agreement with previous studies within a coarse grained structure based model, the level of resistance is found to be substantially higher than in proteins in which the mechanical clamp operates through shear. The large stretching forces arise through formation of the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp and the resulting steric jamming. We elucidate the workings of such a clamp in an atomic detail. We also study the behavior of five top strength proteins with the shear-based mechanostability in which no jamming is involved. We show that in the atomic model, the jamming state is relieved by moving one amino acid at a time and there is a choice in the selection of the amino acid that advances the first. In contrast, the coarse grained model also allows for a simultaneous passage of two amino acids.

  1. Molecular jamming--the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp in all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Pepłowski, Lukasz; Sikora, Mateusz; Nowak, Wiesław; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-02-28

    A recent survey of 17 134 proteins has identified a new class of proteins which are expected to yield stretching induced force peaks in the range of 1 nN. Such high force peaks should be due to forcing of a slip-loop through a cystine ring, i.e., by generating a cystine slipknot. The survey has been performed in a simple coarse grained model. Here, we perform all-atom steered molecular dynamics simulations on 15 cystine knot proteins and determine their resistance to stretching. In agreement with previous studies within a coarse grained structure based model, the level of resistance is found to be substantially higher than in proteins in which the mechanical clamp operates through shear. The large stretching forces arise through formation of the cystine slipknot mechanical clamp and the resulting steric jamming. We elucidate the workings of such a clamp in an atomic detail. We also study the behavior of five top strength proteins with the shear-based mechanostability in which no jamming is involved. We show that in the atomic model, the jamming state is relieved by moving one amino acid at a time and there is a choice in the selection of the amino acid that advances the first. In contrast, the coarse grained model also allows for a simultaneous passage of two amino acids. PMID:21361557

  2. All-atom force field for molecular dynamics simulations on organotransition metal solids and liquids. Application to M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) compounds.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Carlos E S; Canongia Lopes, José N; Minas da Piedade, Manuel E

    2013-10-31

    A previously developed OPLS-based all-atom force field for organometallic compounds was extended to a series of first-, second-, and third-row transition metals based on the study of M(CO)(n) (M = Cr, Fe, Ni, Mo, Ru, or W) complexes. For materials that are solid at ambient temperature and pressure (M = Cr, Mo, W) the validation of the force field was based on reported structural data and on the standard molar enthalpies of sublimation at 298.15 K, experimentally determined by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry using samples corresponding to a specific and well-characterized crystalline phase: Δ(sub)H(m)° = 72.6 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Cr(CO)(6), 73.4 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for Mo(CO)(6), and 77.8 ± 0.3 kJ·mol(–1) for W(CO)(6). For liquids, where problems of polymorphism or phase mixtures are absent, critically analyzed literature data were used. The force field was able to reproduce the volumetric properties of the test set (density and unit cell volume) with an average deviations smaller than 2% and the experimentally determined enthalpies of sublimation and vaporization with an accuracy better than 2.3 kJ·mol(–1). The Lennard-Jones (12-6) potential function parameters used to calculate the repulsive and dispersion contributions of the metals within the framework of the force field were found to be transferable between chromium, iron, and nickel (first row) and between molybdenum and ruthenium (second row). PMID:24079472

  3. Molecular insights into diphenylalanine nanotube assembly: all-atom simulations of oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Joohyun; Mills, Carolyn E; Shell, M Scott

    2013-04-18

    Self-assembling peptides represent a growing class of inexpensive, environmentally benign, nanostructured materials. In particular, diphenylalanine (FF) self-assembles into nanotubes with remarkable strength and thermal stability that have found use in a wide variety of applications, including as sacrificial templates and scaffolds for structuring inorganic materials and as interfacial "nanoforests" for superhydrophobic surfaces and high-performance supercapacitors and biosensors. However, little is known about the assembly mechanisms of FF nanotubes or the forces underlying their stability. Here, we perform a variety of molecular dynamics simulations on both zwitterionic and capped (uncharged) versions of the FF peptide to understand the early stages of self-assembly. We compare these results to simulations of the proposed nanotube X-ray crystal structure. When comparing the zwitterionic and uncharged FF peptides, we find that, while electrostatic interactions steer the former into more ordered dimers and trimers, the hydrophobic side chain interactions play a strong role in determining the structures of larger oligomers. Simulations of the crystal structure fragment also suggest that the strongest interactions occur between side chains, not between the charged termini that form salt bridges. We conclude that the amphiphilic nature of FF is key to understanding its self-assembly, and that the early precursors to nanotube structures are likely to involve substantial hydrophobic clustering, rather than hexamer ring motifs as has been previously suggested. PMID:23521630

  4. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjun; Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  5. Probing the folded state and mechanical unfolding pathways of T4 lysozyme using all-atom and coarse-grained molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Wenjun Glenn, Paul

    2015-01-21

    The Bacteriophage T4 Lysozyme (T4L) is a prototype modular protein comprised of an N-terminal and a C-domain domain, which was extensively studied to understand the folding/unfolding mechanism of modular proteins. To offer detailed structural and dynamic insights to the folded-state stability and the mechanical unfolding behaviors of T4L, we have performed extensive equilibrium and steered molecular dynamics simulations of both the wild-type (WT) and a circular permutation (CP) variant of T4L using all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Our all-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the folded state have consistently found greater stability of the C-domain than the N-domain in isolation, which is in agreement with past thermostatic studies of T4L. While the all-atom simulation cannot fully explain the mechanical unfolding behaviors of the WT and the CP variant observed in an optical tweezers study, the coarse-grained simulations based on the Go model or a modified elastic network model (mENM) are in qualitative agreement with the experimental finding of greater unfolding cooperativity in the WT than the CP variant. Interestingly, the two coarse-grained models predict different structural mechanisms for the observed change in cooperativity between the WT and the CP variant—while the Go model predicts minor modification of the unfolding pathways by circular permutation (i.e., preserving the general order that the N-domain unfolds before the C-domain), the mENM predicts a dramatic change in unfolding pathways (e.g., different order of N/C-domain unfolding in the WT and the CP variant). Based on our simulations, we have analyzed the limitations of and the key differences between these models and offered testable predictions for future experiments to resolve the structural mechanism for cooperative folding/unfolding of T4L.

  6. Analysis of Ligand-Receptor Association and Intermediate Transfer Rates in Multienzyme Nanostructures with All-Atom Brownian Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christopher C; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-25

    We present the second-generation GeomBD Brownian dynamics software for determining interenzyme intermediate transfer rates and substrate association rates in biomolecular complexes. Substrate and intermediate association rates for a series of enzymes or biomolecules can be compared between the freely diffusing disorganized configuration and various colocalized or complexed arrangements for kinetic investigation of enhanced intermediate transfer. In addition, enzyme engineering techniques, such as synthetic protein conjugation, can be computationally modeled and analyzed to better understand changes in substrate association relative to native enzymes. Tools are provided to determine nonspecific ligand-receptor association residence times, and to visualize common sites of nonspecific association of substrates on receptor surfaces. To demonstrate features of the software, interenzyme intermediate substrate transfer rate constants are calculated and compared for all-atom models of DNA origami scaffold-bound bienzyme systems of glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Also, a DNA conjugated horseradish peroxidase enzyme was analyzed for its propensity to increase substrate association rates and substrate local residence times relative to the unmodified enzyme. We also demonstrate the rapid determination and visualization of common sites of nonspecific ligand-receptor association by using HIV-1 protease and an inhibitor, XK263. GeomBD2 accelerates simulations by precomputing van der Waals potential energy grids and electrostatic potential grid maps, and has a flexible and extensible support for all-atom and coarse-grained force fields. Simulation software is written in C++ and utilizes modern parallelization techniques for potential grid preparation and Brownian dynamics simulation processes. Analysis scripts, written in the Python scripting language, are provided for quantitative simulation analysis. GeomBD2 is applicable to the fields of biophysics, bioengineering

  7. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Method Combined with Hybrid All-Atom and Coarse-Grained Model: Theory and Application on Redox Potential Calculations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lin; Yang, Weitao

    2016-04-12

    We developed a new multiresolution method that spans three levels of resolution with quantum mechanical, atomistic molecular mechanical, and coarse-grained models. The resolution-adapted all-atom and coarse-grained water model, in which an all-atom structural description of the entire system is maintained during the simulations, is combined with the ab initio quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. We apply this model to calculate the redox potentials of the aqueous ruthenium and iron complexes by using the fractional number of electrons approach and thermodynamic integration simulations. The redox potentials are recovered in excellent accordance with the experimental data. The speed-up of the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model renders it computationally more attractive. The accuracy depends on the hybrid all-atom and coarse-grained water model used in the combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical method. We have used another multiresolution model, in which an atomic-level layer of water molecules around redox center is solvated in supramolecular coarse-grained waters for the redox potential calculations. Compared with the experimental data, this alternative multilayer model leads to less accurate results when used with the coarse-grained polarizable MARTINI water or big multipole water model for the coarse-grained layer. PMID:26930454

  8. Molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1988-08-01

    The basic methodology of equilibrium molecular dynamics is described. Examples from the literature are used to illustrate how molecular dynamics has been used to resolve theoretical controversies, provide data to test theories, and occasionally to discover new phenomena. The emphasis is on the application of molecular dynamics to an understanding of the microscopic physics underlying the transport properties of simple fluids. 98 refs., 4 figs.

  9. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  10. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-01-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect. PMID:26926570

  11. All-atom simulations and free-energy calculations of coiled-coil peptides with lipid bilayers: binding strength, structural transition, and effect on lipid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Sun Young; Lee, Hwankyu

    2016-03-01

    Peptides E and K, which are synthetic coiled-coil peptides for membrane fusion, were simulated with lipid bilayers composed of lipids and cholesterols at different ratios using all-atom models. We first calculated free energies of binding from umbrella sampling simulations, showing that both E and K peptides tend to adsorb onto the bilayer surface, which occurs more strongly in the bilayer composed of smaller lipid headgroups. Then, unrestrained simulations show that K peptides more deeply insert into the bilayer with partially retaining the helical structure, while E peptides less insert and predominantly become random coils, indicating the structural transition from helices to random coils, in quantitative agreement with experiments. This is because K peptides electrostatically interact with lipid phosphates, as well as because hydrocarbons of lysines of K peptide are longer than those of glutamic acids of E peptide and thus form stronger hydrophobic interactions with lipid tails. This deeper insertion of K peptide increases the bilayer dynamics and a vacancy below the peptide, leading to the rearrangement of smaller lipids. These findings help explain the experimentally observed or proposed differences in the insertion depth, binding strength, and structural transition of E and K peptides, and support the snorkeling effect.

  12. Open boundary molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Buscalioni, R.; Sablić, J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution analyzes several strategies and combination of methodologies to perform molecular dynamic simulations in open systems. Here, the term open indicates that the total system has boundaries where transfer of mass, momentum and energy can take place. This formalism, which we call Open Boundary Molecular Dynamics (OBMD), can act as interface of different schemes, such as Adaptive Resolution Scheme (AdResS) and Hybrid continuum-particle dynamics to link atomistic, coarse-grained (CG) and continuum (Eulerian) fluid dynamics in the general framework of fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations. The core domain of the simulation box is solved using all-atom descriptions. The CG layer introduced using AdResS is located at the outer part of the open box to make feasible the insertion of large molecules into the system. Communications between the molecular system and the outer world are carried out in the outer layers, called buffers. These coupling preserve momentum and mass conservation laws and can thus be linked with Eulerian hydro- dynamic solvers. In its simpler form, OBMD allows, however, to impose a local pressure tensor and a heat flux across the system's boundaries. For a one component molecular system, the external normal pressure and temperature determine the external chemical potential and thus the independent parameters of a grand-canonical ensemble simulation. Extended ensembles under non-equilibrium stationary states can also be simulated as well as time dependent forcings (e.g. oscillatory rheology). To illustrate the robustness of the combined OBMD-AdResS method, we present simulations of star-polymer melts at equilibrium and in sheared flow.

  13. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  14. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  15. Accelerated molecular dynamics methods

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2011-01-04

    The molecular dynamics method, although extremely powerful for materials simulations, is limited to times scales of roughly one microsecond or less. On longer time scales, dynamical evolution typically consists of infrequent events, which are usually activated processes. This course is focused on understanding infrequent-event dynamics, on methods for characterizing infrequent-event mechanisms and rate constants, and on methods for simulating long time scales in infrequent-event systems, emphasizing the recently developed accelerated molecular dynamics methods (hyperdynamics, parallel replica dynamics, and temperature accelerated dynamics). Some familiarity with basic statistical mechanics and molecular dynamics methods will be assumed.

  16. Improving an all-atom force field.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Sandipan; Hansmann, U H E

    2007-07-01

    Experimentally well-characterized proteins that are small enough to be computationally tractable provide useful information for refining existing all-atom force fields. This is used by us for reparametrizing a recently developed all-atom force field. Relying on high statistics parallel tempering simulations of a designed 20 residue beta-sheet peptide, we propose incremental changes that improve the force field's range of applicability. PMID:17677516

  17. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. . Dept. of Applied Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1990-11-01

    The development of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics is described, with emphasis on massively-parallel simulations involving the motion of millions, soon to be billions, of atoms. Corresponding continuum simulations are also discussed. 14 refs., 8 figs.

  18. An all-atom structure-based potential for proteins: bridging minimal models with all-atom empirical forcefields.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Noel, Jeffrey K; Gosavi, Shachi; Schug, Alexander; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y; Onuchic, José N

    2009-05-01

    Protein dynamics take place on many time and length scales. Coarse-grained structure-based (Go) models utilize the funneled energy landscape theory of protein folding to provide an understanding of both long time and long length scale dynamics. All-atom empirical forcefields with explicit solvent can elucidate our understanding of short time dynamics with high energetic and structural resolution. Thus, structure-based models with atomic details included can be used to bridge our understanding between these two approaches. We report on the robustness of folding mechanisms in one such all-atom model. Results for the B domain of Protein A, the SH3 domain of C-Src Kinase, and Chymotrypsin Inhibitor 2 are reported. The interplay between side chain packing and backbone folding is explored. We also compare this model to a C(alpha) structure-based model and an all-atom empirical forcefield. Key findings include: (1) backbone collapse is accompanied by partial side chain packing in a cooperative transition and residual side chain packing occurs gradually with decreasing temperature, (2) folding mechanisms are robust to variations of the energetic parameters, (3) protein folding free-energy barriers can be manipulated through parametric modifications, (4) the global folding mechanisms in a C(alpha) model and the all-atom model agree, although differences can be attributed to energetic heterogeneity in the all-atom model, and (5) proline residues have significant effects on folding mechanisms, independent of isomerization effects. Because this structure-based model has atomic resolution, this work lays the foundation for future studies to probe the contributions of specific energetic factors on protein folding and function. PMID:18837035

  19. Substructured multibody molecular dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Grest, Gary Stephen; Stevens, Mark Jackson; Plimpton, Steven James; Woolf, Thomas B. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Lehoucq, Richard B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Ismail, Ahmed E.; Mukherjee, Rudranarayan M. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY); Draganescu, Andrei I.

    2006-11-01

    We have enhanced our parallel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation software LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator, lammps.sandia.gov) to include many new features for accelerated simulation including articulated rigid body dynamics via coupling to the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute code POEMS (Parallelizable Open-source Efficient Multibody Software). We use new features of the LAMMPS software package to investigate rhodopsin photoisomerization, and water model surface tension and capillary waves at the vapor-liquid interface. Finally, we motivate the recipes of MD for practitioners and researchers in numerical analysis and computational mechanics.

  20. Superposition State Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Venkatnathan, Arun; Voth, Gregory A

    2005-01-01

    The ergodic sampling of rough energy landscapes is crucial for understanding phenomena like protein folding, peptide aggregation, polymer dynamics, and the glass transition. These rough energy landscapes are characterized by the presence of many local minima separated by high energy barriers, where Molecular Dynamics (MD) fails to satisfy ergodicity. To enhance ergodic behavior, we have developed the Superposition State Molecular Dynamics (SSMD) method, which uses a superposition of energy states to obtain an effective potential for the MD simulation. In turn, the dynamics on this effective potential can be used to sample the configurational free energy of the real potential. The effectiveness of the SSMD method for a one-dimensional rough potential energy landscape is presented as a test case. PMID:26641113

  1. Molecular Dynamics of Acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, T Y.; Tai, Kaihsu; Henchman, Richard H.; Mccammon, Andy

    2002-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are leading to a deeper understanding of the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase. Simulations have shown how breathing motions in the enzyme facilitate the displacement of substrate from the surface of the enzyme to the buried active site. The most recent work points to the complex and spatially extensive nature of such motions and suggests possible modes of regulation of the activity of the enzyme.

  2. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-12-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system.

  3. Multiscale reactive molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Chris; Lindberg, Gerrick E.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Many processes important to chemistry, materials science, and biology cannot be described without considering electronic and nuclear-level dynamics and their coupling to slower, cooperative motions of the system. These inherently multiscale problems require computationally efficient and accurate methods to converge statistical properties. In this paper, a method is presented that uses data directly from condensed phase ab initio simulations to develop reactive molecular dynamics models that do not require predefined empirical functions. Instead, the interactions used in the reactive model are expressed as linear combinations of interpolating functions that are optimized by using a linear least-squares algorithm. One notable benefit of the procedure outlined here is the capability to minimize the number of parameters requiring nonlinear optimization. The method presented can be generally applied to multiscale problems and is demonstrated by generating reactive models for the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide ion based directly on condensed phase ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting models faithfully reproduce the water-ion structural properties and diffusion constants from the ab initio simulations. Additionally, the free energy profiles for proton transfer, which is sensitive to the structural diffusion of both ions in water, are reproduced. The high fidelity of these models to ab initio simulations will permit accurate modeling of general chemical reactions in condensed phase systems with computational efficiency orders of magnitudes greater than currently possible with ab initio simulation methods, thus facilitating a proper statistical sampling of the coupling to slow, large-scale motions of the system. PMID:23249062

  4. Interactive molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Daniel V.

    2015-03-01

    Physics students now have access to interactive molecular dynamics simulations that can model and animate the motions of hundreds of particles, such as noble gas atoms, that attract each other weakly at short distances but repel strongly when pressed together. Using these simulations, students can develop an understanding of forces and motions at the molecular scale, nonideal fluids, phases of matter, thermal equilibrium, nonequilibrium states, the Boltzmann distribution, the arrow of time, and much more. This article summarizes the basic features and capabilities of such a simulation, presents a variety of student exercises using it at the introductory and intermediate levels, and describes some enhancements that can further extend its uses. A working simulation code, in html5 and javascript for running within any modern Web browser, is provided as an online supplement.

  5. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  6. Introduction to Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Danny

    2012-07-10

    Molecular Dynamics is the numerical solution of the equations of motion of a set of atoms, given an interatomic potential V and some boundary and initial conditions. Molecular Dynamics is the largest scale model that gives unbiased dynamics [x(t),p(t)] in full atomistic detail. Molecular Dynamics: is simple; is 'exact' for classical dynamics (with respect to a given V); can be used to compute any (atomistic) thermodynamical or dynamical properties; naturally handles complexity -- the system does the right thing at the right time. The physics derives only from the interatomic potential.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The development of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics is very important in the history of physics, and it underlines the difficulty in dealing with systems involving many bodies, even if those bodies are identical. Macroscopic systems of atoms typically contain so many particles that it would be virtually impossible to follow the behavior of all of the particles involved. Therefore, the behavior of a complete system can only be described or predicted in statistical ways. Under a grant to the NASA Lewis Research Center, scientists at the Case Western Reserve University have been examining the use of modern computing techniques that may be able to investigate and find the behavior of complete systems that have a large number of particles by tracking each particle individually. This is the study of molecular dynamics. In contrast to Monte Carlo techniques, which incorporate uncertainty from the outset, molecular dynamics calculations are fully deterministic. Although it is still impossible to track, even on high-speed computers, each particle in a system of a trillion trillion particles, it has been found that such systems can be well simulated by calculating the trajectories of a few thousand particles. Modern computers and efficient computing strategies have been used to calculate the behavior of a few physical systems and are now being employed to study important problems such as supersonic flows in the laboratory and in space. In particular, an animated video (available in mpeg format--4.4 MB) was produced by Dr. M.J. Woo, now a National Research Council fellow at Lewis, and the G-VIS laboratory at Lewis. This video shows the behavior of supersonic shocks produced by pistons in enclosed cylinders by following exactly the behavior of thousands of particles. The major assumptions made were that the particles involved were hard spheres and that all collisions with the walls and with other particles were fully elastic. The animated video was voted one of two

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alder, B.J.

    1985-07-01

    The molecular dynamics computer simulation discovery of the slow decay of the velocity autocorrelation function in fluids is briefly reviewed in order to contrast that long time tail with those observed for the stress autocorrelation function in fluids and the velocity autocorrelation function in the Lorentz gas. For a non-localized particle in the Lorentz gas it is made plausible that even if it behaved quantum mechanically its long time tail would be the same as the classical one. The generalization of Fick's law for diffusion for the Lorentz gas, necessary to avoid divergences due to the slow decay of correlations, is presented. For fluids, that generalization has not yet been established, but the region of validity of generalized hydrodynamics is discussed. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  9. VMD: visual molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, W; Dalke, A; Schulten, K

    1996-02-01

    VMD is a molecular graphics program designed for the display and analysis of molecular assemblies, in particular biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids. VMD can simultaneously display any number of structures using a wide variety of rendering styles and coloring methods. Molecules are displayed as one or more "representations," in which each representation embodies a particular rendering method and coloring scheme for a selected subset of atoms. The atoms displayed in each representation are chosen using an extensive atom selection syntax, which includes Boolean operators and regular expressions. VMD provides a complete graphical user interface for program control, as well as a text interface using the Tcl embeddable parser to allow for complex scripts with variable substitution, control loops, and function calls. Full session logging is supported, which produces a VMD command script for later playback. High-resolution raster images of displayed molecules may be produced by generating input scripts for use by a number of photorealistic image-rendering applications. VMD has also been expressly designed with the ability to animate molecular dynamics (MD) simulation trajectories, imported either from files or from a direct connection to a running MD simulation. VMD is the visualization component of MDScope, a set of tools for interactive problem solving in structural biology, which also includes the parallel MD program NAMD, and the MDCOMM software used to connect the visualization and simulation programs. VMD is written in C++, using an object-oriented design; the program, including source code and extensive documentation, is freely available via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web. PMID:8744570

  10. All-atom Simulation of Amyloid Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berhanu, Workalemahu M.; Alred, Erik J.; Bernhardt, Nathan A.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    Molecular simulations are now commonly used to complement experiments in the investigation of amyloid formation and their role in human diseases. While various simulations based on enhanced sampling techniques are used in amyloid formation simulations, this article will focus on those using standard atomistic simulations to evaluate the stability of fibril models. Such studies explore the limitations that arise from the choice of force field or polymorphism; and explore the stability of in vivo and in vitro forms of Aβ fibril aggregates, and the role of heterologous seeding as a link between different amyloid diseases.

  11. Floating orbital molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Perlt, Eva; Brüssel, Marc; Kirchner, Barbara

    2014-04-21

    We introduce an alternative ab initio molecular dynamics simulation as a unification of Hartree-Fock molecular dynamics and the floating orbital approach. The general scheme of the floating orbital molecular dynamics method is presented. Moreover, a simple but sophisticated guess for the orbital centers is provided to reduce the number of electronic structure optimization steps at each molecular dynamics step. The conservation of total energy and angular momentum is investigated in order to validate the floating orbital molecular dynamics approach with and without application of the initial guess. Finally, a water monomer and a water dimer are simulated, and the influence of the orbital floating on certain properties like the dipole moment is investigated. PMID:24600690

  12. Multiscale approach for the construction of equilibrated all-atom models of a poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianfeng; Murthy, N Sanjeeva; Becker, Matthew L; Latour, Robert A

    2016-06-01

    A multiscale modeling approach is presented for the efficient construction of an equilibrated all-atom model of a cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel using the all-atom polymer consistent force field (PCFF). The final equilibrated all-atom model was built with a systematic simulation toolset consisting of three consecutive parts: (1) building a global cross-linked PEG-chain network at experimentally determined cross-link density using an on-lattice Monte Carlo method based on the bond fluctuation model, (2) recovering the local molecular structure of the network by transitioning from the lattice model to an off-lattice coarse-grained (CG) model parameterized from PCFF, followed by equilibration using high performance molecular dynamics methods, and (3) recovering the atomistic structure of the network by reverse mapping from the equilibrated CG structure, hydrating the structure with explicitly represented water, followed by final equilibration using PCFF parameterization. The developed three-stage modeling approach has application to a wide range of other complex macromolecular hydrogel systems, including the integration of peptide, protein, and/or drug molecules as side-chains within the hydrogel network for the incorporation of bioactivity for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications. PMID:27013229

  13. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  14. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-07-01

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion.Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice

  15. Molecular photoionization dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dehmer, Joseph L.

    1982-05-01

    This program seeks to develop both physical insight and quantitative characterization of molecular photoionization processes. Progress is briefly described, and some publications resulting from the research are listed. (WHK)

  16. Nanoscale deicing by molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Senbo; He, Jianying; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2016-08-14

    Deicing is important to human activities in low-temperature circumstances, and is critical for combating the damage caused by excessive accumulation of ice. The aim of creating anti-icing materials, surfaces and applications relies on the understanding of fundamental nanoscale ice adhesion mechanics. Here in this study, we employ all-atom modeling and molecular dynamics simulation to investigate ice adhesion. We apply force to detach and shear nano-sized ice cubes for probing the determinants of atomistic adhesion mechanics, and at the same time investigate the mechanical effect of a sandwiched aqueous water layer between ice and substrates. We observe that high interfacial energy restricts ice mobility and increases both ice detaching and shearing stresses. We quantify up to a 60% decrease in ice adhesion strength by an aqueous water layer, and provide atomistic details that support previous experimental studies. Our results contribute quantitative comparison of nanoscale adhesion strength of ice on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, and supply for the first time theoretical references for understanding the mechanics at the atomistic origins of macroscale ice adhesion. PMID:27431975

  17. Dynamic-domain-decomposition parallel molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, S. G.; Ashok, I.; Jônsson, Hannes; Kalonji, Gretchen; Zahorjan, John

    1997-05-01

    Parallel molecular dynamics with short-range forces can suffer from load-imbalance problems and attendant performance degradation due to density variations in the simulated system. In this paper, we describe an approach to dynamical load balancing, enabled by the Ādhāra runtime system. The domain assigned to each processor is automatically and dynamically resized so as to evenly distribute the molecular dynamics computations across all the processors. The algorithm was tested on an Intel Paragon parallel computer for two and three-dimensional Lennard-Jones systems containing 99 458 and 256000 atoms, respectively, and using up to 256 processors. In these benchmarks, the overhead for carrying out the load-balancing operations was found to be small and the total computation time was reduced by as much as 50%.

  18. Molecular dynamics studies of interfacial water at the alumina surface.

    SciTech Connect

    Argyris, Dr. Dimitrios; Ho, Thomas; Cole, David

    2011-01-01

    Interfacial water properties at the alumina surface were investigated via all-atom equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations at ambient temperature. Al-terminated and OH-terminated alumina surfaces were considered to assess the structural and dynamic behavior of the first few hydration layers in contact with the substrates. Density profiles suggest water layering up to {approx}10 {angstrom} from the solid substrate. Planar density distribution data indicate that water molecules in the first interfacial layer are organized in well-defined patterns dictated by the atomic terminations of the alumina surface. Interfacial water exhibits preferential orientation and delayed dynamics compared to bulk water. Water exhibits bulk-like behavior at distances greater than {approx}10 {angstrom} from the substrate. The formation of an extended hydrogen bond network within the first few hydration layers illustrates the significance of water?water interactions on the structural properties at the interface.

  19. Molecular dynamics and protein function

    PubMed Central

    Karplus, M.; Kuriyan, J.

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental appreciation for how biological macromolecules work requires knowledge of structure and dynamics. Molecular dynamics simulations provide powerful tools for the exploration of the conformational energy landscape accessible to these molecules, and the rapid increase in computational power coupled with improvements in methodology makes this an exciting time for the application of simulation to structural biology. In this Perspective we survey two areas, protein folding and enzymatic catalysis, in which simulations have contributed to a general understanding of mechanism. We also describe results for the F1 ATPase molecular motor and the Src family of signaling proteins as examples of applications of simulations to specific biological systems. PMID:15870208

  20. A sampling of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhikara, Daniel Jon

    The sheer vastness of the number of computations required to simulate a biological molecule puts incredible pressure on algorithms to be efficient while maintaining sufficient accuracy. This dissertation summarizes various projects whose purposes address the large span of types of problems in molecular dynamics simulations of biological systems including: increasing efficiency, measuring convergence, avoiding pitfalls, and an application and analysis of a biological system. Chapters 3 and 4 deal with an enhanced sampling algorithm called "replica exchange molecular dynamics" which is designed to speed-up molecular dynamics simulations. The optimization of a key parameter of these simulations is analyzed. In these successive projects, it was found conclusively that maximizing "exchange attempt frequency" is the most efficient way to run a replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation. Chapter 5 describes an enhanced metric for convergence in parallel simulations called the normalized ergodic measure. The metric is applied to several properties for several replica exchange simulations. Advantages of this metric over other methods are described. Chapter 6 describes the implementation and optimization of an enhanced sampling algorithm similar to replica exchange molecular dynamics called multicanonical algorithm replica exchange molecular dynamics. The algorithm was implemented into a biomolecular simulation suite called AMBER. Additionally several parameters were analyzed and optimized. In Chapter 7, a pitfall in molecular dynamics is observed in biological systems that is caused by negligent use of a simulation's "thermostat". It was found that if the same pseudorandom number seed were used for multiple systems, they eventually synchronize. In this project, synchronization was observed in biological molecules. Various negative effects including corruption of data are pointed out. Chapter 8 describes molecular dynamics simulation of NikR, a homotetrameric nickel

  1. Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.; Prrese, J.M.; Sears, T.J.; Weston, R.E.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions involving short-lived chemical intermediates and their properties. High-resolution high-sensitivity laser absorption methods are augmented by high temperature flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular flee radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical and computational work using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations that provide insights into energy flow between the vibrational modes of the molecule.

  2. In situ structure and dynamics of DNA origami determined through molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2013-01-01

    The DNA origami method permits folding of long single-stranded DNA into complex 3D structures with subnanometer precision. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and recently cryo-EM tomography have been used to characterize the properties of such DNA origami objects, however their microscopic structures and dynamics have remained unknown. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that characterized the structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects in unprecedented microscopic detail. When simulated in an aqueous environment, the structures of DNA origami objects depart from their idealized targets as a result of steric, electrostatic, and solvent-mediated forces. Whereas the global structural features of such relaxed conformations conform to the target designs, local deformations are abundant and vary in magnitude along the structures. In contrast to their free-solution conformation, the Holliday junctions in the DNA origami structures adopt a left-handed antiparallel conformation. We find the DNA origami structures undergo considerable temporal fluctuations on both local and global scales. Analysis of such structural fluctuations reveals the local mechanical properties of the DNA origami objects. The lattice type of the structures considerably affects global mechanical properties such as bending rigidity. Our study demonstrates the potential of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to play a considerable role in future development of the DNA origami field by providing accurate, quantitative assessment of local and global structural and mechanical properties of DNA origami objects. PMID:24277840

  3. Integration methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Leimkuhler, B.J.; Reich, S.; Skeel, R.D.

    1996-12-31

    Classical molecular dynamics simulation of a macromolecule requires the use of an efficient time-stepping scheme that can faithfully approximate the dynamics over many thousands of timesteps. Because these problems are highly nonlinear, accurate approximation of a particular solution trajectory on meaningful time intervals is neither obtainable nor desired, but some restrictions, such as symplecticness, can be imposed on the discretization which tend to imply good long term behavior. The presence of a variety of types and strengths of interatom potentials in standard molecular models places severe restrictions on the timestep for numerical integration used in explicit integration schemes, so much recent research has concentrated on the search for alternatives that possess (1) proper dynamical properties, and (2) a relative insensitivity to the fastest components of the dynamics. We survey several recent approaches. 48 refs., 2 figs.

  4. All-atom Multiscale Simulation of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus Capsid Swelling

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Johnson, John E.; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    An all-atom multiscale computational modeling approach, Molecular Dynamics/Order Parameter eXtrapolation (MD/OPX), has recently been developed for simulating large bionanosystems. It accelerates MD simulations and addresses rapid atomistic fluctuations and slowly-varying nanoscale dynamics of bionanosystems simultaneously. With modules added to account for water molecules and ions, MD/OPX is applied to simulate the swelling of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid solvated in a host medium in this study. Simulation results show that the N-terminal arms of capsid proteins undergo large deviations from the initial configurations with their length extended quickly during the early stage of capsid swelling. The capsid swelling is a symmetry-breaking process involving local initiation and front propagation. The capsid swelling rate is ~0.25 nm/ns (npn) during early stage of the simulation and propagation of the structural transition across the capsid is roughly 0.6npn. The system conditions that affect swelling of the capsid are analyzed. Prospects for creating a phase diagram for CCMV capsid swelling and using predictions to guide experiments are discussed. PMID:20695471

  5. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches ˜90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is ˜20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  6. Ab initio based force field and molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline TATB.

    PubMed

    Gee, Richard H; Roszak, Szczepan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan; Fried, Laurence E

    2004-04-15

    An all-atom force field for 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) is presented. The classical intermolecular interaction potential for TATB is based on single-point energies determined from high-level ab initio calculations of TATB dimers. The newly developed potential function is used to examine bulk crystalline TATB via molecular dynamics simulations. The isobaric thermal expansion and isothermal compression under hydrostatic pressures obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations are in good agreement with experiment. The calculated volume-temperature expansion is almost one dimensional along the c crystallographic axis, whereas under compression, all three unit cell axes participate, albeit unequally. PMID:15267608

  7. All-atom and coarse-grained simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of the SNARE complex.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjun

    2014-07-01

    The SNARE complex, consisting of three proteins (VAMP2, syntaxin, and SNAP-25), is thought to drive membrane fusion by assembling into a four-helix bundle through a zippering process. In support of the above zippering model, a recent single-molecule optical tweezers experiment by Gao et al. revealed a sequential unzipping of SNARE along VAMP2 in the order of the linker domain → the C-terminal domain → the N-terminal domain. To offer detailed structural insights to this unzipping process, we have performed all-atom and coarse-grained steered molecular dynamics (sMD) simulations of the forced unfolding pathways of SNARE using different models and force fields. Our findings are summarized as follows: First, the sMD simulations based on either an all-atom force field (with an implicit solvent model) or a coarse-grained Go model were unable to capture the forced unfolding pathway of SNARE as observed by Gao et al., which may be attributed to insufficient simulation time and inaccurate force fields. Second, the sMD simulations based on a reparameterized coarse-grained model (i.e., modified elastic network model) were able to predict a sequential unzipping of SNARE in good agreement with the findings by Gao et al. The key to this success is to reparameterize the intrahelix and interhelix nonbonded force constants against the pair-wise residue-residue distance fluctuations collected from all-atom MD simulations of SNARE. Therefore, our finding supports the importance of accurately describing the inherent dynamics/flexibility of SNARE (in the absence of force), in order to correctly simulate its unfolding behaviors under force. This study has established a useful computational framework for future studies of the zippering function of SNARE and its perturbations by point mutations with amino-acid level of details, and more generally the forced unfolding pathways of other helix bundle proteins. PMID:24403006

  8. Dynamic fracture toughness determined using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Swadener, J. G.; Baskes, M. I.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of fracture in crystalline silicon are conducted in order to determine the dynamic fracture toughness. The MD simulations show how the potential energy released during fracture is partitioned into surface energy, energy stored in defects and kinetic energy. First, the MD fracture simulations are shown to produce brittle fracture and be in reasonable agreement with experimental results. Then dynamic hcture toughness is calculated as the sum of the surface energy and the energy stored as defects directly from the MD models. Models oriented to produce fracture on either (111) or (101) planes are used. For the (101) fracture orientation, equilibrium crack speeds of greater than 80% of the Rayleigh wave speed are obtained. Crack speeds initially show a steep increase with increasing energy release rate followed by a much more gradual increase. No plateau in crack speed is observed for static energy release rates up to 20 J/m{sup 2}. At the point where the change in crack speed behavior occur, the dynamic fracture toughness (J{sub d}) is still within 10% of two times the surface energy (2{gamma}{sub 0}) and changing very slowly. From these MD simulations, it appears that the change in crack speed behavior is due to a change in the kinetic energy generation during dynamic fracture. In addition, MD simulations of facture in silicon with defects were conducted. The addition of defects increases the inelastic dissipation and the energy stored in defects.

  9. Fiftieth anniversary of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melker, Alexander I.

    2007-04-01

    The history of computer application in physics for solving nonlinear problems is considered. Examples from different branches of condensed matter physics (nonlinear vibrations of anharmonic chains of atoms, dynamics of radiation damage of crystals, deformation and fracture of crystals) are given. A new line of investigation and the results obtained in the field of computer simulation of physical processes realized in the department of metal physics and computer technologies in materials science are considered. This line incorporates both a study of self-organization and properties of new materials (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes) and biological objects by molecular dynamics technique as well as the development of new computer simulation methods.

  10. Combining Optimal Control Theory and Molecular Dynamics for Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization - MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages. PMID:22238629

  11. Available Instruments for Analyzing Molecular Dynamics Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Likhachev, I. V.; Balabaev, N. K.; Galzitskaya, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are the result of molecular dynamics simulations. Trajectories are sequential snapshots of simulated molecular system which represents atomic coordinates at specific time periods. Based on the definition, in a text format trajectory files are characterized by their simplicity and uselessness. To obtain information from such files, special programs and information processing techniques are applied: from molecular dynamics animation to finding characteristics along the trajectory (versus time). In this review, we describe different programs for processing molecular dynamics trajectories. The performance of these programs, usefulness for analyses of molecular dynamics trajectories, strong and weak aspects are discussed. PMID:27053964

  12. Molecular dynamics on vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, F.; Mountain, R. D.; Oconnell, J.

    1985-10-01

    An algorithm called the method of lights (MOL) has been developed for the computerized simulation of molecular dynamics. The MOL, implemented on the CYBER 205 computer, is based on sorting and reformulating the manner in which neighbor lists are compiled, and it uses data structures compatible with specialized vector statements that perform parallel computations. The MOL is found to reduce running time over standard methods in scalar form, and vectorization is shown to produce an order-of-magnitude reduction in execution time.

  13. Molecular dynamics for dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Watanabe, Gentaro; Chiba, Satoshi

    2012-08-01

    We review a molecular dynamics method for nucleon many-body systems called quantum molecular dynamics (QMD), and our studies using this method. These studies address the structure and the dynamics of nuclear matter relevant to neutron star crusts, supernova cores, and heavy-ion collisions. A key advantage of QMD is that we can study dynamical processes of nucleon many-body systems without any assumptions about the nuclear structure. First, we focus on the inhomogeneous structures of low-density nuclear matter consisting not only of spherical nuclei but also of nuclear "pasta", i.e., rod-like and slab-like nuclei. We show that pasta phases can appear in the ground and equilibrium states of nuclear matter without assuming nuclear shape. Next, we show our simulation of compression of nuclear matter which corresponds to the collapsing stage of supernovae. With the increase in density, a crystalline solid of spherical nuclei changes to a triangular lattice of rods by connecting neighboring nuclei. Finally, we discuss fragment formation in expanding nuclear matter. Our results suggest that a generally accepted scenario based on the liquid-gas phase transition is not plausible at lower temperatures.

  14. Implementation of a protein reduced point charge model toward molecular dynamics applications.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2011-11-17

    A reduced point charge model was developed in a previous work from the study of extrema in smoothed charge density distribution functions generated from the Amber99 molecular electrostatic potential. In the present work, such a point charge distribution is coupled with the Amber99 force field and implemented in the program TINKER to allow molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins. First applications to two polypeptides that involve α-helix and β-sheet motifs are analyzed and compared to all-atom MD simulations. Two types of coarse-grained (CG)-based trajectories are generated using, on one hand, harmonic bond stretching terms and, on the other hand, distance restraints. Results show that the use of the unrestrained CG conditions are sufficient to preserve most of the secondary structure characteristics but restraints lead to a better agreement between CG and all-atom simulation results such as rmsd, dipole moment, and time-dependent mean square deviation functions. PMID:21800922

  15. Local elasticity of strained DNA studied by all-atom simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Alexey K.

    2011-08-01

    Genomic DNA is constantly subjected to various mechanical stresses arising from its biological functions and cell packaging. If the local mechanical properties of DNA change under torsional and tensional stress, the activity of DNA-modifying proteins and transcription factors can be affected and regulated allosterically. To check this possibility, appropriate steady forces and torques were applied in the course of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of DNA with AT- and GC-alternating sequences. It is found that the stretching rigidity grows with tension as well as twisting. The torsional rigidity is not affected by stretching, but it varies with twisting very strongly, and differently for the two sequences. Surprisingly, for AT-alternating DNA it passes through a minimum with the average twist close to the experimental value in solution. For this fragment, but not for the GC-alternating sequence, the bending rigidity noticeably changes with both twisting and stretching. The results have important biological implications and shed light on earlier experimental observations.

  16. Amyloid fibril disruption by ultrasonic cavitation: nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G

    2014-07-30

    We describe the disruption of amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptides by ultrasonic cavitation. For this purpose, we performed nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with sinusoidal pressure and visualized the process with movies. When the pressure is negative, a bubble is formed, usually at hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane region. Most β-strands maintain their secondary structures in the bubble. When the pressure becomes positive, the bubble collapses, and water molecules crash against the hydrophilic residues in the nontransmembrane region to disrupt the amyloid. Shorter amyloids require longer sonication times for disruption because they do not have enough hydrophobic residues to serve as a nucleus to form a bubble. These results agree with experiments in which monodispersed amyloid fibrils were obtained by ultrasonication. PMID:24987794

  17. Molecular Dynamics and Energy Minimization Based on Embedded Atom Method

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-01

    This program performs atomic scale computer simulations of the structure and dynamics of metallic system using energetices based on the Embedded Atom Method. The program performs two types of calculations. First, it performs local energy minimization of all atomic positions to determine ground state and saddle point energies and structures. Second, it performs molecular dynamics simulations to determine thermodynamics or miscroscopic dynamics of the system. In both cases, various constraints can be applied to themore » system. The volume of the system can be varied automatically to achieve any desired external pressure. The temperature in molecular dynamics simulations can be controlled by a variety of methods. Further, the temperature control can be applied either to the entire system or just a subset of the atoms that would act as a thermal source/sink. The motion of one or more of the atoms can be constrained to either simulate the effects of bulk boundary conditions or to facilitate the determination of saddle point configurations. The simulations are performed with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  18. Scalable Molecular Dynamics with NAMD

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, James C.; Braun, Rosemary; Wang, Wei; Gumbart, James; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Villa, Elizabeth; Chipot, Christophe; Skeel, Robert D.; Kalé, Laxmikant; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    NAMD is a parallel molecular dynamics code designed for high-performance simulation of large biomolecular systems. NAMD scales to hundreds of processors on high-end parallel platforms, as well as tens of processors on low-cost commodity clusters, and also runs on individual desktop and laptop computers. NAMD works with AMBER and CHARMM potential functions, parameters, and file formats. This paper, directed to novices as well as experts, first introduces concepts and methods used in the NAMD program, describing the classical molecular dynamics force field, equations of motion, and integration methods along with the efficient electrostatics evaluation algorithms employed and temperature and pressure controls used. Features for steering the simulation across barriers and for calculating both alchemical and conformational free energy differences are presented. The motivations for and a roadmap to the internal design of NAMD, implemented in C++ and based on Charm++ parallel objects, are outlined. The factors affecting the serial and parallel performance of a simulation are discussed. Next, typical NAMD use is illustrated with representative applications to a small, a medium, and a large biomolecular system, highlighting particular features of NAMD, e.g., the Tcl scripting language. Finally, the paper provides a list of the key features of NAMD and discusses the benefits of combining NAMD with the molecular graphics/sequence analysis software VMD and the grid computing/collaboratory software BioCoRE. NAMD is distributed free of charge with source code at www.ks.uiuc.edu. PMID:16222654

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of nanopatterning with multivalent inks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Thompson, Damien

    2008-06-01

    A coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) model is developed to study the multivalent, or multisite, binding of small functionalized dendrimer molecules to β-cyclodextrin-terminated self-assembled monolayers, the so-called ``molecular printboards'' used to print ``ink'' molecules on surfaces with a high degree of positional control and specificity. Some current and future bionanotechnology applications are in the creation of nanoparticle assemblies, directed protein assembly, platforms for biosensing, and cell:surface attachment. The coarse-grained model allows us to probe up to microsecond timescales and model ink diffusion, crucial for the application of the printboard in, for example, medical diagnostics. Recent all-atom MD simulations identified and quantified the molecular strain limiting the stability of nanopatterns created with small dendrimer inks, and explained the different patterns obtained experimentally with different dendrimer inks. In the present work, the all-atom simulations are ``scaled up'' to longer timescales via coarse graining, without incurring significant additional computational expense, and, crucially, without significant loss in atom-scale detail, the coarse-grained MD simulations yielding properties similar to those obtained from the all-atom simulations. The anchoring of the ink molecules to the monolayer is of multivalent nature and the degree of multivalency shows a sharp dependence on temperature, control of temperature thus providing a further operational ``switch'' for directed molecular assembly. The computational protocol developed can, in principle, be extended to model any multivalent assembly, for example, virus-cell complexation.

  20. Molecular dynamics studies of Hsp90 with ADP: Protein-ligand binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Takasu, Masako; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

    2013-02-01

    Ligand binding to a protein molecule plays a key role in the function of many proteins. We performed all-atom model molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the N-terminal domain of human Hsp90 in complex with ADP, and calculated a free energy profile for ligand binding with thermodynamic integration method. The free energy profile as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 and ADP was calculated using the results of the binding-distance constrained MD simulations. The free energy profile was fit to a harmonic oscillator. We obtained spring constant k = 3.84kJ/molṡnm2 = 9.17×10-1kcal/molṡÅ2. This result indicates that the dynamics of the ligand binding to the protein molecule is about 1,000 times slower than that of the covalent bond.

  1. Multisurface Adiabatic Reactive Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Tibor; Yosa Reyes, Juvenal; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Adiabatic reactive molecular dynamics (ARMD) simulation method is a surface-crossing algorithm for modeling chemical reactions in classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force fields. As the ARMD Hamiltonian is time dependent during crossing, it allows only approximate energy conservation. In the current work, the range of applicability of conventional ARMD is explored, and a new multisurface ARMD (MS-ARMD) method is presented, implemented in CHARMM and applied to the vibrationally induced photodissociation of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the gas phase. For this, an accurate global potential energy surface (PES) involving 12 H2SO4 and 4 H2O + SO3 force fields fitted to MP2/6-311G++(2d,2p) reference energies is employed. The MS-ARMD simulations conserve total energy and feature both intramolecular H-transfer reactions and water elimination. An analytical treatment of the dynamics in the crossing region finds that conventional ARMD can approximately conserve total energy for limiting cases. In one of them, the reduced mass of the system is large, which often occurs for simulations of solvated biomolecular systems. On the other hand, MS-ARMD is a general approach for modeling chemical reactions including gas-phase, homogeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic catalytic reactions while conserving total energy in atomistic simulations. PMID:26580356

  2. Temperature-Dependent Conformational Properties of Human Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1 Protein Revealed by All-Atom Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuzhen; Ma, Buyong; Qi, Ruxi; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Qingwen

    2016-04-14

    Neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1) protein has orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to human with highly conserved amino acid sequences. NCS-1 is an important factor controlling the animal's response to temperature change. This leads us to investigate the temperature effects on the conformational dynamics of human NCS-1 at 310 and 316 K by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic community network analysis. Four independent 500 ns MD simulations show that secondary structure content at 316 K is similar to that at 310 K, whereas the global protein structure is expanded. Loop 3 (L3) adopts an extended state occuping the hydrophobic crevice, and the number of suboptimal communication paths between residue D176 and V190 is reduced at 316 K. The dynamic community network analysis suggests that the interdomain correlation is weakened, and the intradomain coupling is strengthened at 316 K. The elevated temperature reduces the number of the salt bridges, especially in C-domain. This study suggests that the elevated temperature affects the conformational dynamics of human NCS-1 protein. Comparison of the structural dynamics of R102Q mutant and Δ176-190 truncated NCS-1 suggests that the structural and dynamical response of NCS-1 protein to elevated temperature may be one of its intrinsic functional properties. PMID:27007011

  3. Better, Cheaper, Faster Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Recent, revolutionary progress in genomics and structural, molecular and cellular biology has created new opportunities for molecular-level computer simulations of biological systems by providing vast amounts of data that require interpretation. These opportunities are further enhanced by the increasing availability of massively parallel computers. For many problems, the method of choice is classical molecular dynamics (iterative solving of Newton's equations of motion). It focuses on two main objectives. One is to calculate the relative stability of different states of the system. A typical problem that has' such an objective is computer-aided drug design. Another common objective is to describe evolution of the system towards a low energy (possibly the global minimum energy), "native" state. Perhaps the best example of such a problem is protein folding. Both types of problems share the same difficulty. Often, different states of the system are separated by high energy barriers, which implies that transitions between these states are rare events. This, in turn, can greatly impede exploration of phase space. In some instances this can lead to "quasi non-ergodicity", whereby a part of phase space is inaccessible on time scales of the simulation. To overcome this difficulty and to extend molecular dynamics to "biological" time scales (millisecond or longer) new physical formulations and new algorithmic developments are required. To be efficient they should account for natural limitations of multi-processor computer architecture. I will present work along these lines done in my group. In particular, I will focus on a new approach to calculating the free energies (stability) of different states and to overcoming "the curse of rare events". I will also discuss algorithmic improvements to multiple time step methods and to the treatment of slowly decaying, log-ranged, electrostatic effects.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie

    1995-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been undertaken in this work to explore structures and properties of polyethylene (PE), polyisobutylene (PIB), atactic polypropylene (aPP) and atactic polystyrene (aPS). This work has not only demonstrated the reliability of MD simulations by comparing results with available experiments, but more importantly has revealed structure-property relationships on a molecular level for these selected polymers. Structures of these amorphous polymers were characterized by radial distribution functions (RDFs) or scattering profiles, and properties of the polymers studied were pressure-volume -temperature (PVT) equation of state, enthalpy, cohesive energy, the diffusion coefficient of methane in the polymer, and glass transition temperature. Good agreement was found for these structures and properties between simulation and experiment. More importantly, the scientific understanding of structure-property relationships was established on a molecular level. In the order of aPP (PE), PIB and aPS, with the chain surface separation or free volume decreasing, the density increases and the diffusion coefficient decreases. Therefore, the effects of changes or modifications in the chemical structure of monomer molecules (substituting pendent hydrogen with methyl or phenyl) on polymeric materials performance were attributed to the effects of molecular chain structure on packing structure, which, in turn, affects the properties of these polymers. Local chain dynamics and relaxation have been studied for bulk PE and aPS. Cooperative transitions occur at second-neighbor bonds for PE, and first-neighbor bonds for aPS due to the role of side groups. The activation energy is a single torsional barrier for overall conformational transitions, and is single torsional barrier plus locally "trapped" barrier for relaxation. Temperature dependence is Arrhenius for transition time, and is WLF for relaxation time. The mean correlation times derived from

  5. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-01

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica® package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics. Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  6. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica{sup ®} package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics . Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories.

  7. Recovering position-dependent diffusion from biased molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Ljubetič, Ajasja; Urbančič, Iztok; Štrancar, Janez

    2014-02-28

    All atom molecular dynamics (MD) models provide valuable insight into the dynamics of biophysical systems, but are limited in size or length by the high computational demands. The latter can be reduced by simulating long term diffusive dynamics (also known as Langevin dynamics or Brownian motion) of the most interesting and important user-defined parts of the studied system, termed collective variables (colvars). A few hundred nanosecond-long biased MD trajectory can therefore be extended to millisecond lengths in the colvars subspace at a very small additional computational cost. In this work, we develop a method for determining multidimensional anisotropic position- and timescale-dependent diffusion coefficients (D) by analysing the changes of colvars in an existing MD trajectory. As a test case, we obtained D for dihedral angles of the alanine dipeptide. An open source Mathematica(®) package, capable of determining and visualizing D in one or two dimensions, is available at https://github.com/lbf-ijs/DiffusiveDynamics. Given known free energy and D, the package can also generate diffusive trajectories. PMID:24588150

  8. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  9. Error and efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Rosta, Edina; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-10-28

    We derive simple analytical expressions for the error and computational efficiency of replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations (and by analogy replica exchange Monte Carlo simulations). The theory applies to the important case of systems whose dynamics at long times is dominated by the slow interconversion between two metastable states. As a specific example, we consider the folding and unfolding of a protein. The efficiency is defined as the rate with which the error in an estimated equilibrium property, as measured by the variance of the estimator over repeated simulations, decreases with simulation time. For two-state systems, this rate is in general independent of the particular property. Our main result is that, with comparable computational resources used, the relative efficiency of REMD and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is given by the ratio of the number of transitions between the two states averaged over all replicas at the different temperatures, and the number of transitions at the single temperature of the MD run. This formula applies if replica exchange is frequent, as compared to the transition times. High efficiency of REMD is thus achieved by including replica temperatures in which the frequency of transitions is higher than that at the temperature of interest. In tests of the expressions for the error in the estimator, computational efficiency, and the rate of equilibration we find quantitative agreement with the results both from kinetic models of REMD and from actual all-atom simulations of the folding of a peptide in water. PMID:19894977

  10. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  11. Dielectric relaxation of ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; You, Xinli; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Rempe, Susan B.

    2015-11-24

    Ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC) are widely used solvents in lithium (Li)-ion batteries and supercapacitors. Ion dissolution and diffusion in those media are correlated with solvent dielectric responses. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the pure solvents to calculate dielectric constants and relaxation times, and molecular mobilities. The computed results are compared with limited available experiments to assist more exhaustive studies of these important characteristics. As a result, the observed agreement is encouraging and provides guidance for further validation of force-field simulation models for EC and PC solvents.

  12. Reconciling Structural and Thermodynamic Predictions Using All-Atom and Coarse-Grain Force Fields: The Case of Charged Oligo-Arginine Translocation into DMPC Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Using the translocation of short, charged cationic oligo-arginine peptides (mono-, di-, and triarginine) from bulk aqueous solution into model DMPC bilayers, we explore the question of the similarity of thermodynamic and structural predictions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations using all-atom and Martini coarse-grain force fields. Specifically, we estimate potentials of mean force associated with translocation using standard all-atom (CHARMM36 lipid) and polarizable and nonpolarizable Martini force fields, as well as a series of modified Martini-based parameter sets. We find that we are able to reproduce qualitative features of potentials of mean force of single amino acid side chain analogues into model bilayers. In particular, modifications of peptide–water and peptide–membrane interactions allow prediction of free energy minima at the bilayer–water interface as obtained with all-atom force fields. In the case of oligo-arginine peptides, the modified parameter sets predict interfacial free energy minima as well as free energy barriers in almost quantitative agreement with all-atom force field based simulations. Interfacial free energy minima predicted by a modified coarse-grained parameter set are −2.51, −4.28, and −5.42 for mono-, di-, and triarginine; corresponding values from all-atom simulations are −0.83, −3.33, and −3.29, respectively, all in units of kcal/mol. We found that a stronger interaction between oligo-arginine and the membrane components and a weaker interaction between oligo-arginine and water are crucial for producing such minima in PMFs using the polarizable CG model. The difference between bulk aqueous and bilayer center states predicted by the modified coarse-grain force field are 11.71, 14.14, and 16.53 kcal/mol, and those by the all-atom model are 6.94, 8.64, and 12.80 kcal/mol; those are of almost the same order of magnitude. Our simulations also demonstrate a remarkable similarity in the structural aspects of

  13. The "Collisions Cube" Molecular Dynamics Simulator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, John J.; Smith, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a molecular dynamics simulator that employs ping-pong balls as the atoms or molecules and is suitable for either large lecture halls or small classrooms. Discusses its use in illustrating many of the fundamental concepts related to molecular motion and dynamics and providing a three-dimensional perspective of molecular motion. (JRH)

  14. Unraveling the molecular effects of mutation L270P on Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein: insights from molecular dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Chandrasekaran; Rao, Sethumadhavan; Ramalingam, Rajasekaran

    2016-09-01

    Missense mutation L270P disrupts the auto-inhibited state of "Wiskkot-Aldrich syndrome protein" (WASP), thereby constitutively activating the mutant structure, a key event for pathogenesis of X-linked neutropenia (XLN). In this study, we comprehensively deciphered the molecular feature of activated mutant structure by all atom molecular dynamics (MD) approach. MD analysis revealed that mutant structure exposed a wide variation in the spatial environment of atoms, resulting in enhanced residue flexibility. The increased flexibility of residues favored to decrease the number of intra-molecular hydrogen bonding interactions in mutant structure. The reduction of hydrogen bonds in the mutant structure resulted to disrupt the local folding of secondary structural elements that eventually affect the proper folding of mutants. The unfolded state of mutant structure established more number of inter-molecular hydrogen bonding interaction at interface level due to the conformational variability, thus mediated high binding affinity with its interacting partner, Cdc42. PMID:26457828

  15. Molecular Dynamics with the United-Residue Model of Polypeptide Chains. II. Langevin and Berendsen-Bath Dynamics and Tests on Model α-Helical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Mey; Liwo, Adam; Jagielska, Anna; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2008-01-01

    The implementation of molecular dynamics (MD) with our physics-based protein united-residue (UNRES) force field, described in the accompanying paper (Khalili et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 13785), was extended to Langevin dynamics. The equations of motion are integrated by using a simplified stochastic velocity Verlet algorithm. To compare the results to those with all-atom simulations with implicit solvent in which no explicit stochastic and friction forces are present, we alternatively introduced the Berendsen thermostat. Test simulations on the Ala10 polypeptide demonstrated that the average kinetic energy is stable with about a 5 fs time step. To determine the correspondence between the UNRES time step and the time step of all-atom molecular dynamics, all-atom simulations with the AMBER 99 force field and explicit solvent and also with implicit solvent taken into account within the framework of the generalized Born/surface area (GBSA) model were carried out on the unblocked Ala10 polypeptide. We found that the UNRES time scale is 4 times longer than that of all-atom MD simulations because the degrees of freedom corresponding to the fastest motions in UNRES are averaged out. When the reduction of the computational cost for evaluation of the UNRES energy function is also taken into account, UNRES (with hydration included implicitly in the side chain–side chain interaction potential) offers about at least a 4000-fold speed up of computations relative to all-atom simulations with explicit solvent and at least a 65-fold speed up relative to all-atom simulations with implicit solvent. To carry out an initial full-blown test of the UNRES/MD approach, we ran Berendsen-bath and Langevin dynamics simulations of the 46-residue B-domain of staphylococcal protein A. We were able to determine the folding temperature at which all trajectories converged to nativelike structures with both approaches. For comparison, we carried out ab initio folding simulations of this

  16. A concurrent multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shaofan Tong, Qi

    2015-04-21

    In this work, we have derived a multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics (MMMD) from first principle to extend the (Andersen)-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics to mesoscale and continuum scale. The multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics is a con-current three-scale dynamics that couples a fine scale molecular dynamics, a mesoscale micromorphic dynamics, and a macroscale nonlocal particle dynamics together. By choosing proper statistical closure conditions, we have shown that the original Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics is the homogeneous and equilibrium case of the proposed multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics. In specific, we have shown that the Andersen-Parrinello-Rahman molecular dynamics can be rigorously formulated and justified from first principle, and its general inhomogeneous case, i.e., the three scale con-current multiscale micromorphic molecular dynamics can take into account of macroscale continuum mechanics boundary condition without the limitation of atomistic boundary condition or periodic boundary conditions. The discovered multiscale scale structure and the corresponding multiscale dynamics reveal a seamless transition from atomistic scale to continuum scale and the intrinsic coupling mechanism among them based on first principle formulation.

  17. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B.; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-01

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  18. Overcoming potential energy distortions in constrained internal coordinate molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Saugat; Salomon-Ferrer, Romelia; Larsen, Adrien B; Jain, Abhinandan; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2016-01-28

    The Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics (ICMD) method is an attractive molecular dynamics (MD) method for studying the dynamics of bonded systems such as proteins and polymers. It offers a simple venue for coarsening the dynamics model of a system at multiple hierarchical levels. For example, large scale protein dynamics can be studied using torsional dynamics, where large domains or helical structures can be treated as rigid bodies and the loops connecting them as flexible torsions. ICMD with such a dynamic model of the protein, combined with enhanced conformational sampling method such as temperature replica exchange, allows the sampling of large scale domain motion involving high energy barrier transitions. Once these large scale conformational transitions are sampled, all-torsion, or even all-atom, MD simulations can be carried out for the low energy conformations sampled via coarse grained ICMD to calculate the energetics of distinct conformations. Such hierarchical MD simulations can be carried out with standard all-atom forcefields without the need for compromising on the accuracy of the forces. Using constraints to treat bond lengths and bond angles as rigid can, however, distort the potential energy landscape of the system and reduce the number of dihedral transitions as well as conformational sampling. We present here a two-part solution to overcome such distortions of the potential energy landscape with ICMD models. To alleviate the intrinsic distortion that stems from the reduced phase space in torsional MD, we use the Fixman compensating potential. To additionally alleviate the extrinsic distortion that arises from the coupling between the dihedral angles and bond angles within a force field, we propose a hybrid ICMD method that allows the selective relaxing of bond angles. This hybrid ICMD method bridges the gap between all-atom MD and torsional MD. We demonstrate with examples that these methods together offer a solution to eliminate the potential

  19. Nonadiabatic Molecular Dynamics with Trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2012-02-01

    In the mixed quantum-classical description of molecular systems, only the quantum character of the electronic degrees of freedom is considered while the nuclear motion is treated at a classical level. In the adiabatic case, this picture corresponds to the Born-Oppenheimer limit where the nuclei move as point charges on the potential energy surface (PES) associated with a given electronic state. Despite the success of this approximation, many physical and chemical processes do not fall in the regime where nuclei and electrons can be considered decoupled. In particular, most photoreactions pass through regions of the PES in which electron-nuclear quantum interference effects are sizeable and often crucial for a correct description of the phenomena. Recently, we have developed a trajectory-based nonadiabatic molecular dynamics scheme that describes the nuclear wavepacket as an ensemble of particles following classical trajectories on PESs derived from time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) [1]. The method is based on Tully's fewest switches trajectories surface hopping (TSH) where the nonadiabatic coupling elements between the different potential energy surfaces are computed on-the-fly as functionals of the ground state electron density or, equivalently, of the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals [2]. Here, we present the theoretical fundamentals of our approach together with an extension that allows for the direct coupling of the dynamics to an external electromagnetic field [3] as well as to the external potential generated by the environment (solvent effects) [4]. The method is applied to the study of the photodissociation dynamics of simple molecules in gas phase and to the description of the fast excited state dynamics of molecules in solution (in particular Ruthenium (II) tris(bipyridine) in water). [4pt] [1] E. Tapavicza, I. Tavernelli, U. Rothlisberger, Phys. Rev. Lett., 98, (2007) 023001. [0pt] [2] Tavernelli I.; Tapavicza E.; Rothlisberger U., J. Chem

  20. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trumpakaj, Zygmunt; Linde, Bogumił B. J.

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular potentials and a few models of intermolecular interaction in liquid benzene are tested by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations. The repulsive part of the Lennard-Jones 12-6 (LJ 12-6) potential is too hard, which yields incorrect results. The exp-6 potential with a too hard repulsive term is also often used. Therefore, we took an expa-6 potential with a small Gaussian correction plus electrostatic interactions. This allows to modify the curvature of the potential. The MD simulations are carried out in the temperature range 280-352 K under normal pressure and at experimental density. The Rayleigh scattering of depolarized light is used for comparison. The results of MD simulations are comparable with the experimental values.

  1. Buckybomb: Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Fileti, Eudes Eterno; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2015-03-01

    Energetic materials, such as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics, are widely used in civilian and military applications. Nanoscale explosives represent a special group because of the high density of energetic covalent bonds. The reactive molecular dynamics (ReaxFF) study of nitrofullerene decomposition reported here provides a detailed chemical mechanism of explosion of a nanoscale carbon material. Upon initial heating, C60(NO2)12 disintegrates, increasing temperature and pressure by thousands of Kelvins and bars within tens of picoseconds. The explosion starts with NO2 group isomerization into C-O-N-O, followed by emission of NO molecules and formation of CO groups on the buckyball surface. NO oxidizes into NO2, and C60 falls apart, liberating CO2. At the highest temperatures, CO2 gives rise to diatomic carbon. The study shows that the initiation temperature and released energy depend strongly on the chemical composition and density of the material. PMID:26262672

  2. Molecular energetics in the capsomere of virus-like particle revealed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Tang, Ronghong; Bai, Shu; Connors, Natalie K; Lua, Linda H L; Chuan, Yap P; Middelberg, Anton P J; Sun, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are highly organized nanoparticles that have great potential in vaccinology, gene therapy, drug delivery, and materials science. However, the application of VLPs is hindered by obstacles in their design and production due to low efficiency of self-assembly. In the present study, all-atom (AA) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method are utilized to examine the molecular interactions in the capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV) VLP. It is found that both low ionic strength and the intracapsomere disulfide bonds are favorable for maintaining a stable capsomere. Simulation results examining the effects of solution conditions on the stabilization of a capsomere were verified by calorimetry experiments. Simulation results of free energy decomposition indicate that hydrophobic interaction is favorable for the formation of a capsomere, whereas electrostatic interaction is unfavorable. With increasing ionic strength, the dominant interaction for the stabilization of a capsomere changes from hydrophobic to electrostatic. By comprehensive analyses, the key amino acid residues (hot spots) in VP1 protein aiding formation of a capsomere in different solution conditions have been identified. These results provide molecular insights into the stabilization of building blocks for VLP and are expected to have implications in their partitioning between the correct and off-pathway reactions in VLP assembly. PMID:23586433

  3. Rigid-body molecular dynamics of DNA inside a nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Fathizadeh, Arman; Berdy Besya, Azim; Reza Ejtehadi, Mohammad; Schiessel, Helmut

    2013-03-01

    The majority of eukaryotic DNA, about three quarter, is wrapped around histone proteins forming so-called nucleosomes. To study nucleosomal DNA we introduce a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model based on sequence-dependent harmonic rigid base pair step parameters of DNA and nucleosomal binding sites. Mixed parametrization based on all-atom molecular dynamics and crystallographic data of protein-DNA structures is used for the base pair step parameters. The binding site parameters are adjusted by experimental B-factor values of the nucleosome crystal structure. The model is then used to determine the energy cost for placing a twist defect into the nucleosomal DNA which allows us to use Kramers theory to calculate nucleosome sliding caused by such defects. It is shown that the twist defect scenario together with the sequence-dependent elasticity of DNA can explain the slow time scales observed for nucleosome mobility along DNA. With this method we also show how the twist defect mechanism leads to a higher mobility of DNA in the presence of sin mutations near the dyad axis. Finally, by performing simulations on 5s rDNA, 601, and telomeric base pair sequences, it is demonstrated that the current model is a powerful tool to predict nucleosome positioning. PMID:23475204

  4. Molecular dynamics of membrane proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Woolf, Thomas B.; Crozier, Paul Stewart; Stevens, Mark Jackson

    2004-10-01

    Understanding the dynamics of the membrane protein rhodopsin will have broad implications for other membrane proteins and cellular signaling processes. Rhodopsin (Rho) is a light activated G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). When activated by ligands, GPCRs bind and activate G-proteins residing within the cell and begin a signaling cascade that results in the cell's response to external stimuli. More than 50% of all current drugs are targeted toward G-proteins. Rho is the prototypical member of the class A GPCR superfamily. Understanding the activation of Rho and its interaction with its Gprotein can therefore lead to a wider understanding of the mechanisms of GPCR activation and G-protein activation. Understanding the dark to light transition of Rho is fully analogous to the general ligand binding and activation problem for GPCRs. This transition is dependent on the lipid environment. The effect of lipids on membrane protein activity in general has had little attention, but evidence is beginning to show a significant role for lipids in membrane protein activity. Using the LAMMPS program and simulation methods benchmarked under the IBIG program, we perform a variety of allatom molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields.

    PubMed

    Vitalini, F; Noé, F; Keller, B G

    2016-06-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations data of the twenty encoded amino acids in different force fields

    PubMed Central

    Vitalini, F.; Noé, F.; Keller, B.G.

    2016-01-01

    We present extensive all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation data of the twenty encoded amino acids in explicit water, simulated with different force fields. The termini of the amino acids have been capped to ensure that the dynamics of the Φ and ψ torsion angles are analogues to the dynamics within a peptide chain. We use representatives of each of the four major force field families: AMBER ff-99SBILDN [1], AMBER ff-03 [2], OPLS-AA/L [3], CHARMM27 [4] and GROMOS43a1 [5], [6]. Our data represents a library and test bed for method development for MD simulations and for force fields development. Part of the data set has been previously used for comparison of the dynamic properties of force fields (Vitalini et al., 2015) [7] and for the construction of peptide basis functions for the variational approach to molecular kinetics [8]. PMID:27054161

  7. An effective all-atom potential for proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irbäck, Anders; Mitternacht, Simon; Mohanty, Sandipan

    2009-01-01

    We describe and test an implicit solvent all-atom potential for simulations of protein folding and aggregation. The potential is developed through studies of structural and thermodynamic properties of 17 peptides with diverse secondary structure. Results obtained using the final form of the potential are presented for all these peptides. The same model, with unchanged parameters, is furthermore applied to a heterodimeric coiled-coil system, a mixed α/β protein and a three-helix-bundle protein, with very good results. The computational efficiency of the potential makes it possible to investigate the free-energy landscape of these 49–67-residue systems with high statistical accuracy, using only modest computational resources by today's standards. PACS Codes: 87.14.E-, 87.15.A-, 87.15.Cc PMID:19356242

  8. Molecular Dynamics/Order Parameter eXtrapolation (MD/OPX) for Bionanosystem Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yinglong; Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale approach, Molecular Dynamics/Order Parameter eXtrapolation (MD/OPX), to the all-atom simulation of large bionanosystems is presented. The approach starts with the introduction of a set of order parameters (OPs) automatically generated with orthogonal polynomials to characterize the nanoscale features of bionanosystems. The OPs are shown to evolve slowly via Newton’s equations and the all-atom multiscale analysis (AMA) developed earlier1 demonstrates the existence of their stochastic dynamics, which serve as the justification for our MD/OPX approach. In MD/OPX, a short MD run estimates the rate of change of the OPs, which is then used to extrapolate the state of the system over time that is much longer than the 10−14 second timescale of fast atomic vibrations and collisions. The approach is implemented in NAMD and demonstrated on cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) capsid structural transitions (STs). It greatly accelerates the MD code and its underlying all-atom description of the nanosystems enables the use of a universal inter-atomic force field, avoiding recalibration with each new application as needed for coarse-grained models. PMID:18636559

  9. Langevin stabilization of molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izaguirre, Jesús A.; Catarello, Daniel P.; Wozniak, Justin M.; Skeel, Robert D.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper we show the possibility of using very mild stochastic damping to stabilize long time step integrators for Newtonian molecular dynamics. More specifically, stable and accurate integrations are obtained for damping coefficients that are only a few percent of the natural decay rate of processes of interest, such as the velocity autocorrelation function. Two new multiple time stepping integrators, Langevin Molly (LM) and Brünger-Brooks-Karplus-Molly (BBK-M), are introduced in this paper. Both use the mollified impulse method for the Newtonian term. LM uses a discretization of the Langevin equation that is exact for the constant force, and BBK-M uses the popular Brünger-Brooks-Karplus integrator (BBK). These integrators, along with an extrapolative method called LN, are evaluated across a wide range of damping coefficient values. When large damping coefficients are used, as one would for the implicit modeling of solvent molecules, the method LN is superior, with LM closely following. However, with mild damping of 0.2 ps-1, LM produces the best results, allowing long time steps of 14 fs in simulations containing explicitly modeled flexible water. With BBK-M and the same damping coefficient, time steps of 12 fs are possible for the same system. Similar results are obtained for a solvated protein-DNA simulation of estrogen receptor ER with estrogen response element ERE. A parallel version of BBK-M runs nearly three times faster than the Verlet-I/r-RESPA (reversible reference system propagator algorithm) when using the largest stable time step on each one, and it also parallelizes well. The computation of diffusion coefficients for flexible water and ER/ERE shows that when mild damping of up to 0.2 ps-1 is used the dynamics are not significantly distorted.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Analysis and Visualization of Large Structures Solved by Molecular Dynamics Flexible Fitting

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Ryan; Isralewitz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid structure fitting methods combine data from cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography with molecular dynamics simulations for the determination of all-atom structures of large biomolecular complexes. Evaluating the quality-of-fit obtained from hybrid fitting is computationally demanding, particularly in the context of a multiplicity of structural conformations that must be evaluated. Existing tools for quality-of-fit analysis and visualization have previously targeted small structures and are too slow to be used interactively for large biomolecular complexes of particular interest today such as viruses or for long molecular dynamics trajectories as they arise in protein folding. We present new data-parallel and GPU-accelerated algorithms for rapid interactive computation of quality-of-fit metrics linking all-atom structures and molecular dynamics trajectories to experimentally determined density maps obtained from cryo-electron microscopy or X-ray crystallography. We evaluate the performance and accuracy of the new quality-of-fit analysis algorithms vis-a-vis existing tools, examine algorithm performance on GPU-accelerated desktop workstations and supercomputers, and describe new visualization techniques for results of hybrid structure fitting methods. PMID:25340325

  11. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Monticelli, Luca; Heberle, Frederick A; Kucerka, Norbert; Tieleman, D. Peter; Katsaras, John

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  12. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  13. Dynamical Localization in Molecular Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xidi

    In the first four chapters of this thesis we concentrate on the Davydov model which describes the vibrational energy quanta of Amide I bonds (C=O bonds on the alpha -helix) coupled to the acoustic phonon modes of the alpha-helix backbone in the form of a Frohlich Hamiltonian. Following a brief introduction in chapter one, in chapter two we formulate the dynamics of vibrational quanta at finite temperature by using coherent state products. The fluctuation-dissipation relation is derived. At zero temperature, in the continuum limit, we recover the original results of Davydov. We also achieve good agreement with numerical simulations. In chapter three, the net contraction of the lattice is calculated exactly at any temperature, and its relation to the so -call "topological stability" of the Davydov soliton is discussed. In the second section of the chapter three we calculate the overtone spectra of crystalline acetanilide (according to some opinions ACN provides experimental evidence for the existence of Davydov solitons). Good agreement with experimental data has been obtained. In chapter four we study the self-trapped vibrational excitations by the Quantum Monte Carlo technique. For a single excitation, the temperature dependence of different physical observables is calculated. The quasi-particle which resembles the Davydov soliton has been found to be fairly narrow using the most commonly used data for the alpha -helix; at temperatures above a few Kelvin, the quasi-particle reaches its smallest limit (extends over three sites), which implies diffusive motion of the small polaron-like quasi-particle at high temperatures. For the multi-excitation case, bound pairs and clusters of excitations are found at low temperatures; they gradually dissociate when the temperature of the system is increased as calculated from the density-density correlation function. In the last chapter of this thesis, we study a more general model of dynamical local modes in molecular systems

  14. Molecular dynamics on APE100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barone, Luciano Maria; Simonazzi, Riccardo; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    1995-09-01

    We have studied portability, efficiency and accuracy of a standard Molecular Dynamics simulation on the SIMD parallel computer APE100. Computing speed performance and physical system size range have been analyzed and compared with those of a conventional computer. Short range and long range potentials have been considered, and the comparative advantage of different simulation approaches has been assessed. For long range potentials, APE turns out to be faster than a conventional computer; large systems can be conveniently simulated using either the cloning approach (up to ˜ 10 5 particles) or a domain decomposition with the systolic method. In the case of short range potentials and systems with diffusion (like a liquid), APE is convenient only when using a large number of processors. In a special case (a crystal without diffusion), a specific domain decomposition technique with frames makes APE advantageous for intermediate and large systems. Using the latter technique we have studied in detail the effect of different numerical error sources, and compared the accuracy of APE with that of a conventional computer.

  15. Dynamics of riboswitches: Molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2014-10-01

    Riboswitch RNAs play key roles in bacterial metabolism and represent a promising new class of antibiotic targets for treatment of infectious disease. While many studies of riboswitches have been performed, the exact mechanism of riboswitch operation is still not fully understood at the atomistic level of detail. Molecular dynamics simulations are useful for interpreting existing experimental data and producing predictions for new experiments. Here, a wide range of computational studies on riboswitches is reviewed. By elucidating the key principles of riboswitch operation, computation may aid in the effort to design more specific antibiotics with affinities greater than those of the native ligand. Such a detailed understanding may be required to improve efficacy and reduce side effects. These studies are laying the groundwork for understanding the action mechanism of new compounds that inhibit riboswitch activity. Future directions such as magnesium effects, large-scale conformational changes, expression platforms and co-transcriptional folding are also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches. PMID:24953187

  16. Benchmarking all-atom simulations using hydrogen exchange

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, John J.; Yu, Wookyung; Gichana, Elizabeth K.; Baxa, Michael C.; Hinshaw, James R.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    Long-time molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are now able to fold small proteins reversibly to their native structures [Lindorff-Larsen K, Piana S, Dror RO, Shaw DE (2011) Science 334(6055):517–520]. These results indicate that modern force fields can reproduce the energy surface near the native structure. To test how well the force fields recapitulate the other regions of the energy surface, MD trajectories for a variant of protein G are compared with data from site-resolved hydrogen exchange (HX) and other biophysical measurements. Because HX monitors the breaking of individual H-bonds, this experimental technique identifies the stability and H-bond content of excited states, thus enabling quantitative comparison with the simulations. Contrary to experimental findings of a cooperative, all-or-none unfolding process, the simulated denatured state ensemble, on average, is highly collapsed with some transient or persistent native 2° structure. The MD trajectories of this protein G variant and other small proteins exhibit excessive intramolecular H-bonding even for the most expanded conformations, suggesting that the force fields require improvements in describing H-bonding and backbone hydration. Moreover, these comparisons provide a general protocol for validating the ability of simulations to accurately capture rare structural fluctuations. PMID:25349413

  17. An all-atom force field developed for Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxin; Sun, Huai

    2014-03-01

    An all-atom force field is developed for metal organic frameworks Zn₄O(RCO₂)₆ by fitting to quantum mechanics data. Molecular simulations are conducted to validate the force field by calculating thermal expansion coefficients, crystal bulk and Young's moduli, power spectra, self-diffusion coefficients, and activation energies of self-diffusions for benzene and n-hexane. The calculated results are in good agreement with available experimental data. The proposed force field is suitable for simulations of adsorption or diffusion of organic molecules with flexible frameworks. PMID:24562858

  18. Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Electrical Double

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zifeng; Milner, Scott; Fichthorn, Kristen

    2015-03-01

    The electrical double layer (EDL) near the polymer/water interface plays a key role in the colloidal stability of latex paint. To elucidate the structure of the EDL at the molecular level, we conducted an all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We studied two representative surface charge groups in latex, the ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the grafted short polyelectrolyte charged by dissociated methyl methacrylic acid (MAA) monomers. Our results confirm that the Poisson-Boltzmann theory works well outside the Stern layer. Our calculated electrostatic potential at the Outer Helmholtz Plane (OHP) is close to the zeta potential measured experimentally, which suggests that the potential at the OHP is a good estimate of the zeta potential. We found that the position of the OHP for the MAA polyelectrolyte system extends much further into the aqueous phase than that in the SDS system, resulting in a Stern layer that is twice as thick. This model will allow for future investigations of the interactions of the surface with different surfactants and rheology modifiers, which may serve as a guide to tune the rheology of latex formulations. We thank Dow Chemical Company for financial support.

  19. Hemolytic mechanism of dioscin proposed by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu; Wang, Renxiao

    2010-01-01

    Saponins are a class of compounds containing a triterpenoid or steroid core with some attached carbohydrate modules. Many saponins cause hemolysis. However, the hemolytic mechanism of saponins at the molecular level is not yet fully understood. In an attempt to explore this issue, we have studied dioscin-a saponin with high hemolytic activity-through extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Firstly, all-atom MD simulations of 8 ns duration were conducted to study the stability of the dioscin-cholesterol complex and the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in water and in decane, respectively. MM-GB/SA computations indicate that the dioscin-cholesterol complex is energetically more favorable than the cholesterol-cholesterol complex in a non-polar environment. Next, several coarse-grained MD simulations of 400 ns duration were conducted to directly observe the distribution of multiple dioscin molecules on a DPPC-POPC-PSM-CHOL lipid bilayer. Our results indicate that dioscin can penetrate into the lipid bilayer, accumulate in the lipid raft micro-domain, and then bind cholesterol. This leads to the destabilization of lipid raft and consequent membrane curvature, which may eventually result in the hemolysis of red cells. This possible mechanism of hemolysis can well explain some experimental observations on hemolysis. PMID:19513766

  20. Small molecule interactions with lipid bilayers: a molecular dynamics study of chlorhexidine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oosten, Brad; Marquardt, Drew; Sternin, Edward; Harroun, Thad

    2013-03-01

    Chlorhexidine presents an interesting modelling challenge with a hydrophobic hexane connecting two biguanides (arginine analogues) and two aromatic rings. We conducted molecular dynamic simulations using the GROMACS simulation software to reproduce the experimental environment of chlorhexidine in a 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayer to produce atomic-level information. We constructed an all-atom force field of chlorhexidine from the CHARMM36 force field using well established parameters of certain amino acids. Partial charges were treated differently, which were calculated using GAUSSIAN software. We will compare and contrast the results of our model to that of our neutron scattering experiments previously done in our lab.

  1. Time-Dependent Molecular Reaction Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Oehrn, Yngve

    2007-11-29

    This paper is a brief review of a time-dependent, direct, nonadiabatic theory of molecular processes called Electron Nuclear Dynamics (END). This approach to the study of molecular reaction dynamics is a hierarchical theory that can be applied at various levels of approximation. The simplest level of END uses classical nuclei and represents all electrons by a single, complex, determinantal wave function. The wave function parameters such as average nuclear positions and momenta, and molecular orbital coefcients carry the time dependence and serve as dynamical variables. Examples of application are given of the simplest level of END to ion-atom and ion-molecule reactions.

  2. Dynamics of Lipids, Cholesterol, and Transmembrane α-Helices from Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (∼24 μs total) allowed exploration of configurational space and calculation of lateral diffusion coefficients of the components of a protein-embedded, cholesterol-containing model bilayer. The three model membranes are composed of an ∼50/50 (by mole) dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol bilayer and contained an α-helical transmembrane protein (HIV-1 gp41 TM). Despite the high concentration of cholesterol, normal Brownian motion was observed and the calculated diffusion coefficients (on the order of 10–9 cm2/s) are consistent with experiments. Diffusion is sensitive to a variety of parameters, and a temperature difference of ∼4 K from thermostat artifacts resulted in 2–10-fold differences in diffusion coefficients and significant differences in lipid order, membrane thickness, and unit cell area. Also, the specific peptide sequence likely underlies the consistently observed faster diffusion in one leaflet. Although the simulations here present molecular dynamics (MD) an order of magnitude longer than those from previous studies, the three systems did not approach ergodicity. The distributions of cholesterol and DPPC around the peptides changed on the microsecond time scale, but not significantly enough to thoroughly explore configurational space. These simulations support conclusions of other recent microsecond MD in that even longer time scales are needed for equilibration of model membranes and simulations of more realistic cellular or viral bilayers. PMID:25380392

  3. Communication: Relation of centroid molecular dynamics and ring-polymer molecular dynamics to exact quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

    2015-05-21

    We recently obtained a quantum-Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics by making a single change to the derivation of the “Classical Wigner” approximation. Here, we show that the further approximation of this “Matsubara dynamics” gives rise to two popular heuristic methods for treating quantum Boltzmann time-correlation functions: centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) and ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD). We show that CMD is a mean-field approximation to Matsubara dynamics, obtained by discarding (classical) fluctuations around the centroid, and that RPMD is the result of discarding a term in the Matsubara Liouvillian which shifts the frequencies of these fluctuations. These findings are consistent with previous numerical results and give explicit formulae for the terms that CMD and RPMD leave out.

  4. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Simple Liquids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Speer, Owner F.; Wengerter, Brian C.; Taylor, Ramona S.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment, in which students were given the opportunity to perform molecular dynamics simulations on a series of molecular liquids using the Amber suite of programs, is presented. They were introduced to both physical theories underlying classical mechanics simulations and to the atom-atom pair distribution function.

  6. Molecular ions, Rydberg spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jungen, Ch.

    2015-01-22

    Ion spectroscopy, Rydberg spectroscopy and molecular dynamics are closely related subjects. Multichannel quantum defect theory is a theoretical approach which draws on this close relationship and thereby becomes a powerful tool for the study of systems consisting of a positively charged molecular ion core interacting with an electron which may be loosely bound or freely scattering.

  7. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Program for Molecules

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-03-07

    ParBond is a parallel classical molecular dynamics code that models bonded molecular systems, typically of an organic nature. It uses classical force fields for both non-bonded Coulombic and Van der Waals interactions and for 2-, 3-, and 4-body bonded (bond, angle, dihedral, and improper) interactions. It integrates Newton''s equation of motion for the molecular system and evaluates various thermodynamical properties of the system as it progresses.

  8. Fermionic Molecular Dynamics for Nuclear Dynamics and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnaoui, K. H. O.; Chomaz, Ph; Gulminelli, F.

    A new Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model based on a Skyrme functional is proposed in this paper. After introducing the basic formalism, some first applications to nuclear structure and nuclear thermodynamics are presented.

  9. Molecular dynamics: A stitch in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deupi, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Lengthy molecular dynamics simulations of complex systems at the atomic scale usually require supercomputers. Now, by stitching together many shorter independent simulations run 'in the cloud', this requirement has been circumvented, allowing two milliseconds of the dynamics of a G-protein-coupled receptor to be simulated.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of membrane proteins under asymmetric ionic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Khalili-Araghi, Fatemeh; Ziervogel, Brigitte; Gumbart, James C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational method is developed to allow molecular dynamics simulations of biomembrane systems under realistic ionic gradients and asymmetric salt concentrations while maintaining the conventional periodic boundary conditions required to minimize finite-size effects in an all-atom explicit solvent representation. The method, which consists of introducing a nonperiodic energy step acting on the ionic species at the edge of the simulation cell, is first tested with illustrative applications to a simple membrane slab model and a phospholipid membrane bilayer. The nonperiodic energy-step method is then used to calculate the reversal potential of the bacterial porin OmpF, a large cation-specific β-barrel channel, by simulating the I-V curve under an asymmetric 10:1 KCl concentration gradient. The calculated reversal potential of 28.6 mV is found to be in excellent agreement with the values of 26–27 mV measured from lipid bilayer experiments, thereby demonstrating that the method allows realistic simulations of nonequilibrium membrane transport with quantitative accuracy. As a final example, the pore domain of Kv1.2, a highly selective voltage-activated K+ channel, is simulated in a lipid bilayer under conditions that recreate, for the first time, the physiological K+ and Na+ concentration gradients and the electrostatic potential difference of living cells. PMID:24081985

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Human Glucose Transporter GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) provide a pathway for glucose transport across membranes. Human GLUTs are implicated in devastating diseases such as heart disease, hyper- and hypo-glycemia, type 2 diabetes and caner. The human GLUT1 has been recently crystalized in the inward-facing open conformation. However, there is no other structural information for other conformations. The X-ray structures of E. coli Xylose permease (XylE), a glucose transporter homolog, are available in multiple conformations with and without the substrates D-xylose and D-glucose. XylE has high sequence homology to human GLUT1 and key residues in the sugar-binding pocket are conserved. Here we construct a homology model for human GLUT1 based on the available XylE crystal structure in the partially occluded outward-facing conformation. A long unbiased all atom molecular dynamics simulation starting from the model can capture a new fully opened outward-facing conformation. Our investigation of molecular interactions at the interface between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the intracellular helices (ICH) domain in the outward- and inward-facing conformation supports that the ICH domain likely stabilizes the outward-facing conformation in GLUT1. Furthermore, inducing a conformational transition, our simulations manifest a global asymmetric rocker switch motion and detailed molecular interactions between the substrate and residues through the water-filled selective pore along a pathway from the extracellular to the intracellular side. The results presented here are consistent with previously published biochemical, mutagenesis and functional studies. Together, this study shed light on the structure and functional relationships of GLUT1 in multiple conformational states. PMID:25919356

  12. Folding peptides and proteins with all-atom physics: methods and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shell, M. Scott

    2008-03-01

    Computational methods offer powerful tools for investigating proteins and peptides at the molecular-level; however, it has proven challenging to reproduce the long time scale folding processes of these molecules at a level that is both faithful to the atomic driving forces and attainable with modern commodity cluster computing. Alternatively, the past decade has seen significant progress in using bioinformatics-based approaches to infer the three dimensional native structures of proteins, drawing upon extensive knowledge databases of known protein structures [1]. These methods work remarkably well when a homologous protein can be found to provide a structural template for a candidate sequence. However, in cases where homology to database proteins is low, where the folding pathway is of interest, or where conformational flexibility is substantial---as in many emerging protein and peptide technologies---bioinformatics methods perform poorly. There is therefore great interest in seeing purely physics-based approaches succeed. We discuss a purely physics-based, database-free folding method, relying on proper thermal sampling (replica exchange molecular dynamics) and molecular potential energy functions. In order to surmount the tremendous computational demands of all-atom folding simulations, our approach implements a conformational search strategy based on a putative protein folding mechanism called zipping and assembly [2-4]. That is, we explicitly seek out potential folding pathways inferred from short simulations, and iteratively pursue all such routes by coaxing a polypeptide chain along them. The method is called the Zipping and Assembly Method (ZAM) and it works in two parts: (1) the full polypeptide chain is broken into small fragments that are first simulated independently and then successively re-assembled into larger segments with further sampling, and (2) consistently stable structure in fragments is detected and locked into place, in order to avoid re

  13. Dynamic molecular crystals with switchable physical properties.

    PubMed

    Sato, Osamu

    2016-06-21

    The development of molecular materials whose physical properties can be controlled by external stimuli - such as light, electric field, temperature, and pressure - has recently attracted much attention owing to their potential applications in molecular devices. There are a number of ways to alter the physical properties of crystalline materials. These include the modulation of the spin and redox states of the crystal's components, or the incorporation within the crystalline lattice of tunable molecules that exhibit stimuli-induced changes in their molecular structure. A switching behaviour can also be induced by changing the molecular orientation of the crystal's components, even in cases where the overall molecular structure is not affected. Controlling intermolecular interactions within a molecular material is also an effective tool to modulate its physical properties. This Review discusses recent advances in the development of such stimuli-responsive, switchable crystalline compounds - referred to here as dynamic molecular crystals - and suggests how different approaches can serve to prepare functional materials. PMID:27325090

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations: advances and applications

    PubMed Central

    Hospital, Adam; Goñi, Josep Ramon; Orozco, Modesto; Gelpí, Josep L

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have evolved into a mature technique that can be used effectively to understand macromolecular structure-to-function relationships. Present simulation times are close to biologically relevant ones. Information gathered about the dynamic properties of macromolecules is rich enough to shift the usual paradigm of structural bioinformatics from studying single structures to analyze conformational ensembles. Here, we describe the foundations of molecular dynamics and the improvements made in the direction of getting such ensemble. Specific application of the technique to three main issues (allosteric regulation, docking, and structure refinement) is discussed.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of large macromolecular complexes

    PubMed Central

    Perilla, Juan R.; Goh, Boon Chong; Cassidy, C. Keith; Liu, Bo; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Rudack, Till; Yu, Hang; Wu, Zhe; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Connecting dynamics to structural data from diverse experimental sources, molecular dynamics simulations permit the exploration of biological phenomena in unparalleled detail. Advances in simulations are moving the atomic resolution descriptions of biological systems into the million-to-billion atom regime, in which numerous cell functions reside. In this opinion, we review the progress, driven by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations, in the study of viruses, ribosomes, bioenergetic systems, and other diverse applications. These examples highlight the utility of molecular dynamics simulations in the critical task of relating atomic detail to the function of supramolecular complexes, a task that cannot be achieved by smaller-scale simulations or existing experimental approaches alone. PMID:25845770

  16. Self-assembly of Spherical Macroions in Solution: A Coarse-grained Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhuonan; Liu, Tianbo; Tsige, Mesfin

    2015-03-01

    Macroions (such as polyoxometalates) in solution can form a stable hollow spherical super-molecular structure called blackberry when they have moderate surface charge density and size (1-10 nm). Depending on the surface charge density of macroions, the size of the blackberry can be from 20 to more than 100 nm. Other macroions such as dendrimers can also self-assemble into similar super-molecular structure in solution. Existing theories such as Debye-Hückel and DLVO theories cannot explain this phenomenon and we are not aware of any other theory that can explain this. Previous studies using all-atom Molecular Dynamics simulations have shown identical macroions forming oligomers mediated by counterions. Due to the limitations in all-atom simulation and available computational capabilities, these studies handled only small systems with simple macroions, leading to less conclusive but still relevant results on the self-assembly behavior. To overcome these limitations, in this work large-scale coarse-grained modeling of macroions in solution is used. In order to understand the origin of the attractive force that is responsible for the self-assembly of macroions, different types of macroions in different solution conditions are studied. This work was supported by NSF Grant DMR0847580.

  17. Equilibrium conformational dynamics in an RNA tetraloop from massively parallel molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Allison J.; Thompson, Erik J.; Patel, Sarav S.; Haldeman, Kristin; Sorin, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Conformational equilibrium within the ubiquitous GNRA tetraloop motif was simulated at the ensemble level, including 10 000 independent all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories totaling over 110 µs of simulation time. This robust sampling reveals a highly dynamic structure comprised of 15 conformational microstates. We assemble a Markov model that includes transitions ranging from the nanosecond to microsecond timescales and is dominated by six key loop conformations that contribute to fluctuations around the native state. Mining of the Protein Data Bank provides an abundance of structures in which GNRA tetraloops participate in tertiary contact formation. Most predominantly observed in the experimental data are interactions of the native loop structure within the minor groove of adjacent helical regions. Additionally, a second trend is observed in which the tetraloop assumes non-native conformations while participating in multiple tertiary contacts, in some cases involving multiple possible loop conformations. This tetraloop flexibility can act to counterbalance the energetic penalty associated with assuming non-native loop structures in forming tertiary contacts. The GNRA motif has thus evolved not only to readily participate in simple tertiary interactions involving native loop structure, but also to easily adapt tetraloop secondary conformation in order to participate in larger, more complex tertiary interactions. PMID:20223768

  18. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  19. Reorientation and Dimerization of the Membrane-Bound Antimicrobial Peptide PGLa from Microsecond All-Atom MD Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Ulmschneider, Jakob P.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Ulmschneider, Martin B.; Ulrich, Anne S.; Strandberg, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-active antimicrobial peptide PGLa from Xenopus laevis is known from solid-state 2H-, 15N-, and 19F-NMR spectroscopy to occupy two distinct α-helical surface adsorbed states in membranes: a surface-bound S-state with a tilt angle of ∼95° at low peptide/lipid molar ratio (P/L = 1:200), and an obliquely tilted T-state with a tilt angle of 127° at higher peptide concentration (P/L = 1:50). Using a rapid molecular-dynamics insertion protocol in combination with microsecond-scale simulation, we have characterized the structure of both states in detail. As expected, the amphiphilic peptide resides horizontally on the membrane surface in a monomeric form at a low P/L, whereas the T-state is seen in the simulations to be a symmetric antiparallel dimer, with close contacts between small glycine and alanine residues at the interface. The computed tilt angles and azimuthal rotations, as well as the quadrupolar splittings predicted from the simulations agree with the experimental NMR data. The simulations reveal many structural details previously inaccessible, such as the immersion depth of the peptide in the membrane and the packing of the dimerization interface. The study highlights the ability and limitations of current state-of-the-art multimicrosecond all-atom simulations of membrane-active peptides to complement experimental data from solid-state NMR. PMID:22947863

  20. Molecular dynamic simulations of ocular tablet dissolution.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qian; Fadda, Hala M; Li, Chung; Paul, Daniel; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Zloh, Mire

    2013-11-25

    Small tablets for implantation into the subconjunctival space in the eye are being developed to inhibit scarring after glaucoma filtration surgery (GFS). There is a need to evaluate drug dissolution at the molecular level to determine how the chemical structure of the active may correlate with dissolution in the nonsink conditions of the conjunctival space. We conducted molecular dynamics simulations to study the dissolution process of tablets derived from two drugs that can inhibit fibrosis after GFS, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and the matrix metalloprotease inhibitor (MMPi), ilomastat. The dissolution was simulated in the presence of simple point charge (SPC) water molecules, and the liquid turnover of the aqueous humor in the subconjunctival space was simulated by removal of the dissolved drug molecules at regular intervals and replacement by new water molecules. At the end of the simulation, the total molecular solvent accessible surface area of 5-FU tablets increased by 60 times more than that of ilomastat as a result of tablet swelling and release of molecules into solution. The tablet dissolution pattern shown in our molecular dynamic simulations tends to correlate with experimental release profiles. This work indicates that a series of molecular dynamic simulations can be used to predict the influence of the molecular properties of a drug on its dissolution profile and could be useful during preformulation where sufficient amounts of the drug are not always available to perform dissolution studies. PMID:24073784

  1. Molecular Scale Dynamics of Large Ring Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gooßen, S.; Brás, A. R.; Krutyeva, M.; Sharp, M.; Falus, P.; Feoktystov, A.; Gasser, U.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Wischnewski, A.; Richter, D.

    2014-10-01

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture.

  2. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, C. E.; Self, J. L.; Copley, J. R. D.; Faraone, A.

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids.

  3. Dynamic signature of molecular association in methanol.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, C E; Self, J L; Copley, J R D; Faraone, A

    2016-07-01

    Quasielastic neutron scattering measurements and molecular dynamics simulations were combined to investigate the collective dynamics of deuterated methanol, CD3OD. In the experimentally determined dynamic structure factor, a slow, non-Fickian mode was observed in addition to the standard density-fluctuation heat mode. The simulation results indicate that the slow dynamical process originates from the hydrogen bonding of methanol molecules. The qualitative behavior of this mode is similar to the previously observed α-relaxation in supercooled water [M. C. Bellissent-Funel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 3644 (2000)] which also originates from the formation and dissolution of hydrogen-bonded associates (supramolecular clusters). In methanol, however, this mode is distinguishable well above the freezing transition. This finding indicates that an emergent slow mode is not unique to supercooled water, but may instead be a general feature of hydrogen-bonding liquids and associating molecular liquids. PMID:27394112

  4. Molecular scale dynamics of large ring polymers.

    PubMed

    Gooßen, S; Brás, A R; Krutyeva, M; Sharp, M; Falus, P; Feoktystov, A; Gasser, U; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Wischnewski, A; Richter, D

    2014-10-17

    We present neutron scattering data on the structure and dynamics of melts from polyethylene oxide rings with molecular weights up to ten times the entanglement mass of the linear counterpart. The data reveal a very compact conformation displaying a structure approaching a mass fractal, as hypothesized by recent simulation work. The dynamics is characterized by a fast Rouse relaxation of subunits (loops) and a slower dynamics displaying a lattice animal-like loop displacement. The loop size is an intrinsic property of the ring architecture and is independent of molecular weight. This is the first experimental observation of the space-time evolution of segmental motion in ring polymers illustrating the dynamic consequences of their topology that is unique among all polymeric systems of any other known architecture. PMID:25361284

  5. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  6. Semiclassical guided optimal control of molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kondorskiy, A.; Mil'nikov, G.; Nakamura, H.

    2005-10-15

    An efficient semiclassical optimal control theory applicable to multidimensional systems is formulated for controlling wave packet dynamics on a single adiabatic potential energy surface. The approach combines advantages of different formulations of optimal control theory: quantum and classical on one hand and global and local on the other. Numerical applications to the control of HCN-CNH isomerization demonstrate that this theory can provide an efficient tool to manipulate molecular dynamics of many degrees of freedom by laser pulses.

  7. Bridging between NMA and Elastic Network Models: Preserving All-Atom Accuracy in Coarse-Grained Models

    PubMed Central

    Na, Hyuntae; Jernigan, Robert L.; Song, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics can provide deep insights into the functional mechanisms of proteins and protein complexes. For large protein complexes such as GroEL/GroES with more than 8,000 residues, obtaining a fine-grained all-atom description of its normal mode motions can be computationally prohibitive and is often unnecessary. For this reason, coarse-grained models have been used successfully. However, most existing coarse-grained models use extremely simple potentials to represent the interactions within the coarse-grained structures and as a result, the dynamics obtained for the coarse-grained structures may not always be fully realistic. There is a gap between the quality of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures given by all-atom models and that by coarse-grained models. In this work, we resolve an important question in protein dynamics computations—how can we efficiently construct coarse-grained models whose description of the dynamics of the coarse-grained structures remains as accurate as that given by all-atom models? Our method takes advantage of the sparseness of the Hessian matrix and achieves a high efficiency with a novel iterative matrix projection approach. The result is highly significant since it can provide descriptions of normal mode motions at an all-atom level of accuracy even for the largest biomolecular complexes. The application of our method to GroEL/GroES offers new insights into the mechanism of this biologically important chaperonin, such as that the conformational transitions of this protein complex in its functional cycle are even more strongly connected to the first few lowest frequency modes than with other coarse-grained models. PMID:26473491

  8. Optimizing replica exchange moves for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nadler, Walter; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2007-11-01

    We sketch the statistical physics framework of the replica exchange technique when applied to molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we draw attention to generalized move sets that allow a variety of optimizations as well as new applications of the method. PMID:18233794

  9. Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Glikman, E.; Kelson, I. ); Doan, N.V. )

    1991-09-01

    Molecular dynamics calculations of nuclear stimulated desorption are carried out for a palladium crystal containing radioactive palladium atoms. The total desorption probability from various sites are computed, as well as the angular distribution of the desorbing atoms. The implications of the results to different experimental scenarios are discussed.

  10. Reaction dynamics in polyatomic molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.H.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is the development of theoretical methods and models for describing the dynamics of chemical reactions, with specific interest for application to polyatomic molecular systems of special interest and relevance. There is interest in developing the most rigorous possible theoretical approaches and also in more approximate treatments that are more readily applicable to complex systems.

  11. Routine Access to Millisecond Time Scale Events with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we critically assess the ability of the all-atom enhanced sampling method accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) to investigate conformational changes in proteins that typically occur on the millisecond time scale. We combine aMD with the inherent power of graphics processor units (GPUs) and apply the implementation to the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). A 500 ns aMD simulation is compared to a previous millisecond unbiased brute force MD simulation carried out on BPTI, showing that the same conformational space is sampled by both approaches. To our knowledge, this represents the first implementation of aMD on GPUs and also the longest aMD simulation of a biomolecule run to date. Our implementation is available to the community in the latest release of the Amber software suite (v12), providing routine access to millisecond events sampled from dynamics simulations using off the shelf hardware. PMID:22984356

  12. Recent development and application of constant pH molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Morrow, Brian H.; Shi, Chuanyin; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-01-01

    Solution pH is a critical environmental factor for chemical and biological processes. Over the last decade, significant efforts have been made in the development of constant pH molecular dynamics (pHMD) techniques for gaining detailed insights into pH-coupled dynamical phenomena. In this article we review the advancement of this field in the past five years, placing a special emphasis on the development of the all-atom continuous pHMD technique. We discuss various applications, including the prediction of pKa shifts for proteins, nucleic acids and surfactant assemblies, elucidation of pH-dependent population shifts, protein-protein and protein-RNA binding, as well as the mechanisms of pH-dependent self-assembly and phase transitions of surfactants and peptides. We also discuss future directions for the further improvement of the pHMD techniques. PMID:25309035

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Graphene Oxide Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pan; Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, V.; Nicolai, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    We use quantum mechanical calculations to develop a full set of force field parameters in order to perform molecular dynamics simulations to understand and optimize the molecular storage properties inside Graphene Oxide Frameworks (GOFs). A set of boron-related parameters for commonly used empirical force fields is determined to describe the non-bonded and bonded interactions between linear boronic acid linkers and graphene sheets of GOF materials. The transferability of the parameters is discussed and their validity is quantified by comparing quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical structural and vibrational properties. The application of the model to the dynamics of water inside the GOFs reveals significant variations in structural flexibility of GOF depending on the linker density, which is shown to be usable as a tuning parameter for desired diffusion properties.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of weak detonations.

    PubMed

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Zeiri, Yehuda; Zybin, Sergey V; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2011-12-01

    Detonation of a three-dimensional reactive nonisotropic molecular crystal is modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. The detonation process is initiated by an impulse, followed by the creation of a stable fast reactive shock wave. The terminal shock velocity is independent of the initiation conditions. Further analysis shows supersonic propagation decoupled from the dynamics of the decomposed material left behind the shock front. The dependence of the shock velocity on crystal nonlinear compressibility resembles solitary behavior. These properties categorize the phenomena as a weak detonation. The dependence of the detonation wave on microscopic potential parameters was investigated. An increase in detonation velocity with the reaction exothermicity reaching a saturation value is observed. In all other respects the model crystal exhibits typical properties of a molecular crystal. PMID:22304055

  15. Molecular dynamics of PLK1 during mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Stephane; Sumara, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is a key regulator of eukaryotic cell division. During mitosis, dynamic regulation of PLK1 is crucial for its roles in centrosome maturation, spindle assembly, microtubule–kinetochore attachment, and cytokinesis. Similar to other members of the PLK family, the molecular architecture of PLK1 protein is characterized by 2 domains—the kinase domain and the regulatory substrate-binding domain (polo-box domain)—that cooperate and control PLK1 function during mitosis. Mitotic cells employ many layers of regulation to activate and target PLK1 to different cellular structures in a timely manner. During the last decade, numerous studies have shed light on the precise molecular mechanisms orchestrating the mitotic activity of PLK1 in time and space. This review aims to discuss available data and concepts related to regulation of the molecular dynamics of human PLK1 during mitotic progression. PMID:27308323

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations of the Cx26 hemichannel: Evaluation of structural models with Brownian dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taekyung; Harris, Andrew L.; Rossi, Angelo

    2011-01-01

    The recently published crystal structure of the Cx26 gap junction channel provides a unique opportunity for elucidation of the structure of the conductive connexin pore and the molecular determinants of its ion permeation properties (conductance, current–voltage [I-V] relations, and charge selectivity). However, the crystal structure was incomplete, most notably lacking the coordinates of the N-terminal methionine residue, which resides within the pore, and also lacking two cytosolic domains. To allow computational studies for comparison with the known channel properties, we completed the structure. Grand canonical Monte Carlo Brownian dynamics (GCMC/BD) simulations of the completed and the published Cx26 hemichannel crystal structure indicate that the pore is too narrow to permit significant ion flux. The GCMC/BD simulations predict marked inward current rectification and almost perfect anion selectivity, both inconsistent with known channel properties. The completed structure was refined by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (220 ns total) in an explicit solvent and POPC membrane system. These MD simulations produced an equilibrated structure with a larger minimal pore diameter, which decreased the height of the permeation barrier formed by the N terminus. GCMC/BD simulations of the MD-equilibrated structure yielded more appropriate single-channel conductance and less anion/cation selectivity. However, the simulations much more closely matched experimentally determined I-V relations when the charge effects of specific co- and posttranslational modifications of Cx26 previously identified by mass spectrometry were incorporated. We conclude that the average equilibrated structure obtained after MD simulations more closely represents the open Cx26 hemichannel structure than does the crystal structure, and that co- and posttranslational modifications of Cx26 hemichannels are likely to play an important physiological role by defining the conductance and ion

  17. Transmembrane helix structure, dynamics, and interactions: multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L; Bassolino, D; Stouch, T

    1997-01-01

    To probe the fundamentals of membrane/protein interactions, all-atom multi-nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations were conducted on a single transmembrane poly(32)alanine helix in a fully solvated dimyristoyphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer. The central 12 residues, which interact only with the lipid hydrocarbon chains, maintained a very stable helical structure. Helical regions extended beyond these central 12 residues, but interactions with the lipid fatty-acyl ester linkages, the lipid headgroups, and water molecules made the helix less stable in this region. The C and N termini, exposed largely to water, existed as random coils. As a whole, the helix tilted substantially, from perpendicular to the bilayer plane (0 degree) to a 30 degrees tilt. The helix experienced a bend at its middle, and the two halves of the helix at times assumed substantially different tilts. Frequent hydrogen bonding, of up to 0.7 ns in duration, occurred between peptide and lipid molecules. This resulted in correlated translational diffusion between the helix and a few lipid molecules. Because of the large variation in lipid conformation, the lipid environment of the peptide was not well defined in terms of "annular" lipids and on average consisted of 18 lipid molecules. When compared with a "neat" bilayer without peptide, no significant difference was seen in the bilayer thickness, lipid conformations or diffusion, or headgroup orientation. However, the lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters showed a significant decrease in order, especially in those methylene groups closest to the headgroup. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 14 PMID:9199766

  18. Energy Landscape of All-Atom Protein-Protein Interactions Revealed by Multiscale Enhanced Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Moritsugu, Kei; Terada, Tohru; Kidera, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are regulated by a subtle balance of complicated atomic interactions and solvation at the interface. To understand such an elusive phenomenon, it is necessary to thoroughly survey the large configurational space from the stable complex structure to the dissociated states using the all-atom model in explicit solvent and to delineate the energy landscape of protein-protein interactions. In this study, we carried out a multiscale enhanced sampling (MSES) simulation of the formation of a barnase-barstar complex, which is a protein complex characterized by an extraordinary tight and fast binding, to determine the energy landscape of atomistic protein-protein interactions. The MSES adopts a multicopy and multiscale scheme to enable for the enhanced sampling of the all-atom model of large proteins including explicit solvent. During the 100-ns MSES simulation of the barnase-barstar system, we observed the association-dissociation processes of the atomistic protein complex in solution several times, which contained not only the native complex structure but also fully non-native configurations. The sampled distributions suggest that a large variety of non-native states went downhill to the stable complex structure, like a fast folding on a funnel-like potential. This funnel landscape is attributed to dominant configurations in the early stage of the association process characterized by near-native orientations, which will accelerate the native inter-molecular interactions. These configurations are guided mostly by the shape complementarity between barnase and barstar, and lead to the fast formation of the final complex structure along the downhill energy landscape. PMID:25340714

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of biological membranes and membrane proteins using enhanced conformational sampling algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Im, Wonpil; Feig, Michael; Sugita, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    This paper reviews various enhanced conformational sampling methods and explicit/implicit solvent/membrane models, as well as their recent applications to the exploration of the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations have become an essential tool to investigate biological problems, and their success relies on proper molecular models together with efficient conformational sampling methods. The implicit representation of solvent/membrane environments is reasonable approximation to the explicit all-atom models, considering the balance between computational cost and simulation accuracy. Implicit models can be easily combined with replica-exchange molecular dynamics methods to explore a wider conformational space of a protein. Other molecular models and enhanced conformational sampling methods are also briefly discussed. As application examples, we introduce recent simulation studies of glycophorin A, phospholamban, amyloid precursor protein, and mixed lipid bilayers and discuss the accuracy and efficiency of each simulation model and method. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26766517

  20. Probing the Huntingtin 1-17 Membrane Anchor on a Phospholipid Bilayer by Using All-Atom Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Sébastien; Binette, Vincent; Salnikov, Evgeniy S.; Bechinger, Burkhard; Mousseau, Normand

    2015-01-01

    Mislocalization and aggregation of the huntingtin protein are related to Huntington’s disease. Its first exon—more specifically the first 17 amino acids (Htt17)—is crucial for the physiological and pathological functions of huntingtin. It regulates huntingtin’s activity through posttranslational modifications and serves as an anchor to membrane-containing organelles of the cell. Recently, structure and orientation of the Htt17 membrane anchor were determined using a combined solution and solid-state NMR approach. This prompted us to refine this model by investigating the dynamics and thermodynamics of this membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer using all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics and Hamiltonian replica exchange. Our simulations are combined with various experimental measurements to generate a high-resolution atomistic model for the huntingtin Htt17 membrane anchor on a POPC bilayer. More precisely, we observe that the single α-helix structure is more stable in the phospholipid membrane than the NMR model obtained in the presence of dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles. The resulting Htt17 monomer has its hydrophobic plane oriented parallel to the bilayer surface. Our results further unveil the key residues interacting with the membrane in terms of hydrogen bonds, salt-bridges, and nonpolar contributions. We also observe that Htt17 equilibrates at a well-defined insertion depth and that it perturbs the physical properties—order parameter, thickness, and area per lipid—of the bilayer in a manner that could favor its dimerization. Overall, our observations reinforce and refine the NMR measurements on the Htt17 membrane anchor segment of huntingtin that is of fundamental importance to its biological functions. PMID:25762330

  1. The MOLDY short-range molecular dynamics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackland, G. J.; D'Mellow, K.; Daraszewicz, S. L.; Hepburn, D. J.; Uhrin, M.; Stratford, K.

    2011-12-01

    measuring thermodynamic properities, diffusion, radiation damage, fracture, twinning deformation, nucleation and growth of phase transitions, sputtering etc. In the vast majority of materials, the interactions are non-pairwise, and the code must be able to deal with many-body forces. Solution method: Molecular dynamics involves integrating Newton's equations of motion. MOLDY uses verlet (for good energy conservation) or predictor-corrector (for accurate trajectories) algorithms. It is parallelised using open MP. It also includes a static minimisation routine to find the lowest energy structure. Boundary conditions for surfaces, clusters, grain boundaries, thermostat (Nose), barostat (Parrinello-Rahman), and externally applied strain are provided. The initial configuration can be either a repeated unit cell or have all atoms given explictly. Initial velocities are generated internally, but it is also possible to specify the velocity of a particular atom. A wide range of interatomic force models are implemented, including embedded atom, Morse or Lennard-Jones. Thus the program is especially well suited to calculations of metals. Restrictions: The code is designed for short-ranged potentials, and there is no Ewald sum. Thus for long range interactions where all particles interact with all others, the order- N scaling will fail. Different interatomic potential forms require recompilation of the code. Additional comments: There is a set of associated open-source analysis software for postprocessing and visualisation. This includes local crystal structure recognition and identification of topological defects. Running time: A set of test modules for running time are provided. The code scales as order N. The parallelisation shows near-linear scaling with number of processors in a shared memory environment. A typical run of a few tens of nanometers for a few nanoseconds will run on a timescale of days on a multiprocessor desktop.

  2. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, C.; Wehner, J.; Hausner, J.; Wenzel, M.; Engel, V.

    2015-01-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  3. Exciton dynamics in perturbed vibronic molecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Brüning, C; Wehner, J; Hausner, J; Wenzel, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-01

    A site specific perturbation of a photo-excited molecular aggregate can lead to a localization of excitonic energy. We investigate this localization dynamics for laser-prepared excited states. Changing the parameters of the electric field significantly influences the exciton localization which offers the possibility for a selective control of this process. This is demonstrated for aggregates possessing a single vibrational degree of freedom per monomer unit. It is shown that the effects identified for the molecular dimer can be generalized to larger aggregates with a high density of vibronic states. PMID:26798840

  4. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ronald E.; Tadmor, Ellad B.; Gibson, Joshua S.; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress.

  5. Molecular dynamics at constant Cauchy stress.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ronald E; Tadmor, Ellad B; Gibson, Joshua S; Bernstein, Noam; Pavia, Fabio

    2016-05-14

    The Parrinello-Rahman algorithm for imposing a general state of stress in periodic molecular dynamics simulations is widely used in the literature and has been implemented in many readily available molecular dynamics codes. However, what is often overlooked is that this algorithm controls the second Piola-Kirchhoff stress as opposed to the true (Cauchy) stress. This can lead to misinterpretation of simulation results because (1) the true stress that is imposed during the simulation depends on the deformation of the periodic cell, (2) the true stress is potentially very different from the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff stress, and (3) the true stress can vary significantly during the simulation even if the imposed second Piola-Kirchhoff is constant. We propose a simple modification to the algorithm that allows the true Cauchy stress to be controlled directly. We then demonstrate the efficacy of the new algorithm with the example of martensitic phase transformations under applied stress. PMID:27179471

  6. Molecular dynamics study of cyclohexane interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael A.; Chandler, David

    1990-12-01

    Classical molecular dynamics calculations are reported for one C 6H 12 molecule in a bath of 250 CS 2 molecules at roomtemperature and liquid densities of 1.0, 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5 g/cm 3. The solvent contribution to the free energy of activation for the chair-boat isomerization has been determined to high accuracy. The transmission coefficient and reactive flux correlation functions have also been computed. The results obtained agree with earlier conclusions drawn from RISM integral equation calculations and stochastic molecular dynamics calculations. Namely, the solvent effect on the rate manifests a qualitative breakdown of transition state theory and the RRKM picture of unimolecular kinetics. Analysis of the activated trajectories indicate a significant degree of quasiperiodicity.

  7. ADAPTIVE MULTILEVEL SPLITTING IN MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATIONS*

    PubMed Central

    Aristoff, David; Lelièvre, Tony; Mayne, Christopher G.; Teo, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive Multilevel Splitting (AMS) is a replica-based rare event sampling method that has been used successfully in high-dimensional stochastic simulations to identify trajectories across a high potential barrier separating one metastable state from another, and to estimate the probability of observing such a trajectory. An attractive feature of AMS is that, in the limit of a large number of replicas, it remains valid regardless of the choice of reaction coordinate used to characterize the trajectories. Previous studies have shown AMS to be accurate in Monte Carlo simulations. In this study, we extend the application of AMS to molecular dynamics simulations and demonstrate its effectiveness using a simple test system. Our conclusion paves the way for useful applications, such as molecular dynamics calculations of the characteristic time of drug dissociation from a protein target. PMID:26005670

  8. Molecular dynamics studies of polyurethane nanocomposite hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strankowska, J.; Piszczyk, Ł.; Strankowski, M.; Danowska, M.; Szutkowski, K.; Jurga, S.; Kwela, J.

    2013-10-01

    Polyurethane PEO-based hydrogels have a broad range of biomedical applicability. They are attractive for drug-controlled delivery systems, surgical implants and wound healing dressings. In this study, a PEO based polyurethane hydrogels containing Cloisite® 30B, an organically modified clay mineral, was synthesized. Structure of nanocomposite hydrogels was determined using XRD technique. Its molecular dynamics was studied by means of NMR spectroscopy, DMA and DSC analysis. The mechanical properties and thermal stability of the systems were improved by incorporation of clay and controlled by varying the clay content in polymeric matrix. Molecular dynamics of polymer chains depends on interaction of Cloisite® 30B nanoparticles with soft segments of polyurethanes. The characteristic nanosize effect is observed.

  9. New faster CHARMM molecular dynamics engine

    PubMed Central

    Hynninen, Antti-Pekka; Crowley, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new faster molecular dynamics (MD) engine into the CHARMM software package. The new MD engine is faster both in serial (i.e., single CPU core) and parallel execution. Serial performance is approximately two times higher than in the previous version of CHARMM. The newly programmed parallelization method allows the MD engine to parallelize up to hundreds of CPU cores. PMID:24302199

  10. Nanoindentation of Zr by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu (芦子哲), Zizhe; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Noordhoek, Mark J.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Phillpot, Simon R.

    2015-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation are used to study the deformation behaviors of single crystal Zr for four different surface orientations. The comparison of results for two different potentials, an embedded atom method potential and a charged optimized many body potential, reveals the influence of stable and unstable stacking fault energy on dislocation behaviors under nanoindentation. The load-displacement curve, hardness and deformation behaviors of the various surface orientations Zr are compared and the elastic and plastic deformation behaviors are analyzed.

  11. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  12. Molecular crowding and protein enzymatic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Carlos; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-05-21

    The effects of molecular crowding on the enzymatic conformational dynamics and transport properties of adenylate kinase are investigated. This tridomain protein undergoes large scale hinge motions in the course of its enzymatic cycle and serves as prototype for the study of crowding effects on the cyclic conformational dynamics of proteins. The study is carried out at a mesoscopic level where both the protein and the solvent in which it is dissolved are treated in a coarse grained fashion. The amino acid residues in the protein are represented by a network of beads and the solvent dynamics is described by multiparticle collision dynamics that includes effects due to hydrodynamic interactions. The system is crowded by a stationary random array of hard spherical objects. Protein enzymatic dynamics is investigated as a function of the obstacle volume fraction and size. In addition, for comparison, results are presented for a modification of the dynamics that suppresses hydrodynamic interactions. Consistent with expectations, simulations of the dynamics show that the protein prefers a closed conformation for high volume fractions. This effect becomes more pronounced as the obstacle radius decreases for a given volume fraction since the average void size in the obstacle array is smaller for smaller radii. At high volume fractions for small obstacle radii, the average enzymatic cycle time and characteristic times of internal conformational motions of the protein deviate substantially from their values in solution or in systems with small density of obstacles. The transport properties of the protein are strongly affected by molecular crowding. Diffusive motion adopts a subdiffusive character and the effective diffusion coefficients can change by more than an order of magnitude. The orientational relaxation time of the protein is also significantly altered by crowding. PMID:22476233

  13. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    PubMed Central

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  14. Local order parameters for use in driving homogeneous ice nucleation with all-atom models of water.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Aleks; Doye, Jonathan P K; Noya, Eva G; Vega, Carlos

    2012-11-21

    We present a local order parameter based on the standard Steinhardt-Ten Wolde approach that is capable both of tracking and of driving homogeneous ice nucleation in simulations of all-atom models of water. We demonstrate that it is capable of forcing the growth of ice nuclei in supercooled liquid water simulated using the TIP4P/2005 model using over-biassed umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations. However, even with such an order parameter, the dynamics of ice growth in deeply supercooled liquid water in all-atom models of water are shown to be very slow, and so the computation of free energy landscapes and nucleation rates remains extremely challenging. PMID:23181323

  15. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  16. Structure and dynamics of complex liquid water: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Indrajith V.; Natesan, Baskaran

    2015-06-01

    We have carried out detailed structure and dynamical studies of complex liquid water using molecular dynamics simulations. Three different model potentials, namely, TIP3P, TIP4P and SPC-E have been used in the simulations, in order to arrive at the best possible potential function that could reproduce the structure of experimental bulk water. All the simulations were performed in the NVE micro canonical ensemble using LAMMPS. The radial distribution functions, gOO, gOH and gHH and the self diffusion coefficient, Ds, were calculated for all three models. We conclude from our results that the structure and dynamical parameters obtained for SPC-E model matched well with the experimental values, suggesting that among the models studied here, the SPC-E model gives the best structure and dynamics of bulk water.

  17. Dynamic Maintenance and Visualization of Molecular Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, C L; Pascucci, V; Shamir, A; Holt, R J; Netravali, A N

    2004-12-16

    Molecular surface computations are often necessary in order to perform synthetic drug design. A critical step in this process is the computation and update of an exact boundary representation for the molecular surface (e.g. the Lee-Richards surface). In this paper they introduce efficient techniques for computing a molecular surface boundary representation as a set of NURBS (non-uniform rational B-splines) patches. This representation introduces for molecules the same geometric data structure used in the solid modeling community and enables immediate access to a wide range of modeling operations and techniques. Furthermore, this allows the use of any general solid modeling or visualization system as a molecular modeling interface. However, using such a representation in a molecular modeling environment raises several efficiency and update constraints, especially in a dynamic setting. For example, changes in the probe radius result in both geometric and topological changes to the set of patches. The techniques provide the option of trading accuracy of the representation for the efficiency of the computation, while still tracking the changes in the set of patches. In particular, they discuss two main classes of dynamic updates: one that keeps the topology of the molecular configuration fixed, and a more complicated case where the topology may be updated continuously. In general the generated output surface is represented in a format that can be loaded into standard solid modeling systems. It can also be directly triangulated or rendered, possibly at different levels of resolution, by a standard graphics library such as OpenGL without any additional effort.

  18. The 2011 Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2011-07-11

    The Dynamics of Molecular Collisions Conference focuses on all aspects of molecular collisions--experimental & theoretical studies of elastic, inelastic, & reactive encounters involving atoms, molecules, ions, clusters, & surfaces--as well as half collisions--photodissociation, photo-induced reaction, & photodesorption. The scientific program for the meeting in 2011 included exciting advances in both the core & multidisciplinary forefronts of the study of molecular collision processes. Following the format of the 2009 meeting, we also invited sessions in special topics that involve interfacial dynamics, novel emerging spectroscopies, chemical dynamics in atmospheric, combustion & interstellar environments, as well as a session devoted to theoretical & experimental advances in ultracold molecular samples. Researchers working inside & outside the traditional core topics of the meeting are encouraged to join the conference. We invite contributions of work that seeks understanding of how inter & intra-molecular forces determine the dynamics of the phenomena under study. In addition to invited oral sessions & contributed poster sessions, the scientific program included a formal session consisting of five contributed talks selected from the submitted poster abstracts. The DMC has distinguished itself by having the Herschbach Medal Symposium as part of the meeting format. This tradition of the Herschbach Medal was first started in the 2007 meeting chaired by David Chandler, based on a generous donation of funds & artwork design by Professor Dudley Herschbach himself. There are two such awards made, one for experimental & one for theoretical contributions to the field of Molecular Collision Dynamics, broadly defined. The symposium is always held on the last night of the meeting & has the awardees are asked to deliver an invited lecture on their work. The 2011 Herschbach Medal was dedicated to the contributions of two long standing leaders in Chemical Physics, Professor

  19. Ten-Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Fast-Folding WW Domain

    PubMed Central

    Freddolino, Peter L.; Liu, Feng; Gruebele, Martin; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of protein folding allow analysis of the folding process at an unprecedented level of detail. Unfortunately, such simulations have not yet reached their full potential both due to difficulties in sufficiently sampling the microsecond timescales needed for folding, and because the force field used may yield neither the correct dynamical sequence of events nor the folded structure. The ongoing study of protein folding through computational methods thus requires both improvements in the performance of molecular dynamics programs to make longer timescales accessible, and testing of force fields in the context of folding simulations. We report a ten-microsecond simulation of an incipient downhill-folding WW domain mutant along with measurement of a molecular time and activated folding time of 1.5 microseconds and 13.3 microseconds, respectively. The protein simulated in explicit solvent exhibits several metastable states with incorrect topology and does not assume the native state during the present simulations. PMID:18339748

  20. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    PubMed Central

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electro­physiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP. PMID:25195748

  1. Polymer Fluid Dynamics: Continuum and Molecular Approaches.

    PubMed

    Bird, R B; Giacomin, A J

    2016-06-01

    To solve problems in polymer fluid dynamics, one needs the equations of continuity, motion, and energy. The last two equations contain the stress tensor and the heat-flux vector for the material. There are two ways to formulate the stress tensor: (a) One can write a continuum expression for the stress tensor in terms of kinematic tensors, or (b) one can select a molecular model that represents the polymer molecule and then develop an expression for the stress tensor from kinetic theory. The advantage of the kinetic theory approach is that one gets information about the relation between the molecular structure of the polymers and the rheological properties. We restrict the discussion primarily to the simplest stress tensor expressions or constitutive equations containing from two to four adjustable parameters, although we do indicate how these formulations may be extended to give more complicated expressions. We also explore how these simplest expressions are recovered as special cases of a more general framework, the Oldroyd 8-constant model. Studying the simplest models allows us to discover which types of empiricisms or molecular models seem to be worth investigating further. We also explore equivalences between continuum and molecular approaches. We restrict the discussion to several types of simple flows, such as shearing flows and extensional flows, which are of greatest importance in industrial operations. Furthermore, if these simple flows cannot be well described by continuum or molecular models, then it is not necessary to lavish time and energy to apply them to more complex flow problems. PMID:27276553

  2. Insights into activation and RNA binding of trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) through all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Falck, Emma

    2008-06-01

    Tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus stearothermophilus is regulated by a trp RNA binding attenuation protein (TRAP). It is a ring-shaped 11-mer of identical 74 residue subunits. Tryptophan binding pockets are located between adjacent subunits, and tryptophan binding activates TRAP to bind RNA. Here, we report results from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the system, complementing existing extensive experimental studies. We focus on two questions. First, we look at the activation mechanism, of which relatively little is known experimentally. We find that the absence of tryptophan allows larger motions close to the tryptophan binding site, and we see indication of a conformational change in the BC loop. However, complete deactivation seems to occur on much longer time scales than the 40 ns studied here. Second, we study the TRAP-RNA interactions. We look at the relative flexibilities of the different bases in the complex and analyze the hydrogen bonds between the protein and RNA. We also study the role of Lys37, Lys56, and Arg58, which have been experimentally identified as essential for RNA binding. Hydrophobic stacking of Lys37 with the nearby RNA base is confirmed, but we do not see direct hydrogen bonding between RNA and the other two residues, in contrast to the crystal structure. Rather, these residues seem to stabilize the RNA-binding surface, and their positive charge may also play a role in RNA binding. Simulations also indicate that TRAP is able to attract RNA nonspecifically, and the interactions are quantified in more detail using binding energy calculations. The formation of the final binding complex is a very slow process: within the simulation time scale of 40 ns, only two guanine bases become bound (and no others), indicating that the binding initiates at these positions. In general, our results are in good agreement with experimental studies, and provide atomic-scale insights into the processes. PMID:18186477

  3. Application of optimal prediction to molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Barber IV, John Letherman

    2004-12-01

    Optimal prediction is a general system reduction technique for large sets of differential equations. In this method, which was devised by Chorin, Hald, Kast, Kupferman, and Levy, a projection operator formalism is used to construct a smaller system of equations governing the dynamics of a subset of the original degrees of freedom. This reduced system consists of an effective Hamiltonian dynamics, augmented by an integral memory term and a random noise term. Molecular dynamics is a method for simulating large systems of interacting fluid particles. In this thesis, I construct a formalism for applying optimal prediction to molecular dynamics, producing reduced systems from which the properties of the original system can be recovered. These reduced systems require significantly less computational time than the original system. I initially consider first-order optimal prediction, in which the memory and noise terms are neglected. I construct a pair approximation to the renormalized potential, and ignore three-particle and higher interactions. This produces a reduced system that correctly reproduces static properties of the original system, such as energy and pressure, at low-to-moderate densities. However, it fails to capture dynamical quantities, such as autocorrelation functions. I next derive a short-memory approximation, in which the memory term is represented as a linear frictional force with configuration-dependent coefficients. This allows the use of a Fokker-Planck equation to show that, in this regime, the noise is {delta}-correlated in time. This linear friction model reproduces not only the static properties of the original system, but also the autocorrelation functions of dynamical variables.

  4. Spectroscopy and molecular dynamics in nonpolar fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everitt, Karl Frederick

    This thesis considers the mechanisms by which molecular dynamics in nonpolar liquids influences solvation dynamics and vibrational energy relaxation. We use semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations to calculate photon echo signals for two simple fluids. We demonstrate that two new observables are directly related to the relevant molecular quantity, the frequency- frequency time correlation function (TCF), in contrast to the commonly measured 3PEPS, which cannot be simply related to this TCF at short times. We also present a semianalytic photon echo theory, based on an ansatz which determines the full time dependence from the short time expansion coefficients of the TCF. We demonstrate that this theory accurately predicts most photon echo observables, even when the theory's gaussian approximation is not accurate. We also consider vibrational energy relaxation (VER) in liquid oxygen. Using semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations and an intermolecular potential from the literature, we evaluate the required quantity (the spectral density of a certain force-force TCF) using the same ansatz described above. We demonstrate numerically that this procedure is accurate. Approximately relating this semiclassical rate to the fully quantum mechanical VER rate, using one of the more accurate ``quantum corrections'' available in the literature, yields a result which is in order-of-magnitude agreement with the experimental VER rate. We also calculate the VER rate for liquid oxygen/argon mixtures. The rotations of the solvent near a vibrationally excited molecule, and of that molecule itself, have important consequences for the short-time dynamics of the force-force TCF. We propose a simple statistical model which quantitatively explains the mole- fraction dependence of the observed VER rate. Next, we demonstrate that a newly-developed model for oxygen very accurately describes the liquid, by comparing to experimental measures of microscopic structure and dynamics. We also

  5. Molecular Dynamics Study of Hsp90 and ADP: Hydrogen Bond Analysis for ADP Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

    The contacts between the N-terminal domain of heat shock protein 90 (N-Hsp90) and ADP involve both direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds in X-ray crystallographic structure. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of N-Hsp90 and ADP to investigate the changes of the hydrogen bond lengths during ADP dissociation. We show the difference between the hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure and MD simulations. Moreover, the N6 group of ADP does not contact with the Cγ group of Asp93, and the hydrogen bonds between Asn51 side chain and ADP are stable in the early step of ADP dissociation.

  6. Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Transmembrane Protein-Lipid Systems

    PubMed Central

    Spijker, Peter; van Hoof, Bram; Debertrand, Michel; Markvoort, Albert J.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hilbers, Peter A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many biological cellular processes occur at the micro- or millisecond time scale. With traditional all-atom molecular modeling techniques it is difficult to investigate the dynamics of long time scales or large systems, such as protein aggregation or activation. Coarse graining (CG) can be used to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in such a system, and reduce the computational complexity. In this paper the first version of a coarse grained model for transmembrane proteins is presented. This model differs from other coarse grained protein models due to the introduction of a novel angle potential as well as a hydrogen bonding potential. These new potentials are used to stabilize the backbone. The model has been validated by investigating the adaptation of the hydrophobic mismatch induced by the insertion of WALP-peptides into a lipid membrane, showing that the first step in the adaptation is an increase in the membrane thickness, followed by a tilting of the peptide. PMID:20640160

  7. Molecular Dynamics of Ionic Transport and Electrokinetic Effects in Realistic Silica Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Christian D. Lorenz; Paul S. Crozier; Joshua A. Anderson; Alex Travesset

    2008-04-28

    Silica is one of the most widely used inorganic materials in experiments and applications involving aqueous solutions of biomolecules, nanoparticles, etc. In this paper, we construct a detailed atomistic model of a silica interface that captures the essential experimentally known properties of a silica interface. We then perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a silica nanochannel subjected to either an external pressure or an electric field and provide an atomistic description of ionic transport and both electro-osmotic flow and streaming currents for a solution of monovalent (0.4 M NaCl) as well as divalent (0.2 and 1.0 M CaCl{sub 2}) salts. Our results allow a detailed investigation of {zeta}-potentials, Stern layer conductance, charge inversion, ionic mobilities, as well as continuum theories and Onsager relations. We conclude with a discussion on the implications of our results for silica nanopore experiments and micro- and nanofluidic devices.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of themore » substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  9. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of the Substrate Binding Mechanism in Carboxylesterase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qi; Luan, Zheng-Jiao; Cheng, Xiaolin; Xu, Jian-He

    2015-02-25

    A recombinant carboxylesterase, cloned from Pseudomonas putida and designated as rPPE, is capable of catalyzing the bioresolution of racemic 2-acetoxy-2-(2 -chlorophenyl)acetate (rac-AcO-CPA) with excellent (S)-enantioselectivity. Semi-rational design of the enzyme showed that the W187H variant could increase the activity by ~100-fold compared to the wild type (WT) enzyme. In this study, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of both apo-rPPE and rPPE in complex with (S)-AcO-CPA to gain insights into the origin of the increased catalysis in the W187H mutant. Moreover, our results show differential binding of (S)-AcO-CPA in the WT and W187H enzymes, especially the interactions of the substrate with the two active site residues Ser159 and His286. The replacement of Trp187 by His leads to considerable structural rearrangement in the active site of W187H. Unlike in the WT rPPE, the cap domain in the W187 mutant shows an open conformation in the simulations of both apo and substrate-bound enzymes. This open conformation exposes the catalytic triad to the solvent through a water accessible channel, which may facilitate the entry of the substrate and/or the exit of the product. Binding free energy calculations confirmed that the substrate binds more strongly in W187H than in WT. Based on these computational results, furthermore, we predicted that the mutations W187Y and D287G might also be able to increase the substrate binding, thus improve the enzyme s catalytic efficiency. Experimental binding and kinetic assays on W187Y and D287G show improved catalytic efficiency over WT, but not W187H. Contrary to our prediction, W187Y shows slightly decreased substrate binding coupled with a 100 fold increase in turn-over rate, while in D287G the substrate binding is 8 times stronger but with a slightly reduced turn-over rate. Finally, our work provides important molecular-level insights into the binding of the (S)-AcO-CPA substrate to carboxylesterase r

  10. xMDFF: molecular dynamics flexible fitting of low-resolution X-ray structures

    SciTech Connect

    McGreevy, Ryan; Singharoy, Abhishek; Li, Qufei; Zhang, Jingfen; Xu, Dong; Perozo, Eduardo; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    A new real-space refinement method for low-resolution X-ray crystallography is presented. The method is based on the molecular dynamics flexible fitting protocol targeted at addressing large-scale deformations of the search model to achieve refinement with minimal manual intervention. An explanation of the method is provided, augmented by results from the refinement of both synthetic and experimental low-resolution data, including an independent electrophysiological verification of the xMDFF-refined crystal structure of a voltage-sensor protein. X-ray crystallography remains the most dominant method for solving atomic structures. However, for relatively large systems, the availability of only medium-to-low-resolution diffraction data often limits the determination of all-atom details. A new molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF)-based approach, xMDFF, for determining structures from such low-resolution crystallographic data is reported. xMDFF employs a real-space refinement scheme that flexibly fits atomic models into an iteratively updating electron-density map. It addresses significant large-scale deformations of the initial model to fit the low-resolution density, as tested with synthetic low-resolution maps of d-ribose-binding protein. xMDFF has been successfully applied to re-refine six low-resolution protein structures of varying sizes that had already been submitted to the Protein Data Bank. Finally, via systematic refinement of a series of data from 3.6 to 7 Å resolution, xMDFF refinements together with electrophysiology experiments were used to validate the first all-atom structure of the voltage-sensing protein Ci-VSP.

  11. Local Refinements in Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fackeldey, Konstantin; Weber, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Quantum mechanics provide a detailed description of the physical and chemical behavior of molecules. However, with increasing size of the system the complexity rises exponentially, which is prohibitive for efficient dynamical simulation. In contrast, classical molecular dynamics procure a coarser description by using less degrees of freedom. Thus, it seems natural to seek for an adequate trade-off between accurateness and computational feasibility in the simulation of molecules. Here, we propose a novel method, which combines classical molecular simulations with quantum mechanics for molecular systems. For this we decompose the state space of the respective molecule into subsets, by employing a meshfree partition of unity. We show, that this partition allows us to localize an empirical force field and to run locally constrained classical trajectories. Within each subset, we compute the energy on the quantum level for a fixed number of spatial states (ab initio points). With these energy values from the ab initio points we have a local scattered data problem, which can be solved by the moving least squares method.

  12. Symmetry Reduced Dynamics of Charged Molecular Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, David C. P.; Gay-Balmaz, François; Holm, Darryl D.; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Ratiu, Tudor S.

    2010-09-01

    The equations of motion are derived for the dynamical folding of charged molecular strands (such as DNA) modeled as flexible continuous filamentary distributions of interacting rigid charge conformations. The new feature is that these equations are nonlocal when the screened Coulomb interactions, or Lennard-Jones potentials between pairs of charges, are included. The nonlocal dynamics is derived in the convective representation of continuum motion by using modified Euler-Poincaré and Hamilton-Pontryagin variational formulations that illuminate the various approaches within the framework of symmetry reduction of Hamilton’s principle for exact geometric rods. In the absence of nonlocal interactions, the equations recover the classical Kirchhoff theory of elastic rods. The motion equations in the convective representation are shown to arise by a classical Lagrangian reduction associated to the symmetry group of the system. This approach uses the process of affine Euler-Poincaré reduction initially developed for complex fluids. On the Hamiltonian side, the Poisson bracket of the molecular strand is obtained by reduction of the canonical symplectic structure on phase space. A change of variables allows a direct passage from this classical point of view to the covariant formulation in terms of Lagrange-Poincaré equations of field theory. In another revealing perspective, the convective representation of the nonlocal equations of molecular strand motion is transformed into quaternionic form.

  13. Concerted dynamic motions of an FABP4 model and its ligands revealed by microsecond molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Xiang; Dong, Zigang

    2014-10-14

    In this work, we investigate the dynamic motions of fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) in the absence and presence of a ligand by explicitly solvated all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamics of one ligand-free FABP4 and four ligand-bound FABP4s is compared via multiple 1.2 μs simulations. In our simulations, the protein interconverts between the open and closed states. Ligand-free FABP4 prefers the closed state, whereas ligand binding induces a conformational transition to the open state. Coupled with opening and closing of FABP4, the ligand adopts distinct binding modes, which are identified and compared with crystal structures. The concerted dynamics of protein and ligand suggests that there may exist multiple FABP4-ligand binding conformations. Thus, this work provides details about how ligand binding affects the conformational preference of FABP4 and how ligand binding is coupled with a conformational change of FABP4 at an atomic level. PMID:25231537

  14. A Real-Time All-Atom Structural Search Engine for Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F.

    2014-01-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new “designability”-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license). PMID:25079944

  15. Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Donev, Aleksandar Garcia, Alejandro L.; Alder, Berni J.

    2008-02-01

    A novel Stochastic Event-Driven Molecular Dynamics (SEDMD) algorithm is developed for the simulation of polymer chains suspended in a solvent. SEDMD combines event-driven molecular dynamics (EDMD) with the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The polymers are represented as chains of hard-spheres tethered by square wells and interact with the solvent particles with hard-core potentials. The algorithm uses EDMD for the simulation of the polymer chain and the interactions between the chain beads and the surrounding solvent particles. The interactions between the solvent particles themselves are not treated deterministically as in EDMD, rather, the momentum and energy exchange in the solvent is determined stochastically using DSMC. The coupling between the solvent and the solute is consistently represented at the particle level retaining hydrodynamic interactions and thermodynamic fluctuations. However, unlike full MD simulations of both the solvent and the solute, in SEDMD the spatial structure of the solvent is ignored. The SEDMD algorithm is described in detail and applied to the study of the dynamics of a polymer chain tethered to a hard-wall subjected to uniform shear. SEDMD closely reproduces results obtained using traditional EDMD simulations with two orders of magnitude greater efficiency. Results question the existence of periodic (cycling) motion of the polymer chain.

  16. Molecular dynamics studies of aromatic hydrocarbon liquids

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, E.; Gupta, S.

    1990-01-01

    This project mainly involves a molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo study of the effect of molecular shape on thermophysical properties of bulk fluids with an emphasis on the aromatic hydrocarbon liquids. In this regard we have studied the modeling, simulation methodologies, and predictive and correlating methods for thermodynamic properties of fluids of nonspherical molecules. In connection with modeling we have studied the use of anisotropic site-site potentials, through a modification of the Gay-Berne Gaussian overlap potential, to successfully model the aromatic rings after adding the necessary electrostatic moments. We have also shown these interaction sites should be located at the geometric centers of the chemical groups. In connection with predictive methods, we have shown two perturbation type theories to work well for fluids modeled using one-center anisotropic potentials and the possibility exists for extending these to anisotropic site-site models. In connection with correlation methods, we have studied, through simulations, the effect of molecular shape on the attraction term in the generalized van der Waals equation of state for fluids of nonspherical molecules and proposed a possible form which is to be studied further. We have successfully studied the vector and parallel processing aspects of molecular simulations for fluids of nonspherical molecules.

  17. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L. C.

    2016-06-01

    Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called "dipolons"); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  18. Toward a Coarse Graining/All Atoms Force Field (CG/AA) from a Multiscale Optimization Method: An Application to the MCM-41 Mesoporous Silicates.

    PubMed

    Ghoufi, A; Morineau, D; Lefort, R; Malfreyt, P

    2010-10-12

    Many interesting physical phenomena occur on length and time scales that are not accessible by atomistic molecular simulations. By introducing a coarse graining of the degrees of freedom, coarse-grained (CG) models allow ther study of larger scale systems for longer times. Coarse-grained force fields have been mostly derived for large molecules, including polymeric materials and proteins. By contrast, there exist no satisfactory CG potentials for mesostructured porous solid materials in the literature. This issue has become critical among a growing number of studies on confinement effects on fluid properties, which require both long time and large scale simulations and the conservation of a sufficient level of atomistic description to account for interfacial phenomena. In this paper, we present a general multiscale procedure to derive a hybrid coarse grained/all atoms force field CG/AA model for mesoporous systems. The method is applied to mesostructured MCM-41 molecular sieves, while the parameters of the mesoscopic interaction potentials are obtained and validated from the computation of the adsorption isotherm of methanol by grand canonical molecular dynamic simulation. PMID:26616783

  19. Theoretical studies of lipid bilayer electroporation using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary Alan

    Computer simulations of physical, chemical, and biological systems have improved tremendously over the past five decades. From simple studies of liquid argon in the 1960s to fully atomistic simulations of entire viruses in the past few years, recent advances in high-performance computing have continuously enabled simulations to bridge the gap between scientific theory and experiment. Molecular dynamics simulations in particular have allowed for the direct observation of spatial and temporal events which are at present inaccessible to experiments. For this dissertation I employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study the transient, electric field-induced poration (or electroporation) of phospholipid bilayers at MV/m electric fields. Phospholipid bilayers are the dominant constituents of cell membranes and act as both a barrier and gatekeeper to the cell interior. This makes their structural integrity and susceptibility to external perturbations an important topic for study, especially as the density of electromagnetic radiation in our environment is increasing steadily. The primary goal of this dissertation is to understand the specific physical and biological mechanisms which facilitate electroporation, and to connect our simulated observations to experiments with live cells and to continuum models which seek to describe the underlying biological processes of electroporation. In Chapter 1 I begin with a brief introduction to phospholipids and phospholipid bilayers, followed by an extensive overview of electroporation and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The following chapters will then focus on peer-reviewed and published work we performed, or on existing projects which are currently being prepared for submission. Chapter 2 looks at how external electric fields affect both oxidized and unoxidized lipid bilayers as a function of oxidation concentration and oxidized lipid type. Oxidative damage to cell membranes represents a physiologically relevant

  20. Thermostability of Enzymes from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Zeiske, Tim; Stafford, Kate A; Palmer, Arthur G

    2016-06-14

    Thermodynamic stability is a central requirement for protein function, and one goal of protein engineering is improvement of stability, particularly for applications in biotechnology. Herein, molecular dynamics simulations are used to predict in vitro thermostability of members of the bacterial ribonuclease HI (RNase H) family of endonucleases. The temperature dependence of the generalized order parameter, S, for four RNase H homologues, from psychrotrophic, mesophilic, and thermophilic organisms, is highly correlated with experimentally determined melting temperatures and with calculated free energies of folding at the midpoint temperature of the simulations. This study provides an approach for in silico mutational screens to improve thermostability of biologically and industrially relevant enzymes. PMID:27123810

  1. 8B structure in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, K. R.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the light exotic nucleus 8B is investigated in the Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD) model. The decay of 8B is responsible for almost the entire high- energy solar-neutrino flux, making structure calculations of 8B important for determining the solar core temperature. 8B is a proton halo candidate thought to exhibit clustering. FMD uses a wave-packet basis and is well-suited for modelling clustering and halos. For a multiconfiguration treatment we construct the many-body Hilbert space from antisymmetrised angular-momentum projected 8-particle states. First results show formation of a proton halo.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.A.; Kress, J.D.; Kwon, I.; Lynch, D.L.; Troullier, N.

    1993-12-31

    We have performed quantum molecular dynamics simulations of hot, dense plasmas of hydrogen over a range of temperatures(0.1-5eV) and densities(0.0625-5g/cc). We determine the forces quantum mechanically from density functional, extended Huckel, and tight binding techniques and move the nuclei according to the classical equations of motion. We determine pair-correlation functions, diffusion coefficients, and electrical conductivities. We find that many-body effects predominate in this regime. We begin to obtain agreement with the OCP and Thomas-Fermi models only at the higher temperatures and densities.

  3. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1987-03-01

    Purpose of this research project is two-fold: (1) to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions which are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photo chemical processes which play an important role in many macroscopic processes and (2) to determine the energetics of polyatomic free radicals using microscopic experimental methods. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment translational energy and angular distributions using unique molecular beam apparati designed for these purposes.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of ice XII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzsák, István; Cummings, Peter T.

    1999-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed on the newly discovered metastable ice XII. This new crystalline ice phase [C. Lobban, J.L. Finney, W.F. Kuhs, Nature (London) 391 (1998) 268] is proton-disordered. Thus 90 possible configurations of the unit cell can be constructed which differ only in the orientations of the water molecules. The simulation used the TIP4P potential model for water at constant temperature and density. About one-quarter of the initial configurations did not melt in the course of the simulation. This result is supportive of the experimental structure and also demonstrates the ability of this water model to study ice phases.

  5. Crystallization of nickel nanoclusters by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamati, H.; Gaminchev, K.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the melting properties of bulk nickel and the crystallization of nickel nanocrystals via molecular dynamics using a potential in the framework of the second moment approximation of tight-binding theory. The melting behavior was simulated with the hysteresis approach by subsequently heating and cooling gradually the system over a wide range of temperatures. The crystallization of nickel nanoclusters consisting of 55, 147 and 309 atoms was achieved after repeatedly annealing and quenching the corresponding quasicrystals several times to avoid being trapped in a local energy minimum. The time over which the global minimum was reached was found to increase with the cluster size.

  6. Structural, dynamic, and electrostatic properties of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations accelerated with graphical processing units (GPUs).

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Narayan; Bauer, Brad A; Lucas, Timothy R; Patel, Sandeep; Taufer, Michela

    2011-11-15

    We present results of molecular dynamics simulations of fully hydrated DMPC bilayers performed on graphics processing units (GPUs) using current state-of-the-art non-polarizable force fields and a local GPU-enabled molecular dynamics code named FEN ZI. We treat the conditionally convergent electrostatic interaction energy exactly using the particle mesh Ewald method (PME) for solution of Poisson's Equation for the electrostatic potential under periodic boundary conditions. We discuss elements of our implementation of the PME algorithm on GPUs as well as pertinent performance issues. We proceed to show results of simulations of extended lipid bilayer systems using our program, FEN ZI. We performed simulations of DMPC bilayer systems consisting of 17,004, 68,484, and 273,936 atoms in explicit solvent. We present bilayer structural properties (atomic number densities, electron density profiles), deuterium order parameters (S(CD)), electrostatic properties (dipole potential, water dipole moments), and orientational properties of water. Predicted properties demonstrate excellent agreement with experiment and previous all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We observe no statistically significant differences in calculated structural or electrostatic properties for different system sizes, suggesting the small bilayer simulations (less than 100 lipid molecules) provide equivalent representation of structural and electrostatic properties associated with significantly larger systems (over 1000 lipid molecules). We stress that the three system size representations will have differences in other properties such as surface capillary wave dynamics or surface tension related effects that are not probed in the current study. The latter properties are inherently dependent on system size. This contribution suggests the suitability of applying emerging GPU technologies to studies of an important class of biological environments, that of lipid bilayers and their associated integral

  7. Molecular dynamics at constant temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toxvaerd, S.

    1993-01-01

    Algorithms for molecular dynamics (MD) at constant temperature and pressure are investigated. The ability to remain in a regular orbit in an intermittent chaotic regime is used as a criterion for long-time stability. A simple time-centered algorithm (leap frog) is found to be the most stable of the commonly used algorithms in MD. A model of N one-dimensional dimers with a double-well intermolecular potential, for which the distribution functions at constant temperature T and pressure P can be calculated, is used to investigate MD-NPT dynamics. A time-centered NPT algorithm is found to sample correctly and to be very robust with respect to volume scaling.

  8. Charge transport network dynamics in molecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Nicholas E; Chen, Lin X; Ratner, Mark A

    2016-08-01

    Due to the nonperiodic nature of charge transport in disordered systems, generating insight into static charge transport networks, as well as analyzing the network dynamics, can be challenging. Here, we apply time-dependent network analysis to scrutinize the charge transport networks of two representative molecular semiconductors: a rigid n-type molecule, perylenediimide, and a flexible p-type molecule, [Formula: see text] Simulations reveal the relevant timescale for local transfer integral decorrelation to be [Formula: see text]100 fs, which is shown to be faster than that of a crystalline morphology of the same molecule. Using a simple graph metric, global network changes are observed over timescales competitive with charge carrier lifetimes. These insights demonstrate that static charge transport networks are qualitatively inadequate, whereas average networks often overestimate network connectivity. Finally, a simple methodology for tracking dynamic charge transport properties is proposed. PMID:27439871

  9. Interactions between ether phospholipids and cholesterol as determined by scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kučerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-12-27

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol's molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup's phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules. PMID:23199292

  10. Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jianjun; Cheng, Xiaolin; Heberle, Frederick A; Mostofian, Barmak; Kucerka, Norbert; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

  11. Combining molecular dynamics with mesoscopic Green's function reaction dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaykumar, Adithya; Bolhuis, Peter G.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    In many reaction-diffusion processes, ranging from biochemical networks, catalysis, to complex self-assembly, the spatial distribution of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions are crucial for the macroscopic behavior. The recently developed mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. We propose a novel approach that combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesoscopic scale where particles are far apart, with a microscopic technique such as Langevin dynamics or Molecular Dynamics (MD), for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. This scheme defines the regions where the particles are close together and simulated with high microscopic resolution and those where they are far apart and simulated with lower mesoscopic resolution, adaptively on the fly. The new multi-scale scheme, called MD-GFRD, is generic and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Mauro C C

    2006-05-01

    A previously proposed model for molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of liquid sulfur dioxide, SO(2), has been reviewed. Thermodynamic, structural, and dynamical properties were calculated for a large range of thermodynamic states. Predicted (P,V,T) of simulated system agrees with an elaborated equation of state recently proposed for liquid SO(2). Calculated heat capacity, expansion coefficient, and isothermal compressibility are also in good agreement with experimental data. Calculated equilibrium structure agrees with X-ray and neutron scattering measurements on liquid SO(2). The model also predicts the same (SO(2))(2) dimer structure as previously determined by ab initio calculations. Detailed analysis of equilibrium structure of liquid SO(2) is provided, indicating that, despite the rather large dipole moment of the SO(2) molecule, the structure is mainly determined by the Lennard-Jones interactions. Both single-particle and collective dynamics are investigated. Temperature dependency of dynamical properties is given. The MD results are compared with previous findings obtained from the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering spectra of liquid SO(2), including wave-vector dependent structural relaxation, tau(k), and viscosity, eta(k). PMID:16640437

  13. Dynamic molecules: molecular dynamics for everyone. An internet-based access to molecular dynamic simulations: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin; Gutbrod, Peter; Hassayoun, Chokri; von Der Lieth, Claus-W

    2003-10-01

    Molecular dynamics is a rapidly developing field of science and has become an established tool for studying the dynamic behavior of biomolecules. Although several high quality programs for performing molecular dynamic simulations are freely available, only well-trained scientists are currently able to make use of the broad scientific potential that molecular dynamic simulations offer to gain insight into structural questions at an atomic level. The "Dynamic Molecules" approach is the first internet portal that provides an interactive access to set up, perform and analyze molecular dynamic simulations. It is completely based on standard web technologies and uses only publicly available software. The aim is to open molecular dynamics techniques to a broader range of users including undergraduate students, teachers and scientists outside the bioinformatics field. The time-limiting factors are the availability of free capacity on the computing server to run the simulations and the time required to transport the history file through the internet for the animation mode. The interactive access mode of the portal is acceptable for animations of molecules having up to about 500 atoms. PMID:12908101

  14. The influence of electrostatic forces on the structure and dynamics of molecular ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, C.; Steinhauser, O.

    2008-06-01

    The vast majority of molecular dynamics simulations are based on nonpolarizable force fields with fixed partial charges for all atoms. The traditional way to obtain these charges are quantum-mechanical calculations performed prior to simulation. Unfortunately, the set of the partial charges heavily relies on the method and the basis set used. Therefore, investigations of the influence of charge variation on simulation data are necessary in order to validate various charge sets. This paper elucidates the consequences of different charge sets on the structure and dynamics of the ionic liquid: 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium dicyanoamide. The structural features seem to be more or less independent of the partial charge set pointing to a dominance of shape force as modeled by Lennard-Jones parameters. This can be seen in the radial distribution and orientational correlation functions. The role of electrostatic forces comes in when studying dynamical properties. Here, significant deviations between different charge sets can be observed. Overall, dynamics seems to be governed by viscosity. In fact, all dynamical parameters presented in this work can be converted from one charge set to another by viscosity scaling.

  15. Dynamic Shear Modulus of Polymers from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byutner, Oleksiy; Smith, Grant

    2001-03-01

    In this work we describe the methodology for using equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations (MD) simulations to obtain the viscoelastic properties of polymers in the glassy regime. Specifically we show how the time dependent shear stress modulus and frequency dependent complex shear modulus in the high-frequency regime can be determined from the off-diagonal terms of the stress-tensor autocorrelation function obtained from MD trajectories using the Green-Kubo method and appropriate Fourier transforms. In order to test the methodology we have performed MD simulations of a low-molecular-weight polybutadiene system using quantum chemistry based potential functions. Values of the glassy modulus and the maximum loss frequency were found to be in good agreement with experimental data for polybutadiene at 298 K.

  16. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, N. J.; Hoyle, R. B.

    2012-08-01

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)], 10.1021/j150544a010 on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods.

  17. Structure and Dynamics of Cellulose Molecular Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Howard; Zhang, Xin; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Mao, Yimin; Briber, Robert

    Molecular dissolution of microcrystalline cellulose has been achieved through mixing with ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc), and organic solvent dimethylformamide (DMF). The mechanism of cellulose dissolution in tertiary mixtures has been investigated by combining quasielastic and small angle neutron scattering (QENS and SANS). As SANS data show that cellulose chains take Gaussian-like conformations in homogenous solutions, which exhibit characteristics of having an upper critical solution temperature, the dynamic signals predominantly from EMIMAc molecules indicate strong association with cellulose in the dissolution state. The mean square displacement quantities support the observation of the stoichiometric 3:1 EMIMAc to cellulose unit molar ratio, which is a necessary criterion for the molecular dissolution of cellulose. Analyses of dynamics structure factors reveal the temperature dependence of a slow and a fast process for EMIMAc's bound to cellulose and in DMF, respectively, as well as a very fast process due possibly to the rotational motion of methyl groups, which persisted to near the absolute zero.

  18. Exact dynamic properties of molecular motors.

    PubMed

    Boon, N J; Hoyle, R B

    2012-08-28

    Molecular motors play important roles within a biological cell, performing functions such as intracellular transport and gene transcription. Recent experimental work suggests that there are many plausible biochemical mechanisms that molecules such as myosin-V could use to achieve motion. To account for the abundance of possible discrete-stochastic frameworks that can arise when modeling molecular motor walks, a generalized and straightforward graphical method for calculating their dynamic properties is presented. It allows the calculation of the velocity, dispersion, and randomness ratio for any proposed system through analysis of its structure. This article extends work of King and Altman ["A schematic method of deriving the rate laws of enzyme-catalyzed reactions," J. Phys. Chem. 60, 1375-1378 (1956)] on networks of enzymatic reactions by calculating additional dynamic properties for spatially hopping systems. Results for n-state systems are presented: single chain, parallel pathway, divided pathway, and divided pathway with a chain. A novel technique for combining multiple system architectures coupled at a reference state is also demonstrated. Four-state examples illustrate the effectiveness and simplicity of these methods. PMID:22938213

  19. Evaluation of reduced point charge models of proteins through Molecular Dynamics simulations: application to the Vps27 UIM-1-Ubiquitin complex.

    PubMed

    Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P

    2014-02-01

    Reduced point charge models of amino acids are designed, (i) from local extrema positions in charge density distribution functions built from the Poisson equation applied to smoothed molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) functions, and (ii) from local maxima positions in promolecular electron density distribution functions. Corresponding charge values are fitted versus all-atom Amber99 MEPs. To easily generate reduced point charge models for protein structures, libraries of amino acid templates are built. The program GROMACS is used to generate stable Molecular Dynamics trajectories of an Ubiquitin-ligand complex (PDB: 1Q0W), under various implementation schemes, solvation, and temperature conditions. Point charges that are not located on atoms are considered as virtual sites with a nul mass and radius. The results illustrate how the intra- and inter-molecular H-bond interactions are affected by the degree of reduction of the point charge models and give directions for their implementation; a special attention to the atoms selected to locate the virtual sites and to the Coulomb-14 interactions is needed. Results obtained at various temperatures suggest that the use of reduced point charge models allows to probe local potential hyper-surface minima that are similar to the all-atom ones, but are characterized by lower energy barriers. It enables to generate various conformations of the protein complex more rapidly than the all-atom point charge representation. PMID:24316938

  20. Dynamic transitions in molecular dynamics simulations of supercooled silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xiaojun; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-04-01

    Two dynamic transitions or crossovers, one at a low temperature (T* ≈ 1006 K) and the other at a high temperature (T0 ≈ 1384 K), are shown to emerge in supercooled liquid silicon using molecular dynamics simulations. The high-temperature transition (T0) marks the decoupling of stress, density, and energy relaxation mechanisms. At the low-temperature transition (T*), depending on the cooling rate, supercooled silicon can either undergo a high-density-liquid to low-density-liquid (HDL-LDL) phase transition or experience an HDL-HDL crossover. Dynamically heterogeneous domains that emerge with supercooling become prominent across the HDL-HDL transition at 1006 K, with well-separated mobile and immobile regions. Interestingly, across the HDL-LDL transition, the most mobile atoms form large prominent aggregates while the least mobile atoms get spatially dispersed akin to that in a crystalline state. The attendant partial return to spatial uniformity with the HDL-LDL phase transition indicates a dynamic mechanism for relieving the frustration in supercooled states.

  1. Molecular Basis for the Dissociation Dynamics of Protein A-Immunoglobulin G1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Feng; Huang, Bo; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) is the most popular affinity ligand for immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1). However, the molecular basis for the dissociation dynamics of SpA-IgG1 complex is unclear. Herein, coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the Martini force field were used to study the dissociation dynamics of the complex. The CG-MD simulations were first verified by the agreement in the structural and interactional properties of SpA and human IgG1 (hIgG1) in the association process between the CG-MD and all-atom MD at different NaCl concentrations. Then, the CG-MD simulation studies focused on the molecular insight into the dissociation dynamics of SpA-hIgG1 complex at pH 3.0. It is found that there are four steps in the dissociation process of the complex. First, there is a slight conformational adjustment of helix II in SpA. This is followed by the phenomena that the electrostatic interactions provided by the three hot spots (Glu143, Arg146 and Lys154) of helix II of SpA break up, leading to the dissociation of helix II from the binding site of hIgG1. Subsequently, breakup of the hydrophobic interactions between helix I (Phe132, Tyr133 and His137) in SpA and hIgG1 occurs, resulting in the disengagement of helix I from its binding site of hIgG1. Finally, the non-specific interactions between SpA and hIgG1 decrease slowly till disappearance, leading to the complete dissociation of the SpA-hIgG1 complex. This work has revealed that CG-MD coupled with the Martini force field is an effective method for studying the dissociation dynamics of protein-protein complex. PMID:23776704

  2. Atomistic molecular dynamic simulations of multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L

    2012-08-10

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings. PMID:23006300

  3. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic Simulations of Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Weerasinghe, Jeevaka; Bellaiche, L.

    2012-08-01

    A first-principles-based approach is developed to simulate dynamical properties, including complex permittivity and permeability in the GHz-THz range, of multiferroics at finite temperatures. It includes both structural degrees of freedom and magnetic moments as dynamic variables in Newtonian and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equations within molecular dynamics, respectively, with the couplings between these variables being incorporated. The use of a damping coefficient and of the fluctuation field in the LLG equations is required to obtain equilibrated magnetic properties at any temperature. No electromagnon is found in the spin-canted structure of BiFeO3. On the other hand, two magnons with very different frequencies are predicted via the use of this method. The smallest-in-frequency magnon corresponds to oscillations of the weak ferromagnetic vector in the basal plane being perpendicular to the polarization while the second magnon corresponds to magnetic dipoles going in and out of this basal plane. The large value of the frequency of this second magnon is caused by static couplings between magnetic dipoles with electric dipoles and oxygen octahedra tiltings.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Ion Transport and Mechanisms in Polymer Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogurampelly, Santosh; Ganesan, Venkat

    2015-03-01

    Using all atom molecular dynamics and trajectory-extending kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we study the influence of Al2O3 nanoparticles on the transport properties of Li+ ions in polymer electrolytes consisting of polyethylene oxide (PEO) melt solvated with LiBF4 salt. We observe that the nanoparticles have a strong influence on polymer segmental dynamics which in turn correlates with the mobility of Li+ ions. Explicitly, polymer segmental relaxation times and Li+ ion residence times around polymer were found to increase with the addition of nanoparticles. We also observe that increasing short range repulsive interactions between nanoparticles and polymer membrane leads to increasing polymer dynamics and ion mobility. Overall, our simulation results suggest that nanoparticle induced changes in conformational and dynamic properties of the polymer influences the ion mobilities in polymer electrolytes and suggests possible directions for using such findings to improve the polymer matrix conductivity. The authors acknowledge the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin for providing computing resources that have contributed to the research.

  5. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    SciTech Connect

    Kouza, Maksim Kolinski, Andrzej; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  6. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: Insights from lattice and all-atom models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-01

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  7. Preformed template fluctuations promote fibril formation: insights from lattice and all-atom models.

    PubMed

    Kouza, Maksim; Co, Nguyen Truong; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kolinski, Andrzej; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-04-14

    Fibril formation resulting from protein misfolding and aggregation is a hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Despite the fact that the fibril formation process is very slow and thus poses a significant challenge for theoretical and experimental studies, a number of alternative pictures of molecular mechanisms of amyloid fibril formation have been recently proposed. What seems to be common for the majority of the proposed models is that fibril elongation involves the formation of pre-nucleus seeds prior to the creation of a critical nucleus. Once the size of the pre-nucleus seed reaches the critical nucleus size, its thermal fluctuations are expected to be small and the resulting nucleus provides a template for sequential (one-by-one) accommodation of added monomers. The effect of template fluctuations on fibril formation rates has not been explored either experimentally or theoretically so far. In this paper, we make the first attempt at solving this problem by two sets of simulations. To mimic small template fluctuations, in one set, monomers of the preformed template are kept fixed, while in the other set they are allowed to fluctuate. The kinetics of addition of a new peptide onto the template is explored using all-atom simulations with explicit water and the GROMOS96 43a1 force field and simple lattice models. Our result demonstrates that preformed template fluctuations can modulate protein aggregation rates and pathways. The association of a nascent monomer with the template obeys the kinetics partitioning mechanism where the intermediate state occurs in a fraction of routes to the protofibril. It was shown that template immobility greatly increases the time of incorporating a new peptide into the preformed template compared to the fluctuating template case. This observation has also been confirmed by simulation using lattice models and may be invoked to understand the role of template fluctuations in

  8. Osmosis : a molecular dynamics computer simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Thomas

    Osmosis is a phenomenon of critical importance in a variety of processes ranging from the transport of ions across cell membranes and the regulation of blood salt levels by the kidneys to the desalination of water and the production of clean energy using potential osmotic power plants. However, despite its importance and over one hundred years of study, there is an ongoing confusion concerning the nature of the microscopic dynamics of the solvent particles in their transfer across the membrane. In this thesis the microscopic dynamical processes underlying osmotic pressure and concentration gradients are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. I first present a new derivation for the local pressure that can be used for determining osmotic pressure gradients. Using this result, the steady-state osmotic pressure is studied in a minimal model for an osmotic system and the steady-state density gradients are explained using a simple mechanistic hopping model for the solvent particles. The simulation setup is then modified, allowing us to explore the timescales involved in the relaxation dynamics of the system in the period preceding the steady state. Further consideration is also given to the relative roles of diffusive and non-diffusive solvent transport in this period. Finally, in a novel modification to the classic osmosis experiment, the solute particles are driven out-of-equilibrium by the input of energy. The effect of this modification on the osmotic pressure and the osmotic ow is studied and we find that active solute particles can cause reverse osmosis to occur. The possibility of defining a new "osmotic effective temperature" is also considered and compared to the results of diffusive and kinetic temperatures..

  9. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  10. Development of semiclassical molecular dynamics simulation method.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroki; Nanbu, Shinkoh; Teranishi, Yoshiaki; Ohta, Ayumi

    2016-04-28

    Various quantum mechanical effects such as nonadiabatic transitions, quantum mechanical tunneling and coherence play crucial roles in a variety of chemical and biological systems. In this paper, we propose a method to incorporate tunneling effects into the molecular dynamics (MD) method, which is purely based on classical mechanics. Caustics, which define the boundary between classically allowed and forbidden regions, are detected along classical trajectories and the optimal tunneling path with minimum action is determined by starting from each appropriate caustic. The real phase associated with tunneling can also be estimated. Numerical demonstration with use of a simple collinear chemical reaction O + HCl → OH + Cl is presented in order to help the reader to well comprehend the method proposed here. Generalization to the on-the-fly ab initio version is rather straightforward. By treating the nonadiabatic transitions at conical intersections by the Zhu-Nakamura theory, new semiclassical MD methods can be developed. PMID:27067383

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Shock Induced Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, Vikas; Zhou, Min

    2004-07-01

    This research focuses on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of shock induced detonation in Fe2O3+Al thermite mixtures. A MD model is developed to simulate non-equilibrium stress-induced reactions. The focus is on establishing a criterion for reaction initiation, energy content and rate of energy release as functions of mixture and reinforcement characteristics. A cluster functional potential is proposed for this purpose. The potential uses the electronegativity equalization to account for changes in the charge of different species according to local environment. Parameters in the potential are derived to fit to the properties of Fe, Al, Fe2O3, and Al2O3. NPT MD simulations are carried out to qualitatively check the energetics of the forward (Fe2O3+Al) as well as backward (Al2O3+Fe) thermite reactions. The results show that the potential can account for the energetics of thermite reactions.

  12. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  13. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics: The first 25 years

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G. |

    1992-08-01

    Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics has been generalized to simulate Nonequilibrium systems by adding sources of thermodynamic heat and work. This generalization incorporates microscopic mechanical definitions of macroscopic thermodynamic and hydrodynamic variables, such as temperature and stress, and augments atomistic forces with special boundary, constraint, and driving forces capable of doing work on, and exchanging heat with, an otherwise Newtonian system. The underlying Lyapunov instability of these nonequilibrium equations of motion links microscopic time-reversible deterministic trajectories to macroscopic time-irreversible hydrodynamic behavior as described by the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Green-Kubo linear-response theory has been checked. Nonlinear plastic deformation, intense heat conduction, shockwave propagation, and nonequilibrium phase transformation have all been simulated. The nonequilibrium techniques, coupled with qualitative improvements in parallel computer hardware, are enabling simulations to approximate real-world microscale and nanoscale experiments.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water Evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Chengyuan; Grest, Gary; Cheng, Shengfeng

    2015-03-01

    The evaporation of water from the liquid/vapor interface is studied via large-scale molecular dynamics simulations for systems of more than a million atoms at 550K and 600K. The TIP4P-2005 water model whose liquid/vapor surface tension is in excellent agreement with experiments is used. Evaporative cooling at the interface is observed from temperature profiles determined from both translational and rotational kinetic energy. During evaporation, the density of water is slightly enhanced near the liquid-vapor interface. The velocity distribution of water molecules in the vapor phase during evaporation at various distances relative to the interface fit a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. While our results indicate an imbalance between evaporating and condensing water molecules, local thermal equilibrium is found to hold in addition to mechanical equilibrium. Department of Physics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

  15. Cluster production within antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Clusters are quite important at various situations in heavy-ion collisions. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics was improved to take into account the correlations to form light clusters, such as deuterons and α particles, and light nuclei composed of several clusters. The momentum fluctuations of emitted particles are also taken into account by a simple method. Formation of fragments and light clusters in a wide range of heavy-ion collisions was well described with a single set of model parameters. Fragmentation in a proton induced reaction was also well reproduced by introducing cluster correlations. Calculated results demonstrate strong impacts of clusters in various observables including those usually regarded as probes of the density dependence of symmetry energy.

  16. Cell list algorithms for nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, Matthew; Fox, Ian; Saracino, Alexandra

    2016-06-01

    We present two modifications of the standard cell list algorithm that handle molecular dynamics simulations with deforming periodic geometry. Such geometry naturally arises in the simulation of homogeneous, linear nonequilibrium flow modeled with periodic boundary conditions, and recent progress has been made developing boundary conditions suitable for general 3D flows of this type. Previous works focused on the planar flows handled by Lees-Edwards or Kraynik-Reinelt boundary conditions, while the new versions of the cell list algorithm presented here are formulated to handle the general 3D deforming simulation geometry. As in the case of equilibrium, for short-ranged pairwise interactions, the cell list algorithm reduces the computational complexity of the force computation from O(N2) to O(N), where N is the total number of particles in the simulation box. We include a comparison of the complexity and efficiency of the two proposed modifications of the standard algorithm.

  17. Molecular-dynamics simulations of lead clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendy, S. C.; Hall, B. D.

    2001-08-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of nanometer-sized lead clusters have been performed using the Lim-Ong-Ercolessi glue potential [Surf. Sci. 269/270, 1109 (1992)]. The binding energies of clusters forming crystalline (fcc), decahedron and icosahedron structures are compared, showing that fcc cuboctahedra are the most energetically favored of these polyhedral model structures. However, simulations of the freezing of liquid droplets produced a characteristic form of surface-reconstructed ``shaved'' icosahedron, in which atoms are absent at the edges and apexes of the polyhedron. This arrangement is energetically favored for 600-4000 atom clusters. Larger clusters favor crystalline structures. Indeed, simulated freezing of a 6525-atom liquid droplet produced an imperfect fcc Wulff particle, containing a number of parallel stacking faults. The effects of temperature on the preferred structure of crystalline clusters below the melting point have been considered. The implications of these results for the interpretation of experimental data is discussed.

  18. Dielectrophoresis of nanocolloids: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Salonen, E; Terama, E; Vattulainen, I; Karttunen, M

    2005-10-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP), the motion of polarizable particles in non-uniform electric fields, has become an important tool for the transport, separation, and characterization of microparticles in biomedical and nanoelectronics research. In this article we present, to our knowledge, the first molecular dynamics simulations of DEP of nanometer-sized colloidal particles. We introduce a simplified model for a polarizable nanoparticle, consisting of a large charged macroion and oppositely charged microions, in an explicit solvent. The model is then used to study DEP motion of the particle at different combinations of temperature and electric field strength. In accord with linear response theory, the particle drift velocities are shown to be proportional to the DEP force. Analysis of the colloid DEP mobility shows a clear time dependence, demonstrating the variation of friction under non-equilibrium. The time dependence of the mobility further results in an apparent weak variation of the DEP displacements with temperature. PMID:16195818

  19. Dynamics of dewetting at the nanoscale using molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Blake, T D; Ledauphin, V; Ogonowski, G; Coninck, J De; Fornasiero, D; Ralston, J

    2007-03-27

    Large-scale molecular dynamics simulations are used to model the dewetting of solid surfaces by partially wetting thin liquid films. Two levels of solid-liquid interaction are considered that give rise to large equilibrium contact angles. The initial length and thickness of the films are varied over a wide range at the nanoscale. Spontaneous dewetting is initiated by removing a band of molecules either from each end of the film or from its center. As observed experimentally and in previous simulations, the films recede at an initially constant speed, creating a growing rim of liquid with a constant receding dynamic contact angle. Consistent with the current understanding of wetting dynamics, film recession is faster on the more poorly wetted surface to an extent that cannot be explained solely by the increase in the surface tension driving force. In addition, the rates of recession of the thinnest films are found to increase with decreasing film thickness. These new results imply not only that the mobility of the liquid molecules adjacent to the solid increases with decreasing solid-liquid interactions, but also that the mobility adjacent to the free surface of the film is higher than in the bulk, so that the effective viscosity of the film decreases with thickness. PMID:17328565

  20. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Moye; Hu, Jie; Zhang, Zhuqing

    2016-01-01

    As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5–10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design. PMID:27128902

  1. Hybrid Atomistic and Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) in Explicit Water.

    PubMed

    Stanzione, Francesca; Jayaraman, Arthi

    2016-05-01

    In-silico design of polymeric biomaterials requires molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that retain essential atomistic/molecular details (e.g., explicit water around the biofunctional macromolecule) while simultaneously achieving large length and time scales pertinent to macroscale function. Such large-scale atomistically detailed macromolecular MD simulations with explicit solvent representation are computationally expensive. One way to overcome this limitation is to use an adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) in which the explicit solvent molecules dynamically adopt either atomistic or coarse-grained resolution depending on their location (e.g., near or far from the macromolecule) in the system. In this study we present the feasibility and the limitations of AdResS methodology for studying polyethylene glycol (PEG) in adaptive resolution water, for varying PEG length and architecture. We first validate the AdResS methodology for such systems, by comparing PEG and solvent structure with that from all-atom simulations. We elucidate the role of the atomistic zone size and the need for calculating thermodynamic force correction within this AdResS approach to correctly reproduce the structure of PEG and water. Lastly, by varying the PEG length and architecture, we study the hydration of PEG, and the effect of PEG architectures on the structural properties of water. Changing the architecture of PEG from linear to multiarm star, we observe reduction in the solvent accessible surface area of the PEG, and an increase in the order of water molecules in the hydration shells. PMID:27108869

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular polymer rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenlong; Djohari, Hadrian; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2010-11-01

    Using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we studied the equilibrium and rheological properties of dilute and semidilute solutions of head-to-tail associating polymers. In our simulation model, a spontaneous complementary reversible association between the donor and the acceptor groups at the ends of oligomers was achieved by introducing a combination of truncated pseudo-Coulombic attractive potential and Lennard Jones repulsive potential between donor, acceptor, and neighboring groups. We have calculated the equilibrium properties of supramolecular polymers, such as the ring/chain equilibrium, average molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution of self-assembled chains and rings, which all agree well with previous analytical and computer modeling results. We have investigated shear thinning of solutions of 8- and 20-bead associating oligomers with different association energies at different temperatures and oligomer volume fractions. All reduced viscosity data for a given oligomer length can be collapsed into one master curve, exhibiting two power-law regions of shear-thinning behavior with an exponent of -0.55 at intermediate ranges of the reduced shear rate β and -0.8 (or -0.9) at larger shear rates. The equilibrium viscosity of supramolecular solutions with different oligomer lengths and associating energies is found to obey a power-law scaling dependence on oligomer volume fraction with an exponent of 1.5, in agreement with the experimental observations for several dilute or semidilute solutions of supramolecular polymers. This implies that dilute and semidilute supramolecular polymer solutions exhibit high polydispersity but may not be sufficiently entangled to follow the reptation mechanism of relaxation.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations and morphology analysis of TEM imaged PVDF nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Jiayuan; Reneker, Darrell; Tsige, Mesfin; Taylor, Philip

    With the goal of elucidating the structure of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were performed, and the results compared with structures observed in high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at the molecular level. Simulation shows that the stability of the β-phase component in a PVDF nanofiber is influenced by its thickness and processing history. When exposed to irradiation, as in a TEM observation, the structure is then further modified by the effects of chain scission. The transformation from the β phase into a paraelectric phase can explain the spindle formation and serpentine motion of molecular segments observed by Zhong et al. (Polymer, 54, 2013, 3745-3756) in irradiated PVDF nanofibers. From a comparison between simulated and experimental TEM images it was possible to identify numerous features that are useful in unveiling the inherent structure of PVDF nanofibers. The experimental TEM images appear to match well with those predicted by a model based on α-phase PVDF, while also being consistent with an alternative model (Nanoscale 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01619c). Work supported by the Petroleum Research Fund of the ACS.

  5. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.T.

    1993-12-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  6. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yuan T.

    1991-03-01

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  7. All-atom normal-mode analysis reveals an RNA-induced allostery in a bacteriophage coat protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykeman, Eric C.; Twarock, Reidun

    2010-03-01

    Assembly of the T=3 bacteriophage MS2 is initiated by the binding of a 19 nucleotide RNA stem loop from within the phage genome to a symmetric coat protein dimer. This binding event effects a folding of the FG loop in one of the protein subunits of the dimer and results in the formation of an asymmetric dimer. Since both the symmetric and asymmetric forms of the dimer are needed for the assembly of the protein container, this allosteric switch plays an important role in the life cycle of the phage. We provide here details of an all-atom normal-mode analysis of this allosteric effect. The results suggest that asymmetric contacts between the A -duplex RNA phosphodiester backbone of the stem loop with the EF loop in one coat protein subunit results in an increased dynamic behavior of its FG loop. The four lowest-frequency modes, which encompass motions predominantly on the FG loops, account for over 90% of the increased dynamic behavior due to a localization of the vibrational pattern on a single FG loop. Finally, we show that an analysis of the allosteric effect using an elastic network model fails to predict this localization effect, highlighting the importance of using an all-atom full force field method for this problem.

  8. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  10. GAS-PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: VIBRATIONAL DYNAMICS OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    MUCKERMAN,J.T.

    1999-06-09

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high-temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometric sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and, in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  11. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Vibrational Dynamics of Polyatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Muckerman, J.T.

    1999-05-21

    The goal of this research is the understanding of elementary chemical and physical processes important in the combustion of fossil fuels. Interest centers on reactions and properties of short-lived chemical intermediates. High-resolution, high-sensitivity, laser absorption methods are augmented by high- temperature, flow-tube reaction kinetics studies with mass-spectrometic sampling. These experiments provide information on the energy levels, structures and reactivity of molecular free radical species and in turn, provide new tools for the study of energy flow and chemical bond cleavage in the radicals involved in chemical systems. The experimental work is supported by theoretical studies using time-dependent quantum wavepacket calculations, which provide insight into energy flow among the vibrational modes of polyatomic molecules and interference effects in multiple-surface dynamics.

  12. Ab initio prediction of protein structure with both all-atom and simplified force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheraga, Harold

    2004-03-01

    Using only a physics-based ab initio method, and both all-atom (ECEPP/3) and simplified united-residue (UNRES) force fields, global optimization of both potential functions with Monte Carlo-plus-Minimization (MCM) and Conformational Space Annealing (CSA), respectively, provides predicted structures of proteins without use of knowledge-based information. The all-atom approach has been applied to the 46-residue protein A, and the UNRES approach has been applied to larger CASP targets. The predicted structures will be described.

  13. Internal Coordinate Molecular Dynamics: A Foundation for Multiscale Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Internal coordinates such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles (BAT) are natural coordinates for describing a bonded molecular system. However, the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods that are widely used for proteins, DNA, and polymers are based on Cartesian coordinates owing to the mathematical simplicity of the equations of motion. However, constraints are often needed with Cartesian MD simulations to enhance the conformational sampling. This makes the equations of motion in the Cartesian coordinates differential-algebraic, which adversely impacts the complexity and the robustness of the simulations. On the other hand, constraints can be easily placed in BAT coordinates by removing the degrees of freedom that need to be constrained. Thus, the internal coordinate MD (ICMD) offers an attractive alternative to Cartesian coordinate MD for developing multiscale MD method. The torsional MD method is a special adaptation of the ICMD method, where all the bond lengths and bond angles are kept rigid. The advantages of ICMD simulation methods are the longer time step size afforded by freezing high frequency degrees of freedom and performing a conformational search in the more important low frequency torsional degrees of freedom. However, the advancements in the ICMD simulations have been slow and stifled by long-standing mathematical bottlenecks. In this review, we summarize the recent mathematical advancements we have made based on spatial operator algebra, in developing a robust long time scale ICMD simulation toolkit useful for various applications. We also present the applications of ICMD simulations to study conformational changes in proteins and protein structure refinement. We review the advantages of the ICMD simulations over the Cartesian simulations when used with enhanced sampling methods and project the future use of ICMD simulations in protein dynamics. PMID:25517406

  14. Interfacial water on crystalline silica: A comparative molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan A.; Argyris, D.; Cole, David; Striolo, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the dynamics of aqueous electrolyte solutions confined in slit-shaped silica nanopores of various degrees of protonation. Five degrees of protonation were prepared by randomly removing surface hydrogen atoms from fully protonated crystalline silica surfaces. Aqueous electrolyte solutions containing NaCl or CsCl salt were simulated at ambient conditions. In all cases, the ionic concentration was 1 M. The results were quantified in terms of atomic density distributions within the pores, and the self-diffusion coefficient along the direction parallel to the pore surface. We found evidence for ion-specific properties that depend on ion surface, water ion, and only in some cases ion ion correlations. The degree of protonation strongly affects the structure, distribution, and the dynamic behavior of confined water and electrolytes. Cl ions adsorb on the surface at large degrees of protonation, and their behavior does not depend significantly on the cation type (either Na+ or Cs+ ions are present in the systems considered). The cations show significant ion-specific behavior. Na+ ions occupy different positions within the pore as the degree of protonation changes, while Cs+ ions mainly remain near the pore center at all conditions considered. For a given degree of protonation, the planar self-diffusion coefficient of Cs+ is always greater than that of Na+ ions. The results are useful for better understanding transport under confinement, including brine behavior in the subsurface, with important applications such as environmental remediation.

  15. Parametrizing linear generalized Langevin dynamics from explicit molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Fabian; Karsten, Sven; Ivanov, Sergei D. Kühn, Oliver

    2015-06-28

    Fundamental understanding of complex dynamics in many-particle systems on the atomistic level is of utmost importance. Often the systems of interest are of macroscopic size but can be partitioned into a few important degrees of freedom which are treated most accurately and others which constitute a thermal bath. Particular attention in this respect attracts the linear generalized Langevin equation, which can be rigorously derived by means of a linear projection technique. Within this framework, a complicated interaction with the bath can be reduced to a single memory kernel. This memory kernel in turn is parametrized for a particular system studied, usually by means of time-domain methods based on explicit molecular dynamics data. Here, we discuss that this task is more naturally achieved in frequency domain and develop a Fourier-based parametrization method that outperforms its time-domain analogues. Very surprisingly, the widely used rigid bond method turns out to be inappropriate in general. Importantly, we show that the rigid bond approach leads to a systematic overestimation of relaxation times, unless the system under study consists of a harmonic bath bi-linearly coupled to the relevant degrees of freedom.

  16. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  17. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  18. Thermal transpiration: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    T, Joe Francis; Sathian, Sarith P.

    2014-12-09

    Thermal transpiration is a phenomenon where fluid molecules move from the cold end towards the hot end of a channel under the influence of longitudinal temperature gradient alone. Although the phenomenon of thermal transpiration is observed at rarefied gas conditions in macro systems, the phenomenon can occur at atmospheric pressure if the characteristic dimensions of the channel is less than 100 nm. The flow through these nanosized channels is characterized by the free molecular flow regimes and continuum theory is inadequate to describe the flow. Thus a non-continuum method like molecular dynamics (MD) is necessary to study such phenomenon. In the present work, MD simulations were carried out to investigate the occurance of thermal transpiration in copper and platinum nanochannels at atmospheric pressure conditions. The mean pressure of argon gas confined inside the nano channels was maintained around 1 bar. The channel height is maintained at 2nm. The argon atoms interact with each other and with the wall atoms through the Lennard-Jones potential. The wall atoms are modelled using an EAM potential. Further, separate simulations were carried out where a Harmonic potential is used for the atom-atom interaction in the platinum channel. A thermally insulating wall was introduced between the low and high temperature regions and those wall atoms interact with fluid atoms through a repulsive potential. A reduced cut off radius were used to achieve this. Thermal creep is induced by applying a temperature gradient along the channel wall. It was found that flow developed in the direction of the increasing temperature gradient of the wall. An increase in the volumetric flux was observed as the length of the cold and the hot regions of the wall were increased. The effect of temperature gradient and the wall-fluid interaction strength on the flow parameters have been studied to understand the phenomenon better.

  19. How Dynamic Visualization Technology Can Support Molecular Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Dalit

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and…

  20. Global and local molecular dynamics of a bacterial carboxylesterase provide insight into its catalytic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaozhen; Sigler, Sara C.; Hossain, Delwar; Wierdl, Monika; Gwaltney, Steven R.; Potter, Philip M.; Wadkins, Randy M.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (CEs) are ubiquitous enzymes responsible for the detoxification of xenobiotics. In humans, substrates for these enzymes are far-ranging, and include the street drug heroin and the anticancer agent irinotecan. Hence, their ability to bind and metabolize substrates is of broad interest to biomedical science. In this study, we focused our attention on dynamic motions of a CE from B. subtilis (pnbCE), with emphasis on the question of what individual domains of the enzyme might contribute to its catalytic activity. We used a 10 ns all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, normal mode calculations, and enzyme kinetics to understand catalytic consequences of structural changes within this enzyme. Our results shed light on how molecular motions are coupled with catalysis. During molecular dynamics, we observed a distinct C-C bond rotation between two conformations of Glu310. Such a bond rotation would alternately facilitate and impede protonation of the active site His399 and act as a mechanism by which the enzyme alternates between its active and inactive conformation. Our normal mode results demonstrate that the distinct low-frequency motions of two loops in pnbCE, coil_5 and coil_21, are important in substrate conversion and seal the active site. Mutant CEs lacking these external loops show significantly reduced rates of substrate conversion, suggesting this sealing motion prevents escape of substrate. Overall, the results of our studies give new insight into the structure-function relationship of CEs and have implications for the entire family of α/β fold family of hydrolases, of which this CE is a member. PMID:22127613

  1. Low-mass molecular dynamics simulation: A simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Yuan-Ping

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Reducing atomic masses by 10-fold vastly improves sampling in MD simulations. • CLN025 folded in 4 of 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when masses were reduced by 10-fold. • CLN025 folded as early as 96.2 ns in 1 of the 4 simulations that captured folding. • CLN025 did not fold in 10 × 0.5-μs MD simulations when standard masses were used. • Low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic sampling enhancement technique. - Abstract: CLN025 is one of the smallest fast-folding proteins. Until now it has not been reported that CLN025 can autonomously fold to its native conformation in a classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. This article reports the autonomous and repeated folding of CLN025 from a fully extended backbone conformation to its native conformation in explicit solvent in multiple 500-ns MD simulations at 277 K and 1 atm with the first folding event occurring as early as 66.1 ns. These simulations were accomplished by using AMBER forcefield derivatives with atomic masses reduced by 10-fold on Apple Mac Pros. By contrast, no folding event was observed when the simulations were repeated using the original AMBER forcefields of FF12SB and FF14SB. The results demonstrate that low-mass MD simulation is a simple and generic technique to enhance configurational sampling. This technique may propel autonomous folding of a wide range of miniature proteins in classical, all-atom, and isothermal–isobaric MD simulations performed on commodity computers—an important step forward in quantitative biology.

  2. Statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics into peridynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Silling, Stewart Andrew; Lehoucq, Richard B.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes an elegant statistical coarse-graining of molecular dynamics at finite temperature into peridynamics, a continuum theory. Peridynamics is an efficient alternative to molecular dynamics enabling dynamics at larger length and time scales. In direct analogy with molecular dynamics, peridynamics uses a nonlocal model of force and does not employ stress/strain relationships germane to classical continuum mechanics. In contrast with classical continuum mechanics, the peridynamic representation of a system of linear springs and masses is shown to have the same dispersion relation as the original spring-mass system.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Coulomb Explosion

    SciTech Connect

    Bringa, E M

    2002-05-17

    A swift ion creates a track of electronic excitations in the target material. A net repulsion inside the track can cause a ''Coulomb Explosion'', which can lead to damage and sputtering of the material. Here we report results from molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of Coulomb explosion for a cylindrical track as a function of charge density and neutralization/quenching time, {tau}. Screening by the free electrons is accounted for using a screened Coulomb potential for the interaction among charges. The yield exhibits a prompt component from the track core and a component, which dominates at higher excitation density, from the heated region produced. For the cases studied, the number of atoms ejected per incident ion, i.e. the sputtering yield Y, is quadratic with charge density along the track as suggested by simple models. Y({tau} = 0.2 Debye periods) is nearly 20% of the yield when there is no neutralization ({tau} {yields} {infinity}). The connections between ''Coulomb explosions'', thermal spikes and measurements of electronic sputtering are discussed.

  4. A molecular dynamics study of dielectric friction

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnikova, M.G.; Waldeck, D.H.; Coalson, R.D.

    1996-07-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the friction experienced by the dye molecule resorufamine rotating in a polar solvent is performed. The validity of simple continuum theories of dielectric friction is tested. It is found that the Alavi{endash}Waldeck theory gives reasonable results for the zero frequency dielectric friction coefficient while the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory requires an unphysically small cavity radius. A procedure for evaluating the time dependent friction kernel from torques and angular velocities, which enables the contributions to the friction from the van der Waals and Coulomb forces to be evaluated separately, is suggested. This study of a realistic system shows that electrostatic interactions can enhance friction by at least two physical mechanisms. First is a contribution to the friction which arises solely from retardation of the solvent reaction field. Second is a contribution arising from local structural changes of the solvent which are driven by the electrostatic field, i.e., a change in the local viscosity. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of dense matter

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.; Kress, J.; Troullier, N.; Lenosky, T.; Kwon, I.

    1997-12-31

    The authors have developed a quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulation method for investigating the properties of dense matter in a variety of environments. The technique treats a periodically-replicated reference cell containing N atoms in which the nuclei move according to the classical equations-of-motion. The interatomic forces are generated from the quantum mechanical interactions of the (between?) electrons and nuclei. To generate these forces, the authors employ several methods of varying sophistication from the tight-binding (TB) to elaborate density functional (DF) schemes. In the latter case, lengthy simulations on the order of 200 atoms are routinely performed, while for the TB, which requires no self-consistency, upwards to 1000 atoms are systematically treated. The QMD method has been applied to a variety cases: (1) fluid/plasma Hydrogen from liquid density to 20 times volume-compressed for temperatures of a thousand to a million degrees Kelvin; (2) isotopic hydrogenic mixtures, (3) liquid metals (Li, Na, K); (4) impurities such as Argon in dense hydrogen plasmas; and (5) metal/insulator transitions in rare gas systems (Ar,Kr) under high compressions. The advent of parallel versions of the methods, especially for fast eigensolvers, presage LDA simulations in the range of 500--1000 atoms and TB runs for tens of thousands of particles. This leap should allow treatment of shock chemistry as well as large-scale mixtures of species in highly transient environments.

  6. Integrating influenza antigenic dynamics with molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Lemey, Philippe; Dudas, Gytis; Gregory, Victoria; Hay, Alan J; McCauley, John W; Russell, Colin A; Smith, Derek J; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic evolution allowing mutant viruses to evade host immunity acquired to previous virus strains. Antigenic phenotype is often assessed through pairwise measurement of cross-reactivity between influenza strains using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Here, we extend previous approaches to antigenic cartography, and simultaneously characterize antigenic and genetic evolution by modeling the diffusion of antigenic phenotype over a shared virus phylogeny. Using HI data from influenza lineages A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/Victoria and B/Yamagata, we determine patterns of antigenic drift across viral lineages, showing that A/H3N2 evolves faster and in a more punctuated fashion than other influenza lineages. We also show that year-to-year antigenic drift appears to drive incidence patterns within each influenza lineage. This work makes possible substantial future advances in investigating the dynamics of influenza and other antigenically-variable pathogens by providing a model that intimately combines molecular and antigenic evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01914.001 PMID:24497547

  7. Molecular chaperone-mediated nuclear protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Echtenkamp, Frank J; Freeman, Brian C

    2014-05-01

    Homeostasis requires effective action of numerous biological pathways including those working along a genome. The variety of processes functioning in the nucleus is considerable, yet the number of employed factors eclipses this total. Ideally, individual components assemble into distinct complexes and serially operate along a pathway to perform work. Adding to the complexity is a multitude of fluctuating internal and external signals that must be monitored to initiate, continue or halt individual activities. While cooperative interactions between proteins of the same process provide a mechanism for rapid and precise assembly, the inherent stability of such organized structures interferes with the proper timing of biological events. Further prolonging the longevity of biological complexes are crowding effects resulting from the high concentration of intracellular macromolecules. Hence, accessory proteins are required to destabilize the various assemblies to efficiently transition between structures, avoid off-pathway competitive interactions, and to terminate pathway activity. We suggest that molecular chaperones have evolved, in part, to manage these challenges by fostering a general and continuous dynamic protein environment within the nucleus. PMID:24694369

  8. Reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: Direct simulation of the dynamic equilibrium properties of chemically reacting mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, John K.; Lísal, Martin; Gubbins, Keith E.; Rice, Betsy M.

    2004-12-01

    A molecular simulation method to study the dynamics of chemically reacting mixtures is presented. The method uses a combination of stochastic and dynamic simulation steps, allowing for the simulation of both thermodynamic and transport properties. The method couples a molecular dynamics simulation cell (termed dynamic cell) to a reaction mixture simulation cell (termed control cell) that is formulated upon the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo (RxMC) method, hence the term reaction ensemble molecular dynamics. Thermodynamic and transport properties are calculated in the dynamic cell by using a constant-temperature molecular dynamics simulation method. RxMC forward and reverse reaction steps are performed in the control cell only, while molecular dynamics steps are performed in both the dynamic cell and the control cell. The control cell, which acts as a sink and source reservoir, is maintained at reaction equilibrium conditions via the RxMC algorithm. The reaction ensemble molecular dynamics method is analogous to the grand canonical ensemble molecular dynamics technique, while using some elements of the osmotic molecular dynamics method, and so simulates conditions that directly relate to real, open systems. The accuracy and stability of the method is assessed by considering the ammonia synthesis reaction N2+3H2⇔2NH3 . It is shown to be a viable method for predicting the effects of nonideal environments on the dynamic properties (particularly diffusion) as well as reaction equilibria for chemically reacting mixtures.

  9. Molecular dynamics in cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra deconvolution

    SciTech Connect

    Bossis, Fabrizio; Palese, Luigi L.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase molecular dynamics serve to predict Moessbauer lineshape widths. {yields} Half height widths are used in modeling of Lorentzian doublets. {yields} Such spectral deconvolutions are useful in detecting the enzyme intermediates. -- Abstract: In this work low temperature molecular dynamics simulations of cytochrome c oxidase are used to predict an experimentally observable, namely Moessbauer spectra width. Predicted lineshapes are used to model Lorentzian doublets, with which published cytochrome c oxidase Moessbauer spectra were simulated. Molecular dynamics imposed constraints to spectral lineshapes permit to obtain useful information, like the presence of multiple chemical species in the binuclear center of cytochrome c oxidase. Moreover, a benchmark of quality for molecular dynamic simulations can be obtained. Despite the overwhelming importance of dynamics in electron-proton transfer systems, limited work has been devoted to unravel how much realistic are molecular dynamics simulations results. In this work, molecular dynamics based predictions are found to be in good agreement with published experimental spectra, showing that we can confidently rely on actual simulations. Molecular dynamics based deconvolution of Moessbauer spectra will lead to a renewed interest for application of this approach in bioenergetics.

  10. All-Atom Internal Coordinate Mechanics (ICM) Force Field for Hexopyranoses and Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We present an extension of the all-atom internal-coordinate force field, ICMFF, that allows for simulation of heterogeneous systems including hexopyranose saccharides and glycan chains in addition to proteins. A library of standard glycan geometries containing α- and β-anomers of the most common hexapyranoses, i.e., d-galactose, d-glucose, d-mannose, d-xylose, l-fucose, N-acetylglucosamine, N-acetylgalactosamine, sialic, and glucuronic acids, is created based on the analysis of the saccharide structures reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. The new force field parameters include molecular electrostatic potential-derived partial atomic charges and the torsional parameters derived from quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related molecules. The ϕ/ψ torsional parameters for different types of glycosidic linkages are developed using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates, i.e., glycosidic-linked tetrahydropyran–cyclohexane dimers. Target data for parameter optimization include two-dimensional energy surfaces corresponding to the ϕ/ψ glycosidic dihedral angles in the disaccharide analogues, as determined by quantum mechanical MP2/6-31G** single-point energies on HF/6-31G** optimized structures. To achieve better agreement with the observed geometries of glycosidic linkages, the bond angles at the O-linkage atoms are added to the internal variable set and the corresponding bond bending energy term is parametrized using quantum mechanical data. The resulting force field is validated on glycan chains of 1–12 residues from a set of high-resolution X-ray glycoprotein structures based on heavy atom root-mean-square deviations of the lowest-energy glycan conformations generated by the biased probability Monte Carlo (BPMC) molecular mechanics simulations from the native structures. The appropriate BPMC distributions for monosaccharide–monosaccharide and protein–glycan linkages are derived

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Selectivity of a Silica Polymer for Ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, M Natalia D S

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the sol-gel polycondensation technique has been increasingly employed with great success as an alternative approach to the preparation of molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs). The main aim of this study was to study, through a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the selectivity of an imprinted silica xerogel towards a new template-the (±)-2-(P-Isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (Ibuprofen, IBU). We have previously demonstrated the affinity of this silica xerogel toward a similar molecule. In the present study, we simulated the imprinting process occurring in a sol-gel mixture using the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA) force field, in order to evaluate the selectivity of this xerogel for a template molecule. In addition, for the first time, we have developed and verified a new parameterisation for the Ibuprofen(®) based on the OPLS-AA framework. To evaluate the selectivity of the polymer, we have employed both the radial distribution functions, interaction energies and cluster analyses. PMID:27399685

  12. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-01-01

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million atom biological systems scale well up to 30k cores, producing 30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach.

  13. Comparative study of local structure of two cyanobiphenyl liquid crystals by molecular dynamics method

    SciTech Connect

    Gerts, Egor D. Komolkin, Andrei V.; Burmistrov, Vladimir A.; Alexandriysky, Victor V.; Dvinskikh, Sergey V.

    2014-08-21

    Fully-atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on two similar cyanobiphenyl nematogens, HO-6OCB and 7OCB, in order to study effects of hydrogen bonds on local structure of liquid crystals. Comparable length of these two molecules provides more evident results on the effects of hydrogen bonding. The analysis of radial and cylindrical distribution functions clearly shows the differences in local structure of two mesogens. The simulations showed that anti-parallel alignment is preferable for the HO-6OCB. Hydrogen bonds between OH-groups are observed for 51% of HO-6OCB molecules, while hydrogen bonding between CN- and OH-groups occurs only for 16% of molecules. The lifetimes of H-bonds differ due to different mobility of molecular fragments (50 ps for N⋅⋅⋅H–O and 41 ps for O⋅⋅⋅H–O). Although the standard Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations - All-Atom force field cannot reproduce some experimental parameters quantitatively (order parameters are overestimated, diffusion coefficients are not reproduced well), the comparison of relative simulated results for the pair of mesogens is nevertheless consistent with the same relative experimental parameters. Thus, the comparative study of simulated and experimental results for the pair of similar liquid crystals still can be assumed plausible.

  14. Scaling of Multimillion-Atom Biological Molecular Dynamics Simulation on a Petascale Supercomputer.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Roland; Lindner, Benjamin; Petridis, Loukas; Smith, Jeremy C

    2009-10-13

    A strategy is described for a fast all-atom molecular dynamics simulation of multimillion-atom biological systems on massively parallel supercomputers. The strategy is developed using benchmark systems of particular interest to bioenergy research, comprising models of cellulose and lignocellulosic biomass in an aqueous solution. The approach involves using the reaction field (RF) method for the computation of long-range electrostatic interactions, which permits efficient scaling on many thousands of cores. Although the range of applicability of the RF method for biomolecular systems remains to be demonstrated, for the benchmark systems the use of the RF produces molecular dipole moments, Kirkwood G factors, other structural properties, and mean-square fluctuations in excellent agreement with those obtained with the commonly used Particle Mesh Ewald method. With RF, three million- and five million-atom biological systems scale well up to ∼30k cores, producing ∼30 ns/day. Atomistic simulations of very large systems for time scales approaching the microsecond would, therefore, appear now to be within reach. PMID:26631792

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of the Selectivity of a Silica Polymer for Ibuprofen

    PubMed Central

    Concu, Riccardo; Cordeiro, M. Natalia D. S.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the sol-gel polycondensation technique has been increasingly employed with great success as an alternative approach to the preparation of molecularly imprinted materials (MIMs). The main aim of this study was to study, through a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the selectivity of an imprinted silica xerogel towards a new template—the (±)-2-(P-Isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (Ibuprofen, IBU). We have previously demonstrated the affinity of this silica xerogel toward a similar molecule. In the present study, we simulated the imprinting process occurring in a sol-gel mixture using the Optimized Potentials for Liquid Simulations-All Atom (OPLS-AA) force field, in order to evaluate the selectivity of this xerogel for a template molecule. In addition, for the first time, we have developed and verified a new parameterisation for the Ibuprofen® based on the OPLS-AA framework. To evaluate the selectivity of the polymer, we have employed both the radial distribution functions, interaction energies and cluster analyses. PMID:27399685

  16. Paramaterization of a coarse-grained model for linear alkylbenzene sulfonate surfactants and molecular dynamics studies of their self-assembly in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xibing; Shinoda, Wataru; DeVane, Russell; Anderson, Kelly L.; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-02-01

    A coarse-grained (CG) forcefield for linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) was systematically parameterized. Thermodynamic data from experiments and structural data obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics were used as targets to parameterize CG potentials for the bonded and non-bonded interactions. The added computational efficiency permits one to employ computer simulation to probe the self-assembly of LAS aqueous solutions into different morphologies starting from a random configuration. The present CG model is shown to accurately reproduce the phase behavior of solutions of pure isomers of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, despite the fact that phase behavior was not directly taken into account in the forcefield parameterization.

  17. Combined molecular dynamics-spin dynamics simulations of bcc iron

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Meewanage Dilina N; Yin, Junqi; Landau, David P; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm; Eisenbach, Markus; Brown, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Using a classical model that treats translational and spin degrees of freedom on an equal footing, we study phonon-magnon interactions in BCC iron with combined molecular and spin dynamics methods. The atomic interactions are modeled via an empirical many-body potential while spin dependent interactions are established through a Hamiltonian of the Heisenberg form with a distance dependent magnetic exchange interaction obtained from first principles electronic structure calculations. The temporal evolution of translational and spin degrees of freedom was determined by numerically solving the coupled equations of motion, using an algorithm based on the second order Suzuki-Trotter decomposition of the exponential operators. By calculating Fourier transforms of space- and time-displaced correlation functions, we demonstrate that the the presence of lattice vibrations leads to noticeable softening and damping of spin wave modes. As a result of the interplay between lattice and spin subsystems, we also observe additional longitudinal spin wave excitations, with frequencies which coincide with that of the longitudinal lattice vibrations.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  19. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Cx26 Hemichannel: Insights into Voltage-Dependent Loop-Gating

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taekyung; Roux, Benoît; Jo, Sunhwan; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Harris, Andrew L.; Bargiello, Thaddeus A.

    2012-01-01

    Loop-gating is one of two voltage-dependent mechanisms that regulate the open probability of connexin channels. The loop-gate permeability barrier is formed by a segment of the first extracellular loop (E1) (the parahelix) and appears to be accompanied by straightening of the bend angle between E1 and the first transmembrane domain (TM1). Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to identify and characterize interacting van der Waals and electrostatic networks that stabilize the parahelices and TM1/E1 bend angles of the open Cx26 hemichannel. Dynamic fluctuations in an electrostatic network in each subunit are directly linked to the stability of parahelix structure and TM1/E1 bend angle in adjacent subunits. The electrostatic network includes charged residues that are pore-lining and thus positioned to be voltage sensors. We propose that the transition to the closed state is initiated by voltage-driven disruption of the networks that stabilize the open-state parahelix configuration, allowing the parahelix to protrude into the channel pore to form the loop-gate barrier. Straightening of the TM1/E1 bend appears to be a consequence of the reorganization of the interacting networks that accompany the conformational change of the parahelix. The electrostatic network extends across subunit boundaries, suggesting a concerted gating mechanism. PMID:22455917

  20. Force Field Development and Molecular Dynamics of [NiFe] Hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Xiong, Yijia; Straatsma, TP; Rosso, Kevin M.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2012-05-09

    Classical molecular force-field parameters describing the structure and motion of metal clusters in [NiFe] hydrogenase enzymes can be used to compare the dynamics and thermodynamics of [NiFe] under different oxidation, protonation, and ligation circumstances. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations of small model clusters representative of the active site and the proximal, medial, and distal Fe/S metal centers and their attached protein side chains, we have calculated classical force-field parameters for [NiFe] in reduced and oxidized states, including internal coordinates, force constants, and atom-centered charges. Derived force constants revealed that cysteinate ligands bound to the metal ions are more flexible in the Ni-B active site, which has a bridging hydroxide ligand, than in the Ni-C active site, which has a bridging hydride. Ten nanosecond all-atom, explicit-solvent MD simulations of [NiFe] hydrogenase in oxidized and reduced catalytic states established the stability of the derived force-field parameters in terms of C{alpha} and metal cluster fluctuations. Average active site structures from the protein MD simulations are consistent with [NiFe] structures from the Protein Data Bank, suggesting that the derived force-field parameters are transferrable to other hydrogenases beyond the structure used for testing. A comparison of experimental H{sub 2}-production rates demonstrated a relationship between cysteinate side chain rotation and activity, justifying the use of a fully dynamic model of [NiFe] metal cluster motion.

  1. Routine Microsecond Molecular Dynamics Simulations with AMBER on GPUs. 1. Generalized Born

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We present an implementation of generalized Born implicit solvent all-atom classical molecular dynamics (MD) within the AMBER program package that runs entirely on CUDA enabled NVIDIA graphics processing units (GPUs). We discuss the algorithms that are used to exploit the processing power of the GPUs and show the performance that can be achieved in comparison to simulations on conventional CPU clusters. The implementation supports three different precision models in which the contributions to the forces are calculated in single precision floating point arithmetic but accumulated in double precision (SPDP), or everything is computed in single precision (SPSP) or double precision (DPDP). In addition to performance, we have focused on understanding the implications of the different precision models on the outcome of implicit solvent MD simulations. We show results for a range of tests including the accuracy of single point force evaluations and energy conservation as well as structural properties pertainining to protein dynamics. The numerical noise due to rounding errors within the SPSP precision model is sufficiently large to lead to an accumulation of errors which can result in unphysical trajectories for long time scale simulations. We recommend the use of the mixed-precision SPDP model since the numerical results obtained are comparable with those of the full double precision DPDP model and the reference double precision CPU implementation but at significantly reduced computational cost. Our implementation provides performance for GB simulations on a single desktop that is on par with, and in some cases exceeds, that of traditional supercomputers. PMID:22582031

  2. Combined Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Experimental Studies of the Structure and Dynamics of Poly-Amido-Saccharides.

    PubMed

    Chin, Stacy L; Lu, Qing; Dane, Eric L; Dominguez, Laura; McKnight, Christopher J; Straub, John E; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-05-25

    Poly-amido-saccharides (PAS) are carbohydrate-based, enantiopure synthetic polymers in which sugar repeat units are joined by amide linkages. This unique and relatively rigid pyranose backbone contributes to their defined helical secondary structure and remarkable chemical properties. Glucose- (glc-) and galactose- (gal-) PAS 10-mer structures are synthesized and investigated with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental measurements. Quantum mechanical DFT energy minimization calculations, as well as experimental observables including circular dichroism, (1)H,(13)C-HSQC, and (1)H,(1)H-NOESY 2D-NMR studies, validated the all-atom simulation models produced using a modified CHARMM force field. Water radial distribution functions show distinct differences in the glc- and gal-PAS systems that correlate well with observed differences in solubility between gal-PASs and glc-PASs. The computational analysis and MD simulations are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the proposed models as reliable representations of novel glc- and gal-PASs. PMID:27119983

  3. Dynamic conformational ensembles regulate casein kinase-1 isoforms: Insights from molecular dynamics and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Gupta, Dwijendra K

    2016-04-01

    Casein kinase-1 (CK1) isoforms actively participate in the down-regulation of canonical Wnt signaling pathway; however recent studies have shown their active roles in oncogenesis of various tissues through this pathway. Functional loss of two isoforms (CK1-α/ε) has been shown to activate the carcinogenic pathway which involves the stabilization of of cytoplasmic β-catenin. Development of anticancer therapeutics is very laborious task and depends upon the structural and conformational details of the target. This study focuses on, how the structural dynamics and conformational changes of two CK1 isoforms are synchronized in carcinogenic pathway. The conformational dynamics in kinases is the responsible for their action as has been supported by the molecular docking experiments. PMID:26788877

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Disordered Zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.; Chartier, Alain; Meis, Constantin

    2004-02-27

    The melting of zircon and the amorphous state produced by quenching from the melt were simulated by molecular dynamics using a new partial charge model combined with the Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential. The model has been established for the description of the crystalline and aperiodic structures of zircon in order to be used for the simulation of displacement cascades. It provides an excellent fit to the structure, and accounts with convenient precision the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of zircon. The calculated melting temperature is about 2100 K. The activation energy for self-diffusion of ions in the liquid state was determined to be 190-200 kJ/mole. Melt quenching was employed to produce two different disordered states with distinct densities and structures. In the high density disordered state, the zircon structure is intact but the bond angle distributions are broader, 4% of the Si units are polymerized, and the volume swelling is about 8%. In the low density amorphous state, the Zr and Si coordination numbers are lower, and the Zr-O and Si-O bond lengths are shorter than corresponding values for the crystal. In addition, a highly polymerized Si network, with average connectivity of two, is observed in the low density amorphous state. These features have all been experimentally observed in natural metamict zircon. The present findings, when considered in light of experimental radiation effects studies, suggest that the swelling in zircon arises initially from disorder in the zircon crystal, and at high doses the disordered crystal is unable to accommodate the volume expansion and transforms to the amorphous state.

  5. Condensation on nanorods by molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Donguk; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-06-01

    Many recent experimental studies have been conducted on constructing nanorods and nanowires to use in a wide range of applications. In this study, molecular dynamics is used to directly examine the condensation rate of nanorods and the results are compared with other basic configurations such as cubes or spheres. According to previous studies conducted by Suh and Yasuoka [J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 10631 (2011); 116, 14637 (2012)], a simple change in the configuration of the seed produces a shape effect, where the curvature of the solid seed surface directly affects the growth generating an orderly difference depending on the curvature. Nanoscale cuboids or nanorods were studied to find an aspect ratio effect when condensation occurs on the surface. Various aspect ratios were examined for different nanorod sizes over a wide range of supersaturation ratios. The results show that the growth rate of the nanorod is independent of the supersaturation ratio, which was also observed for the sphere and cube. The growth rate for the rod fell between those of the cube and the sphere, and this is due to an increase in the surface area of the nanorod compared to the cube and curvature effect in comparison with the sphere. A clear size dependence of the seed was observed, which is also similar to the cube and sphere. Furthermore, no aspect ratio influence was seen for the growth rate. This does not mean that the actual amount of condensation is the same for longer seeds, but rather from the definition of the growth rate, the amount of accumulation per unit area is the same for all seed lengths.

  6. An improved version of the Green's function molecular dynamics method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Ling Ti; Denniston, Colin; Müser, Martin H.

    2011-02-01

    ://www.mcs.anl.gov/research/projects/mpi/), FFT ( http://www.fftw.org/) Catalogue identifier of previous version: AECW_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 1004 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Green's function molecular dynamics (GFMD) is a coarse-graining method that enables one to investigate the full elastic response of an interface between a semi-infinite solid and a contact while taking only the surface atoms in the solid into consideration. The effect of long-range elastic deformations on the surface atoms from the semi-infinite solid is replaced by effective elastic interactions, thus reducing the problem from three dimensions to two dimensions without compromising the physical essence of the problem. Solution method: See "Nature of problem". Reasons for new version: The basic theory underlying the new version is essentially the same as the previous one, while the special treatment to reduce the finite size effect on effective elastic coefficients at the Γ-point is now realized in a physically meaningful manner. Finite size effects are an important issue in molecular dynamics simulations, particularly for GFMD, they result in a violation of the acoustic sum rule (ASR) for the effective elastic coefficients measured at the Γ-point ( Φ). In the previous implementation, the effective elastic coefficients measured at the Γ-point were altered by setting their eigenvalues corresponding to the acoustic modes to zero. This scheme was found to work well for simple Bravais lattices as long as only atoms within the last layer were treated as Green's function atoms. However, it failed to function as expected in all other cases. We therefore adopt a new algorithm to enforce the ASR for Φ (Kong, 2010 [3]) which is implemented in this revision. Summary of revisions: Assuming the lattice under study consists of surface unit cells with n basis atoms labeled by k=1,2,…,n. When all atoms in the lattice are moved by the same amount, i

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations and neutron reflectivity as an effective approach to characterize biological membranes and related macromolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Darré, L; Iglesias-Fernandez, J; Kohlmeyer, A; Wacklin, H; Domene, C

    2015-10-13

    In combination with other spectroscopy, microscopy, and scattering techniques, neutron reflectivity is a powerful tool to characterize biological systems. Specular reflection of neutrons provides structural information at the nanometer and subnanometer length scales, probing the composition and organization of layered materials. Currently, analysis of neutron reflectivity data involves several simplifying assumptions about the structure of the sample under study, affecting the extraction and interpretation of information from the experimental data. Computer simulations can be used as a source of structural and dynamic data with atomic resolution. We present a novel tool to compare the structural properties determined by neutron reflectivity experiments with those obtained from molecular simulations. This tool allows benchmarking the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to reproduce experimental data, but it also promotes unbiased interpretation of experimentally determined quantities. Two application examples are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the new tool. The first example is the generation of reflectivity profiles for a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) lipid bilayer from molecular dynamics simulations using data from both atomistic and coarse-grained models, and comparison with experimentally measured data. The second example is the calculation of lipid volume changes with temperature and composition from all atoms simulations of single and mixed 1,2-di-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayers. PMID:26574275

  8. Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics: A flexible and modular molecular dynamics code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; Loyola, Claudia; González, Felipe; Peralta, Joaquín

    2010-12-01

    Las Palmeras Molecular Dynamics (LPMD) is a highly modular and extensible molecular dynamics (MD) code using interatomic potential functions. LPMD is able to perform equilibrium MD simulations of bulk crystalline solids, amorphous solids and liquids, as well as non-equilibrium MD (NEMD) simulations such as shock wave propagation, projectile impacts, cluster collisions, shearing, deformation under load, heat conduction, heterogeneous melting, among others, which involve unusual MD features like non-moving atoms and walls, unstoppable atoms with constant-velocity, and external forces like electric fields. LPMD is written in C++ as a compromise between efficiency and clarity of design, and its architecture is based on separate components or plug-ins, implemented as modules which are loaded on demand at runtime. The advantage of this architecture is the ability to completely link together the desired components involved in the simulation in different ways at runtime, using a user-friendly control file language which describes the simulation work-flow. As an added bonus, the plug-in API (Application Programming Interface) makes it possible to use the LPMD components to analyze data coming from other simulation packages, convert between input file formats, apply different transformations to saved MD atomic trajectories, and visualize dynamical processes either in real-time or as a post-processing step. Individual components, such as a new potential function, a new integrator, a new file format, new properties to calculate, new real-time visualizers, and even a new algorithm for handling neighbor lists can be easily coded, compiled and tested within LPMD by virtue of its object-oriented API, without the need to modify the rest of the code. LPMD includes already several pair potential functions such as Lennard-Jones, Morse, Buckingham, MCY and the harmonic potential, as well as embedded-atom model (EAM) functions such as the Sutton-Chen and Gupta potentials. Integrators to

  9. Molecular dynamics study of linear and comb-like polyelectrolytes in aqueous solution: effect of Ca2+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Kefeng; Song, Xingfu; Sun, Shuying; Xu, Yanxia; Yu, Jianguo

    2014-08-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were employed to provide microscopic mechanism for the salt tolerance of polyelectrolytes dispersants. The conformational variation of polyelectrolytes and interactions between COO- groups and counterions/water molecules were also studied via radius of gyration and pair correlations functions. Sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) and sodium salts of poly(acrylic acid)-poly(ethylene oxide) (NaPA-PEO) were selected as the representative linear and comb-like polyelectrolyte, respectively. The results show that Ca2+ ions interact with COO- groups much stronger than Na+ ions and can bring ion-bridging interaction between intermolecular COO- groups in the NaPA systems. While in the NaPA-PEO systems, the introduced PEO side chains can prevent backbone chains from ion-bridging interactions and weaken the conformational changes. The present results can help in selecting and designing new-type efficient polyelectrolyte dispersants with good salt tolerance.

  10. CHARACTERIZING COUPLED CHARGE TRANSPORT WITH MULTISCALE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Jessica

    2011-08-31

    This is the final progress report for Award DE-SC0004920, entitled 'Characterizing coupled charge transport with multi scale molecular dynamics'. The technical abstract will be provided in the uploaded report.

  11. Masses, luminosities and dynamics of galactic molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, P. M.; Rivolo, A. R.; Mooney, T. J.; Barrett, J. W.; Sage, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies takes place in molecular clouds and the Milky Way is the only galaxy in which it is possible to resolve and study the physical properties and star formation activity of individual clouds. The masses, luminosities, dynamics, and distribution of molecular clouds, primarily giant molecular clouds in the Milky Way are described and analyzed. The observational data sets are the Massachusetts-Stony Brook CO Galactic Plane Survey and the IRAS far IR images. The molecular mass and infrared luminosities of glactic clouds are then compared with the molecular mass and infrared luminosities of external galaxies.

  12. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; Ho, Kenneth L.; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models derived from moderate-resolution protein crystal structures contain a high frequency of close nonbonded contacts, independent of the major refinement program used for structure determination. All-atom refinement with PrimeX corrects many of these problematic interactions, producing models that are better suited for use in computational chemistry and related applications. All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5–2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R{sub free} values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein–ligand interactions.

  13. Beyond Standard Molecular Dynamics: Investigating the Molecular Mechanisms of G Protein-Coupled Receptors with Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Methods

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological processes mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) take place on timescales that are not conveniently accessible to standard molecular dynamics (MD) approaches, notwithstanding the current availability of specialized parallel computer architectures, and efficient simulation algorithms. Enhanced MD-based methods have started to assume an important role in the study of the rugged energy landscape of GPCRs by providing mechanistic details of complex receptor processes such as ligand recognition, activation, and oligomerization. We provide here an overview of these methods in their most recent application to the field. PMID:24158803

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study of Potassium Azide (KN_3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossowski, M.; Hardy, J. R.

    1998-03-01

    An ab initio model developed for intermolecular and intramolecular potentials in ionic molecular solids(H. M. Lu and J. R. Hardy, Phys. Rev. B, 42, 8339 (1990)) is employed to study the phase diagram of potassium azide (KN_3). We performed first-principles static structural relaxation, supercell molecular dynamics, lattice- dynamical studies and predict the existence of a high temperature rotationally disordered phase in KN_3. A selected work on other members of the alkali azide family will also be discussed.

  15. HTMD: High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics for Molecular Discovery.

    PubMed

    Doerr, S; Harvey, M J; Noé, Frank; De Fabritiis, G

    2016-04-12

    Recent advances in molecular simulations have allowed scientists to investigate slower biological processes than ever before. Together with these advances came an explosion of data that has transformed a traditionally computing-bound into a data-bound problem. Here, we present HTMD, a programmable, extensible platform written in Python that aims to solve the data generation and analysis problem as well as increase reproducibility by providing a complete workspace for simulation-based discovery. So far, HTMD includes system building for CHARMM and AMBER force fields, projection methods, clustering, molecular simulation production, adaptive sampling, an Amazon cloud interface, Markov state models, and visualization. As a result, a single, short HTMD script can lead from a PDB structure to useful quantities such as relaxation time scales, equilibrium populations, metastable conformations, and kinetic rates. In this paper, we focus on the adaptive sampling and Markov state modeling features. PMID:26949976

  16. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  17. All-Atom Structural Models of the Transmembrane Domains of Insulin and Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadiarani, Hossein; Vashisth, Harish

    2016-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase superfamily comprises many cell-surface receptors including the insulin receptor (IR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) that are constitutively homodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins. Therefore, these receptors require ligand-triggered domain rearrangements rather than receptor dimerization for activation. Specifically, binding of peptide ligands to receptor ectodomains transduces signals across the transmembrane domains for trans-autophosphorylation in cytoplasmic kinase domains. The molecular details of these processes are poorly understood in part due to the absence of structures of full-length receptors. Using MD simulations and enhanced conformational sampling algorithms, we present all-atom structural models of peptides containing 51 residues from the transmembrane and juxtamembrane regions of IR and IGF1R. In our models, the transmembrane regions of both receptors adopt helical conformations with kinks at Pro961 (IR) and Pro941 (IGF1R), but the C-terminal residues corresponding to the juxtamembrane region of each receptor adopt unfolded and flexible conformations in IR as opposed to a helix in IGF1R. We also observe that the N-terminal residues in IR form a kinked-helix sitting at the membrane–solvent interface, while homologous residues in IGF1R are unfolded and flexible. These conformational differences result in a larger tilt-angle of the membrane-embedded helix in IGF1R in comparison to IR to compensate for interactions with water molecules at the membrane–solvent interfaces. Our metastable/stable states for the transmembrane domain of IR, observed in a lipid bilayer, are consistent with a known NMR structure of this domain determined in detergent micelles, and similar states in IGF1R are consistent with a previously reported model of the dimerized transmembrane domains of IGF1R. Our all-atom structural models suggest potentially unique structural organization of kinase domains in each receptor. PMID

  18. Elucidation of molecular dynamics of invasive species of rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cultivated rice fields are aggressively invaded by weedy rice in the U.S. and worldwide. Weedy rice results in loss of yield and seed contamination. The molecular dynamics of the evolutionary adaptive traits of weedy rice are not fully understood. To understand the molecular basis and identify the i...

  19. Molecular dynamics simulation of interfacial adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Yarovsky, I.; Chaffee, A.L.

    1996-12-31

    Chromium salts are often used in the pretreatment stages of steel painting processes in order to improve adhesion at the metal oxide/primer interface. Although well established empirically, the chemical basis for the improved adhesion conferred by chromia is not well understood. A molecular level understanding of this behaviour should provide a foundation for the design of materials offering improved adhesion control. Molecular modelling of adhesion involves simulation and analysis of molecular behaviour at the interface between two interacting phases. The present study concerns behaviour at the boundary between the metal coated steel surface (with or without chromium pretreatment) and an organic primer based on a solid epoxide resin produced from bisphenol A and epichlorohydrin. An epoxy resin oligomer of molecular weight 3750 was used as the model for the primer.

  20. Visualizing Functional Motions of Membrane Transporters with Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling and molecular simulation techniques have become an integral part of modern molecular research. Various areas of molecular sciences continue to benefit from, indeed rely on, the unparalleled spatial and temporal resolutions offered by these technologies, to provide a more complete picture of the molecular problems at hand. Because of the continuous development of more efficient algorithms harvesting ever-expanding computational resources, and the emergence of more advanced and novel theories and methodologies, the scope of computational studies has expanded significantly over the past decade, now including much larger molecular systems and far more complex molecular phenomena. Among the various computer modeling techniques, the application of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and related techniques has particularly drawn attention in biomolecular research, because of the ability of the method to describe the dynamical nature of the molecular systems and thereby to provide a more realistic representation, which is often needed for understanding fundamental molecular properties. The method has proven to be remarkably successful in capturing molecular events and structural transitions highly relevant to the function and/or physicochemical properties of biomolecular systems. Herein, after a brief introduction to the method of MD, we use a number of membrane transport proteins studied in our laboratory as examples to showcase the scope and applicability of the method and its power in characterizing molecular motions of various magnitudes and time scales that are involved in the function of this important class of membrane proteins. PMID:23298176

  1. Coarse-graining to the meso and continuum scales with molecular-dynamics-like models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimpton, Steve

    Many engineering-scale problems that industry or the national labs try to address with particle-based simulations occur at length and time scales well beyond the most optimistic hopes of traditional coarse-graining methods for molecular dynamics (MD), which typically start at the atomic scale and build upward. However classical MD can be viewed as an engine for simulating particles at literally any length or time scale, depending on the models used for individual particles and their interactions. To illustrate I'll highlight several coarse-grained (CG) materials models, some of which are likely familiar to molecular-scale modelers, but others probably not. These include models for water droplet freezing on surfaces, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models of explosives where particles have internal state, CG models of nano or colloidal particles in solution, models for aspherical particles, Peridynamics models for fracture, and models of granular materials at the scale of industrial processing. All of these can be implemented as MD-style models for either soft or hard materials; in fact they are all part of our LAMMPS MD package, added either by our group or contributed by collaborators. Unlike most all-atom MD simulations, CG simulations at these scales often involve highly non-uniform particle densities. So I'll also discuss a load-balancing method we've implemented for these kinds of models, which can improve parallel efficiencies. From the physics point-of-view, these models may be viewed as non-traditional or ad hoc. But because they are MD-style simulations, there's an opportunity for physicists to add statistical mechanics rigor to individual models. Or, in keeping with a theme of this session, to devise methods that more accurately bridge models from one scale to the next.

  2. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  3. Tunable Interfacial Thermal Conductance by Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meng

    We study the mechanism of tunable heat transfer through interfaces between solids using a combination of non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (NEMD), vibrational mode analysis and wave packet simulation. We investigate how heat transfer through interfaces is affected by factors including pressure, interfacial modulus, contact area and interfacial layer thickness, with an overreaching goal of developing fundamental knowledge that will allow one to tailor thermal properties of interfacial materials. The role of pressure and interfacial stiffness is unraveled by our studies on an epitaxial interface between two Lennard-Jones (LJ) crystals. The interfacial stiffness is varied by two different methods: (i) indirectly by applying pressure which due to anharmonic nature of bonding, increases interfacial stiffness, and (ii) directly by changing the interfacial bonding strength by varying the depth of the potential well of the LJ potential. When the interfacial bonding strength is low, quantitatively similar behavior to pressure tuning is observed when the interfacial thermal conductance is increased by directly varying the potential-well depth parameter of the LJ potential. By contrast, when the interfacial bonding strength is high, thermal conductance is almost pressure independent, and even slightly decreases with increasing pressure. This decrease can be explained by the change in overlap between the vibrational densities of states of the two crystalline materials. The role of contact area is studied by modeling structures comprised of Van der Waals junctions between single-walled nanotubes (SWCNT). Interfacial thermal conductance between SWCNTs is obtained from NEMD simulation as a function of crossing angle. In this case the junction conductance per unit area is essentially a constant. By contrast, interfacial thermal conductance between multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is shown to increase with diameter of the nanotubes by recent experimental studies [1

  4. The Computer Simulation of Liquids by Molecular Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposes a mathematical computer model for the behavior of liquids using the classical dynamic principles of Sir Isaac Newton and the molecular dynamics method invented by other scientists. Concludes that other applications will be successful using supercomputers to go beyond simple Newtonian physics. (CW)

  5. Identifying the mechanisms of polymer friction through molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ling; Minn, M; Satyanarayana, N; Sinha, Sujeet K; Tan, V B C

    2011-12-20

    Mechanisms governing the tribological behavior of polymer-on-polymer sliding were investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. Three main mechanisms governing frictional behavior were identified. Interfacial "brushing" of molecular chain ends over one another was observed as the key contribution to frictional forces. With an increase of the sliding speed, fluctuations in frictional forces reduced in both magnitude and periodicity, leading to dynamic frictional behavior. While "brushing" remained prevalent, two additional irreversible mechanisms, "combing" and "chain scission", of molecular chains were observed when the interfaces were significantly diffused. PMID:22044344

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  7. Resveratrol interferes with the aggregation of membrane-bound human-IAPP: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Fabio; Raudino, Antonio; Milardi, Danilo; La Rosa, Carmelo

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in pancreatic tissues is a typical feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Resveratrol, a natural product extensively studied for its wide range of biological effects, has been shown to inhibit IAPP aggregation. However, the mechanism by which resveratrol inhibits IAPP aggregation is still far from complete elucidation. Now, an increasing knowledge of the mechanism of amyloid toxicity shifts the target of research towards the development of compounds which can prevent amyloid-mediated membrane damage rather than merely inhibit fiber formation. In this study we used all atom molecular dynamics to investigate the interaction of resveratrol with full-length human IAPP in a negatively charged membrane environment. Our results show that the presence of resveratrol induces the formation of secondary structures (sheets and helices) by inserting in a hydrophobic pocket between the interaction surface of two IAPP molecules in aqueous solution. On the other hand, resveratrol significantly perturbs the interaction of IAPP with negatively charged membranes by anchoring specific hydrophobic regions (23FGA25 and 32VGS34) of the peptide and forming a stable 1:2 IAPP:resveratrol complex at the water/membrane interphase. PMID:25638571

  8. The role of phosphorylation in dentin phosphoprotein peptide absorption to hydroxyapatite surfaces: a molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Garduño-Juarez, Ramon; Gericke, Arne; Boskey, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) is a protein expressed mainly in dentin and to a lesser extent in bone. DPP has a disordered structure, rich in glutamic acid, aspartic acid and phosphorylated serine/threonine residues. It has a high capacity for binding to calcium ions and to hydroxyapatite (HA) crystal surfaces. We used molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a method for virtually screening interactions between DPP motifs and HA. The goal was to determine which motifs are absorbed to HA surfaces. For these simulations, we considered five peptides from the human DPP sequence. All-atom MD simulations were performed using GROMACS, the peptides were oriented parallel to the {100} HA crystal surface, the distance between the HA and the peptide was 3 nm. The system was simulated for 20 ns. Preliminary results show that for the unphosphorylated peptides, the acidic amino acids present an electrostatic attraction where their side chains are oriented towards HA. This attraction, however, is slow to facilitate bulk transport to the crystal surface. On the other hand, the phosphorylated (PP) peptides are rapidly absorbed on the surface of the HA with their centers of mass closer to the HA surface. More importantly, the root mean square fluctuation (RMSF) indicates that the average structures of the phosphorylated peptides are very inflexible and elongate, while that of the unphosphorylated peptides are flexible. Radius of gyration (Rg) analysis showed the compactness of un-phosphorylated peptides is lower than phosphorylated peptides. Phosphorylation of the DPP peptides is necessary for binding to HA surfaces. PMID:25158198

  9. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  10. A Generic Force Field for Protein Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junfeng; Bai, Fang; Li, Honglin; Wang, Xicheng

    2012-01-01

    Coarse-grained (CG) force fields have become promising tools for studies of protein behavior, but the balance of speed and accuracy is still a challenge in the research of protein coarse graining methodology. In this work, 20 CG beads have been designed based on the structures of amino acid residues, with which an amino acid can be represented by one or two beads, and a CG solvent model with five water molecules was adopted to ensure the consistence with the protein CG beads. The internal interactions in protein were classified according to the types of the interacting CG beads, and adequate potential functions were chosen and systematically parameterized to fit the energy distributions. The proposed CG force field has been tested on eight proteins, and each protein was simulated for 1000 ns. Even without any extra structure knowledge of the simulated proteins, the Cα root mean square deviations (RMSDs) with respect to their experimental structures are close to those of relatively short time all atom molecular dynamics simulations. However, our coarse grained force field will require further refinement to improve agreement with and persistence of native-like structures. In addition, the root mean square fluctuations (RMSFs) relative to the average structures derived from the simulations show that the conformational fluctuations of the proteins can be sampled. PMID:23203075

  11. Electrostatic Unfolding and Interactions of Albumin Driven by pH Changes: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene melts: Mechanical and structural responses

    SciTech Connect

    Fröhlich, Markus G. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu; Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu

    2014-01-14

    The mechanical and structural responses of hydroxyl-terminated cis-1,4-polybutadiene melts to shock waves were investigated by means of all-atom non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed using the OPLS-AA force field but with the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential replaced by the Buckingham exponential-6 potential to better represent the interactions at high compression. Monodisperse systems containing 64, 128, and 256 backbone carbon atoms were studied. Supported shock waves were generated by impacting the samples onto stationary pistons at impact velocities of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 km s{sup −1}, yielding shock pressures between approximately 2.8 GPa and 12.5 GPa. Single-molecule structural properties (squared radii of gyration, asphericity parameters, and orientational order parameters) and mechanical properties (density, shock pressure, shock temperature, and shear stress) were analyzed using a geometric binning scheme to obtain spatio-temporal resolution in the reference frame centered on the shock front. Our results indicate that while shear stress behind the shock front is relieved on a ∼0.5 ps time scale, a shock-induced transition to a glass-like state occurs with a concomitant increase of structural relaxation times by several orders of magnitude.

  13. Molecular dynamics study of the shock response in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froehlich, Markus G.; Sewell, Thomas D.; Thompson, Donald L.

    2013-03-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using the non-reactive OPLS-AA force field were performed to study the detailed structural, mechanical, and spectroscopic response of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) melts subjected to supported shock waves. A combination of Monte Carlo and MD techniques was used to generate thoroughly equilibrated initial configurations, for monodisperse systems with chain lengths ranging from 64 to 256 backbone carbons per chain. Properties characterizing the size, shape and orientation of single chains, as well as the vibrational density of states, were evaluated prior to and following shock passage for four impact velocities between 1.0 and 2.5 km/s. The structural properties and global scaling behaviors of the unshocked systems are in excellent agreement with literature data. Results for the shocked systems, obtained using a geometric binning approach that provides spatio-temporal resolution in the reference frame centered on the shock front, indicate a transition to a glass-like state with a concomitant increase by several orders of magnitude of structural relaxation times in the shocked material. Supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, grant number HDTRA1-10-1-0078.

  14. On dioxygen permeation through a dehydrogenase-pyrroloquinoline quinone complex. A molecular-dynamics investigation.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2014-02-01

    In this work, an all atom model of the quinoprotein dehydrogenase PqqC in complex with the PQQ (=4,5-dihydro-4,5-dioxo-1H-pyrrolo[2,3-f]quinoline-2,7,9-tricarboxylic acid) cofactor and dioxygen (O2 ), solvated with TIP3 water in periodic boxes, was subjected to random-acceleration molecular dynamics (RAMD). It was found that O2 leaves the active binding pocket, in front of PQQ, to get to the solvent, as easily as with a variety of other O2 -activating enzymes, O2 carriers, and gas-sensing proteins. The shortest pathway, orthogonal to the center of the mean plane of PQQ, was largely preferred by O2 over pathways slightly deviating from this line. These observations challenge the interpretation of an impermeable active binding pocket of PqqC-PQQ, as drawn from both X-ray diffraction data of the crystal at low temperature and physiological experimentation. PMID:24591312

  15. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Pulmonary Surfactant Protein B Peptide in a Lipid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Freites, J. Alfredo; Choi, Yunsoo; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins that lines the air/liquid interface of the alveolar hypophase and confers mechanical stability to the alveoli during the breathing process. The desire to formulate synthetic mixtures for low-cost prophylactic and therapeutic applications has motivated the study of the specific roles and interactions of the different components. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a model system composed of a monolayer of palmitic acid (PA) and a surfactant protein B peptide, SP-B1–25. A detailed structural characterization as a function of the lipid monolayer specific area revealed that the peptide remains inserted in the monolayer up to values of specific area corresponding to an untilted condensed phase of the the pure palmitic acid monolayer. The system remains stable by altering the conformational order of both the anionic lipid monolayer and the peptide secondary structure. Two elements appear to be key for the constitution of this phase: an electrostatic interaction between the cationic peptide residues with the anionic headgroups, and an exclusion of the aromatic residues on the hydrophobic end of the peptide from the hydrophilic and aqueous regions. PMID:12668426

  16. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  17. Temperature dependence of protein hydration hydrodynamics by molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Krishnan, V V

    2007-07-18

    The dynamics of water molecules near the protein surface are different from those of bulk water and influence the structure and dynamics of the protein itself. To elucidate the temperature dependence hydration dynamics of water molecules, we present results from the molecular dynamic simulation of the water molecules surrounding two proteins (Carboxypeptidase inhibitor and Ovomucoid) at seven different temperatures (T=273 to 303 K, in increments of 5 K). Translational diffusion coefficients of the surface water and bulk water molecules were estimated from 2 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Temperature dependence of the estimated bulk water diffusion closely reflects the experimental values, while hydration water diffusion is retarded significantly due to the protein. Protein surface induced scaling of translational dynamics of the hydration waters is uniform over the temperature range studied, suggesting the importance protein-water interactions.

  18. Reactive Molecular Dynamics Simulations at the Petascale (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.

    2013-12-01

    We are developing a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework into a metascalable (or 'design once, scale on new architectures') parallelization scheme to perform large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The scheme has achieved parallel efficiency well over 0.9 on 786,432 IBM BlueGene/Q processors for 8.5 trillion-atom molecular dynamics and 1.9 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom quantum molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. Simulation results reveal intricate interplay between photoexcitation, mechanics, flow, and chemical reactions at the nanoscale. Specifically, we will discuss atomistic mechanisms of: (1) rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles; (2) molecular control of charge transfer, charge recombination, and singlet fission for efficient solar cells; and (3) mechanically enhanced reaction kinetics in nanobubbles and nanojets.

  19. Interfacial Molecular Searching Using Forager Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monserud, Jon H.; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    Many biological and technological systems employ efficient non-Brownian intermittent search strategies where localized searches alternate with long flights. Coincidentally, molecular species exhibit intermittent behavior at the solid-liquid interface, where periods of slow motion are punctuated by fast flights through the liquid phase. Single-molecule tracking was used here to observe the interfacial search process of DNA for complementary DNA. Measured search times were qualitatively consistent with an intermittent-flight model, and ˜10 times faster than equivalent Brownian searches, suggesting that molecular searches for reactive sites benefit from similar efficiencies as biological organisms.

  20. Dynamics of molecular superrotors in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2015-08-01

    We excite diatomic oxygen and nitrogen to high rotational states with an optical centrifuge and study their dynamics in an external magnetic field. Ion imaging is employed to directly visualize, and follow in time, the rotation plane of the molecular superrotors. The two different mechanisms of interaction between the magnetic field and the molecular angular momentum in paramagnetic oxygen and non-magnetic nitrogen lead to qualitatively different behaviour. In nitrogen, we observe the precession of the molecular angular momentum around the field vector. In oxygen, strong spin-rotation coupling results in faster and richer dynamics, encompassing the splitting of the rotation plane into three separate components. As the centrifuged molecules evolve with no significant dispersion of the molecular wave function, the observed magnetic interaction presents an efficient mechanism for controlling the plane of molecular rotation.

  1. Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Study of Dimerization in Prion Protein: Multiple Modes of Interaction and Stabilization.

    PubMed

    Chamachi, Neharika G; Chakrabarty, Suman

    2016-08-01

    The pathological forms of prions are known to be a result of misfolding, oligomerization, and aggregation of the cellular prion. While the mechanism of misfolding and aggregation in prions has been widely studied using both experimental and computational tools, the structural and energetic characterization of the dimer form have not garnered as much attention. On one hand dimerization can be the first step toward a nucleation-like pathway to aggregation, whereas on the other hand it may also increase the conformational stability preventing self-aggregation. In this work, we have used extensive all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of both monomer and dimer forms of a mouse prion protein to understand the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic stability of dimeric prion as compared to the monomeric form. We show that prion proteins can dimerize spontaneously being stabilized by hydrophobic interactions as well as intermolecular hydrogen bonding and salt bridge formation. We have computed the conformational free energy landscapes for both monomer and dimer forms to compare the thermodynamic stability and misfolding pathways. We observe large conformational heterogeneity among the various modes of interactions between the monomers and the strong intermolecular interactions may lead to as high as 20% β-content. The hydrophobic regions in helix-2, surrounding coil regions, terminal regions along with the natively present β-sheet region appear to actively participate in prion-prion intermolecular interactions. Dimerization seems to considerably suppress the inherent dynamic instability observed in monomeric prions, particularly because the regions of structural frustration constitute the dimer interface. Further, we demonstrate an interesting reversible coupling between the Q160-G131 interaction (which leads to inhibition of β-sheet extension) and the G131-V161 H-bond formation. PMID:27390876

  2. A comparative molecular dynamics study on BACE1 and BACE2 flap flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kumalo, H M; Soliman, Mahmoud E

    2016-10-01

    Beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme1 (BACE1) and beta-amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme2 (BACE2), members of aspartyl protease family, are close homologs and have high similarity in their protein crystal structures. However, their enzymatic properties are different, which leads to different clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed sequence analysis and all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulations for both enzymes in their ligand-free states in order to compare their dynamical flap behaviors. This is to enhance our understanding of the relationship between sequence, structure and the dynamics of this protein family. Sequence analysis shows that in BACE1 and BACE2, most of the ligand-binding sites are conserved, indicative of their enzymatic property as aspartyl protease members. The other conserved residues are more or less unsystematically localized throughout the structure. Herein, we proposed and applied different combined parameters to define the asymmetric flap motion; the distance, d1, between the flap tip and the flexible region; the dihedral angle, φ, to account for the twisting motion and the TriCα angle, θ2 and θ1. All four combined parameters were found to appropriately define the observed "twisting" motion during the flaps different conformational states. Additional analysis of the parameters indicated that the flaps can exist in an ensemble of conformations, i.e. closed, semi-open and open conformations for both systems. However, the behavior of the flap tips during simulations is different between BACE1 and BACE2. The BACE1 active site cavity is more spacious as compared to that of BACE2. The analysis of 10S loop and 113S loop showed a similar trend to that of flaps, with the BACE1 loops being more flexible and less stable than those of BACE2. We believe that the results, methods and perspectives highlighted in this report would assist researchers in the discovery of BACE inhibitors as potential Alzheimer's disease therapies

  3. First principles molecular dynamics without self-consistent field optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Souvatzis, Petros; Niklasson, Anders M. N.

    2014-01-28

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics approach that is based on time-reversible extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] in the limit of vanishing self-consistent field optimization. The optimization-free dynamics keeps the computational cost to a minimum and typically provides molecular trajectories that closely follow the exact Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. Only one single diagonalization and Hamiltonian (or Fockian) construction are required in each integration time step. The proposed dynamics is derived for a general free-energy potential surface valid at finite electronic temperatures within hybrid density functional theory. Even in the event of irregular functional behavior that may cause a dynamical instability, the optimization-free limit represents a natural starting guess for force calculations that may require a more elaborate iterative electronic ground state optimization. Our optimization-free dynamics thus represents a flexible theoretical framework for a broad and general class of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. A simple and transferable all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model to study membrane processes.

    PubMed

    Genheden, Samuel; Essex, Jonathan W

    2015-10-13

    We present an efficient all-atom/coarse-grained hybrid model and apply it to membrane processes. This model is an extension of the all-atom/ELBA model applied previously to processes in water. Here, we improve the efficiency of the model by implementing a multiple-time step integrator that allows the atoms and the coarse-grained beads to be propagated at different timesteps. Furthermore, we fine-tune the interaction between the atoms and the coarse-grained beads by computing the potential of mean force of amino acid side chain analogs along the membrane normal and comparing to atomistic simulations. The model was independently validated on the calculation of small-molecule partition coefficients. Finally, we apply the model to membrane peptides. We studied the tilt angle of the Walp23 and Kalp23 helices in two different model membranes and the stability of the glycophorin A dimer. The model is efficient, accurate, and straightforward to use, as it does not require any extra interaction particles, layers of atomistic solvent molecules or tabulated potentials, thus offering a novel, simple approach to study membrane processes. PMID:26574264

  5. Hydration Properties and Solvent Effects for All-Atom Solutes in Polarizable Coarse-Grained Water.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xin Cindy; Tirado-Rives, Julian; Jorgensen, William L

    2016-08-25

    Due to the importance of water in chemical and biological systems, a coarse-grained representation of the solvent can greatly simplify the description of the system while retaining key thermodynamic properties of the medium. A multiscale solvation model that couples all-atom solutes and polarizable Martini coarse-grained water (AAX/CGS) is developed to reproduce free energies of hydration of organic solutes. Using Monte Carlo/free energy perturbation (MC/FEP) calculations, results from multiscale and all-atom simulations are compared. Improved accuracy is obtained with the AAX/CGS approach for hydrophobic and sulfur- or halogen-containing solutes, but larger deviations are found for polar solute molecules where hydrogen bonding is featured. Furthermore, solvent effects on conformational and tautomeric equilibria of AA solutes were investigated using AA, CG, and GB/SA solvent models. It is found that the CG solvent model can reproduce well the medium effects from experiment and AA simulations; however, the GB/SA solvent model fails in some cases. A 7-30-fold reduction in computational cost is found for the present AAX/CGS multiscale simulations compared to the AA alternative. PMID:26901452

  6. An All-Atom Model of the Structure of Human Copper Transporter 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharikov, Yuriy; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Miller, Mark A.; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Larson, Christopher A.; Howell, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Human copper transporter 1 (hCTR1) is the major high affinity copper influx transporter in mammalian cells that also mediates uptake of the cancer chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. A low resolution structure of hCTR1 determined by cryoelectron microscopy was recently published. Several protein structure simulation techniques were used to create an all-atom model of this important transporter using the low resolution structure as a starting point. The all-atom model provides new insights into the roles of specific residues of the N-terminal extracellular domain, the intracellular loop, and C-terminal region in metal ion transport. In particular, the model demonstrates that the central region of the pore contains four sets of methionine triads in the intramembranous region. The structure confirms that two triads of methionine residues delineate the intramembranous region of the transporter, and further identifies two additional methionine triads that are located in the extracellular N-terminal part of the transporter. Together, the four triads create a structure that promotes stepwise transport of metal ions into and then through the intramembranous channel of the transporter via transient thioether bonds to methionine residues. Putative copper-binding sites in the hCTR1 trimer were identified by a program developed by us for prediction of metal-binding sites. These sites correspond well with the known effects of mutations on the ability of the protein to transport copper and cisplatin. PMID:22569840

  7. Three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation coupled with molecular dynamics in Amber

    PubMed Central

    Luchko, Tyler; Gusarov, Sergey; Roe, Daniel R.; Simmerling, Carlos; Case, David A.; Tuszynski, Jack; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    We present the three-dimensional molecular theory of solvation (also known as 3D-RISM) coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulation by contracting solvent degrees of freedom, accelerated by extrapolating solvent-induced forces and applying them in large multi-time steps (up to 20 fs) to enable simulation of large biomolecules. The method has been implemented in the Amber molecular modeling package, and is illustrated here on alanine dipeptide and protein G. PMID:20440377

  8. VUV studies of molecular photofragmentation dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.G.

    1993-12-01

    State-resolved, photoion and photoelectron methods are used to study the neutral fragmentation and ionization dynamics of small molecules relevant to atmospheric and combustion chemistry. Photodissociation and ionization are initiated by coherent VUV radiation and the fragmentation dynamics are extracted from measurements of product rovibronic state distributions, kinetic energies and angular distributions. The general aim of these studies is to investigate the multichannel interactions between the electronic and nuclear motions which determine the evolution of the photoexcited {open_quotes}complex{close_quotes} into the observed asymptotic channels.

  9. Studies of structural, dynamical, and interfacial properties of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium iodide ionic liquids by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatee, Mohammad Hadi; Zolghadr, Amin Reza; Moosavi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Younes

    2012-03-01

    Bulk and surface properties of the ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methyl-imidazolium iodides ([Cnmim]I) were simulated by classical molecular dynamics using all atom non-polarizable force field (n = 4, butyl; 6, hexyl; 8, octyl). The structure of ionic liquids were initially optimized by density functional theory and atomic charges obtained by CHELPG method. Reduction of partial atomic charges (by 20% for simulation of density and surface tension, and by 10% for viscosity) found to improve the accuracy, while a non-polarizable force field was applied. Additionally, the simulation ensembles approach the equilibrium faster when the charge reduction is applied. By these refined force field parameters, simulated surface tensions in the range of 323-393 k are quite in agreement with the experiments. Simulation of temperature dependent surface tension of [C4mim]I well beyond room temperature (up to 700 K) permits prediction of the critical temperature in agreement with that predicted from experimental surface tension data. Simulated densities in the range of 298-450 K for the three ionic liquids are within 0.8% of the experimental data. Structural properties for [C4mim]I were found to be in agreement with the results of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation we performed, which indicates a rather well-structured cation-anion interaction and occurs essentially through the imidazolium ring cation. Diffusion coefficient changes with alkyl chain length in the order of [C8mim]I > [C6mim]I > [C4mim]I for the cation and the anion. Formation of a dense domain in subsurface region is quite evident, and progressively becomes denser as the alkyl chain length increases. Bivariate orientational analysis was used to determine the average orientation of molecule in ionic liquids surface, subsurface, and bulk regions. Dynamic bisector-wise and side-wise movement of the imodazolium ring cation in the surface region can be deduced from the bivariate maps. Atom-atom density profile and

  10. Visualizing global properties of a molecular dynamics trajectory.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Li, Shangyang; Makowski, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories are very large data sets that contain substantial information about the dynamic behavior of a protein. Condensing these data into a form that can provide intuitively useful understanding of the molecular behavior during the trajectory is a substantial challenge that has received relatively little attention. Here, we introduce the sigma-r plot, a plot of the standard deviation of intermolecular distances as a function of that distance. This representation of global dynamics contains within a single, one-dimensional plot, the average range of motion between pairs of atoms within a macromolecule. Comparison of sigma-r plots calculated from 10 ns trajectories of proteins representing the four major SCOP fold classes indicates diversity of dynamic behaviors which are recognizably different among the four classes. Differences in domain structure and molecular weight also produce recognizable features in sigma-r plots, reflective of differences in global dynamics. Plots generated from trajectories with progressively increasing simulation time reflect the increased sampling of the structural ensemble as a function of time. Single amino acid replacements can give rise to changes in global dynamics detectable through comparison of sigma-r plots. Dynamic behavior of substructures can be monitored by careful choice of interatomic vectors included in the calculation. These examples provide demonstrations of the utility of the sigma-r plot to provide a simple measure of the global dynamics of a macromolecule. PMID:26522428

  11. Molecular Mechanotransduction: how forces trigger cytoskeletal dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlicher, Allen

    2012-02-01

    Mechanical stresses elicit cellular reactions mediated by chemical signals. Defective responses to forces underlie human medical disorders, such as cardiac failure and pulmonary injury. Despite detailed knowledge of the cytoskeleton's structure, the specific molecular switches that convert mechanical stimuli into chemical signals have remained elusive. Here we identify the actin-binding protein, filamin A (FLNa) as a central mechanotransduction element of the cytoskeleton by using Fluorescence Loss After photoConversion (FLAC), a novel high-speed alternative to FRAP. We reconstituted a minimal system consisting of actin filaments, FLNa and two FLNa-binding partners: the cytoplasmic tail of ß-integrin, and FilGAP. Integrins form an essential mechanical linkage between extracellular and intracellular environments, with ß integrin tails connecting to the actin cytoskeleton by binding directly to filamin. FilGAP is a FLNa-binding GTPase-activating protein specific for Rac, which in vivo regulates cell spreading and bleb formation. We demonstrate that both externally-imposed bulk shear and myosin II driven forces differentially regulate the binding of integrin and FilGAP to FLNa. Consistent with structural predictions, strain increases ß-integrin binding to FLNa, whereas it causes FilGAP to dissociate from FLNa, providing a direct and specific molecular basis for cellular mechanotransduction. These results identify the first molecular mechanotransduction element within the actin cytoskeleton, revealing that mechanical strain of key proteins regulates the binding of signaling molecules. Moreover, GAP activity has been shown to switch cell movement from mesenchymal to amoeboid motility, suggesting that mechanical forces directly impact the invasiveness of cancer.

  12. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  13. Molecular dynamics insights into human aquaporin 2 water channel.

    PubMed

    Binesh, A R; Kamali, R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the first molecular dynamics simulation of the human aquaporin 2 is performed and for a better understanding of the aquaporin 2 permeability performance, the characteristics of water transport in this protein channel and key biophysical parameters of AQP2 tetramer including osmotic and diffusive permeability constants and the pore radius are investigated. For this purpose, recently recovered high resolution X-ray crystal structure of` the human aquaporin 2 is used to perform twenty nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of fully hydrated tetramer of this protein embedded in a lipid bilayer. The resulting water permeability characteristics of this protein channel showed that the water permeability of the human AQP2 is in a mean range in comparison with other human aquaporins family. Finally, the results reported in this research demonstrate that molecular dynamics simulation of human AQP2 provided useful insights into the mechanisms of water permeation and urine concentration in the human kidney. PMID:26489820

  14. Hydrolysis of Al3+ from constrained molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Takashi; Hirata, Masaru; Kimura, Takaumi

    2006-02-21

    We investigated the hydrolysis reactions of Al(3+) in AlCl(3) aqueous solution using the constrained molecular dynamics based on the Car-Parrinello molecular-dynamics method. By employing the proton-aluminum coordination number as a reaction coordinate in the constrained molecular dynamics the deprotonation as well as dehydration processes are successfully realized. From our free-energy difference of DeltaG(0) approximately 8.0 kcal mol(-1) the hydrolysis constant pK(a1) is roughly estimated as 5.8, comparable to the literature value of 5.07. We show that the free-energy difference for the hydrolysis of Al(3+) in acidic conditions is at least 4 kcal mol(-1) higher than that in neutral condition, indicating that the hydrolysis reaction is inhibited by the presence of excess protons located around the hydrated ion, in agreement with the change of the predominant species by pH. PMID:16497053

  15. Investigation of protein folding by coarse-grained molecular dynamics with the UNRES force field

    PubMed Central

    Maisuradze, Gia G.; Senet, Patrick; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam; Scheraga, Harold A.

    2010-01-01

    Coarse-grained molecular-dynamics simulations offer a dramatic extension of the time-scale of simulations compared to all-atom approaches. In this article, we describe the use of the physics-based united-residue (UNRES) force field, developed in our laboratory, in protein-structure simulations. We demonstrate that this force field offers about a 4000-times extension of the simulation time scale; this feature arises both from averaging out the fast-moving degrees of freedom and reduction of the cost of energy and force calculations compared to all-atom approaches with explicit solvent. With massively parallel computers, microsecond folding simulation times of proteins containing about 1000 residues can be obtained in days. A straightforward application of canonical UNRES/MD simulations, demonstrated with the example of the N-terminal part of the B-domain of staphylococcal protein A (PDB code: 1BDD, a three-α-helix bundle), discerns the folding mechanism and determines kinetic parameters by parallel simulations of several hundred or more trajectories. Use of generalized-ensemble techniques, of which the multiplexed replica exchange method proved to be the most effective, enables us to compute thermodynamics of folding and carry out fully physics-based prediction of protein structure, in which the predicted structure is determined as a mean over the most populated ensemble below the folding-transition temperature. By using principal component analysis of the UNRES folding trajectories of the formin-binding protein WW domain (PDB code: 1E0L; a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet) and 1BDD, we identified representative structures along the folding pathways and demonstrated that only a few (low-indexed) principal components can capture the main structural features of a protein-folding trajectory; the potentials of mean force calculated along these essential modes exhibit multiple minima, as opposed to those along the remaining modes which are unimodal. In addition, a

  16. Significant reduction in errors associated with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures: automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX.

    PubMed

    Bell, Jeffrey A; Ho, Kenneth L; Farid, Ramy

    2012-08-01

    All-atom models are essential for many applications in molecular modeling and computational chemistry. Nonbonded atomic contacts much closer than the sum of the van der Waals radii of the two atoms (clashes) are commonly observed in such models derived from protein crystal structures. A set of 94 recently deposited protein structures in the resolution range 1.5-2.8 Å were analyzed for clashes by the addition of all H atoms to the models followed by optimization and energy minimization of the positions of just these H atoms. The results were compared with the same set of structures after automated all-atom refinement with PrimeX and with nonbonded contacts in protein crystal structures at a resolution equal to or better than 0.9 Å. The additional PrimeX refinement produced structures with reasonable summary geometric statistics and similar R(free) values to the original structures. The frequency of clashes at less than 0.8 times the sum of van der Waals radii was reduced over fourfold compared with that found in the original structures, to a level approaching that found in the ultrahigh-resolution structures. Moreover, severe clashes at less than or equal to 0.7 times the sum of atomic radii were reduced 15-fold. All-atom refinement with PrimeX produced improved crystal structure models with respect to nonbonded contacts and yielded changes in structural details that dramatically impacted on the interpretation of some protein-ligand interactions. PMID:22868759

  17. An All-Atom Force Field for Tertiary Structure Prediction of Helical Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Herges, T.; Wenzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed an all-atom free-energy force field (PFF01) for protein tertiary structure prediction. PFF01 is based on physical interactions and was parameterized using experimental structures of a family of proteins believed to span a wide variety of possible folds. It contains empirical, although sequence-independent terms for hydrogen bonding. Its solvent-accessible surface area solvent model was first fit to transfer energies of small peptides. The parameters of the solvent model were then further optimized to stabilize the native structure of a single protein, the autonomously folding villin headpiece, against competing low-energy decoys. Here we validate the force field for five nonhomologous helical proteins with 20–60 amino acids. For each protein, decoys with 2–3 Å backbone root mean-square deviation and correct experimental Cβ–Cβ distance constraints emerge as those with the lowest energy. PMID:15507688

  18. All-atom homology model of the Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunit.

    PubMed

    Tung, Chang-Shung; Joseph, Simpson; Sanbonmatsu, Kevin Y

    2002-10-01

    Understanding the structural basis of ribosomal function requires close comparison between biochemical and structural data. Although a large amount of biochemical data are available for the Escherichia coli ribosome, the structure has not been solved to atomic resolution. Using a new RNA homology procedure, we have modeled the all-atom structure of the E. coli 30S ribosomal subunit. We find that the tertiary structure of the ribosome core, including the A-, P- and E-sites, is highly conserved. The hypervariable regions in our structure, which differ from the structure of the 30S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus, are consistent with the cryo-EM map of the E. coli ribosome. PMID:12244297

  19. All-atomic generation and noise-quadrature filtering of squeezed vacuum in hot Rb vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrom, Travis; Romanov, Gleb; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E.

    2013-01-01

    With our all-atomic squeezing and filtering setup, we demonstrate control over the noise amplitudes and manipulation of the frequency-dependent squeezing angle of a squeezed vacuum quantum state by passing it through an atomic medium with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We generate low sideband frequency squeezed vacuum using the polarization self-rotation effect in a hot Rb vapor cell, and direct it through a second atomic vapor subject to EIT conditions. We use the frequency-dependent absorption of the EIT window to demonstrate an example of squeeze amplitude attenuation and squeeze angle rotation of the quantum noise quadratures of the squeezed probe. These studies have implications for quantum memory and storage as well as gravitational wave interferometric detectors.

  20. Studying Interactions by Molecular Dynamics Simulations at High Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, Federico; Corazza, Alessandra; Toppo, Stefano; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.; Viglino, Paolo; Ursini, Fulvio; Esposito, Gennaro

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to study molecular encounters and recognition. In recent works, simulations using high concentration of interacting molecules have been performed. In this paper, we consider the practical problems for setting up the simulation and to analyse the results of the simulation. The simulation of beta 2-microglobulin association and the simulation of the binding of hydrogen peroxide by glutathione peroxidase are provided as examples. PMID:22500085

  1. Energy conserving, linear scaling Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cawkwell, M J; Niklasson, Anders M N

    2012-10-01

    Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations with long-term conservation of the total energy and a computational cost that scales linearly with system size have been obtained simultaneously. Linear scaling with a low pre-factor is achieved using density matrix purification with sparse matrix algebra and a numerical threshold on matrix elements. The extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism [A. M. N. Niklasson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 123004 (2008)] yields microcanonical trajectories with the approximate forces obtained from the linear scaling method that exhibit no systematic drift over hundreds of picoseconds and which are indistinguishable from trajectories computed using exact forces. PMID:23039583

  2. Mitochondrial dynamics: molecular mechanisms and the role in the heart.

    PubMed

    Jazbutyte, V

    2010-04-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles which actively move along the cytoskeleton within the cell, change their shape and undergo fusion and fission. The heart is a metabolically active organ with high energy demands and rich in mitochondria. Mitochondria not only supply the heart with the high energy compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), but also actively participate in cell signaling and apoptotic events and communicate with the cytosol. Recent advantages in molecular biology and imaging techniques helped to study mitochondrial dynamics directly in the cell and under real time conditions. In this review, I will briefly summarize current knowledge about molecular machinery mediating mitochondrial fusion/ fission, its link to apoptosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:20440252

  3. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid peptide aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecchini, M.; Rao, F.; Seeber, M.; Caflisch, A.

    2004-12-01

    The replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) approach is applied to four oligomeric peptide systems. At physiologically relevant temperature values REMD samples conformation space and aggregation transitions more efficiently than constant temperature molecular dynamics (CTMD). During the aggregation process the energetic and structural properties are essentially the same in REMD and CTMD. A condensation stage toward disordered aggregates precedes the β-sheet formation. Two order parameters, borrowed from anisotropic fluid analysis, are used to monitor the aggregation process. The order parameters do not depend on the peptide sequence and length and therefore allow to compare the amyloidogenic propensity of different peptides.

  4. Trillion-atom molecular dynamics becomes a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Kadau, Kai; Germann, Timothy C

    2008-01-01

    By utilizing the molecular dynamics code SPaSM on Livermore's BlueGene/L architecture, consisting of 212 992 IBM PowerPC440 700 MHz processors, a molecular dynamics simulation was run with one trillion atoms. To demonstrate the practicality and future potential of such ultra large-scale simulations, the onset of the mechanical shear instability occurring in a system of Lennard-Jones particles arranged in a simple cubic lattice was simulated. The evolution of the instability was analyzed on-the-fly using the in-house developed massively parallel graphical object-rendering code MD{_}render.

  5. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  6. How Dynamic Visualization Technology can Support Molecular Reasoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Dalit

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the results of a study aimed at exploring the advantages of dynamic visualization for the development of better understanding of molecular processes. We designed a technology-enhanced curriculum module in which high school chemistry students conduct virtual experiments with dynamic molecular visualizations of solid, liquid, and gas. They interact with the visualizations and carry out inquiry activities to make and refine connections between observable phenomena and atomic level processes related to phase change. The explanations proposed by 300 pairs of students in response to pre/post-assessment items have been analyzed using a scale for measuring the level of molecular reasoning. Results indicate that from pretest to posttest, students make progress in their level of molecular reasoning and are better able to connect intermolecular forces and phase change in their explanations. The paper presents the results through the lens of improvement patterns and the metaphor of the "ladder of molecular reasoning," and discusses how this adds to our understanding of the benefits of interacting with dynamic molecular visualizations.

  7. Enhanced Sampling Techniques in Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Biological Systems

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Rafael C.; Melo, Marcelo C. R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular Dynamics has emerged as an important research methodology covering systems to the level of millions of atoms. However, insufficient sampling often limits its application. The limitation is due to rough energy landscapes, with many local minima separated by high-energy barriers, which govern the biomolecular motion. Scope of review In the past few decades methods have been developed that address the sampling problem, such as replica-exchange molecular dynamics, metadynamics and simulated annealing. Here we present an overview over theses sampling methods in an attempt to shed light on which should be selected depending on the type of system property studied. Major Conclusions Enhanced sampling methods have been employed for a broad range of biological systems and the choice of a suitable method is connected to biological and physical characteristics of the system, in particular system size. While metadynamics and replica-exchange molecular dynamics are the most adopted sampling methods to study biomolecular dynamics, simulated annealing is well suited to characterize very flexible systems. The use of annealing methods for a long time was restricted to simulation of small proteins; however, a variant of the method, generalized simulated annealing, can be employed at a relatively low computational cost to large macromolecular complexes. General Significance Molecular dynamics trajectories frequently do not reach all relevant conformational substates, for example those connected with biological function, a problem that can be addressed by employing enhanced sampling algorithms. PMID:25450171

  8. Multiple time step integrators in ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luehr, Nathan; Martínez, Todd J.; Markland, Thomas E.

    2014-02-28

    Multiple time-scale algorithms exploit the natural separation of time-scales in chemical systems to greatly accelerate the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulations. Although the utility of these methods in systems where the interactions are described by empirical potentials is now well established, their application to ab initio molecular dynamics calculations has been limited by difficulties associated with splitting the ab initio potential into fast and slowly varying components. Here we present two schemes that enable efficient time-scale separation in ab initio calculations: one based on fragment decomposition and the other on range separation of the Coulomb operator in the electronic Hamiltonian. We demonstrate for both water clusters and a solvated hydroxide ion that multiple time-scale molecular dynamics allows for outer time steps of 2.5 fs, which are as large as those obtained when such schemes are applied to empirical potentials, while still allowing for bonds to be broken and reformed throughout the dynamics. This permits computational speedups of up to 4.4x, compared to standard Born-Oppenheimer ab initio molecular dynamics with a 0.5 fs time step, while maintaining the same energy conservation and accuracy.

  9. Detachment of semiflexible polymer chains from a substrate: A molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Paturej, J.; Erbas, A.; Milchev, A.; Rostiashvili, V. G.

    2014-12-07

    Using Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the force-induced detachment of a coarse-grained model polymer chain from an adhesive substrate. One of the chain ends is thereby pulled at constant speed off the attractive substrate and the resulting saw-tooth profile of the measured mean force 〈f〉 vs height D of the end-segment over the plane is analyzed for a broad variety of parameters. It is shown that the observed characteristic oscillations in the 〈f〉-D profile depend on the bending and not on the torsional stiffness of the detached chains. Allowing for the presence of hydrodynamic interactions (HI) in a setup with explicit solvent and dissipative particle dynamics-thermostat, rather than the case of Langevin thermostat, one finds that HI have little effect on the 〈f〉-D profile. Also the change of substrate affinity with respect to the solvent from solvophilic to solvophobic is found to play negligible role in the desorption process. In contrast, a changing ratio ε{sub s}{sup B}/ε{sub s}{sup A} of the binding energies of A- and B-segments in the detachment of an AB-copolymer from adhesive surface strongly changes the 〈f〉-D profile whereby the B-spikes vanish when ε{sub s}{sup B}/ε{sub s}{sup A}<0.15. Eventually, performing an atomistic simulation of (bio)-polymers, we demonstrate that the simulation results, derived from our coarse-grained model, comply favorably with those from the all-atom simulation.

  10. Detachment of semiflexible polymer chains from a substrate: A molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturej, J.; Erbas, A.; Milchev, A.; Rostiashvili, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    Using Molecular Dynamics simulations, we study the force-induced detachment of a coarse-grained model polymer chain from an adhesive substrate. One of the chain ends is thereby pulled at constant speed off the attractive substrate and the resulting saw-tooth profile of the measured mean force ⟨f⟩ vs height D of the end-segment over the plane is analyzed for a broad variety of parameters. It is shown that the observed characteristic oscillations in the ⟨f⟩-D profile depend on the bending and not on the torsional stiffness of the detached chains. Allowing for the presence of hydrodynamic interactions (HI) in a setup with explicit solvent and dissipative particle dynamics-thermostat, rather than the case of Langevin thermostat, one finds that HI have little effect on the ⟨f⟩-D profile. Also the change of substrate affinity with respect to the solvent from solvophilic to solvophobic is found to play negligible role in the desorption process. In contrast, a changing ratio ɛ _s^B / ɛ _s^A of the binding energies of A- and B-segments in the detachment of an AB-copolymer from adhesive surface strongly changes the ⟨f⟩-D profile whereby the B-spikes vanish when ɛ _s^B / ɛ _s^A < 0.15. Eventually, performing an atomistic simulation of (bio)-polymers, we demonstrate that the simulation results, derived from our coarse-grained model, comply favorably with those from the all-atom simulation.

  11. Chain networking revealed by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yexin; Tsige, Mesfin; Wang, Shi-Qing

    Based on Kremer-Grest model for entangled polymer melts, we demonstrate how the response of a polymer glass depends critically on the chain length. After quenching two melts of very different chain lengths (350 beads per chain and 30 beads per chain) into deeply glassy states, we subject them to uniaxial extension. Our MD simulations show that the glass of long chains undergoes stable necking after yielding whereas the system of short chains is unable to neck and breaks up after strain localization. During ductile extension of the polymer glass made of long chain significant chain tension builds up in the load-bearing strands (LBSs). Further analysis is expected to reveal evidence of activation of the primary structure during post-yield extension. These results lend support to the recent molecular model 1 and are the simulations to demonstrate the role of chain networking. This work is supported, in part, by a NSF Grant (DMR-EAGER-1444859)

  12. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e -ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computer simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

  13. Electron-phonon interaction within classical molecular dynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tamm, A.; Samolyuk, G.; Correa, A. A.; Klintenberg, M.; Aabloo, A.; Caro, A.

    2016-07-14

    Here, we present a model for nonadiabatic classical molecular dynamics simulations that captures with high accuracy the wave-vector q dependence of the phonon lifetimes, in agreement with quantum mechanics calculations. It is based on a local view of the e-ph interaction where individual atom dynamics couples to electrons via a damping term that is obtained as the low-velocity limit of the stopping power of a moving ion in a host. The model is parameter free, as its components are derived from ab initio-type calculations, is readily extended to the case of alloys, and is adequate for large-scale molecular dynamics computermore » simulations. We also show how this model removes some oversimplifications of the traditional ionic damped dynamics commonly used to describe situations beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.« less

  14. Numerical methods for molecular dynamics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, R.D.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes our research progress to date on the use of multigrid methods for three-dimensional elliptic partial differential equations, with particular emphasis on application to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics. This research is motivated by the need for fast and accurate numerical solution techniques for three-dimensional problems arising in physics and engineering. In many applications these problems must be solved repeatedly, and the extremely large number of discrete unknowns required to accurately approximate solutions to partial differential equations in three-dimensional regions necessitates the use of efficient solution methods. This situation makes clear the importance of developing methods which are of optimal order (or nearly so), meaning that the number of operations required to solve the discrete problem is on the order of the number of discrete unknowns. Multigrid methods are generally regarded as being in this class of methods, and are in fact provably optimal order for an increasingly large class of problems. The fundamental goal of this research is to develop a fast and accurate numerical technique, based on multi-level principles, for the solutions of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation of molecular biophysics and similar equations occurring in other applications. An outline of the report is as follows. We first present some background material, followed by a survey of the literature on the use of multigrid methods for solving problems similar to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. A short description of the software we have developed so far is then given, and numerical results are discussed. Finally, our research plans for the coming year are presented.

  15. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets' spin dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar; Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-01

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet's spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  16. Plastic dislocation motion via nonequilibrium molecular and continuum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.; Ladd, A.J.C.; Hoover, N.E.

    1980-09-29

    The classical two-dimensional close-packed triangular lattice, with nearest-neighbor spring forces, is a convenient standard material for the investigation of dislocation motion and plastic flow. Two kinds of calculations, based on this standard material, are described here: (1) Molecular Dynamics simulations, incorporating adiabatic strains described with the help of Doll's Tensor, and (2) Continuum Dynamics simulations, incorporating periodic boundaries and dislocation interaction through stress-field superposition.

  17. Imaging the molecular dynamics of dissociative electron attachment to water

    SciTech Connect

    Adaniya, Hidihito; Rudek, B.; Osipov, Timur; Haxton, Dan; Weber, Thorsten; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C.W.; Belkacem, Ali

    2009-10-19

    Momentum imaging experiments on dissociative electron attachment to the water molecule are combined with ab initio theoretical calculations of the angular dependence of the quantum mechanical amplitude for electron attachment to provide a detailed picture of the molecular dynamics of dissociation attachment via the two lowest energy Feshbach resonances. The combination of momentum imaging experiments and theory can reveal dissociation dynamics for which the axial recoil approximation breaks down and thus provides a powerful reaction microscope for DEA to polyatomics.

  18. Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics: Dissipation Due to Internal Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, R E

    2001-12-21

    We describe progress on the issue of pathological elastic wave reflection in atomistic and multiscale simulation. First we briefly review Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (CGMD). Originally CGMD was formulated as a Hamiltonian system in which energy is conserved. This formulation is useful for many applications, but recently CGMD has been extended to include generalized Langevin forces. Here we describe how Langevin dynamics arise naturally in CGMD, and we examine the implication for elastic wave scattering.

  19. Input File Creation for the Molecular Dynamics Program LAMMPS.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    The program creates an input data file for the molecular dynamics program LAMMPS. The input file created is a liquid mixture between two walls explicitly composed of particles. The liquid molecules are modeled as a bead-spring molecule. The input data file specifies the position and topology of the starting state. The data structure of input allows for dynamic bond creation (cross-linking) within the LAMMPS code.

  20. Electron trapping in amorphous silicon: A quantum molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin H.; Kalia, R.K.; Vashishta, P.

    1990-12-01

    Quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations provide the real-time dynamics of electrons and ions through numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrodinger and Newton equations, respectively. Using the QMD approach we have investigated the localization behavior of an excess electron in amorphous silicon at finite temperatures. For time scales on the order of a few picoseconds, we find the excess electron is localized inside a void of radius {approximately}3 {Angstrom} at finite temperatures. 12 refs.

  1. A fast recursive algorithm for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, A.; Vaidehi, N.; Rodriguez, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present recursive algorithm for solving molecular systems' dynamical equations of motion employs internal variable models that reduce such simulations' computation time by an order of magnitude, relative to Cartesian models. Extensive use is made of spatial operator methods recently developed for analysis and simulation of the dynamics of multibody systems. A factor-of-450 speedup over the conventional O(N-cubed) algorithm is demonstrated for the case of a polypeptide molecule with 400 residues.

  2. Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil : a new parallel computing environment for a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Futoshi; Kimizuka, Hajime; Kaburaki, Hideo

    2002-08-01

    A new parallel computing environment, called as ``Parallel Molecular Dynamics Stencil'', has been developed to carry out a large-scale short-range molecular dynamics simulation of solids. The stencil is written in C language using MPI for parallelization and designed successfully to separate and conceal parts of the programs describing cutoff schemes and parallel algorithms for data communication. This has been made possible by introducing the concept of image atoms. Therefore, only a sequential programming of the force calculation routine is required for executing the stencil in parallel environment. Typical molecular dynamics routines, such as various ensembles, time integration methods, and empirical potentials, have been implemented in the stencil. In the presentation, the performance of the stencil on parallel computers of Hitachi, IBM, SGI, and PC-cluster using the models of Lennard-Jones and the EAM type potentials for fracture problem will be reported.

  3. Simplified protein models can rival all atom simulations in predicting folding pathways and structure

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Aashish N.; Freed, Karl F.; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability of simultaneously determining a protein’s folding pathway and structure using a properly formulated model without prior knowledge of the native structure. Our model employs a natural coordinate system for describing proteins and a search strategy inspired by the observation that real proteins fold in a sequential fashion by incrementally stabilizing native-like substructures or "foldons". Comparable folding pathways and structures are obtained for the twelve proteins recently studied using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations [K. Lindorff-Larsen, S. Piana, R.O. Dror, D. E. Shaw, Science 334, 517 (2011)], with our calculations running several orders of magnitude faster. We find that native-like propensities in the unfolded state do not necessarily determine the order of structure formation, a departure from a major conclusion of the MD study. Instead, our results support a more expansive view wherein intrinsic local structural propensities may be enhanced or overridden in the folding process by environmental context. The success of our search strategy validates it as an expedient mechanism for folding both in silico and in vivo. PMID:23889448

  4. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  5. Molecular circuits for dynamic noise filtering.

    PubMed

    Zechner, Christoph; Seelig, Georg; Rullan, Marc; Khammash, Mustafa

    2016-04-26

    The invention of the Kalman filter is a crowning achievement of filtering theory-one that has revolutionized technology in countless ways. By dealing effectively with noise, the Kalman filter has enabled various applications in positioning, navigation, control, and telecommunications. In the emerging field of synthetic biology, noise and context dependency are among the key challenges facing the successful implementation of reliable, complex, and scalable synthetic circuits. Although substantial further advancement in the field may very well rely on effectively addressing these issues, a principled protocol to deal with noise-as provided by the Kalman filter-remains completely missing. Here we develop an optimal filtering theory that is suitable for noisy biochemical networks. We show how the resulting filters can be implemented at the molecular level and provide various simulations related to estimation, system identification, and noise cancellation problems. We demonstrate our approach in vitro using DNA strand displacement cascades as well as in vivo using flow cytometry measurements of a light-inducible circuit in Escherichia coli. PMID:27078094

  6. Analysis of solvation structure and thermodynamics of methane in water by reference interaction site model theory using an all-atom model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qizhi; Smith, Vedene H.

    2000-12-01

    An all-atom molecular model and optimized site-site pair potential parameters are employed for methane solute. By use of the reference interaction site model theory, the methane hydration structure is analyzed at the atomic level and its hydration free energies, energies, enthalpies, and entropies for four different thermodynamic states: temperature T=283.15, 298.15, 313.15, 328.15 K and the corresponding bulk water density ρ=0.9997, 0.9970, 0.9922, 0.9875 g cm-3 are calculated. Our calculated thermodynamic properties are in rather good agreement with experiments.

  7. Modeling Signal Propagation Mechanisms and Ligand-Based Conformational Dynamics of the Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone Full-Length Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Giulia; Verkhivker, Gennady; Colombo, Giorgio

    2009-01-01

    Hsp90 is a molecular chaperone essential for protein folding and activation in normal homeostasis and stress response. ATP binding and hydrolysis facilitate Hsp90 conformational changes required for client activation. Hsp90 plays an important role in disease states, particularly in cancer, where chaperoning of the mutated and overexpressed oncoproteins is important for function. Recent studies have illuminated mechanisms related to the chaperone function. However, an atomic resolution view of Hsp90 conformational dynamics, determined by the presence of different binding partners, is critical to define communication pathways between remote residues in different domains intimately affecting the chaperone cycle. Here, we present a computational analysis of signal propagation and long-range communication pathways in Hsp90. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the full-length Hsp90 dimer, combined with essential dynamics, correlation analysis, and a signal propagation model. All-atom MD simulations with timescales of 70 ns have been performed for complexes with the natural substrates ATP and ADP and for the unliganded dimer. We elucidate the mechanisms of signal propagation and determine “hot spots” involved in interdomain communication pathways from the nucleotide-binding site to the C-terminal domain interface. A comprehensive computational analysis of the Hsp90 communication pathways and dynamics at atomic resolution has revealed the role of the nucleotide in effecting conformational changes, elucidating the mechanisms of signal propagation. Functionally important residues and secondary structure elements emerge as effective mediators of communication between the nucleotide-binding site and the C-terminal interface. Furthermore, we show that specific interdomain signal propagation pathways may be activated as a function of the ligand. Our results support a “conformational selection model” of the Hsp90 mechanism, whereby the protein may exist in a

  8. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography.

    PubMed

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H_{2} and D_{2} molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H_{2} and D_{2} with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules. PMID:27081975

  9. Probing Molecular Dynamics by Laser-Induced Backscattering Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haertelt, Marko; Bian, Xue-Bin; Spanner, Michael; Staudte, André; Corkum, Paul B.

    2016-04-01

    We use differential holography to overcome the forward scattering problem in strong-field photoelectron holography. Our differential holograms of H2 and D2 molecules exhibit a fishbonelike structure, which arises from the backscattered part of the recolliding photoelectron wave packet. We demonstrate that the backscattering hologram can resolve the different nuclear dynamics between H2 and D2 with subangstrom spatial and subcycle temporal resolution. In addition, we show that attosecond electron dynamics can be resolved. These results open a new avenue for ultrafast studies of molecular dynamics in small molecules.

  10. Ultrafast dynamics in isolated molecules and molecular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, I. V.; Radloff, W.

    2006-06-01

    During the past decade the understanding of photo-induced ultrafast dynamics in molecular systems has improved at an unforeseen speed and a wealth of detailed insight into the fundamental processes has been obtained. This review summarizes our present knowledge on ultrafast dynamics in isolated molecules and molecular clusters evolving after excitation with femtosecond pulses as studied by pump-probe analysis in real time. Experimental tools and methods as well as theoretical models are described which have been developed to glean information on primary, ultrafast processes in photophysics, photochemistry and photobiology. The relevant processes are explained by way of example—from wave packet dynamics in systems with a few atoms all the way to internal conversion via conical intersections in bio-chromophores. A systematic overview on characteristic systems follows, starting with diatomic and including larger organic molecules as well as various types of molecular clusters, such as micro-solvated chromophore molecules. For conciseness the focus is on molecular systems which remain unperturbed by the laser pulses—apart from the excitation and detection processes as such. Thus, only some aspects of controlling and manipulating molecular reactions by shaped and/or very intense laser pulses are discussed briefly for particularly instructive examples, illustrating the perspectives of this prospering field. The material presented in this review comprises some prototypical examples from earlier pioneering work but emphasizes studies from recent years and covers the most important and latest developments until January 2006.

  11. Relating Soil Organic Matter Dynamics to its Molecular Structure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our understanding of the dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM) must be integrated with a sound knowledge of it biochemical complexity. The molecular structure of SOM was determined in 98% sand soils to eliminate the known protective effects of clay on the amount and turnover rate of the SOM constitu...

  12. Clustering Molecular Dynamics Trajectories for Optimizing Docking Experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V.; Ruiz, Duncan D.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  13. Clustering molecular dynamics trajectories for optimizing docking experiments.

    PubMed

    De Paris, Renata; Quevedo, Christian V; Ruiz, Duncan D; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Barros, Rodrigo C

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of protein receptors have become an attractive tool for rational drug discovery. However, the high computational cost of employing molecular dynamics trajectories in virtual screening of large repositories threats the feasibility of this task. Computational intelligence techniques have been applied in this context, with the ultimate goal of reducing the overall computational cost so the task can become feasible. Particularly, clustering algorithms have been widely used as a means to reduce the dimensionality of molecular dynamics trajectories. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology for clustering entire trajectories using structural features from the substrate-binding cavity of the receptor in order to optimize docking experiments on a cloud-based environment. The resulting partition was selected based on three clustering validity criteria, and it was further validated by analyzing the interactions between 20 ligands and a fully flexible receptor (FFR) model containing a 20 ns molecular dynamics simulation trajectory. Our proposed methodology shows that taking into account features of the substrate-binding cavity as input for the k-means algorithm is a promising technique for accurately selecting ensembles of representative structures tailored to a specific ligand. PMID:25873944

  14. Molecular vibrational dynamics in PMMA studied by femtosecond CARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Sheng; Zhou, Boyang; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying; Zhang, Zhonghua; Xia, Yuanqin

    2014-11-01

    The ultrafast molecular vibrational dynamics in PMMA sheets is studied by femtosecond time-resolved coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy at room temperature. The C-H stretch modes at 2870 cm-1 and 3008 cm-1 in PMMA sheets are excited and detected. The coherence relaxation times and beat wavenumbers of the Raman modes are obtained.

  15. Quantum Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Nanotube Tip Assisted Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    In this report we detail the development and application of an efficient quantum molecular dynamics computational algorithm and its application to the nanotube-tip assisted reactions on silicon and diamond surfaces. The calculations shed interesting insights into the microscopic picture of tip surface interactions.

  16. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-05-14

    The directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In our paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We also demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also resultmore » in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMAS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel (R) Xeon Phi (TM) coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs: The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.« less

  18. Optimizing legacy molecular dynamics software with directive-based offload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael Brown, W.; Carrillo, Jan-Michael Y.; Gavhane, Nitin; Thakkar, Foram M.; Plimpton, Steven J.

    2015-10-01

    Directive-based programming models are one solution for exploiting many-core coprocessors to increase simulation rates in molecular dynamics. They offer the potential to reduce code complexity with offload models that can selectively target computations to run on the CPU, the coprocessor, or both. In this paper, we describe modifications to the LAMMPS molecular dynamics code to enable concurrent calculations on a CPU and coprocessor. We demonstrate that standard molecular dynamics algorithms can run efficiently on both the CPU and an x86-based coprocessor using the same subroutines. As a consequence, we demonstrate that code optimizations for the coprocessor also result in speedups on the CPU; in extreme cases up to 4.7X. We provide results for LAMMPS benchmarks and for production molecular dynamics simulations using the Stampede hybrid supercomputer with both Intel®  Xeon Phi™ coprocessors and NVIDIA GPUs. The optimizations presented have increased simulation rates by over 2X for organic molecules and over 7X for liquid crystals on Stampede. The optimizations are available as part of the "Intel package" supplied with LAMMPS.

  19. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  20. Open boundary molecular dynamics of sheared star-polymer melts.

    PubMed

    Sablić, Jurij; Praprotnik, Matej; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael

    2016-02-28

    Open boundary molecular dynamics (OBMD) simulations of a sheared star polymer melt under isothermal conditions are performed to study the rheology and molecular structure of the melt under a fixed normal load. Comparison is made with the standard molecular dynamics (MD) in periodic (closed) boxes at a fixed shear rate (using the SLLOD dynamics). The OBMD system exchanges mass and momentum with adjacent reservoirs (buffers) where the external pressure tensor is imposed. Insertion of molecules in the buffers is made feasible by implementing there a low resolution model (blob-molecules with soft effective interactions) and then using the adaptive resolution scheme (AdResS) to connect with the bulk MD. Straining with increasing shear stress induces melt expansion and a significantly different redistribution of pressure compared with the closed case. In the open sample, the shear viscosity is also a bit lowered but more stable against the viscous heating. At a given Weissenberg number, molecular deformations and material properties (recoverable shear strain and normal stress ratio) are found to be similar in both setups. We also study the modelling effect of normal and tangential friction between monomers implemented in a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) thermostat. Interestingly, the tangential friction substantially enhances the elastic response of the melt due to a reduction of the kinetic stress viscous contribution. PMID:26820315

  1. Nanoscale probing of dynamics in local molecular environments.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Joanna M; Sass, Paul M; Teichen, Paul E; Eaves, Joel D; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-11-19

    Vibrational spectroscopy can provide information about structure, coupling, and dynamics underlying the properties of complex molecular systems. While measurements of spectral line broadening can probe local chemical environments, the spatial averaging in conventional spectroscopies limits insight into underlying heterogeneity, in particular in disordered molecular solids. Here, using femtosecond infrared scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (IR s-SNOM), we resolve in vibrational free-induction decay (FID) measurements a high degree of spatial heterogeneity in polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) as a dense molecular model system. In nanoscopic probe volumes as small as 10(3) vibrational oscillators, we approach the homogeneous response limit, with extended vibrational dephasing times of several picoseconds, that is, up to 10 times the inhomogeneous lifetime, and spatial average converging to the bulk ensemble response. We simulate the dynamics of relaxation with a finite set of local vibrational transitions subject to random modulations in frequency. The combined results suggest that the observed heterogeneity arises due to static and dynamic variations in the local molecular environment. This approach thus provides real-space and real-time visualization of the subensemble dynamics that define the properties of many functional materials. PMID:26528865

  2. Molecular dynamics simulations of n-hexane at 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide interface

    SciTech Connect

    Lisal, Martin; Izak, Pavel

    2013-07-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of n-hexane adsorbed onto the interface of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([bmim][Tf{sub 2}N]) are performed at three n-hexane surface densities, ranged from 0.7 to 2.3 {mu}mol/m{sup 2} at 300 K. For [bmim][Tf{sub 2}N] room-temperature ionic liquid, we use a non-polarizable all-atom force field with the partial atomic charges based on ab initio calculations for the isolated ion pair. The net charges of the ions are {+-}0.89e, which mimics the anion to cation charge transfer and polarization effects. The OPLS-AA force field is employed for modeling of n-hexane. The surface tension is computed using the mechanical route and its value decreases with increase of the n-hexane surface density. The [bmim][Tf{sub 2}N]/n-hexane interface is analyzed using the intrinsic method, and the structural and dynamic properties of the interfacial, sub-interfacial, and central layers are computed. We determine the surface roughness, global and intrinsic density profiles, and orientation ordering of the molecules to describe the structure of the interface. We further compute the survival probability, normal and lateral self-diffusion coefficients, and re-orientation correlation functions to elucidate the effects of n-hexane on dynamics of the cations and anions in the layers.

  3. pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation investigated by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    The activation of human epidermal growth factor receptor (hEGFR) involves a large conformational change in its soluble extracellular domains (sECD, residues 1-620), from a tethered to an extended conformation upon binding of ligands, such as EGF. It has been reported that this dynamic process is pH-dependent, that is, hEGFR can be activated by EGF at high pH to form an extended dimer but remains as an inactive monomer at low pH. In this paper, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations starting from the tethered conformation of sECD:EGF complex, at pH 5.0 and 8.5, respectively. Simulation results indicate that sECD:EGF shows different dynamic properties between the two pHs, and the complex may have a higher tendency of activation at pH 8.5. Twenty residues, including 13 histidines, in sECD:EGF have different protonation states between the two pHs (calculated by the H++ server). The charge distribution at pH 8.5 is more favorable for forming an extended conformation toward the active state of sECD than that at pH 5.0. Our study may shed light on the mechanism of pH dependence of hEGFR activation. Graphical abstract pH dependence of ligand-induced human epidermal growth factor receptor activation. PMID:27179806

  4. Molecular dynamics investigation of the adhesion mechanism acting between dopamine and the surface of dopamine-processed aramid fibers.

    PubMed

    Chai, Dongliang; Xie, Zhimin; Wang, Youshan; Liu, Li; Yum, Young-Jin

    2014-10-22

    Dopamine, as a universal material for surface treatment, can effectively improve the surface performance of aramid fibers. However, directly processing the surface of aramid fibers using dopamine currently incurs a high cost. To seek dopamine substitutes, one must first explore the adhesion mechanism responsible for binding the dopamine to the surface of the fiber. In this study, we construct an all-atomic molecular dynamics model of an aramid fiber before and after surface modification using dopamine. A force field based on condensed-phase optimized molecular potentials for atomistic simulation studies (COMPASS) is used. Using it, we analyze the surface adhesion mechanism of polydopamines aggregated by 21 kinds of molecular structures typically found on the surface of aramid fibers. The results show that a clear and smooth interface is formed between the polydopamine nanofilm layer and the surface of the aramid fiber. The high atomic density of the polydopamine in the small interface region is found to be conducive to noncovalent bonds of polydopamines with the surface of the aramid fiber. In addition, we investigate the works of adhesion of the 21 molecular structures typically found on the surface of aramid fibers. The results suggest that the work of adhesion of 5,6-indolequinone is the highest, followed by annular eumelanin molecules with annular planar structure. Straight-chain shaped dimers proved to be the molecules with the highest adhesion ability of the dihydroxyindole chain oligomers. Therefore, there is reason to suppose that more molecular structures (as above) can be formed by processing the surface of aramid fibers using dopamine by controlling the processing conditions. These molecular structures help improve the adhesion ability of the dopamine on the surface of the aramid fiber. Additionally, if these polydopamine molecules with high adhesion ability can be synthesized on a large scale, then new surface-processing materials are possible. PMID

  5. Nonholonomic Hamiltonian Method for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Reacting Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahrenthold, Eric; Bass, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Conventional molecular dynamics simulations of reacting shocks employ a holonomic Hamiltonian formulation: the breaking and forming of covalent bonds is described by potential functions. In general these potential functions: (a) are algebraically complex, (b) must satisfy strict smoothness requirements, and (c) contain many fitted parameters. In recent research the authors have developed a new noholonomic formulation of reacting molecular dynamics. In this formulation bond orders are determined by rate equations and the bonding-debonding process need not be described by differentiable functions. This simplifies the representation of complex chemistry and reduces the number of fitted model parameters. Example applications of the method show molecular level shock to detonation simulations in nitromethane and RDX. Research supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  6. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors.

    PubMed

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable 'gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the 'gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules. PMID:26160223

  7. Diversity dynamics: molecular phylogenies need the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Quental, Tiago B; Marshall, Charles R

    2010-08-01

    Over the last two decades, new tools in the analysis of molecular phylogenies have enabled study of the diversification dynamics of living clades in the absence of information about extinct lineages. However, computer simulations and the fossil record show that the inability to access extinct lineages severely limits the inferences that can be drawn from molecular phylogenies. It appears that molecular phylogenies can tell us only when there have been changes in diversification rates, but are blind to the true diversity trajectories and rates of origination and extinction that have led to the species that are alive today. We need to embrace the fossil record if we want to fully understand the diversity dynamics of the living biota. PMID:20646780

  8. A dynamic data structure for flexible molecular maintenance and informatics

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Chandrajit; Chowdhury, Rezaul Alam; Rasheed, Muhibur

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: We present the ‘Dynamic Packing Grid’ (DPG), a neighborhood data structure for maintaining and manipulating flexible molecules and assemblies, for efficient computation of binding affinities in drug design or in molecular dynamics calculations. Results: DPG can efficiently maintain the molecular surface using only linear space and supports quasi-constant time insertion, deletion and movement (i.e. updates) of atoms or groups of atoms. DPG also supports constant time neighborhood queries from arbitrary points. Our results for maintenance of molecular surface and polarization energy computations using DPG exhibit marked improvement in time and space requirements. Availability: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/DPG.shtml Contact: bajaj@cs.utexas.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:21115440

  9. Collisional dynamics in a gas of molecular super-rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodorkovsky, Yuri; Steinitz, Uri; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, femtosecond laser techniques have been developed that are capable of bringing gas molecules to extremely fast rotation in a very short time, while keeping their translational motion relatively slow. Here we study collisional equilibration dynamics of this new state of molecular gases. We show that the route to equilibrium starts with a metastable `gyroscopic stage' in the course of which the molecules maintain their fast rotation and orientation of the angular momentum through many collisions. The inhibited rotational-translational relaxation is characterized by a persistent anisotropy in the molecular angular distribution, and is manifested in the optical birefringence and anisotropic diffusion in the gas. After a certain induction time, the `gyroscopic stage' is abruptly terminated by an explosive rotational-translational energy exchange, leading the gas towards the final equilibrium. We illustrate our conclusions by direct molecular dynamics simulation of several gases of linear molecules.

  10. Rational Prediction with Molecular Dynamics for Hit Identification

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Sara E; Swift, Robert V; Amaro, Rommie E

    2012-01-01

    Although the motions of proteins are fundamental for their function, for pragmatic reasons, the consideration of protein elasticity has traditionally been neglected in drug discovery and design. This review details protein motion, its relevance to biomolecular interactions and how it can be sampled using molecular dynamics simulations. Within this context, two major areas of research in structure-based prediction that can benefit from considering protein flexibility, binding site detection and molecular docking, are discussed. Basic classification metrics and statistical analysis techniques, which can facilitate performance analysis, are also reviewed. With hardware and software advances, molecular dynamics in combination with traditional structure-based prediction methods can potentially reduce the time and costs involved in the hit identification pipeline. PMID:23110535

  11. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    PubMed

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics/molecular

  12. Electric field control of proton-transfer molecular switching: molecular dynamics study on salicylidene aniline.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Joanna; Sadlej, Joanna; Sobolewski, Andrzej L

    2015-06-14

    In this letter, we propose a novel, ultrafast, efficient molecular switch whose switching mechanism involves the electric field-driven intramolecular proton transfer. By means of ab initio quantum chemical calculations and on-the-fly dynamics simulations, we examine the switching performance of an isolated salicylidene aniline molecule and analyze the perspectives of its possible use as an electric field-controlled molecular electronics unit. PMID:25986469

  13. Multiscale equation-free algorithms for molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abi Mansour, Andrew

    Molecular dynamics is a physics-based computational tool that has been widely employed to study the dynamics and structure of macromolecules and their assemblies at the atomic scale. However, the efficiency of molecular dynamics simulation is limited because of the broad spectrum of timescales involved. To overcome this limitation, an equation-free algorithm is presented for simulating these systems using a multiscale model cast in terms of atomistic and coarse-grained variables. Both variables are evolved in time in such a way that the cross-talk between short and long scales is preserved. In this way, the coarse-grained variables guide the evolution of the atom-resolved states, while the latter provide the Newtonian physics for the former. While the atomistic variables are evolved using short molecular dynamics runs, time advancement at the coarse-grained level is achieved with a scheme that uses information from past and future states of the system while accounting for both the stochastic and deterministic features of the coarse-grained dynamics. To complete the multiscale cycle, an atom-resolved state consistent with the updated coarse-grained variables is recovered using algorithms from mathematical optimization. This multiscale paradigm is extended to nanofluidics using concepts from hydrodynamics, and it is demonstrated for macromolecular and nanofluidic systems. A toolkit is developed for prototyping these algorithms, which are then implemented within the GROMACS simulation package and released as an open source multiscale simulator.

  14. Ab initio molecular dynamics: concepts, recent developments, and future trends.

    PubMed

    Iftimie, Radu; Minary, Peter; Tuckerman, Mark E

    2005-05-10

    The methodology of ab initio molecular dynamics, wherein finite-temperature dynamical trajectories are generated by using forces computed "on the fly" from electronic structure calculations, has had a profound influence in modern theoretical research. Ab initio molecular dynamics allows chemical processes in condensed phases to be studied in an accurate and unbiased manner, leading to new paradigms in the elucidation of microscopic mechanisms, rationalization of experimental data, and testable predictions of new phenomena. The purpose of this work is to give a brief introduction to the technique and to review several important recent developments in the field. Several illustrative examples showing the power of the technique have been chosen. Perspectives on future directions in the field also will be given. PMID:15870204

  15. Emulating Molecular Orbitals and Electronic Dynamics with Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühmann, Dirk-Sören; Weitenberg, Christof; Sengstock, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, ultracold atoms in optical lattices have proven their great value as quantum simulators for studying strongly correlated phases and complex phenomena in solid-state systems. Here, we reveal their potential as quantum simulators for molecular physics and propose a technique to image the three-dimensional molecular orbitals with high resolution. The outstanding tunability of ultracold atoms in terms of potential and interaction offer fully adjustable model systems for gaining deep insight into the electronic structure of molecules. We study the orbitals of an artificial benzene molecule and discuss the effect of tunable interactions in its conjugated π electron system with special regard to localization and spin order. The dynamical time scales of ultracold atom simulators are on the order of milliseconds, which allows for the time-resolved monitoring of a broad range of dynamical processes. As an example, we compute the hole dynamics in the conjugated π system of the artificial benzene molecule.

  16. Drugs That Target Dynamic Microtubules: A New Molecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Stanton, Richard A.; Gernert, Kim M.; Nettles, James H.; Aneja, Ritu

    2011-01-01

    Microtubules have long been considered an ideal target for anticancer drugs because of the essential role they play in mitosis, forming the dynamic spindle apparatus. As such, there is a wide variety of compounds currently in clinical use and in development that act as antimitotic agents by altering microtubule dynamics. Although these diverse molecules are known to affect microtubule dynamics upon binding to one of the three established drug domains (taxane, vinca alkaloid, or colchicine site), the exact mechanism by which each drug works is still an area of intense speculation and research. In this study, we review the effects of microtubule-binding chemotherapeutic agents from a new perspective, considering how their mode of binding induces conformational changes and alters biological function relative to the molecular vectors of microtubule assembly or disassembly. These “biological vectors” can thus be used as a spatiotemporal context to describe molecular mechanisms by which microtubule-targeting drugs work. PMID:21381049

  17. Multi-petaflop/s quantum and reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Aiichiro

    We have developed a divide-conquer-recombine algorithmic framework for large quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) and reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations. The algorithms have achieved parallel efficiency over 0.98 on 786,432 IBM Blue Gene/Q processors for 39.8 trillion electronic degrees-of-freedom QMD in the framework of density functional theory and 67.6 billion-atom RMD. We will discuss several applications including (1) 16,616-atom QMD simulation of rapid hydrogen production from water using metallic alloy nanoparticles, (2) 6,400-atom nonadiabatic QMD simulation of exciton dynamics for efficient solar cells, and (3) 112 million-atom RMD simulation of nanocarbon synthesis by high temperature oxidation of SiC nanoparticles.

  18. Refined OPLS all-atom force field for saturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers at full hydration.

    PubMed

    Maciejewski, Arkadiusz; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Cramariuc, Oana; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    We report parametrization of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in the framework of the Optimized Parameters for Liquid Simulations all-atom (OPLS-AA) force field. We chose DPPC as it is one of the most studied phospholipid species and thus has plenty of experimental data necessary for model validation, and it is also one of the highly important and abundant lipid types, e.g., in lung surfactant. Overall, PCs have not been previously parametrized in the OPLS-AA force field; thus, there is a need to derive its bonding and nonbonding parameters for both the polar and nonpolar parts of the molecule. In the present study, we determined the parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties and in the acyl chains, as well the partial atomic charges. In these calculations, we used three methods: (1) Hartree-Fock (HF), (2) second order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), and (3) density functional theory (DFT). We also tested the effect of the polar environment by using the polarizable continuum model (PCM), and for acyl chains the van der Waals parameters were also adjusted. In effect, six parameter sets were generated and tested on a DPPC bilayer. Out of these six sets, only one was found to be able to satisfactorily reproduce experimental data for the lipid bilayer. The successful DPPC model was obtained from MP2 calculations in an implicit polar environment (PCM). PMID:24745688

  19. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Phosphate and Sulfate Linked to Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Mallajosyula, Sairam S.; Guvench, Olgun; Hatcher, Elizabeth; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2012-01-01

    Presented is an extension of the CHARMM additive all-atom carbohydrate force field to enable the modeling of phosphate and sulfate linked to carbohydrates. The parameters are developed in a hierarchical fashion using model compounds containing the key atoms in the full carbohydrates. Target data for parameter optimization included full two-dimensional energy surfaces defined by the glycosidic dihedral angle pairs in the phosphate/sulfate model compound analogs of hexopyranose monosaccharide phosphates and sulfates, as determined by quantum mechanical (QM) MP2/cc-pVTZ single point energies on MP2/6-31+G(d) optimized structures. In order to achieve balanced, transferable dihedral parameters for the dihedral angles, surfaces for all possible anomeric and conformational states were included during the parametrization process. In addition, to model physiologically relevant systems both the mono- and di-anionic charged states were studied for the phosphates. This resulted in over 7000 MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G+(d) model compound conformational energies which, supplemented with QM geometries, were the main target data for the parametrization. Parameters were validated against crystals of relevant monosaccharide derivatives obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and larger systems, namely inositol-(tri/tetra/penta) phosphates non-covalently bound to the pleckstrin homology (PH) domain and oligomeric chondroitin sulfate in solution and in complex with cathepsin K protein. PMID:22685386

  20. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Acyclic Polyalcohols, Acyclic Carbohydrates and Inositol

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Parametrization of the additive all-atom CHARMM force field for acyclic polyalcohols, acyclic carbohydrates and inositol is conducted. Initial parameters were transferred from the alkanes and hexopyranose carbohydrates, with subsequent development and optimization of parameters unique to the molecules considered in this study. Using the model compounds acetone and acetaldehyde, nonbonded parameters for carbonyls were optimized targeting quantum mechanical interaction data for solute-water pairs and pure solvent thermodynamic data. Bond and angle parameters were adjusted by comparing optimized geometries to small molecule crystal survey data and by performing vibrational analyses on acetone, acetaldehyde and glycerol. C-C-C-C, C-C-C-O, C-C-OH and O-C-C-O torsional parameters for polyol chains were fit to quantum mechanical dihedral potential energy scans comprising over 1500 RIMP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) conformations using an automated Monte Carlo simulated annealing procedure. Comparison of computed condensed-phase data, including crystal lattice parameters and densities, NMR proton-proton couplings, densities and diffusion coefficients of aqueous solutions, to experimental data validated the optimized parameters. Parameter development for these compounds proved particularly challenging because of the flexibility of the acyclic sugars and polyalcohols as well as the intramolecular hydrogen bonding between vicinal hydroxyls for all of the compounds. The newly optimized additive CHARMM force field parameters are anticipated to be of utility for atomic level of detail simulations of acyclic polyalcohols, acyclic carbohydrates and inositol in solution. PMID:20160980

  1. Laser-enhanced dynamics in molecular rate processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T. F.; Zimmerman, I. H.; Devries, P. L.; Yuan, J.-M.; Lam, K.-S.; Bellum, J. C.; Lee, H.-W.; Slutsky, M. S.

    1978-01-01

    The present discussion deals with some theoretical aspects associated with the description of molecular rate processes in the presence of intense laser radiation, where the radiation actually interacts with the molecular dynamics. Whereas for weak and even moderately intense radiation, the absorption and stimulated emission of photons by a molecular system can be described by perturbative methods, for intense radiation, perturbation theory is usually not adequate. Limiting the analysis to the gas phase, an attempt is made to describe nonperturbative approaches applicable to the description of such processes (in the presence of intense laser radiation) as electronic energy transfer in molecular (in particular atom-atom) collisions; collision-induced ionization and emission; and unimolecular dissociation.

  2. Molecular dynamics computer simulation of permeation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Pohl, P.I.; Heffelfinger, G.S.; Fisler, D.K.; Ford, D.M.

    1997-12-31

    In this work the authors simulate permeation of gases and cations in solid models using molecular mechanics and a dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The molecular sieving nature of microporous zeolites are discussed and compared with that for amorphous silica made by sol-gel methods. One mesoporous and one microporous membrane model are tested with Lennard-Jones gases corresponding to He, H{sub 2}, Ar and CH{sub 4}. The mesoporous membrane model clearly follows a Knudsen diffusion mechanism, while the microporous model having a hard-sphere cutoff pore diameter of {approximately}3.4 {angstrom} demonstrates molecular sieving of the methane ({sigma} = 3.8 {angstrom}) but anomalous behavior for Ar ({sigma} = 3.4 {angstrom}). Preliminary results of Ca{sup +} diffusion in calcite and He/H{sub 2} diffusion in polyisobutylene are also presented.

  3. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4″″-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  4. GAS PHASE MOLECULAR DYNAMICS: HIGH-RESOLUTION SPECTROSCOPIC PROBES OF CHEMICAL DYNAMICS.

    SciTech Connect

    HALL, G.E.

    2006-05-30

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics group program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopic tools are developed and applied to problems in chemical dynamics. Recent topics have included the state-resolved studies of collision-induced electronic energy transfer, dynamics of barrierless unimolecular reactions, and the kinetics and spectroscopy of transient species.

  5. Special issue on ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Fernando; Hishikawa, Akiyoshi; Vrakking, Marc

    2014-06-01

    In the last few years, the advent of novel experimental and theoretical approaches has made possible the investigation of (time-resolved) molecular dynamics in ways not anticipated before. Experimentally, the introduction of novel light sources such as high-harmonic generation (HHG) and XUV/x-ray free electron lasers, and the emergence of novel detection strategies, such as time-resolved electron/x-ray diffraction and the fully coincident detection of electrons and fragment ions in reaction microscopes, has significantly expanded the arsenal of available techniques, and has taken studies of molecular dynamics into new domains of spectroscopic, spatial and temporal resolution, the latter including first explorations into the attosecond domain, thus opening completely new avenues for imaging electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules. Along the way, particular types of molecular dynamics, e.g., dynamics around conical intersections, have gained an increased prominence, sparked by the realization of the essential role that this dynamics plays in relaxation pathways in important bio-molecular systems. In the short term, this will allow one to uncover and control the dynamics of elementary chemical processes such as, e.g., ultrafast charge migration, proton transfer, isomerization or multiple ionization, and to address new key questions about the role of attosecond coherent electron dynamics in chemical reactivity. The progress on the theoretical side has been no less impressive. Novel generations of supercomputers and a series of novel computational strategies have allowed nearly exact calculations in small molecules, as well as highly successful approximate calculations in large, polyatomic molecules, including biomolecules. Frequent and intensive collaborations involving both theory and experiment have been essential for the progress that has been accomplished. The special issue 'Ultrafast electron and molecular dynamics' seeks to provide an overview of the current

  6. A reduced basis method for molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent-Finley, Rachel Elisabeth

    In this dissertation, we develop a method for molecular simulation based on principal component analysis (PCA) of a molecular dynamics trajectory and least squares approximation of a potential energy function. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a computational tool used to study molecular systems as they evolve through time. With respect to protein dynamics, local motions, such as bond stretching, occur within femtoseconds, while rigid body and large-scale motions, occur within a range of nanoseconds to seconds. To capture motion at all levels, time steps on the order of a femtosecond are employed when solving the equations of motion and simulations must continue long enough to capture the desired large-scale motion. To date, simulations of solvated proteins on the order of nanoseconds have been reported. It is typically the case that simulations of a few nanoseconds do not provide adequate information for the study of large-scale motions. Thus, the development of techniques that allow longer simulation times can advance the study of protein function and dynamics. In this dissertation we use principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant characteristics of an MD trajectory and to represent the coordinates with respect to these characteristics. We augment PCA with an updating scheme based on a reduced representation of a molecule and consider equations of motion with respect to the reduced representation. We apply our method to butane and BPTI and compare the results to standard MD simulations of these molecules. Our results indicate that the molecular activity with respect to our simulation method is analogous to that observed in the standard MD simulation with simulations on the order of picoseconds.

  7. A simple, efficient polarizable coarse-grained water model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Riniker, Sereina; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-02-28

    The development of coarse-grained (CG) models that correctly represent the important features of compounds is essential to overcome the limitations in time scale and system size currently encountered in atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Most approaches reported in the literature model one or several molecules into a single uncharged CG bead. For water, this implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions, however, fails to mimic important properties, e.g., the dielectric screening. Therefore, a coarse-grained model for water is proposed which treats the electrostatic interactions between clusters of water molecules explicitly. Five water molecules are embedded in a spherical CG bead consisting of two oppositely charged particles which represent a dipole. The bond connecting the two particles in a bead is unconstrained, which makes the model polarizable. Experimental and all-atom simulated data of liquid water at room temperature are used for parametrization of the model. The experimental density and the relative static dielectric permittivity were chosen as primary target properties. The model properties are compared with those obtained from experiment, from clusters of simple-point-charge water molecules of appropriate size in the liquid phase, and for other CG water models if available. The comparison shows that not all atomistic properties can be reproduced by a CG model, so properties of key importance have to be selected when coarse graining is applied. Yet, the CG model reproduces the key characteristics of liquid water while being computationally 1-2 orders of magnitude more efficient than standard fine-grained atomistic water models. PMID:21361530

  8. Molecular dynamics methods to predict peptide locations in membranes: LAH4 as a stringent test case.

    PubMed

    Farrotti, A; Bocchinfuso, G; Palleschi, A; Rosato, N; Salnikov, E S; Voievoda, N; Bechinger, B; Stella, L

    2015-02-01

    Determining the structure of membrane-active peptides inside lipid bilayers is essential to understand their mechanism of action. Molecular dynamics simulations can easily provide atomistic details, but need experimental validation. We assessed the reliability of self-assembling (or "minimum-bias") and potential of mean force (PMF) approaches, using all-atom (AA) and coarse-grained (CG) force-fields. The LAH4 peptide was selected as a stringent test case, since it is known to attain different orientations depending on the protonation state of its four histidine residues. In all simulations the histidine side-chains inserted in the membrane when neutral, while they interacted with phospholipid headgroups in their charged state. This led to transmembrane orientations for neutral-His LAH4 in all minimum-bias AA simulations and in most CG trajectories. By contrast, the charged-His peptide stabilized membrane defects in AA simulations, whereas it was located at the membrane surface in some CG trajectories, and interacted with both lipid leaflets in others. This behavior is consistent with the higher antimicrobial activity and membrane-permeabilizing behavior of the charged-His LAH4. In addition, good agreement with solid-state NMR orientational data was observed in AA simulations. PMF calculations correctly predicted a higher membrane affinity for the neutral-His peptide. Interestingly, the structures and relative populations of PMF local free-energy minima corresponded to those determined in the less computationally demanding minimum-bias simulations. These data provide an indication about the possible membrane-perturbation mechanism of the charged-His LAH4 peptide: by interacting with lipid headgroups of both leaflets through its cationic side-chains, it could favor membrane defects and facilitate translocation across the bilayer. PMID:25445672

  9. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the β-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-01

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the β6.3-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed β4.4-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed β4.4-helix, right-handed and left-handed β6.3-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite β-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed β6.3-helix and β4.4-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these β-helix structures. The results suggested that β6.3-helix is more stable than β4.4-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the β6.3-helix conformation.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of DNA Capture and Transport in Heated Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The integration of local heat sources with solid-state nanopores offers new means for controlling the transmembrane transport of charged biomacromolecules. In the case of electrophoretic transport of DNA, recent experimental studies revealed unexpected temperature dependences of the DNA capture rate, the DNA translocation velocity, and the ionic current blockades produced by the presence of DNA in the nanopore. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the effect of temperature on the key microscopic processes governing electric field-driven transport of DNA through nanopores. Mimicking the experimental setup, we simulated the capture and subsequent translocation of short DNA duplexes through a locally heated nanopore at several temperatures and electrolyte conditions. The temperature dependence of ion mobility at the DNA surface was found to cause the dependence of the relative conductance blockades on temperature. To the first order, the effective force on DNA in the nanopore was found to be independent of temperature, despite a considerable reduction of solution viscosity. The temperature dependence of the solution viscosity was found to make DNA translocations faster for a uniformly heated system but not in the case of local heating that does not affect viscosity of solution surrounding the untranslocated part of the molecule. Increasing solution temperature was also found to reduce the lifetime of bonds formed between cations and DNA. Using a flow suppression algorithm, we were able to separate the effects of electro-osmotic flow and direct ion binding, finding the reduced durations of DNA–ion bonds to increase, albeit weakly, the effective force experienced by DNA in an electric field. Unexpectedly, our simulations revealed a considerable temperature dependence of solvent velocity at the DNA surface—slip velocity, an effect that can alter hydrodynamic coupling between the motion of DNA and the surrounding fluid

  11. Molecular dynamics simulation of rotational relaxation in nitrogen: Implications for rotational collision number models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paolo; Zhang, Chonglin; Schwartzentruber, Thomas E.

    2012-10-01

    We study the rotational relaxation process in nitrogen using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). The intermolecular model used in the MD simulations is shown to (i) reproduce very well the shear viscosity of nitrogen over a wide range of temperatures, (ii) predict the near-equilibrium rotational collision number in good agreement with published trajectory calculations done on ab initio potential energy surfaces, and (iii) produce shock wave profiles in excellent accordance with the experimental measurements. We find that the rotational relaxation process is dependent not only on the near-equilibrium temperature (i.e., when systems relax to equilibrium after a small perturbation), but more importantly on both the magnitude and direction of the initial deviation from the equilibrium state. The comparison between MD and DSMC, based on the Borgnakke-Larsen model, for shock waves (both at low and high temperatures) and one-dimensional expansions shows that a judicious choice of a constant Zrot can produce DSMC results which are in relatively good agreement with MD. However, the selection of the rotational collision number is case-specific, depending not only on the temperature range, but more importantly on the type of flow (compression or expansion), with significant limitations for more complex simulations characterized both by expansion and compression zones. Parker's model, parametrized for nitrogen, overpredicts Zrot for temperatures above about 300 K. It is also unable to describe the dependence of the relaxation process on the direction to equilibrium. Finally, we present a demonstrative cell-based formulation of a rotational relaxation model to illustrate how, by including the key physics obtained from the MD data (dependence of the relaxation process on both the rotational and the translational state of the gas), the agreement between MD and DSMC solutions is drastically improved.

  12. Molecular Dynamics simulations of liquid isoquinoline as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Norariza; Adnan, Rohana; Soetens, Jean-Christophe; Millot, Claude

    2012-10-01

    Molecular Dynamics simulations of isoquinoline in liquid phase have been conducted in the temperature range 300-365 K corresponding to the normal liquid phase in order to investigate the evolution of translational and rotational diffusion with temperature. Molecules are supposed to be rigid and interact through an all-atom potential composed of Coulombic and Lennard-Jones terms. Translational diffusion coefficients are computed from velocity autocorrelation functions and mean square displacement. Anisotropic rotational diffusion coefficients are computed from angular velocity autocorrelation functions. The evolution of the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time with temperature has been obtained from the simulations and compared with experimental results. A small non-Arrhenius behavior, more pronounced than what was observed experimentally, has been found for this property. The structure has been analyzed in terms of populations of different kinds of first-neighbor dimers. A continuous evolution of the structure with temperature has been observed. The general trend is thus a continuous smooth evolution of the structure at dimer level and a slight non-Arrhenius evolution for diffusion coefficients and reorientational correlation times. These results are compared with those obtained for liquid quinoline where a clear non-Arrhenius break around 290 K was observed for the 13C spin-lattice relaxation time from experiments [D. Jalabert, J.-B. Robert, H. Roux-Buisson, J.-P. Kintzinger, J.-M. Lehn, R. Zinzius, D. Canet, P. Tekely, Europhys. Lett. 15 (1991) 435] and from simulations [C. Millot, J.-C. Soetens, N. Ahmad, R. Adnan, Europhys. Lett. 96 (2011) 43002]. Moreover, the identification of break temperatures for liquid isoquinoline appears to be less clear than for quinoline.

  13. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  14. Nature of protein-CO2 interactions as elucidated via molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Michael L; Wilson, Angela K; Cundari, Thomas R

    2012-09-27

    Rising global temperatures require innovative measures to reduce atmospheric concentrations of CO(2). The most successful carbon capture technology on Earth is the enzymatic capture of CO(2) and its sequestration in the form of glucose. Efforts to improve upon or mimic this naturally occurring process will require a rich understanding of protein-CO(2) interactions. Toward that end, extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed on the CO(2)-utilizing enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). Preliminary simulations were performed using implicit and explicit solvent models, which yielded similar results: arginine, lysine, tyrosine, and asparagine enhance the ability of a protein to bind carbon dioxide. Extensive explicit solvent simulations were performed for both wild-type PEPCK and five single-point PEPCK mutants, revealing three prevalent channels by which CO(2) enters (or exits) the active site cleft, as well as a fourth channel (observed only once), the existence of which can be rationalized in terms of the position of a key Arg residue. The strongest CO(2) binding sites in these simulations consist of appropriately positioned hydrogen bond donors and acceptors. Interactions between CO(2) and both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) present in PEPCK are minimal due to the stable protein- and solvent-based coordination environments of these cations. His 232, suggested by X-ray crystallography as being a potential important CO(2) binding site, is indeed found to be particularly "CO(2)-philic" in these simulations. Finally, a recent mechanism, proposed on the basis of X-ray crystallography, for PEPCK active site lid closure is discussed in light of the MD trajectories. Overall, the results of this work will prove useful not only to scientists investigating PEPCK, but also to groups seeking to develop an environmentally benign, protein-based carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization system. PMID:22882078

  15. Linearly scaling and almost Hamiltonian dielectric continuum molecular dynamics simulations through fast multipole expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzen, Konstantin; Mathias, Gerald; Tavan, Paul

    2015-11-14

    Hamiltonian Dielectric Solvent (HADES) is a recent method [S. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 104103 (2014)] which enables atomistic Hamiltonian molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of peptides and proteins in dielectric solvent continua. Such simulations become rapidly impractical for large proteins, because the computational effort of HADES scales quadratically with the number N of atoms. If one tries to achieve linear scaling by applying a fast multipole method (FMM) to the computation of the HADES electrostatics, the Hamiltonian character (conservation of total energy, linear, and angular momenta) may get lost. Here, we show that the Hamiltonian character of HADES can be almost completely preserved, if the structure-adapted fast multipole method (SAMM) as recently redesigned by Lorenzen et al. [J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 3244-3259 (2014)] is suitably extended and is chosen as the FMM module. By this extension, the HADES/SAMM forces become exact gradients of the HADES/SAMM energy. Their translational and rotational invariance then guarantees (within the limits of numerical accuracy) the exact conservation of the linear and angular momenta. Also, the total energy is essentially conserved—up to residual algorithmic noise, which is caused by the periodically repeated SAMM interaction list updates. These updates entail very small temporal discontinuities of the force description, because the employed SAMM approximations represent deliberately balanced compromises between accuracy and efficiency. The energy-gradient corrected version of SAMM can also be applied, of course, to MD simulations of all-atom solvent-solute systems enclosed by periodic boundary conditions. However, as we demonstrate in passing, this choice does not offer any serious advantages.

  16. Amino acids and proteins at ZnO-water interfaces in molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Grzegorz; Cieplak, Marek

    2013-08-28

    We determine potentials of the mean force for interactions of amino acids with four common surfaces of ZnO in aqueous solutions. The method involves all-atom molecular dynamics simulations combined with the umbrella sampling technique. The profiled nature of the density of water with the strongly adsorbed first layer affects the approach of amino acids to the surface and generates either repulsion or weak binding. The largest binding energy is found for tyrosine interacting with the surface in which the Zn ions are at the top. It is equal to 7 kJ mol(-1) which is comparable to that of the hydrogen bonds in a protein. This makes the adsorption of amino acids onto the ZnO surface much weaker than onto the well studied surface of gold. Under vacuum, binding energies are more than 40 times stronger (for one of the surfaces). The precise manner in which water molecules interact with a given surface influences the binding energies in a way that depends on the surface. Among the four considered surfaces the one with Zn at the top is recognized as binding almost all amino acids with an average binding energy of 2.60 kJ mol(-1). Another (O at the top) is non-binding for most amino acids. For binding situations the average energy is 0.66 kJ mol(-1). The remaining two surfaces bind nearly as many amino acids as they do not and the average binding energies are 1.46 and 1.22 kJ mol(-1). For all of the surfaces the binding energies vary between amino acids significantly: the dispersion in the range of 68-154% of the mean. A small protein is shown to adsorb onto ZnO only intermittently and with only a small deformation. Various adsorption events lead to different patterns in mobilities of amino acids within the protein. PMID:23836065

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of DNA Capture and Transport in Heated Nanopores.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Maxim; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-25

    The integration of local heat sources with solid-state nanopores offers new means for controlling the transmembrane transport of charged biomacromolecules. In the case of electrophoretic transport of DNA, recent experimental studies revealed unexpected temperature dependences of the DNA capture rate, the DNA translocation velocity, and the ionic current blockades produced by the presence of DNA in the nanopore. Here, we report the results of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations that elucidated the effect of temperature on the key microscopic processes governing electric field-driven transport of DNA through nanopores. Mimicking the experimental setup, we simulated the capture and subsequent translocation of short DNA duplexes through a locally heated nanopore at several temperatures and electrolyte conditions. The temperature dependence of ion mobility at the DNA surface was found to cause the dependence of the relative conductance blockades on temperature. To the first order, the effective force on DNA in the nanopore was found to be independent of temperature, despite a considerable reduction of solution viscosity. The temperature dependence of the solution viscosity was found to make DNA translocations faster for a uniformly heated system but not in the case of local heating that does not affect viscosity of solution surrounding the untranslocated part of the molecule. Increasing solution temperature was also found to reduce the lifetime of bonds formed between cations and DNA. Using a flow suppression algorithm, we were able to separate the effects of electro-osmotic flow and direct ion binding, finding the reduced durations of DNA-ion bonds to increase, albeit weakly, the effective force experienced by DNA in an electric field. Unexpectedly, our simulations revealed a considerable temperature dependence of solvent velocity at the DNA surface-slip velocity, an effect that can alter hydrodynamic coupling between the motion of DNA and the surrounding fluid

  18. Characterization of the Lipid-Binding Site of Equinatoxin II by NMR and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Daniel K.; Yao, Shenggen; Rojko, Nejc; Anderluh, Gregor; Lybrand, Terry P.; Downton, Matthew T.; Wagner, John; Separovic, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII) is a soluble, 20 kDa pore-forming protein toxin isolated from the sea anemone Actinia equina. Although pore formation has long been known to occur in distinct stages, including monomeric attachment to phospholipid membranes followed by detachment of the N-terminal helical domain and oligomerization into the final pore assembly, atomistic-level detail of the protein-lipid interactions underlying these events remains elusive. Using high-resolution solution state NMR of uniformly-15N-labeled EqtII at the critical micelle concentration of dodecylphosphocholine, we have mapped the lipid-binding site through chemical shift perturbations. Subsequent docking of an EqtII monomer onto a dodecylphosphocholine micelle, followed by 400 ns of all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, saw several high-occupancy lipid-binding pockets stabilized by cation-π, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interactions; and stabilization of the loop housing the conserved arginine-glycine-aspartate motif. Additional simulation of EqtII with an N-acetyl sphingomyelin micelle, for which high-resolution NMR data cannot be obtained due to aggregate formation, revealed that sphingomyelin specificity might occur via hydrogen bonding to the 3-OH and 2-NH groups unique to the ceramide backbone by side chains of D109 and Y113; and main chains of P81 and W112. Furthermore, a binding pocket formed by K30, K77, and P81, proximate to the hinge region of the N-terminal helix, was identified and may be implicated in triggering pore formation. PMID:25902438

  19. Estimation of the mutual orientation and intermolecular interaction of C12Ex from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Velinova, Maria; Tsoneva, Yana; Ivanova, Anela; Tadjer, Alia

    2012-04-26

    Nonionic surfactants, such as poly(ethylene glycol) alkyl ethers (abbreviated as CyEx) show a rich phase behavior in aqueous solution, i.e., they form micellar, lamellar, cubic, and so forth phases depending on experimental parameters such as the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chain lengths, temperature, or concentration. The aim of the present study is to determine the nature of the preaggregates, which are inferred to exist before the actual self-assembly process in aqueous solution, and to assess the aptitude to their formation. The target molecules are C12E3, C12E4 and C12E5, surfactants of moderate water solubility. Coarse-grained and all-atom molecular dynamics simulations (NPT/293 K) of two molecules of each species with explicit water in periodic boundary conditions are carried out to estimate the mutual orientation and the interaction between the surfactants in their dimers. The force fields are MARTINI and Amber99, the latter with self-derived parameters for the ether groups. The change in the orientation and distance between the molecules in the dimers are discussed based on different structural parameters. In addition, the interaction between the surfactants is evaluated from quantum chemistry calculations in terms of binding energy for the average structures from the cluster analysis. The solvent-solute interaction is quantified by the mean number of hydrogen bonds formed between them. On the basis of combined analysis, a series of different structures for subsequent study of the possible self-assembly patterns of C12E3, C12E4, and C12E5 is outlined. PMID:22448734

  20. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the beta-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-28

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the beta(6.3)-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed beta(4.4)-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed beta(4.4)-helix, right-handed and left-handed beta(6.3)-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite beta-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed beta(6.3)-helix and beta(4.4)-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these beta-helix structures. The results suggested that beta(6.3)-helix is more stable than beta(4.4)-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the beta(6.3)-helix conformation. PMID:19894978

  1. Dynamics of Seeded Aβ40-Fibril Growth from Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations: Kinetic Trapping and Reduced Water Mobility in the Locking Step.

    PubMed

    Schwierz, Nadine; Frost, Christina V; Geissler, Phillip L; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-20

    Filamentous β-amyloid aggregates are crucial for the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Despite the tremendous biomedical importance, the molecular pathway of growth propagation is not completely understood and remains challenging to investigate by simulations due to the long time scales involved. Here, we apply extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit water to obtain free energy profiles and kinetic information from position-dependent diffusion profiles for three different Aβ9-40-growth processes: fibril elongation by single monomers at the structurally unequal filament tips and association of larger filament fragments. Our approach provides insight into the molecular steps of the kinetic pathway and allows close agreement with experimental binding free energies and macroscopic growth rates. Water plays a decisive role, and solvent entropy is identified as the main driving force for assembly. Fibril growth is disfavored energetically due to cancellation of direct peptide-peptide interactions and solvation effects. The kinetics of growth is consistent with the characteristic dock/lock mechanism, and docking is at least 2 orders of magnitude faster. During initial docking, interactions are mediated by transient non-native hydrogen bonds, which efficiently catch the incoming monomer or fragment already at separations of about 3 nm. In subsequent locking, the dynamics is much slower due to formation of kinetically trapped conformations caused by long-lived non-native hydrogen bonds. Fibril growth additionally requires collective motion of water molecules to create a dry binding interface. Fibril growth is further retarded due to reduced mobility of the involved hydration water, evident from a 2-fold reduction of the diffusion coefficient. PMID:26694883

  2. A molecular dynamics study of polymer/graphene interfacial systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rissanou, Anastassia N.; Harmandaris, Vagelis

    2014-05-15

    Graphene based polymer nanocomposites are hybrid materials with a very broad range of technological applications. In this work, we study three hybrid polymer/graphene interfacial systems (polystyrene/graphene, poly(methyl methacrylate)/graphene and polyethylene/graphene) through detailed atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Density profiles, structural characteristics and mobility aspects are being examined at the molecular level for all model systems. In addition, we compare the properties of the hybrid systems to the properties of the corresponding bulk ones, as well as to theoretical predictions.

  3. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  4. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  5. Data for molecular dynamics simulations of B-type cytochrome c oxidase with the Amber force field.

    PubMed

    Yang, Longhua; Skjevik, Åge A; Han Du, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis; Walker, Ross C; Götz, Andreas W

    2016-09-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a vital enzyme that catalyzes the reduction of molecular oxygen to water and pumps protons across mitochondrial and bacterial membranes. This article presents parameters for the cofactors of ba3-type CcO that are compatible with the all-atom Amber ff12SB and ff14SB force fields. Specifically, parameters were developed for the CuA pair, heme b, and the dinuclear center that consists of heme a3 and CuB bridged by a hydroperoxo group. The data includes geometries in XYZ coordinate format for cluster models that were employed to compute proton transfer energies and derive bond parameters and point charges for the force field using density functional theory. Also included are the final parameter files that can be employed with the Amber leap program to generate input files for molecular dynamics simulations with the Amber software package. Based on the high resolution (1.8 Å) X-ray crystal structure of the ba3-type CcO from Thermus thermophilus (Protein Data Bank ID number PDB: 3S8F), we built a model that is embedded in a POPC lipid bilayer membrane and solvated with TIP3P water molecules and counterions. We provide PDB data files of the initial model and the equilibrated model that can be used for further studies. PMID:27547799

  6. Zwitterionic lipid assemblies: Molecular dynamics studies of monolayers, bilayers, and vesicles using a new coarse grain force field

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, Wataru; DeVane, Russell; Klein, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    A new coarse-grained (CG) intermolecular force field is presented for a series of zwitterionic lipids. The model is an extension of our previous work on nonionic surfactants and is designed to reproduce experimental surface/interfacial properties as well as distribution functions from all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using simple functional forms, the force field parameters are optimized for multiple lipid molecules, simultaneously. The resulting CG lipid bilayers have reasonable molecular areas, chain order parameters, and elastic properties. The computed surface pressure vs. area (π-A) curve for a DPPC monolayer demonstrates a significant improvement over the previous CG models. The DPPC monolayer has a longer persistence length than a PEG lipid monolayer, exhibiting a long-lived curved monolayer surface under negative tension. The bud ejected from an oversaturated DPPC monolayer has a large bicelle-like structure, which is different from the micellar bud formed from an oversaturated PEG lipid monolayer. We have successfully observed vesicle formation during CG-MD simulations, starting from an aggregate of DMPC molecules. Depending on the aggregate size, the lipid assembly spontaneously transforms into a closed vesicle or a bicelle. None of the various intermediate structures between these extremes seem to be stable. An attempt to observe fusion of two vesicles through the application of an external adhesion force was not successful. The present CG force field also supports stable multi-lamellar DMPC vesicles. PMID:20438090

  7. CHARMM Additive All-Atom Force Field for Aldopentofuranoses, Methyl-Aldopentofuranosides and Fructofuranose

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Elizabeth; Guvench, Olgun; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    An additive all-atom empirical force field for aldopentofuranoses, methyl-aldopentofuranosides (Me-aldopentofuranosides) and fructofuranose carbohydrates, compatible with existing CHARMM carbohydrate parameters, is presented. Building on existing parameters transferred from cyclic ethers and hexopyranoses, parameters were further developed using target data for complete furanose carbohydrates as well as O-methyl tetrahydrofuran. The bond and angle equilibrium parameters were adjusted to reproduce target geometries from a survey of furanose crystal structures, and dihedral parameters were fit to over 1700 quantum mechanical (QM) MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) conformational energies. The conformational energies were for a variety of complete furanose monosaccharides, and included two-dimensional ring pucker energy surfaces. Bonded parameter optimization led to the correct description of the ring pucker for a large set of furanose compounds, while furanose-water interaction energies and distances reproduced QM HF/6-31G(d) results for a number of furanose monosaccharides, thereby validating the nonbonded parameters. Crystal lattice unit cell parameters and volumes, aqueous-phase densities, and aqueous NMR ring pucker and exocyclic data were used to validate the parameters in condensed-phase environments. Conformational sampling analysis of the ring pucker and exocyclic group showed excellent agreement with experimental NMR data, demonstrating that the conformational energetics in aqueous solution are accurately described by the optimized force field. Overall, the parameters reproduce available experimental data well and are anticipated to be of utility in future computational studies of carbohydrates, including in the context of proteins, nucleic acids and/or lipids when combined with existing CHARMM biomolecular force fields. PMID:19694450

  8. All-atom 3D structure prediction of transmembrane β-barrel proteins from sequences

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Sikander; Sander, Chris; Marks, Debora S.

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane β-barrels (TMBs) carry out major functions in substrate transport and protein biogenesis but experimental determination of their 3D structure is challenging. Encouraged by successful de novo 3D structure prediction of globular and α-helical membrane proteins from sequence alignments alone, we developed an approach to predict the 3D structure of TMBs. The approach combines the maximum-entropy evolutionary coupling method for predicting residue contacts (EVfold) with a machine-learning approach (boctopus2) for predicting β-strands in the barrel. In a blinded test for 19 TMB proteins of known structure that have a sufficient number of diverse homologous sequences available, this combined method (EVfold_bb) predicts hydrogen-bonded residue pairs between adjacent β-strands at an accuracy of ∼70%. This accuracy is sufficient for the generation of all-atom 3D models. In the transmembrane barrel region, the average 3D structure accuracy [template-modeling (TM) score] of top-ranked models is 0.54 (ranging from 0.36 to 0.85), with a higher (44%) number of residue pairs in correct strand–strand registration than in earlier methods (18%). Although the nonbarrel regions are predicted less accurately overall, the evolutionary couplings identify some highly constrained loop residues and, for FecA protein, the barrel including the structure of a plug domain can be accurately modeled (TM score = 0.68). Lower prediction accuracy tends to be associated with insufficient sequence information and we therefore expect increasing numbers of β-barrel families to become accessible to accurate 3D structure prediction as the number of available sequences increases. PMID:25858953

  9. Efficient Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Multiple Radical Center Systems Based on the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, Hiroya; Schmidt, Michael W; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Gordon, Mark S

    2014-10-16

    The fully analytic energy gradient has been developed and implemented for the restricted open-shell Hartree–Fock (ROHF) method based on the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) theory for systems that have multiple open-shell molecules. The accuracy of the analytic ROHF energy gradient is compared with the corresponding numerical gradient, illustrating the accuracy of the analytic gradient. The ROHF analytic gradient is used to perform molecular dynamics simulations of an unusual open-shell system, liquid oxygen, and mixtures of oxygen and nitrogen. These molecular dynamics simulations provide some insight about how triplet oxygen molecules interact with each other. Timings reveal that the method can calculate the energy gradient for a system containing 4000 atoms in only 6 h. Therefore, it is concluded that the FMO-ROHF method will be useful for investigating systems with multiple open shells.

  10. Accelerating ring-polymer molecular dynamics with parallel-replica dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Yaung; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F

    2016-06-28

    Nuclear quantum effects are important for systems containing light elements, and the effects are more prominent in the low temperature regime where the dynamics also becomes sluggish. We show that parallel replica (ParRep) dynamics, an accelerated molecular dynamics approach for infrequent-event systems, can be effectively combined with ring-polymer molecular dynamics, a semiclassical trajectory approach that gives a good approximation to zero-point and tunneling effects in activated escape processes. The resulting RP-ParRep method is a powerful tool for reaching long time scales in complex infrequent-event systems where quantum dynamics are important. Two illustrative examples, symmetric Eckart barrier crossing and interstitial helium diffusion in Fe and Fe-Cr alloy, are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and long-time scale capability of this approach. PMID:27369499

  11. Accelerating ring-polymer molecular dynamics with parallel-replica dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chun-Yaung; Perez, Danny; Voter, Arthur F.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear quantum effects are important for systems containing light elements, and the effects are more prominent in the low temperature regime where the dynamics also becomes sluggish. We show that parallel replica (ParRep) dynamics, an accelerated molecular dynamics approach for infrequent-event systems, can be effectively combined with ring-polymer molecular dynamics, a semiclassical trajectory approach that gives a good approximation to zero-point and tunneling effects in activated escape processes. The resulting RP-ParRep method is a powerful tool for reaching long time scales in complex infrequent-event systems where quantum dynamics are important. Two illustrative examples, symmetric Eckart barrier crossing and interstitial helium diffusion in Fe and Fe-Cr alloy, are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and long-time scale capability of this approach.

  12. Concise NMR approach for molecular dynamics characterizations in organic solids.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Abil E; Courtier-Murias, Denis

    2013-08-22

    Molecular dynamics characterisations in solids can be carried out selectively using dipolar-dephasing experiments. Here we show that the introduction of a sum of Lorentzian and Gaussian functions greatly improve fittings of the "intensity versus time" data for protonated carbons in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The Lorentzian term accounts for remote intra- and intermolecular (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions, which vary from one molecule to another or for different carbons within the same molecule. Thus, by separating contributions from weak remote interactions, more accurate Gaussian decay constants, T(dd), can be extracted for directly bonded (1)H-(13)C dipole-dipole interactions. Reorientations of the (1)H-(13)C bonds lead to the increase of T(dd), and by measuring dipolar-dephasing constants, insight can be gained into dynamics in solids. We have demonstrated advantages of the method using comparative dynamics studies in the α and γ polymorphs of glycine, cyclic amino acids L-proline, DL-proline and trans-4-hydroxy-L-proline, the Ala residue in different dipeptides, as well as adamantane and hexamethylenetetramine. It was possible to distinguish subtle differences in dynamics of different carbon sites within a molecule in polymorphs and in L- and DL-forms. The presence of overall molecular motions is shown to lead to particularly large differences in dipolar-dephasing experiments. The differences in dynamics can be attributed to differences in noncovalent interactions. In the case of hexamethylenetetramine, for example, the presence of C-H···N interactions leads to nearly rigid molecules. Overall, the method allows one to gain insight into the role of noncovalent interactions in solids and their influence on the molecular dynamics. PMID:23879450

  13. Molecular mechanism of the inhibition and remodeling of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP(1-37)) oligomer by resveratrol from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianqian; Ning, Lulu; Niu, Yuzhen; Liu, Huanxiang; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-01-01

    Natural polyphenols are one of the most actively investigated categories of amyloid inhibitors, and resveratrol has recently been reported to inhibit and remodel the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) oligomers and fibrils. However, the exact mechanism of its action is still unknown, especially for the full-length hIAPP1-37. To this end, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations for hIAPP1-37 pentamer with and without resveratrol. The obtained results show that the binding of resveratrol is able to cause remarkable conformational changes of hIAPP1-37 pentamer, in terms of secondary structures, order degree, and morphology. By clustering analysis, two possible binding sites of resveratrol on the hIAPP1-37 pentamer were found, located at the grooves of the top and bottom surfaces of β-sheet layer, respectively. After the binding free energy calculation and residue energy decomposition, it can be concluded that the bottom site is the more possible one, and that the nonpolar interactions act as the driving force for the binding of hIAPP1-37 to resveratrol. In addition, Arg11 is the most important residue for the binding of resveratrol. The full understanding of inhibitory mechanism of resveratrol on the hIAPP1-37 oligomer, and the identification of its binding sites on this protein are helpful for the future design and discovery of new amyloid inhibitors. PMID:25494644

  14. Pseudo generators for under-resolved molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittracher, A.; Hartmann, C.; Junge, O.; Koltai, P.

    2015-09-01

    Many features of a molecule which are of physical interest (e.g. molecular conformations, reaction rates) are described in terms of its dynamics in configuration space. This article deals with the projection of molecular dynamics in phase space onto configuration space. Specifically, we study the situation that the phase space dynamics is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation and study its relation with the configurational Smoluchowski equation in the three different scaling regimes: Firstly, the Smoluchowski equations in non-Cartesian geometries are derived from the overdamped limit of the Langevin equation. Secondly, transfer operator methods are used to describe the metastable behaviour of the system at hand, and an explicit small-time asymptotics is derived on which the Smoluchowski equation turns out to govern the dynamics of the position coordinate (without any assumptions on the damping). By using an adequate reduction technique, these considerations are then extended to one-dimensional reaction coordinates. Thirdly, we sketch three different approaches to approximate the metastable dynamics based on time-local information only.

  15. Analysis of motion features for molecular dynamics simulation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Mayumi; Toda, Mikito; Sekijima, Masakazu; Takata, Masami; Joe, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a new method for time series analysis using the wavelet transformation has been proposed by Sakurai et al. We apply it to molecular dynamics simulation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Introducing indexes to characterize collective motion of the protein, we have obtained the following two results. First, time evolution of the collective motion involves not only the dynamics within a single potential well but also takes place wandering around multiple conformations. Second, correlation of the collective motion between secondary structures shows that collective motion exists involving multiple secondary structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving 'disordered proteins'.

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Laser Powered Carbon Nanotube Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Globus, Al; Han, Jie; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Dynamics of laser powered carbon nanotube gears is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations with Brenner's hydrocarbon potential. We find that when the frequency of the laser electric field is much less than the intrinsic frequency of the carbon nanotube, the tube exhibits an oscillatory pendulam behavior. However, a unidirectional rotation of the gear with oscillating frequency is observed under conditions of resonance between the laser field and intrinsic gear frequencies. The operating conditions for stable rotations of the nanotube gears, powered by laser electric fields are explored, in these simulations.

  17. Finite Temperature Quasicontinuum: Molecular Dynamics without all the Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuy, L; Tadmor, E B; Miller, R E; Phillips, R

    2005-02-02

    Using a combination of statistical mechanics and finite-element interpolation, the authors develop a coarse-grained (CG) alternative to molecular dynamics (MD) for crystalline solids at constant temperature. The new approach is significantly more efficient than MD and generalizes earlier work on the quasi-continuum method. The method is validated by recovering equilibrium properties of single crystal Ni as a function of temperature. CG dynamical simulations of nanoindentation reveal a strong dependence on temperature of the critical stress to nucleate dislocations under the indenter.

  18. Application of two dimensional periodic molecular dynamics to interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, David H.; Slater, Ben; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    1997-08-01

    We have applied two-dimensional molecular dynamics to the surface of a crystalline aspartame and the interface between the crystal face and a solvent (water). This has allowed us to look at the dynamic processes at the surface. Understanding the surface structure and properties are important to controlling the crystal morphology. The thermodynamic ensemble was constant Number, surface Area and Temperature (NAT). The calculations have been carried out using a 2D Ewald summation and 2D periodic boundary conditions for the short range potentials. The equations of motion integration has been carried out using the standard velocity Verlet algorithm.

  19. Molecular dynamical simulations of melting behaviors of metal clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ilyar; Fang, Meng; Duan, Haiming

    2015-04-15

    The melting behaviors of metal clusters are studied in a wide range by molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated results show that there are fluctuations in the heat capacity curves of some metal clusters due to the strong structural competition; For the 13-, 55- and 147-atom clusters, variations of the melting points with atomic number are almost the same; It is found that for different metal clusters the dynamical stabilities of the octahedral structures can be inferred in general by a criterion proposed earlier by F. Baletto et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 116 3856 (2002)] for the statically stable structures.

  20. Molecular dynamics and the phase transition in solid C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tycko, R.; Dabbagh, G.; Fleming, R. M.; Haddon, R. C.; Makhija, A. V.; Zahurak, S. M.

    1991-09-01

    The molecular reorientational dynamics in two phases of solid C60 with C-13 NMR measurements are characterized. A change in the nature of the dynamics, indicated by a change in kinetic parameters extracted from spin-lattice relaxation data, occurs at the phase transition at 260 K. Above the transition, the molecules appear to execute continuous rotational diffusion; below the transition, they appear to jump between symmetry-equivalent orientations. This interpretation is consistent with the X-ray-diffraction results of Heiney et al. (1991) as well as the NMR relaxation and spectral data.

  1. Molecular Dynamics and Electron Density Studies of Siderophores and Peptides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidelis, Krzysztof Andrzej

    1990-08-01

    The dissertation comprises three separate studies of siderophores and peptides. In the first of these studies the relative potential energies for a series of diastereomers of a siderophore neocoprogen I are evaluated with molecular mechanics force field methods. Charges on the hydroxamate moiety are determined with a synthetic model siderophore compound using valence population refinements, and alternatively, with the theoretical ab initio/ESP calculations. The single diastereomer found in the crystal structure is among four characterized by the low potential energy, while prevalence of Delta vs. Lambda configuration about the iron is found to be a property of the entire series. In the second study the crystal structure of a ferrichrome siderophore ferrirhodin is reported. The crystal structure conformation of the molecular backbone as well as the iron coordination geometry compare well with other ferrichrome structures. The differences between the acyl groups of ferrirubin and ferrirhodin are explored using the methods of molecular mechanics. The third study a 300 ps, 300 K, in vacuo molecular dynamics simulation of didemnin A and B yields distinct molecular conformers, which are different from the one found in the crystal structure or modeled in solution, using the Nuclear Overhauser Effect data. Evaluations of the relative potential energy are performed with short 10 ps simulations in solution. Didemnins are natural depsipeptides isolated from a Caribbean tunicate and characterized by particularly potent antiproliferative and immunomodulatory activity. Conformationally rigid and flexible regions of the molecule are described. A short review of the molecular mechanics methodology is given in the introduction.

  2. Visual verification and analysis of cluster detection for molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Vrabec, Jadran; Ertl, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    A current research topic in molecular thermodynamics is the condensation of vapor to liquid and the investigation of this process at the molecular level. Condensation is found in many physical phenomena, e.g. the formation of atmospheric clouds or the processes inside steam turbines, where a detailed knowledge of the dynamics of condensation processes will help to optimize energy efficiency and avoid problems with droplets of macroscopic size. The key properties of these processes are the nucleation rate and the critical cluster size. For the calculation of these properties it is essential to make use of a meaningful definition of molecular clusters, which currently is a not completely resolved issue. In this paper a framework capable of interactively visualizing molecular datasets of such nucleation simulations is presented, with an emphasis on the detected molecular clusters. To check the quality of the results of the cluster detection, our framework introduces the concept of flow groups to highlight potential cluster evolution over time which is not detected by the employed algorithm. To confirm the findings of the visual analysis, we coupled the rendering view with a schematic view of the clusters' evolution. This allows to rapidly assess the quality of the molecular cluster detection algorithm and to identify locations in the simulation data in space as well as in time where the cluster detection fails. Thus, thermodynamics researchers can eliminate weaknesses in their cluster detection algorithms. Several examples for the effective and efficient usage of our tool are presented. PMID:17968118

  3. Counter-ion binding and mobility in the presence of hydrophobic polyions – combining molecular dynamics simulations and NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druchok, Maksym; Malikova, Natalie; Rollet, Anne-Laure; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Counter-ion binding and mobility in aqueous solutions of partially hydrophobic ionene oligoions is studied here by a combination of all-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and NMR (19F and 81Br nuclei) measurements. We present results for 12, 12-ionenes in the presence of different halide ions (F-, Cl-, Br- and I-), as well as their mixtures; the latter allowing us to probe counter-ion selectivity of these oligoions. We consolidate both structural and dynamic information, in particular simulated radial distribution functions and average residence times of counter-ions in the vicinity of ionenes and NMR data in the form of counter-ion chemical shift and self-diffusion coefficients. On one hand, previously reported enthalpy of dilution and mixing measurements show a reverse counter-ion sequence for 12, 12-ionenes with respect to their less hydrophobic 3, 3- and 6, 6- analogues. On the other hand, the current MD and NMR data, reflecting the counter-ion binding tendencies to the ionene chain, give evidence for the same ordering as that observed by MD for 3, 3-ionenes. This is not seen as a contradiction and can be rationalized on the basis of increasing chain hydrophobicity, which has different consequences for enthalpy and ion-binding. The latter is reflecting free energy changes and as such includes both enthalpic and entropic contributions.

  4. Extrapolated gradientlike algorithms for molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, I P

    2006-09-01

    A class of symplectic algorithms is introduced to integrate the equations of motion in many-body systems. The algorithms are derived on the basis of an advanced gradientlike decomposition approach. Its main advantage over the standard gradient scheme is the avoidance of time-consuming evaluations of force gradients by force extrapolation without any loss of precision. As a result, the efficiency of the integration improves significantly. The algorithms obtained are analyzed and optimized using an error-function theory. The best among them are tested in actual molecular dynamics and celestial mechanics simulations for comparison with well-known nongradient and gradient algorithms such as the Störmer-Verlet, Runge-Kutta, Cowell-Numerov, Forest-Ruth, Suzuki-Chin, and others. It is demonstrated that for moderate and high accuracy, the extrapolated algorithms should be considered as the most efficient for the integration of motion in molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:17025782

  5. Human Lactate Dehydrogenase A Inhibitors: A Molecular Dynamics Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yun; Pinto, B. Mario

    2014-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) is an important enzyme in fermentative glycolysis, generating most energy for cancer cells that rely on anaerobic respiration even under normal oxygen concentrations. This renders LDHA a promising molecular target for the treatment of various cancers. Several efforts have been made recently to develop LDHA inhibitors with nanomolar inhibition and cellular activity, some of which have been studied in complex with the enzyme by X-ray crystallography. In this work, we present a molecular dynamics (MD) study of the binding interactions of selected ligands with human LDHA. Conventional MD simulations demonstrate different binding dynamics of inhibitors with similar binding affinities, whereas steered MD simulations yield discrimination of selected LDHA inhibitors with qualitative correlation between the in silico unbinding difficulty and the experimental binding strength. Further, our results have been used to clarify ambiguities in the binding modes of two well-known LDHA inhibitors. PMID:24466056

  6. Tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics in nuclear physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myo, Takayuki; Toki, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Kiyomi; Horiuchi, Hisashi; Suhara, Tadahiro

    2015-07-01

    We develop a new formalism to treat nuclear many-body systems using the bare nucleon-nucleon interaction. It has become evident that the tensor interaction plays an important role in nuclear many-body systems due to the role of the pion in strongly interacting systems. We take the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) as a basic framework and add a tensor correlation operator acting on the AMD wave function using the concept of the tensor-optimized shell model. We demonstrate a systematical and straightforward formulation utilizing the Gaussian integration and differentiation method and the antisymmetrization technique to calculate all the matrix elements of the many-body Hamiltonian. We can include the three-body interaction naturally and calculate the matrix elements systematically in the progressive order of the tensor correlation operator. We call the new formalism "tensor-optimized antisymmetrized molecular dynamics".

  7. Shock induced phase transition of water: Molecular dynamics investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogi, Anupam; Mitra, Nilanjan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out using numerous force potentials to investigate the shock induced phenomenon of pure bulk liquid water. Partial phase transition was observed at single shock velocity of 4.0 km/s without requirement of any external nucleators. Change in thermodynamic variables along with radial distribution function plots and spectral analysis revealed for the first time in the literature, within the context of molecular dynamic simulations, the thermodynamic pathway leading to formation of ice VII from liquid water on shock loading. The study also revealed information for the first time in the literature about the statistical time-frame after passage of shock in which ice VII formation can be observed and variations in degree of crystallinity of the sample over the entire simulation time of 100 ns.

  8. Annihilation of craters: Molecular dynamic simulations on a silver surface

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, K. O. E.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J.

    2007-12-15

    The ability of silver cluster ions containing 13 atoms to fill in a preexisting crater with a radius of about 28 A ring on a silver (001) target has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and the molecular-dynamics-Monte Carlo corrected effective medium potential. The largest lateral distance r between crater and ion was about three times the radius of the preexisting crater, namely, 75 A ring . The results reveal that when r<20 A ring and r>60 A ring the preexisting crater is partially filled in, and for other distances there is a net growth of the crater. The lattice damage created by the cluster ions, the total sputtering yield, the cluster sputtering yield, and simulated transmission electron microscopy images of the irradiated targets are also presented.

  9. An implicit divalent counterion force field for RNA molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Paul S.; Mak, Chi H.

    2016-03-01

    How to properly account for polyvalent counterions in a molecular dynamics simulation of polyelectrolytes such as nucleic acids remains an open question. Not only do counterions such as Mg2+ screen electrostatic interactions, they also produce attractive intrachain interactions that stabilize secondary and tertiary structures. Here, we show how a simple force field derived from a recently reported implicit counterion model can be integrated into a molecular dynamics simulation for RNAs to realistically reproduce key structural details of both single-stranded and base-paired RNA constructs. This divalent counterion model is computationally efficient. It works with existing atomistic force fields, or coarse-grained models may be tuned to work with it. We provide optimized parameters for a coarse-grained RNA model that takes advantage of this new counterion force field. Using the new model, we illustrate how the structural flexibility of RNA two-way junctions is modified under different salt conditions.

  10. Molecular dynamic simulation of non-melt laser annealing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liren, Yan; Dai, Li; Wei, Zhang; Zhihong, Liu; Wei, Zhou; Quan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is performed to study the process of material annealing caused by a 266 nm pulsed laser. A micro-mechanism describing behaviors of silicon and impurity atoms during the laser annealing at a non-melt regime is proposed. After ion implantation, the surface of the Si wafer is acted by a high energy laser pulse, which loosens the material and partially frees both Si and impurity atoms. While the residual laser energy is absorbed by valence electrons, these atoms are recoiled and relocated to finally form a crystal. Energy-related movement behavior is observed by using the molecular dynamic method. The non-melt laser anneal appears to be quite sensitive to the energy density of the laser, as a small excess energy may causes a significant impurity diffusion. Such a result is also supported by our laser anneal experiment.

  11. Time series analysis of molecular dynamics simulation using wavelet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Mikito

    2012-08-01

    A new method is presented to extract nonstationary features of slow collective motion toward time series data of molecular dynamics simulation for proteins. The method consists of the following two steps: (1) the wavelet transformation and (2) the singular value decomposition (SVD). The wavelet transformation enables us to characterize time varying features of oscillatory motions and SVD enables us to reduce the degrees of freedom of the movement. We apply the method to molecular dynamics simulation of various proteins such as Adenylate Kinase from Escherichia coli (AKE) and Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Moreover, we introduce indexes to characterize collective motion of proteins. These indexes provide us with information of nonstationary deformation of protein structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving "intrinsically disordered proteins".

  12. Molecular dynamics studies of U1A-RNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, C M; Kollman, P A

    1999-01-01

    The U1A protein binds to a hairpin RNA and an internal-loop RNA with picomolar affinities. To probe the molecular basis of U1A binding, we performed state-of-the-art nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations on both complexes. The good agreement with experimental structures supports the protocols used in the simulations. We compare the dynamics, hydrogen-bonding occupancies, and interfacial flexibility of both complexes and also describe a rigid-body motion in the U1A-internal loop complex that is not observed in the U1A-hairpin simulation. We relate these observations to experimental mutational studies and highlight their significance in U1A binding affinity and specificity. PMID:10024175

  13. Coherent Amplification of Ultrafast Molecular Dynamics in an Optical Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igal; Pe'er, Avi

    2016-02-01

    Optical oscillators present a powerful optimization mechanism. The inherent competition for the gain resources between possible modes of oscillation entails the prevalence of the most efficient single mode. We harness this "ultrafast" coherent feedback to optimize an optical field in time, and show that, when an optical oscillator based on a molecular gain medium is synchronously pumped by ultrashort pulses, a temporally coherent multimode field can develop that optimally dumps a general, dynamically evolving vibrational wave packet, into a single vibrational target state. Measuring the emitted field opens a new window to visualization and control of fast molecular dynamics. The realization of such a coherent oscillator with hot alkali dimers appears within experimental reach.

  14. Description of ferrocenylalkylthiol SAMs on gold by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Goujon, F; Bonal, C; Limoges, B; Malfreyt, P

    2009-08-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations of mixed monolayers consisting of Fc(CH2)12S-/C10S-Au SAMs are carried out to calculate structural (density profiles, angular distributions, positions of atoms) and energetic properties. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible inhomogeneity of the neutral ferrocene moieties within the monolayer. Five systems have been studied using different grafting densities for the ferrocenylalkylthiolates. The angular distributions are described in terms of the relative contributions from isolated and clustered ferrocene moieties in the binary SAMs. It is shown that the energetic contributions strongly depend on the state of the ferrocene. The ability of molecular dynamics simulations to enable better understanding the SAM structure is illustrated in this work. PMID:19449821

  15. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine.

    PubMed

    Rapaport, D C

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency. PMID:19518394

  16. Complete Characterization of Molecular Dynamics in Ultrashort Laser Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Feuerstein, B.; Ergler, Th.; Rudenko, A.; Zrost, K.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Niederhausen, T.; Thumm, U.

    2007-10-12

    Reaction Microscope-based, complete, and time-resolved Coulomb explosion imaging of vibrating and dissociating D{sub 2}{sup +} molecules with femtosecond time-resolution allowed us to perform an internuclear distance (R-)dependent Fourier analysis of the corresponding wave packets. Calculations demonstrate that the obtained two-dimensional R-dependent frequency spectra enable the complete characterization of the wave packet dynamics and directly visualize the field-modified molecular potential curves in intense, ultrashort laser pulses.

  17. Probing Molecular Dynamics at Attosecond Resolution with Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X. M.; Zhao, Z. X.; Lin, C. D.

    2003-12-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of D+ ions resulting from the interaction of a femtosecond laser pulse with D2 molecules is calculated based on the rescattering model. From analyzing the molecular dynamics, it is shown that the recollision time between the ionized electron and the D+2 ion can be read from the D+ kinetic energy peaks to attosecond accuracy. We further suggest that a more precise reading of the clock can be achieved by using shorter fs laser pulses (about 15fs).

  18. Simulational nanoengineering: Molecular dynamics implementation of an atomistic Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapaport, D. C.

    2009-04-01

    A nanoscale-sized Stirling engine with an atomistic working fluid has been modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. The design includes heat exchangers based on thermostats, pistons attached to a flywheel under load, and a regenerator. Key aspects of the behavior, including the time-dependent flows, are described. The model is shown to be capable of stable operation while producing net work at a moderate level of efficiency.

  19. Quantum tunneling splittings from path-integral molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Wales, David J; Althorpe, Stuart C

    2016-03-21

    We illustrate how path-integral molecular dynamics can be used to calculate ground-state tunnelling splittings in molecules or clusters. The method obtains the splittings from ratios of density matrix elements between the degenerate wells connected by the tunnelling. We propose a simple thermodynamic integration scheme for evaluating these elements. Numerical tests on fully dimensional malonaldehyde yield tunnelling splittings in good overall agreement with the results of diffusion Monte Carlo calculations. PMID:27004863

  20. Smoothed-particle hydrodynamics and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W. G.; Hoover, C. G.

    1993-08-01

    Gingold, Lucy, and Monaghan invented a grid-free version of continuum mechanics ``smoothed-particle hydrodynamics,`` in 1977. It is a likely contributor to ``hybrid`` simulations combining atomistic and continuum simulations. We describe applications of this particle-based continuum technique from the closely-related standpoint of nonequilibrium molecular dynamics. We compare chaotic Lyapunov spectra for atomistic solids and fluids with those which characterize a two-dimensional smoothed-particle fluid system.

  1. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  2. Improving the performance of molecular dynamics simulations on parallel clusters.

    PubMed

    Borstnik, Urban; Hodoscek, Milan; Janezic, Dusanka

    2004-01-01

    In this article a procedure is derived to obtain a performance gain for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on existing parallel clusters. Parallel clusters use a wide array of interconnection technologies to connect multiple processors together, often at different speeds, such as multiple processor computers and networking. It is demonstrated how to configure existing programs for MD simulations to efficiently handle collective communication on parallel clusters with processor interconnections of different speeds. PMID:15032512

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations on PGLa using NMR orientational constraints.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ulrich; Witter, Raiker

    2015-11-01

    NMR data obtained by solid state NMR from anisotropic samples are used as orientational constraints in molecular dynamics simulations for determining the structure and dynamics of the PGLa peptide within a membrane environment. For the simulation the recently developed molecular dynamics with orientational constraints technique (MDOC) is used. This method introduces orientation dependent pseudo-forces into the COSMOS-NMR force field. Acting during a molecular dynamics simulation these forces drive molecular rotations, re-orientations and folding in such a way that the motional time-averages of the tensorial NMR properties are consistent with the experimentally measured NMR parameters. This MDOC strategy does not depend on the initial choice of atomic coordinates, and is in principle suitable for any flexible and mobile kind of molecule; and it is of course possible to account for flexible parts of peptides or their side-chains. MDOC has been applied to the antimicrobial peptide PGLa and a related dimer model. With these simulations it was possible to reproduce most NMR parameters within the experimental error bounds. The alignment, conformation and order parameters of the membrane-bound molecule and its dimer were directly derived with MDOC from the NMR data. Furthermore, this new approach yielded for the first time the distribution of segmental orientations with respect to the membrane and the order parameter tensors of the dimer systems. It was demonstrated the deuterium splittings measured at the peptide to lipid ratio of 1/50 are consistent with a membrane spanning orientation of the peptide. PMID:26358333

  4. Scattering studies of molecular dynamics of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ciya

    The dynamics of complex fluids is studied by modeling the spectrum of density fluctuation: dynamic structure factor. The theoretic models are compared with experimental measurements by X-ray and molecular dynamics simulation results. In time scale, the dynamics of supercooled water can be well separated into short time and long time dynamics. While the long time dynamics is modeled well by a stretch exponential and explained as cage relaxations by mode coupling theory, the short time dynamics is under study in this thesis. We introduce two models for the short time dynamics. One model assumes that the short time movement of particles inside a cage is in a harmonic potential well with a vibrational frequency distribution function having a two-peak structure. The relationship of density of state with the single particle dynamic structure factor is employed to formulate the model. The other model treats the in-cage rattlings as collisions between hard sphere particles which can be modeled by a kinetic theory. A modification of the kinetic theory has to be used to account for the cage effect on the short time dynamics. The idea that the short time dynamics can be considered separately from long time dynamics is verified by the potential landscape view. The inherent structure which is defined as a local minimum in the potential function varies from time to time as the result of the crossing- basin of system in the potential landscape. The within basin movement regarded as short time rattlings can be eliminated by calculating the intermediate scattering function of the inherent structure, which shows an almost identical behavior as the long time part of original intermediate scattering function. A recent development of high resolution inelastic X-ray scattering technique brings a challenge on how to deal with the form factors of different atoms in the explanation of the measured dynamic structure factor. A generalized dynamic structure factor is defined to include the

  5. Molecular dynamics of a water jet from a carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Yonebayashi, Toru; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2009-04-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) can be viewed as a molecular nozzle. It has a cylindrical shape of atomistic regularity, and the diameter can be even less than 1 nm. We have conducted molecular-dynamics simulations of water jet from a (6,6) CNT that confines water in a form of single-file molecular chain. The results show that the water forms nanoscale clusters at the outlet and they are released intermittently. The jet breakup is dominated by the thermal fluctuations, which leads to the strong dependence on the temperature. The cluster size n decreases and the release frequency f increases at higher temperatures. The f roughly follows the reaction kinetics by the transition state theory. The speed of a cluster is proportional to the 1/sqrt[n] because of the central limit theorem. These properties make great contrast with the macroscopic liquid jets. PMID:19518333

  6. Dynamics in a supercooled molecular liquid: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rinaldi, Adele; Sciortino, Francesco; Tartaglia, Piero

    2001-06-01

    We report extensive simulations of liquid supercooled states for a simple three-site molecular model, introduced by Lewis and Wahnstrom [Phys. Rev. E >50, 3865 (1994)] to mimic the behavior of ortho-terphenyl. The large system size and the long simulation length allow us to calculate very precisely (in a large q-vector range) self-correlation and collective correlation functions, providing a clean and simple reference model for theoretical descriptions of molecular liquids in supercooled states. The time and wave-vector dependence of the site-site correlation functions are compared (neglecting the molecular constraints) with detailed ideal mode-coupling theory predictions. Except for the wave-vector region where the dynamics are controlled by the center of mass (around 9 nm{sup {minus}1}), the theoretical predictions compare very well with the simulation data.

  7. Shapiro like steps reveals molecular nanomagnets’ spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Abdollahipour, Babak; Abouie, Jahanfar Ebrahimi, Navid

    2015-09-15

    We present an accurate way to detect spin dynamics of a nutating molecular nanomagnet by inserting it in a tunnel Josephson junction and studying the current voltage (I-V) characteristic. The spin nutation of the molecular nanomagnet is generated by applying two circularly polarized magnetic fields. We demonstrate that modulation of the Josephson current by the nutation of the molecular nanomagnet’s spin appears as a stepwise structure like Shapiro steps in the I-V characteristic of the junction. Width and heights of these Shapiro-like steps are determined by two parameters of the spin nutation, frequency and amplitude of the nutation, which are simply tuned by the applied magnetic fields.

  8. Exploiting molecular dynamics in Nested Sampling simulations of small peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkoff, Nikolas S.; Baldock, Robert J. N.; Várnai, Csilla; Wild, David L.; Csányi, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Nested Sampling (NS) is a parameter space sampling algorithm which can be used for sampling the equilibrium thermodynamics of atomistic systems. NS has previously been used to explore the potential energy surface of a coarse-grained protein model and has significantly outperformed parallel tempering when calculating heat capacity curves of Lennard-Jones clusters. The original NS algorithm uses Monte Carlo (MC) moves; however, a variant, Galilean NS, has recently been introduced which allows NS to be incorporated into a molecular dynamics framework, so NS can be used for systems which lack efficient prescribed MC moves. In this work we demonstrate the applicability of Galilean NS to atomistic systems. We present an implementation of Galilean NS using the Amber molecular dynamics package and demonstrate its viability by sampling alanine dipeptide, both in vacuo and implicit solvent. Unlike previous studies of this system, we present the heat capacity curves of alanine dipeptide, whose calculation provides a stringent test for sampling algorithms. We also compare our results with those calculated using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) and find good agreement. We show the computational effort required for accurate heat capacity estimation for small peptides. We also calculate the alanine dipeptide Ramachandran free energy surface for a range of temperatures and use it to compare the results using the latest Amber force field with previous theoretical and experimental results.

  9. Fast parallel algorithms for short-range molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, S.

    1993-05-01

    Three parallel algorithms for classical molecular dynamics are presented. The first assigns each processor a subset of atoms; the second assigns each a subset of inter-atomic forces to compute; the third assigns each a fixed spatial region. The algorithms are suitable for molecular dynamics models which can be difficult to parallelize efficiently -- those with short-range forces where the neighbors of each atom change rapidly. They can be implemented on any distributed-memory parallel machine which allows for message-passing of data between independently executing processors. The algorithms are tested on a standard Lennard-Jones benchmark problem for system sizes ranging from 500 to 10,000,000 atoms on three parallel supercomputers, the nCUBE 2, Intel iPSC/860, and Intel Delta. Comparing the results to the fastest reported vectorized Cray Y-MP and C90 algorithm shows that the current generation of parallel machines is competitive with conventional vector supercomputers even for small problems. For large problems, the spatial algorithm achieves parallel efficiencies of 90% and the Intel Delta performs about 30 times faster than a single Y-MP processor and 12 times faster than a single C90 processor. Trade-offs between the three algorithms and guidelines for adapting them to more complex molecular dynamics simulations are also discussed.

  10. Applications of the molecular dynamics flexible fitting method.

    PubMed

    Trabuco, Leonardo G; Schreiner, Eduard; Gumbart, James; Hsin, Jen; Villa, Elizabeth; Schulten, Klaus

    2011-03-01

    In recent years, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has established itself as a key method in structural biology, permitting the structural characterization of large biomolecular complexes in various functional states. The data obtained through single-particle cryo-EM has recently seen a leap in resolution thanks to landmark advances in experimental and computational techniques, resulting in sub-nanometer resolution structures being obtained routinely. The remaining gap between these data and revealing the mechanisms of molecular function can be closed through hybrid modeling tools that incorporate known atomic structures into the cryo-EM data. One such tool, molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF), uses molecular dynamics simulations to combine structures from X-ray crystallography with cryo-EM density maps to derive atomic models of large biomolecular complexes. The structures furnished by MDFF can be used subsequently in computational investigations aimed at revealing the dynamics of the complexes under study. In the present work, recent applications of MDFF are presented, including the interpretation of cryo-EM data of the ribosome at different stages of translation and the structure of a membrane-curvature-inducing photosynthetic complex. PMID:20932910

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of solutions at constant chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, C.; Salvalaglio, M.; Parrinello, M.

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamics studies of chemical processes in solution are of great value in a wide spectrum of applications, which range from nano-technology to pharmaceutical chemistry. However, these calculations are affected by severe finite-size effects, such as the solution being depleted as the chemical process proceeds, which influence the outcome of the simulations. To overcome these limitations, one must allow the system to exchange molecules with a macroscopic reservoir, thus sampling a grand-canonical ensemble. Despite the fact that different remedies have been proposed, this still represents a key challenge in molecular simulations. In the present work, we propose the Constant Chemical Potential Molecular Dynamics (CμMD) method, which introduces an external force that controls the environment of the chemical process of interest. This external force, drawing molecules from a finite reservoir, maintains the chemical potential constant in the region where the process takes place. We have applied the CμMD method to the paradigmatic case of urea crystallization in aqueous solution. As a result, we have been able to study crystal growth dynamics under constant supersaturation conditions and to extract growth rates and free-energy barriers.

  12. Molecular-level dynamics of refractory dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niggemann, J.; Gerdts, G.; Dittmar, T.

    2012-04-01

    Refractory dissolved organic matter (DOM) accounts for most of the global oceanic organic carbon inventory. Processes leading to its formation and factors determining its stability are still largely unknown. We hypothesize that refractory DOM carries a universal molecular signature. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability in this universal signature is a key to understanding dynamics of refractory DOM. We present results from a long-term study of the DOM geo-metabolome in the open North Sea. Geo-metabolomics considers the entity of DOM as a population of compounds, each characterized by a specific function and reactivity in the cycling of energy and elements. Ten-thousands of molecular formulae were identified in DOM by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry analysis (FT-ICR-MS, Fourier-Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry). The DOM pool in the North Sea was influenced by a complex interplay of processes that produced, transformed and degraded dissolved molecules. We identified a stable fraction in North Sea DOM with a molecular composition similar to deep ocean DOM. Molecular-level changes in this stable fraction provide novel information on dynamics and interactions of refractory DOM.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of triclinic lysozyme in a crystal lattice.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Pawel A; Liu, Chunmei; Deckman, Jason; Case, David A

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of crystals can enlighten interpretation of experimental X-ray crystallography data and elucidate structural dynamics and heterogeneity in biomolecular crystals. Furthermore, because of the direct comparison against experimental data, they can inform assessment of molecular dynamics methods and force fields. We present microsecond scale results for triclinic hen egg-white lysozyme in a supercell consisting of 12 independent unit cells using four contemporary force fields (Amber ff99SB, ff14ipq, ff14SB, and CHARMM 36) in crystalline and solvated states (for ff14SB only). We find the crystal simulations consistent across multiple runs of the same force field and robust to various solvent equilibration schemes. However, convergence is slow compared with solvent simulations. All the tested force fields reproduce experimental structural and dynamic properties well, but Amber ff14SB maintains structure and reproduces fluctuations closest to the experimental model: its average backbone structure differs from the deposited structure by 0.37Å; by contrast, the average backbone structure in solution differs from the deposited by 0.65Å. All the simulations are affected by a small progressive deterioration of the crystal lattice, presumably due to imperfect modeling of hydrogen bonding and other crystal contact interactions; this artifact is smallest in ff14SB, with average lattice positions deviating by 0.20Å from ideal. Side-chain disorder is surprisingly low with fewer than 30% of the nonglycine or alanine residues exhibiting significantly populated alternate rotamers. Our results provide helpful insight into the methodology of biomolecular crystal simulations and indicate directions for future work to obtain more accurate energy models for molecular dynamics. PMID:26013419

  14. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    PubMed

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  15. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  16. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  17. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron-nuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-03-18

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump-probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  18. Molecular interferometer to decode attosecond electron–nuclear dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Alicia; González-Castrillo, Alberto; Martín, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the coupled electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules by using pump–probe schemes requires not only the use of short enough laser pulses but also wavelengths and intensities that do not modify the intrinsic behavior of the system. In this respect, extreme UV pulses of few-femtosecond and attosecond durations have been recognized as the ideal tool because their short wavelengths ensure a negligible distortion of the molecular potential. In this work, we propose the use of two twin extreme UV pulses to create a molecular interferometer from direct and sequential two-photon ionization processes that leave the molecule in the same final state. We theoretically demonstrate that such a scheme allows for a complete identification of both electronic and nuclear phases in the wave packet generated by the pump pulse. We also show that although total ionization yields reveal entangled electronic and nuclear dynamics in the bound states, doubly differential yields (differential in both electronic and nuclear energies) exhibit in addition the dynamics of autoionization, i.e., of electron correlation in the ionization continuum. Visualization of such dynamics is possible by varying the time delay between the pump and the probe pulses. PMID:24591647

  19. Temperature Effects on Soft Polymeric Nanoparticles: Molecular Dynamics Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maskey, Sabina; Grest, Gary S.; Perahia, Dvora

    Luminescent polymers collapsed into soft nanoparticles or polydots have emerged as the potential candidates for biomedical applications such as drug delivery and biosensing. Here, using fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation, the temperatures effects on the stability, internal structure and dynamics of polydots formed by substituted and bare dialkyl paraphenylene ethynylenes (PPEs) will be discussed. We find that with increasing temperature from 300 K to 600K both substituted and bare PPE polydots expand but do not fully unfold and remain in their confined state. As observed visually and by measurement of structure factor S(q), the overall shape of the both type of polydots changes from spherical to elongated with the increase in temperature. These effects are more pronounced for bare PPE polydots which show that interdigitation of side chains in substituted PPE polydots enhances stability. In addition, the side chains are more dynamic than the backbone.. NSF CHE 1308298 2013-2016.

  20. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene.

    PubMed

    Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain's threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019