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Sample records for all-pressure fluid drop

  1. Validation of an All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model: Heptane Fluid Drops in Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.; Bulzan, Daniel L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Despite the fact that supercritical fluids occur both in nature and in industrial situations, the fundamentals of their behavior is poorly understood because supercritical fluids combine the characteristics of both liquids and gases, and therefore their behavior is not intuitive. There are several specific reasons for the lack of understanding: First, data from (mostly optical) measurements can be very misleading because regions of high density thus observed are frequently identified with liquids. A common misconception is that if in an experiment one can optically identify "drops" and "ligaments", the observed fluid must be in a liquid state. This inference is incorrect because in fact optical measurements detect any large change (i.e. gradients) in density. Thus, the density ratio may be well below Omicron(10(exp 3)) that characterizes its liquid/gas value, but the measurement will still identify a change in the index of refraction providing that the change is sudden (steep gradients). As shown by simulations of supercritical fluids, under certain conditions the density gradients may remain large during the supercritical binary fluids mixing, thus making them optically identifiable. Therefore, there is no inconsistency between the optical observation of high density regions and the fluids being in a supercritical state. A second misconception is that because a fluid has a liquid-like density, it is appropriate to model it as a liquid. However, such fluids may have liquid-like densities while their transport properties differ from those of a liquid. Considering that the critical pressure of most fuel hydrocarbons used in Diesel and gas turbine engines is in the range of 1.5 - 3 MPa, and the fact that the maximum pressure attained in these engines is about 6 Mps, it is clear that the fuel in the combustion chamber will experience both subcritical and supercritical conditions. Studies of drop behavior over a wide range of pressures were performed in the past

  2. A Validated All-Pressure Fluid Drop Model and Lewis Number Effects for a Binary Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K.; Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    The differences between subcritical liquid drop and supercritical fluid drop behavior are discussed. Under subcritical, evaporative high emission rate conditions, a film layer is present in the inner part of the drop surface which contributes to the unique determination of the boundary conditions; it is this film layer which contributes to the solution's convective-diffusive character. In contrast, under supercritical condition as the boundary conditions contain a degree of arbitrariness due to the absence of a surface, and the solution has then a purely diffusive character. Results from simulations of a free fluid drop under no-gravity conditions are compared to microgravity experimental data from suspended, large drop experiments at high, low and intermediary temperatures and in a range of pressures encompassing the sub-and supercritical regime. Despite the difference between the conditions of the simulations and experiments (suspension vs. free floating), the time rate of variation of the drop diameter square is remarkably well predicted in the linear curve regime. The drop diameter is determined in the simulations from the location of the maximum density gradient, and agrees well with the data. It is also shown that the classical calculation of the Lewis number gives qualitatively erroneous results at supercritical conditions, but that an effective Lewis number previously defined gives qualitatively correct estimates of the length scales for heat and mass transfer at all pressures.

  3. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  4. Fluid dynamics and solidification of levitated drops and shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The fluid dynamic investigaton of simple free liquid drops is described based on ground-based and low-gravity experimental results. The behavior of compound drops and liquid shells as described in recent theoretical and experimental studies is discussed. Experimental investigations using both levitation devices and drop tubes are considered in the case of 1-g laboratory investigations, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks of both techniques.

  5. A 2D electrohydrodynamic model for electrorotation of fluid drops.

    PubMed

    Feng, James Q

    2002-02-01

    A theoretical analysis of spontaneous electrorotation of deformable fluid drops in a DC electric field is presented with a 2D electrohydrodynamic model. The fluids in the system are assumed to be leaky dielectric and Newtonian. If the rotating flow is dominant over the cellular convection type of electrohydrodynamic flow, closed-form solutions for drops of small deformations can be obtained. Because the governing equations are in general nonlinear even when drop deformations are ignored, the general solution for even undeformed drop takes a form of infinite series and can only be evaluated by numerical means. Both closed-form solutions for special cases and numerical solutions for more general cases are obtained here to describe steady-state field variables and first-order drop deformations. In a DC electric field of strength beyond the threshold value, spontaneous electrorotation of a drop is shown to occur when charge relaxation in the surrounding fluid is faster than the fluid inside the drop. With increasing the strength of the applied electric field from the threshold for onset of electrorotation, the axis of drop contraction deviates from from that of the applied electric field in the direction of the rotating flow with an angle increasing with the field strength. PMID:16290391

  6. Coalescence of Drops of a Power-law Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamat, Pritish; Thete, Sumeet; Basaran, Osman

    2014-11-01

    Drop coalescence is crucial in a host of industrial, household, and natural processes that involve dispersions. Coalescence is a rate-controlling process in breaking emulsions and strongly influences drop-size-distributions in sprays. In a continuum approach, coalescence begins by the formation of a microscopic, non-slender bridge connecting the two drops. Indefinitely large axial curvature at the neck results in local lowering of pressure that drives fluid from the bulk of the drops toward the neck, thereby causing the bridge radius r (t) and height z (t) to increase in time t. The coalescence of Newtonian drops in air has heretofore been thoroughly studied. Here, we extend these earlier studies by analyzing the coalescence of drops of power-law fluids because many fluids encountered in real applications, including cosmetic creams, shampoos, grease, and paint, exhibit power-law (deformation-rate thinning) rheology. On account of the non-slender geometry of the liquid bridge connecting the two drops (z << r) , we analyze the resulting free surface flow problem by numerical simulation. Among other results, we present and discuss the nature of flows and scaling behaviors for r and z as functions of the initial viscosity and power-law index (0 < n <= 1) .

  7. Measurements of fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay X.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 μl of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized Newtonian fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. It also yields dynamical viscosity of non-Newtonian fluids at moderate shear rates. The device is easy to assemble and it allows for the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Therefore, the technique is particularly useful in characterizing biological fluids such as solutions of proteins, DNA, and polymers frequently used in biomaterial applications.

  8. Breakup modes of fluid drops in confined shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barai, Nilkamal; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-07-01

    Using a conservative level set method we investigate the deformation behavior of isolated spherical fluid drops in a fluid channel subjected to simple shear flows, accounting the following three non-dimensional parameters: (1) degree of confinement (Wc = 2a/h, where a is the drop radius and h is the channel thickness); (2) viscosity ratio between the two fluids (λ = μd/μm, where μd is the drop viscosity and μm is the matrix viscosity); and (3) capillary number (Ca). For a given Wc, a drop steadily deforms to attain a stable geometry (Taylor number and inclination of its long axis to the shear direction) when Ca < 0.3. For Ca > 0.3, the deformation behavior turns to be unsteady, leading to oscillatory variations of both its shape and orientation with progressive shear. This kind of unsteady deformation also occurs in a condition of high viscosity ratios (λ > 2). Here we present a detailed parametric analysis of the drop geometry with increasing shear as a function of Wc, Ca, and λ. Under a threshold condition, deforming drops become unstable, resulting in their breakup into smaller droplets. We recognize three principal modes of breakup: Mode I (mid-point pinching), Mode II (edge breakup), and Mode III (homogeneous breakup). Each of these modes is shown to be most effective in the specific field defined by Ca and λ. Our study also demonstrates the role of channel confinement (Wc) in controlling the transition of Mode I to III. Finally, we discuss implications of the three modes in determining characteristic drop size distributions in multiphase flows.

  9. Microseismicity Induced by Fluid Pressure Drop (Laboratory Study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turuntaev, Sergey; Zenchenko, Evgeny; Melchaeva, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Pore pressure change in saturated porous rocks may result in its fracturing (Maury et Fourmaintraux, 1993) and corresponding microseismic event occurrences. Microseismicity due to fluid injection is considered in numerous papers (Maxwell, 2010, Shapiro et al., 2005). Another type of the porous medium fracturing is related with rapid pore pressure drop at some boundary. The mechanism of such fracturing was considered by (Khristianovich, 1985) as a model of sudden coal blowing and by (Alidibirov, Panov, 1998) as a model of volcano eruptions. If the porous saturated medium has a boundary where it directly contacted with fluid under the high pressure (in a hydraulic fracture or in a borehole), and the pressure at that boundary is dropped, the conditions for tensile cracks can be achieved at some distance from the boundary. In the paper, the results of experimental study of saturated porous sample fracturing due to pore pressure rapid drop are discussed. The samples (82 mm high, ∅60 mm) were made of quartz sand, which was cemented by "liquid glass" glue with mass fraction 1%. The sample (porosity 35%, uniaxial unconfined compression strength 2.5 MPa) was placed in a mould and saturated by oil. The upper end of the sample contacted with the mould upper lid, the lower end contacted with fluid. The fluid pressure was increased to 10 MPa and then discharged through the bottom nipple. The pressure increases/drops were repeated 30-50 times. Pore pressure and acoustic emission (AE) were registered by transducers mounted into upper and bottom lids of the mould. It was found, that AE sources (corresponded to microfracturing) were spreading from the open end to the closed end of the sample, and that maximal number of AE events was registered at some distance from the opened end. The number of AE pulses increased with every next pressure drop, meanwhile the number of pulses with high amplitudes diminished. It was found that AE maximal rate corresponded to the fluid pressure

  10. Evaporation and fluid dynamics of a sessile drop of capillary size.

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, L. Yu.; Bigioni, T. P.; Vinokur, V. M.; Shchur, L. N.; Materials Science Division; Landau Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Theoretical description and numerical simulation of an evaporating sessile drop are developed. We jointly take into account the hydrodynamics of an evaporating sessile drop, effects of the thermal conduction in the drop, and the diffusion of vapor in air. A shape of the rotationally symmetric drop is determined within the quasistationary approximation. Nonstationary effects in the diffusion of the vapor are also taken into account. Simulation results agree well with the data of evaporation rate measurements for the toluene drop. Marangoni forces associated with the temperature dependence of the surface tension generate fluid convection in the sessile drop. Our results demonstrate several dynamical stages of the convection characterized by different number of vortices in the drop. During the early stage the array of vortices arises near a surface of the drop and induces a nonmonotonic spatial distribution of the temperature over the drop surface. The initial number of near-surface vortices in the drop is controlled by the Marangoni cell size which is similar to that given by Pearson for flat fluid layers. This number quickly decreases with time resulting in three bulk vortices in the intermediate stage. The vortices finally transform into the single convection vortex in the drop existing during about 1/2 of the evaporation time.

  11. Interferometric technique for nanoscale dynamics of fluid drops on arbitrary substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Gopal; Pandey, Mrityunjay; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate a simple interferometric probe to detect nanoscale dynamics of sessile fluid drops on arbitrary rough or flexible substrates. The technique relies on producing high-contrast Newton-ring like dynamical fringes by interference between a weak Fresnel reflection from the air-fluid interface of the drop and an air-glass interface of a convex lens placed above the drop in quasi-normal geometry. By analyzing the dynamical fringes, we observed 100-700 nm/s fluctuations in water drops evaporating on metal, leaves, insect wing, and sand paper due to their surface roughness. Similar fluctuations were also observed during spreading of non-volatile glycerin drops on various rough surfaces. Another application of the technique is demonstrated in precision measurement of change in evaporation rate of a water drop due to cooling of a metal substrate. This technique can be further miniaturized with a microscope objective with potential for wide applications.

  12. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  13. Prediction of pressure drop in fluid tuned mounts using analytical and computational techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasher, William C.; Khalilollahi, Amir; Mischler, John; Uhric, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A simplified model for predicting pressure drop in fluid tuned isolator mounts was developed. The model is based on an exact solution to the Navier-Stokes equations and was made more general through the use of empirical coefficients. The values of these coefficients were determined by numerical simulation of the flow using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package FIDAP.

  14. Drop Tower Experiments concerning Fluid Management under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulke, Diana; Dreyer, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Transport and positioning of liquid under microgravity is done utilizing capillary forces. Therefore, capillary transport processes have to be understood for a wide variety of space applications, ranging from propellant management in tanks of space transportation systems to eating and drinking devices for astronauts. There are two types of liquid transportation in microgravity using capillary forces. First, the driven liquid flow in open channels where the capillary forces at free surfaces ensure a gas and vapor free flow. Here it is important to know the limiting flow rate through such an open channel before the free surface collapses and gas is sucked into the channel. A number of different experiments at the drop tower Bremen, on sounding rockets and at the ISS have been conducted to analyse this phenomenon within different geometries. As result a geometry dependent theory for calculating the maximum flow rate has been found. On the other hand liquid positioning and transportation requires the capillary pressure of curved surfaces to achieve a liquid flow to a desired area. Especially for space applications the weight of structure has to be taken into account for development. For example liquid positioning in tanks can be achieved via a complicated set of structure filling the whole tank resulting in heavy devices not reasonable in space applications. Astrium developed in cooperation with ZARM a propellant management device much smaller than the tank volume and ensuring a gas and vapour free supply of propellant to the propulsion system. In the drop tower Bremen a model of this device was tested concerning different microgravity scenarios. To further decrease weight and ensure functionality within different scenarios structure elements are designed as perforated geometries. Capillary transport between perforated plates has been analyzed concerning the influence of geometrical pattern of perforations. The conducted experiments at the drop tower Bremen show the

  15. Deformation of a partially engulfed compound drop slowly moving in an immiscible viscous fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, L.; Lavrenteva, O. M.; Spivak, R.; Nir, A.

    2011-02-01

    Compound drops are comprised of two or more immiscible phases, one of which entirely or partially engulfs the others. In this work, we consider a partially engulfed compound drop comprised of two immiscible incompressible fluids, dispersed in an isothermal liquid, and that moved under the action of gravity and buoyancy. The contact angles between the three phases are determined by three interfacial tensions associated with the different fluids comprising the compound drop. The surfaces deform as the drop moves through the ambient fluid. If the capillary number is small (Ca≪1), corrections to the shapes of the undeformable case (Ca=0) are constructed, making use of a perturbation technique. We report on stationary drops' deformation for a variety of the physical parameters involved, such as volume ratio and surface tension of each interface, which determine the unperturbed configuration and the distribution of density between the two phases of the drop. Several examples of various transient behaviors of highly deformable compound drops are computed using FLUENT software and are presented as well.

  16. Acoustic microfluidics: Capillary waves and vortex currents in a spherical fluid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev-Stepanov, P. V.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the radiation forces in a spherical drop lying on a solid substrate. The forces form as a result of the action of a capillary wave on a fluid as it propagates along the free spherical surface. We study the structure of acoustic currents excited by the radiation forces.

  17. Reduction, partial evaporation, and spattering - Possible chemical and physical processes in fluid drop chondrule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, E. A.

    1983-01-01

    The major chemical differences between fluid drop chondrules and their probable parent materials may have resulted from the loss of volatiles such as S, H2O, Fe, and volatile siderophile elements by partial evaporation during the chondrule-forming process. Vertical access solar furnace experiments in vacuum and hydrogen have demonstrated such chemical fractionation trends using standard rock samples. The formation of immiscible iron droplets and spherules by in situ reduction of iron from silicate melt and the subsequent evaporation of the iron have been observed directly. During the time that the main sample bead is molten, many small spatter spherules are thrown off the main bead, thereby producing many additional chondrule-like melt spherules that cool rapidly and generate a population of spherules with size frequency distribution characteristics that closely approximate some populations of fluid drop chondrules in chondrites. It is possible that spatter-produced fluid drop chondrules dominate the meteoritic fluid drop chondrule populations. Such meteoritic chondrule populations should be chemically related by various relative amounts of iron and other volatile loss by vapor fractionation.

  18. Pressure drop and pumping power for fluid flow through round tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinek, D.

    1973-01-01

    Program, written for Hewlett-Packard 9100A electronic desk computer provides convenient and immediate solution to problem of calculating pressure drop and fluid pumping power for flow through round tubes. Program was designed specifically for steady-state analysis and assumes laminar flow.

  19. An undergraduate lab on measuring fluid viscosity using a miniature ball drop device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    I would like to describe measurement of fluid viscosity using a small ball drop device. It requires as little as 100 microliters of fluid. Each measurement can be performed in seconds. Through simple experimentation, students observe fluid flow confined in a thin cylindrical tube. They analyze forces and torques on a tiny ball falling and rolling down in an inclined tube. They gain practice in observing and identifying sources of errors and variability in their measurements beyond those indicated by standard error bars. The experiment is designed to yield reliable viscosity values by operating at properly chosen tilt angles and with calibration using well-characterized fluids such as mixtures of glycerol and water. The technique is also useful in research and technological applications as the device is easy to assemble and it allows the measurement of viscosity even when the fluid samples are too small to measure using most commercial viscometers or rheometers. Work Partially Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  20. On self-similarity in the drop-filament corner region formed during pinch-off of viscoelastic fluid threads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Pradeep P.; Appathurai, Santosh; Harris, Michael T.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2012-08-01

    A characteristic feature of pinch-off of fluid threads is the formation of drops connected to thinning filaments. This phenomenon is encountered in a number of widely used applications requiring the production of drops such as electronics microfabrication via inkjet printing, spray coating/drying, and microarraying. In pinch-off of viscoelastic fluid threads, the region that connects the drops to the filaments develops into a sharp corner. Recently, Clasen et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 556, 283-308 (2006)], 10.1017/S0022112006009633 showed that such a corner evolves self-similarly. They, however, neglected the capillary pressure in the drop. A modified similarity solution is presented here that incorporates the drop capillary-pressure term, and transient simulations of corner region profiles are shown to converge onto the new similarity solution better than that of Clasen et al. Indeed, the new similarity solution is valid in all the three regions: the drop, the corner, and the filament regions. Similarity solutions, so obtained, are particularly useful in capillary-breakup rheometry where they are employed to estimate a fluid's extensional viscosity—a material property of viscoelastic fluids that influences greatly the drop formation process.

  1. Gravity-Dependent Combustion and Fluids Research - From Drop Towers to Aircraft to the ISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Singh, Bhim S.; Kohl, Fred J.

    2007-01-01

    Driven by the need for knowledge related to the low-gravity environment behavior of fluids in liquid fuels management, thermal control systems and fire safety for spacecraft, NASA embarked on a decades long research program to understand, accommodate and utilize the relevant phenomena. Beginning in the 1950s, and continuing through to today, drop towers and aircraft were used to conduct an ever broadening and increasingly sophisticated suite of experiments designed to elucidate the underlying gravity-dependent physics that drive these processes. But the drop towers and aircraft afford only short time periods of continuous low gravity. Some of the earliest rocket test flights and manned space missions hosted longer duration experiments. The relatively longer duration low-g times available on the space shuttle during the 1980s and 1990s enabled many specialized experiments that provided unique data for a wide range of science and engineering disciplines. Indeed, a number of STS-based Spacelab missions were dedicated solely to basic and applied microgravity research in the biological, life and physical sciences. Between 1980 and 2000, NASA implemented a vigorous Microgravity Science Program wherein combustion science and fluid physics were major components. The current era of space stations from the MIR to the International Space Station have opened up a broad range of opportunities and facilities that are now available to support both applied research for technologies that will help to enable the future exploration missions and for a continuation of the non-exploration basic research that began over fifty years ago. The ISS-based facilities of particular value to the fluid physics and combustion/fire safety communities are the Fluids and Combustion Facility Combustion Integrated Rack and the Fluids Integrated Rack.

  2. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid-rock interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water-silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water-rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water-rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.

  3. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid-rock interactions.

    PubMed

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water-silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water-rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water-rock interactions without changes in oxidation state. PMID:26529259

  4. Response of an emulsion of leaky dielectric drops immersed in a simple shear flow: Drops more conductive than the suspending fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Arturo

    2008-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to examine the rheological properties of an emulsion of leaky dielectric fluids when an electric field is applied to the system. The emulsion consisting of neutrally buoyant drops is immersed in a simple shear flow where an electric potential difference is applied between the plates. It is assumed that drops are more conductive than the suspending fluid and that the electrical conductivity ratio between the drops and the suspending fluid, R =σi/σo, is larger than the dielectric permittivity ratio, S =ɛo/ɛi. If a single leaky dielectric drop is immersed in an electric field, this combination of properties leads to a viscous fluid motion from the equator to the poles. The response of an emulsion depends on the competition between the electrical forces and the fluid shear. This relation is quantified by the Mason number, Mn =(3λ+2)μγ˙/6(λ+1)ɛ0β2E∞2. The significance of drop deformability is measured through the electric capillary number, Ce=ɛ0β2E∞2a/γ. The microstructure and properties of an emulsion depend mainly on Mn, Ce, and R. An emulsion immersed in an electric field exhibits three different regimes for increasing Mn. When the electrical forces are substantially larger than the fluid shear, Mn <0.02, the drops aggregate in structures oriented parallel to the electric field that dictate the response of the system. At intermediate shear rates, 0.02fluid shear results in a continuous rearrangement of the aggregated structures. When the shear rate is increased further, Mn >0.2, the aggregated structures are broken up, and the effect of the electrical interaction weakens. The application of an electric field leads electrorheological emulsions to exhibit an increase in their effective viscosity for the range of properties examined here, 0.001

  5. Non-Toxic, Low-Freezing, Drop-In Replacement Heat Transfer Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutbirth, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    A non-toxic, non-flammable, low-freezing heat transfer fluid is being developed for drop-in replacement within current and future heat transfer loops currently using water or alcohol-based coolants. Numerous water-soluble compounds were down-selected and screened for toxicological, physical, chemical, compatibility, thermodynamic, and heat transfer properties. Two fluids were developed, one with a freezing point near 0 C, and one with a suppressed freezing point. Both fluids contain an additive package to improve material compatibility and microbial resistance. The optimized sub-zero solution had a freezing point of 30 C, and a freezing volume expansion of 10-percent of water. The toxicity of the solutions was experimentally determined as LD(50) greater than 5g/kg. The solutions were found to produce minimal corrosion with materials identified by NASA as potentially existing in secondary cooling loops. Thermal/hydrodynamic performance exceeded that of glycol-based fluids with comparable freezing points for temperatures Tf greater than 20 C. The additive package was demonstrated as a buffering agent to compensate for CO2 absorption, and to prevent microbial growth. The optimized solutions were determined to have physically/chemically stable shelf lives for freeze/thaw cycles and longterm test loop tests.

  6. Drop formation, pinch-off dynamics and liquid transfer of simple and complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinic, Jelena; Sharma, Vivek

    Liquid transfer and drop formation processes underlying jetting, spraying, coating, and printing - inkjet, screen, roller-coating, gravure, nanoimprint hot embossing, 3D - often involve formation of unstable columnar necks. Capillary-driven thinning of such necks and their pinchoff dynamics are determined by a complex interplay of inertial, viscous and capillary stresses for simple, Newtonian fluids. Micro-structural changes in response to extensional flow field that arises within the thinning neck give rise to additional viscoelastic stresses in complex, non- Newtonian fluids. Using FLOW-3D, we simulate flows realized in prototypical geometries (dripping and liquid bridge stretched between two parallel plates) used for studying pinch-off dynamics and influence of microstructure and viscoelasticity. In contrast with often-used 1D or 2D models, FLOW-3D allows a robust evaluation of the magnitude of the underlying stresses and extensional flow field (both uniformity and magnitude). We find that the simulated radius evolution profiles match the pinch-off dynamics that are experimentally-observed and theoretically-predicted for model Newtonian fluids and complex fluids.

  7. Numerical modelling of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase fluid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochan, Agata; Lamorski, Krzysztof; Bieganowski, Andrzej; Ryżak, Magdalena

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was validation of a numerical model of the impact of a liquid drop on the surface of a two-phase system of immiscible fluids. The drop impact phenomenon was recorded using a high-speed camera (Vision Research MIRO M310) and the data were recorded at 2000 frames per second. The numerical calculations were performed with the Finite Volume Method (FVM) solving the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations for three phases: air and two selected immiscible fluids. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique was employed for modelling of the boundaries between the phases. Numerical modelling was done with the Finite Volume Method using an available OpenFOAM software. The experiment was based on three variables: • the height from which the drop of the selected fluids fell (the speed of the drop), • the thickness of the layers of the two selected immiscible fluids (a thin layer of the fluid with a lower density was spread over the higher-density fluid), • the size of the fluid droplet. The velocity and radius of the falling drop was calculated based on the recorded images. The used parameters allowed adequate projection of the impact of fluid droplets on a system of two immiscible liquids. Development of the numerical model of splash may further have practical applications in environmental protection (spraying of hazardous fluids, spread of fuels and other hazardous substances as a result of disasters, spraying (water cooling) of hot surfaces), and in agriculture (prevention of soil erosion). The study was partially funded from the National Science Centre (Poland) based on the decision no. DEC-2012/07/N/ST10/03280.

  8. Fast Imaging Technique to Study Drop Impact Dynamics of Non-Newtonian Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qin; Peters, Ivo; Wilken, Sam; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    In the field of fluid mechanics, many dynamical processes not only occur over a very short time interval but also require high spatial resolution for detailed observation, scenarios that make it challenging to observe with conventional imaging systems. One of these is the drop impact of liquids, which usually happens within one tenth of millisecond. To tackle this challenge, a fast imaging technique is introduced that combines a high-speed camera (capable of up to one million frames per second) with a macro lens with long working distance to bring the spatial resolution of the image down to 10 µm/pixel. The imaging technique enables precise measurement of relevant fluid dynamic quantities, such as the flow field, the spreading distance and the splashing speed, from analysis of the recorded video. To demonstrate the capabilities of this visualization system, the impact dynamics when droplets of non-Newtonian fluids impinge on a flat hard surface are characterized. Two situations are considered: for oxidized liquid metal droplets we focus on the spreading behavior, and for densely packed suspensions we determine the onset of splashing. More generally, the combination of high temporal and spatial imaging resolution introduced here offers advantages for studying fast dynamics across a wide range of microscale phenomena. PMID:24637404

  9. Equilibrium shapes and stability of nonconducting pendant drops surrounded by a conducting fluid in an electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.

    1995-03-15

    The shapes and stability of pendant drops in the presence of an electric field is a classical problem in capillarity. This problem has been studied in great detail by numerous investigators when the drops are either perfect conductors or nonconductors and the surrounding fluid is a nonconductor. In this paper, the axisymmetric equilibrium shapes and stability of a nonconducting drop hanging from a nonconducting nozzle that is immersed in a perfectly conducting ambient fluid, a problem that has heretofore not been considered in the literature, are determined by solving the free boundary problem comprised of the Young-Laplace equation for drop shape and an integral equation for the electric field distribution. Here the free boundary problem is discretized by a hybrid technique in which the Young-Laplace equation is solved by the finite element method and the electrostatic problem solved by the boundary element method.

  10. Sizing of colloidal particle and protein molecules in a hanging fluid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.

    1995-01-01

    We report non-invasive particle size measurements of polystyrene latex colloidal particles and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein molecules suspended in tiny hanging fluid drops of 30 micro-Liter volume using a newly designed fiber optic probe. The probe is based upon the principles of the technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The motivation for this work comes from growing protein crystals in outer space. Protein crystals have been grown previously in hanging drops in microgravity experiments on-board the space shuttle orbiter. However, obtaining quantitative information on nucleation and growth of the protein crystals in real time has always been a desired goal, but hitherto not achieved. Several protein researchers have shown interest in using DLS to monitor crystal growth process in a droplet, but elaborate instrumentation and optical alignment problems have made in-situ applications difficult. We demonstrate that such an experiment is now possible. Our system offers fast (5 seconds) determination of particle size, utilize safe levels of very low laser power (less than or equal to 0.2 mW), a small scattering volume (approximately 2 x 10(exp -5) cu mm) and high spatial coherence (Beta) values. This is a major step forward when compared to currently available DLS systems.

  11. Merging drops in a Teflon tube, and transferring fluid between them, illustrated by protein crystallization and drug screening.

    PubMed

    Feuerborn, A; Prastowo, A; Cook, P R; Walsh, E

    2015-01-01

    The ability to manipulate drops with small volumes has many practical applications. Current microfluidic devices generally exploit channel geometry and/or active external equipment to control drops. Here we use a Teflon tube attached to a syringe pump and exploit the properties of interfaces between three immiscible liquids to create particular fluidic architectures. We then go on to merge any number of drops (with volumes of micro- to nano-liters) at predefined points in time and space in the tube; for example, 51 drops were merged in a defined order to yield one large drop. Using a different architecture, specified amounts of fluid were transferred between 2 nl drops at specified rates; for example, 2.5 pl aliquots were transferred (at rates of ~500 fl s(-1)) between two drops through inter-connecting nano-channels (width ~40 nm). One proof-of-principle experiment involved screening conditions required to crystallize a protein (using a concentration gradient created using such nano-channels). Another demonstrated biocompatibility; drugs were mixed with human cells grown in suspension or on surfaces, and the treated cells responded like those grown conventionally. Although most experiments were performed manually, moderate high-throughput potential was demonstrated by mixing ~1000 different pairs of 50 nl drops in ~15 min using a robot. We suggest this reusable, low-cost, and versatile methodology could facilitate the introduction of microfluidics into workflows of many experimental laboratories. PMID:26246015

  12. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  13. Lateral migration of a viscoelastic drop in a Newtonian fluid in a shear flow near a wall

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Swarnajay; Sarkar, Kausik

    2014-01-01

    Wall induced lateral migration of a viscoelastic (FENE-MCR) drop in a Newtonian fluid is investigated. Just like a Newtonian drop, a viscoelastic drop reaches a quasi-steady state where the lateral velocity only depends on the instantaneous distance from the wall. The drop migration velocity and the deformation scale inversely with the square and the cube of the distance from the wall, respectively. The migration velocity varies non-monotonically with increasing viscoelasticity (increasing Deborah number); initially increasing and then decreasing. An analytical explanation has been given of the effects by computing the migration velocity as arising from an image stresslet field due to the drop. The semi-analytical expression matches well with the simulated migration velocity away from the wall. It contains a viscoelastic stresslet component apart from those arising from interfacial tension and viscosity ratio. The migration dynamics is a result of the competition between the viscous (interfacial tension and viscosity ratio) and the viscoelastic effects. The viscoelastic stresslet contribution towards the migration velocity steadily increases. But the interfacial stresslet—arising purely from the drop shape—first increases and then decreases with rising Deborah number causing the migration velocity to be non-monotonic. The geometric effect of the interfacial stresslet is caused by a corresponding nonmonotonic variation of the drop inclination. High viscosity ratio is briefly considered to show that the drop viscoelasticity could stabilize a drop against breakup, and the increase in migration velocity due to viscoelasticity is larger compared to the viscosity-matched case. PMID:25378894

  14. Modeling the vertical motion of drops bouncing on a bounded fluid reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, François

    2016-03-01

    We present a first-principles model of drops bouncing on a liquid reservoir. We consider a nearly inviscid liquid reservoir and track the waves that develop in a bounded domain. Bouncing drops are modeled as vertical linear springs. We obtain an expression for the contact force between drop and liquid surface and a model where the only adjustable parameter is an effective viscosity used to describe the waves on the reservoir's surface. With no adjustable parameters associated to the drop, we recover experimental bouncing times and restitution coefficients. We use our model to describe the effect of the Bond, Ohnesorge, and Weber numbers on drops bouncing on a stationary reservoir. We also use our model to describe drops bouncing on an oscillated reservoir, describing various bouncing modes and a walking threshold.

  15. Scaling crossover in thin-film drag dynamics of fluid drops in the Hele-Shaw cell

    PubMed Central

    Yahashi, Misato; Kimoto, Natsuki; Okumura, Ko

    2016-01-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the descending motion due to gravity of a fluid drop surrounded by another immiscible fluid in a confined space between two parallel plates, i.e., in the Hele-Shaw cell. As a result, we show a new scaling regime of a nonlinear drag friction in viscous liquid that replaces the well-known Stokes’ drag friction through a clear collapse of experimental data thanks to the scaling law. In the novel regime, the dissipation in the liquid thin film formed between the drop and cell walls governs the dynamics. The crossover of this scaling regime to another scaling regime in which the dissipation inside the droplet is dominant is clearly demonstrated and a phase diagram separating these scaling regimes is presented. PMID:27562151

  16. Scaling crossover in thin-film drag dynamics of fluid drops in the Hele-Shaw cell.

    PubMed

    Yahashi, Misato; Kimoto, Natsuki; Okumura, Ko

    2016-01-01

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the descending motion due to gravity of a fluid drop surrounded by another immiscible fluid in a confined space between two parallel plates, i.e., in the Hele-Shaw cell. As a result, we show a new scaling regime of a nonlinear drag friction in viscous liquid that replaces the well-known Stokes' drag friction through a clear collapse of experimental data thanks to the scaling law. In the novel regime, the dissipation in the liquid thin film formed between the drop and cell walls governs the dynamics. The crossover of this scaling regime to another scaling regime in which the dissipation inside the droplet is dominant is clearly demonstrated and a phase diagram separating these scaling regimes is presented. PMID:27562151

  17. Near-field acousto monitoring shear interactions inside a drop of fluid: The role of the zero-slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaohua; Fernandez, Rodolfo; Li, Nan; Hung, Hsien-Chih; Venkataraman, Anuradha; Nordstrom, Richard; La Rosa, Andres H.

    2016-05-01

    A full understanding of nanometer-range (near-field) interactions between two sliding solid boundaries, with a mesoscopic fluid layer sandwiched in between, remains challenging. In particular, the origin of the blue-shift resonance frequency experienced by a laterally oscillating probe when approaching a substrate is still a matter of controversy. A simpler problem is addressed here, where a laterally oscillating solid probe interacts with a more sizable drop of fluid that rests on a substrate, aiming at identifying interaction mechanisms that could also be present in the near-field interaction case. It is found that the inelastic component of the probe-fluid interaction does not constitute the main energy-dissipation channel and has a weak dependence on fluid's viscosity, which is attributed to the zero-slip hydrodynamic condition. In contrast, the acoustic signal engendered by the fluid has a stronger dependence on the fluid's viscosity (attributed also to the zero-slip hydrodynamic condition) and correlates well with the probe's resonance frequency red-shift. We propose a similar mechanism happens in near field experiments, but a blue-shift in the probe's resonance results as a consequence of the fluid molecules (subjected to the zero-slip condition at both the probe and substrate boundaries) exerting instead a spring type restoring force on the probe.

  18. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  19. Overall heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop in a typical tubular exchanger employing alumina nano-fluid as the tube side hot fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabeel, A. E.; Abdelgaied, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    Nano-fluids are used to improve the heat transfer rates in heat exchangers, especially; the shell-and-tube heat exchanger that is considered one of the most important types of heat exchangers. In the present study, an experimental loop is constructed to study the thermal characteristics of the shell-and-tube heat exchanger; at different concentrations of Al2O3 nonmetallic particles (0.0, 2, 4, and 6 %). This material concentrations is by volume concentrations in pure water as a base fluid. The effects of nano-fluid concentrations on the performance of shell and tube heat exchanger have been conducted based on the overall heat transfer coefficient, the friction factor, the pressure drop in tube side, and the entropy generation rate. The experimental results show that; the highest heat transfer coefficient is obtained at a nano-fluid concentration of 4 % of the shell side. In shell side the maximum percentage increase in the overall heat transfer coefficient has reached 29.8 % for a nano-fluid concentration of 4 %, relative to the case of the base fluid (water) at the same tube side Reynolds number. However; in the tube side the maximum relative increase in pressure drop has recorded the values of 12, 28 and 48 % for a nano-material concentration of 2, 4 and 6 %, respectively, relative to the case without nano-fluid, at an approximate value of 56,000 for Reynolds number. The entropy generation reduces with increasing the nonmetallic particle volume fraction of the same flow rates. For increase the nonmetallic particle volume fraction from 0.0 to 6 % the rate of entropy generation decrease by 10 %.

  20. High-Pressure Transport Properties Of Fluids: Theory And Data From Levitated Drops At Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth; Ohsaka, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Although the high pressure multicomponent fluid conservation equations have already been derived and approximately validated for binary mixtures by this PI, the validation of the multicomponent theory is hampered by the lack of existing mixing rules for property calculations. Classical gas dynamics theory can provide property mixing-rules at low pressures exclusively. While thermal conductivity and viscosity high-pressure mixing rules have been documented in the literature, there is no such equivalent for the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. The primary goal of this investigation is to extend the low pressure mixing rule theory to high pressures and validate the new theory with experimental data from levitated single drops. The two properties that will be addressed are the diffusion coefficients and the thermal diffusion factors. To validate/determine the property calculations, ground-based experiments from levitated drops are being conducted.

  1. Supercritical (and Subcritical) Fluid Behavior and Modeling: Drops, Streams, Shear and Mixing Layers, Jets and Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.

    1999-01-01

    A critical review of recent investigations in the real of supercritical (and subcritical) fluid behavior is presented with the goal of obtaining a perspective on the peculiarities of high pressure observations.

  2. Evaporation dynamics of non-spherical sessile drops of pure fluids and binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenz, Pedro J.; Matar, Omar K.; Sefiane, Khellil; Valluri, Prashant; Kim, Jungho

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of pure axisymmetric volatile sessile droplets have been meticulously examined over the last four decades but remain poorly understood. Studies focusing on more realistic non-spherical configurations are virtually non-existent. The dynamics of the latter are examined in this investigation by means of experiments and numerical simulations. We show that the lifetime and bulk flow characteristics of these drops depend on their size and shape. The irregular geometries lead to the emergence preferential convection currents in the liquid as well as differential local evaporation rates noticeable along the contact line. Similarly, we inspect the thermocapillary stability of the flow, which results as the liquid volatility increases, and find that this is also affected by the non-uniform wettability along the triple line. The Marangoni-driven instabilities grow in an intricate spatio-temporal fashion leading to the emergence of different flow regimes. Finally, we also provide new insights into the evaporation process of binary-mixture drops. Memphis Multiphase (EPSRC EP/K003976/1) & ThermaPOWER (EU IRSES-PIRSES GA-2011-294905).

  3. High Pressure, Transport Properties of Fluids: Theory and Data from Levitated Fluid-Drops at Combustion-Relevant Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, J.; Ohaska, K.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to derive a set of consistent mixing rules for calculating diffusivities and thermal diffusion factors over a thermodynamic regime encompassing the subcritical and supercritical ranges. These should serve for modeling purposes, and therefore for accurate simulations of high pressure phenomena such as fluid disintegration, turbulent flows and sprays. A particular consequence of this work will be the determination of effective Lewis numbers for supercritical conditions, thus enabling the examination of the relative importance of heat and mass transfer at supercritical pressures.

  4. An Experimental Investigation of Fluid Flow Resulting from the Impact of a Water Drop with an Unyielding Dry Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stow, C. D.; Hadfield, M. G.

    1981-01-01

    The flow of fluid associated with the impact of water drops of radius R at a speed V onto unyielding dry metal surfaces of known roughness R_a is described. Spatial dimensions of the deforming drop are normalized by transformations of the kind x' = x/R, and time scales are normalized according to t' = tV/R, to permit comparison of events where R or V differ. It is shown that the primary influence of the surface roughness parameter R_a is the determination of the condition for the ejection of secondary droplets by the excitation of an instability in the developing watersheet; provided R_a ~= R, it is possible to evaluate the condition to a high degree of accuracy, and for R_a = 0.84 μ m it is found to be α4/3RV1.69 > 7.4, where α is the eccentricity of the drop at the moment of impact. Deceleration of the drop apex does not commence until t' > 0.6, contrary to the prediction of Engel (1955) but in good agreement with that of Savic & Boult (1957). Close examination of the very early stages of impact suggests strongly that the so-called watersheet originates at a moment t' = 0.01 after first contact, regardless of the absolute values of R, V or R_a; the initial normalized watersheet velocity is of order 5. Where there is ejected material, its normalized velocity at the moment of ejection is of the order of 20% greater than that of the watersheet substrate. Simple calculations also suggest that initial fluid velocities greater than 10V are required immediately before the initiation of the watersheet (t' < 0.01). Impacts at speeds considerably greater than the appropriate terminal fall speed in air show no deviations in character from those investigated at much lower speeds. A simple subsidiary experiment also suggests that greater impact velocities are required to produce splashing on inclined targets.

  5. Evaluation of Steadiness and Drop Size Distribution in Sprays Generated by Different Twin-Fluid Atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaremba, Matouš; Mlkvik, Marek; Malý, Milan; Jedelský, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Twin-fluid atomizers underwent a significant development during the last few decades. They are common in many industrial applications such as fuel spraying, melt atomization and food processing. This paper is focused on the evaluation of four different twin-fluid atomizers. The aim is to compare the quality of sprays generated by various atomizers with similar dimensions and in the same operating regimes. A phase- Doppler anemometry (PDA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to measure spray characteristics such as velocity and size of the droplets. Measured data were used to compare droplet size distribution and to evaluate steadiness of the spray. Visualisations were made to support measured data and to clarify the principles of primary atomization and its influence on the spray.

  6. Earthquake dynamics. Mapping pressurized volcanic fluids from induced crustal seismic velocity drops.

    PubMed

    Brenguier, F; Campillo, M; Takeda, T; Aoki, Y; Shapiro, N M; Briand, X; Emoto, K; Miyake, H

    2014-07-01

    Volcanic eruptions are caused by the release of pressure that has accumulated due to hot volcanic fluids at depth. Here, we show that the extent of the regions affected by pressurized fluids can be imaged through the measurement of their response to transient stress perturbations. We used records of seismic noise from the Japanese Hi-net seismic network to measure the crustal seismic velocity changes below volcanic regions caused by the 2011 moment magnitude (M(w)) 9.0 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. We interpret coseismic crustal seismic velocity reductions as related to the mechanical weakening of the pressurized crust by the dynamic stress associated with the seismic waves. We suggest, therefore, that mapping seismic velocity susceptibility to dynamic stress perturbations can be used for the imaging and characterization of volcanic systems. PMID:24994652

  7. Controlling the Mobility of the Fluid Interface of Moving Gas Bubbles or Liquid Drops by Using Micellar Solutions of Surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldarelli, Charles; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity processes must rely on mechanisms other than buoyancy to move bubbles or droplets from one region to another in a continuous liquid phase. One suggested method is thermocapillary migration in which a temperature gradient is applied to the continuous phase. A significant and as yet unresolved impediment to the use of thermocapillary migration to direct bubble or drop motion is that these migrations can be significantly retarded by the adsorption onto the fluid particle surface of surface active impurities unavoidably present in the continuous or (if the particle is a liquid) droplet phases. The focus of our research was to develop a theory for remobilizing fluid particle interfaces retarded by a surfactant impurity in an effort to make more viable the use of thermocapillary migrations for the management of bubbles and drops in microgravity. We postulated that a surfactant at high bulk concentration which kinetically exchanges rapidly with the surface can restore interface mobility. The scaling arguments along with a discussion of the previous literature is reviewed in the context of the scaling framework. The specific objectives of the research were twofold. The first was to prove the remobilization theory by studying a model problem. As the mechanism for remobilization is independent of the force which drives the particle, the fluid particle shape and the presence of fluid inertia, we chose the simplest model consisting of a spherical bubble rising steadily by buoyancy in creeping flow. We solved the hydrodynamic and surfactant transport equations for rapid kinetic exchange to demonstrate that as the concentration increases, the Marangoni retardation at first increases (the low k behavior) and then decreases (the high k behavior). The second objective was to develop a method to determine the kinetic rate constants of a surfactant molecule, since this information is necessary to select surfactants which will exchange rapidly enough relative to the

  8. High-Speed Transport of Fluid Drops and Solid Particles via Surface Acoustic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Badescu, Mircea; Lih, Shyh-shiuh

    2012-01-01

    A compact sampling tool mechanism that can operate at various temperatures, and transport and sieve particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains with no moving parts, has been created using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) that are emitted by an inter-digital transducer (IDT). The generated waves are driven at about 10 MHz, and it causes powder to move towards the IDT at high speed with different speeds for different sizes of particles, which enables these particles to be sieved. This design is based on the use of SAWs and their propelling effect on powder particles and fluids along the path of the waves. Generally, SAWs are elastic waves propagating in a shallow layer of about one wavelength beneath the surface of a solid substrate. To generate SAWs, a piezoelectric plate is used that is made of LiNbO3 crystal cut along the x-axis with rotation of 127.8 along the y-axis. On this plate are printed pairs of fingerlike electrodes in the form of a grating that are activated by subjecting the gap between the electrodes to electric field. This configuration of a surface wave transmitter is called IDT. The IDT that was used consists of 20 pairs of fingers with 0.4-mm spacing, a total length of 12.5 mm. The surface wave is produced by the nature of piezoelectric material to contract or expand when subjected to an electric field. Driving the IDT to generate wave at high amplitudes provides an actuation mechanism where the surface particles move elliptically, pulling powder particles on the surface toward the wavesource and pushing liquids in the opposite direction. This behavior allows the innovation to separate large particles and fluids that are mixed. Fluids are removed at speed (7.5 to 15 cm/s), enabling this innovation of acting as a bladeless wiper for raindrops. For the windshield design, the electrodes could be made transparent so that they do not disturb the driver or pilot. Multiple IDTs can be synchronized to transport water or powder over larger

  9. Retaining activity of enzymes after capture and extraction within a single-drop of biological fluid using immunoaffinity membranes.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Youji; Sato, Yuki

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was the measurement of enzyme activity within a single-drop of biological fluid after micropurification. Esterase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) retained their enzymatic activities after being captured by membrane-immobilized antibodies, which were prepared by non-denaturing two-dimensional electrophoresis, transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride and then stained by Ponceau S. The activities of both enzymes were also measured after being captured by antibodies and biotinylated antibodies bound to membrane-immobilized protein A or avidin, respectively. After esterase and LDH were captured from biological samples by membrane-immobilized protein A or avidin, their activities were semi-quantitatively measured on the surface of the membrane using fluorescence determination. More than 51% of enzyme activities were retained even after the enzymes were captured by biotinylated antibody bound to membrane-immobilized avidin and eluted by rinsing with 5μL of 1% Triton X-100, compared with the activities of the enzyme on the immunoaffinity membrane. PMID:26776499

  10. Foot Drop

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Foot Drop Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Foot Drop? Foot drop describes the inability to raise ...

  11. Pressure drop and heat transfer in turbulent non-Newtonian pipe flow of advanced energy transmission fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, U. S.; Liu, K. V.; Kasza, K. E.

    1988-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, is making significant progress on the development of advanced energy transmission fluids for thermal systems, in particular district heating and cooling systems. ANL has identified two concepts for developing advanced energy transmission fluids. Tests have been conducted at ANL to prove these concepts. This paper presents experimental results and discusses the degradation behavior of linear polymer additives and the flow and heat transfer characteristics of non-melting slurry flows. The experimental data obtained in this study provide support for the use of friction reducing additives and slurries in thermal system applications.

  12. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  13. Drag on Sessile Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Nobes, David; Sen, Debjyoti; Amirfazli, Alidad; University of Alberta Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    We present the first ever direct measurements of the coefficient of drag on sessile drops at Reynolds numbers from the creeping flow regime up to the point of incipient motion, made using a newly developed floating element differential drag sensor. Surfaces of different wettabilities (PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS)), wet by water, hexadecane, and various silicone oils, are used to study the effects of drop shape, and fluid properties on drag. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number (scaled by drop height) varies slightly with liquid-solid system and drop volume with results suggesting the drop experiences increased drag compared to similar shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillation influencing the otherwise laminar flow. Drops adopting more spherical shapes are seen to experience the greatest force at any given airspeed. This indicates that the relative exposed areas of drops is an important consideration in terms of force, with implications for the shedding of drops in applications such as airfoil icing and fuel cell flooding. The measurement technique used in this work can be adapted to measure drag force on other deformable, lightly adhered objects such as dust, sand, snow, vesicles, foams, and biofilms. The authours acknowledge NSERC, Alberta Innovates Technology Futures, and the Killam Trusts.

  14. Drop impact of suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoraval, M.-J.; Boyer, F.; Sandoval Nava, E.; Dijksman, J. F.; Lohse, D.; Snoeijer, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Drop impact studies have a wide range of applications, many of which involve complex fluids. We study here the liquid drop impact of a silver nano-particles dispersion on a solid glass surface. This dispersion is used for inkjet printing of functional electronic materials. When the impact velocity increases, the drop classically splashes into smaller droplets. However, it surprisingly stops splashing above a critical impact velocity. We combine high-speed imaging experiments with different characterizations of the dispersion to understand this transition to non-splashing.

  15. Effect of particle geometry on triple line motion of nano-fluid drops and deposit nano-structuring.

    PubMed

    Askounis, Alexandros; Sefiane, Khellil; Koutsos, Vasileios; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2015-08-01

    We illustrate the importance of particle geometry on droplet contact line pinning, 'coffee-stain' formation and nano-structuring within the resulting rings. We present the fundamentals of pure liquid droplet evaporation and then discuss the effect of particles on the evaporation process. The resulting coffee-stain patterns and particle structuring within them are presented and discussed. In the second part, we turn our attention to the effect of particle geometry on the evaporation process. A wide range of particle shapes, categorised according to aspect ratio, from the simple shape of a sphere to the highly irregular shapes of platelets and tubes is discussed. Particle geometry effect on evaporation behaviour was quantified in terms of change in contact angle and contact radius for the stick-slip cases. Consequently the hysteretic energy barrier pinning the droplets was estimated, showing an increasing trend with particle aspect ratio. The three-phase contact line (TL) motion kinetics are complemented with analysis of the nano-structuring behaviour of each shape, leading to the identification of the two main parameters affecting nanoparticle self-assembly behaviour at the wedge. Flow velocity and wedge constraints were found to have antagonist effects on particle deposition, although these varied with particle shape. This description should help in understanding the drying behaviour of more complex fluids. Furthermore, knowing the fundamentals of this simple and inexpensive surface patterning technique should permit its tailoring to the needs of many potential applications. PMID:24927853

  16. Drop dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    The drop dynamics module is a Spacelab-compatible acoustic positioning and control system for conducting drop dynamics experiments in space. It consists basically of a chamber, a drop injector system, an acoustic positioning system, and a data collection system. The principal means of collecting data is by a cinegraphic camera. The drop is positioned in the center of the chamber by forces created by standing acoustic waves generated in the nearly cubical chamber (about 12 cm on a side). The drop can be spun or oscillated up to fission by varying the phse and amplitude of the acoustic waves. The system is designed to perform its experiments unattended, except for start-up and shutdown events and other unique events that require the attention of the Spacelab payload specialist.

  17. Pressure Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Mike Lawson briefly discussed pressure drop for aerospace applications and presented short stories about adventures experienced while working at NASA and General Dynamics, including exposure to technologies like the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) cart and the SWME.

  18. Capillary Thinning of Particle-laden Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner, Brayden; Thete, Sumeet; Jahns, Matt; Doshi, Pankaj; Basaran, Osman

    2015-11-01

    Drop formation is central in many applications such as ink-jet printing, microfluidic devices, and atomization. During drop formation, a thinning filament is created between the about-to-form drop and the fluid hanging from the nozzle. Therefore, the physics of capillary thinning of filaments is key to understanding drop formation and has been thoroughly studied for pure Newtonian fluids. The thinning dynamics is, however, altered completely when the fluid contains particles, the physics of which is not well understood. In this work, we explore the impact of solid particles on filament thinning and drop formation by using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations.

  19. Viscous effects in drop impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Roberto; Schroll, Robert; Blanchette, Francois; Zhang, Wendy

    2006-11-01

    We investigate the onset of splash for a viscous drop impacting a solid surface. The simulation is based on the volume-of-fluid methods of Popinet and Zaleski [Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 30, 775-793 (1999)] and tracks the interface evolution explicitly. The qualitative shape evolution and the quantitative spreading dynamics are examined and compared against available experimental results.

  20. Drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  1. Proceedings of the Second International Colloquium on Drops and Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecroissette, D. H. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Applications of bubble and drop technologies are discussed and include: low gravity manufacturing, containerless melts, microballoon fabrication, ink printers, laser fusion targets, generation of organic glass and metal shells, and space processing. The fluid dynamics of bubbles and drops were examined. Thermomigration, capillary flow, and interfacial tension are discussed. Techniques for drop control are presented and include drop size control and drop shape control.

  2. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of The Fluid Flow through an Array of Interrupted, Parallel-Plate Heat Transfer Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Sadanari; Yagi, Yoshinao

    A scale-up modeling technique was used to examine the effect of the geometrical properties of interrupted surfaces on the heat transfer and pressure drop performance of compact heat exchangers having off-set-strip and slotted fins. The test cores, each consisting of a number of machined copper finns, were tested in a subsonic wind tunnel. The heat transfer and the pressure drop for each test core was measured for various fin lengths (in flow direction) and slot distances. Flow visualization and local turbulence intensity and pressure measurements within each test core were also performed to gain insight into the mechanisms of heat transfer augmentation in compact heat exchangers with interrupted surfaces. The effect of the geometrical properties of the fins as well as the Reynolds number on the heat transfer rate and the pressure drop were determined and those results were interpreted in terms of observed flow structure. Basic heat transfer and pressure drop data are presented in terms of Colburn j-factors and Fanning friction factors plotted versus Reynolds number. An empirical correlation for heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics for off-set-strip fins are presented.

  3. Large amplitude drop shape oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental study of large amplitude drop shape oscillation was conducted in immiscible liquids systems and with levitated free liquid drops in air. In liquid-liquid systems the results indicate the existence of familiar characteristics of nonlinear phenomena. The resonance frequency of the fundamental quadrupole mode of stationary, low viscosity Silicone oil drops acoustically levitated in water falls to noticeably low values as the amplitude of oscillation is increased. A typical, experimentally determined relative frequency decrease of a 0.5 cubic centimeters drop would be about 10% when the maximum deformed shape is characterized by a major to minor axial ratio of 1.9. On the other hand, no change in the fundamental mode frequency could be detected for 1 mm drops levitated in air. The experimental data for the decay constant of the quadrupole mode of drops immersed in a liquid host indicate a slight increase for larger oscillation amplitudes. A qualitative investigation of the internal fluid flows for such drops revealed the existence of steady internal circulation within drops oscillating in the fundamental and higher modes. The flow field configuration in the outer host liquid is also significantly altered when the drop oscillation amplitude becomes large.

  4. Microfluidics with compound ``bubble-drops''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saif A.; Duraiswamy, Suhanya

    2008-11-01

    ``Bubble-drops'' are compound fluid particles comprising a gas bubble and liquid drop that flow as a single fluid object through another immiscible liquid in a microchannel network. These fluid particles represent discrete multiphase `quanta', and expand the sphere of application of droplet microfluidics to inter-phase phenomena. We present here a simple method to generate monodisperse bubble-drop trains in microfabricated channel networks. The difference in drag force exerted on flowing bubbles and drops by the immiscible carrier liquid implies different translational speeds, thus providing the driving force for bubble-drop formation. We outline the criteria for stable generation and analyze factors influencing bubble-drop dynamics. We will also highlight several applications in chemical and biological synthesis and screening.

  5. Characterisation of heat transfer and pressure drop in condensation processes within mini-channel tubes with last generation of refrigerant fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Belchi, D. Alejandro

    Heat exchanger developments are driven by energetic efficiency increase and emissionreduction. To reach the standards new system are required based on mini-channels. Mini-channels can be described as tubes with one or more ports extruded in aluminiumwith hydraulic diameter are in the range of 0.2 to 3 mm. Its use in refrigeration systemsfor some years ago is a reality thanks to the human ability to made micro-scale systems.Some heat exchanger enterprises have some models developed specially for their use inautomotive sector, cooling sector, and industrial refrigeration without having a deepknowledge of how these reduced geometries affect the most important parameters suchas pressure drop and the heat transfer coefficient. To respond to this objective, an exhaustive literature review of the last two decades hasbeen performed to determinate the state of the research. Between all the publications,several models have been selected to check the predicting capacities of them becausemost of them were developed for single port mini-channel tubes. Experimentalmeasurements of heat transfer coefficient and frictional pressure drop were recorded inan experimental installation built on purpose at the Technical University of Cartagena.Multiple variables are recorded in this installation in order to calculate local heattransfer coefficient in two-phase condensing flow within mini-channels. Both pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient experimental measurements arecompared to the previously mentioned models. Most of them capture the trend correctlybut others fail predicting experimental data. These differences can be explained by theexperimental parameters considered during the models development. In some cases themodels found in the literature were developed specific conditions, consequently theirpredicting capacities are restricted. As main contributions, this thesis provides new modelling tools for mini-channelscondensing pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient

  6. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  7. Leidenfrost drops: Effect of gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquet, L.; Brandenbourger, M.; Sobac, B.; Biance, A.-L.; Colinet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2015-04-01

    A specific experimental set-up has been installed in a large centrifuge facility in order to study different aspects of Leidenfrost drops under high-gravity conditions (5, 10, 15 and 20 times the Earth gravity). In particular, the drop lifetime and more precisely the variations of drop diameter vs. time have shown to be in good agreement with previous experiments and scaling analysis (Biance A.-L. et al., Phys. Fluids, 15 (2003) 1632). Moreover, so-called chimneys are expectedly observed in the large puddles, the distance between two chimneys depending linearly on the capillary length. Finally, the Leidenfrost point, i.e. the temperature above which the Leidenfrost effect takes place, was unexpectedly found to increase slightly with gravity. A qualitative explanation based on a refined model (Sobac B. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90 (2014) 053011) recognizing the non-trivial shape of the vapor film under the drop is proposed to explain this observation.

  8. Exploding Water Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Water has the unusual property that it expands on freezing, so that ice has a specific gravity of 0.92 compared to 1.0 for liquid water. The most familiar demonstration of this property is ice cubes floating in a glass of water. A more dramatic demonstration is the ice bomb shown in Fig. 1. Here a cast iron flask is filled with water and tightly stoppered. The flask is then cooled, either by leaving it outdoors in winter or by immersing it in a cryogenic fluid, until the water freezes. As the water freezes and expands, the pressure inside the flask increases dramatically, eventually becoming sufficient to fracture the metal walls of the enclosure. A related, but much less familiar, phenomenon is the explosive fracturing of small water drops upon freezing. That water drops can fracture in this way has been known for many years, and the phenomenon has been described in detail in the atmospheric sciences literature, where it is seen as relevant to the freezing of raindrops as they fall through cold air. Carefully controlled experiments have been done documenting how the character and frequency of fracture is affected by such variables as drop size, rate of cooling, chemistry of dissolved gases, etc. Here I describe instead a simple demonstration of fracture suitable for video analysis and appropriate for study at the introductory physics level. Readers may also be interested in other characteristics of freezing and fragmenting water drops, for example, charge separation upon fracture and the appearance of spikes and bulges on the surface.

  9. Binary drop coalescence in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungyong

    Experiments on binary drop collisions within an index-matched liquid were conducted for Weber numbers (We) of 1-50 and collision angles of 15-80° below the horizontal. Drop pairs of water/glycerin mixture were injected into silicone oil and, due to gravitational effects, traveled on downward trajectories before colliding. A dual-field high-speed PIV measurement system was employed to quantify drop trajectories and overall collision conditions while simultaneously examining detailed velocity fields near the collision interface. In the We range examined, for equal size drops, both rebounding and coalescing behavior occurred. The drops coalesced for We > 10 and rebounded for We < 10, and this boundary was found to be insensitive to collision angle. Coalescence was found to result from a combination of vortical flow within drops and strong drop deformation characteristic of higher We. Flow through the centers of opposing ring vortices, strengthened by drop deformation, enhanced drainage of the thin film in the impact region, leading to film rupture and coalescence. The collision angle affected the eventual location of film rupture, with the rupture location moving higher in the thin film region as the collision angle increased. The film rupture location correlated closely with the location of maximum downward velocity in the thin film. The time between collision and rupture increases with We until We = 30. For We > 30, the time decreases as We increases. Unequal size drop collisions with drop size ratios (Ds/D L) of 0.7 and 0.5 were also examined. Coalescence occurs above We* = 11 similar to equal size drops. As drop size ratio decreases, the intervening film deforms more. If the velocity ratio uL/u s < 1, the deformed interface becomes flat before coalescence. The rupture location varies due to the asymmetry of the drops. As collision offset increases (B > 0), the film rupture time is shortened and mixing of the fluid from both drops is enhanced after coalescence

  10. Shapes of Bubbles and Drops in Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connell, James

    2000-01-01

    Explains the shape distortions that take place in fluid packets (bubbles or drops) with steady flow motion by using the laws of Archimedes, Pascal, and Bernoulli rather than advanced vector calculus. (WRM)

  11. Review on drop towers and long drop tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayuzick, R. J.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Robinson, M. B.

    1987-01-01

    A drop tube is an enclosure in which a molten sample can be solidified while falling; three such large tubes are currently in existence, all at NASA research facilities, and are engaged in combustion and fluid physics-related experiments rather than in materials research. JPL possesses smaller tubes, one of which can be cryogenically cooled to produce glass and metal microshells. A new small drop tube will soon begin operating at NASA Lewis that is equipped with four high-speed two-color pyrometers spaced equidistantly along the column.

  12. Air induced breakup of drops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jaehoon; Tryggvason, Gretar

    1997-11-01

    The deformation and breakup of drops subject to both sudden and gradual acceleration is examined by axisymmetric inviscid and full numerical simulations. In the full simulations, the Navier Stokes equations are solved for the fluid inside and outside of the drop by a Front Tracking/Finite Difference Method. In the limit of small density stratification, inviscid simulations show the formation of a toroidal drop for small surface tension and the formation of skirts as the surface tension is increased. The viscous computations show a similar transition plus a RbagS break up for a relatively high surface tension, but not high enough so that the drop reaches a steady state deformation. The RbagS break up mode appears when the drop slows down due to viscous dissipation after most of its fluid has accumulated in the rim, forming a torous connected by a thin film. A RbagS is formed when the rim starts to fall faster than the film. The various break up modes, as a function of the Ohnesorge and Weber (or Eotvos) numbers as well as property ratios is discussed. Supported by AFOSR.

  13. Electrohydrodynamics of a particle-covered drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouriemi, Malika; Vlahovska, Petia

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a drop nearly-completely covered with a particle monolayer in a uniform DC electric field. The weakly conducting fluid system consists of a silicon oil drop suspended in castor oil. A broad range of particle sizes, conductivities, and shapes is explored. In weak electric fields, the presence of particles increases drop deformation compared to a particle-free drop and suppresses the electrohydrodynamic flow. Very good agreement is observed between the measured drop deformation and the small deformation theory derived for surfactant-laden drops (Nganguia et al., 2013). In stronger electric fields, where drops are expected to undergo Quincke rotation (Salipante and Vlahovska, 2010), the presence of the particles greatly decreases the threshold for rotation and the stationary tilted drop configuration observed for clean drop is replaced by a spinning drop with either a wobbling inclination or a very low inclination. These behaviors resemble the predicted response of rigid ellipsoids in uniform electric fields. At even stronger electric fields, the particles can form dynamic wings or the drop implodes. The similar behavior of particle-covered and surfactant-laden drops provides new insights into understanding stability of Pickering emulsions. Supported by NSF-CBET 1437545.

  14. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dilating Eye Drops En Español Read in Chinese What are dilating eye drops? Dilating eye drops contain medication to enlarge ( ...

  15. Production of ultra-small ink jet drops using drop-on-demand (DOD) drop formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Haijing; Xu, Qi; Harris, Michael; Basaran, Osman

    2009-11-01

    The formation of drops having radii that are smaller than the radii of the nozzle from which they are ejected is an active area of research in drop-on-demand (DOD) ink jet printing. In the last decade, Chen and Basaran (Phys Fluids, 2002; US patent, 2003) showed experimentally and computationally that several fold reduction in drop radius R (an order of magnitude reduction in drop volume V) is possible by judicious use of waveform modulation in which one or more intrinsic time scales such as capillary time, time for vorticity diffusion, and time for piezo actuation are varied. In this paper, we report the results of a computational study through which we have uncovered a novel method for achieving a factor of 5-10 reduction in R (about two to three orders of magnitude reduction in V). Scaling arguments are also developed which yield a simple expression for the size of the ultra-small drops formed as a function of the governing dimensionless groups. Formation of such small drops using DOD technology may prove especially attractive in applications involving direct printing of flexible electronics and solar cells.

  16. Joint fluid Gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    Gram stain of joint fluid ... A sample of joint fluid is needed. The fluid sample is sent to a lab where a small drop is placed in a ... on how to prepare for the removal of joint fluid, see joint fluid aspiration .

  17. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Smith, Robbie E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An apparatus (10) is constructed having a cylindrical enclosure (16) within which a disc-shaped wicking element (18) is positioned. A well or recess (22) is cut into an upper side (24) of this wicking element, and a glass cover plate or slip (28) having a protein drop disposed thereon is sealably positioned on the wicking element (18), with drop (12) being positioned over well or recess (22). A flow of control fluid is generated by a programmable gradient former (16), with this control fluid having a vapor pressure that is selectively variable. This flow of control fluid is coupled to the wicking element (18) where control fluid vapor diffusing from walls (26) of the recess (22) is exposed to the drop (12), forming a vapor pressure gradient between the drop (12) and the control fluid vapor. Initially, this gradient is adjusted to draw solvent from the drop (12) at a relatively high rate, and as the critical supersaturation point is approached (the point at which crystal nucleation occurs), the gradient is reduced to more slowly draw solvent from the drop (12). This allows discrete protein molecules more time to orient themselves into an ordered crystalline lattice, producing protein crystals which, when processed by X-ray crystallography, possess a high degree of resolution.

  18. Head-on collision of drops: A numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R.; Jan, Y.-J.; Tryggvason, G.

    1993-01-01

    The head-on collision of equal sized drops is studied by full numerical simulations. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved for fluid motion both inside and outside the drops using a front tracking/finite difference technique. The drops are accelerated toward each other by a body force that is turned off before the drops collide. When the drops collide, the fluid between them is pushed outward leaving a thin later bounded by the drop surface. This layer gets progressively thinner as the drops continue to deform and in several of the calculations this double layer is artificially removed once it is thin enough, thus modeling rupture. If no rupture takes place, the drops always rebound, but if the film is ruptured the drops may coalesce permanently or coalesce temporarily and then split again.

  19. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  20. Computations of Drop Collision and Coalescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Juric, Damir; Nas, Selman; Mortazavi, Saeed

    1996-01-01

    Computations of drops collisions, coalescence, and other problems involving drops are presented. The computations are made possible by a finite difference/front tracking technique that allows direct solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for a multi-fluid system with complex, unsteady internal boundaries. This method has been used to examine the various collision modes for binary collisions of drops of equal size, mixing of two drops of unequal size, behavior of a suspension of drops in linear and parabolic shear flows, and the thermal migration of several drops. The key results from these simulations are reviewed. Extensions of the method to phase change problems and preliminary results for boiling are also shown.

  1. Alternate drop pulse polarography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, J.H.; Jackson, L.L.; Osteryoung, R.A.

    1976-01-01

    The new technique of alternate drop pulse polarography is presented. An experimental evaluation of alternate drop pulse polarography shows complete compensation of the capacitative background due to drop expansion. The capillary response phenomenon was studied in the absence of faradaic reaction and the capillary response current was found to depend on the pulse width to the -0.72 power. Increased signal-to-noise ratios were obtained using alternate drop pulse polarography at shorter drop times.

  2. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A crystal growth apparatus is presented. It utilizes a vapor diffusion method for growing protein crystals, and particularly such an apparatus wherein a ball mixer is used to mix the fluids that form a drop within which crystals are grown. Particular novelty of this invention lies in utilizing a ball mixer to completely mix the precipitate and protein solutions prior to forming the drop. Additional novelty lies in details of construction of the vials, the fluid deployment system, and the fluid storage system of the preferred embodiment.

  3. Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Lacy, Claud E.; Wozniak, Guenter; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    1996-01-01

    When a drop or bubble is placed in another fluid and subjected to the action of a temperature gradient, the drop will move. Such motion is a direct consequence of the variation of interfacial tension with temperature, and is termed thermocapillary migration. This paper discusses results from experiments conducted in reduced gravity on the thermocapillary motion of bubbles and drops.

  4. Electrolytic drops in an electric field: A numerical study of drop deformation and breakup.

    PubMed

    Pillai, R; Berry, J D; Harvie, D J E; Davidson, M R

    2015-07-01

    The deformation and breakup of an axisymmetric, conducting drop suspended in a nonconducting medium and subjected to an external electric field is numerically investigated here using an electrokinetic model. This model uses a combined level set-volume of fluid formulation of the deformable surfaces, along with a multiphase implementation of the Nernst-Planck equation for transport of ions, that allows for varying conductivity inside the drop. A phase diagram, based on a parametric study, is used to characterize the stability conditions. Stable drops with lower ion concentration are characterized by longer drop shapes than those achieved at higher ion concentrations. For higher drop ion concentration, greater charge accumulation is observed at drop tips. Consequently, such drops break up by pinching off rather than tip streaming. The charge contained in droplets released from unstable drops is shown to increase with drop ion concentration. These dynamic drop behaviors depend on the strength of the electric field and the concentration of ions in the drop and result from the interplay between the electric forces arising from the permittivity jump at the drop interface and the ions in the bulk. PMID:26274270

  5. Micro-explosion of compound drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Kuei; Lin, Ta-Hui

    2014-08-01

    Introducing water into spray combustion systems, by either water-in-oil emulsification or supplementary water injection, is one of the major techniques for combustion improvement and NOx reduction. Plentiful researches are available on combustion of water-in-oil emulsion fuel drops. The emulsified liquid is a heterogeneous mixture of immiscible liquids. One component forms the continuous phase and the other component forms the discrete phase. The discrete phase consists of globules of the one fluid that are suspended in the continuous phase fluid. Water-in-oil emulsions are commonly considered for combustion applications because emulsions can result in micro-explosion, thereby reducing the average drop diameter to enhance liquid vaporization, and suppressing the formation of soot and NOx. However, the water addition generally does not exceed about 20% for smooth engine operations[!, 21. The combustion characteristics and micro-explosion of emulsion drop were studied by many researchers. The micro-explosion of water in fuel emulsion drops was caused by very fast growth of superheated water vapor bubbles, its superheat limits must be lower than the boiling point temperature of the fuel. These bubbles were primarily governed by the pressure difference between the superheated vapor and the liquid, and by the inertia imparted to the liquid by the motion of the bubble surface[3 6 In this study, we used a coaxial nozzle to generation the multi-component drop. The different type of water-in-oil fuel drops called the compound drops. Unlike an emulsion drop, a compound drop consists of a water core and a fuel shell, which can originate from the phase separation of emulsion[7, 81 or a water drop colliding with a fuel drop[9, 101 Burning and micro-explosion of compound drops have been found to be distinct from those of emulsion drops[9-111 Wang et al.[9 , 101 studied the combustion characteristics of collision merged alkane-water drops. The merged drops appeared in adhesive

  6. Method and apparatus for producing drops using a drop-on-demand dispenser

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Alvin U.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus for dispensing fluid from a drop-on-demand (DOD) fluid dispenser. The method involves withdrawing fluid in the dispenser for a first duration of time, followed by a second duration of time during which the fluid is propelled toward the orifice of the dispenser. Following the period during which the fluid is propelled, there is a second withdrawing of the fluid into the dispenser. The duration of the propelling period is shorter than the duration of either the first withdrawing or the second withdrawing. The propelling of the fluid results in the extension of a small tongue of fluid from the meniscus of the fluid. The second withdrawing of the fluid results in a retraction of the meniscus into the passageway such that only the small tongue of fluid separates and is ejected from the dispenser.

  7. Attracting Water Drops

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Ron Garan perform the Attracting Water Drops experiment from Chabad Hebrew Academy in San Diego, Calif. This research determines if a free-floating water drop can be att...

  8. Dilating Eye Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  9. Ternary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinterbichler, Hannes; Planchette, Carole; Brenn, Günter

    2015-10-01

    It has been recently proposed to use drop collisions for producing advanced particles or well-defined capsules, or to perform chemical reactions where the merged drops constitute a micro-reactor. For all these promising applications, it is essential to determine whether the merged drops remain stable after the collision, forming a single entity, or if they break up. This topic, widely investigated for binary drop collisions of miscible and immiscible liquid, is quite unexplored for ternary drop collisions. The current study aims to close this gap by experimentally investigating collisions between three equal-sized drops of the same liquid arranged centri-symmetrically. Three drop generators are simultaneously operated to obtain controlled ternary drop collisions. The collision outcomes are observed via photographs and compared to those of binary collisions. Similar to binary collisions, a regime map is built, showing coalescence and bouncing as well as reflexive and stretching separation. Significant differences are observed in the transitions between these regimes.

  10. Generalized Charts for Determination of Pressure Drop of a High-speed Compressible Fluid in Heat-exchanger Passages I : Air Heated in Smooth Passages of Constant Area with Constant Wall Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valerino, Michael F

    1948-01-01

    In the present paper an analysis is made of the compressible-flow variations occurring in heat-exchanger passages. The results of the analysis describe the flow and heating characteristics for which specific flow passages can be treated as segments of generalized flow systems. The graphical representation of the flow variations in the generalized flow systems can then be utilized as working charts to determine directly the pressure changes occurring in any specific flow passage. On the basis of these results, working charts are constructed to handle the case of air heated at constant wall temperature under turbulent-flow conditions. A method is given of incorporating the effect on the heat-exchanger flow process of high temperature differential between passage wall and fluid as based on recent NACA experimental data. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental and the chart pressure-drop values for passage-wall average temperatures as high as 1752 degrees R (experimental limit) and for flow Mach numbers ranging from 0.32 to 1.00 (choke) at the passage exit.

  11. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  12. NMR velocity imaging of single liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, A.; Stapf, S.; Bluemich, B.

    2007-03-01

    Liquid-liquid extraction processes are often found in industrial applications when a bulk phase needs to be purified from dissolved components. The extraction strategy consists of dissolving the impurities into a second, carrier phase, with optimal performance being guaranteed by maximizing both contact interface area and mass transfer rate, in the shape of a swarm of dispersed droplets. Their buoyancy-driven flow within the continuous medium induces internal fluid motion driven by momentum transfer at the drop surface. This convective transport enhances mass transfer and the efficiency of an extraction column. However, understanding mass transfer depends on a proper description of the flow field inside and outside the drops. For that purpose, a cell was built that enables the levitation of a single drop within a counterstream of water. NMR velocity imaging was then applied to drops of different fluids to monitor the internal dynamics as a function of drop size, age, and interface tension. Vortex-type patterns in at least part of the drop were observed where their size and velocity magnitude depended on the system impurity concentration.

  13. Thermocapillary motion of deformable drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haj-Hariri, Hossein; Shi, Qingping; Borhan, Ali

    1994-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of initially spherical drops/bubbles driven by a constant temperature gradient in an unbounded liquid medium is simulated numerically. Effects of convection of momentum and energy, as well as shape deformations, are addressed. The method used is based on interface tracking on a base cartesian grid, and uses a smeared color or indicator function for the determination of the surface topology. Quad-tree adaptive refinement of the cartesian grid is implemented to enhance the fidelity of the surface tracking. It is shown that convection of energy results in a slowing of the drop, as the isotherms get wrapped around the front of the drop. Shape deformation resulting from inertial effects affect the migration velocity. The physical results obtained are in agreement with the existing literature. Furthermore, remarks are made on the sensitivity of the calculated solutions to the smearing of the fluid properties. Analysis and simulations show that the migration velocity depends very strongly on the smearing of the interfacial force whereas it is rather insensitive to the smearing of other properties, hence the adaptive grid.

  14. Youth Crime Drop. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butts, Jeffrey A.

    This report examines the recent drop in violent crime in the United States, discussing how much of the decrease seen between 1995-99 is attributable to juveniles (under age 18 years) and older youth (18-24 years). Analysis of current FBI arrest data indicates that not only did America's violent crime drop continue through 1999, but falling youth…

  15. Axisymmetric Liquid Hanging Drops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meister, Erich C.; Latychevskaia, Tatiana Yu

    2006-01-01

    The geometry of drops hanging on a circular capillary can be determined by numerically solving a dimensionless differential equation that is independent on any material properties, which enables one to follow the change of the height, surface area, and contact angle of drops hanging on a particular capillary. The results show that the application…

  16. Drop Tower Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William A.

    2014-01-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in "The Physics Teacher" in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at…

  17. Effect of neighboring perturbations on drop coalescence at an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2012-06-01

    Coalescence at a quiescent silicone oil/water glycerine interface was investigated for water/glycerine drops with Bond number ˜7 and Ohnesorge number = 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic particle image velocimetry. In addition to a single drop case, three perturbation cases were considered corresponding with a second drop, a solid particle wetted in oil, and a solid particle wetted in water/glycerine placed adjacent to the coalescing drop. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The initial retraction speed of the ruptured film was higher for drops initially tilted at significant angles, and the local variations in retraction speed correlated well with the expected variations in local film thickness. The drop fluid always collapsed away from the drop axis in the direction of the rupture location in all unperturbed or perturbed cases. In the case of a drop next to a particle wetted in water/glycerine, the collapsing fluid travelled away from the particle, and the downward propagating vortex ring which developed was similar to that resulting from an unperturbed drop rupture. By contrast, the drop fluid collapsed toward either a second drop or a particle wetted in oil. The resulting vortex rings were more asymmetric, and viscous interaction between the particle and collapsing fluid hindered the downward motion of the associated ring.

  18. Dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Shubhadeep; Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2016-06-01

    The dielectrophoresis of a surfactant-laden viscous drop in the presence of non-uniform DC electric field is investigated analytically and numerically. Considering the presence of bulk-insoluble surfactants at the drop interface, we first perform asymptotic solution for both low and high surface Péclet numbers, where the surface Péclet number signifies the strength of surface convection of surfactants as compared to the diffusion at the drop interface. Neglecting fluid inertia and interfacial charge convection effects, we obtain explicit expression for dielectrophoretic drop velocity for low and high Péclet numbers by assuming small deviation of drop shape from sphericity and small deviation of surfactant concentration from the equilibrium uniform distribution. We then depict a numerical solution, assuming spherical drop, for arbitrary values of Péclet number. Our analyses demonstrate that the asymptotic solution shows excellent agreement with the numerical solution in the limiting conditions of low and high Péclet numbers. The present analysis shows that the flow-induced redistribution of the surfactants at the drop interface generates Marangoni stress, owing to the influence of the surfactant distribution on the local interfacial tension, at the drop interface and significantly alters the drop velocity at steady state. For a perfectly conducting/dielectric drop suspended in perfectly dielectric medium, Marangoni stress always retards the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop as compared with a surfactant-free drop. For a leaky dielectric drop suspended in another leaky dielectric medium, in the low Péclet number limit, depending on the electrical conductivity and permittivity of both the liquids, the Marangoni stress may aid or retard the dielectrophoretic velocity of the drop. The Marangoni stress also has the ability to move the drop in the opposite direction as compared with a surfactant-free drop. This non-intuitive reverse motion of the drop is

  19. Pattern formation in drying drops of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, D.; Sobac, B.; Loquet, B.; Sampol, J.

    2011-01-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood exhibits coupled physical mechanisms, such as Marangoni flow, evaporation and wettability. The final stage of a whole blood drop evaporation reveals regular patterns with a good reproducibility for a healthy person. Other experiments on anaemic and hyperlipidemic people were performed, and different patterns were revealed. The flow motion inside the blood drop is observed and analyzed with the use of a digital camera: the influence of the red blood cells (RBCs) motion is revealed at the drop periphery as well as its consequences on the final stage of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of the dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of haematology. The blood drop evaporation process is evidenced to be driven only by Marangoni flow. The same axisymetric pattern formation is observed, and can be forecast for different blood drop diameters. The evaporation mass flux can be predicted with a good agreement, assuming only the knowledge of the colloids mass concentration.

  20. Investigation of drop motion through circular orifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Longmire, Ellen; Kong, Xiangzhao; Saar, Martin

    2011-11-01

    The motion of drops though porous media occurs in numerous science and engineering fields including multiphase fluid flow in the subsurface during groundwater flow, geothermal energy recovery, and geologic carbon dioxide sequestration. Here, we simplify the porous medium to a thin plate with an orifice to study the interactions between the drop and the solid medium. Drops of water/glycerin with diameter, D, are released in a tank of silicone oil with matched refractive index and allowed to fall downward by gravity. After reaching terminal speed, the drops encounter a thin plate with orifice diameter, d, placed horizontally within the surrounding tank. Drop deformation, contact with the orifice, and breakage are investigated using high-speed imaging, and velocity fields are determined by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Effects of diameter ratio d/D, drop Reynolds number, and drop offset with respect to the orifice center are examined. The experimental results are compared to results from numerical simulations using an immiscible, two-color BGK lattice-Boltzmann method performed under similar test conditions. Supported by DOE (DOE EERE-PMC-10EE0002764).

  1. Gravity driven current during the coalescence of two sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Oberdick, Samuel D.; Swanson, Ellen R.; Anna, Shelley L.; Garoff, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Coalescence of liquid drops is critical in many phenomena such as emulsion stability, inkjet printing, and coating applications. For sessile drops on a solid surface, the coalescence process is more complicated than the coalescence of drops suspended in a fluid medium as a result of the coupling of the contact line motions to the fluid flow. In this paper, we use video microscopy to track the evolution of the interfaces and contact lines as well as the internal fluid motion within a merged sessile droplet. In this study, the fluids in the coalescing drops are miscible and have similar surface tensions and drop volumes but different viscosities and densities. Coalescence occurs in three stages. During the first stage, rapid healing of the bridge between the drops occurs just after they touch. In the second stage, slower rearrangement of the liquids occurs. We show that these intermediate rearrangements are driven by gravity even for density differences of the two fluids as small as 1%. For the systems examined, little to no mixing occurs during these first two stages. Finally, in the third stage, diffusion leads to mixing of the fluids. Dimensional analysis reveals the scaling of the intermediate flow behavior as a function of density difference and geometric dimensions of the merged drop; however, the scaling with viscosity is more complicated, motivating development of a lubrication analysis of the coalescence problem. Numerical calculations based on the lubrication analysis capture aspects of the experimental observations and reveal the governing forces and time scales of the coalescence process. The results reveal that internal fluid motions persist over much longer time scales than imaging of the external interface alone would reveal. Furthermore, nearly imperceptible motions of the external composite drop interface can lead to important deviations from the predominant gravity current scaling, where viscous resistance of the lighter fluid layer plays a

  2. Drop Tower Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, William A. Toby

    2014-10-01

    The drop towers of yesteryear were used to make lead shot for muskets, as described in The Physics Teacher1 in April 2012. However, modern drop towers are essentially elevators designed so that the cable can "break" on demand, creating an environment with microgravity for a short period of time, currently up to nine seconds at the drop tower in Bremen, Germany. Using these drop towers, one can briefly investigate various physical systems operating in this near zero-g environment. The resulting "Drop Tower Physics" is a new and exciting way to challenge students with a physical example that requires solid knowledge of many basic physics principles, and it forces them to practice the scientific method. The question is, "How would a simple toy, like a pendulum, behave when it is suddenly exposed to a zero-g environment?" The student must then postulate a particular behavior, test the hypothesis against physical principles, and if the hypothesis conforms to these chosen physical laws, the student can formulate a final conclusion. At that point having access to a drop tower is very convenient, in that the student can then experimentally test his or her conclusion. The purpose of this discussion is to explain the response of these physical systems ("toys") when the transition is made to a zero-g environment and to provide video demonstrations of this behavior to support in-class discussions of Drop Tower Physics.

  3. The Flow Induced by the Coalescence of Two Initially Stationary Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nobari, M. R.; Tryggvason, G.

    1994-01-01

    The coalescence of two initially stationary drops of different size is investigated by solving the unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations numerically, using a Front-Tracking/Finite Difference method. Initially, the drops are put next to each other and the film between them ruptured. Due to surface tension forces, the drops coalesce rapidly and the fluid from the small drop is injected into the larger one. For low nondimensional viscosity, or Ohnesorge number, little mixing takes place and the small drop fluid forms a blob near the point where the drops touched initially. For low Ohnesorge number, on the other hand, the small drop forms a jet that penetrates far into the large drop. The penetration depth also depends on the size of the drops and shows that for a given fluid of sufficiently low viscosity, there is a maximum penetration depth for intermediate size ratios.

  4. Drop Tower Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    Ground based microgravity facilities are an important proving ground for space experiments, ground-based research and space hardware risk mitigation. An overview of existing platforms will be discussed with an emphasis on drop tower capabilities. The potential for extension to partial gravity conditions will be discussed. Input will be solicited from attendees for their potential to use drop towers in the future and the need for enhanced capabilities (e.g. partial gravity)

  5. Determination of pressure drop coefficient by CFD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočilasová, Blanka; Skočilas, Jan

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with method applied to the verification of the turbulence models. The turbulence models were used in the simulation of the Newtonian fluid turbulent flow in the circular tube. The principle of the method is in the comparison of the pressure drop obtained by the simulation and the analytic solution. The parameters of the fluid flow were varied with the specified Reynolds number range. The pressure drop of inserted element in the pipe is evaluated.

  6. Sliding viscoelastic drops on slippery surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Clarke, A.; Rothstein, J. P.; Poole, R. J.

    2016-06-01

    We study the sliding of drops of constant-viscosity dilute elastic liquids (Boger fluids) on various surfaces caused by sudden surface inclination. For smooth or roughened hydrophilic surfaces, such as glass or acrylic, there is essentially no difference between these elastic liquids and a Newtonian comparator fluid (with identical shear viscosity, surface tension, and static contact angle). In contrast for embossed polytetrafluoroethylene superhydrophobic surfaces, profound differences are observed: the elastic drops slide at a significantly reduced rate and complex branch-like patterns are left on the surface by the drop's wake including, on various scales, beads-on-a-string like phenomena. Microscopy images indicate that the strong viscoelastic effect is caused by stretching filaments of fluid from isolated islands, residing at pinning sites on the surface pillars, of the order ˜30 μm in size. On this scale, the local strain rates are sufficient to extend the polymer chains, locally increasing the extensional viscosity of the solution, retarding the drop and leaving behind striking branch-like structures on much larger scales.

  7. Jumps, somersaults, and symmetry breaking in Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Chen, Simeng; Bertola, Volfango

    2016-08-01

    When a droplet of water impacts a heated surface, the drop may be observed to bounce. Recently is has been found that small quantities (∼100 ppm) of polymer additives such as polyethylene oxide can significantly increase the maximum bouncing height of drops. This effect has been explained in terms of the reduction of energy dissipation caused by polymer additives during the drop retraction and rebound, resulting in higher mechanical energy available for bouncing. Here we demonstrate, by comparing three types of fluids (Newtonian, shear-thinning, and viscoelastic), that the total kinetic energy carried by low-viscosity Newtonian drops during retraction is partly transformed into rotational kinetic energy rather than dissipated when compared with high-viscosity or non-Newtonian drops. We also show that non-Newtonian effects play little role in the energy distribution during drop impact, while the main effect is due to the symmetry break observed during the retraction of low-viscosity drops. PMID:27627234

  8. Destabilising Pickering emulsions by drop flocculation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Whitby, Catherine P; Khairul Anwar, Hunainah; Hughes, James

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated how emulsions of water drops coated by organoclay particles destabilise in organic solvents. The drops destabilise and the emulsions undergo a fluid-solid transition if the particles are poorly wetted by the solvent. We show that the drops adhere together and form three-dimensional networks as the fraction of the poor-quality solvent in the mixture increases. Microscopic observations revealed that the drops coalesce into buckled, non-spherical shapes in mixtures rich in poor-quality solvent. A key finding is that destabilisation is favoured under conditions where the energy of adhesion between the particle layers coating drops is comparable to the energy required to detach the particles from the drops. Rupture of the interfacial layer produces particle flocs and uncoated, unstable water drops that settle out of the emulsion. PMID:26674231

  9. Coalescing drops in microfluidic parking networks: A multifunctional platform for drop-based microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Bithi, Swastika S.; Wang, William S.; Sun, Meng; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2014-01-01

    Multiwell plate and pipette systems have revolutionized modern biological analysis; however, they have disadvantages because testing in the submicroliter range is challenging, and increasing the number of samples is expensive. We propose a new microfluidic methodology that delivers the functionality of multiwell plates and pipettes at the nanoliter scale by utilizing drop coalescence and confinement-guided breakup in microfluidic parking networks (MPNs). Highly monodisperse arrays of drops obtained using a hydrodynamic self-rectification process are parked at prescribed locations in the device, and our method allows subsequent drop manipulations such as fine-gradation dilutions, reactant addition, and fluid replacement while retaining microparticles contained in the sample. Our devices operate in a quasistatic regime where drop shapes are determined primarily by the channel geometry. Thus, the behavior of parked drops is insensitive to flow conditions. This insensitivity enables highly parallelized manipulation of drop arrays of different composition, without a need for fine-tuning the flow conditions and other system parameters. We also find that drop coalescence can be switched off above a critical capillary number, enabling individual addressability of drops in complex MPNs. The platform demonstrated here is a promising candidate for conducting multistep biological assays in a highly multiplexed manner, using thousands of submicroliter samples. PMID:25379078

  10. Coalescing drops in microfluidic parking networks: A multifunctional platform for drop-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Bithi, Swastika S; Wang, William S; Sun, Meng; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; Vanapalli, Siva A

    2014-05-01

    Multiwell plate and pipette systems have revolutionized modern biological analysis; however, they have disadvantages because testing in the submicroliter range is challenging, and increasing the number of samples is expensive. We propose a new microfluidic methodology that delivers the functionality of multiwell plates and pipettes at the nanoliter scale by utilizing drop coalescence and confinement-guided breakup in microfluidic parking networks (MPNs). Highly monodisperse arrays of drops obtained using a hydrodynamic self-rectification process are parked at prescribed locations in the device, and our method allows subsequent drop manipulations such as fine-gradation dilutions, reactant addition, and fluid replacement while retaining microparticles contained in the sample. Our devices operate in a quasistatic regime where drop shapes are determined primarily by the channel geometry. Thus, the behavior of parked drops is insensitive to flow conditions. This insensitivity enables highly parallelized manipulation of drop arrays of different composition, without a need for fine-tuning the flow conditions and other system parameters. We also find that drop coalescence can be switched off above a critical capillary number, enabling individual addressability of drops in complex MPNs. The platform demonstrated here is a promising candidate for conducting multistep biological assays in a highly multiplexed manner, using thousands of submicroliter samples. PMID:25379078

  11. Rain Drop Charge Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    S, Sreekanth T.

    begin{center} Large Large Rain Drop Charge Sensor Sreekanth T S*, Suby Symon*, G. Mohan Kumar (1) , S. Murali Das (2) *Atmospheric Sciences Division, Centre for Earth Science Studies, Thiruvananthapuram 695011 (1) D-330, Swathi Nagar, West Fort, Thiruvananthapuram 695023 (2) Kavyam, Manacaud, Thiruvananthapuram 695009 begin{center} ABSTRACT To study the inter-relations with precipitation electricity and precipitation microphysical parameters a rain drop charge sensor was designed and developed at CESS Electronics & Instrumentation Laboratory. Simultaneous measurement of electric charge and fall speed of rain drops could be done using this charge sensor. A cylindrical metal tube (sensor tube) of 30 cm length is placed inside another thick metal cover opened at top and bottom for electromagnetic shielding. Mouth of the sensor tube is exposed and bottom part is covered with metal net in the shielding cover. The instrument is designed in such a way that rain drops can pass only through unhindered inside the sensor tube. When electrically charged rain drops pass through the sensor tube, it is charged to the same magnitude of drop charge but with opposite polarity. The sensor tube is electrically connected the inverted input of a current to voltage converter operational amplifier using op-amp AD549. Since the sensor is electrically connected to the virtual ground of the op-amp, the charge flows to the ground and the generated current is converted to amplified voltage. This output voltage is recorded using a high frequency (1kHz) voltage recorder. From the recorded pulse, charge magnitude, polarity and fall speed of rain drop are calculated. From the fall speed drop diameter also can be calculated. The prototype is now under test running at CESS campus. As the magnitude of charge in rain drops is an indication of accumulated charge in clouds in lightning, this instrument has potential application in the field of risk and disaster management. By knowing the charge

  12. Liquid metal drop ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khuri-Yakub, B. T.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this project was to demonstrate the possibility of ejecting liquid metals using drop on demand printing technology. The plan was to make transducers for operation in the 100 MHz frequency range and to use these transducers to demonstrate the ability to eject drops of liquid metals such as gallium. Two transducers were made by indium bonding piezoelectric lithium niobate to quartz buffer rods. The lithium niobate plates were thinned by mechanical polishing to a thickness of 37 microns for operation at 100 MHz. Hemispherical lenses were polished in the opposite ends of the buffer rods. The lenses, which focus the sound waves in the liquid metal, had an F-number equals 1. A mechanical housing was made to hold the transducers and to allow precise control over the liquid level above the lens. We started by demonstrating the ability to eject drops of water on demand. The drops of water had a diameter of 15 microns which corresponds to the wavelength of the sound wave in the water. A videotape of this ejection was made. We then used a mixture of Gallium and Indium (used to lower the melting temperature of the Gallium) to demonstrate the ejection of liquid metal drops. This proved to be difficult because of the oxide skin which forms on the surface of the liquid. In some instances, we were able to eject metal drops, however, this was not consistent and reproducible. An experiment was set up at NASA-Lewis to stabilize the process of drop on demand liquid metal ejection. The object was to place the transducer and liquid metal in a vacuum station so that no oxide would form on the surface. We were successful in demonstrating that liquid metals could be ejected on demand and that this technology could be used for making sheet metal in space.

  13. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  14. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  15. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  16. The fate of electrospray drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Osman; Collins, Robert; Sambath, Krishnaraj; Harris, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Drops subjected to strong electric fields emit thin fluid jets from conical structures (Taylor cones) that form at their surfaces. Such behavior has practical, e.g. electrospray mass spectrometry, and fundamental, e.g. raindrops in thunderclouds, implications. Theoretical analysis of the temporal development of such EHD tip-streaming phenomena is challenging given the large disparity in length scales between the macroscopic drops and the microscopic jets. Furthermore, there exist conflicting theories and measurements on the size and charge of these small electrospray droplets. We use theory and simulation to show that conductivity can be tuned to yield three scaling regimes for droplet radius and charge, a finding missed by previous studies. The amount of charge Q that electrospray droplets carry determines whether they are coulombically stable and charged below the Rayleigh limit of stability R or are unstable and hence prone to further explosions once formed. Previous experiments reported droplet charge values ranging from 1/10th to in excess of R. Simulations unequivocally show that electrospray droplets are coulombically stable at the instant they are created and that there exists a universal scaling law for droplet charge, Q=0.44 R.

  17. On the Stability of Rotating Drops

    PubMed Central

    Nurse, A. K.; Coriell, S. R.; McFadden, G. B.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the equilibrium and stability of rotating axisymmetric fluid drops by appealing to a variational principle that characterizes the equilibria as stationary states of a functional containing surface energy and rotational energy contributions, augmented by a volume constraint. The linear stability of a drop is determined by solving the eigenvalue problem associated with the second variation of the energy functional. We compute equilibria corresponding to both oblate and prolate shapes, as well as toroidal shapes, and track their evolution with rotation rate. The stability results are obtained for two cases: (i) a prescribed rotational rate of the system (“driven drops”), or (ii) a prescribed angular momentum (“isolated drops”). For families of axisymmetric drops instabilities may occur for either axisymmetric or non-axisymmetric perturbations; the latter correspond to bifurcation points where non-axisymmetric shapes are possible. We employ an angle-arc length formulation of the problem which allows the computation of equilibrium shapes that are not single-valued in spherical coordinates. We are able to illustrate the transition from spheroidal drops with a strong indentation on the rotation axis to toroidal drops that do not extend to the rotation axis. Toroidal drops with a large aspect ratio (major radius to minor radius) are subject to azimuthal instabilities with higher mode numbers that are analogous to the Rayleigh instability of a cylindrical interface. Prolate spheroidal shapes occur if a drop of lower density rotates within a denser medium; these drops appear to be linearly stable. This work is motivated by recent investigations of toroidal tissue clusters that are observed to climb conical obstacles after self-assembly [Nurse et al., Journal of Applied Mechanics 79 (2012) 051013]. PMID:26958440

  18. Surface structuring of particle laden drops using electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommersnes, P.; Fossum, J. O.

    2016-07-01

    Emulsion drops readily adsorb particles at their surfaces, which may lead to a fluid or solid layer encapsulating the drop, known as an armored drop. In this review, we discuss how electric fields can be used to manipulate colloidal surface structures, by dielectrophoretic or electro-hydrodynamic mechanisms and we also compare this to related phenomena in lipid bilayer vesicles. The phenomena discussed are important for a wide range of uses of particle laden drops, including emulsion stabilization, Janus or patchy mesocapsule-, scaffold- or other materials-production.

  19. Experimental study of the oscillating interface of a falling drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Suhwan; Ward, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    The drop interface oscillation generated from detachment from a nozzle due to gravity are experimentally studied. The fluids used in the experiments are glycerol-water mixtures with viscosities ranging from 0.005 to 0.410 Pa s, mineral oil having a viscosity of 0.0270 Pa s, and DI water with viscosity of 0.0009 Pa s. The drop oscillating is taken by fast camera to make observations. For large drops, where the interface relative to a polar angle may be measured, the periodic deformation is plotted as a function of time. For smaller drops we measure the deformation as switching between an oblate and prolate drop as a function of time. The phenomenon is clearly a function of the fluid viscosity but we seek to propose a pinch-off mechanism for understanding the source of the observed oscillations.

  20. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities.

  1. Immersed Interface Method for Drop Electrohydrodynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganguia, Herve; Young, Yuan-Nan; Layton, Anita; Hu, Wei-Fan; Lai, Ming-Chih

    2014-11-01

    A numerical scheme based on the immersed interface method (IIM) is developed to simulate the dynamics of an axisymmetric viscous drop under an electric field. In this work, the IIM is used to solve both the fluid velocity field and the electric potential field. Detailed numerical studies on the numerical scheme shows second-order convergence. Moreover, the numerical scheme is further validated by the good agreement with published analytical models, and results from the Boundary Integral method. The IIM code is used to investigate inertia effects and/or time-varying electric field on drop electro-deformation. Results from the simulations illustrate how the inertia effects and time dependence of the electric field affect the electro-deformation of a viscous leaky dielectric drop.

  2. Hydrodynamic interaction of two deformable drops in confined shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongping; Wang, Chengyao

    2014-09-01

    We investigate hydrodynamic interaction between two neutrally buoyant circular drops in a confined shear flow based on a computational fluid dynamics simulation using the volume-of-fluid method. The rheological behaviors of interactive drops and the flow regimes are explored with a focus on elucidation of underlying physical mechanisms. We find that two types of drop behaviors during interaction occur, including passing-over motion and reversing motion, which are governed by the competition between the drag of passing flow and the entrainment of reversing flow in matrix fluid. With the increasing confinement, the drop behavior transits from the passing-over motion to reversing motion, because the entrainment of the reversing-flow matrix fluid turns to play the dominant role. The drag of the ambient passing flow is increased by enlarging the initial lateral separation due to the departure of the drop from the reversing flow in matrix fluid, resulting in the emergence of passing-over motion. In particular, a corresponding phase diagram is plotted to quantitatively illustrate the dependence of drop morphologies during interaction on confinement and initial lateral separation.

  3. Sheathless hydrodynamic positioning of buoyant drops and bubbles inside microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu A.; Guglielmini, Laura; Ellerbee, Audrey K.; Caviezel, Daniel; Stone, Howard A.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-09-01

    Particles, bubbles, and drops carried by a fluid in a confined environment such as a pipe can be subjected to hydrodynamic lift forces, i.e., forces that are perpendicular to the direction of the flow. We investigated the positioning effect of lift forces acting on buoyant drops and bubbles suspended in a carrier fluid and flowing in a horizontal microchannel. We report experiments on drops of water in fluorocarbon liquid, and on bubbles of nitrogen in hydrocarbon liquid and silicone oil, inside microchannels with widths on the order of 0.1-1 mm. Despite their buoyancy, drops and bubbles could travel without contacting with the walls of channels; the most important parameters for reaching this flow regime in our experiments were the viscosity and the velocity of the carrier fluid, and the sizes of drops and bubbles. The dependencies of the transverse position of drops and bubbles on these parameters were investigated. At steady state, the trajectories of drops and bubbles approached the center of the channel for drops and bubbles almost as large as the channel, carried by rapidly flowing viscous liquids; among our experiments, these flow conditions were characterized by larger capillary numbers and smaller Reynolds numbers. Analytical models of lift forces developed for the flow of drops much smaller than the width of the channel failed to predict their transverse position, while computational fluid dynamic simulations of the experiments agreed better with the experimental measurements. The degrees of success of these predictions indicate the importance of confinement on generating strong hydrodynamic lift forces. We conclude that, inside microfluidic channels, it is possible to support and position buoyant drops and bubbles simply by flowing a single-stream (i.e., “sheathless”) carrier liquid that has appropriate velocity and hydrodynamic properties.

  4. Drop breakup and deformation in sudden onset strong flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Charles Raphael

    This work characterizes the deformation and breakup of a single drop subjected to a sudden onset shear flow. The drop is immersed in a second fluid (the matrix) with which it is immiscible. A cylindrical couette device is used to create a flow field which, in the absence of the drop, would constitute a close approximation of simple shear flow. The magnitude of the imposed shear rate was greater than that which would be necessary to just break the drop. The experiments conducted were limited to matrix fluid viscosities above 7Pa˙ s and shear rates below 15/s, ensuring that the flows considered were inertialess. The matrix fluid was a corn syrup solution. The drop fluids were polybutadiene, paraffin oil and silicone oil, leading to a range of interfacial tensions. At the shear rates used in these experiments the fluids used Newtonian. Viscosity ratios (drop/matrix) ranging from 0.01 to 1 were considered. Two breakup mechanisms were observed to contribute to the dispersion of the original drop. In all cases elongative end pinching, defined by this study, caused the ends of a stretching drop to break off and form daughter drops. Breakup due to elongative end pinching was always the first breakup observed. The daughter drops formed by elongative end pinching were always the largest daughter drops formed. In cases when the experimental conditions were sufficiently stronger than the critical conditions (needed to just barely break up the drop), a second type of breakup, capillary wave breakup, was also observed. Measurement of the characteristic time scales and length scales were made of each type of breakup. The lengths (a) were found to scale as capillary numbers: Ca=a mg/s. The times (t) were found to scale as strains: s=t g. A qualitative explanation for the capillary number scaling is presented and quantitatively compared to predictions based on small deformation analysis. Additionally the daughter drop size distributions resulting from drop breakup is characterized

  5. Bursting Drops in Solid Dielectrics Caused by High Voltages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres—a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting. PMID:23093194

  6. Bursting drops in solid dielectrics caused by high voltages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-01-01

    Fluid drops tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nanofibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops, but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high energy density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting. PMID:23093194

  7. Bursting drops in solid dielectrics caused by high voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming; Suo, Zhigang; Zhao, Xuanhe

    2012-10-01

    Fluid drops tend to be spheres—a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nanofibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops, but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high energy density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  8. Digitizing of drop table output

    SciTech Connect

    Muncy, K.

    1984-01-01

    The method for monitoring and analyzing the drop pulses from the MTS1212 drop table system has been upgraded from a labor intensive manual system to an automatic digital system. The pulse from each drop is recorded, analyzed and printed out. The data printed out includes all product information, the drop parameters calculated and a plot of the drop pulse. Some of the advantages of this system, besides the replacement of old and obsolete equipment, include the dropping of the repeatability check requirement, ease of operation, complete automatic documentation of each drop, no need to take Polaroid pictures of a drop nor is it necessary to have a drop film read by the film analysis group. Data comparisons between the old method and the new digital method have been very favorable.

  9. Drop tube technical tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Criteria, using fundamental thermochemical dynamics, were developed to assist a scientist using the Drop Tube Facility in designing a good experiment. The types of parameters involved in designing the experiments include the type of furnace, the type of atmosphere, and in general which materials are better behaved than others as determined by past experience in the facility. One of the major advantages of the facility lies in its ability to provide large undercoolings in the cooling curve during the drops. A beginning was to consider the effect of oxygen and other gases upon the amount of undercooling observed. The starting point of the thermochemistry was given by Ellingham and later transformed into what is known as the Richardson Chart. The effect of surface oxidations upon the nucleation phenomena can be observed in each specimen.

  10. Drop interaction with solid boundaries in liquid/liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur Deep

    The present experimental work was motivated primarily by the CO 2 sequestration process. In a possible scenario during this process, gravity driven CO2 bubbles coalesce at an interface near the rock surface. In another scenario, trapped CO2 fluid may escape from a porous matrix overcoming interfacial force inside a pore. Based on these potential scenarios, the current research was divided into two broad experimental studies. In the first part, coalescence at a quiescent interface of two analogous fluids (silicone oil and water/glycerin mixture) was investigated for water/glycerin drops with Bond number (Bo) ~7 and Ohnesorge number ~ 0.01 using high-speed imaging and time-resolved tomographic PIV. Two perturbation cases with a solid particle wetted in oil and water/glycerin placed adjacent to the coalescing drop were considered. The results were compared with coalescence of a single drop and that of a drop neighBored by a second drop of equivalent size. Each perturbing object caused an initial tilting of the drop, influencing its rupture location, subsequent film retraction and eventual collapse behavior. Once tilted, drops typically ruptured near their lowest vertical position which was located either toward or away from the perturbing object depending on the case. The trends in local retraction speed of the ruptured film and the overall dynamics of the collapsing drops were discussed in detail. In the second part, the motion of gravity driven drops (B o~0.8-11) through a confining orifice d/D<1) was studied using high speed imaging and planar PIV. Drops of water/glycerin, surrounded by silicone oil, fall toward and encounter the orifice plate after reaching terminal speed. The effects of surface wettability were investigated for Both round-edged and sharp-edged orifices. For the round-edged case, a thin film of surrounding oil prevented the drop fluid from contacting the orifice surface, such that the flow outcomes of the drops were independent of surface

  11. The Drop Tower Bremen -Experiment Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; von Kampen, Peter; Rath, Hans J.

    The idea behind the drop tower facility of the Center of Applied Space Technology and Micro-gravity (ZARM) in Bremen is to provide an inimitable technical opportunity of a daily access to short-term weightlessness on earth. In this way ZARM`s european unique ground-based microgravity laboratory displays an excellent economic alternative for research in space-related conditions at low costs comparable to orbital platforms. Many national and international ex-perimentalists motivated by these prospects decide to benefit from the high-quality and easy accessible microgravity environment only provided by the Drop Tower Bremen. Corresponding experiments in reduced gravity could open new perspectives of investigation methods and give scientists an impressive potential for a future technology and multidisciplinary applications on different research fields like Fundamental Physics, Astrophysics, Fluid Dynamics, Combus-tion, Material Science, Chemistry and Biology. Generally, realizing microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility meet new requirements of the experimental hardware and may lead to some technical constraints in the setups. In any case the ZARM Drop Tower Operation and Service Company (ZARM FAB mbH) maintaining the drop tower facility is prepared to as-sist experimentalists by offering own air-conditioned laboratories, clean rooms, workshops and consulting engineers, as well as scientific personal. Furthermore, ZARM`s on-site apartment can be used for accommodations during the experiment campaigns. In terms of approaching drop tower experimenting, consulting of experimentalists is mandatory to successfully accomplish the pursued drop or catapult capsule experiment. For this purpose there will be a lot of expertise and help given by ZARM FAB mbH in strong cooperation to-gether with the experimentalists. However, in comparison to standard laboratory setups the drop or catapult capsule setup seems to be completely different at first view. While defining a

  12. Leidenfrost Drop on a Step

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagubeau, Guillaume; Le Merrer, Marie; Clanet, Christophe; Quere, David

    2008-11-01

    When deposited on a hot plate, a water droplet evaporates quickly. However, a vapor film appears under the drop above a critical temperature, called Leidenfrost temperature, which insulates the drop from its substrate. Linke & al (2006) reported a spontaneous movement of such a drop, when deposited on a ratchet. We study here the case of a flat substrate decorated with a single micrometric step. The drop is deposited on the lower part of the plate and pushed towards the step at small constant velocity. If the kinetic energy of the drop is sufficient, it can climb up the step. In that case, depending on the substrate temperature, the drop can either be decelerated or accelerated by the step. We try to understand the dynamics of these drops, especially the regime where they accelerate. Taking advantage of this phenomenon, we could then build a multiple-step setup, making it possible for a Leidenfrost drop to climb stairs.

  13. Dynamics of Rising Dispersant Laden Oil Drops in a Quiescent Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Aponte, Khalil; Mehdi, Faraz; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    We study the dynamics of rising oil drops in a quiescent fluid chamber under uniform and density stratified conditions. Digital in-line holography allows for high resolution topological measurements and tracking of drop trajectories. Statistics of rising velocities, drop shapes and sizes are compared as functions of different oil-dispersant ratios. A conceptual model of an oil drop developing appendages and its subsequent breakdown into much smaller droplets is also discussed.

  14. Resonances, radiation pressure and optical scattering phenomena of drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, P. L.; Goosby, S. G.; Langley, D. S.; Loporto-Arione, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    Acoustic levitation and the response of fluid spheres to spherical harmonic projections of the radiation pressure are described. Simplified discussions of the projections are given. A relationship between the tangential radiation stress and the Konstantinov effect is introduced and fundamental streaming patterns for drops are predicted. Experiments on the forced shape oscillation of drops are described and photographs of drop fission are displayed. Photographs of critical angle and glory scattering by bubbles and rainbow scattering by drops are displayed.

  15. Linear oscillations of a supported bubble or drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vejrazka, Jiri; Vobecka, Lucie; Tihon, Jaroslav

    2013-06-01

    Shape oscillations of a spherical bubble or drop, for which part of its interface is fixed due to contact with a solid support, are studied analytically using variational methods. Linear oscillations and irrotational flow are assumed. The present analysis is parallel to those of Strani and Sabetta ["Free vibrations of a drop in partial contact with a solid support," J. Fluid Mech. 141, 233-247 (1984)], 10.1017/S0022112084000811; and Bostwick and Steen ["Capillary oscillations of a constrained liquid drop," Phys. Fluids 21, 032108 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3103344 but is also able to determine the response of bubbles or drops to movements imposed on their supports or to variations of their volumes. The analysis leads to equations of motion with a simple structure, from which the eigenmodes and frequency response to periodic forcing are easily determined.

  16. Effects of an electrostatic field on a suspension of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Arturo; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2003-11-01

    "Effects of an electrostatic field on a suspension of drops" Arturo Fernandez and Gretar Tryggvason A numerical study on the effects of an electrostatic field in a suspension of drops will be presented. Three-dimensional results from a direct numerical simulation show that the drops distribution and the modification in the base flow depend on the competition between the dielectrophoretic attraction and the viscous fluid motion caused by the presence of the electric field. Here, we will focus on prolate drops that present a wider variety of behaviors. Because the fluid motion can go either from the equator to the poles or from the poles to the equator, the attraction in the direction perpendicular or parallel to the electric field are respectively enhanced.

  17. Drop foot corrective device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A light weight, economical device to alleviate a plurality of difficulties encountered in walking by a victim suffering from a drop foot condition is discussed. A legband girdles the leg below the knee and above the calf providing an anchor point for the upper end of a ligament having its lower end attached to a toe of a shoe or a toe on the foot. The ligament is of such length that the foot is supported thereby and retained in a normal position during walking.

  18. How to Use Ear Drops

    MedlinePlus

    How to Use Ear Drops(Having someone else give you the ear drops may make this procedure easier.) Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and ... facecloth and then dry your ear. Warm the drops to near body temperature by holding the container ...

  19. Liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu; Schellenberger, Frank; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Vollmer, Doris; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2013-06-25

    The dynamics of liquid drops impacting superamphiphobic coatings is studied by high-speed video microscopy. Superamphiphobic coatings repel water and oils. The coating consists of a fractal-like hydrophobized silica network. Mixtures of ethanol-water and glycerin-water are chosen to investigate the influence of interfacial tension and viscosity on spreading and retraction dynamics. Drop spreading is dominated by inertia. At low impact velocity, the drops completely rebound. However, the contact time increases with impact velocity, whereas the restitution coefficient decreases. We suggest that the drop temporarily impales the superamphiphobic coating, although the drop completely rebounds. From an estimate of the pressure, it can be concluded that impalement is dominated by depinning rather than sagging. With increasing velocity, the drops partially pin, and an increasing amount of liquid remains on the coating. A time-resolved study of the retraction dynamics reveals two well-separated phases: a fast inertia-dominated phase followed by a slow decrease of the contact diameter of the drop. The crossover occurs when the diameter of the retracting drop matches the diameter of the drop before impact. We suggest that the depth of impalement increases with impact velocity, where impalement is confined to the initial impact zone of the drop. If the drop partially pins on the coating, the depth of impalement exceeds a depth, preventing the whole drop from being removed during the retraction phase. PMID:23697383

  20. Mixing in Sessile Drops Merging on a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anna, Shelley; Zhang, Ying; Oberdick, Samuel; Garoff, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the mixing of two sessile drops that merge on a surface. The drops consist of low viscosity glycerol-water mixtures deposited on a silicone elastomer surface with contact angle near 90°. We observe the shape of the drops and the location of their intersection by placing a fluorescent dye in one drop and using a laser light sheet to image a plane perpendicular to the surface. The initial healing of the meniscus bridge between the merging drops, and the damping of capillary waves appearing on their surfaces occur on timescales comparable to the inertio-capillary relaxation time. However, the interface between the two fluids remains sharp, broadening diffusively over several minutes. The shape of the merged drops and the boundary between them also continues to evolve on a timescale of minutes. This later motion is controlled by gravity, capillary pressure, and viscous stresses. Images of the 3D drop shape indicate that small contact line motions are correlated to the slow relaxation. Although the two drops contain identical liquids except for the presence of the dye, the shape of the interface consistently evolves asymmetrically, assuming a characteristic crescent shape. We note that very tiny surface tension gradients can produce an asymmetric flow like the one observed here. We characterize the long timescale flow as a function of the drop sizes, and we use numerical simulations to aid in elucidating the essential physics.

  1. Formation and Combustion of Unconfined Drop Clusters in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, S.; Craig, G.; Zhang, Y.; Ruff, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Single-drop and droplet array studies have become common methods to isolate and investigate the effects of any of the complexities that enter into the drop combustion process. Microgravity environments are required to allow larger drops to be studied while minimizing or eliminating the confounding effects of buoyancy. Based on the results from current isolated drop, drop array, and spray studies funded through the Microgravity Science and Applications Division, it has become clear that even with the effects of buoyancy removed, the extrapolation of results from droplet array studies to spray flames is difficult. The problem occurs because even the simplest spray systems introduce complexities of multi-disperse drop sizes and drop-drop interactions, coupled with more complicated fluid dynamics. Not only do these features make the interpretation of experimental data difficult, they also make the problem very difficult to analyze computationally. Group combustion models, in which the interaction between droplets is treated on a statistical manner, have become a popular method to investigate the behavior of large numbers of interacting droplets, particularly through the work of Ryan et al. and Bellan and co-workers. While these models idealize the actual spray systems to a point where they can be treated computationally, the experimental analogy to these models is difficult to achieve because it requires the formation and Combustion of drop clusters without the effects of buoyancy. Therefore, even though these models have provided useful and insightful information, the verification of the results by direct comparison with experimental data is still lacking.

  2. An evaporation model of multicomponent solution drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Silvana; Liñán, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2010-11-01

    Solutions of polymers are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as tablets coatings. These allow controlling the rate at which the drug is delivered, taste or appearance. The coating is performed by spraying and drying the tablets at moderate temperatures. The wetting of the coating solution on the pill's surface depends on the droplet Webber and Re numbers, angle of impact and on the rheological properties of the droplet. We present a model for the evaporation of multicomponent solutions droplets in a hot air environment with temperatures substantially lower than the boiling temperature of the solvent. As the liquid vaporizes from the surface the fluid in the drop increases in concentration, until reaching its saturation point. After saturation, precipitation occurs uniformly within the drop. As the surface regresses, a compacting front formed by the precipitate at its maximum packing density advances into the drop, while the solute continues precipitating uniformly. This porous shell grows fast due to the double effect of surface regression and precipitation. The evaporation rate is determined by the rates at which heat is transported to the droplet surface and at which liquid vapor diffuses away from it. When the drop is fully compacted, the evaporation is drastically reduced.

  3. Symmetry breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yahua; Andrew, Matthew; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M.; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves that have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ∼40% reduction in contact time. PMID:26602170

  4. Symmetry breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yahua; Andrew, Matthew; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-01-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves that have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ∼40% reduction in contact time. PMID:26602170

  5. Symmetry breaking in drop bouncing on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yahua; Andrew, Matthew; Li, Jing; Yeomans, Julia M.; Wang, Zuankai

    2015-11-01

    The impact of liquid drops on solid surfaces is ubiquitous in nature, and of practical importance in many industrial processes. A drop hitting a flat surface retains a circular symmetry throughout the impact process. Here we show that a drop impinging on Echevaria leaves exhibits asymmetric bouncing dynamics with distinct spreading and retraction along two perpendicular directions. This is a direct consequence of the cylindrical leaves that have a convex/concave architecture of size comparable to the drop. Systematic experimental investigations on mimetic surfaces and lattice Boltzmann simulations reveal that this novel phenomenon results from an asymmetric momentum and mass distribution that allows for preferential fluid pumping around the drop rim. The asymmetry of the bouncing leads to ~40% reduction in contact time.

  6. Deformation and stability of surfactant - or particle - laden drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosseau, Quentin; Pradillo, Gerardo; Oberlander, Andrew; Vlahovska, Petia; SoftMech@Brown Team

    2015-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the behavior of a drop covered with insoluble surfactant or colloidal particles in a uniform DC electric field. Steady drop shapes, drop evolution upon application of the field, and drop relaxation after the field is turned off are observed for leaky dielectric fluids: Polybutadiene (PB), Silicon oil (PDMS), and Castor oil (CO). The surfactant is generated at the drop interface by reaction between end-functionalized PB and PDMS. The experimental data is compared with existing theoretical models for the steady shape of surfactant covered droplet, and adjusted models taking into account the presence of colloidal spheres with range of electrical properties. We will discuss the complex interplay of shape deformation, surfactant elasticity, particle redistribution, and interfacial charging in droplet electrohydrodynamics. Our results are important for understanding electrorheology of emulsions commonly found in the petroleum industry. We acknowledge grant NSF CBET 1437545 for funding.

  7. Fluid Flow Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vilimpochapornkul, Viroj; Obot, Nsima T.

    1986-01-01

    The undergraduate fluid mechanics laboratory at Clarkson University consists of three experiments: mixing; drag measurements; and fluid flow and pressure drop measurements. The latter experiment is described, considering equipment needed, procedures used, and typical results obtained. (JN)

  8. Two-dimensional, high flow, precisely controlled monodisperse drop source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1993-03-01

    A versatile acoustically-driven fluid atomizer was designed and operated that creates precise monodisperse sprays by Rayleigh breakup or polydisperse sprays by the acoustic driving of amplitude dependent instabilities. The atomizer forms a cylindrical, conical, or flat (sheet) liquid jet by means of a photofabricated nozzle. The spray pattern and spray volume are altered by changing the nozzle. A piezoelectric driver, constructed to efficiently couple energy to the liquid, modulates the fluid velocity. When operated at low power, the drop generator can produce arrays of monodisperse drops as small as 15 microns in diameter. Operating the piezoelectric driver at high power produces perturbations with sufficient energy to break the liquid jets into drops, with a net increase in surface energy. The resulting drop sizes are influenced by the frequency and amplitude of the driving signal and nozzle size. The spatial distribution of the spray is controlled by the spacing and geometry of the holes in the nozzle plate, the amplitude of the acoustic signal, and the swirl in the fluid manifold. This device is more robust than the typical acoustic drop generator because small drops can be made from large holes, reducing the plugging problem. No air flow is used.

  9. Controlling charge on levitating drops.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Westphall, Michael S; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Levitation technologies are used in containerless processing of materials, as microscale manipulators and reactors, and in the study of single drops and particles. Presented here is a method for controlling the amount and polarity of charge on a levitating drop. The method uses single-axis acoustic levitation to trap and levitate a single, initially neutral drop with a diameter between 400 microm and 2 mm. This drop is then charged in a controllable manner using discrete packets of charge in the form of charged drops produced by a piezoelectric drop-on-demand dispenser equipped with a charging electrode. The magnitude of the charge on the dispensed drops can be adjusted by varying the voltage applied to the charging electrode. The polarity of the charge on the added drops can be changed allowing removal of charge from the trapped drop (by neutralization) and polarity reversal. The maximum amount of added charge is limited by repulsion of like charges between the drops in the trap. This charging scheme can aid in micromanipulation and the study of charged drops and particles using levitation. PMID:17580951

  10. Coffee Stains from Drops with Receding Contact Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freed-Brown, Julian

    2015-03-01

    We present a framework for calculating the surface density profile of a coffee stain deposited by a drying drop with a receding contact line. For standard coffee stains, the fluid pins to the substrate, forces flow towards the exterior of the drop and deposits a thin, concentrated ring of particles. Unlike a pinned drop, a receding drop pushes fluid towards its interior and continuously deposits mass across its substrate as it evaporates. This gives rise to a new class of mountain-like morphologies that are not seen in the standard coffee ring effect but are reminiscent of recent experimental results. For a thin, circular drop with uniform evaporation, we calculate the surface density profile analytically and find that it diverges towards the center of the drop as η ~r - 1 / 2 , where r is the distance from the center. We estimate how this divergence is softened due to solute interactions at the final stage of drying. Our framework can easily be extended numerically or analytically to investigate novel stain morphologies left by drying drops of different shapes and evaporation profiles. This work is part of a thesis project advised by Tom Witten. It was supported in part by the National Science Foundation's MRSEC Program under Award Number DMR 0820054.

  11. Electro-rheological fluids. A brief description and typical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossides, S. D.

    1982-10-01

    Fiber formation; electrorheological (ER) fluids composition; electrical properties of ER fluids; modes of operation of ER fluids; valve pressure drop calculation; valve type devices; ER clutch; and damping devices are reviewed.

  12. Drop tube research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the activities performed in the Drop Tube Study which The University of Alabama in Huntsville designed, fabricated and performed various low gravity experiments in materials processing from November 1, 1991 through October 30, 1992. During the performance of this contract the utilization of these ground-based containerless processing facilities has been instrumental in providing the opportunity to determine the feasibility of performing a number of solidification experiments in a simulated space environment, without the expense of a space-based experiment. A number of periodic reports have been given to the TCOR during the course of this contract hence this final report is meant only to summarize the many activities performed and not redundantly cover materials already submitted.

  13. Stability of the shape of a translating viscoelastic drop at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Haj-Hariri, H.; Borhan, A.

    2012-11-01

    We examine the stability of the shape of a viscoelastic drop translating in an immiscible, otherwise quiescent Newtonian fluid at low Reynolds number. Non-Newtonian stresses in the drop phase are characterized by the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Chilcott-Rallison model. A boundary integral method is used to numerically examine the time-evolution of initially perturbed drop shapes over a range of dimensionless parameters. For sufficiently small capillary numbers, the drop achieves an oblate spheroidal steady shape. For large initial deformations or capillary numbers, however, the drop deforms continuously and eventually breaks up through either the formation of an elongated tail or the development of a re-entrant cavity at its trailing end. These mechanisms of drop breakup are qualitatively similar to those reported earlier for Newtonian drops [C. J. Koh and L. G. Leal, Phys. Fluids A 1, 1309 (1989), 10.1063/1.857359; C. Pozrikidis, J. Fluid Mech. 210, 1 (1990), 10.1017/S0022112090001203; H. A. Stone, Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech. 26, 65 (1994), 10.1146/annurev.fl.26.010194.000433]. Compared to the case of a Newtonian drop, drop phase elasticity is found to have a stabilizing (destabilizing) effect for initially oblate (prolate) shape perturbations, due to the development of polymeric stresses caused by deformation of polymer chains in alignment with streamlines of the flow. Polymer viscosity has a strong influence on the stability of the shape of drops, whereas polymer relaxation time and extensibility have relatively weak influences.

  14. First drop dissimilarity in drop-on-demand inkjet devices

    SciTech Connect

    Famili, Amin; Palkar, Saurabh A.; Baldy, William J. Jr.

    2011-01-15

    As inkjet printing technology is increasingly applied in a broader array of applications, careful characterization of its method of use is critical due to its inherent sensitivity. A common operational mode in inkjet technology known as drop-on-demand ejection is used as a way to deliver a controlled quantity of material to a precise location on a target. This method of operation allows ejection of individual or a sequence (burst) of drops based on a timed trigger event. This work presents an examination of sequences of drops as they are ejected, indicating a number of phenomena that must be considered when designing a drop-on-demand inkjet system. These phenomena appear to be driven by differences between the first ejected drop in a burst and those that follow it and result in a break-down of the linear relationship expected between driving amplitude and drop mass. This first drop, as quantified by high-speed videography and subsequent image analysis, can be different in morphology, trajectory, velocity, and volume from subsequent drops within a burst. These findings were confirmed orthogonally by both volume and mass measurement techniques which allowed quantitation down to single drops.

  15. Axisymmetric model of drop spreading on a horizontal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistry, Aashutosh; Muralidhar, K.

    2015-09-01

    Spreading of an initially spherical liquid drop over a textured surface is analyzed by solving an integral form of the governing equations. The mathematical model extends Navier-Stokes equations by including surface tension at the gas-liquid boundary and a force distribution at the three phase contact line. While interfacial tension scales with drop curvature, the motion of the contact line depends on the departure of instantaneous contact angle from its equilibrium value. The numerical solution is obtained by discretizing the spreading drop into disk elements. The Bond number range considered is 0.01-1. Results obtained for sessile drops are in conformity with limiting cases reported in the literature [J. C. Bird et al., "Short-time dynamics of partial wetting," Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 234501 (2008)]. They further reveal multiple time scales that are reported in experiments [K. G. Winkels et al., "Initial spreading of low-viscosity drops on partially wetting surfaces," Phys. Rev. E 85, 055301 (2012) and A. Eddi et al., "Short time dynamics of viscous drop spreading," Phys. Fluids 25, 013102 (2013)]. Spreading of water and glycerin drops over fully and partially wetting surfaces is studied in terms of excess pressure, wall shear stress, and the dimensions of the footprint. Contact line motion is seen to be correctly captured in the simulations. Water drops show oscillations during spreading while glycerin spreads uniformly over the surface.

  16. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-based experiments together with analytical studies are presently being conducted for levitated drops. Both acoustic and electrostatic techniques are being employed to achieve levitation of drops in a gaseous environment. The scientific effort is principally on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the thermocapillary flow associated with local spot heating is being studied. Fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved with some exceptions when random rotational motion of the drop persists. The flow visualization has been carried out by light scattering from smoke particles for the exterior flow and fluorescent tracer particles in the drop. The results indicate a lack of axial symmetry in the internal flow even though the apparatus and the heating are symmetric. The theoretical studies for the past year have included fundamental analyses of acoustically levitated spherical drops. The flow associated with a particle near the velocity antinode is being investigated by the singular perturbation technique. As a first step towards understanding the effect of the particle displacement from the antinode, the flow field about the node has been calculated for the first time. The effect of the acoustic field on the interior of a liquid drop has also been investigated. The results predict that the internal flow field is very weak.

  17. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces. PMID:21889152

  18. The dropped big toe.

    PubMed

    Satku, K; Wee, J T; Kumar, V P; Ong, B; Pho, R W

    1992-03-01

    Surgical procedures for exposure of the upper third of the fibula have been known to cause weakness of the long extensor of the big toe post-operatively. The authors present three representative cases of surgically induced dropped big toe. From cadaveric dissection, an anatomic basis was found for this phenomenon. The tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles have their origin at the proximal end of the leg and receive their first motor innervation from a branch that arises from the common peroneal or deep peroneal nerve at about the level of the neck of the fibula. However, the extensor hallucis longus muscle originates in the middle one-third of the leg and the nerves innervating this muscle run a long course in close proximity to the fibula for up to ten centimeters from a level below the neck of the fibula before entering the muscle. Surgical intervention in the proximal one-third of the fibula just distal to the origin of the first motor branch to the tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus muscles carries a risk of injury to the nerves innervating the extensor hallucis longus. PMID:1519891

  19. System for Manipulating Drops and Bubbles Using Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The manipulation and control of drops of liquid and gas bubbles is achieved using high intensity acoustics in the form of and/or acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. generated by a controlled wave emission from a transducer. Acoustic radiation pressure is used to deploy or dispense drops into a liquid or a gas or bubbles into a liquid at zero or near zero velocity from the discharge end of a needle such as a syringe needle. Acoustic streaming is useful in manipulating the drop or bubble during or after deployment. Deployment and discharge is achieved by focusing the acoustic radiation pressure on the discharge end of the needle, and passing the acoustic waves through the fluid in the needle. through the needle will itself, or coaxially through the fluid medium surrounding the needle. Alternatively, the acoustic waves can be counter-deployed by focusing on the discharge end of the needle from a transducer axially aligned with the needle, but at a position opposite the needle, to prevent premature deployment of the drop or bubble. The acoustic radiation pressure can also be used for detecting the presence or absence of a drop or a bubble at the tip of a needle or for sensing various physical characteristics of the drop or bubble such as size or density.

  20. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  1. Free vibrations of a spherical drop constrained at an azimuth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, Santhosh; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Basaran, Osman A.

    2012-08-01

    Two droplets coupled through a liquid filled (a) hole in a plate or (b) tube is referred to as a double droplet system (DDS) or a capillary switch. Such capillary systems are gaining increasing attention due to their utility in applications. A particularly exciting application is one where a DDS is employed as a liquid lens, one flavor of which entails using a DDS as a variable focus lens by keeping it under sustained oscillations at its natural frequencies. The natural modes of oscillation of a DDS are determined analytically here in the limit in which the plate thickness (or tube length) is vanishingly small and when the effect of gravity is negligible compared to that of surface tension. In this limit, a DDS at rest reduces to two spherical caps that are pinned to and coupled along a common circular ring of contact of negligible thickness. Here, the caps are taken to be complementary pieces of a sphere so that the equilibrium state of the system is a sphere that is constrained by a ring of negligible thickness at an azimuthal angle with respect to the center of the sphere. Both the constrained drop and the fluid exterior to it are taken to be inviscid fluids undergoing irrotational flow. Similar to the linear oscillations of a free drop first studied by Rayleigh, the analytical formulation of the linear oscillations of the constrained drop results in a linear operator eigenvalue problem but with one additional boundary condition, i.e., that which accounts for zero shape perturbation along the circle of contact. Exploiting properties of linear operators, an implicit expression is obtained for the frequency of each mode of oscillation, a feat that appears not to have been accomplished to date in any problem involving oscillations of constrained drops. An extension of a method based on Green's functions that was developed to analyze the linear oscillations of a drop in contact with a spherical bowl [M. Strani and F. Sabetta, "Free-vibrations of a drop in partial

  2. Dynamics of polymeric drop breakup in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Paulo; Gollub, Jerry; Durian, Douglas

    2006-11-01

    The dynamics of drop formation of sheared polymeric and Newtonian fluids are investigated in a 50 μm microchannel. Inverse emulsions are obtained in a cross-like geometry by impinging a continuous oil phase (with surfactant) onto either a polymeric or a Newtonian aqueous solution. The viscosity ratio between the continuous and dispersed phases is kept close to unity, and both flow rates are varied. Solutions containing small amounts (100 ppm) of flexible polymers strongly affect the filament and drop breakup processes when compared to a Newtonian solution of similar viscosity. We find that the thinning of the filament for the Newtonian case is characterized by linear decline followed by a rapid approach to breakup. The polymeric case shows an initial Newtonian-like thinning followed by a slower, elasticity- dominated thinning. Consequently, the filament breakup time and length are considerably increased for the polymeric solutions. Also, larger primary drops and beads-on-string phenomena are found for the polymer solutions.

  3. Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, D.N.

    1998-04-14

    Ultrasonic characterization of single drops of liquids is disclosed. The present invention includes the use of two closely spaced transducers, or one transducer and a closely spaced reflector plate, to form an interferometer suitable for ultrasonic characterization of droplet-size and smaller samples without the need for a container. The droplet is held between the interferometer elements, whose distance apart may be adjusted, by surface tension. The surfaces of the interferometer elements may be readily cleansed by a stream of solvent followed by purified air when it is desired to change samples. A single drop of liquid is sufficient for high-quality measurement. Examples of samples which may be investigated using the apparatus and method of the present invention include biological specimens (tear drops; blood and other body fluid samples; samples from tumors, tissues, and organs; secretions from tissues and organs; snake and bee venom, etc.) for diagnostic evaluation, samples in forensic investigations, and detection of drugs in small quantities. 5 figs.

  4. Technology of eye drops containing aloe (Aloe arborescens Mill.--Liliaceae) and eye drops containing both aloe and neomycin sulphate.

    PubMed

    Kodym, A; Marcinkowski, A; Kukuła, H

    2003-01-01

    Eye drops made of aloe are a sterile, aqueous extract of fresh leaves of Aloe arborescens Mill., containing necessary additives and neomycin sulphate. The aim of the studies was to establish the technology of eye drops containing biologically active aloe substances and those containing both chemical constituents of aloe and neomycin sulphate. Within the studies, the formulary content and the way of preparing eye drops were determined, criteria were defined and methods of qualitative assessment of drops were proposed. On the basis of the proposed analytical methods, the physicochemical and microbiological stability of the eye drops stored at a temperature of 20-25 degrees C was studied. As the criteria of qualitative assessment of the eye drops, the following analyses were considered: sterility, appearance of the eye drops (clarity), pH, osmotic pressure, density, viscosity, TLC analysis, content of aloenin and aloin, studies of anti-microbial activity of neomycin in the drops, and preservative efficiency of thiomersal in the eye drops. The studies showed that the additives such as: sodium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, chlorhexidine diacetate and digluconate, phenylmercuric borate and Nipagins M and P could not be used to prepare the eye drops because they were involved in pharmaceutical interactions with chemical constituents of aloe in the eye drops. The eye drops containing: aqueous extract of fresh leaves of aloe, boric acid, thiomersal, sodium pyrosulphite, disodium EDTA, beta-phenylethyl alcohol and neomycin sulphate, both freshly prepared and after two years of storage, met the requirements of the Polish Pharmacopoeia (PPh V) mentioned in the monograph Guttae ophthalmicae. They were sterile, clear, their osmotic pressure approximated the osmotic pressure of lacrimal fluid and they were characterized by appropriate pH. Aloenin in the drops was much more stable than aloin. Neomycin after two years of storage retained almost 98% of its starting antimicrobial

  5. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    The 100 m Drop Tower at NASA-Marshall was used to provide the step change in acceleration from 1.0 to 0.0005 g. An inter-fluid meniscus oscillates vertically within a cylindrical container when suddenly released from earth's gravity and taken into a microgravity environment. Oscillations damp out from energy dissipative mechanisms such as viscosity and interfacial friction. Damping of the oscillations by the later mechanism is affected by the nature of the interfacial junction between the fluid-fluid interface and the container wall. In earlier stages of the project, the meniscus shape which developed during microgravity conditions was applied to evaluations of wetting phenomena near the critical temperature. Variations in equilibrium contact angle against the container wall were expected to occur under critical wetting conditions. However, it became apparent that the meaningful phenomenon was the damping of interfacial oscillations. This latter concept makes up the bulk of this report. Perfluoromethyl cyclohexane and isopropanol in glass were the materials used for the experiment. The wetting condition of the fluids against the wall changes at the critical wetting transition temperature. This change in wetting causes a change in the damping characteristics of the interfacial excursions during oscillation and no measurable change in contact angle. The effect of contact line friction measured above and below the wetting transition temperature was to increase the period of vertical oscillation for the vapor-liquid interface when below the wetting transition temperature.

  6. Magnetic control of Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Piroird, Keyvan; Clanet, Christophe; Quéré, David

    2012-05-01

    We show how a magnetic field can influence the motion of a paramagnetic drop made of liquid oxygen in a Leidenfrost state on solids at room temperature. It is demonstrated that the trajectory can be modified in both direction and velocity and that the results can be interpreted in terms of classical mechanics as long as the drop does not get too close to the magnet. We study the deviation and report that it can easily overcome 180∘ and even diverge under certain conditions, leading to situations where a drop gets captured. In the vicinity of the magnet, another type of trapping is observed, due to the deformation of the drop in this region, which leads to a strong energy dissipation. Conversely, drops can be accelerated by moving magnets (slingshot effect). PMID:23004866

  7. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.

  8. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing. PMID:26337704

  9. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-01-01

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row of vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing. PMID:26337704

  10. Origin and dynamics of vortex rings in drop splashing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lee, Ji San; Park, Su Ji; Lee, Jun Ho; Weon, Byung Mook; Fezzaa, Kamel; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-09-04

    A vortex is a flow phenomenon that is very commonly observed in nature. More than a century, a vortex ring that forms during drop splashing has caught the attention of many scientists due to its importance in understanding fluid mixing and mass transport processes. However, the origin of the vortices and their dynamics remain unclear, mostly due to the lack of appropriate visualization methods. Here, with ultrafast X-ray phase-contrast imaging, we show that the formation of vortex rings originates from the energy transfer by capillary waves generated at the moment of the drop impact. Interestingly, we find a row ofmore » vortex rings along the drop wall, as demonstrated by a phase diagram established here, with different power-law dependencies of the angular velocities on the Reynolds number. These results provide important insight that allows understanding and modelling any type of vortex rings in nature, beyond just vortex rings during drop splashing.« less

  11. Initiation of liquid-solid contact beneath an impacting drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubinstein, Shmuel; Kolinski, John

    2015-11-01

    Before an impacting drop contacts the solid surface it must first drain the air beneath it. As a prelude to wetting, before any contact occurs, the impinging liquid confines the intervening air into a nanometers-thin film. Once liquid-solid contact initiates by the spontaneous formation of a liquid bridge, the fluid rapidly wicks through the thin film of air, permanently binding the drop to the surface. Here, we experimentally examine these initial stages in the formation of the liquid solid contact beneath the impacting drop. Fast TIR microscopy enables unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of the wetting process beneath the impacting drop and permits 3-dimensional imaging of the real contact line as well as nanometer-resolution of the thin film of air separating the liquid from the solid.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic flow and chaotic mixing inside drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiumei

    Electrohyodynamics, proposed by G. I. Taylor (1966), is the study of fluid motion under the influence of electric fields. In this work, we investigate theoretically and experimentally the electrohydrodynamic flow field inside a dielectric liquid drop and its application in driving chaotic mixing. Previous works on the electrohydrodynamic flows are mainly restricted to neutrally buoyant drops. Since settling drops are expected to occur more commonly in applications, in the first part of this thesis we extend Taylor's theory to deal with translating drops. Both shape distortion and charge convection, when coupled with an asymmetric velocity profile, will produce a net drag and a shift in the settling speed. Corrections to the settling velocity from both contributions are calculated to the first order. Experiments are performed using a PMM/castor oil system, and are in qualitative agreement with the theory: the deformations and the change in settling velocity are all proportional to E2, as predicted, and the settling speed shows the correct trends with drop size. In the second part of this thesis, we investigate three dimensional chaotic mixing driven by the electrohydrodynamic flows. A spatially uniform electric field is periodically switched through an angle, which is equivalent to switching the symmetry axis of the Taylor circulation back and forth, chaotic mixing is therefore generated inside a drop. Mixing efficiency is studied numerically by tracing trajectories of Lagrangian particles. Our calculations of the mixed volume fraction and Lyapunov exponents give optimal mixing conditions. Mixing experiments for a switching angle of 0.5pi are performed using a silicone oil/castor oil system, and show excellent agreement with the theory. In the third part of this thesis, we discuss effects of finite charge relaxation and charge convection on the flow field in both DC and AC electric fields. A pole-to-equator convection, acting together with a slow charge relaxation

  13. Bed of polydisperse viscous spherical drops under thermocapillary effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharanya, V.; Raja Sekhar, G. P.; Rohde, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Viscous flow past an ensemble of polydisperse spherical drops is investigated under thermocapillary effects. We assume that the collection of spherical drops behaves as a porous media and estimates the hydrodynamic interactions analytically via the so- called cell model that is defined around a specific representative particle. In this method, the hydrodynamic interactions are assumed to be accounted by suitable boundary conditions on a fictitious fluid envelope surrounding the representative particle. The force calculated on this representative particle will then be extended to a bed of spherical drops visualized as a Darcy porous bed. Thus, the "effective bed permeability" of such a porous bed will be computed as a function of various parameters and then will be compared with Carman-Kozeny relation. We use cell model approach to a packed bed of spherical drops of uniform size (monodisperse spherical drops) and then extend the work for a packed bed of polydisperse spherical drops, for a specific parameters. Our results show a good agreement with the Carman-Kozeny relation for the case of monodisperse spherical drops. The prediction of overall bed permeability using our present model agrees well with the Carman-Kozeny relation when the packing size distribution is narrow, whereas a small deviation can be noted when the size distribution becomes broader.

  14. Instant freezing of impacting wax drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Virot, Emmanuel; Rubinstein, Shmuel

    2015-11-01

    We present the impact of hot liquid drops of wax on surfaces whose temperature is below the solidifying temperature of the drops. During the fall the drops remain mostly liquid, but upon impact, their temperature quickly decreases resulting in the solidification of the drop. Depending on the impact energy, drops size and the temperature difference between the drop and the surface this results in plethora of solid shapes: simple lenses, triangular drops, spherical caps and popped popcorn shapes.

  15. Solid substrate and head-on impact of viscous drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroll, Robert D.

    Using a volume-of-fluid method, we simulate liquid drops impacting at several meters per second, both onto a solid substrate and in a head-on geometry. The boundary condition that the fluid cannot flow through the impact plane controls the early-time impact dynamics. Whether fluid can flow along the impact plane, the difference between the two configurations, is not as important during the early times, but it does become important later. We also quantify when and where the small effects of viscosity and surface tension affect the dominantly inertial impact dynamics.

  16. Electrokinetics of isolated electrified drops.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Rohit; Berry, Joseph D; Harvie, Dalton J E; Davidson, Malcolm R

    2016-04-14

    Using a recently developed multiphase electrokinetic model, we simulate the transient electrohydrodynamic response of a liquid drop containing ions, to both small and large values of electric field. The temporal evolution is found to be governed primarily by two dimensionless groups: (i) Ohnesorge number (Oh), a ratio of viscous to inertio-capillary effects, and (ii) inverse dimensionless Debye length (κ), a measure of the diffuse regions of charge that develop in the drop. The effects of dielectric polarization dominate at low Oh, while effects of separated charge gain importance with increase in Oh. For small values of electric field, the deformation behaviour of a drop is shown to be accurately described by a simple analytical expression. At large electric fields, the drops are unstable and eject progeny drops. Depending on Oh and κ this occurs via dripping or jetting; the regime transitions are shown by a Oh-κ phase map. In contrast to previous studies, we find universal scaling relations to predict size and charge of progeny drops. Our simulations suggest charge transport plays a significant role in drop dynamics for 0.1 ≤ Oh ≤ 10, a parameter range of interest in microscale flows. PMID:26954299

  17. Pool impacts of Leidenfrost drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Maquet, Laurent; Dorbolo, Stephane; Dehandschoewercker, Eline; Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    This work concerns the impact of a droplet made of a volatile liquid (typically HFE) on a pool of an other liquid (typically silicone oil) which temperature is above the boiling point of the drop. Depending on the properties of the two liquids and the impacting conditions, four different regimes are observed. For low impacting speeds, the droplet bounces on the surface of the bath and finally levitates above it in a Leidenfrost state. Such a regime occurs as soon as the pool temperature exceeds the boiling point of the drop. This observation means that there is no threshold in temperature for a Leidenfrost effect on a liquid surface contrary to the case of a solid substrate. For intermediate impacting velocities, the pinch-off of the surface of the pool entraps the drop in the liquid bulk. The entrapped drop is separated from the pool by a layer of its own vapour in a similar way of antibulles. For increasing impacting speeds, the vapour layer between the drop and the pool does not hold during the pinch-off event. The contact of the drop with the hot liquid provokes a sudden and intense evaporation. At very large impacting speeds, the drop rapidely contacts the pool, spreads and finally induces a hemi-spherical cavity. In the end, these four different regimes are summarized in a Froud-Weber diagram which boundaries are discussed.

  18. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  19. Automated single cell sorting and deposition in submicroliter drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salánki, Rita; Gerecsei, Tamás; Orgovan, Norbert; Sándor, Noémi; Péter, Beatrix; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-08-01

    Automated manipulation and sorting of single cells are challenging, when intact cells are needed for further investigations, e.g., RNA or DNA sequencing. We applied a computer controlled micropipette on a microscope admitting 80 PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) tubes to be filled with single cells in a cycle. Due to the Laplace pressure, fluid starts to flow out from the micropipette only above a critical pressure preventing the precise control of drop volume in the submicroliter range. We found an anomalous pressure additive to the Laplace pressure that we attribute to the evaporation of the drop. We have overcome the problem of the critical dropping pressure with sequentially operated fast fluidic valves timed with a millisecond precision. Minimum drop volume was 0.4-0.7 μl with a sorting speed of 15-20 s per cell. After picking NE-4C neuroectodermal mouse stem cells and human primary monocytes from a standard plastic Petri dish we could gently deposit single cells inside tiny drops. 94 ± 3% and 54 ± 7% of the deposited drops contained single cells for NE-4C and monocytes, respectively. 7.5 ± 4% of the drops contained multiple cells in case of monocytes. Remaining drops were empty. Number of cells deposited in a drop could be documented by imaging the Petri dish before and after sorting. We tuned the adhesion force of cells to make the manipulation successful without the application of microstructures for trapping cells on the surface. We propose that our straightforward and flexible setup opens an avenue for single cell isolation, critically needed for the rapidly growing field of single cell biology.

  20. Orion Capsule Mockup is Dropped

    NASA Video Gallery

    An Orion capsule mockup is dropped from a plane 25,000 feet above the Arizona desert to test its parachute design. Orion will return to Earth at speeds faster than previous human spacecraft, and wi...

  1. Gravity driven current during sessile drop coalescence on a surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Oberdick, Samuel; Garoff, Stephen; Anna, Shelley

    2013-11-01

    We study the mixing behavior of two sessile drops following coalescence on a flat surface. The surface is composed of silicone elastomer on which the drops exhibit contact angles of about 90 degree. The two drops are of equal volume at coalescence, but different densities and viscosities. Using laser induced fluorescence, we obtain both a top view of the contact line motion and a side view of the cross-sectional flow. During the coalescence stage, the initial healing of the meniscus bridge and damping of capillary waves occur on time scales comparable to the inertio-capillary time. However, the interface between the dyed and undyed components remains sharp, with diffusive mixing occurring at much longer timescales. At intermediate time scales the motion is controlled by a gravity current, which leads to the eventual stratification into two separate horizontal layers within the composite drop. Using lubrication analysis, we characterize the gravity current as a function of the drop sizes, and the density and viscosity differences between the two merging fluids. The numerical solution of the lubrication analysis captures the observed scaling of the time dependent interface movement as a function of fluid and geometric parameters.

  2. Unsteady Thermocapillary Migration of Isolated Drops in Creeping Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Loren H.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of an isolated immiscible drop that slowly migrates due to unsteady thermocapillary stresses is considered. All physical properties except for interfacial tension are assumed constant for the two Newtonian fluids. Explicit expressions are found for the migration rate and stream functions in the Laplace domain. The resulting microgravity theory is useful, e.g., in predicting the distance a drop will migrate due to an impulsive interfacial temperature gradient as well as the time required to attain steady flow conditions from an initially resting state.

  3. Structure and Dynamics of Interfaces: Drops and Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. Adin, Jr.; Mann, Elizabeth K.; Meyer, William V.; Neumann, A. Wilhelm; Tavana, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    We aim to acquire measurements of the structure and dynamics of certain liquid-fluid interfaces using an ensemble of techniques in collaboration: (1) Total internal reflection (TIR) Surface light scattering spectroscopy (SLSS), (2) Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and (3) Drop-shape analysis. SLSS and BAM can be done on a shared interfacial footprint. Results using a 50-50 mixture of pentane-isohexane, which extends the range of NASA's Confined Vapor Bubble (CVB) experiment, yield surface tension results that differ from the expected Langmuir Fit. These results were confirmed using both the SLSS and drop-shape analysis approaches.

  4. Investigation of Drop Formation by a Vortex Ring in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, Luis P.; Maksimovic, Pepi

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of drop formation by a vortex ring propagating through one or more fluid interfaces in microgravity is described. The main goal of the research is to determine the dynamics of drop formation by vortical flows in the capillary limit with large density change across the intel-face. Dimensional analysis shows that in microgravity experiments the capillary limit can be studied using a relatively large vortex ring diameter to facilitate experimental characterization of the interaction. Results obtained in density matched systems are reviewed to illustrate the complex nature of these interactions.

  5. Damping of drop oscillations by surfactants and surface viscosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, Brian M.; Nadim, Ali

    1999-01-01

    An energy equation is derived for the general case of a viscous drop suspended in a viscous medium with surfactants contaminating the interface. It contains terms that clearly identify dissipation contributions from the viscous effects in the bulk fluids, surface shear and dilatational viscosity effects at the interface, and surfactant transport. An efficient boundary integral method is developed which incorporates the effects of a constant surface dilatational viscosity in simulations of an oscillating two-dimensional inviscid drop. Surface dilatational viscosity is shown to have a significant damping effect on the otherwise undamped inviscid oscillations.

  6. Electrostatic Liquid-Drop-Levitation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won Kyu; Chung, San Kun; Hyson, Michael T.; Elleman, Daniel D.

    1988-01-01

    Electrostatic levitator has levitated drops of liquid up to 4 mm in diameter while maintaining spherical drop shapes. Stable levitation of spherical drops valuable in experiments involving super-cooling, solidification, and crystal growth.

  7. Finite element analysis of axisymmetric oscillations of sessile liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bixler, N. E.; Benner, R. E.

    Inviscid oscillations of sessile liquid drops are simulated by the Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with the time integrator proposed by Gresho, et al. Simulations are of drops in spherical containers which are subjected to imposed oscillations of specified frequency and amplitude. Five equations govern drop response: (1) Laplace's equation for velocity potential within the drop; (2) a kinematic condition at the free surface; (3) a Bernoulli equation augmented to include gravity and capillary pressure at the free surface; (4) a kinematic condition at the solid surface; and (5) either a condition for fixed contact line or fixed contact angle. Each of these equations is modified to account for an accelerating frame of reference which moves the container. Normalized drop volume, contact angle, and gravitational Bond number are dimensionless parameters which control drop response to an imposed oscillation. Given a set of fluid properties, such as those for mercury, gravitational Bond number is uniquely defined by the container radius. Resonant frequencies and mode interaction are detected by Fourier analysis of a transient signal, such as free surface position at the pole of a spherical coordinate system. Results, especially resonant frequencies, are found to depend strongly on contact line condition. Calculation of resonant frequencies by eigenanalysis with Stewart's method is also discussed.

  8. Distinguishing between microscale gaseous bubbles and liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Beng Hau; An, Hongjie; Chan, Chon U.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, there has been strong research interest in decorating surfaces with tiny bubbles and drops due to their potential applications in reducing slippage in micro and nanofluidic devices. Both nanobubbles and nanodrops are typically nucleated by exchanging fluids over a suitable substrate. However, the nucleation experiments present many challenges, such as reproducibility and the possibility of contamination. The use of one-use plastic syringes and needle cannulas in nucleation experiments can introduce polymeric contamination. A contaminated experiment may nucleate bubbles, drops or both. Moreover, it is surprisingly difficult to distinguish between bubbles and drops under the usual atomic force microscopy or optical techniques. Here we present an experimental study comparing bubbles and oil (PDMS) drops on an atomically smooth surface (HOPG). Instead of nucleating the objects via solvent exchange, we directly introduced bubbles via electrolysis, and oil drops by injecting a dilute solution. Contrary to previous reports, we find that under careful AFM characterisation, liquid drops and gaseous bubbles respond differently to a change in imaging force, and moreover present different characteristic force curves.

  9. Forced Oscillations of Supported Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    Oscillations of supported liquid drops are the subject of wide scientific interest, with applications in areas as diverse as liquid-liquid extraction, synthesis of ceramic powders, growing of pure crystals in low gravity, and measurement of dynamic surface tension. In this research, axisymmetric forced oscillations of arbitrary amplitude of viscous liquid drops of fixed volume which are pendant from or sessile on a rod with a fixed or moving contact line and surrounded by an inviscid ambient gas are induced by moving the rod in the vertical direction sinusiodally in time. In this paper, a preliminary report is made on the computational analysis of the oscillations of supported drops that have 'clean' interfaces and whose contact lines remain fixed throughout their motions. The relative importance of forcing to damping can be increased by either increasing the amplitude of rod motion A or Reynolds number Re. It is shown that as the ratio of forcing to damping rises, for drops starting from an initial rest state a sharp increase in deformation can occur when they are forced to oscillate in the vicinity of their resonance frequencies, indicating the incipience of hysteresis. However, it is also shown that the existence of a second stable limit cycle and the occurrence of hysteresis can be observed if the drop is subjected to a so-called frequency sweep, where the forcing frequency is first increased and then decreased over a suitable range. Because the change in drop deformation response is abrupt in the vicinity of the forcing frequencies where hysteresis occurs, it should be possible to exploit the phenomenon to accurately measure the viscosity and surface tension of the drop liquid.

  10. Drop Impact on to Moving Liquid Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Sánchez, Beatriz Natividad; Castrejón-Pita, José Rafael; Castrejón-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Hutchings, Ian M.

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of droplets on to moving liquid substrates is an omnipresent situation both in nature and industry. A diverse spectrum of phenomena emerges from this simple process. In this work we present a parametric experimental study that discerns the dynamics of the impact in terms of the physical properties of the fluid and the relative velocity between the impacting drop and the moving liquid pool. The behaviour ranges from smooth coalescence (characterized by little mixing) to violent splashing (generation of multiple satellite droplets and interfacial vorticity). In addition, transitional regimes such as bouncing and surfing are also found. We classify the system dynamics and show a parametric diagram for the conditions of each regime. This work was supported by the EPSRC (Grant EP/H018913/1), the Royal Society, Becas Santander Universidades and the International Relationships Office of the University of Extremadura.

  11. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND) experiment was designed to improve understanding of how the shape and behavior of bubbles respond to ultrasound pressure. By understanding this behavior, it may be possible to counteract complications bubbles cause during materials processing on the ground. This 12-second sequence came from video downlinked from STS-94, July 5 1997, MET:3/19:15 (approximate). The BDND guest investigator was Gary Leal of the University of California, Santa Barbara. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). Advanced fluid dynamics experiments will be a part of investigations plarned for the International Space Station. (189KB JPEG, 1293 x 1460 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) The MPG from which this composite was made is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300163.html.

  12. Static Magnetowetting of Ferrofluid Drops.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Carlo; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Talbot, Delphine; Massart, René; Bacri, Jean-Claude; Abou-Hassan, Ali

    2016-08-01

    We report results of a comprehensive study of the wetting properties of sessile drops of ferrofluid water solutions at various concentrations deposited on flat substrates and subjected to the action of permanent magnets of different sizes and strengths. The amplitude and the gradient of the magnetic field experienced by the ferrofluid are changed by varying the magnets and their distance to the surface. Magnetic forces up to 100 times the gravitational one and magnetic gradients up to 1 T/cm are achieved. A rich phenomenology is observed, ranging from flattened drops caused by the magnetic attraction to drops extended normally to the substrate because of the normal traction of the magnetic field. We find that the former effect can be conveniently described in terms of an effective Bond number that compares the effective drop attraction with the capillary force, whereas the drop's vertical elongation is effectively expressed by a dimensionless number S, which compares the pressure jump at the ferrofluid interface because of the magnetization with the capillary pressure. PMID:27385506

  13. The stress system generated by an electromagnetic field in a suspension of drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The stress generated in a suspension of drops in the presence of a uniform electric field and a pure straining motion, taking into account that the magnetohydrodynamic effects are dominant was calculated. It was found that the stress generated in the suspension depended on the direction of the applied electric field, the dielectric constants, the vicosity coefficients, the conductivities, and the permeabilities of fluids inside and outside the drops. The expression of the particle stress shows that for fluids which are good conductors and poor dielectrics, especially for larger drops, magnetohydrodynamic effects end to reduce the dependence on the direction of the applied electric field.

  14. Measurement of extensional viscosity using the falling drop technique. Final report, October 27, 1992--September 27, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.K.; Wildman, D.J. |

    1998-02-01

    In the falling drop technique, a drop is formed by slowly extruding a liquid downward through a small tube. The drop eventually falls, and fluid adheres to both the tube and the drop, creating a distinct extending fiber. Extensional viscosity may be determined by measuring the dimensions of the fiber as it extends. The flow of fluid in a falling drop has been modeled in order to determine extensional viscosity by measuring the extending fiber. A falling drop rheometer was built, and fiber dimensions were measured using two digital cameras and an image processing system. Extensional viscosity was measured for various solutions of glycerol, xanthan gum, and water. The falling drop technique proved to be an effective extensional rheometer for a range of solution concentrations. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Two-Dimensional Microfluidics: hydrodynamics of drops and interfaces in flowing smectic liquid crystal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhiyuan; Nguyen, Zoom; Park, Cheol; Maclennan, Joe; Maclennan, Matt; Clark, Noel

    2012-02-01

    The quantization of film thickness in freely suspended fluid smectic liquid crystal film enables the study of the hydrodynamics of drops and interfaces in 2D. We report microfluidic experiments, in which we observe the hydrodynamics of 2D drops flowing in channels. Using high-speed video microscopy, we track the shape of 2D drops and interfaces, visualizing the deterministic lateral displacement-based separation and pinched flow separation phenomena previously observed only in 3D. Finally, we demonstrate techniques for 2D drop generation and sorting, which will be used for 2D microfluidic applications.

  16. Fat drops in wrist tendon sheaths on MRI in conjunction with a radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Martijn V; Chesaru, Ileana

    2016-08-01

    A case is presented in which fat drops are seen on MRI inside extensor compartment 2 and 3, in conjunction with a radius fracture. The occurrence of traumatic tendon sheath fat-fluid levels has been sparsely reported on CT and MR imaging. This case is the first report of post-traumatic tendon sheath fat drops. Although the clinical relevance of tendon sheath fat drops seems to be limited, it is important to detect and correctly diagnose these fat drops in order to provide an accurate and complete radiologic report. PMID:27170371

  17. Rheological properties, shape oscillations, and coalescence of liquid drops with surfactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apfel, R. E.; Holt, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    A method was developed to deduce dynamic interfacial properties of liquid drops. The method involves measuring the frequency and damping of free quadrupole oscillations of an acoustically levitated drop. Experimental results from pure liquid-liquid systems agree well with theoretical predictions. Additionally, the effects of surfactants is considered. Extension of these results to a proposed microgravity experiment on the drop physics module (DPM) in USML-1 are discussed. Efforts are also underway to model the time history of the thickness of the fluid layer between two pre-coalescence drops, and to measure the film thickness experimentally. Preliminary results will be reported, along with plans for coalescence experiments proposed for USML-1.

  18. Isoelectric Focusing in a Drop

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Noah G.; Hayes, Mark A.; Garcia, Antonio A.; Ansari, Rafat R.

    2010-01-01

    A novel approach to molecular separations is investigated using a technique termed droplet-based isoelectric focusing. Drops are manipulated discretely on a superhydrophobic surface, subjected to low voltages for isoelectric focusing, and split—resulting in a preparative separation. A universal indicator dye demonstrates the generation of stable, reversible pH gradients (3–10) in ampholyte buffers and these gradients lead to protein focusing within the drop length. Focusing was visually characterized, spectroscopically verified, and assessed quantitatively by non-invasive light scattering measurements. It was found to correlate with a quantitative model based on 1D steady state theory. This work illustrates that molecular separations can be deployed within a single open drop and the differential fractions can be separated into new discrete liquid elements. PMID:21117663

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Inhomogeneous Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, P.; Henderson, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The nature of the microscopic stress tensor in an inhomogenous fluid is discussed, with emphasis on the statistical mechanics of drops. Changes in free energy for isothermal deformations of a fluid are expressible as volume integrals of the stress tensor 'times' a strain terror. A particular radial distortion of a drop leads to statistical mechanical expressions for the pressure difference across the surface of the drop. We find that the stress tensor is not uniquely defined by the microscopic laws embodying conservation of momentum and angular momentum and that the ambiguity remains in the ensemble average, or pressure tensor, in regions of inhomomogeneity. This leads to difficulties in defining statistical mechanical expressions for the surface tension of a drop.

  20. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  1. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.965 Section 178.965 Transportation... Packagings § 178.965 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all...) Special preparation for the drop test. Large Packagings must be filled in accordance with § 178.960....

  2. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.1045 Section 178.1045... Containers § 178.1045 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all... subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  3. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.810 Section 178.810 Transportation... Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the qualification of all IBC design types... the drop test. (1) Metal, rigid plastic, and composite IBCs intended to contain solids must be...

  4. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 178.603 Section 178.603 Transportation... Packagings and Packages § 178.603 Drop test. (a) General. The drop test must be conducted for the... than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point...

  5. Stability of a compound sessile drop at the axisymmetric configuration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Chatain, Dominique; Anna, Shelley L; Garoff, Stephen

    2016-01-15

    The equilibrium configuration of compound sessile drops has been calculated previously in the absence of gravity. Using the Laplace equations, we establish seven dimensionless parameters describing the axisymmetric configuration in the presence of gravity. The equilibrium axisymmetric configuration can be either stable or unstable depending on the fluid properties. A stability criterion is established by calculating forces on a perturbed Laplacian shape. In the zero Bond number limit, the stability criterion depends on the density ratio, two ratios of interfacial tensions, the volume ratio of the two drops, and the contact angle. We use Surface Evolver to examine the stability of compound sessile drops at small and large Bond numbers and compare with the zero Bond number approximation. Experimentally, we realize a stable axisymmetric compound sessile drop in air, where the buoyancy force exerted by the air is negligible. Finally, using a pair of fluids in which the density ratio can be tuned nearly independently of the interfacial tensions, the stability transition is verified for the axisymmetric configuration. Even though the perturbations are different for the theory, simulations and experiments, both simulations and experiments agree closely with the zero Bond number approximation, exhibiting a small discrepancy at large Bond number. PMID:26433481

  6. Getting the Drop on Sediment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galindez, Peter

    1977-01-01

    In this exercise, students examine Aristotle's weight hypothesis by testing variously shaped marble chips. These chips are weighed and dropped down a water tube. Average fall times and weights are recorded and graphed. Students are asked to apply this information to rock and soil deposition by streams. (MA)

  7. Size distribution of detached drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baluev, V. V.; Stepanov, V. M.

    1989-10-01

    The law governing the size distribution of detached gas-liquid streams of drops has been determined analytically, and a comparison is carried out against experimental data existing in the literature. The derived theoretical relationships offer an excellent description of existing experimental results.

  8. Linear oscillations of a drop in uniform alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenrui; Carleson, T.E.

    1990-10-01

    Oscillations of a conducting drop immersed in a dielectric fluid in an alternating electric field has been modelled in order to understand the enhancement of the transport processes by the electric field. Numerical solutions for oscillation amplitude, velocity distribution, resonant frequency and streamlines were obtained. The effects of viscosity and density on the resonant frequency and the velocity distribution were investigated. It was found that the resonant frequency of viscous fluids was always smaller than the free oscillation frequency of the same droplet. The predicted scanning frequency response curve and the streamlines agree well with the experimental observations.

  9. Micro-scale drop dynamics for heat transfer enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francois, Marianne; Shyy, Wei

    2002-05-01

    With rapid advances in micro-device fabrication, computational techniques, and diagnostic tools, there is a significant interest in applying micro-scale fluid dynamics and heat transfer to flow control, flight vehicle protection, and thermal management. Utilizing energy transfer associated with phase change, multiphase systems offer many new opportunities. To elucidate the main scientific issues and technical implications, recent research addressing the interplay between capillarity, moving boundaries, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and phase change of micro-scale multiphase systems is reviewed. The parametric variations in contact angle, surface tension, impact velocity, and liquid viscosity related to drop impingement and heat transfer are discussed.

  10. Routines for Computing Pressure Drops in Venturis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Quay, Laurence

    2004-01-01

    A set of computer-program routines has been developed for calculating pressure drops and recoveries of flows through standard venturis, nozzle venturis, and orifices. Relative to prior methods used for such calculations, the method implemented by these routines offers greater accuracy because it involves fewer simplifying assumptions and is more generally applicable to wide ranges of flow conditions. These routines are based on conservation of momentum and energy equations for real nonideal fluids, the properties of which are calculated by curve-fitting subroutines based on empirical properties data. These routines are capable of representing cavitating, choked, non-cavitating, and unchoked flow conditions for liquids, gases, and supercritical fluids. For a computation of flow through a given venturi, nozzle venturi, or orifice, the routines determine which flow condition occurs: First, they calculate a throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is unchoked or non-cavitating, then they calculate the throat pressure under the assumption that the flow is choked or cavitating. The assumption that yields the higher throat pressure is selected as the correct one.

  11. The rate of collisions due to Brownian or gravitational motion of small drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Xiaoguang; Davis, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of the collision rate of two spherical drops undergoing Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation are presented. The diffusion equation for relative Brownian motion of two drops is derived, and the relative motion of pairs of drops in gravitational sedimentation is traced via a trajectory analysis in order to develop theoretical models to determine the collision efficiencies, both with and without interparticle forces applied between the drops. It is concluded that finite collision rates between nondeforming fluid drops are possible for Brownian diffusion or gravitational sedimentation in the absence of attractive forces, in stark contrast to the prediction that lubrication forces prevent rigid spheres from contacting each other unless an attractive force that becomes infinite as the separation approaches zero is applied. Collision rates are shown to increase as the viscosity of the drop-phase decreases. In general, hydrodynamic interactions reduce the collision rates more for gravitational collisions than for Brownian collisions.

  12. Compound pendant drop tensiometry for interfacial tension measurement at zero bond number.

    PubMed

    Neeson, Michael J; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2014-12-30

    A widely used method to determine the interfacial tension between fluids is to quantify the pendant drop shape that is determined by gravity and interfacial tension forces. Failure of this method for small drops or small fluid density differences is a critical limitation in microfluidic applications and when only small fluid samples are available. By adding a small spherical particle to the interface to apply an axisymmetric deformation, both the particle density and the interfacial tension can be simultaneously and precisely determined, providing an accurate and elegant solution to a long-standing problem. PMID:25494530

  13. More investigations in capillary fluidics using a drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollman, Andrew; Weislogel, Mark; Wiles, Brently; Pettit, Donald; Snyder, Trevor

    2016-04-01

    A variety of contemplative demonstrations concerning intermediate-to-large length scale capillary fluidic phenomena were made possible by the brief weightless environment of a drop tower (Wollman and Weislogel in Exp Fluids 54(4):1, 2013). In that work, capillarity-driven flows leading to unique spontaneous droplet ejections, bubble ingestions, and multiphase flows were introduced and discussed. Such efforts are continued herein. The spontaneous droplet ejection phenomena (auto-ejection) is reviewed and demonstrated on earth as well as aboard the International Space Station. This technique is then applied to novel low-g droplet combustion where soot tube structures are created in the wakes of burning drops. A variety of new tests are presented that routinely demonstrate `puddle jumping,' a process defined as the spontaneous recoil and ejection of large liquid drops from hydrophobic surfaces following the step reduction in `gravity' characteristic of most drop towers. The inverse problem of `bubble jumping' is also demonstrated for the case of hydrophilic surfaces. A variety of puddle jump demonstrations are presented in summary as a means of suggesting the further exploitation of drop towers to study such large length scale capillary phenomena.

  14. Collision between immiscible drops with large surface tension difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2009-11-01

    Immiscible drop collision, as occurring in fuel-oxidizer sprays or in the release of certain fire-extinguishing agents, tends to exhibit a much richer behavior with respect to miscible drops collision thanks to the formation of a liquid-liquid interface during impact. For instance, in near-head-on diesel-water drop collisions, ``overlaying'' may occur in which the diesel oil flows from the collision point around the water drop to gather at the opposite location of the drop. To simulate this class of multi-material flows, the combined volume-of-fluid / level set methodology that sharply captures a single liquid-gas interface (Sussman et al, J. of Comp. Phys., 2007) needs to be duplicated for a second, independent interface. In this presentation, we will show that simulation results are not affected by the reconstruction order of the interfaces, as in other surface capturing methods. We will also propose different numerical solutions to treat surface tension in the triple point computational cells, and examine the characteristics of the flow developing at the contact line between the two liquids and air in overlaying head-on collisions.

  15. Rayleigh Taylor instability of viscoelastic drops at high Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, D. D.; Beavers, G. S.; Funada, T.

    2002-02-01

    Movies of the breakup of viscous and viscoelastic drops in the high-speed airstream behind a shock wave in a shock tube have been reported by Joseph, Belanger & Beavers (1999). They performed a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for the initial breakup of a drop of Newtonian liquid and found that the most unstable Rayleigh Taylor wave fits nearly perfectly with waves measured on enhanced images of drops from the movies, but the effects of viscosity cannot be neglected. Here we construct a Rayleigh Taylor stability analysis for an Oldroyd-B fluid using measured data for acceleration, density, viscosity and relaxation time [lambda]1. The most unstable wave is a sensitive function of the retardation time [lambda]2 which fits experiments when [lambda]2/[lambda]1 = O(10-3). The growth rates for the most unstable wave are much larger than for the comparable viscous drop, which agrees with the surprising fact that the breakup times for viscoelastic drops are shorter. We construct an approximate analysis of Rayleigh Taylor instability based on viscoelastic potential flow which gives rise to nearly the same dispersion relation as the unapproximated analysis.

  16. Experimental study of drop impacts on soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawar, Ali; Basu, Saikat; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Impinging drops on flowing and static soap films demonstrate at least three distinct types of impact regimes: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow for a moving film and for static films it gets assimilated within the film, and (c) it pierces through the film. The interaction presents a unique opportunity to explore the impact of a quasi one-dimensional object on a two-dimensional fluid, much like a comet impacting on a thin atmosphere. We present a detailed experimental study of droplet impacts on soap film flow, for a number of film inclination angles and falling heights of the drop. Imaging techniques employed include sodium lamp interferometry to measure film thickness fluctuations and particle tracking velocimetry to measure the velocity field. Film thickness measures approximately 10 microns and the drop diameter is 1 mm. We mostly observe the bouncing-off regime for smaller inclination angles. However, at higher impact angles, puncturing of the film becomes a more common occurrence. We show that when the drop bounces off the film, there is a momentum transfer leading to vortex dipole shedding, along with the generation of capillary waves; an impulsive regime that may share correspondence with the locomotion of water striders.

  17. Two touching spherical drops in a uniaxial compressional flow: The effect of interfacial slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goel, Sachin; Ramachandran, Arun

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution for the problem of two touching drops with slipping interfaces pushed against each other in a uniaxial compressional flow at low capillary and Reynolds numbers. The jump in the tangential velocity at the liquid-liquid interface is modeled using the Navier slip condition. Analytical solutions of the contact force, the drop-scale stresses, and the drop-scale pressure are provided as functions of the slip coefficient (" separators=" α ) , the viscosity ratio (" separators=" κ ) , and the drop size ratio (" separators=" k ) . Since unequal drop sizes are considered, two problems are solved in the tangent sphere co-ordinate system to determine the steady state position: a pair of touching drops with its contact point at the origin of an axisymmetric straining flow, and two touching drops placed in a uniform flow parallel to the axis of symmetry of the drops. A general observation is that the effect of slip is manifested most strongly for drops whose viscosity is much greater than the suspending fluid (" separators=" κ ≫ 1 ) . For highly viscous drops, the flow and stress fields transition from those corresponding to solid particles for ακ ≪ 1, to those for inviscid drops in the limit ακ ≫ 1. The analytical expressions provided here for the contact force and the stress distributions will serve to provide the restrictions that complete the definition of the lubrication flow problem in the thin film between the two colliding drops. While the contact force that drains fluid out of the thin film is relatively unaffected by slip, the tangential stress and pressure in the near-contact region are mitigated significantly for ακ ≫ 1. The latter is expected to assist coalescence at high capillary numbers.

  18. Serious Fun: Using Toys to Demonstrate Fluid Mechanics Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saviz, Camilla M.; Shakerin, Said

    2014-01-01

    Many students have owned or seen fluids toys in which two immiscible fluids within a closed container can be tilted to generate waves. These types of inexpensive and readily available toys are fun to play with, but they are also useful for provoking student learning about fluid properties or complex fluid behavior, including drop formation and…

  19. Pollutant particle scavenging by rain drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. J.; Cârsteanu, A. A.; García, C. A.

    2003-04-01

    Scavenging of air pollutants by rain drops has been studied from various angles of the phenomenon: spatial distribution of drops, size distribution of the larger drops, and scavenging properties of individual drops have been taken into account. The latter makes the object of the present work. In order to study the movement of pollutant particles in the neighborhood of a falling rain drop, a fixed drop is subjected in situ to a vertical air current containing pollutant particles of several microns in size, originating from a Diesel engine exhaust, which are essentially composed of soot. While the speed of the air current reproduces the terminal velocity of the respective rain drop, the trajectories of the particles around the drops are being followed by digital imagery, through an optical microscope. We present the adhesion statistics of boundary layer particles to the water drops, and the incorporation of these results into a multifractal rainfall field model.

  20. The Stability of Two Connected Pendant Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slobozhanin, Lev A.; Alexander, J. Iwan

    2004-01-01

    The stability of an equilibrium system of two drops suspended from circular holes is examined. The drop surfaces are disconnected surfaces of a connected liquid body. For holes of equal radii and identical pendant drops axisymmetric perturbations are always the most dangerous. The stability region for two identical drops differs considerably from that for a single drop. Loss of stability leads to a transition from a critical system of identical drops to a stable system of axisymmetric non-identical. This system of non-identical drops reaches its own stability limit (to isochoric or non-isochoric paturbations). For non-identical drops, loss of stability results in dripping or streaming from the holes. Critical volumes for non-identical drops have been calculated as functions of the Bond number, B. For unequal hole radii, stability regions have been constructed for a set of hole radius, K. The dependence of critical volumes on K and B is analyzed.

  1. Shape change, engulfment, and breakup of partially engulfed compound drops undergoing thermocapillary migration.

    PubMed

    Lavrenteva, O M; Rosenfeld, L; Nir, A

    2011-11-01

    Compound drops comprise two or more immiscible phases, one of which entirely or partially engulfs the others. In this work we consider the thermocapillary-induced motion of partially engulfed compound drops, composed of two phases, in an immiscible fluid. If the capillary number is negligibly small, Ca < 1, the partially engulfed compound drop is composed of three spherical surface segments, intersecting at contact angles that are determined by the three interfacial tensions associated with the three fluid phases that make up the compound drop and the ambient medium. Corrections to the shapes of the undeformable case at Ca = 0 are expected to be of the order Ca. However, as the drop propagates through the nonisothermal fluid, the temperature at the three-phase contact line and, hence, the contact angles, may considerably change, resulting in a dramatic change of the compound drop shape. Moreover, the changes in the interfacial tensions may be so significant that the partially engulfed configuration may become impossible and either two immiscible parts of the compound drop separate or one of them becomes completely engulfed by the other. PMID:22181514

  2. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  3. Containerless protein crystallization in floating drops: application to crystal growth monitoring under reduced nucleation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorber, Bernard; Giegé, Richard

    1996-10-01

    A micromethod was developed for the batch crystallization of proteins under conditions were the solution has no contact with the container walls. Drops of crystallization solutions (5 to 100 μl) are placed at the interface between two layers of inert and non-miscible silicone fluids contained in square glass or plastic cuvettes. The densities of the fluids are either lower or higher than those of the major precipitating agents of macromolecules, including aqueous solutions containing salts, polyethylene glycols or alcohols. Several proteins and a spherical plant virus were crystallized in the temperature range 4°C-20°C using this set-up. A thermostated device was built for the dynamic control of the temperature of crystallization drops and the monitoring of crystal growth by video-microscopy. In all cases, the habit of the crystals grown in floating drops are identical to those of controls grown in sealed glass tubes without silicone fluid. The comparison of the number of crystals in drops kept under one layer of fluid and in floating drops of the same volume indicates that heterogeneous nucleation is minimized when protein crystallization is performed in floating drops. The advantages and limitations of this novel containerless crystallization method are discussed.

  4. Surfactant Saturation of Drops in Microgravity by Terrestrial Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, Antonio

    It is well known that diffusion plays an appreciable role in mass transfer only in the case of weak gravitational convection. However, even under such conditions the use of a surfactant as a dif-fusing substance essentially complicates the mass transfer processes. The appearance of gas or liquid inclusions in the surfactant solution causes the development of solutocapillary motion on their surface, which may become a generator of the large-scale flows in the surrounding liquid, especially in microgravity conditions. The paper presents the results of terrestrial simulation of such flows during saturation of the drop of weakly soluble fluid by a surfactant from its water solution forming a thin ( 1 ) horizontal layer. In our experiments, we used chlorobenzene and water as the basic fluids of the drop and the surrounding medium, respectively, and isopropyl alcohol -as a surfactant. The initial concentration 0 of the alcohol in the solution ranged from 5 to 50%. This lent specific feature to the saturation process, manifesting itself in the fact that at concentration higher than 25% a mutual dissolution of water and chlorobenzene began to increase. Visualization of flow structures and concentration fields showed that in laboratory conditions even at maximum suppression of the gravitational convection the saturation of the surfactant is a rather complicated process specified by the initial surfactant concentration in the solution and by the degree of the solution homogeneity. In the case of initially homoge-neous solution, a complicated character of mass transfer between the drop and the surrounding medium is evidently due to the small values of surfactant diffusion coefficients in basic flu-ids. Penetration of the surfactant into the drop leads to the formation of local inhomigeneities of the solution density at both sides of the interface and to the development of a slow three-dimensional flow of gravitational nature. An increase in the concentration gives rise to a

  5. Piezoelectric Water Drop Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ahmad, Mahmoud

    2014-02-01

    Piezoelectric materials convert mechanical deformation directly into electrical charges, which can be harvested and used to drive micropower electronic devices. The low power consumption of such systems on the scale of microwatts leads to the possibility of using harvested vibrational energy due to its almost universal nature. Vibrational energy harvested using piezoelectric cantilevers provides sufficient output for small-scale power applications. This work reports on vibrational energy harvesting from free-falling droplets at the tip of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric-based cantilevers. The harvester incorporates a multimorph clamped-free cantilever made of lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric thick films. During the impact, the droplet's kinetic energy is transferred to the form of mechanical stress, forcing the piezoelectric structure to vibrate and thereby producing charges. Experimental results show an instantaneous drop-power of 2.15 mW cm-3 g-1. The scenario of a medium intensity of falling water drops, i.e., 200 drops per second, yielded a power of 0.48 W cm-3 g-1 per second.

  6. Fragmentation of hot classical drops

    SciTech Connect

    Vicentini, A.; Jacucci, G.; Pandharipande, V.R.

    1985-05-01

    Time evolution of hot drops of matter containing approx.230 or approx.130 particles is studied by classical molecular dynamics. Initially, the drops have uniform density and a sharp surface. The chosen initial conditions include three values of density and a range of temperatures wide enough to study the phenomena of evaporation, fragmentation, and total vaporization in a unified fashion. The average density and temperature of central matter is measured periodically to obtain trajectories of the evolution in the rho,T plane. These trajectories indicate that the matter expands almost adiabatically until it reaches the region of adiabatic instabilities. Density inhomogeneities develop in this region, but the matter fragments only if the expansion continues to average densities of less than one-fourth the liquid density, otherwise it recondenses into a single blob. The recondensed matter and fragments have very crooked surfaces. If the temperature is high enough, the expanding matter does not enter the region of adiabatic instabilities and totally vaporizes. For initial densities of the order of equilibrium density, matter does not fragment or develop large inhomogeneities in the region enclosed by the isothermal and adiabatic spinodals. Thus it appears unlikely that fragmentation of small drops (nuclei) can be used to study the isothermal critical region of gas-liquid phase transition. A detailed tabulation of the energies and number of monomers, dimers, light, and heavy fragments emitted in each event is presented.

  7. How to freeze drop oscillations with powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, Jeremy; Zhu, Ying; Vakarelski, Ivan; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur

    2012-11-01

    We present experiments that show when a water drop impacts onto a bed of fine, hydrophobic powder, the final form of the drop can be very different from the spherical form with which it impacts. For all drop impact speeds, the drop rebounds due to the hydrophobic nature of the powder. However, we observe that above a critical impact speed, the drop undergoes a permanent deformation to a highly non-spherical shape with a complete coverage of powder, thus creating a deformed liquid marble. This powder coating acts to freeze the drop oscillations during rebound.

  8. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Tcherneshoff, L. M.; Straits, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary results for the Critical Point Wetting CPW Drop Tower Experiment are produced with immiscible systems. Much of the observed phenomena conformed to the anticipated behavior. More drops will be needed to test the CPW theory with these immiscible systems.

  9. How to Use Eye Drops Properly

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tablets, Suppositories, and Creams How to Use Eye Drops Properly (Using a mirror or having someone else ... gently squeeze the dropper so that a single drop falls into the pocket made by the lower ...

  10. Progress on Concepts for Next-Generation Drop Tower Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus; Kaczmarczik, Ulrich

    2016-07-01

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM about 100 scientists, engineers, and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important research center for space sciences and technologies in Europe. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM's ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10-6 g (microgravity), which is one of the best achievable for ground-based flight opportunities. Scientists may choose up to three times a day between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and an experiment in ZARM's worldwide unique catapult system with 9.3 s in weightlessness. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 7500 drops or catapult launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like fundamental physics, combustion, fluid dynamics, planetary formation / astrophysics, biology and materials sciences have been accomplished so far. In addition, more and more technology tests have been conducted under microgravity conditions at the Bremen Drop Tower in order to effectively prepare appropriate space missions in advance. In this paper we report on the progress on concepts for next-generation drop tower systems based on the GraviTower idea utilizing a guided electro-magnetic linear drive. Alternative concepts motivated by the scientific demand for higher

  11. Drag and drop display & builder

    SciTech Connect

    Bolshakov, Timofei B.; Petrov, Andrey D.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Drag and Drop (DnD) Display & Builder is a component-oriented system that allows users to create visual representations of data received from data acquisition systems. It is an upgrade of a Synoptic Display mechanism used at Fermilab since 2002. Components can be graphically arranged and logically interconnected in the web-startable Project Builder. Projects can be either lightweight AJAX- and SVG-based web pages, or they can be started as Java applications. The new version was initiated as a response to discussions between the LHC Controls Group and Fermilab.

  12. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  13. 14 CFR 91.15 - Dropping objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dropping objects. 91.15 Section 91.15... AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may allow any object to be dropped from that aircraft in...

  14. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  15. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  16. 49 CFR 572.102 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Drop test. 572.102 Section 572.102 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Free Motion Headform § 572.102 Drop test. (a) When the headform is dropped from a height of 14.8 inches in accordance with paragraph (b)...

  17. Unusual Contact-Line Dynamics of Thick Films and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veretennikov, Igor; Agarwal, Abhishek; Indeikina, Alexandra; Chang, Hsueh-Chia

    1999-01-01

    We report several novel phenomena In contact-line and fingering dynamics of macroscopic spinning drops and gravity-driven films with dimensions larger than the capillary length. It is shown through experimental and theoretical analysis that such macroscopic films can exhibit various interfacial shapes, including multi valued ones, near the contact line due to a balance between the external body forces with capillarity. This rich variety of front shapes couples with the usual capillary, viscous, and intermolecular forces at the contact line to produce a rich and unexpected spectrum of contact-line dynamics. A single finger develops when part of the front becomes multivalued on a partially wetting macroscopic spinning drop in contrast to a different mechanism for microscopic drops of completely wetting fluids. Contrary to general expectation, we observe that, at high viscosity and low frequencies of rotation, the speed of a glycerine finger increases with increasing viscosity. Completely wetting Dow Corning 200 Fluid spreads faster over a dry inclined plane than a prewetted one. The presence of a thin prewetted film suppresses fingering both for gravity-driven flow and for spin coating. We analyze some of these unique phenomena in detail and offer qualitative physical explanations for the others.

  18. Drops on an arbitrarily wetting substrate: a phase field description.

    PubMed

    Borcia, Rodica; Borcia, Ion Dan; Bestehorn, Michael

    2008-12-01

    We propose a scheme for studying thin liquid films on a solid substrate using a phase field model. For a van der Waals fluid-far from criticality-the most natural phase field function is the fluid density. The theoretical description is based on the Navier-Stokes equation with extra phase field terms and the continuity equation. In this model free of interface conditions, the contact angle can be controlled through the boundary conditions for the density field at the solid walls [L. M. Pismen and Y. Pomeav, Phys. Rev. E 62, 2480 (2000)]. We investigate the stability of a thin liquid film on a flat homogeneous solid support with variable wettability. For almost hydrophobic surfaces, the liquid film breaks up and transitions from a flat film to drops occur. Finally, we report on two-dimensional numerical simulations for static liquid drops resting on a flat horizontal solid support and for drops sliding down on inclined substrates under gravity effects. PMID:19256945

  19. Level Sensor for Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, N. E.; Schroff, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Hot wire sensor combined with voltage-comparator circuit monitors liquid level in cryogenic-fluid storage tanks. Sensor circuit adaptable to different liquids and sensors. Constant-current source drives current through sensing probe and fixed resistor. Voltage comparator circuits interpret voltage drops to tell whether probe is immersed in liquid and is current in probe.

  20. Ground based studies of thermocapillary flows in levitated drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, Satwindar Singh; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1994-01-01

    Analytical studies along with ground-based experiments are presently being carried out in connection with thermocapillary phenomena associated with drops and bubbles in a containerless environment. The effort here focuses on the thermal and the fluid phenomena associated with the local heating of acoustically levitated drops, both at 1-g and at low-g. In particular, the Marangoni effect on drops under conditions of local spot-heating and other types of heating are being studied. With the experiments conducted to date, fairly stable acoustic levitation of drops has been achieved and successful flow visualization by light scattering from smoke particles has been carried out. The results include situations with and without heating. As a preliminary qualitative interpretation of these experimental results, we consider the external flow pattern as a superposition of three discrete circulation cells operating on different spatial scales. The observations of the flow fields also indicate the existence of a steady state torque induced by the streaming flows. The theoretical studies have been concentrated on the analysis of streaming flows in a gaseous medium with the presence of a spherical particle undergoing periodic heating. A matched asymptotic analysis was carried out for small parameters derived from approximations in the high frequency range. The heating frequency being 'in tune' with the acoustic frequency results in a nonzero time-averaged thermal field. This leads to a steady heat flow across the equatorial plane of the sphere.

  1. Drop deformation and breakup in flows with and without shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kékesi, Tímea; Amberg, Gustav; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The deformation and breakup of liquid drops in gaseous flows are studied numerically using the Volume of Fluid method. Fragmentation of fuel drops has a key role in combustion, determining the rate of mixing and the efficiency of the process. It is common to refer to Weber number 12 as the onset of breakup, and to define breakup mode regimes as a function of Weber number. These definitions are established for simple flows and do not take density and viscosity ratios into account. The main objective of this work is the dynamics of the drop leading to breakup. Fully developed uniform flows and flows with various shear rates are considered. A Weber number of 20, Reynolds numbers 20-200, density ratios 20-80, and viscosity ratios 0.5-50 were used. Results for uniform flows are presented in Kékesi T. et al. (2014). The final aim of the project is to extend existing atomization models for fuel sprays by accounting for density and viscosity ratios in addition to the Reynolds and Weber numbers already present in current models. Estimations for the lifetime of the drop are provided; furthermore, the history of the drag coefficient is compared for several cases. Examples of the observed phenomena and ideas for possible model modifications will be presented. This work is supported by the Swedish Research Council and the Linné FLOW Centre.

  2. Measurement of surface and interfacial tension using pendant drop tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Joseph D; Neeson, Michael J; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Tabor, Rico F

    2015-09-15

    Pendant drop tensiometry offers a simple and elegant solution to determining surface and interfacial tension - a central parameter in many colloidal systems including emulsions, foams and wetting phenomena. The technique involves the acquisition of a silhouette of an axisymmetric fluid droplet, and iterative fitting of the Young-Laplace equation that balances gravitational deformation of the drop with the restorative interfacial tension. Since the advent of high-quality digital cameras and desktop computers, this process has been automated with high speed and precision. However, despite its beguiling simplicity, there are complications and limitations that accompany pendant drop tensiometry connected with both Bond number (the balance between interfacial tension and gravitational forces) and drop volume. Here, we discuss the process involved with going from a captured experimental image to a fitted interfacial tension value, highlighting pertinent features and limitations along the way. We introduce a new parameter, the Worthington number, Wo, to characterise the measurement precision. A fully functional, open-source acquisition and fitting software is provided to enable the reader to test and develop the technique further. PMID:26037272

  3. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia.

    PubMed

    Nganguia, H; Young, Y-N; Layton, A T; Lai, M-C; Hu, W-F

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number Ca_{E}. Below the critical Ca_{E}, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed Ca_{E}, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical Ca_{E}, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations. PMID:27300985

  4. Electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop with inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganguia, H.; Young, Y.-N.; Layton, A. T.; Lai, M.-C.; Hu, W.-F.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the existing numerical and theoretical investigations on the electrohydrodynamics of a viscous drop have focused on the creeping Stokes flow regime, where nonlinear inertia effects are neglected. In this work we study the inertia effects on the electrodeformation of a viscous drop under a DC electric field using a novel second-order immersed interface method. The inertia effects are quantified by the Ohnesorge number Oh, and the electric field is characterized by an electric capillary number CaE. Below the critical CaE, small to moderate electric field strength gives rise to steady equilibrium drop shapes. We found that, at a fixed CaE, inertia effects induce larger deformation for an oblate drop than a prolate drop, consistent with previous results in the literature. Moreover, our simulations results indicate that inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation are dictated by the direction of normal electric stress on the drop interface: Larger drop deformation is found when the normal electric stress points outward, and smaller drop deformation is found otherwise. To our knowledge, such inertia effects on the equilibrium drop deformation has not been reported in the literature. Above the critical CaE, no steady equilibrium drop deformation can be found, and often the drop breaks up into a number of daughter droplets. In particular, our Navier-Stokes simulations show that, for the parameters we use, (1) daughter droplets are larger in the presence of inertia, (2) the drop deformation evolves more rapidly compared to creeping flow, and (3) complex distribution of electric stresses for drops with inertia effects. Our results suggest that normal electric pressure may be a useful tool in predicting drop pinch-off in oblate deformations.

  5. Capillarity driven contact line motion in cyclic bridge-drop grab-release events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lengerich, Henrik; Steen, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Motivated by a reversible adhesion device which uses capillary forces to adhere to a substrate, we study the mechanical work done in a grab-release cycle. That is, the volume of a drop is increased until it grabs the substrate and forms a bridge and then shrunk until it goes unstable and releases from the substrate and forms a drop again. In the instant that a drop becomes a bridge (or vice versa) no work is done on the system, however, energy is dissipated due to the decrease in interfacial energy. This dissipation can be compared with the mechanical dissipation based on the fluid flow. For viscous fluids, a wedge model shows that most of the dissipation occurs in the vicinity of the contact line. The thermodynamic dissipation is compared with that expected in the fluid without the need of static contact angle or slip length.

  6. Small drops from large nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Said Mohamed, Ahmed; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael; Herrada, Miguel Angel

    2015-11-01

    We report experimental and numerical results of the generation of drops which are significantly smaller than the nozzle from which they are generated. The system consists of a cylindrical reservoir and two endplates. One plate is a thin metal sheet with a small orifice in its centre which acts as the nozzle. The other end consists of a piston which moves by the action of an elecromechanical actuator which in turn is driven by sine-shape pull-mode pulses. The meniscus (formed at the nozzle) is thus first overturned, forming a cavity. This cavity collapses and a thin and fast jet emerges from its centre. Under appropriate conditions the tip of this jet breaks up and produces a single diminutive drop. A good agreement between the experimental and numerical results was found. Also, a series of experiments were performed in order to study the effects that the pulse amplitude and width, together with variations in the liquid properties, have over the final size of the droplet. Based on these experiments, a predictive law for the droplet size has been derived. This work was funded by the Royal Society (University Research Fellowship and Research Grant), the John Fell Fund (Oxford University Press), the Ministry of Science and Education (DPI2013-46485 Spain), and the Junta de Andalucia (P08-TEP-31704128 Spain).

  7. Liquid-metal pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhibi; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L.

    1994-08-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used as a heat transfer enhancement method in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This paper investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post design beamline mirror with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in literature about pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information about the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even more sparse. Due to this the authors considered the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry, which is very similar to that of the pin-post, to examine the pressure drop correlation with liquid metals over pin fins. The cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank was studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. Study lead to two major variables to influence the pressure drop: fluid properties, viscosity and density, and the relative length of the posts. Correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the prediction of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  8. Liquid-metal, pin-fin pressure drop by correlation in cross flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Kuzay, T.M.; Assoufid, L. )

    1995-02-01

    The pin-fin configuration is widely used in high-heat-flux applications. Recently, the pin-fin design with liquid-metal coolant was also applied to synchrotron-radiation beamline devices. This article investigates the pressure drop in a pin-post crystal with liquid gallium as the coolant. Because the pin-post configuration is a relatively new concept, information in the literature on pin-post mirrors or crystals is rare, and information on the pressure drop in pin-post mirrors with liquid metal as the coolant is even rarer. Because the cross flow in cylinder-array geometry is very similar to that of the pin post, the pressure drop correlation data for the cross flow of fluid with various fluid characteristics or properties through a tube bank are studied so that the results can be scaled to the pin-fin geometry with liquid metal as the coolant. The emphasis of this article is on the influence of two variables on the pressure drop: viscosity and density of fluid. The difference and correlation of the pressure drop between long and short posts and the predication of the pressure drop of liquid metal in the pin-post mirror and comparison with an existing experiment are addressed.

  9. Deformation and secondary breakup of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, L.-P.; Faeth, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    Drop properties during and after secondary breakup in the bag, multimode and shear breakup regimes were observed for shock wave initiated disturbances in air at normal temperature and pressure. Test liquids included water, n-heptane, ethyl alcohol and glycerol mixtures to yield Weber numbers of 15-600. Ohnesorge numbers of 0.0025-0.039, liquid/gas density ratios of 579-985 and Reynolds numbers of 1060-15080. Measurements included pulsed shadowgraphy and double-pulsed holography to find drop sizes and velocities after breakup. Drop size distributions after breakup satisfied Simmons' universal root normal distribution in all three breakup regimes, after removing the core (or drop-forming) drop from the drop population for shear breakup. The size and velocity of the core drop after shear breakup then was correlated successfully based on the observation that the end of drop stripping corresponded to a constant Eotvos number. The relative velocities of the drop liquid were significantly reduced during secondary breakup, due both to large drag coefficients during the drop deformation stage and reduced relaxation times of smaller drops. These effects were correlated successfully based on a simplified phenomenological theory.

  10. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Larsen, Michael; Wiscombe, Warren

    2004-01-01

    The analysis of aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds suggests that for sufficiently small volumes the mean number of cloud drops with a given radius is proportional to volume powered by a drop-size dependent exponent. For abundant small drops present, the exponent is 1 as assumed in conventional approach. However, for rarer large drops, the exponents fall below unity. We show striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents. The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast and also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased.

  11. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Robert W.; Maroone, James P.; Tipping, Donald W.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  12. Why a falling drop does not in general behave like a rising bubble

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manoj Kumar; Sahu, Kirti Chandra; Govindarajan, Rama

    2014-01-01

    Is a settling drop equivalent to a rising bubble? The answer is known to be in general a no, but we show that when the density of the drop is less than 1.2 times that of the surrounding fluid, an equivalent bubble can be designed for small inertia and large surface tension. Hadamard's exact solution is shown to be better for this than making the Boussinesq approximation. Scaling relationships and numerical simulations show a bubble-drop equivalence for moderate inertia and surface tension, so long as the density ratio of the drop to its surroundings is close to unity. When this ratio is far from unity, the drop and the bubble are very different. We show that this is due to the tendency for vorticity to be concentrated in the lighter fluid, i.e. within the bubble but outside the drop. As the Galilei and Bond numbers are increased, a bubble displays underdamped shape oscillations, whereas beyond critical values of these numbers, over-damped behavior resulting in break-up takes place. The different circulation patterns result in thin and cup-like drops but bubbles thick at their base. These shapes are then prone to break-up at the sides and centre, respectively. PMID:24759766

  13. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  14. Analysis of Skylab fluid mechanics science demonstrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tegart, J. R.; Butz, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    The results of the data reduction and analysis of the Skylab fluid mechanics demonstrations are presented. All the fluid mechanics data available from the Skylab missions were identified and surveyed. The significant fluid mechanics phenomena were identified and reduced to measurable quantities wherever possible. Data correlations were performed using existing theories. Among the phenomena analyzed were: static low-g interface shapes, oscillation frequency and damping of a liquid drop, coalescence, rotating drop, liquid films and low-g ice melting. A survey of the possible applications of the results was made and future experiments are recommended.

  15. Hydrocarbon fluid, ejector refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalski, G.J.; Foster, A.R.

    1993-08-31

    A refrigeration system is described comprising: a vapor ejector cycle including a working fluid having a property such that entropy of the working fluid when in a saturated vapor state decreases as pressure decreases, the vapor ejector cycle comprising: a condenser located on a common fluid flow path; a diverter located downstream from the condenser for diverting the working fluid into a primary fluid flow path and a secondary fluid flow path parallel to the primary fluid flow path; an evaporator located on the secondary fluid flow path; an expansion device located on the secondary fluid flow path upstream of the evaporator; a boiler located on the primary fluid flow path parallel to the evaporator for boiling the working fluid, the boiler comprising an axially extending core region having a substantially constant cross sectional area and a porous capillary region surrounding the core region, the core region extending a length sufficient to produce a near sonic velocity saturated vapor; and an ejector having an outlet in fluid communication with the inlet of the condenser and an inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the evaporator and the outlet of the boiler and in which the flows of the working fluid from the evaporator and the boiler are mixed and the pressure of the working fluid is increased to at least the pressure of the condenser, the ejector inlet, located downstream from the axially extending core region, including a primary nozzle located sufficiently close to the outlet of the boiler to minimize a pressure drop between the boiler and the primary nozzle, the primary nozzle of the ejector including a converging section having an included angle and length preselected to receive the working fluid from the boiler as a near sonic velocity saturated vapor.

  16. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Boiling Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and forced convection heat transfer were studied in the boiling nitrogen flow in a horizontal square pipe with a side of 12 mm at inlet pressure between 0.1 and0.15 MPa with a mass flux between 70 and 2000 kg/m2-s and with a heat flux of 5, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Accordingly, the flow and heat transfer mechanisms specific to square pipe were elucidated, and the applicability to cryogenic fluids of pressure drop and heat transfer models originally proposed for room temperature fluids was clarified.

  17. Dynamics of Aqueous Foam Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akhatov, Iskander; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2001-01-01

    We develop a model for the nonlinear oscillations of spherical drops composed of aqueous foam. Beginning with a simple mixture law, and utilizing a mass-conserving bubble-in-cell scheme, we obtain a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for the dynamics of bubbles in a foam mixture. The dispersion relation for sound waves in a bubbly liquid is then coupled with a normal modes expansion to derive expressions for the frequencies of eigenmodal oscillations. These eigenmodal (breathing plus higher-order shape modes) frequencies are elicited as a function of the void fraction of the foam. A Mathieu-like equation is obtained for the dynamics of the higher-order shape modes and their parametric coupling to the breathing mode. The proposed model is used to explain recently obtained experimental data.

  18. Internal Flows in Free Drops (IFFD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Sadhal, Satwindar S.; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of an Earth-based research task investigating the internal flows within freely levitated drops, a low-gravity technology development experiment has been designed and carried out within the NASA Glovebox facility during the STS-83 and STS-94 Shuttle flights (MSL-1 mission). The goal was narrowly defined as the assessment of the capabilities of a resonant single-axis ultrasonic levitator to stably position free drops in the Shuttle environment with a precision required for the detailed measurement of internal flows. The results of this entirely crew-operated investigation indicate that the approach is fundamentally sound, but also that the ultimate stability of the positioning is highly dependent on the residual acceleration characteristic of the Spacecraft, and to a certain extent, on the initial drop deployment of the drop. The principal results are: the measured dependence of the residual drop rotation and equilibrium drop shape on the ultrasonic power level, the experimental evaluation of the typical drop translational stability in a realistic low-gravity environment, and the semi-quantitative evaluation of background internal flows within quasi-isothermal drops. Based on these results, we conclude that the successful design of a full-scale Microgravity experiment is possible, and would allow accurate the measurement of thermocapillary flows within transparent drops. The need has been demonstrated, however, for the capability for accurately deploying the drop, for a quiescent environment, and for precise mechanical adjustments of the levitator.

  19. Studies of complexity in fluid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, Sidney R.

    2000-06-12

    This is the final report of Grant DE-FG02-92ER25119, ''Studies of Complexity in Fluids'', we have investigated turbulence, flow in granular materials, singularities in evolution of fluid surfaces and selective withdrawal fluid flows. We have studied numerical methods for dealing with complex phenomena, and done simulations on the formation of river networks. We have also studied contact-line deposition that occurs in a drying drop.

  20. Fluid Mechanics of Taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Alexis; Bhatia, Nitesh; Carter, Taren; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    Saliva plays a key role in digestion, speech and tactile sensation. Lack of saliva, also known as dry mouth syndrome, increases risk of tooth decay and alters sense of taste; nearly 10% of the general population suffer from this syndrome. In this experimental study, we investigate the spreading of water drops on wet and dry tongues of pigs and cows. We find that drops spread faster on a wet tongue than a dry tongue. We rationalize the spreading rate by consideration of the tongue microstructure, such as as papillae, in promoting wicking. By investigating how tongue microstructure affects spreading of fluids, we may begin to how understand taste receptors are activated by eating and drinking.

  1. Interfacial tension measurements using MRI drop shape analysis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, R; Vogt, S J; Honari, A; Hollingsworth, K G; Sederman, A J; Mitchell, J; Johns, M L

    2014-02-18

    Accurate interfacial tension data for fluid systems such as hydrocarbons and water is essential to many applications such as reservoir oil and gas recovery predictions. Conventional interfacial tension measurement techniques typically use optical images to analyze droplet shapes but require that the continuous-phase fluid be optically transparent and that the fluids are not refractive index matched. Magnetic resonance images obtain contrast between fluids using other mechanisms such as magnetic relaxation weighting, so systems that are impossible to measure with optical methods may be analyzed. In this article, we present high-field (9.4 T) MRI images of various droplets analyzed with axisymmetric drop shape analysis. The resultant interfacial tension data show good agreement with literature data. The method is subsequently demonstrated using both opaque continuous phases and refractive-index-matched fluids. We conclude with a brief consideration of the potential to extrapolate the methodology to lower magnetic fields (0.3 T), featuring more accessible hardware; although droplet imaging is possible, resolution and stability do not currently permit accurate interfacial tension measurements. PMID:24471906

  2. Dynamics of squeezing fluids: Clapping wet hands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gart, Sean; Chang, Brian; Slama, Brice; Goodnight, Randy; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2013-08-01

    Droplets splash around when a fluid volume is quickly compressed. This phenomenon has been observed during common activities such as kids clapping with wet hands. The underlying mechanism involves a fluid volume being compressed vertically between two objects. This compression causes the fluid volume to be ejected radially and thereby generate fluid threads and droplets at a high speed. In this study, we designed and performed laboratory experiments to observe the process of thread and drop formation after a fluid is squeezed. A thicker rim at the outer edge forms and moves after the squeezing, and then becomes unstable and breaks into smaller drops. This process differs from previous well-known examples (i.e., transient crown splashes and continuous water bells) in aspects of transient fluid feeding, expanding rim dynamics, or sparsely distributed drops. We compared experimental measurements with theoretical models over three different stages; early squeezing, intermediate sheet-expansion, and later break-up of the liquid thread. In the earlier stage, the fluid is squeezed and its initial velocity is governed by the lubrication force. The outer rim of the liquid sheet forms curved trajectories due to gravity, inertia, drag, and surface tension. At the late stage, drop spacing set by the initial capillary instability does not change in the course of rim expansion, consequently final ejected droplets are very sparse compared to the size of the rim.

  3. Dynamics of squeezing fluids: clapping wet hands.

    PubMed

    Gart, Sean; Chang, Brian; Slama, Brice; Goodnight, Randy; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2013-08-01

    Droplets splash around when a fluid volume is quickly compressed. This phenomenon has been observed during common activities such as kids clapping with wet hands. The underlying mechanism involves a fluid volume being compressed vertically between two objects. This compression causes the fluid volume to be ejected radially and thereby generate fluid threads and droplets at a high speed. In this study, we designed and performed laboratory experiments to observe the process of thread and drop formation after a fluid is squeezed. A thicker rim at the outer edge forms and moves after the squeezing, and then becomes unstable and breaks into smaller drops. This process differs from previous well-known examples (i.e., transient crown splashes and continuous water bells) in aspects of transient fluid feeding, expanding rim dynamics, or sparsely distributed drops. We compared experimental measurements with theoretical models over three different stages; early squeezing, intermediate sheet-expansion, and later break-up of the liquid thread. In the earlier stage, the fluid is squeezed and its initial velocity is governed by the lubrication force. The outer rim of the liquid sheet forms curved trajectories due to gravity, inertia, drag, and surface tension. At the late stage, drop spacing set by the initial capillary instability does not change in the course of rim expansion, consequently final ejected droplets are very sparse compared to the size of the rim. PMID:24032924

  4. A numerical study of drop-on-demand ink jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromm, J.

    1982-01-01

    Ongoing work related to development and utilization of a numerical model for treating the fluid dynamics of ink jets is discussed. The model embodies the complete nonlinear, time dependent, axi-symmetric equations in finite difference form. The jet nozzle geometry with no-slip boundary conditions and the existence of a contact circle are included. The contact circle is allowed some freedom of movement, but wetting of exterior surfaces is not addressed. The principal objective in current numerical experiments is to determine what pressure history, in conjunction with surface forces, will lead to clean drop formation.

  5. Static and oscillatory response measurements of acoustically levitated foam drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; McDaniel, J. Gregory; Holt, R. Glynn

    2002-11-01

    Small samples of aqueous foam of varying gas volume fraction are acoustically levitated in an ultrasonic field. The drops are subjected to both static and time-varying pressures. Normal mode frequencies and inferred rheological properties (yield stress, shear modulus) for foams as a function of gas volume fraction will be presented. We compare the experimental results to recent theoretical descriptions of such modal oscillations [McDaniel and Holt, Phys. Rev. E 61, 2204 (2000); McDaniel, Akhatov, and Holt, Phys Fluids 14, 1886 (2002)]. [Work supported by NASA.

  6. Interfacial wave dynamics of a drop with an embedded bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes how an embedded bubble changes the surface wave of a suspended liquid drop, and how such modifications, if recorded experimentally, can be used to detect voids in typically opaque interior of the fluid. The analysis uses a matrix formalism to predict the frequencies for natural oscillation and the deformation for acoustically induced forced vibration. The theory shows that the embedded cavity causes major shifts in the frequency and amplitude values as well as twofold increase in number of natural modes, indicating multifacetted utility of the results in process diagnostics, material characterizations, and combustion technology.

  7. Relaxation or breakup of a low-conductivity drop upon removal of a uniform dc electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanauze, Javier A.; Walker, Lynn M.; Khair, Aditya S.

    2016-07-01

    We quantify the dynamics of a prolate leaky dielectric drop upon removal of a uniform dc electric field. Experiments consisting of a castor oil drop suspended in silicone oil are compared against axisymmetric boundary integral computations that account for transient charging, or charge relaxation, of the interface. A temporal asymmetry between the drop deformation and relaxation processes is observed in the experiments and computations: The drop relaxes back to its spherical equilibrium shape faster than the time taken to achieve its steady-state deformation. During the deformation process, the electrical (Maxwell) stress deforms the drop along the direction of the applied field; it is counteracted by the capillary stress. During the relaxation process, i.e., after the field is removed, the electrical stress acts together with the capillary stress to quickly restore the drop back to equilibrium. This change in action of the electrical stress is responsible for the asymmetry between the drop deformation and relaxation. Notably, the electrical stress acts over the charge relaxation time scales of the fluids: Thus, counterintuitively, longer charging time scales yield faster drop relaxation. That is, the longer it takes for the interface to discharge, the faster the drop shape relaxes. We also present computational results for a drop that does not relax back to its initial spherical shape upon removal of the electric field; rather, the drop breaks up via an end-pinching mechanism.

  8. Coalescence dynamics of viscous conical drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jiakai; Fang, Shengyang; Corvalan, Carlos M.

    2016-02-01

    When two oppositely charged drops come into light contact, a liquid meniscus bridge with double-cone geometry forms between the drops. Recent experiments have demonstrated the existence of a critical cone angle above which the meniscus bridge pinches off and the drops do not coalesce. This striking behavior—which has implications for processes ranging from the coarsening of emulsions to electrospray ionization in mass spectrometry—has been studied theoretically and experimentally for inertial liquid drops. Little is known, however, about the influence of the liquid viscosity on the critical cone angle. Here, we use high-fidelity numerical simulations to gain insight into the coalescence dynamics of conical drops at intermediate Reynolds numbers. The simulations, which account for viscous, inertial, and surface tension effects, predict that the critical cone angle increases as the viscosity of the drops decreases. When approaching the inertial regime, however, the predicted critical angle quickly stabilizes at approximately 27∘, as observed in experiments.

  9. Generation of inkjet drop of particulate gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Hansol; Kim, Chongyoup

    2015-08-01

    The generation of inkjet drops of colloidal gels is studied experimentally. Particle suspensions are prepared by dispersing spherical polystyrene particles of 620 nm in the 1:1 mixture of deionized water and ethylene glycol. The gels are prepared by adding polyethylene oxide to the suspensions by inducing the depletion interaction between particles. It is demonstrated that inkjet drops can be generated by using the colloidal gels. It is found that the ligament extended from the inkjet nozzle is stabilized so that the drop can be generated without satellite droplets behind the main drop and the velocity of the gel drop is faster than that of the polymer solution at the same concentration. The gel drop generation characteristics are found to be sensitive to input voltage.

  10. Drop tower Beijing and short-time microgravity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, S. H.; Yin, M. G.; Guan, X. D.; Lin, H.; Xie, J. C.; Hu, Wen-Rui

    Being an important, large ground-based experiment facility for microgravity science, the drop tower of National Microgravity Lab, CAS was founded in 2003 and, since then, has been un-dertaking the experiments to meet the requirements in microgravity research. The 116 meters high drop tower is located in Zhong Guan Cun district, the scientific town of Beijing. Main components of the facility consist of the drop capsule, release mechanism and deceleration and recovery devices, and were developed with particular technical characteristics. Inner space of the drop tower was not vacuumed during the experiment, and a dual capsule system was adopted. The dual capsule comprises an inner and an outer capsule, and there is a space between in the evacuated atmosphere of 30 Pa. During the free fall, the outer capsule falls in normal atmospheric condition, and the inner capsule falls in vacuum. In addition, a single capsule configuration is also available for experiments w of lower gravity level. The residual acceleration is 10-5go or 10-3g0 related to dual capsule or single capsule arrangement respec-tively. An electric magnetic release system was used to release the capsule from position of 83 meters in height. The designed structure of the release mechanism guaranteed the release disturbance to be small enough. An elastic controllable decelerated system, consisted of the reversible mechanic/electric energy transducer, steel cables and rings, string bag, elastic rub-ber stringassembly, energy dissipation resistance, controlling computer system, was used in the drop tower facility. This system is effective to reduce the impact acceleration to a level of 15g0. The experiment data can be recorded by an on-board data acquisition and control system, and transmitted wirelessly to the control room. Many experiments related to the fluid physics, combustion, material science and other field have been successfully conducted by using the short-time microgravity facility of drop tower in

  11. Microgravity Experiment Programs for Students at the Bremen Drop Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Könemann, Thorben; Eigenbrod, Christian; Von Kampen, Peter; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) founded by Prof. Dr.-Ing. Hans J. Rath in 1985 is part of the Department of Production Engineering at the University of Bremen, Germany. ZARM established as a research center and currently headed by Prof. Dr. Claus Lämmerzahl is mainly concentrated on fundamental investigations of gravitational and space-related phenomenas under conditions of weightlessness as well as questions and developments related to technologies for space. At ZARM more than 70 scientists, engineers and administrative staff as well as many students from different departments are employed. Today, ZARM is still one of the largest and most important university institutes for space sciences and technologies in Europe as well as worldwide well known in the space community. With a height of 146 m the Bremen Drop Tower is the predominant facility of ZARM and also the only drop tower of its class in Europe. ZARM’s ground-based laboratory offers the opportunity for daily short-term experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness at a level of 10 (-6) g (microgravity). The provided quality is one of the purest for experiments under weightlessness worldwide achieved. The scientists may choose between a single drop experiment with 4.74 s in simple free fall and a catapult experiment with 9.3 s of weightlessness. Either in the drop or in the worldwide unique catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM are always the same, generally up to 3 times per day. Since the start of operation of the facility in 1990, over 6750 launches of more than 160 different experiment types from various scientific fields like Fundamental Physics, Combustion, Fluid Dynamics, Planetary Formation / Astrophysics, Biology and Materials Sciences have been successfully accomplished so far. In our paper we will report and inform about microgravity experiment programs for students like „Drop Your Thesis!“ by ESA and

  12. Equilibrium shapes of acoustically levitated drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Hsu, C.-J.

    1986-05-01

    The quantitative determination of the shape of liquid drops levitated in an ultrasonic standing wave has provided experimental data on the radiation pressure-induced deformations of freely suspended liquids. Within the limits of small deviations from the spherical shape and small drop diameter relative to the acoustic wavelength, an existing approximate theory yields a good agreement with experimental evidence. The data were obtained for millimeter and submillimeter drops levitated in air under 1 g, where g is the sea level gravitational acceleration.

  13. Chaos in a Water Drop.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Scott Dudley

    Nature is chaotic. It appears to be more disorderly and random than orderly and regular. The path of a leaf in a rocky stream can appear as complex as the smoke from a cigarette or the outline of a cloud. In trying to model the path of a leaf in a rocky stream, the dynamical equations become rapidly complicated. A branch of scientific analysis know as Chaos has sprung up in the last few decades with techniques that can be applied to most of the physical sciences in an attempt to describe or categorize the various non-linear phenomena found in Nature. The aim of this paper is to provide an introduction to the study of chaotic behavior, with an emphasis on the potential teaching possibilities contained in some of the analysis. An appropriate beginning would be motion that is regular and "easy" to understand--stable motion. Along the way, various graphical representations will be developed that enable a clear viewing of the motion of the system under study. Next, the Logistic model will be used to gain an understanding of the nature of chaos; it is very comprehensive in representing the characteristics of chaos that will be studied in other systems. Another system studied is the three-dimensional Rossler model. In the study of the "dripping faucet", a time series of the periods between drips of water is recorded. Various techniques (collected from the introductory systems) are applied in an attempt to model the mechanism behind the water drops, or at least to characterize the graphical "animals" that we find. The water drop "attractor" is found to be chaotic, exhibiting many of the chaotic characteristics seen in other models. It is hoped that this work can be used as a primer for those students beginning a journey into Chaos, or as a reference tool for those already familiar with the topics enclosed. Many areas in this work were touched lightly; there is a rich un-tapped complexity still waiting future study. The waters here have only begun to be charted.

  14. A perspective on the interfacial properties of nanoscopic liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Jackson, George

    2012-11-01

    century by Gibbs and then promoted by Tolman) with a microscopic DFT treatment allows for a direct and unambiguous description of the interfacial properties of drops of arbitrary size; DFT provides all of the bulk and surface characteristics of the system that are required to uniquely define its thermodynamic properties. In this vein, we propose a non-local mean-field DFT for Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluids to examine drops of varying size. A comparison of the predictions of our DFT with recent simulation data based on a second-order fluctuation analysis (Sampayo et al 2010 J. Chem. Phys. 132 141101) reveals the consistency of the two treatments. This observation highlights the significance of fluctuation effects in small drops, which give rise to additional entropic (thermal non-mechanical) contributions, in contrast to what one observes in the case of planar interfaces which are governed by the laws of mechanical equilibrium. A small negative Tolman length (which is found to be about a tenth of the molecular diameter) and a non-monotonic behaviour of the surface tension with the drop radius are predicted for the LJ fluid. Finally, the limits of the validity of the Tolman approach, the effect of the range of the intermolecular potential, and the behaviour of bubbles are briefly discussed.

  15. Nonlinear oscillations of inviscid free drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patzek, T. W.; Benner, R. E., Jr.; Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    The present analysis of free liquid drops' inviscid oscillations proceeds through solution of Bernoulli's equation to obtain the free surface shape and of Laplace's equation for the velocity potential field. Results thus obtained encompass drop-shape sequences, pressure distributions, particle paths, and the temporal evolution of kinetic and surface energies; accuracy is verified by the near-constant drop volume and total energy, as well as the diminutiveness of mass and momentum fluxes across drop surfaces. Further insight into the nature of oscillations is provided by Fourier power spectrum analyses of mode interactions and frequency shifts.

  16. Videographic Assessment of Glaucoma Drop Instillation

    PubMed Central

    Castillejos, Armando; Kahook, Malik; Jimenez-Roman, Jesus; Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To assess the effect of patient education on videotaped topical instillation of artificial tear drops on subsequent topical instillation. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients, who had been using glaucoma drops for at least 6 months and with a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/100 or better, were studied. The patients were asked to instill an artificial tear drop using their accustomed technique while being video recorded. The patients viewed the recordings, and the errors in their drop instillation method were pointed out. This was followed by an educational session on proper drop instillation technique. After 30 minutes, patients were videotaped instilling drops to ascertain the effect of the educational session. The variables compared were: number of drops instilled, number of drops reaching the ocular surface, and the number of times the tip of the medication bottle touched the eye or ocular adnexa. Results: Before the instruction session, patients squeezed an average of 1.5 ± 0.9 drops from the bottle, and the average number of drops reaching the conjunctival fornix was 0.9 ± 0.7. The tip of the bottle touched the ocular adnexa in 29/45 (64.4%) patients. After the education session, the patients squeezed an average of 1.2 ± 0.5 drops and an average of 1.2 ± 0.4 drops reached the conjunctival fornix. The tip of the bottle touched the ocular adnexa in 13/45 (28.9%) patients. With proper instructions, the percentage of patients that instilled just one drop on the eye increased from 66 to 82%. Conclusion: A single educational session on the proper use of topical drops improves the successful instillation of eye drops. However, it was not determined whether the patients will retain the improved instillation technique for long-term or if the intervention results in only a short-term improvement. How to cite this article: Lazcano-Gomez G, Castillejos A, Kahook M, Jimenez-Roman J, Gonzalez-Salinas R. Video-graphic Assessment of Glaucoma

  17. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  18. New student-designed research and demonstration drop tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Donald; Weislogel, Mark

    A new drop tower has been designed and constructed at Portland State University. The ap-proach incorporates innovative features to increase throughput and microgravity quality in a highly public facility. Push button operation with full wireless CCTV coverage and passive magnetic deceleration provides quiet, safe operation from a single control station with low re-cycle time. A two-stage coaxial release mechanism decouples the payload from the drag shield to minimize disturbances to the experiment during release. This is especially important for fluids experiments that are highly sensitive to initial conditions. Performance of the new tower is presented including release, free fall, and deceleration accelerometer data. The two second tower is used for research and educational outreach. The research efforts focus on capillary flows and phenomena relevant to spacecraft fluid systems. The outreach efforts utilize partnerships with local primary, secondary and post-secondary institutions to promote the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

  19. Drop Impact of Viscous Suspensions on Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolleddula, Daniel; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    Droplet impact is a well studied subject with over a century of progress. Most studies are motivated by applications such as inkjet printing, agriculture spraying, or printed circuit boards. Pharmaceutically relevant fluids provide an experimental set that has received little attention. Medicinal tablets are coated by the impaction of micron sized droplets of aqueous suspensions and subsequently dried for various purposes such as brand recognition, mask unpleasant taste, or functionality. We will present a systematic study of micron sized drop impact of Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids used in pharmaceutical coating processes. In our experiments we extend the range of Ohnesorge numbers, O(1), of previous studies on surfaces of varying wettability and roughness.

  20. Saving every drop of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinyu, J.

    2012-04-01

    Since the beginning of 2011 there has been extremely low rainfall, which has resulted in drought conditions that have affected several provinces in China. The situation of the acute water shortage requires people to make many changes in the little things they do in their daily life. Saving every drop of water and forming good habits of using water is of the utmost importance. Based on this need, our students, organized by our teachers, reached out into to the communities. By visiting, observing and issuing questionnaires, the students identified unreasonable water usage in the communities. The results of the research showed that the ratio of secondary treatment of domestic waste is very low, especially the ratio of collecting wastewater from washing, greywater, to flush the toilet. In order to solve this problem, students themselves designed a set of water saving facilities by collecting greywater to flush the toilet. They successfully installed these facilities in residential houses in the XiYinLi community, which achieved satisfactory results regarding saving water.

  1. Wetting dynamics of thin liquid films and drops under Marangoni and centrifugal forces.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek; Behringer, Robert P

    2009-11-18

    This paper presents an experimental study on thin liquid drops and films under the combined action of centrifugal forces due to rotation and radial Marangoni forces due to a corresponding temperature gradient. We shall examine thinning of a given liquid layer both with and without rotation and also consider the onset of the fingering instability in a completely wetting liquid drop. In many of the experiments described here, we use an interferometric technique which provides key information on height profiles. For thick rotating films in the absence of a temperature gradient, when an initially thick layer of fluid is spun to angular velocities where the classical Newtonian solution is negative, the fluid never dewets for the case of a completely wetting fluid, but leaves a microscopic uniform wet layer in the center. Similar experiments with a radially inward temperature gradient reveal the evolution of a radial height profile given by h(r) = A(t)r(α), where A(t) decays logarithmically with time, and [Formula: see text]. In the case where there is no rotation, small centrally placed drops show novel retraction behavior under a sufficiently strong temperature gradient. Using the same interferometric arrangement, we observed the onset of the fingering instability of small drops placed at the center of the rotating substrate in the absence of a temperature gradient. At the onset of the instability, the height profile for small drops is more complex than previously assumed. PMID:21715887

  2. Triple-line behavior and wettability controlled by nanocoated substrates: influence on sessile drop evaporation.

    PubMed

    Sobac, B; Brutin, D

    2011-12-20

    In this article, we investigate the influence of the surface properties of substrates on the evaporation process. Using various nanocoatings, it is possible to modify the surface properties of substrates, such as the roughness and the surface energy, while maintaining constant thermal properties. Experiments are conducted under atmospheric conditions with five fluids (methanol, ethanol, propanol, toluene and water) and four coatings (PFC, PTFE, SiOC, and SiO(x)). The various combinations of these fluids and coatings allow for a wide range of drop evaporation properties to be studied: the dynamics of the triple line, the volatility of fluids, and a large range of wettabilities (from 17 to 135°). The experimental data are in very good quantitative agreement with existing models of quasi-steady, diffusion-driven evaporation. The experimental results show that the dynamics of the evaporative rate are proportional to the dynamics of the wetting radius. Thus, the models succeed in describing the evaporative dynamics throughout the evaporation process regardless of the behavior of the triple line. Moreover, the use of various liquids reveals the validity of the models regardless of their volatility. The results also confirm the recent finding of a universal relation for the time evolution of the drop mass, independent of the drop size and initial contact angle. Finally, this study highlights the separate and coupled roles of the triple line and the wettability on the sessile drop evaporation process. Data reveal that the more wet and pinned a drop, the shorter the evaporation time. PMID:22054245

  3. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime.

    PubMed

    Sprittles, James E; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data. PMID:25019880

  4. Dynamics of liquid drops coalescing in the inertial regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprittles, James E.; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D.

    2014-06-01

    We examine the dynamics of two coalescing liquid drops in the "inertial regime," where the effects of viscosity are negligible and the propagation of the front of the bridge connecting the drops can be considered as "local." The solution fully computed in the framework of classical fluid mechanics allows this regime to be identified, and the accuracy of the approximating scaling laws proposed to describe the propagation of the bridge to be established. It is shown that the scaling law known for this regime has a very limited region of accuracy, and, as a result, in describing experimental data it has frequently been applied outside its limits of applicability. The origin of the scaling law's shortcoming appears to be the fact that it accounts for the capillary pressure due only to the longitudinal curvature of the free surface as the driving force for the process. To address this deficiency, the scaling law is extended to account for both the longitudinal and azimuthal curvatures at the bridge front, which, fortuitously, still results in an explicit analytic expression for the front's propagation speed. This expression is shown to offer an excellent approximation for both the fully computed solution and for experimental data from a range of flow configurations for a remarkably large proportion of the coalescence process. The derived formula allows one to predict the speed at which drops coalesce for the duration of the inertial regime, which should be useful for the analysis of experimental data.

  5. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Liquid Drop Dynamics Within Unsaturated Vertical Hele-Shaw Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hai Huang; Paul Meakin

    2008-03-01

    A three-dimensional, multiphase fluid flow model with volume of fluid-interface tracking was developed and applied to study the multiphase dynamics of moving liquid drops of different sizes within vertical Hele-Shaw cells. The simulated moving velocities are significantly different from those obtained from a first-order analytical approximation, based on simple force-balance concepts. The simulation results also indicate that the moving drops can exhibit a variety of shapes and that the transition among these different shapes is largely determined by the moving velocities. More important, there is a transition from a linear moving regime at small capillary numbers, in which the capillary number scales linearly with the Bond number, to a nonlinear moving regime at large capillary numbers, in which the moving drop releases a train of droplets from its trailing edge. The train of droplets forms a variety of patterns at different moving velocities.

  6. Practice and drop-out effects during a 17-year longitudinal study of cognitive aging.

    PubMed

    Rabbitt, Patrick; Diggle, Peter; Holland, Fiona; McInnes, Lynn

    2004-03-01

    Interpretations of longitudinal studies of cognitive aging are misleading unless effects of practice and selective drop-out are considered. A random effects model taking practice and drop-out into account analyzed data from four successive presentations of each of two intelligence tests, two vocabulary tests, and two verbal memory tests during a 17-year longitudinal study of 5,899 community residents whose ages ranged from 49 to 92 years. On intelligence tests, substantial practice effects counteracted true declines observed over 3 to 5 years of aging and remained significant even with intervals of 7 years between successive assessments. Adjustment for practice and drop-out revealed accelerating declines in fluid intelligence and cumulative learning, linear declines in verbal free recall, and no substantial change in vocabulary. Socioeconomic status and basal levels of general fluid ability did not affect rates of decline. After further adjustment for demographics, variability between individuals was seen to increase as the sample aged. PMID:15014091

  7. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... qualification of all packaging design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.601(e). For other than flat drops, the center of gravity of the test packaging must be vertically over the point of... result in failure of the packaging must be used. The number of drops required and the...

  8. Drops and Bubble in Materials Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doremus, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The formation of extended p-n junctions in semiconductors by drop migration, mechanisms and morphologies of migrating drops and bubbles in solids and nucleation and corrections to the Volmer-Weber equations are discussed. Bubble shrinkage in the processing of glass, the formation of glass microshells as laser-fusion targets, and radiation-induced voids in nuclear reactors were examined.

  9. [Nasal drops addiction--the case report].

    PubMed

    Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Simon, Karolina; Jabłecka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the case of 34-years old man, who has used nasal drops with xylomethazoline for three years. Health consequence of uncontrolled use of the drops and treatment were prescribed. Described problem confirms the need of physicians and pharmacists cooperation to limit the problem of drug-addiction. PMID:23421118

  10. Aging, Terminal Decline, and Terminal Drop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Erdman; Cleveland, William

    1976-01-01

    Data from a 20-year longitudinal study of persons over 60 were analyzed by step-wise multiple regression to test for declines in function with age, for terminal decline (linear relationship to time before death), and for terminal drop (curvilinear relationship to time before death). There were no substantial terminal drop effects. (Author)

  11. Drop Ejection From an Oscillating Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, E. D.; Basaran, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of a drop of a Newtonian liquid that is pendant from or sessile on a solid rod that is forced to undergo time-periodic oscillations along its axis is studied theoretically. The free boundary problem governing the time evolution of the shape of the drop and the flow field inside it is solved by a method of lines using a finite element algorithm incorporating an adaptive mesh. When the forcing amplitude is small, the drop approaches a limit cycle at large times and undergoes steady oscillations thereafter. However, drop breakup is the consequence if the forcing amplitude exceeds a critical value. Over a wide range of amplitudes above this critical value, drop ejection from the rod occurs during the second oscillation period from the commencement of rod motion. Remarkably, the shape of the interface at breakup and the volume of the primary drop formed are insensitive to changes in forcing amplitude. The interface shape at times close to and at breakup is a multi-valued function of distance measured along the rod axis and hence cannot be described by recently popularized one-dimensional approximations. The computations show that drop ejection occurs without the formation of a long neck. Therefore, this method of drop formation holds promise of preventing formation of undesirable satellite droplets.

  12. Drop tower with no aerodynamic drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Cooling air accelerated to match velocity of falling object eliminates drag. 3 meter drop tower with suction fan and specific geometry causes air to accelerate downward at 1 g. Although cooling of molten material released from top is slow because surrounding air moves with it, drop remains nearly spherical.

  13. Spatial Distribution of Large Cloud Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, A.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Larsen, M.; Wiscombe, W.

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing aircraft measurements of individual drop sizes in clouds, we have shown in a companion paper (Knyazikhin et al., 2004) that the probability of finding a drop of radius r at a linear scale l decreases as l(sup D(r)) where 0 less than or equal to D(r) less than or equal to 1. This paper shows striking examples of the spatial distribution of large cloud drops using models that simulate the observed power laws. In contrast to currently used models that assume homogeneity and therefore a Poisson distribution of cloud drops, these models show strong drop clustering, the more so the larger the drops. The degree of clustering is determined by the observed exponents D(r). The strong clustering of large drops arises naturally from the observed power-law statistics. This clustering has vital consequences for rain physics explaining how rain can form so fast. It also helps explain why remotely sensed cloud drop size is generally biased and why clouds absorb more sunlight than conventional radiative transfer models predict.

  14. Why Do Students Drop Advanced Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Ilana

    2004-01-01

    Students, especially black, Latino and Native American youth and students of low socio-economic status drop out of advanced mathematics. Teachers must coordinate their expectations, their knowledge of students and their teaching practices in order to stop struggling students from dropping out of advanced math classes.

  15. University Drop-Out: An Italian Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belloc, Filippo; Maruotti, Antonello; Petrella, Lea

    2010-01-01

    University students' drop-out is a crucial issue for the universities' efficiency evaluation and funding. In this paper, we analyze the drop-out rate of the Economics and Business faculty of Sapienza University of Rome. We use administrative data on 9,725 undergraduates students enrolled in three-years bachelor programs from 2001 to 2007 and…

  16. 14 CFR 91.15 - Dropping objects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dropping objects. 91.15 Section 91.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.15 Dropping objects. No pilot in command of a civil aircraft may...

  17. Mixing in colliding, ultrasonically levitated drops.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Edward T; Choi, Woo-Hyuck; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2014-02-18

    Lab-in-a-drop, using ultrasonic levitation, has been actively investigated for the last two decades. Benefits include lack of contact between solutions and an apparatus and a lack of sample cross-contamination. Understanding and controlling mixing in the levitated drop is necessary for using an acoustically levitated drop as a microreactor, particularly for studying kinetics. A pulsed electrostatic delivery system enables addition and mixing of a desired-volume droplet with the levitated drop. Measurement of mixing kinetics is obtained by high-speed video monitoring of a titration reaction. Drop heterogeneity is visualized as 370 nl of 0.25 M KOH (pH: 13.4) was added to 3.7 μL of 0.058 M HCl (pH: 1.24). Spontaneous mixing time is about 2 s. Following droplet impact, the mixed drop orbits the levitator axis at about 5 Hz during homogenization. The video's green channel (maximum response near 540 nm) shows the color change due to phenolphthalein absorption. While mixing is at least an order of magnitude faster in the levitated drop compared with three-dimensional diffusion, modulation of the acoustic waveform near the surface acoustic wave resonance frequency of the levitated drop does not substantially reduce mixing time. PMID:24460103

  18. Internal Flow in a Free Drop (IFFD) Bubble Surface Tension Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This digital QuickTime movie is of the Internal Flow in a Free Drop (IFFD) Bubble Surface Tension Experiment taking place in the Microgravity laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. The Bubble provides scientists with information about fluid surface tensions in a low-gravity environment.

  19. Clapping wet hands: dynamics of a fluid curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Brian; Slama, Brice; Goodnight, Randall; Gart, Sean; Jung, Sunghwan

    2013-03-01

    Droplets splash around when a fluid volume is quickly compressed. This has been observed during common activities such as kids clapping with wet hands. The underlying mechanism involves a resting fluid volume being compressed vertically between two objects. This compression causes the fluid volume to be ejected radially, thereby generating fluid ligaments and droplets at a high speed. In this study, we designed and performed experiments to observe the process of ligament and drop formation while a fluid is squeezed. A thicker rim at the outer edge forms and moves after the squeezing, and then becomes unstable and breaks into smaller drops. We compared experimental measurements with theoretical models over three different stages; early squeezing, intermediate ejection, and later break-up of the fluid. We found that drop spacing set by the initial capillary instability does not change in the course of rim expansion; consequently final ejected droplets are very sparse compared to the size of the rim.

  20. Planar microfluidic drop splitting and merging.

    PubMed

    Collignon, Sean; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie

    2015-04-21

    Open droplet microfluidic platforms offer attractive alternatives to closed microchannel devices, including lower fabrication cost and complexity, significantly smaller sample and reagent volumes, reduced surface contact and adsorption, as well as drop scalability, reconfigurability, and individual addressability. For these platforms to be effective, however, they require efficient schemes for planar drop transport and manipulation. While there are many methods that have been reported for drop transport, it is far more difficult to carry out other drop operations such as dispensing, merging and splitting. In this work, we introduce a novel alternative to merge and, more crucially, split drops using laterally-offset modulated surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The energy delivery into the drop is divided into two components: a small modulation amplitude excitation to initiate weak rotational flow within the drop followed by a short burst in energy to induce it to stretch. Upon removal of the SAW energy, capillary forces at the center of the elongated drop cause the liquid in this capillary bridge region to drain towards both ends of the drop, resulting in its collapse and therefore the splitting of the drop. This however occurs only below a critical Ohnesorge number, which is a balance between the viscous forces that retard the drainage and the sufficiently large capillary forces that cause the liquid bridge to pinch. We show the possibility of reliably splitting drops into two equal sized droplets with an average deviation in their volumes of only around 4% and no greater than 10%, which is comparable to the 7% and below splitting deviation obtained with electrowetting drop splitting techniques. In addition, we also show that it is possible to split the drop asymmetrically to controllably and reliably produce droplets of different volumes. Such potential as well as the flexibility in tuning the device to operate on drops of different sizes without requiring electrode

  1. Drop-on-demand for aqueous solutions of sodium alginate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herran, C. Leigh; Coutris, Nicole

    2013-06-01

    Inkjet printing is a rapidly growing commercial process for applications that depend on precisely patterning micro-scale droplets. These applications increasingly require complex fluids, introducing viscoelastic properties which play an important role in droplet formation. The objective of this study is to determine how to obtain single, uniform and spherical ("successful") droplets from aqueous solutions of sodium alginate with a piezoelectric drop-on-demand printing method. In order to control the volume and velocities of droplets, the effect on the droplet formation of the characteristics of the waveform such as voltage amplitude and dwell time is studied. The results depend also on the fluid rheology. The viscosity of the chosen fluid is a function of the concentration, as the viscoelastic properties increase at higher concentration. In this paper, the droplet formation process is characterized in terms of both the waveform and the rheological properties of the solution. The characterization of the fluids and waveform will be pursued first and the droplet formation and its control will be studied. Finally, the results will be presented with a map in ranges of the Ohnesorge, Deborah and Weber numbers.

  2. CPAS Preflight Drop Test Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Megan E.; Bledsoe, Kristin J.; Romero, Leah M.

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) drop test program, the CPAS Analysis Team has developed a simulation and analysis process to support drop test planning and execution. This process includes multiple phases focused on developing test simulations and communicating results to all groups involved in the drop test. CPAS Engineering Development Unit (EDU) series drop test planning begins with the development of a basic operational concept for each test. Trajectory simulation tools include the Flight Analysis and Simulation Tool (FAST) for single bodies, and the Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) simulation for the mated vehicle. Results are communicated to the team at the Test Configuration Review (TCR) and Test Readiness Review (TRR), as well as at Analysis Integrated Product Team (IPT) meetings in earlier and intermediate phases of the pre-test planning. The ability to plan and communicate efficiently with rapidly changing objectives and tight schedule constraints is a necessity for safe and successful drop tests.

  3. Internal flow and deformation of a liquid CO2 drop rising through water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steytler, Louis L.; Pearlstein, Arne J.

    2012-11-01

    We report computations of the steady axisymmetric flow in and around a deformable liquid drop of CO2 ascending through a water column under the action of buoyancy, a problem relevant to risk assessment for sub-seabed carbon sequestration and storage. In these initial computations, we consider several drop densities, corresponding to different depths in the ocean, and neglect dissolution of CO2 into the surrounding water and formation of a hydrate film at the drop/water interface. The results, which extend our previous work (Bozzi et al., J. Fluid Mech. 336, 1-32, 1997) to the case in which the dynamic viscosities of the dispersed and continuous phases are unequal, show that the degree of deformation and internal circulation depend strongly on drop size. Supported by the International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, sponsored by the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  5. Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

  6. Deformation of a nearly hemispherical conducting drop due to an electric field: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, L. T.; Tsakonas, C.; Duffy, B. R.; Mottram, N. J.; Sage, I. C.; Brown, C. V.; Wilson, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    We consider, both theoretically and experimentally, the deformation due to an electric field of a pinned nearly hemispherical static sessile drop of an ionic fluid with a high conductivity resting on the lower substrate of a parallel-plate capacitor. Using both numerical and asymptotic approaches, we find solutions to the coupled electrostatic and augmented Young-Laplace equations which agree very well with the experimental results. Our asymptotic solution for the drop interface extends previous work in two ways, namely, to drops that have zero-field contact angles that are not exactly π/2 and to higher order in the applied electric field, and provides useful predictive equations for the changes in the height, contact angle, and pressure as functions of the zero-field contact angle, drop radius, surface tension, and applied electric field. The asymptotic solution requires some numerical computations, and so a surprisingly accurate approximate analytical asymptotic solution is also obtained.

  7. Effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on the bubbling fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Jehng; Chen, Suming; Lei, Perng-Kwei; Wu, Chung-Hsing

    2007-12-01

    Since performance and operational conditions, such as superficial velocity, pressure drop, particles viodage, and terminal velocity, are difficult to measure on an incinerator, this study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine numerical solutions. The effects of pressure drop and superficial velocity on a bubbling fluidized bed incinerator (BFBI) were evaluated. Analytical results indicated that simulation models were able to effectively predict the relationship between superficial velocity and pressure drop over bed height in the BFBI. Second, the models in BFBI were simplified to simulate scale-up beds without excessive computation time. Moreover, simulation and experimental results showed that minimum fluidization velocity of the BFBI must be controlled in at 0.188-3.684 m/s and pressure drop was mainly caused by bed particles. PMID:18074287

  8. The lift force on a drop in unbounded plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wohl, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    The lift force on a deformable liquid sphere moving in steady, plane Poiseuille-Stokes flow and subjected to an external body force is calculated. The results are obtained by seeking a solution to Stokes' equations for the motion of the liquids inside and outside the slightly perturbed sphere surface, as expansions valid for small values of the ratio of the Weber number to the Reynolds number. When the ratio of the drop and external fluid viscosities is small, the lift exerted on a neutrally buoyant drop is found to be approximately one-tenth of the magnitude of the force reported by Wohl and Rubinow acting on the same drop in unbounded Poiseuille flow in a tube. The resultant trajectory of the drop is calculated and displayed as a function of the external body force.

  9. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002220.htm Amniotic fluid To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds ...

  10. Drop Tower Facility at Queensland University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plagens, Owen; Castillo, Martin; Steinberg, Theodore; Ong, Teng-Cheong

    The Queensland University of Technology (QUT) Drop Tower Facility is a {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}2.1 second, 21.3 m fall, dual capsule drop tower system. The dual capsule comprises of an uncoupled exterior hollow drag shield that experiences drag by the ambient atmosphere with the experimental capsule falling within the drag shield. The dual capsule system is lifted to the top of the drop tower via a mechanical crane and the dropping process is initiated by the cutting of a wire coupling the experimental package and suspending the drag shield. The internal experimental capsule reaches the bottom of the drag shield floor just prior to the deceleration stage at the air bag and during this time experience gravity levels of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{-6} g. The deceleration system utilizes an inflatable airbag where experimental packages can be designed to experience a maximum deceleration of {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}10textsuperscript{18} g for {raise.17exscriptstyle˜}0.1 seconds. The drag shield can house experimental packages with a maximum diameter of 0.8 m and height of 0.9 m. The drag shield can also be used in foam mode, where the walls are lined with foam and small experiments can be dropped completely untethered. This mode is generally used for the study of microsatellite manipulation. Payloads can be powered by on-board power systems with power delivered to the experiment until free fall occurs. Experimental data that can be collected includes but is not limited to video, temperature, pressure, voltage/current from the power supply, and triggering mechanisms outputs which are simultaneously collected via data logging systems and high speed video recording systems. Academic and commercial projects are currently under investigation at the QUT Drop Tower Facility and collaboration is openly welcome at this facility. Current research includes the study of heterogeneously burning metals in oxygen which is aimed at fire safety applications and

  11. Thermal activation of superheated lipid-coated perfluorocarbon drops.

    PubMed

    Mountford, Paul A; Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2015-04-28

    This study explored the thermal conditions necessary for the vaporization of superheated perfluorocarbon nanodrops. Droplets C3F8 and C4F10 coated with a homologous series of saturated diacylphosphatidylcholines were formed by condensation of 4 μm diameter microbubbles. These drops were stable at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, but they vaporized back into microbubbles at higher temperatures. The vaporization transition was measured as a function of temperature by laser light extinction. We found that C3F8 and C4F10 drops experienced 90% vaporization at 40 and 75 °C, respectively, near the theoretical superheat limits (80-90% of the critical temperature). We therefore conclude that the metastabilty of these phase-change agents arises not from the droplet Laplace pressure altering the boiling point, as previously reported, but from the metastability of the pure superheated fluid to homogeneous nucleation. The rate of C4F10 drop vaporization was quantified at temperatures ranging from 55 to 75 °C, and an apparent activation energy barrier was calculated from an Arrhenius plot. Interestingly, the activation energy increased linearly with acyl chain length from C14 to C20, indicating that lipid interchain cohesion plays an important role in suppressing the vaporization rate. The vaporized drops (microbubbles) were found to be unstable to dissolution at high temperatures, particularly for C14 and C16. However, proper choice of the fluorocarbon and lipid species provided a nanoemulsion that could undergo at least ten reversible condensation/vaporization cycles. The vaporization properties presented in this study may facilitate the engineering of tunable phase-shift particles for diagnostic imaging, targeted drug delivery, tissue ablation, and other applications. PMID:25853278

  12. A Novel Acousto-Electric Levitator for Studies of Drop and Particle Clusters and Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yuren; Apfel, Robert E.; Zheng, Yibing

    1999-01-01

    A novel and compact instrumentation for studying the behavior of drop sprays and of clusters of drops now permits fundamental research into the behavior of reacting and non-reacting fluid and solid species. The new capability is made possible by simultaneous acousto-electric levitation and charging of "seed" droplets (10-30 microns in diameter) which come together in 2-D clusters (with up to 300 droplets). These clusters are interesting in their own right because of their crystalline and quasi-crystalline forms, which depend on the acoustic and electric field parameters. By varying the electric and acoustic field intensities, one can cause a cluster of droplets to condense into larger drops (e.g. 50-300 microns) which, because of their charge, form uniformly spaced 2-D arrays of monodispersed drops (e.g. 30-40 array drops in preliminary experiments). One or more layers of these 2-D arrays can form in the acoustic standing wave. Such a configuration permits a wide range of fundamental studies of drop evaporation, combustion, and nucleation. The drops can be single or multicomponent. Therefore, fundamental materials studies can also be performed. Using this same Cluster and Array Generation (CAG) instrumentation, it has been also possible in preliminary experiments to demonstrate the clustering and arraying of solid particles, both coated with an electrically conducting layer and uncoated, and both charged and uncharged.

  13. Nonlinear electrohydrodynamics of leaky dielectric drops in the Quincke regime: Numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Debasish; Saintillan, David

    2015-11-01

    The deformation of leaky dielectric drops in a dielectric fluid medium when subject to a uniform electric field is a classic electrohydrodynamic phenomenon best described by the well-known Melcher-Taylor leaky dielectric model. In this work, we develop a three-dimensional boundary element method for the full leaky dielectric model to systematically study the deformation and dynamics of liquid drops in strong electric fields. We compare our results with existing numerical studies, most of which have been constrained to axisymmetric drops or have neglected interfacial charge convection by the flow. The leading effect of convection is to enhance deformation of prolate drops and suppress deformation of oblate drops, as previously observed in the axisymmetric case. The inclusion of charge convection also enables us to investigate the dynamics in the Quincke regime, in which experiments exhibit a symmetry-breaking bifurcation leading to a tank-treading regime. Our simulations confirm the existence of this bifurcation for highly viscous drops, and also reveal the development of sharp interfacial charge gradients driven by convection near the drop's equator. American Chemical Society, Petroleum Research Fund.

  14. Effects of surface wettability and edge geometry on drop motion through an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Longmire, Ellen

    2012-11-01

    In geothermal energy recovery and CO2 sequestration, drops move through a porous structure by displacing a surrounding liquid. Both the pore geometry and surface wettability influence the drop motion. We simplify the pore structure to a thin plate with a circular orifice. The plate is held horizontally inside a rectangular tank filled with silicone oil. Drops of water/glycerin with Bond numbers (Bo) of 1-10 are released above and axisymmetric to the orifice, encountering the plate after reaching their terminal speed. We use high speed imaging to examine the effects of orifice-to-drop diameter ratio (d/D), orifice surface wettability (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) and edge geometry on the passage of drop fluid through the orifice. We generate regime maps for d/D and Bo delineating domains of drop capture, passage, and passage with breakup. For d/D < 1, sharp edges are observed to yield contact between the drop and orifice so that surface wettability influences the subsequent dynamics. On the other hand, rounded edges appear to prevent direct contact so that the dynamics are unaffected by the surface wettability. Supported by DOE (DOE EERE-PMC-10EE0002764).

  15. Fluid spray simulation with two-fluid nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    Two-phase interacting flow inside a two-fluid fuel atomizer was investigated and a correction of aerodynamic and liquid-surface forces with characteristic drop diameter was obtained for liquid-jet breakup in Mach 1 gas flow. Nitrogen gas mass-flux was varied from 6 to 50 g/sq cm sec by using four differently sized two-fluid atomizers with nozzle diameters varyig from 0.32 to 0.56 cm. The correlation was derived by using the acoustic gas velocity, V sub c, as a basic parameter in defining and evaluating the dimensionless product of the Weber (We) and Reynolds (Re) numbers. By using the definition of WeRe, it was found that the ratio of orifice diameter to Sauter mean drop diameter could be correlated with the dimensionless ratio WeRe and the gas to liquid density ratio.

  16. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  17. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  18. Fiber length and orientation prevent migration in fluid filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiman, P. A.

    1966-01-01

    Stainless steel fiber web filter resists fiber migration which causes contamination of filtered fluids. This filter is capable of holding five times more particulate matter before arbitrary cutoff pressure drop and shows excellent retention in fuel flow at high rates.

  19. Fingering instabilities in Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Kristi E.

    Fingering has been studied in different fluid systems. Viscous fingering, which is driven by a difference in viscosity between fluids, has been studied by both experiments and numerical simulations. We used a single fluid with a temperature-dependent viscosity and studied the instability for a range of inlet pressures and viscosity ratios. The spreading and fingering of a fluid drop subjected to a centrifugal force, known as spin coating, has also been studied for a range of drop volumes and rotation speeds, both for a Newtonian and a non-Newtonian fluid. Experiments on viscous fingering with a single fluid, glycerine, show that an instability occurs at the boundary separating hot and cold fluid. The results indicate that the instability is similar to that which occurs between two miscible fluids. Fingering only occurs for high enough values of the inlet pressure and viscosity ratio. The wavelength of the fingering pattern is found to be proportional to the cell width for the two smallest cell widths used. The fingering patterns seen in the simulations are very similar to the experimental patterns, although there are some quantitative differences. In particular, the wavelength of the instability is seen to depend only weakly on the cell width. The spreading of silicone oil, a Newtonian fluid, during spin coating follows the time dependence predicted theoretically, although with a shift in the scaled time variable. Once the radius of the spreading silicone oil drop becomes large enough, fingers form around the perimeter of the drop for all experimental conditions studied. The number of fingers and the growth rate of the fingers are in agreement with theoretical predictions. Fingers are also observed to form for high enough drop volumes and rotation speeds during the spinning of a non-Newtonian fluid drop, Carbopol, which possesses a yield stress. In this case the fingering is a localized effect, occuring once the stress on the drop exceeds the yield stress, rather

  20. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  1. The Drop Tower Bremen -An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Kampen, Peter; Könemann, Thorben; Rath, Hans J.

    The Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM) was founded in 1985 as an institute of the University of Bremen, which focuses on research on gravitational and space-related phenomena. In 1988, the construction of ZARM`s drop tower began. Since its inau-guration in September 1990, the eye-catching Drop Tower Bremen with a height of 146m and its characteristic glass roof has become twice a landmark on the campus of the University of Bremen and the emblem of the technology park Bremen. As such an outstanding symbol of space science in Bremen the drop tower provides an european unique facility for experiments under conditions of high-quality weightlessness with residual gravitational accelerations in the microgravity regime. The period of maximum 4.74s of each freely falling experiment at the Drop Tower Bremen is only limited by the height of the drop tower vacuum tube, which was fully manufactured of steal and enclosed by an outer concrete shell. Thus, the pure free fall height of each microgravity drop experiment is approximately 110m. By using the later in-stalled catapult system established in 2004 ZARM`s short-term microgravity laboratory is able to nearly double the time of free fall. This world-wide inimitable capsule catapult system meets scientists` demand of extending the period of weightlessness. During the catapult operation the experiment capsule performs a vertical parabolic flight within the drop tower vacuum tube. In this way the time of microgravity can be extended to slightly over 9s. Either in the drop or in the catapult operation routine the repetition rates of microgravity experiments at ZARM`s drop tower facility are the same, generally up to 3 times per day. In comparison to orbital platforms the ground-based laboratory Drop Tower Bremen represents an economic alternative with a permanent access to weightlessness on earth. Moreover, the exceptional high quality of weightlessness in order of 1e-6 g (in the frequency range below 100

  2. The effects of polymer molecular weight on filament thinning and drop breakup in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, P. E.; Cramer, L.-A.; Gollub, J. P.; Durian, D. J.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the effects of fluid elasticity on the dynamics of filament thinning and drop breakup processes in a cross-slot microchannel. Elasticity effects are examined using dilute aqueous polymeric solutions of molecular weight (MW) ranging from 1.5×103 to 1.8×107. Results for polymeric fluids are compared to those for a viscous Newtonian fluid. The shearing or continuous phase that induces breakup is mineral oil. All fluids possess similar shear-viscosity (~0.2 Pa s) so that the viscosity ratio between the oil and aqueous phases is close to unity. Measurements of filament thickness as a function of time show different thinning behavior for the different aqueous fluids. For Newtonian fluids, the thinning process shows a single exponential decay of the filament thickness. For low MW fluids (103, 104 and 105), the thinning process also shows a single exponential decay, but with a decay rate that is slower than for the Newtonian fluid. The decay time increases with polymer MW. For high MW (106 and 107) fluids, the initial exponential decay crosses over to a second exponential decay in which elastic stresses are important. We show that the decay rate of the filament thickness in this exponential decay regime can be used to measure the steady extensional viscosity of the fluids. At late times, all fluids cross over to an algebraic decay which is driven mainly by surface tension.

  3. Nonmonotonic Response of Drop Impacting Liquid Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoyu; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, Delin; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-11-01

    Drop impact on liquid film is ubiquitous in both natural phenomena and industrial applications. The dynamics of the gas layer trapped between the drop and the deformed liquid surface play a crucial role in determining the impact outcomes. However, a quantitative measurement of this gas layer dynamics is extremely challenging because it is hidden behind the deformed liquid film. In this study, high-speed white light interferometry enables the measurement of the gas layer dynamics during the drop impact with high resolutions and is complemented by side view shadowgraphy to observe the penetration process below the liquid surface. Drop impacting with different inertia onto liquid film with various thicknesses is systematically studied to obtain a phase diagram of different outcomes in the h/R-We space, where h/R is the liquid thickness normalized by drop radius, and We is the drop Weber number. It is observed that there exists a critical WeC beyond which the drop always merges with the liquid film. However, for `subcritical' conditions, there exists a merging peninsula in otherwise globally bouncing region. Across this peninsula, as the liquid film thickness increases, the impact outcome transits from bouncing to merging and to bouncing again. The merging time within this peninsula is longer compared to its `supercritical' counterpart, indicating different merging mechanisms. Based on scaling analysis, the boundaries between different zones are identified and compared with experiments.

  4. Drop rebound in clouds and precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochs, H. T., III; Beard, K. V.

    1982-01-01

    The possibility of rebound for colliding cloud drops was measured by determining the collection efficiency. The collection efficiency for 17 size pairs of relatively uncharged drops in over 500 experimental runs was measured using two techniques. The collection efficiencies fall in a narrow range of 0.60 to 0.70 even though the collection drop was varied between 63 and 326 microns and the size ratio from 0.05 to 0.33. In addition the measured values of collection efficiencies (Epsilon) were below the computed values of collision efficiencies (E) for rigid spheres. Therefore it was concluded that rebound was occurring for these sizes since inferred coalescence (epsilon = Epsilon/E) efficiencies are about 0.6 yo 0.8. At a very small size ratio (r/R = p = 0.05, R = 326 microns) the coalescence efficiency inferred is in good agreement with the experimental findings for a supported collector drop. At somewhat large size ratios the inferred values of epsilon are well above results of supported drop experiments, but show a slight correspondence in collected drop size dependency to two models of drop rebound. At a large size ratio (p = 0.73, R = 275) the inferred coalescence efficiency is significantly different from all previous results.

  5. Condensation-induced jumping water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narhe, R. D.; Khandkar, M. D.; Shelke, P. B.; Limaye, A. V.; Beysens, D. A.

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length ˜1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface.

  6. Condensation-induced jumping water drops.

    PubMed

    Narhe, R D; Khandkar, M D; Shelke, P B; Limaye, A V; Beysens, D A

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length approximately 1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface. PMID:19905120

  7. Electrically assisted drop sliding on inclined planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Mannetje, D. J. C. M.; Murade, C. U.; van den Ende, D.; Mugele, F.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that electrowetting using alternating current (ac) voltage can be used to overcome pinning of small drops due to omnipresent heterogeneities on solid surfaces. By balancing contact angle hysteresis with gravity on inclined planes, we find that the critical electrowetting number for mobilizing drops is consistent with the voltage-dependent reduction in contact angle hysteresis in ac electrowetting. Moreover, the terminal velocity of sliding drops under ac electrowetting is found to increase linearly with the electrowetting number. Based on this effect, we present a prototype of a wiper-free windscreen.

  8. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  9. Electrohydrodynamic manipulation of particles on drop surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amah, Edison; Shah, Kinnari; Fischer, Ian; Singh, Pushpendra

    2014-11-01

    We have recently shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be self-assembled at the poles or the equator of the drop by applying a uniform ac electric field, and that this method can be used to separate on the surface of a drop those particles experiencing positive dielectrophoresis from those experiencing negative dielectrophoresis. In this talk we show that the frequency of the electric field is an important parameter which can be used to modify the intensities of the dielectrophoretic and the hydrodynamic-flow induced forces, and thus control the distribution of self-assembled monolayers. The work was supported by National Science Foundation.

  10. Drop size control in electro-coflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilanova, N.; Gundabala, V. R.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2011-07-01

    We introduce electro-coflow as a way to generate emulsion drops with an average size that can be larger, comparable, and smaller than the smallest geometric feature of the device. The method relies on using three immiscible liquids, two of them having a finite electrical conductivity. There are three regimes of operation that allow the steady generation of drops: dripping, electro-dripping, and an electrically dominated regime. We transit from one to the other by increasing the applied voltage and describe the changes in drop size by balancing the relevant forces in each regime.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the evaporation of particle-laden drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weikang; Koplik, Joel; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2012-11-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the evaporation of particle-laden droplets on a heated surface. The droplets are composed of a Lennard-Jones fluid containing rigid particles which are spherical sections of an atomic lattice, and heating is controlled through the temperature of an atomistic substrate. We observe that sufficiently large (but still nano-sized) particle-laden drops exhibit contact line pinning, measure the outward fluid flow field which advects particle to the drop rim, and find that the structure of the resulting aggregate varies with inter-particle interactions. In addition, the profile of the evaporative fluid flux is measured with and without particles present, and is also found to be in qualitative agreement with earlier theory. The compatibility of simple nanoscale calculations and micron-scale experiments indicates that molecular simulation may be used to predict aggregate structure in vaporative growth processes.

  12. Ground Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Drops: Analytical Part

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhal, S. S.; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    The main objectives of the analytical part of this investigation are to study the fluid flow phenomena together with the thermal effects on drops levitated in an acoustic field. To a large extent, experimentation on ground requires a strong acoustic field that has a significant interference with other thermal-fluid effects. While most of the work has been directed towards particles in strong acoustic fields to overcome gravity, some results for microgravity have been obtained. One of the objectives was to obtain the thermocapillary flow in a spot-heated drop, and set up a model for the prediction of thermophysical properties. In addition, for acoustically levitated particles, a clear understanding of the underlying fluid mechanics was required. Also, the interaction of acoustics with steady and pulsating thermal stimuli was required to be analyzed. The experimental part of the work was funded through JPL, and has been reported separately.

  13. Double-emulsion drops with ultra-thin shells for capsule templates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Kim, Jin Woong; Cho, Jun-Cheol; Weitz, David A

    2011-09-21

    We introduce an emulsification technique that creates monodisperse double-emulsion drops with a core-shell geometry having an ultra-thin wall as a middle layer. We create a biphasic flow in a microfluidic capillary device by forming a sheath flow consisting of a thin layer of a fluid with high affinity to the capillary wall flowing along the inner wall of the capillary, surrounding the innermost fluid. This creates double-emulsion drops, using a single-step emulsification, having a very thin fluid shell. If the shell is solidified, its thickness can be small as a hundred nanometres or even less. Despite the small thickness of this shell, these structures are nevertheless very stable, giving them great potential for encapsulation. We demonstrate this by creating biodegradable microcapsules of poly(lactic acid) with a shell thickness of a few tens of nanometres, which are potentially useful for encapsulation and delivery of drugs, cosmetics, and nutrients. PMID:21811710

  14. Drop spreading and resorbtion on gel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banaha, Mehdi; Daerr, Adrian; Limat, Laurent

    2008-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of liquid drops on agar gels, using a visualisation method which captures the evolution of the free surface. A first remarquable observation is that drops of water deposited on the surface do not spread, although the gel consists of up to 99.7% water and as low as 0.3% agarose. Instead, the drop slowly de-wets and resorbs into the gel which swells locally. If the deposited drop contains surfactants, the dynamics is very different. A sharp circular swelling front develops and progressively invades the whole surface. We study the propagation of this front as a function of surfactant and agarose concentration, and compare its typical properties to similar fronts appearing during mass swarming events of bacterial colonies under the same conditions. The observations reveal the complex nature of gel surface physico-chemistry and its aging, and may be related to recent friction measurements at gel interfaces.

  15. Drop size measurement of liquid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Y. H.; Pui, D. Y. H.; Xian-Qing, Wang

    The factor B = D/ D' relating the diameter D of a spherical liquid drop to the diameter, D˜, of the same drop collected on a microscope slide has been measured for DOP (di-octyl phthalate) and oleic acid aerosols. The microscope slide was coated with a fluorocarbon, oleophobic surfactant (L-1428, 3M Co., St. Paul, MN). The ratio was found to be independent of drop diameter in the 2-50 μm range and the mean value of B was found to be 0.700 for oleic acid and 0.690 for DOP. Similar measurements for oleic acid and DOP drops collected on a clean, uncoated slide resulted in the values of 0.419 and 0.303, respectively. The experimental values of B were compared with the theoretical values based on contact angle measurements. Good agreement was obtained.

  16. Water drop dynamics on a granular layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorens, Coraline; Biance, Anne-Laure; Ybert, Christophe; Pirat, Christophe; Liquids; Interfaces Team

    2015-11-01

    Liquid drop impacts, either on a solid surface or a liquid bath, have been studied for a while and are still subject of intense research. Less is known concerning impacts on granular layers that are shown to exhibit an intermediate situation between solid and liquid. In this study, we focus on water drop impacts on granular matter made of micrometer-sized spherical glass beads. In particular, we investigate the overall dynamics arising from the interplay between liquid and grains throughout the impact. Depending on the relevant parameters (impact velocity, drop and grain sizes, as well as their wetting properties), various behaviors are evidenced. In particular, the behavior of the beads at the liquid-gas interface (ball-bearing vs imbibition) is shown to greatly affect the spreading dynamics of the drop, as well as satellite droplets formation, beads ejection, and the final crater morphology.

  17. Physical Causes of Drop Size Distribution Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.

    Drop size distributions are measured at ground by instruments (disdrometers) that mostly sample one drop at a time or at best, a small number of drops simultaneously. To obtain a representative sample a time window of the observations is required. This introduces a spurious variability due to the differential fall speed of drops coupled with a highly variable field of precipitation in rapid displacement respect to the dis- drometer. A filter has been studied to minimize this spurious variability as well as instrumental uncertainty. The use of filtered data allows to see case to case differences in DSDs that are hidden in the large scatter in the raw data. These differences can be associated to physical processes revealed by a vertically pointing radar such as the de- gree of aggregation, riming, etc. Numerical modeling of particle size evolution using the quasi-stochastic growth equation serves as guide for the understanding of these processes.

  18. Aligner for Elastic Collisions of Dropped Balls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellen, Walter Roy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses an aligner that permits dropping a stack of any number of balls of different sizes, elasticities, hardnesses, or types to observe the rebound of the top ball. Experimental results allow a reasonable comparison with theory. (MVL)

  19. Drop impact of shear thickening liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, François; Sandoval-Nava, Enrique; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Dijksman, J. Frits; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-05-01

    The impact of drops of concentrated non-Brownian suspensions (cornstarch and polystyrene spheres) onto a solid surface is investigated experimentally. The spreading dynamics and maximal deformation of the droplet of such shear thickening liquids are found to be markedly different from the impact of Newtonian drops. A particularly striking observation is that the maximal deformation is independent of the drop velocity and that the deformation suddenly stops during the impact phase. Both observations are due to the shear thickening rheology of the suspensions, as is explained theoretically from a balance between the kinetic energy and the viscously dissipated energy, from which we establish a scaling relation between the maximal deformation of the drop and rheological parameters of concentrated suspensions.

  20. Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Features Teen Birth Rates Drop, But Disparities Persist Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir The feature you selected is no longer available. In 10 seconds you will be automatically redirected to the CDC. ...

  1. As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158889.html As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops But change requires dedication ... TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A higher level of heart-lung fitness may reduce your risk ...

  2. As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158889.html As Fitness Levels Rise, Diabetes Risk Drops But change ... of the overall population, the study author's explained. "As this benefit remained significant even when adjusting for ...

  3. Rotating drops of axion dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Sacha; Schwetz, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    We consider how QCD axions produced by the misalignment mechanism could form galactic dark matter halos. We recall that stationary, gravitationally stable axion field configurations have the size of an asteroid with masses of order 10-13M⊙ (because gradient pressure is insufficient to support a larger object). We call such field configurations "drops." We explore whether rotating drops could be larger, and find that their mass could increase by a factor ˜10 . This mass is comparable to the mass of miniclusters generated from misalignment axions in the scenario where the axion is born after inflation. We speculate that misalignment axions today are in the form of drops, contributing to dark matter like a distribution of asteroids (and not as a coherent oscillating background field). We consider some observational signatures of the drops, which seem consistent with a galactic halo made of axion dark matter.

  4. Numerical study of drop motion on a surface with stepwise wettability gradient and contact angle hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun-Jie; Huang, Haibo; Wang, Xinzhu

    2014-06-01

    In this work, the motion of a two-dimensional drop on a surface with stepwise wettability gradient (WG) is studied numerically by a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann finite-difference method. We incorporate the geometric wetting boundary condition that allows accurate implementation of a contact angle hysteresis (CAH) model. The method is first validated through a series of tests that check different constituents of the numerical model. Then, simulations of a drop on a wall with given stepwise WG are performed under different conditions. The effects of the Reynolds number, the viscosity ratio, the WG, as well as the CAH on the drop motion are investigated in detail. It was discovered that the shape of the drop in steady motion may be fitted by two arcs that give two apparent contact angles, which are related to the respective contact line velocities and the relevant contact angles (that specify the WG and CAH) through the relation derived by Cox ["The dynamics of the spreading of liquids on a solid surface. Part 1. viscous flow," J. Fluid Mech. 168, 169-194 (1986)] if the slip length in simulation is defined according to Yue et al. ["Sharp-interface limit of the Cahn-Hilliard model for moving contact lines," J. Fluid Mech. 645, 279-294 (2010)]. It was also found that the steady capillary number of the drop is significantly affected by the viscosity ratio, the magnitudes of the WG, and the CAH, whereas it almost shows no dependence on the Reynolds number.

  5. A comparison of boundary element and finite element methods for modeling axisymmetric polymeric drop deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Russell; Toose, Matthijs; Macosko, Christopher W.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2001-12-01

    A modified boundary element method (BEM) and the DEVSS-G finite element method (FEM) are applied to model the deformation of a polymeric drop suspended in another fluid subjected to start-up uniaxial extensional flow. The effects of viscoelasticity, via the Oldroyd-B differential model, are considered for the drop phase using both FEM and BEM and for both the drop and matrix phases using FEM. Where possible, results are compared with the linear deformation theory. Consistent predictions are obtained among the BEM, FEM, and linear theory for purely Newtonian systems and between FEM and linear theory for fully viscoelastic systems. FEM and BEM predictions for viscoelastic drops in a Newtonian matrix agree very well at short times but differ at longer times, with worst agreement occurring as critical flow strength is approached. This suggests that the dominant computational advantages held by the BEM over the FEM for this and similar problems may diminish or even disappear when the issue of accuracy is appropriately considered. Fully viscoelastic problems, which are only feasible using the FEM formulation, shed new insight on the role of viscoelasticity of the matrix fluid in drop deformation. Copyright

  6. Interfacial and morphological features of a twist-bend nematic drop.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Kanakapura S; Kumar, Pramoda; Palakurthy, Nani B; Yelamaggad, Channabasaveshwar V; Virga, Epifanio G

    2016-06-14

    In this experimental and theoretical study, we examine the equilibrium shapes of quasi-two-dimensional twist-bend nematic (Ntb) drops formed within a planarly aligned nematic layer of the liquid crystal CB7CB. Initially, at the setting point of the Ntb phase, the drops assume a nonequilibrium cusped elliptical geometry with the major axis orthogonal to the director of the surrounding nematic fluid; this growth is governed principally by anisotropic heat diffusion. The drops attain equilibrium through thermally driven dynamical evolution close to their melting temperature. They are associated with a characteristic twin-striped morphology that transforms into the familiar focal conic texture as the temperature is lowered. At equilibrium, large millimetric drops are tactoidlike, elongated along the director of the surrounding nematic fluid. This geometry is explained using a mathematical model that features two dimensionless parameters, of which one is the structural cone angle of the Ntb phase and the other is the relative strength of mismatch elastic energy at the drop's interface. Both parameters are extracted from the observations by measuring the aspect ratio of the equilibrium shapes and the inner corner angle of the cusps. PMID:27162094

  7. Experimental study on thermocapillary motion of isolated drop and coalescence problems of drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jingchang; Lin, Hai

    2011-11-01

    Thermocapillay migrations of drops under temperature gradient were studied through ground-based experiment, experiment using drop tower and space experiment in microgravity. The motion of isolated drop at moderate to large Marangoni numbers (Ma) and the interaction of drops were investigated. Experimental data show that the scaled migration velocity of isolated drop, V/VYGB, appears an obvious decrease trend with the increase of Maragoni number up to 5500. This result does not agree with some theoretical predictions. Interferometry was applied in our space experiment to visualize the whole temperature field and to get detailed informations of temperature variation around a moving drop and the thermal wake behind it. Interferometric images indicate that drop's migration very sensitively follows the direction of temperature gradient because of slow migration velocity and microgravity condition. The temperature disturbance around a leading drop and the thermal wake behind it would exist for a quite long time in the real case. The variation of temperature field would substantially affect the migration velocity of a trailing drop in both direction and value, and this would bring about coalescence problems of two or multiple drops.

  8. La Gocciolina (The Little Drop of Water).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palandra, Maria

    This primary level reader in Italian intended for use in a bilingual education setting, is about the life cycle of a drop of water. The drop of water is personified and the story tells of its adventures as it travels from the top of the lake to the bottom, its meeting with the inhabitants of the lake, and its trip to the clouds. After deciding not…

  9. Blood drop patterns: Formation and applications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoyang; Zhang, Liyuan; Zang, Duyang; Shen, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The drying of a drop of blood or plasma on a solid substrate leads to the formation of interesting and complex patterns. Inter- and intra-cellular and macromolecular interactions in the drying plasma or blood drop are responsible for the final morphologies of the dried patterns. Changes in these cellular and macromolecular components in blood caused by diseases have been suspected to cause changes in the dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood, which could be used as simple diagnostic tools to identify the health of humans and livestock. However, complex physicochemical driving forces involved in the pattern formation are not fully understood. This review focuses on the scientific development in microscopic observations and pattern interpretation of dried plasma and whole blood samples, as well as the diagnostic applications of pattern analysis. Dried drop patterns of plasma consist of intricate visible cracks in the outer region and fine structures in the central region, which are mainly influenced by the presence and concentration of inorganic salts and proteins during drying. The shrinkage of macromolecular gel and its adhesion to the substrate surface have been thought to be responsible for the formation of the cracks. Dried drop patterns of whole blood have three characteristic zones; their formation as functions of drying time has been reported in the literature. Some research works have applied engineering treatment to the evaporation process of whole blood samples. The sensitivities of the resultant patterns to the relative humidity of the environment, the wettability of the substrates, and the size of the drop have been reported. These research works shed light on the mechanisms of spreading, evaporation, gelation, and crack formation of the blood drops on solid substrates, as well as on the potential applications of dried drop patterns of plasma and whole blood in diagnosis. PMID:26988066

  10. Bubble, Drop and Particle Unit (BDPU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This section of the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) publication includes the following articles entitled: (1) Oscillatory Thermocapillary Instability; (2) Thermocapillary Convection in Multilayer Systems; (3) Bubble and Drop Interaction with Solidification Front; (4) A Liquid Electrohydrodynamics Experiment; (5) Boiling on Small Plate Heaters under Microgravity and a Comparison with Earth Gravity; (6) Thermocapillary Migration and Interactions of Bubbles and Drops; and (7) Nonlinear Surface Tension Driven Bubble Migration

  11. Misuse of xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Jacek Sein; Salamon, Marek; Habrat, Boguslaw; Scinska, Anna; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2008-12-01

    Six male prisoners who misused xylometazoline nasal drops by inhalation were interviewed by a prison physician in 2006. The prisoners received xylometazoline drops during regular visits in the prison ambulatory service. In order to get the medication, the subjects reported false symptoms of rhinosinusitis and allergic reactions. Psychoactive effects of inhaled xylometazoline were described as "stimulation," "excitation," and "feeling of strength." Although preliminary, our findings suggest that topical adrenergic decongestants can produce rewarding effects when administered by inhalation. PMID:19085441

  12. Representation of average drop sizes in sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Lee G.

    1987-06-01

    Procedures are presented for processing drop-size measurements to obtain average drop sizes that represent overall spray characteristics. These procedures are not currently in general use, but they would represent an improvement over current practice. Clear distinctions are made between processing data for spatial- and temporal-type measurements. The conversion between spatial and temporal measurements is discussed. The application of these procedures is demonstrated by processing measurements of the same spray by two different types of instruments.

  13. Dynamics of rotating and oscillating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T. G.; Trinh, E. H.; Croonquist, A. P.; Elleman, D. D.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of rotation and oscillation is investigated of a freely suspended liquid drop under the influence of surface tension and positioned inside an experimental apparatus by acoustic forces in the low acceleration environment of Spacelab 3. After a drop was observed to be spherical and stably located at the center of the chamber, it was set into rotation or oscillation by acoustic torque or modulated radiation pressure force.

  14. Motion of Drops on Surfaces with Wettability Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. Shankar; McLaughlin, John B.; Moumen, Nadjoua; Qian, Dongying

    2002-01-01

    desiccator. This is done using an approximate line source of the vapor in the form of a string soaked in the alkylchlorosilane. Ordinarily, many fluids, including water, wet the surface of silicon quite well. This means that the contact angle is small. But the silanized surface resists wetting, with contact angles that are as large as 100 degs. Therefore, a gradient of wettability is formed on the silicon surface. The region near the string is highly hydrophobic, and the contact angle decreases gradually toward a small value at the hydrophilic end away from this region. The change in wettability occurs over a distance of several mm. The strip is placed on a platform within a Plexiglas cell. Drops of a suitable liquid are introduced on top of the strip near the hydrophobic end. An optical system attached to a video camera is trained on the drop so that images of the moving drop can be captured on videotape for subsequent analysis. We have performed preliminary experiments with water as well as ethylene glycol drops. Results from these experiments will be presented in the poster. Future plans include the refinement of the experimental system so as to permit images to be recorded from the side as well as the top, and the conduct of a systematic study in which the drop size is varied over a good range. Experiments will be conducted with different fluids so as to obtain the largest possible range of suitably defined Reynolds and Capillary numbers. Also, an effort will be initiated on theoretical modeling of this motion. The challenges in the development of the theoretical description lie in the proper analysis of the region in the vicinity of the contact line, as well as in the free boundary nature of the problem. It is known that continuum models assuming the no slip condition all the way to the contact line fail by predicting that the stress on the solid surface becomes singular as the contact line is approached. One approach for dealing with this issue has been to relax the no

  15. Leidenfrost drops on liquid baths: theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Rednikov, Alexei; Maquet, Laurent; Darbois-Texier, Baptiste; Duchesne, Alexis; Brandenbourger, Martin; Dorbolo, Stéphane; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that a liquid drop released over a very hot surface generally does not contact the surface nor boils but rather levitates over a thin vapor film generated by its own evaporation (Leidenfrost effect). In particular, the case of a hot (and flat) solid substrate has been extensively studied in recent years. In contrast, we here focus on Leidenfrost drops over a superheated liquid bath, addressing the problem theoretically and comparing our predictions with experimental results, detailed in a separate talk. We predict the geometry of the drop and of the liquid bath, based on the hydrostatic Young-Laplace and lubrication equations. A good agreement is observed with the available experimental data concerning the deformation of the liquid bath. The modeling also yields a rather complete insight into the shape of the drop. As in the case of a solid substrate, the vapor layer generally appears to be composed of a vapor pocket surrounded by a circular neck. The influences of the superheat and of the drop size are parametrically investigated. A number of scaling laws are established. Unlike the case of a solid substrate, no chimney instability was found in the range of drop size studied.

  16. Airflows generated by an impacting drop.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ray, Bahni; Morris, Jeffrey F; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-28

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, lowering the ambient air pressure suppresses splashing completely. This effect, robustly found for different liquid and substrate properties, raises the fundamental question of how air affects a spreading drop. In a combined experimental and numerical study we characterize the flow of air induced by the drop after it hits the substrate, using a modified Schlieren optics technique combined with high-speed video imaging and Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. Our experiments reveal the emergence of air structures on different length scales. On large scales, the airflow induced in the drop's wake leads to vortex structures due to interaction with the substrate. On smaller scales, we visualize a ring structure above the outer edge of the spreading liquid generated by the spreading of the drop. Our simulations reveal the interaction between the wake vorticity and the flows originating from the rapidly escaping air from below the impacting drop. We show that the vorticity is governed by a balance between inertial and viscous forces in the air, and is unrelated to the splashing threshold. PMID:26809314

  17. Drops can bounce from perfectly hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, J. M.; Mahadevan, L.; Rubinstein, S. M.

    2014-10-01

    Drops are well known to rebound from superhydrophobic surfaces and from liquid surfaces. Here, we show that drops can also rebound from a superhydrophilic solid surface such as an atomically smooth mica sheet. However, the coefficient of restitution CR associated with this process is significantly lower than that associated with rebound from superhydrophobic surfaces. A direct imaging method allows us to characterize the dynamics of the deformation of the drop in entering the vicinity of the surface. We find that drop bouncing occurs without the drop ever touching the solid and there is a nanometer-scale film of air that separates the liquid and solid, suggesting that shear in the air film is the dominant source of dissipation during rebound. Furthermore, we see that any discrete nanometer-height defects on an otherwise hydrophilic surface, such as treated glass, completely inhibits the bouncing of the drop, causing the liquid to wet the surface. Our study adds a new facet to the dynamics of droplet impact by emphasizing that the thin film of air can play a role not just in the context of splashing but also bouncing, while highlighting the role of rare surface defects in inhibiting this response.

  18. Electrochemistry in an acoustically levitated drop.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Edward T; Ngo, Khanh T; Scheeline, Alexander

    2013-02-19

    Levitated drops show potential as microreactors, especially when radicals are present as reactants or products. Solid/liquid interfaces are absent or minimized, avoiding adsorption and interfacial reaction of conventional microfluidics. We report amperometric detection in an acoustically levitated drop with simultaneous ballistic addition of reactant. A gold microelectrode sensor was fabricated with a lithographic process; active electrode area was defined by a photosensitive polyimide mask. The microdisk gold working electrode of radius 19 μm was characterized using ferrocenemethanol in aqueous buffer. Using cyclic voltammetry, the electrochemically active surface area was estimated by combining a recessed microdisk electrode model with the Randles-Sevcik equation. Computer-controlled ballistic introduction of reactant droplets into the levitated drop was developed. Chronoamperometric measurements of ferrocyanide added ballistically demonstrate electrochemical monitoring using the microfabricated electrode in a levitated drop. Although concentration increases with time due to drop evaporation, the extent of concentration is predictable with a linear evaporation model. Comparison of diffusion-limited currents in pendant and levitated drops show that convection arising from acoustic levitation causes an enhancement of diffusion-limited current on the order of 16%. PMID:23351154

  19. Drop formation from a capillary tube: Comparison of one-dimensional and two-dimensional analyses and occurrence of satellite drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambravaneswaran, Bala; Wilkes, Edward D.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2002-08-01

    The axisymmetric formation of drops of Newtonian liquids from a vertical capillary into air is governed by the three-dimensional but axisymmetric Navier-Stokes system and appropriate boundary and initial conditions. Algorithms for obtaining accurate solutions of the resulting two-dimensional (2D) system of equations have recently been developed by Wilkes [et al.] [Phys. Fluids 11, 3577 (1999)], but are computationally intensive. A one-dimensional (1D) model based on simplification of the governing 2D system through the use of the slender-jet approximation has gained popularity in recent years [Eggers, Rev. Mod. Phys. 69, 865 (1997)]. Such 1D algorithms not only result in great computational savings but appear to capture well the physics of drop formation as has been learned through a somewhat limited number of studies [Eggers and Dupont, J. Fluid Mech. 262, 205 (1994); Brenner [et al.], Phys. Fluids 9, 1573 (1997)]. Indeed, existing 1D analyses [Eggers and Dupont, J. Fluid Mech. 262, 205 (1994); Brenner [et al.], Phys. Fluids 9, 1573 (1997)] have considered solely those situations in which the drops are grown quasi-statically prior to the onset of the instability and hence have ignored the effect of a finite flow rate or nonzero Weber number We, which measures the relative importance of inertial to capillary force, on the dynamics. In this paper, the accuracy of 1D algorithms is critically evaluated by comparing predictions made with them to those obtained with a recently developed 2D algorithm [Wilkes [et al.], Phys. Fluids 11, 3577 (1999)] based on the finite element method (FEM) over large ranges of the governing parameter space spanned by the Weber and Ohnesorge numbers, where the latter group, Oh, measures the relative importance of viscous to capillary force. When capillarity dominates, the predictions of the 1D algorithm are demonstrated to deviate no more than a couple of percent from those of the 2D algorithm. When inertial or viscous force is large

  20. Spacer fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.; Bradshaw, R.D.; Wilton, B.S.; Carpenter, R.B.

    1992-05-19

    This patent describes a method for cementing a wellbore penetrating an earth formation into which a conduit extends, the wellbore having a space occupied by a drilling fluid. It comprises displacing the drilling fluid from the space with a spacer fluid comprising: sulfonated styrene-maleic anhydride copolymer, bentonite, welan gum, surfactant and a weighting agent; and displacing the spacer composition and filling the wellbore space with a settable cement composition.

  1. Quadratic formula for determining the drop size in pressure-atomized sprays with and without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, T.-W.; An, Keju

    2016-06-01

    We use a theoretical framework based on the integral form of the conservation equations, along with a heuristic model of the viscous dissipation, to find a closed-form solution to the liquid atomization problem. The energy balance for the spray renders to a quadratic formula for the drop size as a function, primarily of the liquid velocity. The Sauter mean diameter found using the quadratic formula shows good agreements and physical trends, when compared with experimental observations. This approach is shown to be applicable toward specifying initial drop size in computational fluid dynamics of spray flows.

  2. Ground-Based Studies of Thermocapillary Flows in Levitated Laser-Heated Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhai, S. S.; Zhao, H.; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1999-01-01

    The fluid flow phenomena are studied together with the thermal effects on drops levitated in acoustic and/or electrostatic fields. While the study is concerned primarily with particles in strong acoustic fields to overcome gravity, some results for microgravity have also been obtained. The study also includes an analysis and an experimental investigation of the thermocapillary flow in a spot-heated drop. Results of a Glovebox experiment on the MSL-1 mission, one of whose objectives was to evaluate the acoustic stability criteria in microgravity, are also discussed.

  3. Stress Drops for Potentially Induced Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Beroza, G. C.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Stress drop, the difference between shear stress acting across a fault before and after an earthquake, is a fundamental parameter of the earthquake source process and the generation of strong ground motions. Higher stress drops usually lead to more high-frequency ground motions. Hough [2014 and 2015] observed low intensities in "Did You Feel It?" data for injection-induced earthquakes, and interpreted them to be a result of low stress drops. It is also possible that the low recorded intensities could be a result of propagation effects. Atkinson et al. [2015] show that the shallow depth of injection-induced earthquakes can lead to a lack of high-frequency ground motion as well. We apply the spectral ratio method of Imanishi and Ellsworth [2006] to analyze stress drops of injection-induced earthquakes, using smaller earthquakes with similar waveforms as empirical Green's functions (eGfs). Both the effects of path and linear site response should be cancelled out through the spectral ratio analysis. We apply this technique to the Guy-Greenbrier earthquake sequence in central Arkansas. The earthquakes migrated along the Guy-Greenbrier Fault while nearby injection wells were operating in 2010-2011. Huang and Beroza [GRL, 2015] improved the magnitude of completeness to about -1 using template matching and found that the earthquakes deviated from Gutenberg-Richter statistics during the operation of nearby injection wells. We identify 49 clusters of highly similar events in the Huang and Beroza [2015] catalog and calculate stress drops using the source model described in Imanishi and Ellsworth [2006]. Our results suggest that stress drops of the Guy-Greenbrier sequence are similar to tectonic earthquakes at Parkfield, California (the attached figure). We will also present stress drop analysis of other suspected induced earthquake sequences using the same method.

  4. Heat transfer and pressure drop characteristic of zinc-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonage, B. K.; Mohanan, P.

    2015-04-01

    Development of alternative working fluids with enhanced thermal properties is very much needed to replace conventional fluids. Colloidal solution of some base fluid with solid nanoparticles dispersed in it, which is called as nanofluid, is emerging as a promising alternative heat transfer fluid. Zinc, being ecofriendly material, is selected as dispersed phase in water to develop zinc-water (Zn-H2O) nanofluid. Zn-H2O nanofluid is synthesized by single step method and characterized. Thermophysical properties are estimated by available theoretical models. Estimated properties proved that nanofluid is having enhanced thermophysical properties compared to the base fluid due to which nanofluid can become potential working fluid for heat exchanging devices. Synthesized nanofluid is circulated through heat transfer loop to assess its performance in turbulent flow regime and at constant wall temperature condition. Heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop are estimated from experimental results and both are considered as performance evaluation criteria for heat transfer performance assessment. 83 % increase in Nusselt number with 9 % increase in pressure drop is observed for the nanofluid compared to water.

  5. Self-Diffusion of Drops in a Dilute Sheared Emulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenberg, Michael; Hinch, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    Self-diffusion coefficients that describe cross-flow migration of non-Brownian drops in a dilute sheared emulsion were obtained by trajectory calculations. A boundary integral formulation was used to describe pairwise interactions between deformable drops; interactions between undeformed drops were described with mobility functions for spherical drops. The results indicate that drops have large anisotropic self-diffusivities which depend strongly on the drop viscosity and modestly on the shear-rate. Pairwise interactions between drops in shear-flow do not appreciably promote drop breakup.

  6. Splash of a liquid drop on a dry solid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Shruti; Mandre, Shreyas; Rycroft, Chris; Brenner, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We study the early-time fluid mechanical phenomena of the splash of a liquid drop on a solid surface, focusing on the dynamics before contact through the intervening air layer. Previous theoretical work (e.g. Mani, Mandre and Brenner) on this problem neglected viscous effects in the liquid. However, a set of recent experiments show definitively that even at early times viscous effects in the liquid are important, and in particular have the ability to dramatically change the shape of the interface before contact. We describe a set of computations aimed to reproduce these experimental features. The simulations couple lubrication flow in the gas layer with nonsteady Stokes flow in the liquid, and surface tension at the liquid-air interface.

  7. The breakup of thin air films caught under impacting drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur; Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, T. Goji

    2012-11-01

    When a drop impacts a pool at very low velocities V, an air layer cushions the impact and prevents immediate contact. This air layer is stretched into a hemispheric shape and thins to a submicron thickness. We use silicone oils, where these films are more stable than for water [Saylor & Bounds (2012), AIChE J., online: doi 10.1002/aic.13764 ]. We observe three main breakup mechanisms which are imprinted onto the micro-bubble morphology. First, for lowest V the film ruptures at isolated holes which grow rapidly, leaving bubble necklaces where their edges meet. Based on micro-bubble volumes, we show the film breaks by van der Waals, when its thickness ~ 100 nm. Secondly, for slightly larger V a ring of holes appearing a fixed depth, where the film is thinnest, producing bubble chandeliers. Finally, for larger V an air jet within the drop, ruptures it at the bottom tip, in an axisymmetric breakup. We measure the rupture speed and find that for very viscous liquids, the breakup moves faster than the capillary-viscous velocity, through the repeated ruptures. [Thoroddsen, Thoraval, Takehara & Etoh (2012), J. Fluid Mech. online: doi:10.1017/jfm.2012.319].

  8. The formation of satellite droplets by unstable binary drop collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenn, G.; Valkovska, D.; Danov, K. D.

    2001-09-01

    Experimental investigations on the process of satellite droplet formation by unstable binary drop collisions are presented. The experiments are carried out using two monodisperse streams of drops of equal size. A systematic variation of the parameters influencing the collisions leads to an extended version of the stability nomogram which involves the numbers of satellite droplets formed by stretching separation after off-center collisions. The time scales for the formation of liquid filaments and their breakup into the satellites are measured and, in the case that a single satellite is formed, the satellite size is measured by means of a phase-Doppler anemometer. Furthermore, a theoretical model for the breakup of cylindrical liquid filaments in head-on and off-center collisions is presented. The model is based on a linear stability analysis of the filament formed after the collision. The critical wavelength associated with the largest deformation energy is calculated and identified with the disturbance which eventually breaks the filament and determines the number of satellites formed. Comparisons with experiments by Ashgriz and Poo [J. Fluid Mech. 221, 183 (1990)] for the head-on and near-head-on cases yield agreement of the numbers of satellites formed.

  9. Numerical Analysis including Pressure Drop in Oscillating Water Column Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    das Neves Gomes, Mateus; Domingues dos Santos, Elizaldo; Isoldi, Liércio André; Rocha, Luiz Alberto Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    The wave energy conversion into electricity has been increasingly studied in the last years. There are several proposed converters. Among them, the oscillatingwater column (OWC) device has been widespread evaluated in literature. In this context, the main goal of this work was to perform a comparison between two kinds of physical constraints in the chimney of the OWC device, aiming to represent numerically the pressure drop imposed by the turbine on the air flow inside the OWC. To do so, the conservation equations of mass,momentumand one equation for the transport of volumetric fraction were solved with the finite volume method (FVM). To tackle thewater-air interaction, the multiphase model volume of fluid (VOF)was used. Initially, an asymmetric constraint inserted in chimney duct was reproduced and investigated. Subsequently, a second strategywas proposed,where a symmetric physical constraint with an elliptical shapewas analyzed. Itwas thus possible to establish a strategy to reproduce the pressure drop in OWC devices caused by the presence of the turbine, as well as to generate its characteristic curve.

  10. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  11. Bubble and Drop Nonlinear Dynamics (BDND)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, E. H.; Leal, L. Gary; Thomas, D. A.; Crouch, R. K.

    1998-01-01

    Free drops and bubbles are weakly nonlinear mechanical systems that are relatively simple to characterize experimentally in 1-G as well as in microgravity. The understanding of the details of their motion contributes to the fundamental study of nonlinear phenomena and to the measurement of the thermophysical properties of freely levitated melts. The goal of this Glovebox-based experimental investigation is the low-gravity assessment of the capabilities of a modular apparatus based on ultrasonic resonators and on the pseudo- extinction optical method. The required experimental task is the accurate measurements of the large-amplitude dynamics of free drops and bubbles in the absence of large biasing influences such as gravity and levitation fields. A single-axis levitator used for the positioning of drops in air, and an ultrasonic water-filled resonator for the trapping of air bubbles have been evaluated in low-gravity and in 1-G. The basic feasibility of drop positioning and shape oscillations measurements has been verified by using a laptop-interfaced automated data acquisition and the optical extinction technique. The major purpose of the investigation was to identify the salient technical issues associated with the development of a full-scale Microgravity experiment on single drop and bubble dynamics.

  12. Drops with non-circular footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravazzoli, Pablo D.; González, Alejandro G.; Diez, Javier A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study the morphology of drops formed on partially wetting substrates, whose footprint is not circular. These drops are consequence of the breakup processes occurring in thin films when anisotropic contact line motions take place. The anisotropy is basically due to the hysteresis of the contact angle since there is a wetting process in some parts of the contact line, while a dewetting occurs in other parts. Here, we obtain a characteristic drop shape from the rupture of a long liquid filament sitting on a solid substrate. We analyze its shape and contact angles by means of goniometric and refractive techniques. We also find a non-trivial steady state solution for the drop shape within the long wave approximation (lubrication theory), and we compare most of its features with experimental data. This solution is presented both in Cartesian and polar coordinates, whose constants must be determined by a certain group of measured parameters. Besides, we obtain the dynamics of the drop generation from numerical simulations of the full Navier-Stokes equation, where we emulate the hysteretic effects with an appropriate spatial distribution of the static contact angle over the substrate.

  13. Drop splash on a smooth, dry surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riboux, Guillaume; Gordillo, Jose Manuel; Korobkin, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    It is our purpose here to determine the conditions under which a drop of a given liquid with a known radius R impacting against a smooth impermeable surface at a velocity V, will either spread axisymmetrically onto the substrate or will create a splash, giving rise to usually undesired star-shaped patterns. In our experimental setup, drops are generated injecting low viscosity liquids falling under the action of gravity from a stainless steel hypodermic needle. The experimental observations using two high speed cameras operating simultaneously and placed perpendicularly to each other reveal that, initially, the drop deforms axisymmetrically, with A (T) the radius of the wetted area. For high enough values of the drop impact velocity, a thin sheet of liquid starts to be ejected from A (T) at a velocity Vjet > V for instants of time such that T >=Tc . If Vjet is above a certain threshold, which depends on the solid wetting properties as well as on the material properties of both the liquid and the atmospheric gas, the rim of the lamella dewets the solid to finally break into drops. Using Wagner's theory we demonstrate that A (T) =√{ 3 RVT } and our results also reveal that Tc We - 1 / 2 =(ρV2 R / σ) - 1 / 2 and Vjet We 1 / 4 .

  14. Do Bacterial Symbionts Govern Aphid's Dropping Behavior?

    PubMed

    Lavy, Omer; Sher, Noa; Malik, Assaf; Chiel, Elad

    2015-06-01

    Defensive symbiosis is amongst nature's most important interactions shaping the ecology and evolution of all partners involved. The pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum Harris (Hemiptera: Aphididae), harbors one obligatory bacterial symbiont and up to seven different facultative symbionts, some of which are known to protect the aphid from pathogens, natural enemies, and other mortality factors. Pea aphids typically drop off the plant when a mammalian herbivore approaches it to avoid incidental predation. Here, we examined whether bacterial symbionts govern the pea aphid dropping behavior by comparing the bacterial fauna in dropping and nondropping aphids of two A. pisum populations, using two molecular techniques: high-throughput profiling of community structure using 16 S reads sequenced on the Illumina platform, and diagnostic polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We found that in addition to the obligatory symbiont, Buchnera aphidicola, the tested colonies of A. pisum harbored the facultative symbionts Serratia symbiotica, Regiella insecticola and Rickettsia, with no significant differences in infection proportions between dropping and nondropping aphids. While S. symbiotica was detected by both techniques, R. insecticola and Rickettsia could be detected only by diagnostic PCR. We therefore conclude that A. pisum's dropping behavior is not affected by its bacterial symbionts and is possibly affected by other factors. PMID:26313964

  15. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a crystal growth apparatus (10) generally used for growing protein crystals wherein a vapor diffusion method is used for growing the crystals. In this apparatus, a precipitating solution and a solution containing dissolved crystalline material are stored in separate vials (12, 14), each having a resilient diaphragm (28) across one end and an opening (24) with a puncturable septum (26) thereacross at an opposite end. The vials are placed in receptacles (30) having a manifold (41) with a manifold diaphragm (42) in contact with the vial diaphragm at one end of the receptacle and a hollow needle (36) for puncturing the septum at the other end of the manifold. The needles of each vial communicate with a ball mixer (40) that mixes the precipitate and protein solutions and directs the mixed solution to a drop support (64) disposed in a crystal growth chamber (16), the drop support being a tube with an inner bevelled surface (66) that provides more support for the drop (68) than the tubes of the prior art. A sealable storage region (70) intermediate the drop support and mixer provides storage of the drop (68) and the grown crystals.

  16. Drop impact on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonjae; Leclear, Sani; Leclear, Johnathon; Abhijeet, .; Park, Kyoo-Chul

    We report an empirical study and dimensional analysis on the impact patterns of water drops on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces. While the classic Weber number determines the spreading and recoiling dynamics of a water drop on a horizontal / smooth surface, for a superhydrophobic surface, the dynamics depends on two distinct Weber numbers, each calculated using the length scale of the drop or of the pores on the surface. Impact on an inclined superhydrophobic surface is even more complicated, as the velocity that determines the Weber number is not necessarily the absolute speed of the drop but the velocity components normal and tangential to the surface. We define six different Weber numbers, using three different velocities (absolute, normal and tangential velocities) and two different length scales (size of the drop and of the texture). We investigate the impact patterns on inclined superhydrophobic surfaces with three different types of surface texture: (i) posts, (ii) ridges aligned with and (iii) ridges perpendicular to the impact direction. Results suggest that all six Weber numbers matter, but affect different parts of the impact dynamics, ranging from the Cassie-Wenzel transition, maximum spreading, to anisotropic deformation. We acknowledge financial support from the Office of Naval Research (ONR) through Contract 3002453812.

  17. A spreading drop model for plumes on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Many of the large-scale, plume-related features on Venus can be modeled by a buoyant viscous drop, or plume head, as it rises and spreads laterally below a free fluid surface. The drop has arbitrary density and viscosity contrast and begins as a sphere below the surface of a fluid half space. The boundary integral method is used to solve for the motion of the plume head and for the topography, geoid, and stress at the fluid surface. As the plume approaches the surface, stresses in the fluid above it cause it to spread and become thin below the surface. During the spreading, the surface swell above evolves through various stages whose morphologies resemble several different plume-related features observed on Venus. When the plume head first approaches the surface, a high broad topographic dome develops, with a large geoid, and radial extensional deformation patterns. At later stages, the topography subsides and becomes plateau-like, the geoid to topography ratio (GTR) decreases, and the dominant stress pattern consists of a band of concentric extension surrounded by a band of concentric compression. We find that a low-viscosity model plume head (viscosity that is 0.1 times the mantle viscosity) produces maximum topography that is 20% lower, and swell features which evolve faster, than for an isoviscous plume. We compare model results with both the large-scale highland swells, and smaller-scale features such as coronae and novae. The dome-shaped highlands with large GTRs such as Beta, Atla, and Western Eistla Regiones may be the result of early stage plume motion, while the flatter highlands such as Ovda and Thetis Regiones which have lower GTRs may be later stage features. Comparison of model results with GTR data indicates that the highlands result from plume heads with initial diameters of about 1000 km. On a smaller scale, an evolutionary sequence may begin with novae (domes having radial extensional deformation), followed by features with radial and concentric

  18. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  19. Nonreciprocal photonic crystal add-drop filter

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Keyu; Xiao, Jun-Jun; Yin, Xiaobo

    2014-11-24

    We present a versatile add-drop integrated photonic filter (ADF) consisting of nonreciprocal waveguides in which the propagation of light is restricted in one predetermined direction. With the bus and add/drop waveguides symmetrically coupled through a cavity, the four-port device allows each individual port to add and/or drop a signal of the same frequency. The scheme is general and we demonstrate the nonreciprocal ADF with magneto-optical photonic crystals. The filter is immune to waveguide defects, allowing straightforward implementation of multi-channel ADFs by cascading the four-port designs. The results should find applications in wavelength-division multiplexing and related integrated photonic techniques.

  20. Profiles of electrified drops and bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basaran, O. A.; Scriven, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Axisymmetric equilibrium shapes of conducting drops and bubbles, (1) pendant or sessile on one face of a circular parallel-plate capacitor or (2) free and surface-charged, are found by solving simultaneously the free boundary problem consisting of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for surface shape and the Laplace equation for electrostatic field, given the surface potential. The problem is nonlinear and the method is a finite element algorithm employing Newton iteration, a modified frontal solver, and triangular as well as quadrilateral tessellations of the domain exterior to the drop in order to facilitate refined analysis of sharply curved drop tips seen in experiments. The stability limit predicted by this computer-aided theoretical analysis agrees well with experiments.

  1. Micro coulometric titration in a liquid drop.

    PubMed

    Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Fuekhad, Pongwasin; Grudpan, Kate

    2013-10-15

    Miniaturized coulometric titration in a liquid drop has been investigated. Assays of ascorbic acid and thiosulfate with iodine titration were chosen as models. Constant volumes of falling liquid drops containing sample or reagent are manipulated via gravimetrical force to move along a slope hydrophobic path and directed to stop or to move out from an electrode. Such manipulation is useful for delivery of sample and reagents, in a way of flow without tubing. Electrochemical generation of titrant, in this case, iodine, is started at the electrode and micro coulometric titration can be performed in a drop by applying constant current. Timing in the titration can be made via naked eye with a stopwatch or via recording with a webcam camera connecting to a computer to detect the change due to the blue color complex of the excess iodine and starch. PMID:24054589

  2. Glaucoma eye drops adverse skin reactions.

    PubMed

    Cantisani, Carmen; Ambrifi, Marina; Frascani, Federica; Fazia, Gilda; Paolino, Giovanni; Lisi, Roberto; Calvieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term "Glaucoma" is used to describe a number of diseases of the eye characterized by a particular form of optic nerve damage that is often associated with high intraocular pressure (IOP). The open-angle glaucoma is the most common form that is also referred to as chronic glaucoma. This is described as an optic neuropathy with multifactorial nature in which there is a loss of characteristics of the optic nerve fibers. Therapeutic options for the treatment of this disease are different, you can take advantage of eye drops, laser therapy and conventional surgery or more combined treatments. Medicated eye drops are the most common way to treat glaucoma. Although eye drops are widely used, adverse reactions are not frequently observed and described. In particular, the adverse skin reactions are not frequently described in the literature, but often seen in dermatologic clinic, we reported their skin reactions and possible alternative treatments described in literature and their patent applications. PMID:25487259

  3. Thermocapillary Convection in Bubbles and Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balassubramaniam; Subramanian, R. Shankar

    2003-01-01

    When bubbles or drops are present in an immiscible liquid in reduced gravity and the temperature of the liquid is non-uniform, a thermocapillary stress is generated at the interface due to the variation of interfacial tension with temperature. The resulting flow propels the drop freely suspended in the liquid towards warmer regions, so as to minimize the interfacial energy. In this presentation, we will focus on the effect of convective transport of momentum and energy, that are characterized by the Reynolds number and the Marangoni number, respectively. The results of asymptotic analyses for the speed of the drop for low and large values of these parameters will be discussed. These predictions as well as those from numerical simulations will be compared with reduced gravity experimental results obtained from experiments performed aboard the space shuttle.

  4. Inviscid Partial Coalescence from Bubbles to Drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. H.; Taborek, P.; Burton, J.; Khoo, B. C.; Lim, K. M.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2010-11-01

    Coalescence of bubbles (drops) not only coarse the bubble (drop) sizes, but sometimes produces satellite bubbles (droplets), known as partial coalescence. To explore links between the drop and bubble cases, we experimentally study the partial coalescence of pressurized xenon gas bubbles in nano de-ionized water using high-speed video imaging. The size of these satellites relative to their mother bubbles is found to increase with the density ratio of the gas to the liquid. Moreover, sub-satellite bubbles are sometimes observed, whose size is also found to increase with the density ratio, while keeps about one quarter of the primary satellite. The time duration from start of the coalescence to formation of the satellites, scaled by the capillary time, increases with the density ratio too. In addition, as the size ratio of the father bubble to the mother bubble increases moderately, their coalescence proceeds faster and the sub-satellite is prone to form and relatively larger.

  5. Computer simulations of nematic drops: Coupling between drop shape and nematic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rull, L. F.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.; Fernandez-Nieves, A.

    2012-07-01

    We perform Monte Carlo computer simulations of nematic drops in equilibrium with their vapor using a Gay-Berne interaction between the rod-like molecules. To generate the drops, we initially perform NPT simulations close to the nematic-vapor coexistence region, allow the system to equilibrate and subsequently induce a sudden volume expansion, followed with NVT simulations. The resultant drops coexist with their vapor and are generally not spherical but elongated, have the rod-like particles tangentially aligned at the surface and an overall nematic orientation along the main axis of the drop. We find that the drop eccentricity increases with increasing molecular elongation, κ. For small κ the nematic texture in the drop is bipolar with two surface defects, or boojums, maximizing their distance along this same axis. For sufficiently high κ, the shape of the drop becomes singular in the vicinity of the defects, and there is a crossover to an almost homogeneous texture; this reflects a transition from a spheroidal to a spindle-like drop.

  6. Computer simulations of nematic drops: coupling between drop shape and nematic order.

    PubMed

    Rull, L F; Romero-Enrique, J M; Fernandez-Nieves, A

    2012-07-21

    We perform Monte Carlo computer simulations of nematic drops in equilibrium with their vapor using a Gay-Berne interaction between the rod-like molecules. To generate the drops, we initially perform NPT simulations close to the nematic-vapor coexistence region, allow the system to equilibrate and subsequently induce a sudden volume expansion, followed with NVT simulations. The resultant drops coexist with their vapor and are generally not spherical but elongated, have the rod-like particles tangentially aligned at the surface and an overall nematic orientation along the main axis of the drop. We find that the drop eccentricity increases with increasing molecular elongation, κ. For small κ the nematic texture in the drop is bipolar with two surface defects, or boojums, maximizing their distance along this same axis. For sufficiently high κ, the shape of the drop becomes singular in the vicinity of the defects, and there is a crossover to an almost homogeneous texture; this reflects a transition from a spheroidal to a spindle-like drop. PMID:22830709

  7. Active control of static pressure drop caused by hydraulic servo-actuator engage

    SciTech Connect

    Janlovic, J.

    1994-12-31

    Pressure drop caused by propagation of expansion waves in the source pipeline of fast high cyclic hydraulic actuator produces possible anomalies in its function. To prevent pressure drop it is possible to minimize wave effects by active control of actuator servo-valve throttle leakage. In the paper is presented synthesis of possible discrete active control of hydraulic actuator and its servo-valve for prevention expansion wave pressure drop. Control synthesis is based on static pressure increasing with decreasing of fluid flow velocity, which can be realized by lower throttle leakage. Some of the effects of assumed control are shown on corresponding diagrams of control valve throttle motion, piston displacement and its corresponding linear velocity.

  8. Interactions Forces and the Flow-Induced Coalescence of Drops and Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leal, L. Gary; Israelachvili, J.

    2004-01-01

    In order to accomplish the proposed macroscale experimental goals, we designed and built a pair of miniaturized computer-controlled four-roll mills, similar but much smaller than the 4-roll mill that had been develop earlier in Prof. Leal's group for studies of drop deformation and breakup. This unique experimental facility allows for controlled experiments on the breakup and coalescence of very small drops in the size range of 20-200 micrometers in diameter for a wide variety of flows and under a wide range of flow conditions including time-dependent flows, etc. The small size of this device is necessary for coalescence studies, since coalescence occurs in viscous fluids at capillary numbers that are large enough to be experimentally accessible only for drops that are smaller than approximately 100_m in diameter. Using these miniaturized 4-roll mills, we have obtained the first quantitative data (so far as we are aware) on the flow-induced coalescence process.

  9. Corners, Cusps, and Pearls in Running Drops

    SciTech Connect

    Podgorski, T.; Flesselles, J.-M.; Limat, L.

    2001-07-16

    Small drops sliding down a partially wetting substrate bifurcate between different shapes depending on their capillary number Ca . At low Ca , they are delimited by a rounded, smooth contact line. At intermediate values they develop a corner at the trailing edge, the angle of which evolves from flat to 60{sup o} with increasing velocity. Further up, they exhibit a cusped tail that emits smaller drops (''pearls''). These bifurcations may be qualitatively and quantitatively recovered by considering the dynamic contact angle along the contact line.

  10. Undercooling of acoustically levitated molten drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaka, K.; Trinh, E. H.; Glicksman, M. E.

    1990-11-01

    The effect of ultrasound on the undercooling of an acoustically levitated molten drop is investigated by measuring the onset temperature of solidification. The measurement indicates that ultrasound occasionally terminates undercooling by initiating the nucleation of a solid at an undercooling level which is lower than that determined for nucleation catalyzed by the impurities in the drop. The results are interpreted by thermodynamic considerations which indicate a significant increase in effective undercooling of the liquid, beyond the level set by the impurities upon the collapse of acoustically driven pre-existing gas microbubbles.

  11. Statistical Model of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, Kenneth; LeClercq, Patrick; Bellan, Josette

    2007-01-01

    An improved statistical model has been developed to describe the chemical composition of an evaporating multicomponent- liquid drop and of the mixture of gases surrounding the drop. The model is intended for use in computational simulations of the evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels, which are typically mixtures of as many as hundreds of different hydrocarbon compounds. The present statistical model is an approximation designed to afford results that are accurate enough to contribute to understanding of the simulated physical and chemical phenomena, without imposing an unduly large computational burden.

  12. Transformation of the bridge during drop separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.; Prokhorov, V. E.

    2016-05-01

    The geometry of flows during separation of pendant drops of liquids with significantly different physical properties (alcohol, water, glycerin, oil) has been studied by high-speed video recording. The dynamics of the processes involving the formation of bridges of two characteristic shapes—slightly nonuniform in thickness and with thinning of the upper and lower ends—has been investigated. It has been shown that the shape change of the separated bridge has a number of stages determined by the properties of the liquid. As a result, the bridge is transformed into a small drop—a satellite drop.

  13. Pressure drop of slush nitrogen flow in converging-diverging pipes and corrugated pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Okuyama, Jun; Nakagomi, Kei; Takahashi, Koichi

    2012-12-01

    Cryogenic slush fluids such as slush hydrogen and slush nitrogen are solid-liquid, two-phase fluids. As a functional thermal fluid, there are high expectations for use of slush fluids in various applications such as fuels for spacecraft engines, clean-energy fuels to improve the efficiency of transportation and storage, and as refrigerants for high-temperature superconducting equipment. Experimental flow tests were performed using slush nitrogen to elucidate pressure-drop characteristics of converging-diverging (C-D) pipes and corrugated pipes. In experimental results regarding pressure drop in two different types of C-D Pipes, i.e., a long-throated pipe and a short-throated pipe, each having an inner diameter of 15 mm, pressure drop for slush nitrogen in the long-throated pipe at a flow velocity of over 1.3 m/s increased by a maximum of 50-60% as compared to that for liquid nitrogen, while the increase was about 4 times as compared to slush nitrogen in the short-throated pipe. At a flow velocity of over 1.5 m/s in the short-throated pipe, pressure drop reduction became apparent, and it was confirmed that the decrease in pressure drop compared to liquid nitrogen was a maximum of 40-50%. In the case of two different types of corrugated pipes with an inner diameter of either 12 mm or 15 mm, a pressure-drop reduction was confirmed at a flow velocity of over 2 m/s, and reached a maximum value of 37% at 30 wt.% compared to liquid nitrogen. The greater the solid fractions, the smaller the pipe friction factor became, and the pipe friction factor at the same solid fraction showed a constant value regardless of the Reynolds number. From the observation of the solid particles' behavior using a high-speed video camera and the PIV method, the pressure-drop reduction mechanisms for both C-D and corrugated pipes were demonstrated.

  14. Fluid inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Firouzjahi, H.; Namjoo, M.H.; Sasaki, M. E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-09-01

    In this work we present an inflationary mechanism based on fluid dynamics. Starting with the action for a single barotropic perfect fluid, we outline the procedure to calculate the power spectrum and the bispectrum of the curvature perturbation. It is shown that a perfect barotropic fluid naturally gives rise to a non-attractor inflationary universe in which the curvature perturbation is not frozen on super-horizon scales. We show that a scale-invariant power spectrum can be obtained with the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} = 5/2.

  15. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  16. Migration of earthquakes with a small stress drop in the Tanzawa Mountains, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takuji; Yukutake, Yohei; Terakawa, Toshiko; Arai, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A cluster of earthquake activity took place beneath the Tanzawa Mountains at a depth of 20 km during the end of January 2012. The activity began at 22:39 UT on January 27 and included 78 earthquakes with magnitudes of 2.0 and greater within the span of 50 h. Five of them had magnitudes greater than 4.0, and the largest one was a M5.4 earthquake. We relocated the hypocenters by using the double-difference method and characterized their migrations away from the first earthquake of the cluster activity. The migration was consistent with fluid diffusion and had a similar speed to that of non-volcanic tremors and of induced earthquakes caused by water-injection experiments. We then analyzed stress drops for 16 earthquakes of M3.5 and greater that occurred from July 2003 to June 2012 in the area of the cluster activity. Earthquakes that occurred before and after the cluster activity had typical and stable values of stress drop. This is consistent with structural studies indicating the existence of little fluid in the region. In contrast, the cluster activity included earthquakes with significantly small stress drops. The leading hypothesis is that the cluster activity was associated with a decrease in the shear strength due to an increase in pore pressure, and this can explain both the migration of hypocenters and the small stress drops associated with the cluster activity. This hypothesis is also supported by the fact that earthquakes before and after the cluster activity had similar values of stress drop, thus suggesting that the activity was triggered by a different mechanism from the other earthquakes in the same region. The most plausible explanation is that there is a little fluid in the closed system beneath the Tanzawa Mountains that is undetectable by structural observations.

  17. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (T(s)≈0.96) is close to the theoretically derived value of T(s)=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:26274283

  18. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of evaporation and explosive boiling of liquid drops in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2015-07-01

    The rapid evaporation and explosive boiling of a van der Waals (vdW) liquid drop in microgravity is simulated numerically in two-space dimensions using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The numerical approach is fully adaptive and incorporates the effects of surface tension, latent heat, mass transfer across the interface, and liquid-vapor interface dynamics. Thermocapillary forces are modeled by coupling the hydrodynamics to a diffuse-interface description of the liquid-vapor interface. The models start from a nonequilibrium square-shaped liquid of varying density and temperature. For a fixed density, the drop temperature is increased gradually to predict the point separating normal boiling at subcritical heating from explosive boiling at the superheat limit for this vdW fluid. At subcritical heating, spontaneous evaporation produces stable drops floating in a vapor atmosphere, while at near-critical heating, a bubble is nucleated inside the drop, which then collapses upon itself, leaving a smaller equilibrated drop embedded in its own vapor. At the superheat limit, unstable bubble growth leads to either fragmentation or violent disruption of the liquid layer into small secondary drops, depending on the liquid density. At higher superheats, explosive boiling occurs for all densities. The experimentally observed wrinkling of the bubble surface driven by rapid evaporation followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the thin liquid layer and the linear growth of the bubble radius with time are reproduced by the simulations. The predicted superheat limit (Ts≈0.96 ) is close to the theoretically derived value of Ts=1 at zero ambient pressure for this vdW fluid.

  19. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  20. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  1. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  2. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  3. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  4. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  5. Note: A top-view optical approach for observing the coalescence of liquid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luhai; Zhang, Guifu; Wu, Haiyi; Yang, Jiming; Zhu, Yujian

    2016-02-01

    We developed a new device that is capable of top-view optical examination of the coalescence of liquid drops. The device exhibits great potential for visualization, particularly for the early stage of liquid bridge expansion, owing to the use of a high-speed shadowgraph technique. The fluid densities of the two approaching drops and that of the ambient fluid are carefully selected to be negligibly different, which allows the size of the generated drops to be unlimitedly large in principle. The unique system design allows the point of coalescence between two drops to serve as an undisturbed optical pathway through which to image the coalescence process. The proposed technique extended the dimensionless initial finite radius of the liquid bridge to 0.001, in contrast to 0.01 obtained for conventional optical measurements. An examination of the growth of the bridge radius for a water and oil-tetrachloroethylene system provided results similar to Paulsen's power laws of the inertially limited viscous and inertial regimes. Furthermore, a miniscule shift in the center of the liquid bridge was detected at the point of crossover between the two regimes, which can be scarcely distinguished with conventional side-view techniques.

  6. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klapp, Jaime; di G Sigalotti, Leonardo; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Pena, Franklin; ININ-IVIC Team; Cinvestav-UAM-A Team

    2014-11-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. Cinvestav-Abacus.

  7. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid.

  8. Diffuse-interface modeling of liquid-vapor coexistence in equilibrium drops using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G; Troconis, Jorge; Sira, Eloy; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Klapp, Jaime

    2014-07-01

    We study numerically liquid-vapor phase separation in two-dimensional, nonisothermal, van der Waals (vdW) liquid drops using the method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). In contrast to previous SPH simulations of drop formation, our approach is fully adaptive and follows the diffuse-interface model for a single-component fluid, where a reversible, capillary (Korteweg) force is added to the equations of motion to model the rapid but smooth transition of physical quantities through the interface separating the bulk phases. Surface tension arises naturally from the cohesive part of the vdW equation of state and the capillary forces. The drop models all start from a square-shaped liquid and spinodal decomposition is investigated for a range of initial densities and temperatures. The simulations predict the formation of stable, subcritical liquid drops with a vapor atmosphere, with the densities and temperatures of coexisting liquid and vapor in the vdW phase diagram closely matching the binodal curve. We find that the values of surface tension, as determined from the Young-Laplace equation, are in good agreement with the results of independent numerical simulations and experimental data. The models also predict the increase of the vapor pressure with temperature and the fitting to the numerical data reproduces very well the Clausius-Clapeyron relation, thus allowing for the calculation of the vaporization pressure for this vdW fluid. PMID:25122383

  9. Wellbore fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, B.L.

    1984-06-19

    The water loss properties of well completion and well workover fluids are improved by the addition of an effective amount of at least one adjuvant selected from (1) sodium carbonate with either sodium bicarbonate or an organic polycarboxylic acid or polycarboxylic acid anhydride or (2) sodium bicarbonate alone. In another embodiment, the adjuvants are added to stabilize water loss control agents in wellbore fluids, especially at elevated temperatures.

  10. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  11. Acoustic forcing of a liquid drop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyell, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    The development of systems such as acoustic levitation chambers will allow for the positioning and manipulation of material samples (drops) in a microgravity environment. This provides the capability for fundamental studies in droplet dynamics as well as containerless processing work. Such systems use acoustic radiation pressure forces to position or to further manipulate (e.g., oscillate) the sample. The primary objective was to determine the effect of a viscous acoustic field/tangential radiation pressure forcing on drop oscillations. To this end, the viscous acoustic field is determined. Modified (forced) hydrodynamic field equations which result from a consistent perturbation expansion scheme are solved. This is done in the separate cases of an unmodulated and a modulated acoustic field. The effect of the tangential radiation stress on the hydrodynamic field (drop oscillations) is found to manifest as a correction to the velocity field in a sublayer region near the drop/host interface. Moreover, the forcing due to the radiation pressure vector at the interface is modified by inclusion of tangential stresses.

  12. Reasons Students with Disabilities Drop Out.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, M. Betsy; Gould, Albert

    2000-01-01

    Students with disabilities who dropped out of high school (n=60) cited more school factors (lack of academic success, suspension, peer problems) than personal factors (motivation, pregnancy, family problems) influencing dropout. Three-fourths suggested improved communication with teachers, flexible scheduling, and more relevance would decrease…

  13. Viscosity Measurement Using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin C.; Maxwell, Daniel; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present in here validation studies of a new method for application in microgravity environment which measures the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids using drop coalescence. The method has the advantage of avoiding heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Homogeneous nucleation can also be avoided due to the rapidity of the measurement using this method. The technique relies on measurements from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment as well as highly accurate analytical formulation for the coalescence process. The viscosity of the liquid is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity for two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two sets of validation experiments for the method which were conducted on board aircraft flying parabolic trajectories. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, namely glycerin, was determined at different temperatures using the drop coalescence method described in here. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerin drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The liquid viscosity was determined by adjusting the computed free surface velocity values to the measured experimental data. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the known viscosity for the test liquid used.

  14. Orion Parachute Drop Test, July 18

    NASA Video Gallery

    A C-17 plane dropped a test version of Orion from an altitude of 25,000 feet above the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in southwestern Arizona on July 18, 2012. This test was the second to use an Ori...

  15. Utah Drop-Out Drug Use Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This questionnaire assesses drug use practices in high school drop-outs. The 79 items (multiple choice or apply/not apply) are concerned with demographic data and use, use history, reasons for use/nonuse, attitudes toward drugs, availability of drugs, and drug information with respect to narcotics, amphetamines, LSD, Marijuana, and barbiturates.…

  16. Academic Achievement as a Drop Out Predictor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, David E.

    Improving graduation rates among U.S. elementary and secondary school students requires that one be able to detect which students are at greatest risk for dropping out. There may be a variety of social and psychological differences between those who leave and those who graduate, but there is also evidence that those who abandon school are…

  17. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  18. How to Handle Drop-in Visitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Ronald L.

    1988-01-01

    Although interruptions are an unavoidable part of the principal's job, a completely open-door policy for drop-in visitors could divert attention from planning and other priorities. This article suggests ways for principals to minimize the number of visitors and the length of visits, including keeping people standing, providing uncomfortable…

  19. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Eye Drops

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Yasmeen Jabeen; Zeerak, Sumaya; Hassan, Iffat

    2015-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) occurs due to a milieu of allergens and involves different anatomical sites, including eyelids, and periorbital areas. Topically applied ophthalmic drugs are a potential cause of ACD of the periorbital region. Here we describe the report of a patient who developed ACD to eye drop preparations. PMID:26677304

  20. Transient Marangoni convection in hanging evaporating drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, R.; Fico, S.

    2004-10-01

    A combined experimental and numerical analysis has been carried out to study Marangoni effects during the evaporation of droplets. The experiments are performed with pendant drops of silicone oils (with different viscosities) and hydrocarbons. The temperature of the disk sustaining the drop is rapidly increased or decreased in order to study transient heating or cooling processes. The velocity field in the droplet is evaluated monitoring the motion of tracers in the meridian plane, using a laser sheet illumination system and a video camera. Surface temperature distributions of the drops are detected by infrared thermocamera. The numerical model is based on axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations, taking into account the presence of Marangoni shear stresses and evaporative cooling at the liquid-air interface. Marangoni flows cause a larger, more uniform surface temperature, increasing heat transfer from disk to droplet, as well as evaporation rate. When Marangoni effects are negligible, larger surface temperature differences occur along the drop surface and heat transfer is relatively small. The role of Marangoni and buoyancy flows in silicone oils with different viscosities and hydrocarbons is discussed and correlations are presented between experimental and numerical results.

  1. Lightweight, Economical Device Alleviates Drop Foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deis, B. C.

    1983-01-01

    Corrective apparatus alleviates difficulties in walking for victims of drop foot. Elastic line attached to legband provides flexible support to toe of shoe. Device used with flat (heelless) shoes, sneakers, crepe-soled shoes, canvas shoes, and many other types of shoes not usable with short leg brace.

  2. Predicting Students Drop Out: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dekker, Gerben W.; Pechenizkiy, Mykola; Vleeshouwers, Jan M.

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring and support of university freshmen is considered very important at many educational institutions. In this paper we describe the results of the educational data mining case study aimed at predicting the Electrical Engineering (EE) students drop out after the first semester of their studies or even before they enter the study program…

  3. 49 CFR 178.1045 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Testing of Flexible Bulk... Flexible Bulk Container design types and performed periodically as specified in § 178.1035(e) of this subpart. (b) Special preparation for the drop test. Flexible Bulk Containers must be filled to...

  4. Understanding the Early Regime of Drop Spreading.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Surjyasish; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2016-09-01

    We present experimental data to characterize the spreading of a liquid drop on a substrate kept submerged in another liquid medium. They reveal that drop spreading always begins in a regime dominated by drop viscosity where the spreading radius scales as r ∼ t with a nonuniversal prefactor. This initial viscous regime either lasts in its entirety or switches to an intermediate inertial regime where the spreading radius grows with time following the well-established inertial scaling of r ∼ t(1/2). This latter case depends on the characteristic viscous length scale of the problem. In either case, the final stage of spreading, close to equilibrium, follows Tanner's law. Further experiments performed on the same substrate kept in ambient air reveal a similar trend, albeit with limited spatiotemporal resolution, showing the universal nature of the spreading behavior. It is also found that, for early times of spreading, the process is similar to coalescence of two freely suspended liquid drops, making the presence of the substrate and consequently the three-phase contact line insignificant. PMID:27513708

  5. Student Drops and Failure in Principles Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, William

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have identified factors that contribute to success in economics principles courses, but few have examined the causes and effects of student drops and failure. The author follows 239 students through their economic principles course and tracks the students in the year after the course. The author constructs a model predicting student…

  6. Drop-Out Challenges: Pathways to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Evguenia; McKee, Jan

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an action research at an alternative high school which explores drop-out prevention strategies with first-year students. Student retention is extremely challenging for alternative schools. Because their mission is to provide a second chance to students who could not succeed in a regular setting, those schools regularly must…

  7. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  8. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  9. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  10. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  11. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  12. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  13. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered acceptable test liquids. Test... specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, drop height must be determined according to packing group, as follows...: 0.8 m (2.6 feet). (ii) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding...

  14. 49 CFR 178.603 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of anti-freeze. Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at... is performed with water: (i) Where the materials to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding...) Where the materials to be transported have a specific gravity exceeding 1.2, the drop height must...

  15. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  16. 49 CFR 178.810 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or lower are considered... material having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  17. 49 CFR 178.965 - Drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Water/anti-freeze solutions with a minimum specific gravity of 0.95 for testing at −18 °C (0 °F) or... having essentially the same physical characteristics. (3) The specific gravity and viscosity of a...: (i) Where the substances to be carried have a specific gravity not exceeding 1.2, the drop...

  18. Containerless undercooling and solidification in drop tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.

    1981-01-01

    A containerless low-gravity environment, produced within a 32 m drop tube apparatus, has been used to undercool and solidify metals, alloys or glasses by eliminating crucible induced nucleation processes. Niobium droplets with diameters in the range of 2 to 5 mm have been undercooled by 525 K which corresponds to the maximum undercooling reported by Turnbull and others on fine dispersions of low melting point metals. Solidification at large undercooling resulted in single crystalline spheres with the formation of interdendritic shrinkage channels on the sample surface rather than interior shrinkage cavities. The grain refinement as observed for Ni samples undercooled and solidified in fused silica crucibles does not occur in free-falling drops of Nb. A calculated solidification speed of undercooled Nb is compared to Ni. A solidification speed of 320 m/s is found for the Nb drops. This solidification speed is greater than or comparable to the solidification speeds calculated in splat cooled samples. Thus, a drop tube apparatus can be useful in the preparation and study of high temperature metastable compounds or alloys in bulk form.

  19. Electrorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Halsey, T.C.; Martin, J.E.

    1993-10-01

    An electrorheological fluid is a substance whose form changes in the presence of electric fields. Depending on the strength of the field to which it is subjected, an electrorheological fluid can run freely like water, ooze like honey or solidify like gelatin. Indeed, the substance can switch from ne state to another within a few milliseconds. Electrorheological fluids are easy to make; they consist of microscopic particles suspended in an insulating liquid. Yet they are not ready for most commercial applications. They tend to suffer from a number of problems, including structural weakness as solids, abrasiveness as liquids and chemical breakdown, especially at high temperatures. Automotive engineers could imagine, for instance, constructing an electrorheological clutch. It was also hoped that electrorheological fluids would lead to valveless hydraulic systems, in which solidifying fluid would shut off flow through a thin section of pipe. Electrorheological fluids also offer the possibility of a shock absorber that provides response times of milliseconds and does not require mechanical adjustments. 3 refs.

  20. Linear oscillations of a drop in uniform alternating electric fields. [Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenrui; Carleson, T.E.

    1990-10-01

    Oscillations of a conducting drop immersed in a dielectric fluid in an alternating electric field has been modelled in order to understand the enhancement of the transport processes by the electric field. Numerical solutions for oscillation amplitude, velocity distribution, resonant frequency and streamlines were obtained. The effects of viscosity and density on the resonant frequency and the velocity distribution were investigated. It was found that the resonant frequency of viscous fluids was always smaller than the free oscillation frequency of the same droplet. The predicted scanning frequency response curve and the streamlines agree well with the experimental observations.

  1. Effect of ice contamination on liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. This paper presents experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  2. Effect of ice contamination of liquid-nitrogen drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.; Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Previously reported vaporization time data of liquid nitrogen drops in film boiling on a flat plate are about 30 percent shorter than predicted from standard laminar film boiling theory. This theory, however, had been found to successfully correlate the data for conventional fluids such as water, ethanol, benzene, or carbon tetrachloride. Experimental evidence that some of the discrepancy for cryogenic fluids results from ice contamination due to condensation is presented. The data indicate a fairly linear decrease in droplet evaporation time with the diameter of the ice crystal residue. After correcting the raw data for ice contamination along with convection, a comparison of theory with experiment shows good agreement.

  3. Moving and deforming a liquid drop by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Alexander L.; Visser, Claas Willem; Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Gelderblom, Hanneke

    2014-11-01

    The impact of a focused laser pulse onto a liquid drop can be so violent that the drop strongly deforms and eventually explodes. We studied the drop dynamics that results from this laser impact experimentally, in order to understand the time evolution of the drop and find the underlying driving mechanism. The high reproducibility of the dynamics allowed us to use stroboscopic illumination with short, ns exposure times. Combining this technique with high-speed imaging we captured key details of the laser impact and drop deformation. The laser impact ablates the front the drop while the remainder of the drop acquires a velocity of several m/s. The drop expands radially into a disk-like shape with a velocity of the same order of magnitude, before instabilities develop and the drop fragments. A parameter study of the time-resolved drop shape and velocity as a function of the laser energy is presented.

  4. Instabilities of volatile films and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murisic, Nebojsa

    2008-12-01

    We report on instabilities during spreading of volatile liquids, with emphasis on the novel instability observed when isopropyl alcohol (IPA) is deposited on a monocrystalline silicon (Si) wafer. This instability is characterized by emission of drops ahead of the expanding front, with each drop followed by smaller, satellite droplets, forming the structures which we nickname "octopi" due to their appearance. A less volatile liquid, or a substrate of larger heat conductivity, suppress this instability. In addition, we examine the spreading of drops of water (DIW)-IPA mixtures on both Si wafers and plain glass slides, and describe the variety of contact line instabilities which appear. We find that the decrease of IPA concentration in mixtures leads to transition from "octopi" to mushroom-like instabilities. Through manipulation of our experimental set up, we also find that the mechanism responsible for these instabilities appears to be mostly insensitive to both the external application of convection to the gas phase, and the doping of the gas phase with vapor in order to create the saturated environment. In order to better understand the "octopi" instability, we develop a theoretical model for evaporation of a pure liquid drop on a thermally conductive solid substrate. This model includes all relevant physical effects, including evaporation, thermal conductivity in both liquid and solid, (thermocapillary) Marangoni effect, vapor recoil, disjoining pressure, and gravity. The crucial ingredient in this problem is the evaporation model, since it influences both the motion of the drop contact line, and the temperature profiles along the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interfaces. We consider two evaporation models: the equilibrium "lens" model and the non-equilibrium one-sided (NEOS) model. Along with the assumption of equilibrium at the liquid-gas interface, the "lens" model also assumes that evaporation proceeds in a (vapor) diffusion-limited regime, therefore bringing

  5. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  6. Simulations of Evaporating Multicomponent Fuel Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    A paper presents additional information on the subject matter of Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops (NPO-30505), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 3 (March 2004), page 55. To recapitulate: A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The model is used to perform direct numerical simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behaviors of sprays of liquid petroleum fuels in furnaces, industrial combustors, and engines. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and drops, respectively, and incorporates a concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described by use of a distribution function. In this investigation, the distribution function depends solely on the species molar weight. The present paper reiterates the description of the model and discusses further in-depth analysis of the previous results as well as results of additional numerical simulations assessing the effect of the mass loading. The paper reiterates the conclusions reported in the cited previous article, and states some new conclusions. Some new conclusions are: 1. The slower evaporation and the evaporation/ condensation process for multicomponent-fuel drops resulted in a reduced drop-size polydispersity compared to their single-component counterpart. 2. The inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the species in the layer increases with the initial mass loading. 3. As evaporation becomes faster, the assumed invariant form of the molecular- weight distribution during evaporation becomes inaccurate.

  7. Fluid Mechanics Optimising Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leivadarou, Evgenia; Dalziel, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    The Vortex Fluidic Device (VFD) is a new ``green'' approach in the synthesis of organic chemicals with many industrial applications in biodiesel generation, cosmetics, protein folding and pharmaceutical production. The VFD is a rapidly rotating tube that can operate with a jet feeding drops of liquid reactants to the base of the tube. The aim of this project is to explain the fluid mechanics of the VFD that influence the rate of reactions. The reaction rate is intimately related to the intense shearing that promotes collision between reactant molecules. In the VFD, the highest shears are found at the bottom of the tube in the Rayleigh and the Ekman layer and at the walls in the Stewardson layers. As a step towards optimising the performance of the VFD we present experiments conducted in order to establish the minimum drop volume and maximum rotation rate for maximum axisymmetric spreading without fingering instability. PhD candidate, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics.

  8. Fluid Management System (FMS) fluid systems overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on fluid management system (FMS) fluid systems overview are presented. Topics addressed include: fluid management system description including system requirements (integrated nitrogen system, integrated water system, and integrated waste gas system) and physical description; and fluid management system evolution.

  9. Lifetime of oil drops pressed by buoyancy against a planar interface: Large drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Clara; García-Sucre, Máximo; Urbina-Villalba, Germán

    2010-11-01

    In a previous report [C. Rojas, G. Urbina-Villalba, and M. García-Sucre, Phys. Rev. E 81, 016302 (2010)10.1103/PhysRevE.81.016302] it was shown that emulsion stability simulations are able to reproduce the lifetime of micrometer-size drops of hexadecane pressed by buoyancy against a planar water-hexadecane interface. It was confirmed that small drops (ri<10μm) stabilized with β -casein behave as nondeformable particles, moving with a combination of Stokes and Taylor tensors as they approach the interface. Here, a similar methodology is used to parametrize the potential of interaction of drops of soybean oil stabilized with bovine serum albumin. The potential obtained is then employed to study the lifetime of deformable drops in the range 10≤ri≤1000μm . It is established that the average lifetime of these drops can be adequately replicated using the model of truncated spheres. However, the results depend sensibly on the expressions of the initial distance of deformation and the maximum film radius used in the calculations. The set of equations adequate for large drops is not satisfactory for medium-size drops (10≤ri≤100μm) , and vice versa. In the case of large particles, the increase in the interfacial area as a consequence of the deformation of the drops generates a very large repulsive barrier which opposes coalescence. Nevertheless, the buoyancy force prevails. As a consequence, it is the hydrodynamic tensor of the drops which determine the characteristic behavior of the lifetime as a function of the particle size. While the average values of the coalescence time of the drops can be justified by the mechanism of film thinning, the scattering of the experimental data of large drops cannot be rationalized using the methodology previously described. A possible explanation of this phenomenon required elaborate simulations which combine deformable drops, capillary waves, repulsive interaction forces, and a time-dependent surfactant adsorption.

  10. Pressure drop characteristics of cryogenic mixed refrigerant at macro and micro channel heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Hwang, Gyuwan

    2012-12-01

    Mixed Refrigerant-Joule Thomson (MR-JT) refrigerators are widely used in various kinds of cryogenic systems these days. The temperature glide effect is one of the major features of using mixed refrigerants since a recuperative heat exchanger in a MR-JT refrigerator is utilized for mostly two-phase flow. Although a pressure drop estimation for a multi-phase and multi-component fluid in the cryogenic temperature range is necessarily required in MR-JT refrigerator heat exchanger designs, it has been rarely discussed so far. In this paper, macro heat exchangers and micro heat exchangers are compared in order to investigate the pressure drop characteristics in the experimental MR-JT refrigerator operation. The tube in tube heat exchanger (TTHE) is a well-known macro-channel heat exchanger in MR-JT refrigeration. Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHEs) have been developed as a compact heat exchanger with micro size channels. Several two-phase pressure drop correlations are examined to discuss the experimental pressure measurement results. The result of this paper shows that cryogenic mixed refrigerant pressure drop can be estimated with conventional two-phase pressure drop correlations if an appropriate flow pattern is identified.

  11. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  12. A computer-controlled apparatus for micrometric drop deposition at liquid surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peña-Polo, Franklin; Trujillo, Leonardo; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G

    2010-05-01

    A low-cost, automated apparatus has been used to perform micrometric deposition of small pendant drops onto a quiet liquid surface. The approach of the drop to the surface is obtained by means of discrete, micron-scale translations in order to achieve deposition at adiabatically zero velocity. This process is not only widely used in scientific investigations in fluid mechanics and thermal sciences but also in engineering and biomedical applications. The apparatus has been designed to produce accurate deposition onto the surface and minimize the vibrations induced in the drop by the movement of the capillary tip. Calibration tests of the apparatus have shown that a descent of the drop by discrete translational steps of approximately 5.6 microm and duration of 150-200 ms is sufficient to minimize its penetration depth into the liquid when it touches the surface layer and reduce to a level of noise the vibrations transmitted to it by the translation of the dispenser. Different settings of the experimental setup can be easily implemented for use in a variety of other applications, including deposition onto solid surfaces, surface tension measurements of pendant drops, and wire bonding in microelectronics. PMID:20515172

  13. Equilibrium electro-deformation of a surfactant-laden viscous drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nganguia, Herve; Young, Y.-N.; Vlahovska, Petia M.; Bławzdziewcz, Jerzy; Zhang, J.; Lin, H.

    2013-09-01

    We theoretically investigate the deformation of a viscous drop covered with non-diffusing insoluble surfactant under a uniform DC electric field. At equilibrium, surfactant immobilizes the spheroidal drop surface and completely suppresses the fluid flow. In this work we focus on the equilibrium electro-deformation of a surfactant-laden drop in the leaky dielectric framework by developing (1) a second-order small-deformation analysis and (2) a spheroidal model for a highly deformed (prolate or oblate) drop. Both models are compared against experimental data and numerical simulation results in the literature. Our analysis shows how the existence of equilibrium spheroidal drop depends on the permittivity ratio, conductivity ratio, surfactant coverage, and the elasticity number. Furthermore, the spheroidal model highlights that differences between surfactant effects, such as tip stretching and surface dilution effects, are greatly amplified at large surfactant coverage and high electric capillary number. These surfactant effects are well captured in the spheroidal model, but cannot be described in the second-order small-deformation theory.

  14. An experimental study of liquid drop - interface coalescence in the presence of surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, Panagiota; Chinaud, Maxime; Li, Kai; Wang, Wei; University College London Team; Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Oil; Gas Distribution Technology Team

    2014-11-01

    Drop-interface coalescence has been the subject of many studies both theoretical and experimental. It is of particular interest for the oil industries particularly during the transportation of multiphase mixtures where coalescence rates can affect the stability and separation of dispersions. It is well-known that the presence of surfactants can significantly affect the coalescence rates. In this work a silicon oil -water system has been studied in a rectangular coalescence cell. Both rising oil drops and falling water drops coalescing with the water-oil interface have been investigated. A water soluble surfactant, SPAN 80, was used. High speed imaging has been performed to study the coalescence phenomenon and obtain the coalescence time of the drops with the interface with and without the presence of the surfactant. The velocity fields in the bulk fluid and in the liquid film forming between the drop and the interface were studied with shadowgraphy (bright field Particle Image Velocimetry). To increase the spatial resolution particularly in the liquid film microscope lenses were implemented. Results have been compared against existing literature.

  15. Investigation of Contact Angle Behavior and Stability of Drops to Airflow Forcing on Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmucker, Jason; White, Edward

    2011-11-01

    A method for measuring full-field, instantaneous drop interface profiles on rough surfaces has been implemented to study contact angles and stability to wind forcing on metallic surfaces with micron-scale roughness. Wind tunnel experiments are conducted to produce criteria for runback of drops and set these thresholds for measured water drops spanning a range of Bond numbers from Bo = 0 . 5 to 5 on roughness in the range of RA = 0 . 8 to 4 . 9 with drop based Reynolds numbers spanning an order of magnitude. More importantly, these stability limits are tested with particular care taken to observe their relation to the behavior of both the contact line and contact angle distribution as the drop adjusts its configuration to find a stable condition until it is no longer able to do so and is blown downstream. Results such as critical shear rates and contact angles are discussed and compared with previous numerical studies in the literature such as Dimitrakopoulos [J.Fluid.Mech. 580, 2007] and Ding and Spelt [J.Coll.Sci. 599, 2008] along with experimental results such as Milne [Langmuir 25:24, 2009].

  16. Electrohydrodynamic manipulation of particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop.

    PubMed

    Amah, Edison; Shah, Kinnari; Fischer, Ian; Singh, Pushpendra

    2016-02-14

    In our previous studies we have shown that particles adsorbed on the surface of a drop can be concentrated at its poles or equator by applying a uniform electric field. This happens because even when the applied electric field is uniform the electric field on the surface of the drop is nonuniform, and so particles adsorbed on the surface are subjected to dielectrophoretic (DEP) forces. In this paper, we study the behavior of adsorbed particles at low electric field frequencies when the drop and ambient liquids are weakly conducting dielectric liquids, and model it using a leaky dielectric model. The electrohydrodynamic (EHD) flow which arises because of the accumulation of charge on the surface of the drop can be from pole-to-equator or equator-to-pole depending on the properties of the drop and ambient liquids. The flow however diminishes with increasing frequency and there is a critical frequency at which the drag force on a particle due to the EHD flow becomes equal to the DEP force, and above this critical frequency the DEP force dominates. When the fluid and particles properties are such that the EHD and DEP forces are in the opposite directions, particles can be collected at the poles or the equator, and also can be moved from the poles to the equator, or vice versa, by varying the frequency. Also, it is possible to separate the particles of a binary mixture when the critical frequencies of the two types of particles are different. PMID:26679523

  17. Experimental and computational investigation of the trajectories of blood drops ejected from the nose.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, P H; Spence, C J T; Wilhelm, J; Kabaliuk, N; Taylor, M C; Jermy, M C

    2016-03-01

    Blood expirated from the nose may leave a characteristic bloodstain at a crime scene which can provide important clues for reconstructing events during a violent assault. Little research has been done on the typical velocities, trajectories and size distribution that can be expected from expirated blood. An experimental fluid dynamics technique known as stereoscopic particle image velocimetry is used in this work to obtain the air velocity field inside and outside the nostrils during exhalation. A numerical model was then used to compute the trajectory of blood drops of 0.5 and 2 mm. The drops were tracked until ground plane impact below the nostril exit. Three heights were investigated, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7 m. For an expiration flow rate of 32 l/min in vivo, there is a maximum exit velocity from the nostril of approximately 4 m/s, with a 0.5 m/s difference between nostrils. After the drops have traversed the distances investigated, drops of 0.5 and 2 mm in diameter from both nostrils are at a similar velocity. This implies that the gravitational acceleration after the drops leave the jet has the most influence on velocity. It is however shown that exit velocity does affect impact location. Drop size affects both impact location and impact velocity. An increase in height increases the distance traversed. Compared to the 2-mm drop, the 0.5 mm had a lower impact velocity, but its impact location in the ground plane was further from the nostril exit. Understanding the physics of expirated blood flight allows better interpretation of expirated stains at crime scenes. PMID:25773915

  18. Deformation, breakup and motion of a perfect dielectric drop in a quadrupole electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Shivraj. D.; Thaokar, Rochish. M.

    2012-03-01

    A detailed nonlinear analysis of the deformation and breakup of a perfect dielectric (PD) drop, suspended in another perfect dielectric fluid, in the presence of a quadrupole electric field is presented using analytical (asymptotic) and numerical (boundary integral) methods. The quadrupole field is the simplest kind of an axisymmetric non-uniform electric field. A drop, when placed at the center of such a field, does not translate, thus allowing systematic investigation of the effect of non-uniformity of the electric field. The deformation of a drop under a quadrupole field for PD-PD systems exhibits several novel features as compared to that of a drop under a uniform electric field. The first order analysis predicts oblate deformation for a PD-PD system when the dielectric constant of the suspending medium is larger than that of the drop (Q = ɛi/ɛe < 1). This is in sharp contrast to uniform electric fields where oblate shapes are observed only in leaky dielectric systems. Prolate shapes are observed for Q > 1, and the deformation is larger than that for uniform fields for similar electric capillary numbers. The steady state shapes are defined by higher harmonics as compared to the uniform field. At large capillary numbers, prolate deformations (Q > 1) show breakup whereas oblate deformations (Q < 1) do not. Positive and negative dielectrophoresis is observed when the drop is placed off center, and its translation and simultaneous deformation under quadrupole fields is also investigated. The electro-hydrostatics is unaffected by the viscosity ratio. However, the breakup of the drop and the dielectrophoretic motion and deformation strongly depend upon the viscosity ratio.

  19. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  20. Analysis of MHD Pressure Drop in Liquid LiPb Flow in Chinese ITER DFLL-TBM with Insulating Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongli; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Hongyan

    2008-08-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop in the Chinese Dual Functional Liquid Lithium-lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) proposed for ITER is discussed in this paper. Electrical insulation between the coolant channel surfaces and the liquid metal is required to reduce the MHD pressure drop to a manageable level. Insulation can be provided by a thin insulating coating, such as Al2O3, which can also serve as a tritium barrier layer, at the channel surfaces in contact with LiPb. The coating's effectiveness for reducing the MHD pressure drop is analysed through three-dimensional numerical simulation. A MHD-based commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software FLUENT is used to simulate the LiPb flow. The effect on the MHD pressure drop due to cracks or faults in the coating layer is also considered. The insulating performance requirement for the coating material in DFLL-TBM design is proposed according to the analysis.

  1. A volume of fluid method for simulating fluid/fluid interfaces in contact with solid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahady, Kyle; Afkhami, Shahriar; Kondic, Lou

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to model the fluid/solid interaction forces in a direct solver of the Navier-Stokes equations based on the volume of fluid interface tracking method. The key ingredient of the model is the explicit inclusion of the fluid/solid interaction forces into the governing equations. We show that the interaction forces lead to a partial wetting condition and in particular to a natural definition of the equilibrium contact angle. We present two numerical methods to discretize the interaction forces that enter the model; these two approaches differ in complexity and convergence. To validate the computational framework, we consider the application of these models to simulate two-dimensional drops at equilibrium, as well as drop spreading. We demonstrate that the model, by including the underlying physics, captures contact line dynamics for arbitrary contact angles. More generally, the approach permits novel means to study contact lines, as well as a diverse range of phenomena that previously could not be addressed in direct simulations.

  2. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  3. COD measurement based on the integrated liquid drop sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zurong; Zhang, Guoxiong; Song, Qing; Xu, Jian

    2005-02-01

    A study on Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) measuring method is reported, in which the COD value is measured by an integrated liquid drop monitor sensor without any reagent and chemical treatment. The integrated drop sensor consists of a liquid head, an integrated fiber sensor and a capacitor sensor. The capacitor sensor is composed of a drop head and a ring electrode. As the part of the drop head, the outline of the drop will be changed during the drop forming, which result in the variation of the capacitance. The fiber sensor is composed of two fibers that are positioned into the liquid drop. The light signal goes into the liquid drop from one fiber and out from the other one. A unique fingerprint of the liquid drop can be got by the data processing. The matching between the COD value of a liquid and the codes of the fingerprints in the database are presented and discussed.

  4. Instrumented drop ball tester for percussion primers

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.M.; Robinson, M.A.; Merten, C.W.; Robbins, V.E. ); Begeal, D.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The drop ball tester has historically been used for determining the threshold characteristics of percussion primers. Typically, the data obtained from such a tester show a wide variation with significantly large standard deviations. This requires that the acceptance specifications for primers be fairly lax. To determine how much of the data scatter was due to the tester alone, a drop ball tester was instrumented with a force monitoring gage, velocity capabilities, deflection gages, and a pressure time output measuring system. This paper deals with the basic fundamental physics involved with the tester and presents results of improvements to the tester geometry. Threshold test results are presented, correlating all of the variables measured. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) Contest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The first NASA Dropping In a Microgravity Environment (DIME) student competition pilot project came to a conclusion at the Glenn Research Center in April 2001. The competition involved high-school student teams who developed the concept for a microgravity experiment and prepared an experiment proposal. The two student teams - COSI Academy, sponsored by the Columbus Center of Science and Industry, and another team from Cincinnati, Ohio's Sycamore High School, designed a microgravity experiment, fabricated the experimental apparatus, and visited NASA Glenn to operate their experiment in the 2.2 Second Drop Tower. Students from Sycamore High School in Cincinnati, Ohio (girls), and the COSI Academy, Columbus, Ohio (boys), participated. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  6. Control of Drop Motion by Mechanical Vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bestehorn, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Since the first experimental observations of Michael Faraday in 1831 it is known that a vibrating liquid may show an instability of its flat free surface with respect to oscillating regular surface patterns. We study thin liquid films on a horizontal substrate in the long wave approximation. The films are parametrically excited by mechanical horizontal or inclined oscillations. Inertia effects are taken into account and the standard thin film formulation is extended by a second equation for the vertically averaged mass flux. The films can be additionally unstable by Van der Waals forces on a partially wetting substrate, leading to the formation of drops. These drops can be manipulated by the vibrations to move in a desired direction. Linear results based on a damped complex valued Mathieu equation as well as fully nonlinear results using a reduced model will be presented, for more details see.

  7. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  8. DROP: Durable Reconnaissance and Observation Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parness, Aaron; McKenzie, Clifford F.

    2012-01-01

    Robots have been a valuable tool for providing a remote presence in areas that are either inaccessible or too dangerous for humans. Having a robot with a high degree of adaptability becomes crucial during such events. The adaptability that comes from high mobility and high durability greatly increases the potential uses of a robot in these situations, and therefore greatly increases its usefulness to humans. DROP is a lightweight robot that addresses these challenges with the capability to survive large impacts, carry a usable payload, and traverse a variety of surfaces, including climbing vertical surfaces like wood, stone, and concrete. The platform is crash-proof, allowing it to be deployed in ways including being dropped from an unmanned aerial vehicle or thrown from a large MSL-class (Mars Science Laboratory) rover.

  9. Drop evaporation and triple line dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobac, Benjamin; Brutin, David; Gavillet, Jerome; Université de Provence Team; Cea Liten Team

    2011-03-01

    Sessile drop evaporation is a phenomenon commonly came across in nature or in industry with cooling, paintings or DNA mapping. However, the evaporation of a drop deposited on a substrate is not completely understood due to the complexity of the problem. Here we investigate, with several nano-coating of the substrate (PTFE, SiOx, SiOc and CF), the influence of the dynamic of the triple line on the evaporation process. The experiment consists in analyzing simultaneously the motion of the triple line, the kinetics of evaporation, the internal thermal motion and the heat and mass transfer. Measurements of temperature, heat-flux and visualizations with visible and infrared cameras are performed. The dynamics of the evaporative heat flux appears clearly different depending of the motion of the triple line

  10. Discrete Element Modeling of Drop Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuannian; Tonon, Fulvio

    2012-09-01

    A discrete element code with impact model has been developed and calibrated to simulate the dynamic behavior of rock materials, with special regard to rock fragmentation upon impact during rock-fall analysis. The paper summarizes the discrete element code, the calibration algorithms developed to identify the model microparameters, and the impact model. Experimental work on drop tests is then used to validate the code on modeling impact fragmentation. It has been found that the developed discrete element code and impact model can reasonably simulate rock fragmentation in drop tests. The use of the discrete element code and impact model can provide good reference results in evaluating impact fragmentation in rock-fall analysis.

  11. Impact of water drops on small targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, A.; Prunet-Foch, B.; Vignes-Adler, M.

    2002-10-01

    The collision of water drops against small targets was studied experimentally by means of a high-speed photography technique. The drop impact velocity was about 3.5 m/s. Drop diameters were in the range of 2.8-4.0 mm. The target was a stainless steel disk of 3.9 mm diameter. The drop spread beyond the target like a central cap surrounded by a thin, slightly conical lamella bounded by a thicker rim. By mounting a small obstacle near the target, surface-tension driven Mach waves in the flowing lamella were generated, which are formally equivalent to the familiar compressibility driven Mach waves in gas dynamics. From the measurement of the Mach angle, the values of some flow parameters could be obtained as functions of time, which provided insight into the flow structure. The liquid flowed from the central cap to the liquid rim through the thin lamella at constant momentum flux. At a certain stage of the process, most of the liquid accumulated in the rim and the internal part of the lamella became metastable. In this situation, a rupture wave propagating through the metastable internal part of the lamella caused the rim to retract while forming outwardly directed secondary jets. The jets disintegrated into secondary droplets due to the Savart-Plateau-Rayleigh instability. Prior to the end of the retraction, an internal circular wave of rupture was formed. It originated at the target and then it propagated to meet the retracting rim. Their meeting resulted in a crown of tiny droplets. A theoretical analysis of the ejection process is proposed.

  12. Diffusion Of Mass In Evaporating Multicomponent Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    Report summarizes study of diffusion of mass and related phenomena occurring in evaporation of dense and dilute clusters of drops of multicomponent liquids intended to represent fuels as oil, kerosene, and gasoline. Cluster represented by simplified mathematical model, including global conservation equations for entire cluster and conditions on boundary between cluster and ambient gas. Differential equations of model integrated numerically. One of series of reports by same authors discussing evaporation and combustion of sprayed liquid fuels.

  13. Modeling Evaporation of Drops of Different Kerosenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Harstad, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A mathematical model describes the evaporation of drops of a hydrocarbon liquid composed of as many as hundreds of chemical species. The model is intended especially for application to any of several types of kerosenes commonly used as fuels. The concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of the evaporating multicomponent liquid is described by use of a probability distribution function (PDF). However, the present model is more generally applicable than is its immediate predecessor.

  14. Pollination Drop in Juniperus communis: Response to Deposited Material

    PubMed Central

    Mugnaini, Serena; Nepi, Massimo; Guarnieri, Massimo; Piotto, Beti; Pacini, Ettore

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The pollination drop is a liquid secretion produced by the ovule and exposed outside the micropyle. In many gymnosperms, pollen lands on the surface of the pollination drop, rehydrates and enters the ovule as the drop retracts. The objective of this work was to study the formation of the pollination drop in Juniperus communis, its carbohydrate composition and the response to deposition of conspecific pollen, foreign pollen and other particulate material, in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of pollination drop retraction. Method Branches with female cones close to pollination drop secretion were collected. On the first day of pollination drop exposure, an eyelash mounted on a wooden stick with paraffin was used to collect pollen or silica gel particles, which were then deposited by contact with the drop. Volume changes in pollination drops were measured by using a stereomicroscope with a micrometer eyepiece 3 h after deposition. The volume of non-pollinated control drops was also recorded. On the first day of secretion, drops were also collected for sugar analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography. Key Results The pollination drop persisted for about 12 d if not pollinated, and formed again after removal for up to four consecutive days. After pollination with viable conspecific pollen, the drop retracted quickly and did not form again. Partial withdrawal occurred after deposition of other biological and non-biological material. Fructose was the dominant sugar; glucose was also present but at a much lower percentage. Conclusions Sugar analysis confirmed the general trend of fructose dominance in gymnosperm pollination drops. Complete pollination drop withdrawal appears to be triggered by a biochemical mechanism resulting from interaction between pollen and drop constituents. The results of particle deposition suggest the existence of a non-specific, particle-size-dependent mechanism that induces partial pollination drop withdrawal

  15. Fluid flow electrophoresis in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, R. N.

    1975-01-01

    Four areas relating to free-flow electrophoresis in space were investigated. The first was the degree of improvement over earthbound operations that might be expected. The second area of investigation covered the problems in developing a flowing buffer electrophoresis apparatus. The third area of investigation was the problem of testing on the ground equipment designed for use in space. The fourth area of investigation was the improvement to be expected in space for purification of biologicals. The results of some ground-based experiments are described. Other studies included cooling requirements in space, fluid sealing techniques, and measurement of voltage drop across membranes.

  16. Organization of microbeads in Leidenfrost drops.

    PubMed

    Maquet, Laurent; Colinet, Pierre; Dorbolo, Stéphane

    2014-06-21

    We investigated the organization of micrometric hydrophilic beads (glass or basalt) immersed in Leidenfrost drops. Starting from a large volume of water compared to the volume of the beads, while the liquid evaporates, we observed that the grains are eventually trapped at the interface of the droplet and accumulate. At a moment, the grains entirely cover the droplet. We measured the surface area at this moment as a function of the total mass of particles inserted in the droplet. We concluded that the grains form a monolayer around the droplet assuming (i) that the packing of the beads at the surface is a random close packing and (ii) that the initial surface of the drop is larger than the maximum surface that the beads can cover. Regarding the evaporation dynamics, the beads are found to reduce the evaporation rate of the drop. The slowdown of the evaporation is interpreted as being the consequence of the dewetting of the particles located at the droplet interface which makes the effective surface of evaporation smaller. As a matter of fact, contact angles of the beads with the water deduced from the evaporation rates are consistent with contact angles of beads directly measured at a flat air-water interface of water in a container. PMID:24705688

  17. Weight Drop Models in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Brian T; Whalen, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Weight drop models in rodents have been used for several decades to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury. Weight drop models have been used to replicate focal cerebral contusion as well as diffuse brain injury characterized by axonal damage. More recently, closed head injury models with free head rotation have been developed to model sports concussions, which feature functional disturbances in the absence of overt brain damage assessed by conventional imaging techniques. Here, we describe the history of development of closed head injury models in the first part of the chapter. In the second part, we describe the development of our own weight drop closed head injury model that features impact plus rapid downward head rotation, no structural brain injury, and long-term cognitive deficits in the case of multiple injuries. This rodent model was developed to reproduce key aspects of sports concussion so that a mechanistic understanding of how long-term cognitive deficits might develop will eventually follow. Such knowledge is hoped to impact athletes and war fighters and others who suffer concussive head injuries by leading to targeted therapies aimed at preventing cognitive and other neurological sequelae in these high-risk groups. PMID:27604720

  18. [Development of formulations of desmopressin intranasal drops].

    PubMed

    Gerbutaviciene, Rima; Klimas, Rimantas; Savickas, Arūnas; Maciulevicius, Jonas

    2002-01-01

    In recent years synthetic vasopressin analogues (particularly desmopressin) emerged as safe and effective representatives of this class of drugs for same clinical indications as natural hormone. It was imperative to create intranasal drug form using synthetic desmopressin compound. The purpose of this work was to develop formulations of intranasal desmopressin drug using synthetic active compound with optimal composition. Aquatic desmopressin intranasal solution was prepared in 0.05 mg/ml concentration using phosphate buffer (pH 4.5-5.5) and following preservatives: nipagin-nipazol 7:3--0.1% or benzalkonium chloride 0.01%. Sterility is the main condition for intranasal drops and hormones as a raw material are thermolabile so it is not possible to apply a thermic sterilisation. Polymeric membrane filters of 0.22 micron pore size were employed as sterilizing filters. In order to control the quality, to determine the stability of desmopressin intranasal drops at long-lasting storage (24 months) and to evaluate the influence of the technological factors we have developed the analytical methods of quality control. According to our quality control data, desmopressin intranasal drops are stable for two years and remain sterile during storage and administration of the drug. PMID:12474688

  19. Viscosity Measurement using Drop Coalescence in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.; Ethridge, Edwin; Maxwell, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    We present in here details of a new method, using drop coalescence, for application in microgravity environment for determining the viscosity of highly viscous undercooled liquids. The method has the advantage of eliminating heterogeneous nucleation at container walls caused by crystallization of undercooled liquids during processing. Also, due to the rapidity of the measurement, homogeneous nucleation would be avoided. The technique relies on both a highly accurate solution to the Navier-Stokes equations as well as on data gathered from experiments conducted in near zero gravity environment. The liquid viscosity is determined by allowing the computed free surface shape relaxation time to be adjusted in response to the measured free surface velocity of two coalescing drops. Results are presented from two validation experiments of the method which were conducted recently on board the NASA KC-135 aircraft. In these tests the viscosity of a highly viscous liquid, such as glycerine at different temperatures, was determined to reasonable accuracy using the liquid coalescence method. The experiments measured the free surface velocity of two glycerine drops coalescing under the action of surface tension alone in low gravity environment using high speed photography. The free surface velocity was then compared with the computed values obtained from different viscosity values. The results of these experiments were found to agree reasonably well with the calculated values.

  20. Drop floating on a granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  1. Cryptogenic Drop Attacks: An Affliction of Women

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, D. L.; Matthews, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    A drop attack was defined as falling without warning, not apparently due to any malfunction of the legs, not induced by change of posture or movement of the head, and not accompanied by vertigo or other cephalic sensation. All 33 patients attending a neurological clinic with a primary complaint fulfilling these criteria were women, and a further seven examples were found by questioning 200 consecutive patients at a gynaecological clinic. No affected male was found. In all but one patient, falls occurred only when walking. They were not due to wearing high-heeled shoes. The average age at onset was 44·5 years and in younger women onset was often during pregnancy. The accepted causes of drop attacks were not found with certainty in any of these patients. The sex incidence and the circumstances of the falls suggest that the cause may lie in differences between the two sexes in the mechanism of walking rather than in any central disturbance. Drop attacks in women commonly occur as an isolated symptom for many years, and although distressing have no serious prognostic implications. PMID:4689829

  2. Drop impacts on electrospun nanofiber membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Rakesh P.; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander; Pourdeyhimi, Behnam

    2013-11-01

    This work reports a study of drop impacts of polar and non-polar liquids onto electrospun nanofiber membranes (of 8-10 mm thickness and pore sizes of 3-6 nm) with an increasing degree of hydrophobicity. The nanofibers used were electrospun from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), nylon 6/6, polycaprolactone (PCL) and Teflon. It was found that for any liquid/fiber pair there exists a threshold impact velocity (1.5 to 3 m/s) above which water penetrates membranes irrespective of their wettability. The low surface tension liquid left the rear side of sufficiently thin membranes as a millipede-like system of tiny jets protruding through a number of pores. For such a high surface tension liquid as water, jets immediately merged into a single bigger jet, which formed secondary drops due to capillary instability. An especially non-trivial result is that superhydrophobicity of the porous nano-textured Teflon skeleton with the interconnected pores is incapable of preventing water penetration due to drop impact, even at relatively low impact velocities close to 3.46 m/s. A theoretical estimate of the critical membrane thickness sufficient for complete viscous dissipation of the kinetic energy of penetrating liquid corroborates with the experimental data. The current work is supported by the Nonwovens Cooperative Research Center (NCRC).

  3. Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCready, M. J.; Chang, H.-C.; Leighton, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the major results of the grant "Fundamental Processes of Atomization in Fluid-Fluid Flows." These include: 1) the demonstration that atomization in liquid/liquid shear flow is driven by a viscous shear instability that triggers the formation of a long thin sheet; 2) discovery of a new mode of interfacial instability for oscillatory two-layer systems whereby a mode that originates within the less viscous liquid phase causes interfacial deformation as the oscillation proceeds; 3) the demonstration that rivulet formation from gravity front occurs because the local front shape specified by gravity and surface tension changes from a nose to a wedge geometry, thus triggering a large increase in viscous resistance; and 4) extension of the studies on nonlinear wave evolution on falling films and in stratified flow, particularly the evolution towards large-amplitude solitary waves that tend to generate drops.

  4. Bag breakup of low viscosity drops in the presence of a continuous air jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, V. Sojka, P. E.

    2014-07-15

    This work examines the breakup of a single drop of various low viscosity fluids as it deforms in the presence of continuous horizontal air jet. Such a fragmentation typically occurs after the bulk liquid has disintegrated upon exiting the atomizer and is in the form of an ensemble of drops which undergo further breakup. The drop deformation and its eventual disintegration is important in evaluating the efficacy of a particular industrial process, be it combustion in automobile engines or pesticide spraying in agricultural applications. The interplay between competing influences of surface tension and aerodynamic disruptive forces is represented by the Weber number, We, and Ohnesorge number, Oh, and used to describe the breakup morphology. The breakup pattern considered in our study corresponds to that of a bag attached to a toroidal ring which occurs from ∼12 < We < ∼16. We aim to address several issues connected with this breakup process and their dependence on We and Oh which have been hitherto unexplored. The We boundary at which breakup begins is theoretically determined and the expression obtained, We=12(1+2/3Oh{sup 2}), is found to match well with experimental data ([L.-P. Hsiang and G. M. Faeth, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 21(4), 545–560 (1995)] and [R. S. Brodkey, “Formation of drops and bubbles,” in The Phenomena of Fluid Motions (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1967)]). An exponential growth in the radial extent of the deformed drop and the streamline dimension of the bag is predicted by a theoretical model and confirmed by experimental findings. These quantities are observed to strongly depend on We. However, their dependence on Oh is weak.

  5. Surfactant and nonlinear drop dynamics in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovsky, Joseph Charles

    2000-11-01

    Large amplitude drop dynamics in microgravity were conducted during the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission carried onboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (20 October-5 November 1995). Centimeter- sized drops were statically deformed by acoustic radiation pressure and released to oscillate freely about a spherical equilibrium. Initial aspect ratios of up to 2.0 were achieved. Experiments using pure water and varying aqueous concentrations of Triton-X 100 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were performed. The axisymmetric drop shape oscillations were fit using the degenerate spherical shape modes. The frequency and decay values of the fundamental quadrupole and fourth order shape mode were analyzed. Several large amplitude nonlinear oscillation dynamics were observed. Shape entrainment of the higher modes by the fundamental quadrupole mode occurred. Amplitude- dependent effects were observed. The nonlinear frequency shift, where the oscillation frequency is found to decrease with larger amplitudes, was largely unaffected by the presence of surfactants. The percentage of time spent in the prolate shape over one oscillation cycle was found to increase with oscillation amplitude. This prolate shape bias was also unaffected by the addition of surfactants. These amplitude-dependent effects indicate that the nonlinearities are a function of the bulk properties and not the surface properties. BSA was found to greatly enhance the surface viscoelastic properties by increasing the total damping of the oscillation, while Triton had only a small influence on damping. The surface concentration of BSA was found to be diffusion-controlled over the time of the experiments, while the Triton diffusion rate was very rapid. Using the experimental frequency and decay values, the suface viscoelastic properties of surface dilatational viscosity ( ks ) and surface shear viscosity ( ms ) were found for varying surfactant concentrations using the transcendental equation of Lu

  6. Laplacian drop shapes and effect of random perturbations on accuracy of surface tension measurement for different drop constellations.

    PubMed

    Saad, Sameh M I; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2015-08-01

    Theoretical drop shapes are calculated for three drop constellations: pendant drops, constrained sessile drops, and unconstrained sessile drops. Based on total Gaussian curvature, shape parameter and critical shape parameter are discussed as a function of different drop sizes and surface tensions. The shape parameter is linked to physical parameters for every drop constellation. The as yet unavailable detailed dimensional analysis for the unconstrained sessile drop is presented. Results show that the unconstrained sessile drop shape depends on a dimensionless volume term and the contact angle. Random perturbations are introduced and the accuracy of surface tension measurement is assessed for precise and perturbed profiles of the three drop constellations. It is concluded that pendant drops are the best method for accurate surface tension measurement, followed by constrained sessile drops. The unconstrained sessile drops come last because they tend to be more spherical at low and moderate contact angles. Of course, unconstrained sessile drops are the only option if contact angles are to be measured. PMID:25466689

  7. Microfluidic analysis of pressure drop and flow behavior in hypertensive micro vessels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ruiqing; Li, Fen; Lv, Jiaqi; He, Ying; Lu, Detang; Yamada, Takashi; Ono, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The retinal arterial network is the only source of the highly nutrient-consumptive retina, thus any insult on the arteries can impair the retinal oxygen and nutrient supply and affect its normal function. The aim of this work is to study the influences of vascular structure variation on the flow and pressure characteristics via microfluidic devices. Two sets of micro-channel were designed to mimic the stenosed microvessels and dichotomous branching structure in the retinal arteries. Three working fluids including red blood cell (RBC) suspension were employed to investigate the pressure drop in the stenosed channel. The flow behaviors of RBC suspensions inside the micro channels were observed using high speed camera system. Pressure drop of different working fluids and RBC velocity profiles in the stenosed channel were obtained. Moreover, hematocrit levels of RBC suspensions inside the bifurcated channels were analyzed from the sequential images of RBC flow. The results of the flow in the stenosed channel show that RBCs drift from the center of the channels, and RBC velocity is influenced not only by the inlet flow rate but also the interaction between RBCs. The measured pressure drops in the stenosed channel increase notably with the increase of fluid viscosity. Furthermore, the dimensionless pressure drop due to the stenosis decreases with Reynolds number. On the other hand, the results of flow through the bifurcated channels show that as the ratio of the daughter-branch width to the mother-channel width increases, the ratio of hematocrit in two connected branches (Ht/Hd) decreases, which is in favorable agreement with the available analysis results. PMID:26004808

  8. Drop by drop scattering properties of a radar bin : a numerical experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the development and initial results of a numerical simulation of pseudo-radar observations computed as the sum of the electric field backscattered by each drop. Simulations are carried out for three successive radar bins with a gate length of 30 m and beam width of 1°. The first step is the simulation of a 100 m x 100 m x 100 m volume with all its drops. The 3D raindrop generator relies on the findings on the rainfall field very small scales (mm to few tens of m) spatio-temporal structure, of the HYDROP experiment and a recent analysis of 2D video disdrometer data in a Multifractal framework. More precisely: (i) The Liquid Water Content (LWC) distribution is represented with the help a multiplicative cascade down to 0.5 m, below which it is considered as homogeneous. (ii) Within each 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m3 patch, liquid water is distributed into drops according to a pre-defined Drop Size Distribution (DSD) and located randomly uniformly. (iii) Such configuration is compared with the one consisting of the same drops uniformly distributed over the 50 x 50 x 50 m3 volume. Then the backscattered field by the drops located within a radar bin are computed as the sum a individual contribution. Antenna beam weighing is taken into account Due to the fact that the radar wave length is much smaller than the "patches" size for rainfall, it appears that as theoretically expected we retrieved an exponential distribution for potential measure horizontal reflectivity. A much lower dispersion is noticed for differential reflectivity. We show that a simple ballistic assumption for drop velocities does not enable to reproduce radar observations, and turbulence must be taken into account. Finally the sensitivity of these outputs to the various model parameters is quantified.

  9. Drop impact and capture on a thin flexible fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comtet, Jean; Keshavarz, Bavand; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    When a drop impacts a thin fiber, a critical impact speed can be defined, below which the drop is entirely captured by the fiber, and above which the drop pinches-off and fractures. We discuss here the capture dynamics of both inviscid and viscous drops on flexible fibers free to deform following impact. We characterize the impact-induced elongation of the drop thread for both high and low viscosity drops, and show that the capture dynamics depends on the relative magnitudes of the bending time of the fiber and deformation time of the drop. In particular, when these two timescales are comparable, drop capture is less prevalent, since the fiber rebounds when the drop deformation is maximal. Conversely, larger elasticity and slower bending time favor drop capture, as fiber rebound happens only after the drop has started to recoil. Finally, in the limit of highly flexible fibers, drop capture depends solely on the relative speed between the drop and the fiber directly after impact, as is prescribed by the momentum transferred. Because the fiber speed directly after impact decreases with increasing fiber length and fiber mass, our study identifies an optimal fiber length for maximizing the efficiency of droplet capture.

  10. Adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces, and anisotropic surface tensions studied by capillary meniscus dynamometry.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Stanimirova, Rumyana D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Marinova, Krastanka G; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Blijdenstein, Theodorus B J; Cox, Andrew R; Pelan, Eddie G

    2016-07-01

    Here, we review the principle and applications of two recently developed methods: the capillary meniscus dynamometry (CMD) for measuring the surface tension of bubbles/drops, and the capillary bridge dynamometry (CBD) for quantifying the bubble/drop adhesion to solid surfaces. Both methods are based on a new data analysis protocol, which allows one to decouple the two components of non-isotropic surface tension. For an axisymmetric non-fluid interface (e.g. bubble or drop covered by a protein adsorption layer with shear elasticity), the CMD determines the two different components of the anisotropic surface tension, σs and σφ, which are acting along the "meridians" and "parallels", and vary throughout the interface. The method uses data for the instantaneous bubble (drop) profile and capillary pressure, but the procedure for data processing is essentially different from that of the conventional drop shape analysis (DSA) method. In the case of bubble or drop pressed against a substrate, which forms a capillary bridge, the CBD method allows one to determine also the capillary-bridge force for both isotropic (fluid) and anisotropic (solidified) adsorption layers. The experiments on bubble (drop) detachment from the substrate show the existence of a maximal pulling force, Fmax, that can be resisted by an adherent fluid particle. Fmax can be used to quantify the strength of adhesion of bubbles and drops to solid surfaces. Its value is determined by a competition of attractive transversal tension and repulsive disjoining pressure forces. The greatest Fmax values have been measured for bubbles adherent to glass substrates in pea-protein solutions. The bubble/wall adhesion is lower in solutions containing the protein HFBII hydrophobin, which could be explained with the effect of sandwiched protein aggregates. The applicability of the CBD method to emulsion systems is illustrated by experiments with soybean-oil drops adherent to hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates in

  11. Flow visualization and characterization of evaporating liquid drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F. (Inventor); Zhang, Nengli (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An optical system, consisting of drop-reflection image, reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle of a volatile-liquid drop on a non-transparent substrate. The drop-reflection image and the shadowgraphy is shown by projecting the images of a collimated laser beam partially reflected by the drop and partially passing through the drop onto a screen while the top view photograph is separately viewed by use of a camera video recorder and monitor. For a transparent liquid on a reflective solid surface, thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, can be viewed nonintrusively, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this technique clearly reveal that evaporation and thermocapillary convection greatly affect the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop.

  12. Modeling of drop breakup in the bag breakup regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Chang, S.; Wu, H.; Xu, J.

    2014-04-01

    Several analytic models for predicting the drop deformation and breakup have been developed over the last three decades, but modeling drop breakup in the bag-type regime is less reported. In this Letter, a breakup model has been proposed to predict the drop deformation length and breakup time in the bag-type breakup regime in a more accurate manner. In the present model, the drop deformation which is approximately as the displacement of the centre of mass (c. m.) along the axis located at the centre of the drop, and the movement of c. m. is obtained by solving the pressure balance equation. The effects of the drop deformation on the drop external aerodynamic force are considered in this model. Drop breakup occurs when the deformation length reaches the maximum value and the maximum deformation length is a function of Weber number. The performance and applicability of the proposed breakup model are tested against the published experimental data.

  13. Drop-by-drop chemical reaction and sample introduction for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fengming; Rang, Ying; Weng, Ying; Lin, Luyao; Zeng, Hulie; Nakajim, Hizuru; Lin, Jin-Ming; Uchiyama, Katsumi

    2015-06-21

    In this paper, we report a novel sample introduction and chemical reaction strategy by drop-by-drop inkjet injection for an electrophoretically mediated microanalysis (EMMA). This method makes it possible to achieve an on-line introduction of reactant solutions by alternately ejecting small plugs, with an overlapping region of the plugs for mixing the reactants by electrophoresis, supporting chemical reactions, followed by electrophoretic separation of the final compounds. As a proof-of-concept of the method, the EMMA of an inkjetted mixture of 4-fluoro-7-nitrobenzofurazan (NBD-F) and amino acids was carried out as a model chemical reaction. The product NBD-amino acids were quantified by detection with laser induced fluorescence. The optimal conditions for the procedure were: inkjet driving voltage: +40-44 V; pulse width: 20-24 μs; drop-by-drop injection of reactant solutions: alternately 2 drops × 25 times for the amino acid solution and the NBD-F solution; zone overlapping voltage and time: 3 kV and 2 s; incubation time after overlapping: 5 min; separation voltage: 18 kV. Under the optimized conditions, a significant enhancement in sensitivity and a sensitive quantitative analysis were realized. The results obtained were comparable with those using the off-line labeling method. This method is rapid, cost-effective, and readily automated for EMMA. PMID:25728632

  14. Dynamics of Growth and Breakup of Viscous Pendant Drops into Air.

    PubMed

    Zhang

    1999-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the dynamics of a viscous liquid drop that is being formed directly at the tip of a vertical tube into ambient air. A model is developed to predict the evolution of the drop shape and its breakup based on RIPPLE, which is a solution algorithm for computing transient, two-dimensional, incompressible fluid flow with surface tension on free surfaces of general topology (D. B. Kothe and R. C. Mjolsness, AIAA J. 30, 2694 (1992)). The full Navier-Stokes system is solved by using finite-difference formulation on a Eulerian mesh. The mesh is fixed in space, with the flow and surface moving through it to ensure accurate calculations of complex free surface flows and topology, including surface breakup and coalescence. The novel feature of the numerical algorithm is the use of a Eulerian volume-tracking approach which allows the calculations to pass the breaking point during formation of a drop continuously without interruption or numerical modification and, therefore, to explore the features of generation of satellite droplets. The effects of physical and geometric parameters on the nonlinear dynamics of drop growth and breakup are investigated. The focus here is on drop breakup and subsequent formation of satellite droplets. The effects of finite inertial, capillary, viscous, and gravitational forces are all accounted for to classify different formation dynamics and to elucidate features of satellite droplet generation. The numerical predictions are compared with experimental measurements for water drops, and the results show good agreement. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:10072280

  15. Non-linear shape oscillations of rising drops and bubbles: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalanne, Benjamin; Abi Chebel, Nicolas; Vejražka, Jiří; Tanguy, Sébastien; Masbernat, Olivier; Risso, Frédéric

    2015-12-01

    This paper focuses on shape-oscillations of a gas bubble or a liquid drop rising in another liquid. The bubble/drop is initially attached to a capillary and is released by a sudden motion of that capillary, resulting in the rise of the bubble/drop along with the oscillations of its shape. Such experimental conditions make difficult the interpretation of the oscillation dynamics with regard to the standard linear theory of oscillation because (i) amplitude of deformation is large enough to induce nonlinearities, (ii) the rising motion may be coupled with the oscillation dynamics, and (iii) clean conditions without residual surfactants may not be achieved. These differences with the theory are addressed by comparing experimental observation with numerical simulation. Simulations are carried out using Level-Set and Ghost-Fluid methods with clean interfaces. The effect of the rising motion is investigated by performing simulations under different gravity conditions. Using a decomposition of the bubble/drop shape into a series of spherical harmonics, experimental and numerical time evolutions of their amplitudes are compared. Due to large oscillation amplitude, non-linear couplings between the modes are evidenced from both experimental and numerical signals; modes of lower frequency influence modes of higher frequency, whereas the reverse is not observed. Nevertheless, the dominant frequency and overall damping rate of the first five modes are in good agreement with the linear theory. Effect of the rising motion on the oscillations is globally negligible, provided the mean shape of the oscillation remains close to a sphere. In the drop case, despite the residual interface contamination evidenced by a reduction in the terminal velocity, the oscillation dynamics is shown to be unaltered compared to that of a clean drop.

  16. Colliding nuclei to colliding galaxies: Illustrations using a simple colliding liquid-drop apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becchetti, F. D.; Mack, S. L.; Robinson, W. R.; Ojaruega, M.

    2015-10-01

    A simple apparatus suitable for observing the collisions between drops of fluids of various properties is described. Typical results are shown for experiments performed by undergraduate students using various types of fluids. The collisions take place under free-fall (zero-g) conditions, with analysis employing digital video. Two specific types of collisions are examined in detail, head-on collisions and peripheral, grazing collisions. The collisions for certain fluids illustrate many types of nuclear collisions and provide useful insight into these processes, including both fusion and non-fusion outcomes, often with the formation of exotic shapes or emission of secondary fragments. Collisions of other liquids show a more chaotic behavior, often resembling galactic collisions. As expected, the Weber number associated with a specific collision impact parameter is found to be the important quantity in determining the initial outcome of these colliding systems. The features observed resemble those reported by others using more elaborate experimental techniques.

  17. Impact dynamics of oxidized liquid metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Brown, Eric; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2013-04-01

    With exposure to air, many liquid metals spontaneously generate an oxide layer on their surface. In oscillatory rheological tests, this skin is found to introduce a yield stress that typically dominates the elastic response but can be tuned by exposing the metal to hydrochloric acid solutions of different concentration. We systematically studied the normal impact of eutectic gallium-indium (eGaIn) drops under different oxidation conditions and show how this leads to two different dynamical regimes. At low impact velocity (or low Weber number), eGaIn droplets display strong recoil and rebound from the impacted surface when the oxide layer is removed. In addition, the degree of drop deformation or spreading during impact is controlled by the oxide skin. We show that the scaling law known from ordinary liquids for the maximum spreading radius as a function of impact velocity can still be applied to the case of oxidized eGaIn if an effective Weber number We is employed that uses an effective surface tension factoring in the yield stress. In contrast, no influence on spreading from different oxidations conditions is observed for high impact velocity. This suggests that the initial kinetic energy is mostly damped by bulk viscous dissipation. Results from both regimes can be collapsed in an impact phase diagram controlled by two variables, the maximum spreading factor Pm=R0/Rm, given by the ratio of initial to maximum drop radius, and the impact number K=We/Re4/5, which scales with the effective Weber number We as well as the Reynolds number Re. The data exhibit a transition from capillary to viscous behavior at a critical impact number Kc≈0.1.

  18. Pressure Drop in Radiator Air Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, S R

    1921-01-01

    This report describes a method for measuring the drop in static pressure of air flowing through a radiator and shows (1) a reason for the discrepancy noted by various observers between head resistance and drop in pressure; (2) a difference in degree of contraction of the jet in entering a circular cell and a square cell; (3) the ratio of internal frictional resistance to total head resistance for two representative types; (4) the effect of smoothness of surface on pressure gradient; and (5) the effects of supplying heat to the radiator on pressure gradient. The fact that the pressure gradients are found to be approximately proportional to the square of the rate of flow of air appears to indicate turbulent flow, even in the short tubes of the radiator. It was found that the drop in the static pressure in the air stream through a cellular radiator and the pressure gradient in the air tubes are practically proportional to the square of the air flow in a given air density; that the difference between the head resistance per unit area and the fall of static pressure through the air tubes in radiators is apparent rather than real; and that radiators of different types differ widely in the amount of contraction of the jet at entrance. The frictional resistance was found to vary considerably, and in one case to be two-thirds of the head resistance in the type using circular cells and one-half of the head resistance of the radiator type using square cells of approximately the same dimensions.

  19. Improved Refractometer for Measuring Temperatures of Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naqwi, Amir A.

    2004-01-01

    The Dual Rainbow refractometer is an enhanced version of the Rainbow refractometer, which is added to, and extends the capabilities of, a phase Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). A PDPA utilizes pairs of laser beams to measure individual components of velocity and sizes of drops in a spray. The Rainbow-refractometer addition measures the temperatures of individual drops. The designs of prior versions of the Rainbow refractometer have required substantial modifications of PDPA transmitting optics, plus dedicated lasers as sources of illumination separate from, and in addition to, those needed for PDPA measurements. The enhancement embodied in the Dual Rainbow refractometer eliminates the need for a dedicated laser and confers other advantages as described below. A dedicated laser is no longer needed because the Dual Rainbow refractometer utilizes one of the pairs of laser beams already present in a PDPA. Hence, the design of the Dual Rainbow refractometer simplifies the task of upgrading PDPA hardware to enable measurement of temperature. Furthermore, in a PDPA/Dual Rainbow refractometer system, a single argon-ion laser with three main wavelengths can be used to measure the temperatures, sizes, and all three components of velocity (in contradistinction to only two components of velocity in a prior PDPA/Rainbow refractometer system). In order to enable the Dual Rainbow refractometer to utilize a pair of PDPA laser beams, it was necessary to (1) find a location for the refractometer receiver, such that the combined rainbow patterns of two laser beams amount to a pattern identical to that of a single beam, (2) adjust the polarization of the two beams to obtain the strongest rainbow pattern, and (3) find a location for the PDPA receiver to obtain a linear relationship between the measured phase shift and drop size.

  20. Fluid extraction

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.