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Sample records for alleles causing variable

  1. Estimating the age of alleles by use of intraallelic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Slatkin, M.; Rannala, B.

    1997-02-01

    A method is presented for estimating the age of an allele by use of its frequency and the extent of variation among different copies. The method uses the joint distribution of the number of copies in a population sample and the coalescence times of the intraallelic gene genealogy conditioned on the number of copies. The linear birth-death process is used to approximate the dynamics of a rare allele in a finite population. A maximum-likelihood estimate of the age of the allele is obtained by Monte Carlo integration over the coalescence times. The method is applied to two alleles at the cystic fibrosis (CFTR) locus, {Delta}F508 and G542X, for which intraallelic variability at three intronic microsatellite loci has been examined. Our results indicate that G542X is somewhat older than {Delta}F508. Although absolute estimates depend on the mutation rates at the microsatellite loci, our results support the hypothesis that {Delta}F508 arose <500 generations ({approx}10,000 years) ago. 32 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Genetic Variability and Distribution of Mating Type Alleles in Field Populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  3. Genetic variability and distribution of mating type alleles in field populations of Leptosphaeria maculans from France.

    PubMed

    Gout, Lilian; Eckert, Maria; Rouxel, Thierry; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Leptosphaeria maculans is the most ubiquitous fungal pathogen of Brassica crops and causes the devastating stem canker disease of oilseed rape worldwide. We used minisatellite markers to determine the genetic structure of L. maculans in four field populations from France. Isolates were collected at three different spatial scales (leaf, 2-m2 field plot, and field) enabling the evaluation of spatial distribution of the mating type alleles and of genetic variability within and among field populations. Within each field population, no gametic disequilibrium between the minisatellite loci was detected and the mating type alleles were present at equal frequencies. Both sexual and asexual reproduction occur in the field, but the genetic structure of these populations is consistent with annual cycles of randomly mating sexual reproduction. All L. maculans field populations had a high level of gene diversity (H = 0.68 to 0.75) and genotypic diversity. Within each field population, the number of genotypes often was very close to the number of isolates. Analysis of molecular variance indicated that >99.5% of the total genetic variability was distributed at a small spatial scale, i.e., within 2-m2 field plots. Population differentiation among the four field populations was low (GST < 0.02), suggesting a high degree of gene exchange between these populations. The high gene flow evidenced here in French populations of L. maculans suggests a rapid countrywide diffusion of novel virulence alleles whenever novel resistance sources are used. PMID:16391041

  4. Trisomic and allelic differences influence phenotypic variability during development of Down syndrome mice.

    PubMed

    Deitz, Samantha L; Roper, Randall J

    2011-12-01

    Individuals with full or partial Trisomy 21 (Ts21) present with clinical features collectively referred to as Down syndrome (DS), although DS phenotypes vary in incidence and severity between individuals. Differing genetic and phenotypic content in individuals with DS as well as mouse models of DS facilitate the understanding of the correlation between specific genes and phenotypes associated with Ts21. The Ts1Rhr mouse model is trisomic for 33 genes (the "Down syndrome critical region" or DSCR) hypothesized to be responsible for many clinical DS features, including craniofacial dysmorphology with a small mandible. Experiments with Ts1Rhr mice showed that the DSCR was not sufficient to cause all DS phenotypes by identifying uncharacteristic craniofacial abnormalities not found in individuals with DS or other DS mouse models. We hypothesized that the origins of the larger, dysmorphic mandible observed in adult Ts1Rhr mice develop from larger embryonic craniofacial precursors. Because of phenotypic variability seen in subsequent studies with Ts1Rhr mice, we also hypothesized that genetic background differences would alter Ts1Rhr developmental phenotypes. Using Ts1Rhr offspring from two genetic backgrounds, we found differences in mandibular precursor volume as well as total embryonic volume and postnatal body size of Ts1Rhr and nontrisomic littermates. Additionally, we observed increased relative expression of Dyrk1a and differential expression of Ets2 on the basis of the genetic background in the Ts1Rhr mandibular precursor. Our results suggest that trisomic gene content and allelic differences in trisomic or nontrisomic genes influence variability in gene expression and developmental phenotypes associated with DS. PMID:21926299

  5. Short-limbed dwarfism: slw is a new allele of Npr2 causing chondrodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Sogawa, Chizuru; Tsuji, Takehito; Shinkai, Yusuke; Katayama, Kentaro; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2007-01-01

    Short-limbed dwarfism (SLW) is a new mutant mouse characterized by a dwarf phenotype with markedly short body, limbs, and tail. In the present study, we investigated the skeletal phenotypes of the SLW mouse and determined the chromosomal localization to identify the gene responsible for the phenotypes (slw). Skeletal preparations stained with alcian blue and alizarin red revealed that longitudinal growth of the extremities of the affected (slw/slw) mice was significantly reduced in comparison with that of normal mice, whereas the positions and numbers of skeletal elements were normal. Histological examination of tibial growth plates of the affected mice showed that the numbers of proliferating and hypertrophic chondrocytes were obviously diminished. These phenotypes resembled to those of human chondrodysplasias caused by defective chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. We mapped the slw locus on an 11.7-cM interval of the proximal region of mouse chromosome 4 by linkage analysis. Furthermore, allelism test using Npr2(cn) locus, a mutant allele of Npr2 gene encoding a natriuretic peptide receptor B, revealed that slw locus is an allele of the Npr2 gene. These results suggest that the dwarf phenotype of the SLW mouse is caused by the disturbed endochondral ossification, and a mutation in the Npr2 gene is expected to be responsible for the phenotypes of the SLW mouse. PMID:17728275

  6. A limit to the divergent allele advantage model supported by variable pathogen recognition across HLA-DRB1 allele lineages.

    PubMed

    Lau, Q; Yasukochi, Y; Satta, Y

    2015-11-01

    Genetic diversity in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules is thought to have arisen from the co-evolution between host and pathogen and maintained by balancing selection. Heterozygote advantage is a common proposed scenario for maintaining high levels of diversity in HLA genes, and extending from this, the divergent allele advantage (DAA) model suggests that individuals with more divergent HLA alleles bind and recognize a wider array of antigens. While the DAA model seems biologically suitable for driving HLA diversity, there is likely an upper threshold to the amount of sequence divergence. We used peptide-binding and pathogen-recognition capacity of DRB1 alleles as a model to further explore the DAA model; within the DRB1 locus, we examined binding predictions based on two distinct phylogenetic groups (denoted group A and B) previously identified based on non-peptide-binding region (PBR) nucleotide sequences. Predictions in this study support that group A allele and group B allele lineages have contrasting binding/recognition capacity, with only the latter supporting the DAA model. Furthermore, computer simulations revealed an inconsistency in the DAA model alone with observed extent of polymorphisms, supporting that the DAA model could only work effectively in combination with other mechanisms. Overall, we support that the mechanisms driving HLA diversity are non-exclusive. By investigating the relationships among HLA alleles, and pathogens recognized, we can provide further insights into the mechanisms on how humans have adapted to infectious diseases over time. PMID:26392055

  7. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  8. A Dominantly Acting Murine Allele of Mcm4 Causes Chromosomal Abnormalities and Promotes Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Bruce N.; Keane, Thomas M.; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Marshall, Jonathon G.; Lester, Rachael A.; Cancel, Michelle M.; Paulsen, Alex R.; Bendzick, Laura E.; Been, Raha A.; Kogan, Scott C.; Cormier, Robert T.; Kendziorski, Christina; Adams, David J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the isolation of a murine model for heritable T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) called Spontaneous dominant leukemia (Sdl). Sdl heterozygous mice develop disease with a short latency and high penetrance, while mice homozygous for the mutation die early during embryonic development. Sdl mice exhibit an increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes, and T-ALLs from Sdl mice harbor small amplifications and deletions, including activating deletions at the Notch1 locus. Using exome sequencing it was determined that Sdl mice harbor a spontaneously acquired mutation in Mcm4 (Mcm4D573H). MCM4 is part of the heterohexameric complex of MCM2–7 that is important for licensing of DNA origins prior to S phase and also serves as the core of the replicative helicase that unwinds DNA at replication forks. Previous studies in murine models have discovered that genetic reductions of MCM complex levels promote tumor formation by causing genomic instability. However, Sdl mice possess normal levels of Mcms, and there is no evidence for loss-of-heterozygosity at the Mcm4 locus in Sdl leukemias. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the Sdl mutation produces a biologically inactive helicase. Together, these data support a model in which chromosomal abnormalities in Sdl mice result from the ability of MCM4D573H to incorporate into MCM complexes and render them inactive. Our studies indicate that dominantly acting alleles of MCMs can be compatible with viability but have dramatic oncogenic consequences by causing chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:23133403

  9. Allelic variability in species and stocks of Lake Superior ciscoes (Coregoninae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Thomas N.

    1981-01-01

    Starch gel electrophoresis was used as a means of recognizing species and stocks in Lake Superior Coregonus. Allelic variability at isocitrate dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase loci was recorded for samples of lake herring (Coregonus artedii), bloater (C. hoyi), kiyi (C. kiyi), and shortjaw cisco (C. zenithicus) from five Lake Superior localities. The observed frequencies of genotypes within each subsample did not differ significantly from those expected on the basis of random mating, and suggested that each subsample represented either a random sample from a larger randomly mating population or an independent and isolated subpopulation within which mating was random. Significant contingency X2 values for comparisons between both localities and species suggested that more than one randomly mating population occurred among the Lake Superior ciscoes, but did not reveal how many such populations there were. In contrast to the genetic results of this study, morphology seems to be a better descriptor of cisco stocks, and identification of cisco stocks and species will still have to be based on morphological criteria until more data are forthcoming. Where several species are sympatric, management should strive to preserve the least abundant. Failure to do so could result in the extinction or depletion of the rarer forms.

  10. Allelic background of LEPRE1 mutations that cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta in different populations

    PubMed Central

    Pepin, Melanie G; Schwarze, Ulrike; Singh, Virendra; Romana, Marc; Jones-LeCointe, Altheia; Byers, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Biallelic mutations in LEPRE1 result in recessively inherited forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are often lethal in the perinatal period. A mutation (c.1080+1G>T, IVS5+1G>T) in African Americans has a carrier frequency of about 1/240. The mutant allele originated in West Africa in tribes of Ghana and Nigeria where the carrier frequencies are 2% and 5%. By examining 200 samples from an African-derived population in Tobago and reviewing hospital neonatal death records, we determined that the carrier frequency of c.1080+1G>T was about one in 200 and did not contribute to the neonatal deaths recorded over a 3-year period of time in Trinidad. In the course of sequence analysis, we found surprisingly high LEPRE1 allelic diversity in the Tobago DNA samples in which there were 11 alleles distinguished by a single basepair variant in or near exon 5. All the alleles found in the Tobago population that were within the sequence analysis region were found in the African American population in the Exome Variant Project. This diversity appeared to reflect the geographic origin of the original population in Tobago. In 44 individuals with biallelic LEPRE1 mutations identified by clinical diagnostic testing, we found the sequence alterations occurred on seven of the 11 variant alleles. All but one of the mutations identified resulted in mRNA or protein instability for the majority of the transcripts from the altered allele. These findings suggest that the milder end of the clinical spectrum could be due to as yet unidentified missense mutations in LEPRE1. PMID:24498616

  11. The functional importance of sequence versus expression variability of MHC alleles in parasite resistance.

    PubMed

    Axtner, Jan; Sommer, Simone

    2012-12-01

    Understanding selection processes driving the pronounced allelic polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes and its functional associations to parasite load have been the focus of many recent wildlife studies. Two main selection scenarios are currently debated which explain the susceptibility or resistance to parasite infections either by the effects of (1) specific MHC alleles which are selected frequency-dependent in space and time or (2) a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage. So far, most studies have focused only on structural variance in co-evolutionary processes although this might not be the only trait subject to natural selection. In the present study, we analysed structural variance stretching from exon1 through exon3 of MHC class II DRB genes as well as genotypic expression variance in relation to the gastrointestinal helminth prevalence and infection intensity in wild yellow-necked mice (Apodemus flavicollis). We found support for the functional importance of specific alleles both on the sequence and expression level. By resampling a previously investigated study population we identified specific MHC alleles affected by temporal shifts in parasite pressure and recorded associated changes in allele frequencies. The allele Apfl-DRB*23 was associated with resistance to infections by the oxyurid nematode Syphacia stroma and at the same time with susceptibility to cestode infection intensity. In line with our expectation, MHC mRNA transcript levels tended to be higher in cestode-infected animals carrying the allele Apfl-DRB*23. However, no support for a heterozygote or divergent allele advantage on the sequence or expression level was detected. The individual amino acid distance of genotypes did not explain individual differences in parasite loads and the genetic distance had no effect on MHC genotype expression. For ongoing studies on the functional importance of expression variance in parasite resistance, allele

  12. Genotype and allelic frequencies of a newly identified mutation causing blindness in jordanian awassi sheep flocks.

    PubMed

    Jawasreh, K I Z; Ababneh, H; Awawdeh, F T; Al-Massad, M A; Al-Majali, A M

    2012-01-01

    A total of 423 blood samples were collected (during 2009 and 2010) from all the ram holdings at three major Jordanian governmental Awassi breeding stations (Al-Khanasry, Al-Mushairfa and Al-Fjaje) and two private flocks. All blood samples were screened for the presence of mutations at the CNGA3 gene (responsible for day blindness in Awassi sheep) using RFLP-PCR. The day blindness mutation was detected in all studied flocks. The overall allele and genotype frequencies of all studied flocks of the day blindness mutation were 0.088 and 17.49%, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies were higher in station flocks than the farmer flocks (0.121, 24.15 and 0.012, 2.32, respectively). Al-Mushairfa and Al-Khanasry stations have the highest genotype and allele frequencies for the day blindness mutation that were 27.77, 30.00% and 0.14, 0.171, respectively. The investigated farmer flocks have low percentages (0.03, 5.88% at Al-Shoubak and 0.005 and 1.05%, at Al-Karak, respectively for genotype and allele frequencies) compared with the breeding stations. Ram culling strategy was applied throughout the genotyping period in order to gradually eradicate this newly identified day blindness mutation from Jordanian Breeding station, since they annually distribute a high percentage of improved rams to farmer's flocks. PMID:25049475

  13. Genotype and Allelic Frequencies of a Newly Identified Mutation Causing Blindness in Jordanian Awassi Sheep Flocks

    PubMed Central

    Jawasreh, K. I. Z.; Ababneh, H.; Awawdeh, F. T.; Al-Massad, M. A.; Al-Majali, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    A total of 423 blood samples were collected (during 2009 and 2010) from all the ram holdings at three major Jordanian governmental Awassi breeding stations (Al-Khanasry, Al-Mushairfa and Al-Fjaje) and two private flocks. All blood samples were screened for the presence of mutations at the CNGA3 gene (responsible for day blindness in Awassi sheep) using RFLP-PCR. The day blindness mutation was detected in all studied flocks. The overall allele and genotype frequencies of all studied flocks of the day blindness mutation were 0.088 and 17.49%, respectively. The genotype and allele frequencies were higher in station flocks than the farmer flocks (0.121, 24.15 and 0.012, 2.32, respectively). Al-Mushairfa and Al-Khanasry stations have the highest genotype and allele frequencies for the day blindness mutation that were 27.77, 30.00% and 0.14, 0.171, respectively. The investigated farmer flocks have low percentages (0.03, 5.88% at Al-Shoubak and 0.005 and 1.05%, at Al-Karak, respectively for genotype and allele frequencies) compared with the breeding stations. Ram culling strategy was applied throughout the genotyping period in order to gradually eradicate this newly identified day blindness mutation from Jordanian Breeding station, since they annually distribute a high percentage of improved rams to farmer’s flocks. PMID:25049475

  14. Rhodopsin F45L Allele Does Not Cause Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa in a Large Caucasian Family

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Andrea L.; Carroll, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald A.; Sauer, Alexandra; Sharp, Dianne; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Williams, Vesper; Dubis, Adam M.; Kohl, Susanne; Wong, Fulton

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To ascertain the potential pathogenicity of a retinitis pigmentosa (RP)-causing RHO F45L allele in a family affected by congenital achromatopsia (ACHM). Methods Case series/observational study that included two patients with ACHM and 24 extended family members. Molecular genetic analysis was performed to identify RHO F45L carrier status in the family and a control population. An adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) was used to image the photoreceptor mosaic and assess rod and cone structure. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to examine retinal lamination. Comprehensive clinical testing included acuity, color vision, and dilated fundus examination. Electroretinography was used to assess rod and cone function. Results Five carriers of the RHO F45L allele alone (24–80 years) and three carriers in combination with a heterozygous CNGA3 mutant allele (10–64 years) were all free of the classic symptoms and signs of RP. In heterozygous carriers of both mutations, SD-OCT showed normal retinal thickness and intact outer retinal layers; rod and cone densities were within normal limits on AOSLO. The phenotype in two individuals affected with ACHM and harboring the RHO F45L allele was indistinguishable from that previously reported for ACHM. Conclusions The RHO F45L allele is not pathogenic in this large family; hence, the two ACHM patients would unlikely develop RP in the future. Translational Relevance The combined approach of comprehensive molecular analysis of individual genomes and noninvasive cellular resolution retinal imaging enhances the current repertoire of clinical diagnostic tools, giving a substantial impetus to personalized medicine. PMID:24049715

  15. Mosaicism for dominant collagen VI mutations as a cause for intra-familial phenotypic variability

    PubMed Central

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Hu, Ying; Stojkovic, Tanya; Voermans, Nicol; Foley, A. Reghan; Leach, Meganne E; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Bolduc, Veronique; Cullup, Thomas; de Becdelièvre, Alix; Yang, Lin; Su, Hai; Meilleur, Katherine; Schindler, Alice B.; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Richard, Pascale; Butterfield, Russell; Winder, Thomas L.; Crawford, Thomas; Weiss, Robert B.; Muntoni, Francesco; Allamand, Valérie; Bönnemann, Carsten G.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen VI-related dystrophies and myopathies (COL6-RD) are a group of disorders that form a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), intermediate phenotypes, to the milder Bethlem myopathy (BM). Both inter- and intra-familial variable expressivity are commonly observed. We present clinical, immunohistochemical, and genetic data on four COL6-RD families with marked inter-generational phenotypic heterogeneity. This variable expression seemingly masquerades as anticipation is due to parental mosaicism for a dominant mutation, with subsequent full inheritance and penetrance of the mutation in the heterozygous offspring. We also present an additional 5th simplex patient identified as a mosaic carrier. Parental mosaicism was confirmed in the four families through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant versus wild-type allele (COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3) in genomic DNA (gDNA) from various tissues; including blood, saliva, and dermal fibroblasts. Consistent with somatic mosaicism, parental samples had lower ratios of mutant versus wild-type allele compared to the fully heterozygote offspring. However, there was notable variability of the mutant allele levels between tissues tested, ranging from 16% (saliva) to 43% (fibroblasts) in one mosaic father. This is the first report demonstrating mosaicism as a cause of intra-familial/inter-generational variability of COL6-RD, and suggests that sporadic and parental mosaicism may be more common than previously suspected. PMID:25204870

  16. Mosaicism for dominant collagen 6 mutations as a cause for intrafamilial phenotypic variability.

    PubMed

    Donkervoort, Sandra; Hu, Ying; Stojkovic, Tanya; Voermans, Nicol C; Foley, A Reghan; Leach, Meganne E; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Bolduc, Véronique; Cullup, Thomas; de Becdelièvre, Alix; Yang, Lin; Su, Hai; Meilleur, Katherine; Schindler, Alice B; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Richard, Pascale; Butterfield, Russell J; Winder, Thomas L; Crawford, Thomas O; Weiss, Robert B; Muntoni, Francesco; Allamand, Valérie; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2015-01-01

    Collagen 6-related dystrophies and myopathies (COL6-RD) are a group of disorders that form a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy, intermediate phenotypes, to the milder Bethlem myopathy. Both inter- and intrafamilial variable expressivity are commonly observed. We present clinical, immunohistochemical, and genetic data on four COL6-RD families with marked intergenerational phenotypic heterogeneity. This variable expression seemingly masquerades as anticipation is due to parental mosaicism for a dominant mutation, with subsequent full inheritance and penetrance of the mutation in the heterozygous offspring. We also present an additional fifth simplex patient identified as a mosaic carrier. Parental mosaicism was confirmed in the four families through quantitative analysis of the ratio of mutant versus wild-type allele (COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3) in genomic DNA from various tissues, including blood, dermal fibroblasts, and saliva. Consistent with somatic mosaicism, parental samples had lower ratios of mutant versus wild-type allele compared with the fully heterozygote offspring. However, there was notable variability of the mutant allele levels between tissues tested, ranging from 16% (saliva) to 43% (fibroblasts) in one mosaic father. This is the first report demonstrating mosaicism as a cause of intrafamilial/intergenerational variability of COL6-RD, and suggests that sporadic and parental mosaicism may be more common than previously suspected. PMID:25204870

  17. Physical Causes of Drop Size Distribution Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawadzki, I.

    Drop size distributions are measured at ground by instruments (disdrometers) that mostly sample one drop at a time or at best, a small number of drops simultaneously. To obtain a representative sample a time window of the observations is required. This introduces a spurious variability due to the differential fall speed of drops coupled with a highly variable field of precipitation in rapid displacement respect to the dis- drometer. A filter has been studied to minimize this spurious variability as well as instrumental uncertainty. The use of filtered data allows to see case to case differences in DSDs that are hidden in the large scatter in the raw data. These differences can be associated to physical processes revealed by a vertically pointing radar such as the de- gree of aggregation, riming, etc. Numerical modeling of particle size evolution using the quasi-stochastic growth equation serves as guide for the understanding of these processes.

  18. Combining information on multiple instrumental variables in Mendelian randomization: comparison of allele score and summarized data methods.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Stephen; Dudbridge, Frank; Thompson, Simon G

    2016-05-20

    Mendelian randomization is the use of genetic instrumental variables to obtain causal inferences from observational data. Two recent developments for combining information on multiple uncorrelated instrumental variables (IVs) into a single causal estimate are as follows: (i) allele scores, in which individual-level data on the IVs are aggregated into a univariate score, which is used as a single IV, and (ii) a summary statistic method, in which causal estimates calculated from each IV using summarized data are combined in an inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. To avoid bias from weak instruments, unweighted and externally weighted allele scores have been recommended. Here, we propose equivalent approaches using summarized data and also provide extensions of the methods for use with correlated IVs. We investigate the impact of different choices of weights on the bias and precision of estimates in simulation studies. We show that allele score estimates can be reproduced using summarized data on genetic associations with the risk factor and the outcome. Estimates from the summary statistic method using external weights are biased towards the null when the weights are imprecisely estimated; in contrast, allele score estimates are unbiased. With equal or external weights, both methods provide appropriate tests of the null hypothesis of no causal effect even with large numbers of potentially weak instruments. We illustrate these methods using summarized data on the causal effect of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol on coronary heart disease risk. It is shown that a more precise causal estimate can be obtained using multiple genetic variants from a single gene region, even if the variants are correlated. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26661904

  19. Evolution of HLA class II molecules: Allelic and amino acid site variability across populations.

    PubMed Central

    Salamon, H; Klitz, W; Easteal, S; Gao, X; Erlich, H A; Fernandez-Viña, M; Trachtenberg, E A; McWeeney, S K; Nelson, M P; Thomson, G

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the highly polymorphic beta1 domains of the HLA class II molecules encoded by the DRB1, DQB1, and DPB1 loci reveals contrasting levels of diversity at the allele and amino acid site levels. Statistics of allele frequency distributions, based on Watterson's homozygosity statistic F, reveal distinct evolutionary patterns for these loci in ethnically diverse samples (26 populations for DQB1 and DRB1 and 14 for DPB1). When examined over all populations, the DQB1 locus allelic variation exhibits striking balanced polymorphism (P < 10(-4)), DRB1 shows some evidence of balancing selection (P < 0.06), and while there is overall very little evidence for selection of DPB1 allele frequencies, there is a trend in the direction of balancing selection (P < 0.08). In contrast, at the amino acid level all three loci show strong evidence of balancing selection at some sites. Averaged over polymorphic amino acid sites, DQB1 and DPB1 show similar deviation from neutrality expectations, and both exhibit more balanced polymorphic amino acid sites than DRB1. Across ethnic groups, polymorphisms at many codons show evidence for balancing selection, yet data consistent with directional selection were observed at other codons. Both antigen-binding pocket- and non-pocket-forming amino acid sites show overall deviation from neutrality for all three loci. Only in the case of DRB1 was there a significant difference between pocket- and non-pocket-forming amino acid sites. Our findings indicate that balancing selection at the MHC occurs at the level of polymorphic amino acid residues, and that in many cases this selection is consistent across populations. PMID:10224269

  20. Extensively variable surface antigens of Sarcocystis spp. infecting Brazilian marsupials in the genus Didelphis occur in myriad allelic combinations, suggesting sexual recombination has aided their diversification.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, R M; Keid, L B; Richtzenhain, L J; Valadas, S Y; Muller, G; Soares, R M

    2013-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis falcatula are very similar species of Apicomplexan protozoa that use marsupials of the genus Didelphis as definitive hosts. These mammals can serve as definitive hosts not only for these two parasites, but for other Sarcocystis such as Sarcocystis speeri and Sarcocystis lindsayi. Sarcocystis shed by opossums (with the exception of S. neurona) can cause disease in a great variety of birds, being commonly associated with acute pulmonary sarcocystosis in zoos. S. neurona is the most commonly associated parasite with the equine protozoal myeloencephalitis in horses. Herein we assessed the variability of Sarcocystis spp. isolated from opossums of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, by sequencing fragments of genes coding for glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored surface antigens (termed surface antigen or SAG), SAG2, SAG3 and SAG4. Two genetic groups were identified, one of them related to S. falcatula and the other related to S. neurona. Various allelic combinations of SAG2, SAG3 and SAG4 occur among S. falcatula related isolates and strong evidences suggest that such isolates may exchange high divergent alleles in possible sexual recombination processes. Regarding the group S. neurona-like (isolates G37 and G38), none of the individuals in this group share alleles with individuals of the other group. Comparing G37 and G38 strains and North American strains of S. neurona, four polymorphisms were identified at SAG-3, five at SAG-2 and three at SAG-4. Gene sequences of locus SAG-3 from isolates G37 and G38 differed from the other sequences by an insertion 81bp long. This insertion contains several dinucleotide repeats of AT, resembling a microsatellite locus and has already been detected in SAG3 sequences of S. neurona from North America. When aligned against North American strains of S. neurona, G37 and G38 isolates have a deletion of 8 nucleotides within this intron which indicate that S. neurona strains of South America are

  1. At least two mutant alleles of ornithine delta-aminotransferase cause gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina in Finns.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G A; Brody, L C; Sipila, I; Looney, J E; Wong, C; Engelhardt, J F; Patel, A S; Steel, G; Obie, C; Kaiser-Kupfer, M

    1989-01-01

    Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina (GA) is an inherited chorioretinal degeneration caused by deficiency of ornithine delta-aminotransferase (OAT; L-ornithine: 2-oxo-acid aminotransferase; EC 2.6.1.13). GA is one of the "Finnish genetic diseases," a group of several rare monogenic disorders that occur with increased frequency in the Finnish population. Using a combination of RNase A protection, genomic cloning, and polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA, we found one of two missense mutant OAT alleles to be present in each of 16 Finnish GA pedigrees. The first mutation R180T, in which arginine-180 is replaced by threonine, was present in homozygous form in patients from two pedigrees. The second mutation L402P, in which leucine-402 is replaced by proline, was present in homozygous form in patients from 14 pedigrees. Neither mutation was present in 19 Finnish controls. L402P was not present in 18 non-Finnish GA patients but R180T was found in an American GA patient. We constructed full-length mutant cDNAs by amplifying patient cDNA with the polymerase chain reaction and cloning a restriction fragment containing the mutation into an otherwise normal human OAT cDNA. These mutant cDNAs were then expressed in CHO-K1 cells, which lack endogenous OAT. Both R180T and L402P inactivate OAT. These results show molecular heterogeneity in GA alleles even in the Finnish population. PMID:2492100

  2. Apolipoprotein E Epsilon 4 Allele Interacts with Sex and Cognitive Status to Influence All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Among US Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beydoun, May A.; Beydoun, Hind A.; Kaufman, Jay S.; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M.; O'Brien, Richard; Ferrucci, Luigi; Zonderman, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Apolipoprotein E ε4 (ApoE4 carrier) status, sex and cognitive impairment may interact to affect all-cause and cause-specific mortality risk. Objectives To confirm associations of ApoE4 carrier status, sex and time-dependent cognitive status with mortality risk, and investigate these associations' joint effects in a cohort of community-dwelling US adults. Design & Setting Data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging were used. Participants Of n=3,047 (First-visit Age:17–98y, 60.1% men), we selected a sample with complete genetic data and with ≥1 visit at age≥50y (n=1,461). Measurements Time-to-death from all, cardiovascular or non-cardiovascular causes. Results Survival probability was lower for ApoE4 carriers, particularly at oldest ages. Cox proportional hazards model for all-cause mortality yielded a hazard ratio (HR) for ApoE4 carrier vs. non-carriers of 1.31,95%CI:1.02–1.68. This association was also found for cardiovascular mortality. Time-dependent all-cause dementia (HR=1.73, 95%CI:1.33–2.26) and mild cognitive impairment (HR=1.95,95%CI:1.42–2.67) increased all-cause mortality risk, associations also detected for non-cardiovascular mortality. When individuals were free of cognitive impairment, a dose-response relationship with ε4 alleles was found for all-cause mortality (HR=1.40,95%CI:0.94–2.07 for 1 ε4, and HR=2.61; 95%CI:1.12–6.07 for 2 ε4). After Alzheimer's Disease-type (AD) dementia onset, carrying only 1 ε4 allele increased all-cause mortality risk by ~77% compared to non-carriers. ApoE4 carrier status increased all-cause mortality risk in men and interacted with time-dependent AD to increase the risk of this outcome (RERI=2.15; 95% CI:1.22–3.07). Conclusion We found that ApoE4 carrier status increased all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risks, while interacting with sex and time-dependent AD status to affect all-cause mortality. PMID:23581910

  3. Late onset N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency caused by hypomorphic alleles.

    PubMed

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Panglao, Maria G; Lopez, Giselle Y; Shi, Dashuang; Summar, Marshall L; Tuchman, Mendel

    2005-03-01

    N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is a unique cofactor that is essential for the conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver. N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS) catalyzes the formation of NAG. Deficiency of NAGS causes a block in ureagenesis resulting in hyperammonemia. Although a number of mutations have been identified in the NAGS gene, their effects on NAGS enzymatic activity have not been examined. We describe here three mutations in two families with NAGS deficiency. Studies of the purified recombinant mutant proteins revealed deleterious effects on NAGS affinity for substrates, and on the rate of catalysis. These studies provide a better understanding of the function of NAGS, and the mechanisms for deleterious effect of mutations causing inherited NAGS deficiency. PMID:15714518

  4. DNA Repair Dependence of Somatic Mutagenesis of Transposon-Caused WHITE Alleles in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER after Treatment with Alkylating Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Kondo, Sohei

    1986-01-01

    DNA repair-defective alleles of the mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 loci of Drosophila melanogaster were introduced into stocks bearing the UZ and SZ marker sets. Males with the UZ marker set, z1 (zeste allele) and w+(TE) (genetically unstable white allele presumably caused by a transposable element), or the SZ marker set, z1 and w+R (semistable white allele caused by partial duplication of the w+ locus plus transposon insert), were exposed to EMS at the first instar. After emergence, adult males bearing red spots on lemon-yellow eyes were scored as flies with somatic reversions of w+(TE) or w +R. The relative mutabilities (relative values of reversion frequency at an equal EMS dose) of either w+(TE) or w+R in a repair-proficient strain and in mei-9, mei-41, mus-104 and mus-101 strains were 1:∼1.2:0.3:0.3:0.7, despite the fact that w+(TE) reverted two to three times as frequently as w+R under both the repair-proficient and repair-deficient genetic conditions. Similarly, after treatment with MMS, MNNG and ENNG, w+(TE) was somatically more mutable in the mei-9 strain and less mutable in the mei-41 and mus-104 strains than in the repair-proficient strain. From these results, we propose that mutagenic lesions produced in DNA by treatment with these chemicals are converted to mutant DNA sequences via the error-prone repair mechanisms dependent on the products of the genes mei-41+ (mei-41 and mus-104 being alleles of the same locus) and mus-101+, whereas they are eliminated by mei-9+-dependent excision repair. In contrast to the approximately linear responses of induced reversions of w+( TE) with ENNG in the repair-proficient, mei-9, and mei-41 strains, seemingly there were dosage insensitive ranges for induced reversion with MNNG in the repair-proficient and mei-41 strains, but not for reversion in the mei-9 strain; w+( TE) in the mus-104 strain was virtually nonmutable with MNNG and ENNG. These results suggest that O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) produced in DNA with

  5. A leucine-to-proline substitution causes a defective [alpha]-antichymotrypsin allele associated with familial obstructive lung disease

    SciTech Connect

    Poller, W.; Scholz, S.; Fischer, M. ); Faber, J.P.; Tief, K.; Olek, K.; Kirchgesser, M. ); Weidinger, S. ); Heidtmann, H.H. )

    1993-09-01

    Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA, the authors have identified two defective mutants of the human [alpha][sub 1]-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A leucine 55-to-proline substitution causing a defective ACT allele (Bochum-1) was observed in a family with COPD in three subsequent generations. Another mutation, proline 229-to-alanine (Bonn-1), was associated with ACT serum deficiency in four patients with a positive family history. These mutations were not detected among 100 healthy control subjects, suggesting a possible pathogenetic role of ACT gene defects in a subset of patients with COPD. 14 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. A false positive newborn screening result due to a complex allele carrying two frequent CF-causing variants.

    PubMed

    Bergougnoux, Anne; Boureau-Wirth, Amandine; Rouzier, Cécile; Altieri, Jean-Pierre; Verneau, Fanny; Larrieu, Lise; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Raynal, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    The detection of two frequent CFTR disease-causing variations in the context of a newborn screening program (NBS) usually leads to the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) and a relevant genetic counseling in the family. In the present study, CF-causing variants p.Phe508del (F508del) and c.3140-26A>G (3272-26A>G) were identified on a neonate with positive ImmunoReactive Trypsinogen test by the Elucigene™ CF30 kit. The CF diagnosis initially suggested, despite three inconclusive Sweat Chloride Tests (SCT), was finally ruled out after the familial segregation study combined with a negative SCT. Haplotype studies, based on the comparison of 80 p.Phe508del haplotypes, suggested a probable de novo occurrence of c.3140-26A>G on the p.Phe508del ancestral allele in this family. This false positive case emphasizes the importance of SCT in the NBS strategy. Moreover, it raises the need for familial segregation studies in CF and in overall molecular diagnosis strategy of autosomal recessive diseases. PMID:27117206

  7. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Boitet, Evan R.; Turner, Ashley N.; Johnson, Larry W.; Kennedy, Daniel; Downs, Ethan R.; Hymel, Katherine M.; Gross, Alecia K.; Kesterson, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr) cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray) and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood). These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene. PMID:27224051

  8. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Challa, Anil K; Boitet, Evan R; Turner, Ashley N; Johnson, Larry W; Kennedy, Daniel; Downs, Ethan R; Hymel, Katherine M; Gross, Alecia K; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr) cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1) in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA) as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray) and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood). These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene. PMID:27224051

  9. Some Causes of the Variable Shape of Flocks of Birds

    PubMed Central

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.; Hildenbrandt, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    Flocks of birds are highly variable in shape in all contexts (while travelling, avoiding predation, wheeling above the roost). Particularly amazing in this respect are the aerial displays of huge flocks of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) above the sleeping site at dawn. The causes of this variability are hardly known, however. Here we hypothesise that variability of shape increases when there are larger local differences in movement behaviour in the flock. We investigate this hypothesis with the help of a model of the self-organisation of travelling groups, called StarDisplay, since such a model has also increased our understanding of what causes the oblong shape of schools of fish. The flocking patterns in the model prove to resemble those of real birds, in particular of starlings and rock doves. As to shape, we measure the relative proportions of the flock in several ways, which either depend on the direction of movement or do not. We confirm that flock shape is usually more variable when local differences in movement in the flock are larger. This happens when a) flock size is larger, b) interacting partners are fewer, c) the flock turnings are stronger, and d) individuals roll into the turn. In contrast to our expectations, when variability of speed in the flock is higher, flock shape and the positions of members in the flock are more static. We explain this and indicate the adaptive value of low variability of speed and spatial restriction of interaction and develop testable hypotheses. PMID:21829627

  10. Some causes of the variable shape of flocks of birds.

    PubMed

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K; Hildenbrandt, Hanno

    2011-01-01

    Flocks of birds are highly variable in shape in all contexts (while travelling, avoiding predation, wheeling above the roost). Particularly amazing in this respect are the aerial displays of huge flocks of starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) above the sleeping site at dawn. The causes of this variability are hardly known, however. Here we hypothesise that variability of shape increases when there are larger local differences in movement behaviour in the flock. We investigate this hypothesis with the help of a model of the self-organisation of travelling groups, called StarDisplay, since such a model has also increased our understanding of what causes the oblong shape of schools of fish. The flocking patterns in the model prove to resemble those of real birds, in particular of starlings and rock doves. As to shape, we measure the relative proportions of the flock in several ways, which either depend on the direction of movement or do not. We confirm that flock shape is usually more variable when local differences in movement in the flock are larger. This happens when a) flock size is larger, b) interacting partners are fewer, c) the flock turnings are stronger, and d) individuals roll into the turn. In contrast to our expectations, when variability of speed in the flock is higher, flock shape and the positions of members in the flock are more static. We explain this and indicate the adaptive value of low variability of speed and spatial restriction of interaction and develop testable hypotheses. PMID:21829627

  11. Unusual cause of aborted sudden cardiac death in a teen athlete: homozygosity for the 4G allele of the plasminogen activase inhibitor type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susie B; Batlivala, Sarosh; Knudson, Jarrod D

    2015-10-01

    Common aetiologies of sudden cardiac death in children include coronary anomalies, channelopathies, and cardiomyopathies. Less frequently, hypercoagulable states cause sudden arrest. We report an unusual case of aborted sudden cardiac death in a teenager, ultimately found to have homozygosity for the 4G allele of the plasminogen activase inhibitor type 1 gene. PMID:25498839

  12. Population Bottlenecks and Nonequilibrium Models in Population Genetics. I. Allele Numbers When Populations Evolve from Zero Variability

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takeo; Fuerst, Paul A.

    1984-01-01

    A simple numerical method was developed for the mean number and average age of alleles in a population that was initiated with no genetic variation following a sudden population expansion. The methods are used to examine the question of whether allele numbers are elevated compared with values seen in equilibrium populations having equivalent gene diversity. Excess allele numbers in expanding populations were found to be the rule. This was true whether the population began with zero variation or with low levels of variation in either of two initial distributions (initially an equilibrium allele frequency distribution or initially with loci occurring in only two classes of variation). Although the increase of alleles may persist for only a short time, when compared with the time which is required for approach to final equilibrium, the increase may be long when measured in absolute generation numbers. The pattern of increase in very rare alleles (those present only once in a sample) and the persistence of the original allele were also investigated. PMID:6500263

  13. A rare cause of secondary amyloidosis: common variable immunodeficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Kadiroğlu, Ali Kemal; Yıldırım, Yaşar; Yılmaz, Zülfükar; Kayabaşı, Hasan; Avcı, Yahya; Yıldırım, M Serdar; Yılmaz, M Emin

    2012-01-01

    The common variable immunodeficiency disease (CVID) is the most common symptomatic primary antibody deficiency. It is the most frequently observed cause of panhypogammaglobulinemia in adults. Here, we present a case of systemic amyloidosis that developed secondary to the common variable immunodeficiency disease causing recurrent infections in a young female patient. A 24-year-old female patient, who was under treatment at the gynecology and obstetrics clinic for pelvic inflammatory disease, was referred to our clinic when she was observed to have swellings in her legs, hands, and face. She had proteinuria at a rate of 3.5 gr/day, and her serum albumin was 1.5 gr/dl. The levels of immunoglobulins are IgG: 138 mg/dl, IgA: 22,6 mg/dl, and IgM: 16,8 mg/dl. The renal USG revealed that the kidneys were observed to be enlarged. Since the patient had recurrent infections, hypogammaglobulinemia, nephrotic range proteinuria, and enlarged kidneys in the renal USG, she was thought to have type AA amyloidosis and therefore underwent a renal biopsy. The kidney biopsy revealed amyloid (+). So the patient was diagnosed with AA type of amyloidosis secondary to common variable immunodeficiency disease. A treatment regimen (an ACE inhibitor and a statin) with monthly administration of intravenous immunoglobulin was started. PMID:24558615

  14. Albinism and disease causing pathogens in Tanzania: are alleles that are associated with OCA2 being maintained by balancing selection?

    PubMed

    Tuli, Abbas M; Valenzuela, Robert K; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Brilliant, Murray H

    2012-12-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) is present at significantly higher frequencies in sub-Saharan African populations compared to populations in other regions of the world. In Tanzania and other sub-Saharan countries, most OCA2 is associated with a common 2.7kb deletion allele. Leprosy is also in high prevalence in sub-Saharan African populations. The infectious agent of leprosy, Mycobacterium leprae, contains a gene, 38L, that is similar to OCA2. Hypopigmented patches of skin are early symptoms that present with infection of leprosy. In consideration of both the genetic similarity of OCA2 and the 38L gene of M. leprae and the involvement of pigmentation in both disorders, we hypothesized that the high rates of OCA2 may be due to heterozygote advantage. Hence, we hypothesized that carriers of the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 may provide a protective advantage from infection with leprosy. We tested this hypothesis by determining the carrier frequency of the 2.7kb deletion allele from a sample of 240 individuals with leprosy from Tanzania. The results were inconclusive due to the small sample size; however, they enabled us to rule out a large protective effect, but perhaps not a small advantage. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is another infectious organism prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa that contains a gene, arsenic-transport integral membrane protein that is also similar to OCA2. Interestingly, chromosomal region 15q11-13, which also contains OCA2, was reported to be linked to tuberculosis susceptibility. Although variants within OCA2 were tested for association, the 2.7kb deletion allele of OCA2 was not tested. This led us to hypothesize that the deletion allele may confer resistance to susceptibility. Confirmation of our hypothesis would enable development of novel pharmocogenetic therapies for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in turn, may enable development of drugs that target other pathogens that utilize a similar infection mechanism as M. tuberculosis

  15. Gene expression variability in clonal populations: Causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Roberfroid, Stefanie; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade it has been shown that among cell variation in gene expression plays an important role within clonal populations. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanisms contributing to gene expression variability in clonal populations. These are ranging from inherent variations in the biochemical process of gene expression itself, such as intrinsic noise, extrinsic noise and bistability to individual responses to variations in the local micro-environment, a phenomenon called phenotypic plasticity. Also genotypic variations caused by clonal evolution and phase variation can contribute to gene expression variability. Consequently, gene expression studies need to take these fluctuations in expression into account. However, frequently used techniques for expression quantification, such as microarrays, RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR and gene reporter fusions classically determine the population average of gene expression. Here, we discuss how these techniques can be adapted towards single cell analysis by integration with single cell isolation, RNA amplification and microscopy. Alternatively more qualitative selection-based techniques, such as mutant screenings, in vivo expression technology (IVET) and recombination-based IVET (RIVET) can be applied for detection of genes expressed only within a subpopulation. Finally, differential fluorescence induction (DFI), a protocol specially designed for single cell expression is discussed. PMID:26731119

  16. Comparison of somatic reversions between the ivory allele and transposon-caused mutant alleles at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster after larval treatment with X rays and ethyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ryo, H.; Yoo, M.A.; Fujikawa, K.; Kondo, S.

    1985-07-01

    Somatic reversion of strains with the ivory (wi) allele, a mutation associated with a tandem duplication of a DNA sequence at the white locus, increased with the age of larvae at the time of X-irradiation as expected from the increase in the number of target cells. In contrast, two independently isolated strains with unstable w+ loci associated with insertion of transposable elements showed higher reversion frequencies after treatment with X rays or ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at early larval stages than at late stages. Nevertheless, both the wi strain and the two unstable w+ strains reverted at nearly equal rates after treatment with X rays or EMS at early larval stages. Possible similarity in hot spot structure for the high reversibility of the two types of mutations is discussed in relation to production of presumed mutator-type cofactors specific to the transposon-caused mutations at early larval stages.

  17. On the causes of plasmaspheric rotation variability: IMAGE EUV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan, David A.; Moldwin, Mark B.; Sandel, Bill R.; Crowley, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    IMAGE EUV observations demonstrate that the plasmasphere usually does not corotate as assumed in simple convection models, even at low L shells. We carry out a statistical survey of plasmaspheric rotation rates over several months of IMAGE EUV data in 2001, using two different measurement techniques. We test the prevailing hypothesis, that subcorotation is due to enhanced auroral zone Joule heating driving equatorward thermospheric winds, by testing for correlation of rotation rates with several geomagnetic indices. Azimuthal features such as "notches" are tracked in local time over a single pass of the IMAGE satellite, both visually and using an automated cross-correlation routine. Each technique provides an estimate of the plasmasphere's rotation rate. We find a weak correlation between rotation rate and Dst, Kp, AE, the midnight boundary index (MBI), and Joule heating estimates from assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) at L = 2.5, but not at L = 3.5. In general, lower rotation rates correspond to higher auroral and geomagnetic activity. We also make the first direct observation of plasmaspheric superrotation. The plasmaspheric rotation rate is found to be highly variable on multiday timescales, but the typical state of the plasmasphere is subcorotation, with inferred mean values ranging from 88% to 95% of corotation, depending on L shell. In addition, a statistical analysis shows that rotation rates near dusk are generally lower than those at dawn, suggesting that local time and magnetospheric convection contribute to the variation in rotation rate as well. We conclude that the cause of variability in plasmaspheric rotation rate is a combination of storm phase, local-time-dependent convection, and westward ionospheric drift.

  18. Variable phenotypic presentation of iron overload in H63D homozygotes: are genetic modifiers the cause?

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Martinez, P; Bismuth, M; Picot, M; Thelcide, C; Pageaux, G; Blanc, F; Blanc, P; Schved, J; Larrey, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—First considered as a polymorphism of the HFE gene, the H63D mutation is now widely recognised as a haemochromatosis associated allele. But few H63D homozygotes with clinical manifestations of hereditary haemochromatosis (HH) have been reported. Concurrently, an increasing number of genes have been shown to interact with HFE in iron metabolism.
AIMS—To describe the clinical expression of iron overload (IO) associated with H63D homozygosity, and search for potential genetic modifiers (within the HFE or other genes) that could explain the variability of the phenotypes.
PATIENTS AND METHODS—We retrospectively analysed the clinical phenotype of 56 H63D homozygotes referred for a personal or family history of IO. For each subject we examined intragenic HFE haplotypes and transferrin receptor (TfR) gene polymorphisms and searched for the Y250X mutation on the TFR2 gene. Additionally, we sequenced the HFE gene of H63D homozygotes with HH.
RESULTS—Fifty of 56 subjects had biological and/or clinical abnormalities of iron metabolism. Up to two thirds of patients (n=34) had no acquired cause of IO. Among these, 12 had a phenotypic diagnosis of HH. In the iron loaded group there was a strong prevalence of male patients. No correlation was found between the potential genetic modifiers and phenotypes. No additional mutation of HFE was identified.
CONCLUSION—The variable phenotypes associated with H63D homozygosity do not appear to be linked to other HFE mutations, to the TFR2 Y250X mutation, or to HFE or TfR gene intragenic polymorphisms. The exact role of H63D homozygosity in IO and HH needs to be further investigated in unselected populations.


Keywords: haemochromatosis; H63D homozygotes; phenotypic variability; HFE haplotypes; transferrin receptor gene PMID:11358905

  19. Deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene is sufficient to cause oxidative stress, delayed differentiation and neuronal death in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ahlemeyer, Barbara; Gottwald, Magdalena; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired neuronal migration and cell death are commonly observed in patients with peroxisomal biogenesis disorders (PBDs), and in mouse models of this diseases. In Pex11β-deficient mice, we observed that the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene (Pex11β+/− heterozygous mice) caused cell death in primary neuronal cultures prepared from the neocortex and cerebellum, although to a lesser extent as compared with the homozygous-null animals (Pex11β−/− mice). In corresponding brain sections, cell death was rare, but differences between the genotypes were similar to those found in vitro. Because PEX11β has been implicated in peroxisomal proliferation, we searched for alterations in peroxisomal abundance in the brain of heterozygous and homozygous Pex11β-null mice compared with wild-type animals. Deletion of one allele of the Pex11β gene slightly increased the abundance of peroxisomes, whereas the deletion of both alleles caused a 30% reduction in peroxisome number. The size of the peroxisomal compartment did not correlate with neuronal death. Similar to cell death, neuronal development was delayed in Pex11β+/− mice, and to a further extent in Pex11β−/− mice, as measured by a reduced mRNA and protein level of synaptophysin and a reduced protein level of the mature isoform of MAP2. Moreover, a gradual increase in oxidative stress was found in brain sections and primary neuronal cultures from wild-type to heterozygous to homozygous Pex11β-deficient mice. SOD2 was upregulated in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice, but not from Pex11β−/− animals, whereas the level of catalase remained unchanged in neurons from Pex11β+/− mice and was reduced in those from Pex11β−/− mice, suggesting a partial compensation of oxidative stress in the heterozygotes, but a failure thereof in the homozygous Pex11β−/− brain. In conclusion, we report the alterations in the brain caused by the deletion of a single allele of the Pex11β gene. Our data

  20. A Unique Missense Allele of BAF155, a Core BAF Chromatin Remodeling Complex Protein, Causes Neural Tube Closure Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Harmacek, Laura; Watkins-Chow, Dawn E.; Chen, Jianfu; Jones, Kenneth L.; Pavan, William J.; Salbaum, J. Michael; Niswander, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Failure of embryonic neural tube closure results in the second most common class of birth defects known as neural tube defects (NTDs). While NTDs are likely the result of complex multigenic dysfunction, it is not known whether polymorphisms in epigenetic regulators may be risk factors for NTDs. Here we characterized Baf155msp3, a unique ENU-induced allele in mice. Homozygous Baf155mps3 embryos exhibit highly penetrant exencephaly, allowing us to investigate the roles of an assembled, but malfunctional BAF chromatin remodeling complex in vivo at the time of neural tube closure. Evidence of defects in proliferation and apoptosis were found within the neural tube. RNA-Seq analysis revealed that surprisingly few genes showed altered expression in Baf155 mutant neural tissue, given the broad epigenetic role of the BAF complex, but included genes involved in neural development and cell survival. Moreover, gene expression changes between individual mutants were variable even though the NTD was consistently observed. This suggests that inconsistent gene regulation contributes to failed neural tube closure. These results shed light on the role of the BAF complex in the process of neural tube closure and highlight the importance of studying missense alleles to understand epigenetic regulation during critical phases of development. PMID:24170322

  1. Interindividual variability in social insects - proximate causes and ultimate consequences.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Raphaël; Weidenmüller, Anja

    2014-08-01

    Individuals within social groups often show consistent differences in behaviour across time and context. Such interindividual differences and the evolutionary challenge they present have recently generated considerable interest. Social insects provide some of the most familiar and spectacular examples of social groups with large interindividual differences. Investigating these within-group differences has a long research tradition, and behavioural variability among the workers of a colony is increasingly regarded as fundamental for a key feature of social insects: division of labour. The goal of this review is to illustrate what we know about both the proximate mechanisms underlying behavioural variability among the workers of a colony and its ultimate consequences; and to highlight the many open questions in this research field. We begin by reviewing the literature on mechanisms that potentially introduce, maintain, and adjust the behavioural differentiation among workers. We highlight the fact that so far, most studies have focused on behavioural variability based on genetic variability, provided by e.g. multiple mating of the queen, while other mechanisms that may be responsible for the behavioural differentiation among workers have been largely neglected. These include maturational, nutritional and environmental influences. We further discuss how feedback provided by the social environment and learning and experience of adult workers provides potent and little-explored sources of differentiation. In a second part, we address what is known about the potential benefits and costs of increased behavioural variability within the workers of a colony. We argue that all studies documenting a benefit of variability so far have done so by manipulating genetic variability, and that a direct test of the effect of behavioural variability on colony productivity has yet to be provided. We emphasize that the costs associated with interindividual variability have been largely

  2. Satellite assessment of Mississippi River plume variability: Causes and predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, N.D.

    1996-10-01

    The Mississippi River is the largest river in North America and 6th largest worldwide in terms of discharge. In this study, 5 years (1989--1993) of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer satellite data were used to investigate the variability of the Mississippi River sediment plume and the environmental forcing factors responsible for its variability. Plume variability was determined by extracting information on plume area and plume length from 112 cloud-free satellite images. Correlation and multiple regression techniques were used to quantify these relationships for possible predictive applications. River discharge and wind forcing were identified as the main factors affecting plume variability. Seasonal and interannual variabilities in plume area were similar in magnitude and corresponded closely with large changes in river discharge. However, day-to-day variability in plume size and morphology was more closely associated with changes in the wind field. The plume parameters best predicted by the multiple regression models were plume area, east and west of the delta. Predictive models were improved by separating the data into summer and winter seasons.

  3. Bi-allelic Mutations in KLHL7 Cause a Crisponi/CISS1-like Phenotype Associated with Early-Onset Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Angius, Andrea; Uva, Paolo; Buers, Insa; Oppo, Manuela; Puddu, Alessandro; Onano, Stefano; Persico, Ivana; Loi, Angela; Marcia, Loredana; Höhne, Wolfgang; Cuccuru, Gianmauro; Fotia, Giorgio; Deiana, Manila; Marongiu, Mara; Atalay, Hatice Tuba; Inan, Sibel; El Assy, Osama; Smit, Leo M E; Okur, Ilyas; Boduroglu, Koray; Utine, Gülen Eda; Kılıç, Esra; Zampino, Giuseppe; Crisponi, Giangiorgio; Crisponi, Laura; Rutsch, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Crisponi syndrome (CS)/cold-induced sweating syndrome type 1 (CISS1) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a complex phenotype with high neonatal lethality, associated with the following main clinical features: hyperthermia and feeding difficulties in the neonatal period, scoliosis, and paradoxical sweating induced by cold since early childhood. CS/CISS1 can be caused by mutations in cytokine receptor-like factor 1 (CRLF1). However, the physiopathological role of CRLF1 is still poorly understood. A subset of CS/CISS1 cases remain yet genetically unexplained after CRLF1 sequencing. In five of them, exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing identified four homozygous disease-causing mutations in kelch-like family member 7 (KLHL7), affecting the Kelch domains of the protein. KLHL7 encodes a BTB-Kelch-related protein involved in the ubiquitination of target proteins for proteasome-mediated degradation. Mono-allelic substitutions in other domains of KLHL7 have been reported in three families affected by a late-onset form of autosomal-dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Retinitis pigmentosa was also present in two surviving children reported here carrying bi-allelic KLHL7 mutations. KLHL7 mutations are thus associated with a more severe phenotype in recessive than in dominant cases. Although these data further support the pathogenic role of KLHL7 mutations in a CS/CISS1-like phenotype, they do not explain all their clinical manifestations and highlight the high phenotypic heterogeneity associated with mutations in KLHL7. PMID:27392078

  4. The Adaptive Change of HLA-DRB1 Allele Frequencies Caused by Natural Selection in a Mongolian Population That Migrated to the South of China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hao; Yang, Zhaoqing; Lin, Keqin; Liu, Shuyuan; Huang, Kai; Wang, Xiuyun; Chu, Jiayou; Huang, Xiaoqin

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen-driven balancing selection determines the richness of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Changes in the pathogen spectrum may cause corresponding changes in HLA loci. Approximately 700 years ago, a Mongolian population moved from the north of China to the Yunnan region in the south of China. The pathogen spectrum in the south of China differs from that in the north. In this study, changes in the HLA genes in the Yunnan Mongolian population, as well as the underlying mechanism, were investigated. A sequence-based typing method (SBT) was used to genotype HLA-DRB1 in 470 individuals from two Mongolian populations and another five ethnic groups. Meanwhile, 10 autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) were genotyped to assess the influence of genetic background on HLA-DRB1 frequencies. The frequencies of certain alleles changed significantly in the Mongolian population that migrated to Yunnan. For example, DRB1*12:02:01 increased from 6.1% to 35.4%. STR analysis excluded the possibility of a recent bottleneck and indicated that 50% of the genetic consistency between northern and southern Mongolians; Tajima's D value for HLA-DRB1 exon2 and dN/dS analysis showed that the HLA-DRB1 genes in both Mongolian populations were under balancing selection. However, the sites under natural selection changed. We proposed that the dramatically change of HLA frequencies in southern Mongolian was caused by a combination of inter-population gene flow and natural selection. Certain diseases specific to the south of China, such as malaria, may be the driving force behind the enhanced DRB1*12:02:01 frequency. PMID:26230582

  5. Excess functional copy of allele at chromosomal region 11p15 may cause Wiedemann-Beckwith (EMG) syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, T.; Saitoh, S.; Jinno, Y.; Niikawa, N.; Matsumoto, T.; Narahara, K.; Fukushima, Y.

    1994-02-15

    Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome (WBS) is a genetic disorder with overgrowth and predisposition to Wilms` tumor. The putative locus of the gene responsible for this syndrome is assigned to chromosome region 11p15.5, and genomic imprinting in this region has been proposed: the paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5 is selectively expressed, while the maternally transmitted gene(s) is inactive. The authors examined 18 patients for the parental origin of their 11p15 regions. DNA polymorphism analyses using 6 loci on chromosome 11 showed that 2 patients with duplications of 11p15 regions from their respective fathers and one from the mother, indicating the transmission of an excessive paternal gene at 11p15 to each patient. The result, together with the previous findings in karyotypically normal or abnormal patients and in overgrowth mouse experiments, are consistent with imprinting hypothesis that overexpression of paternally derived gene(s) at 11p15.5, probably the human insulin-like growth factor II (IFG-II) gene, may cause the phenotype. Total constitutional uniparental paternal disomy (UPD) or segmental UPD for the 6 loci examined of chromosome 11 was not observed in our 12 sporadic patients. In order to explain completely the inheritance of this syndrome in patients with various chromosomal constitutions, the authors propose an alternative imprinting mechanism involving the other locus that may be paternally imprinted and may suppress the expression of this gene. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Next-generation sequencing analysis of off-ladder alleles due to migration shift caused by sequence variation at D12S391 locus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Koji; Watahiki, Haruhiko; Mita, Yusuke; Iwashima, Yasuki; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kitayama, Tetsushi; Nakahara, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Natsuko; Sekiguchi, Kazumasa

    2016-09-01

    In short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, length polymorphisms are detected by capillary electrophoresis (CE). At most STR loci, mobility shift due to sequence variation in the repeat region was thought not to affect the typing results. In our recent population studies of 1501 Japanese individuals, off-ladder calls were observed at the D12S391 locus using PowerPlex Fusion in nine samples for allele 22, one sample for allele 25, and one sample for allele 26. However, these samples were typed as ordinary alleles within the bins using GlobalFiler. In this study, next-generation sequencing analysis using MiSeq was performed for the D12S391 locus from the 11 off-ladder samples and 33 other samples, as well as the allelic ladders of PowerPlex Fusion and GlobalFiler. All off-ladder allele 22 in the nine samples had [AGAT]11[AGAC]11 as a repeat structure, while the corresponding allele was [AGAT]15[AGAC]6[AGAT] for the PowerPlex Fusion ladder, and [AGAT]13[AGAC]9 for the GlobalFiler ladder. Overall, as the number of [AGAT] in the repeat structure decreased at the D12S391 locus, the peak migrated more slowly using PowerPlex Fusion, the reverse strand of which was labeled, and it migrated more rapidly using GlobalFiler, the forward strand of which was labeled. The allelic ladders of both STR kits were reamplified with our small amplicon D12S391 primers and their mobility was also examined. In conclusion, off-ladder observations of allele 22 at the D12S391 locus using PowerPlex Fusion were mainly attributed to a relatively large difference of the repeat structure between its allelic ladder and off-ladder allele 22. PMID:27591542

  7. Examining the Causes of Memory Strength Variability: Recollection, Attention Failure, or Encoding Variability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koen, Joshua D.; Aly, Mariam; Wang, Wei-Chun; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    A prominent finding in recognition memory is that studied items are associated with more variability in memory strength than new items. Here, we test 3 competing theories for why this occurs--the "encoding variability," "attention failure", and "recollection" accounts. Distinguishing among these theories is critical…

  8. Autosomal-Dominant Corneal Endothelial Dystrophies CHED1 and PPCD1 Are Allelic Disorders Caused by Non-coding Mutations in the Promoter of OVOL2

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Liskova, Petra; Evans, Cerys J.; Dudakova, Lubica; Nosková, Lenka; Pontikos, Nikolas; Hartmannová, Hana; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Stránecký, Viktor; Kozmík, Zbyněk; Levis, Hannah J.; Idigo, Nwamaka; Sasai, Noriaki; Maher, Geoffrey J.; Bellingham, James; Veli, Neyme; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Daniels, Julie T.; Thaung, Caroline M.H.; Jirsova, Katerina; Plagnol, Vincent; Filipec, Martin; Kmoch, Stanislav; Tuft, Stephen J.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hereditary endothelial dystrophy 1 (CHED1) and posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy 1 (PPCD1) are autosomal-dominant corneal endothelial dystrophies that have been genetically mapped to overlapping loci on the short arm of chromosome 20. We combined genetic and genomic approaches to identify the cause of disease in extensive pedigrees comprising over 100 affected individuals. After exclusion of pathogenic coding, splice-site, and copy-number variations, a parallel approach using targeted and whole-genome sequencing facilitated the identification of pathogenic variants in a conserved region of the OVOL2 proximal promoter sequence in the index families (c.−339_361dup for CHED1 and c.−370T>C for PPCD1). Direct sequencing of the OVOL2 promoter in other unrelated affected individuals identified two additional mutations within the conserved proximal promoter sequence (c.−274T>G and c.−307T>C). OVOL2 encodes ovo-like zinc finger 2, a C2H2 zinc-finger transcription factor that regulates mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of the established PPCD-associated gene ZEB1. Interestingly, we did not detect OVOL2 expression in the normal corneal endothelium. Our in vitro data demonstrate that all four mutated OVOL2 promoters exhibited more transcriptional activity than the corresponding wild-type promoter, and we postulate that the mutations identified create cryptic cis-acting regulatory sequence binding sites that drive aberrant OVOL2 expression during endothelial cell development. Our data establish CHED1 and PPCD1 as allelic conditions and show that CHED1 represents the extreme of what can be considered a disease spectrum. They also implicate transcriptional dysregulation of OVOL2 as a common cause of dominantly inherited corneal endothelial dystrophies. PMID:26749309

  9. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Sushant V.; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Methods: Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. Results: A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (P<0.001) in the proximal promoter region and -3845G/A (P<0.001) in enhancer region showed significant association with serum PSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (P<0.001) at both of these polymorphic sites showed higher expression of PSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (P<0.001) carriers demonstrated lower PSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. Interpretation & conclusions: The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression. PMID:24820830

  10. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. PMID:26647311

  11. What Is a Recessive Allele?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Biology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents four misconceptions students have concerning the concepts of recessive and dominant alleles. Discusses the spectrum of dominant-recessive relationships, different levels of analysis between phenotype and genotype, possible causes of dominance, and an example involving wrinkled peas. (MDH)

  12. High-level cefixime- and ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae in France: novel penA mosaic allele in a successful international clone causes treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Unemo, Magnus; Golparian, Daniel; Nicholas, Robert; Ohnishi, Makoto; Gallay, Anne; Sednaoui, Patrice

    2012-03-01

    Recently, the first Neisseria gonorrhoeae strain (H041) highly resistant to the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) ceftriaxone and cefixime, which are the last remaining options for first-line gonorrhea treatment, was isolated in Japan. Here, we confirm and characterize a second strain (F89) with high-level cefixime and ceftriaxone resistance which was isolated in France and most likely caused a treatment failure with cefixime. F89 was examined using six species-confirmatory tests, antibiograms (33 antimicrobials), porB sequencing, N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing (NG-MAST), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and sequencing of known gonococcal resistance determinants (penA, mtrR, penB, ponA, and pilQ). F89 was assigned to MLST sequence type 1901 (ST1901) and NG-MAST ST1407, which is a successful gonococcal clone that has spread globally. F89 has high-level resistance to cefixime (MIC = 4 μg/ml) and ceftriaxone (MIC = 1 to 2 μg/ml) and resistance to most other antimicrobials examined. A novel penA mosaic allele (penA-CI), which was penA-XXXIV with an additional A501P alteration in penicillin-binding protein 2, was the primary determinant for high-level ESC resistance, as determined by transformation into a set of recipient strains. N. gonorrhoeae appears to be emerging as a superbug, and in certain circumstances and settings, gonorrhea may become untreatable. Investigations of the biological fitness and enhanced understanding and monitoring of the ESC-resistant clones and their international transmission are required. Enhanced disease control activities, antimicrobial resistance control and surveillance worldwide, and public health response plans for global (and national) perspectives are also crucial. Nevertheless, new treatment strategies and/or drugs and, ideally, a vaccine are essential to develop for efficacious gonorrhea management. PMID:22155830

  13. Phenotypic variability within the JAK2 V617F-positive MPD: The roles of progenitor cell and neutrophil allele burdens

    PubMed Central

    Moliterno, Alison R.; Williams, Donna M.; Rogers, Ophelia; Isaacs, Mary Ann; Spivak, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    (1) Objective The myeloproliferative disorders (MPD), polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocytosis (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) differ phenotypically but share the same JAK2V617F mutation. We examined the relationship of the quantitative JAK2V617F allele burden to MPD disease phenotype among the three MPD classes and within PV. (2) Methods We measured the JAK2V617F allele percentage in genomic DNA from neutrophils, CD34+ cells, and cloned progenitors in 212 JAK2V617F –positive MPD patients and correlated the allele burdens to both disease class and disease features. (3) Results In ET and PV, the mean CD34+ cell JAK2V617F allele burdens were lower than the corresponding neutrophil allele burdens, but these were equivalent in PMF. JAK2WT progenitors were present in ET and PV when the CD34+ JAK2V617F allele burden was lower than the neutrophil allele burden, but not in PV and PMF subjects in whom the CD34+ cell and neutrophil allele burdens were similar. CD34+ cell JAK2V617F clonal dominance, defined as coherence between the CD34+ cell and neutrophil JAK2V617F allele burdens, was present in 24% of ET, 56% of PV and 93% of PMF patients, and was independent of the CD34+ cell JAK2V617F genotype. Clonally-dominant PV patients had significantly longer disease durations, higher white cell counts and larger spleens than nondominant PV patients. (4) Conclusions We conclude that the extent of JAK2V617F CD34+ cell clonal dominance is associated with disease phenotype within the MPD, and in PV, is associated with extramedullary disease, leukocytosis and disease duration. PMID:18723264

  14. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) types II and III in the same sibship are not caused by different alleles at the SMA locus on 5q.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, B; Melki, J; Burlet, P; Clerget-Darpoux, F

    1992-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a group of progressive muscular diseases recently mapped to chromosome 5q. SMA is usually classified into types I-III, and there are cases of two types of SMA in the same sibship. Becker and others later proposed that these sibships might be due to the existence of several alleles at the same locus predisposing to the different forms of the disease. In a sample of four sibships in which both SMA type II and SMA type III occur, this hypothesis was clearly rejected for the SMA locus on 5q, by using information on the segregation of linked markers (P less than .001). Thus the difference between SMA type II and SMA type III is not due to different alleles at the SMA locus on 5q. This finding is suggestive of an involvement of other factors, genetic or environmental, in the determination of disease severity in SMA. PMID:1570842

  15. Evidence that the penetrance of mutations at the RP11 locus causing dominant retinitis pigmentosa is influenced by a gene linked to the homologous RP11 allele.

    PubMed Central

    McGee, T L; Devoto, M; Ott, J; Berson, E L; Dryja, T P

    1997-01-01

    A subset of families with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) display reduced penetrance with some asymptomatic gene carriers showing no retinal abnormalities by ophthalmic examination or by electroretinography. Here we describe a study of three families with reduced-penetrance RP. In all three families the disease gene appears to be linked to chromosome 19q13.4, the region containing the RP11 locus, as defined by previously reported linkage studies based on five other reduced-penetrance families. Meiotic recombinants in one of the newly identified RP11 families and in two of the previously reported families serve to restrict the disease locus to a 6-cM region bounded by markers D19S572 and D19S926. We also compared the disease status of RP11 carriers with the segregation of microsatellite alleles within 19q13.4 from the noncarrier parents in the newly reported and the previously reported families. The results support the hypothesis that wild-type alleles at the RP11 locus or at a closely linked locus inherited from the noncarrier parents are a major factor influencing the penetrance of pathogenic alleles at this locus. PMID:9345108

  16. Controls on interannual variability in lightning-caused fire activity in the western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abatzoglou, John T.; Kolden, Crystal A.; Balch, Jennifer K.; Bradley, Bethany A.

    2016-04-01

    Lightning-caused wildfires account for a majority of burned area across the western United States (US), yet lightning remains among the more unpredictable spatiotemporal aspects of the fire environment and a challenge for both modeling and managing fire activity. A data synthesis of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, climate and fire data across the western US from 1992 to 2013 was conducted to better understand geographic variability in lightning-caused wildfire and the factors that influence interannual variability in lightning-caused wildfire at regional scales. Distinct geographic variability occurred in the proportion of fires and area burned attributed to lightning, with a majority of fires in the interior western US attributed to lightning. Lightning ignition efficiency was highest across the western portion of the region due to the concomitance of peak lightning frequency and annual nadir in fuel moisture in mid-to-late summer. For most regions the number of total and dry lightning strikes exhibited strong interannual correlation with the number of lightning-caused fires, yet were a poor predictor of area burned at regional scales. Commonality in climate–fire relationships for regional annual area burned by lightning- versus human-ignited fires suggests climate conditions, rather than lightning activity, are the predominant control of interannual variability in area burned by lightning-caused fire across much of the western US.

  17. The Variability of Sesquiterpenes Emitted from Two Zea mays Cultivars Is Controlled by Allelic Variation of Two Terpene Synthase Genes Encoding Stereoselective Multiple Product Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Köllner, Tobias G.; Schnee, Christiane; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Degenhardt, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    The mature leaves and husks of Zea mays release a complex blend of terpene volatiles after anthesis consisting predominantly of bisabolane-, sesquithujane-, and bergamotane-type sesquiterpenes. The varieties B73 and Delprim release the same volatile constituents but in significantly different proportions. To study the molecular genetic and biochemical mechanisms controlling terpene diversity and distribution in these varieties, we isolated the closely related terpene synthase genes terpene synthase4 (tps4) and tps5 from both varieties. The encoded enzymes, TPS4 and TPS5, each formed the same complex mixture of sesquiterpenes from the precursor farnesyl diphosphate but with different proportions of products. These mixtures correspond to the sesquiterpene blends observed in the varieties B73 and Delprim, respectively. The differences in the stereoselectivity of TPS4 and TPS5 are determined by four amino acid substitutions with the most important being a Gly instead of an Ala residue at position 409 at the catalytic site of the enzyme. Although both varieties contain tps4 and tps5 alleles, their differences in terpene composition result from the fact that B73 has only a single functional allele of tps4 and no functional alleles of tps5, whereas Delprim has only a functional allele of tps5 and no functional alleles of tps4. Lack of functionality was shown to be attributable to frame-shift mutations or amino acid substitutions that greatly reduce the activity of their encoded proteins. Therefore, the diversity of sesquiterpenes in these two maize cultivars is strongly influenced by single nucleotide changes in the alleles of two terpene synthase genes. PMID:15075399

  18. Variable expressivity of ciliopathy neurological phenotypes that encompass Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome is caused by complex de-regulated ciliogenesis, Shh and Wnt signalling defects

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamed, Zakia A.; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Natarajan, Subaashini; Toomes, Carmel; Inglehearn, Chris; Johnson, Colin A.

    2013-01-01

    The ciliopathies are a group of heterogeneous diseases with considerable variations in phenotype for allelic conditions such as Meckel–Gruber syndrome (MKS) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS) even at the inter-individual level within families. In humans, mutations in TMEM67 (also known as MKS3) cause both MKS and JBTS, with TMEM67 encoding the orphan receptor meckelin (TMEM67) that localizes to the ciliary transition zone. We now describe the Tmem67tm1(Dgen/H) knockout mouse model that recapitulates the brain phenotypic variability of these human ciliopathies, with categorization of Tmem67 mutant animals into two phenotypic groups. An MKS-like incipient congenic group (F6 to F10) manifested very variable neurological features (including exencephaly, and frontal/occipital encephalocele) that were associated with the loss of primary cilia, diminished Shh signalling and dorsalization of the caudal neural tube. The ‘MKS-like’ group also had high de-regulated canonical Wnt/β-catenin signalling associated with hyper-activated Dishevelled-1 (Dvl-1) localized to the basal body. Conversely, a second fully congenic group (F > 10) had less variable features pathognomonic for JBTS (including cerebellar hypoplasia), and retention of abnormal bulbous cilia associated with mild neural tube ventralization. The ‘JBTS-like’ group had de-regulated low levels of canonical Wnt signalling associated with the loss of Dvl-1 localization to the basal body. Our results suggest that modifier alleles partially determine the variation between MKS and JBTS, implicating the interaction between Dvl-1 and meckelin, or other components of the ciliary transition zone. The Tmem67tm1(Dgen/H) line is unique in modelling the variable expressivity of phenotypes in these two ciliopathies. PMID:23283079

  19. Characteristics, processes, and causes of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ronghui; Chen, Jilong; Wang, Lin; Lin, Zhongda

    2012-09-01

    Recent advances in the study of the characteristics, processes, and causes of spatio-temporal variabilities of the East Asian monsoon (EAM) system are reviewed in this paper. The understanding of the EAM system has improved in many aspects: the basic characteristics of horizontal and vertical structures, the annual cycle of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) system and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) system, the characteristics of the spatio-temporal variabilities of the EASM system and the EAWM system, and especially the multiple modes of the EAM system and their spatio-temporal variabilities. Some new results have also been achieved in understanding the atmosphere-ocean interaction and atmosphere-land interaction processes that affect the variability of the EAM system. Based on recent studies, the EAM system can be seen as more than a circulation system, it can be viewed as an atmosphere-ocean-land coupled system, namely, the EAM climate system. In addition, further progress has been made in diagnosing the internal physical mechanisms of EAM climate system variability, especially regarding the characteristics and properties of the East Asia-Pacific (EAP) teleconnection over East Asia and the North Pacific, the "Silk Road" teleconnection along the westerly jet stream in the upper troposphere over the Asian continent, and the dynamical effects of quasi-stationary planetary wave activity on EAM system variability. At the end of the paper, some scientific problems regarding understanding the EAM system variability are proposed for further study.

  20. A temperature-sensitive allele of a putative mRNA splicing helicase down-regulates many cell wall genes and causes radial swelling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Howles, Paul A; Gebbie, Leigh K; Collings, David A; Varsani, Arvind; Broad, Ronan C; Ohms, Stephen; Birch, Rosemary J; Cork, Ann H; Arioli, Tony; Williamson, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    The putative RNA helicase encoded by the Arabidopsis gene At1g32490 is a homolog of the yeast splicing RNA helicases Prp2 and Prp22. We isolated a temperature-sensitive allele (rsw12) of the gene in a screen for root radial swelling mutants. Plants containing this allele grown at the restrictive temperature showed weak radial swelling, were stunted with reduced root elongation, and contained reduced levels of cellulose. The role of the protein was further explored by microarray analysis. By using both fold change cutoffs and a weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA) to investigate coexpression of genes, we found that the radial swelling phenotype was not linked to genes usually associated with primary cell wall biosynthesis. Instead, the mutation has strong effects on expression of secondary cell wall related genes. Many genes potentially associated with secondary walls were present in the most significant WGCNA module, as were genes coding for arabinogalactans and proteins with GPI anchors. The proportion of up-regulated genes that possess introns in rsw12 was above that expected if splicing was unrelated to the activity of the RNA helicase, suggesting that the helicase does indeed play a role in splicing in Arabidopsis. The phenotype may be due to a change in the expression of one or more genes coding for cell wall proteins. PMID:27008640

  1. Reduced Methylprednisolone Clearance Causing Prolonged Pharmacodynamics in a Healthy Subject Was Not Associated With CYP3A5*3 Allele or a Change in Diet Composition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Jun; Jusko, William J.; Salaita, Christine G.; Calis, Karim A.; Jann, Michael W.; Spratlin, Vicky E.; Goldstein, Joyce A.; Hon, Yuen Yi

    2014-01-01

    The influence of diet and genetics was investigated in a healthy white person who had distinctly low methylprednisolone clearance. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter values were similar on 2 occasions during the consumption of a low-carbohydrate diet and a Weight Watchers diet, indicating that the decreased clearance was unlikely attributable to a change in diet composition. Although the subject was found to be homozygous for CYP3A5*3, genetic findings were not significant for a number of other CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 allelic variants. Because of the high prevalence of CYP3A5*3/*3 in whites and because 5 of 7 white control subjects are also homozygous for CYP3A5*3, this genotype cannot fully explain the reduced metabolism of the drug. Other genetic or contributing factors might have been involved. New polymerase chain reaction–based genotyping methods for functionally defective CYP3A5*6, *8, *9, and *10 alleles were developed in this study. These assays will be useful for CYP3A5 genotype analysis in future clinical studies. PMID:16638735

  2. Photocentric variability of quasars caused by variations in their inner structure: consequences for Gaia measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popović, L. Č.; Jovanović, P.; Stalevski, M.; Anton, S.; Andrei, A. H.; Kovačević, J.; Baes, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. We study the photocenter position variability caused by variations in the quasar inner structure. We consider the variability in the accretion disk emissivity and torus structure variability caused by the different illumination by the central source. We discuss the possible detection of these effects by Gaia. Observations of the photocenter variability in two AGNs, SDSS J121855+020002 and SDSS J162011+1724327 have been reported and discussed. Aims: For variations in the quasar inner structure, we explore how much this effect can affect the position determination and whether it can (or not) be detected with the Gaia mission. Methods: We use models of (a) a relativistic disk, including the perturbation that can increase the brightness of part of the disk, and consequently offset the photocenter position, and (b) a dusty torus that absorbs and re-emits the incoming radiation from the accretion disk (central continuum source). We estimate the value of the photocenter offset caused by these two effects. Results: We found that perturbations in the inner structure can cause a significant offset to the photocenter. This offset depends on the characteristics of both the perturbation and accretion disk and on the structure of the torus. In the case of the two considered QSOs, the observed photocenter offsets cannot be explained by variations in the accretion disk and other effects should be considered. We discuss the possibility of exploding stars very close to the AGN source, and also that there are two variable sources at the center of these two AGNs that may indicate a binary supermassive black hole system on a kpc (pc) scale. Conclusions: The Gaia mission seems to be very promising, not only for astrometry, but also for exploring the inner structure of AGNs. We conclude that variations in the quasar inner structure can affect the observed photocenter (by up to several mas). There is a chance to observe such an effect in the case of bright and low-redshift QSOs.

  3. Causes of Decadal Climate Variability over the North Pacific and North America.

    PubMed

    Latif, M; Barnett, T P

    1994-10-28

    The cause of decadal climate variability over the North Pacific Ocean and North America is investigated by the analysis of data from a multidecadal integration with a state-of-the-art coupled ocean-atmosphere model and observations. About one-third of the low-frequency climate variability in the region of interest can be attributed to a cycle involving unstable air-sea interactions between the subtropical gyre circulation in the North Pacific and the Aleutian low-pressure system. The existence of this cycle provides a basis for long-range climate forecasting over the western United States at decadal time scales. PMID:17793457

  4. Infertility due to congenital absence of vas deferens in mainly caused by variable exon 9 skipping of the CFTR gene in heterozygous males for cystic fibrosis mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Chillon, M.; Casals, T.; Nunes, V.

    1994-09-01

    About 65% or the individuals with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) have mutations in at least one of the CFTR alleles. We have studied the phenotypic effects of the CFTR gene intron 8 polyT tract 5T allele in 90 CBAVD subjects and in parents of CF patients. This group was compared with normal individuals, and with fathers and mothers of CF patients. Allele 5T was significantly associated with CBAVD (19.6%) when compared to the general population (5.2%) ({chi}{sup 2} = 33.3%; p<<0.0001). It was represented poorly in fathers of CF patients (1.3%). Mutations were identified in one (60%) or both CFTR alleles (8.9%) of CBAVD patients. Heterozygosity for the 5T allele was strongly associated with heterozygosity for CF mutations ({chi}{sup 2} = 10.9; p<0.0004). The strong correlation between allele 5T and CBAVD, together with the low frequency of this allele in fathers of CF patients, demonstrates that variable {Delta}exon 9 produces infertility in males if associated with a CF mutation on the other chromosome. The 30% of CBAVD cases with only one CFTR mutation and without a 5T-allele may be due to other molecular mechanisms involving CFTR, distinct from {Delta}exon 9. Since there is a relatively high proportion of CBAVD without CF mutations (25%), other gene(s), distinct from CFTR, may have a role in the CBAVD phenotype.

  5. Determining the causes of fault slip rate variability for Northern Apennine thrusts on intermediate timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderson, K. L.; Anastasio, D. J.; Pazzaglia, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Apennines, representing a dynamic reorganization of the Apennine wedge. This suggests two separate causes for slip rate variability on Apennines thrusts: a high-frequency variability that is likely due to processes internal to the wedge, such as slip partitioning, and a low frequency variability that is probably caused by exter-nal forces affecting the entire Apennine wedge.

  6. Linking global climate and temperature variability to widespread amphibian declines putatively caused by disease.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Jason R; Raffel, Thomas R

    2010-05-01

    The role of global climate change in the decline of biodiversity and the emergence of infectious diseases remains controversial, and the effect of climatic variability, in particular, has largely been ignored. For instance, it was recently revealed that the proposed link between climate change and widespread amphibian declines, putatively caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), was tenuous because it was based on a temporally confounded correlation. Here we provide temporally unconfounded evidence that global El Niño climatic events drive widespread amphibian losses in genus Atelopus via increased regional temperature variability, which can reduce amphibian defenses against pathogens. Of 26 climate variables tested, only factors associated with temperature variability could account for the spatiotemporal patterns of declines thought to be associated with Bd. Climatic predictors of declines became significant only after controlling for a pattern consistent with epidemic spread (by temporally detrending the data). This presumed spread accounted for 59% of the temporal variation in amphibian losses, whereas El Niño accounted for 59% of the remaining variation. Hence, we could account for 83% of the variation in declines with these two variables alone. Given that global climate change seems to increase temperature variability, extreme climatic events, and the strength of Central Pacific El Niño episodes, climate change might exacerbate worldwide enigmatic declines of amphibians, presumably by increasing susceptibility to disease. These results suggest that changes to temperature variability associated with climate change might be as significant to biodiversity losses and disease emergence as changes to mean temperature. PMID:20404180

  7. How the Number of Alleles Influences Gene Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hat, Beata; Paszek, Pawel; Kimmel, Marek; Piechor, Kazimierz; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2007-07-01

    The higher organisms, eukaryotes, are diploid and most of their genes have two homological copies (alleles). However, the number of alleles in a cell is not constant. In the S phase of the cell cycle all the genome is duplicated and then in the G2 phase and mitosis, which together last for several hours, most of the genes have four copies instead of two. Cancer development is, in many cases, associated with a change in allele number. Several genetic diseases are caused by haploinsufficiency: Lack of one of the alleles or its improper functioning. In the paper we consider the stochastic expression of a gene having a variable number of copies. We applied our previously developed method in which the reaction channels are split into slow (connected with change of gene state) and fast (connected with mRNA/protein synthesis/decay), the later being approximated by deterministic reaction rate equations. As a result we represent gene expression as a piecewise deterministic time-continuous Markov process, which is further related with a system of partial differential hyperbolic equations for probability density functions (pdfs) of protein distribution. The stationary pdfs are calculated analytically for haploidal gene or numerically for diploidal and tetraploidal ones. We distinguished nine classes of simultaneous activation of haploid, diploid and tetraploid genes. This allows for analysis of potential consequences of gene duplication or allele loss. We show that when gene activity is autoregulated by a positive feedback, the change in number of gene alleles may have dramatic consequences for its regulation and may not be compensated by the change of efficiency of mRNA synthesis per allele.

  8. A novel allele of RAD52 that causes severe DNA repair and recombination deficiencies only in the absence of RAD51 or RAD59.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Y; Davis, A P; Symington, L S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of an intrachromosomal inverted repeat as a recombination reporter, we have shown that mitotic recombination is dependent on the RAD52 gene, but reduced only fivefold by mutation of RAD51. RAD59, a component of the RAD51-independent pathway, was identified previously by screening for mutations that reduced inverted-repeat recombination in a rad51 strain. Here we describe a rad52 mutation, rad52R70K, that also reduced recombination synergistically in a rad51 background. The phenotype of the rad52R70K strain, which includes weak gamma-ray sensitivity, a fourfold reduction in the rate of inverted-repeat recombination, elevated allelic recombination, sporulation proficiency, and a reduction in the efficiency of mating-type switching and single-strand annealing, was similar to that observed for deletion of the RAD59 gene. However, rad52R70K rad59 double mutants showed synergistic defects in ionizing radiation resistance, sporulation, and mating-type switching. These results suggest that Rad52 and Rad59 have partially overlapping functions and that Rad59 can substitute for this function of Rad52 in a RAD51 rad52R70K strain. PMID:10545446

  9. Genetic and phenotypic analysis of the mouse mutant mh2J, an Ap3d allele caused by IAP element insertion.

    PubMed

    Kantheti, Prameela; Diaz, Maria E; Peden, Andrew E; Seong, Eunju E; Dolan, David F; Robinson, Margaret S; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Burmeister, Margit L

    2003-03-01

    Mocha (mh), a mouse model for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS), is characterized by platelet storage pool deficiency, pigment dilution, and deafness as well as neurological abnormalities. The trans-Golgi/endosome adaptor-related complex AP-3 is missing in mh mice owing to a deletion in the gene encoding the delta subunit. Mice mutant for a second allele, mh(2J), are as hyperactive as mh, and display both spike wave absence and generalized tonic clonic seizures, but have less coat color dilution, no hearing loss, and no hypersynchronized EEG. Here we show that the mh(2J) mutation is due to an IAP element insertion in the Ap3d gene leading to a C-terminally truncated protein. Despite correct assembly of the AP-3 complex and localization to the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, AP-3 function in neurons remains impaired. While mh mice show a severe reduction of vesicular zinc (TIMM staining) owing to mislocalization and degradation of the Zinc transporter ZnT-3, the TIMM and ZnT-3 staining patterns in mh(2J) varies, with normal expression in hippocampal mossy fibers, but abnormal patterns in neocortex. These results indicate that the N-terminal portion of the delta subunit is sufficient for AP-3 complex assembly and subcellular localization to the TGN/endosomes, while subsequent function is regulated in part by cell-specific interactions with the C-terminal portion. PMID:12647238

  10. Quasiperiodicity in cataclysmic variable stars caused by solar-type magnetic cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Brian

    1988-01-01

    Cyclical variations of orbital periods, quiescent magnitudes and outburst intervals in the activity of cataclysmic variable binary stars are inter-related and are ascribed to variations in radii of the secondaries, caused by solar-type (sunspot) magnetic cycles. In the nova remnant DQ Herculis the observed variations in orbital period and quiescent magnitude are consistent with this mechanism. But accretion onto the white dwarf, from an accretion disk acquired from its companion, cannot explain the observed variation of the 71-second oscillations.

  11. Large-basin hydrological response to climate model outputs: uncertainty caused by internal atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfan, A.; Semenov, V. A.; Gusev, E.; Motovilov, Y.; Nasonova, O.; Krylenko, I.; Kovalev, E.

    2015-06-01

    An approach is proposed to assess hydrological simulation uncertainty originating from internal atmospheric variability. The latter is one of three major factors contributing to uncertainty of simulated climate change projections (along with so-called "forcing" and "climate model" uncertainties). Importantly, the role of internal atmospheric variability is most visible over spatio-temporal scales of water management in large river basins. Internal atmospheric variability is represented by large ensemble simulations (45 members) with the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model. Ensemble simulations are performed using identical prescribed lower boundary conditions (observed sea surface temperature, SST, and sea ice concentration, SIC, for 1979-2012) and constant external forcing parameters but different initial conditions of the atmosphere. The ensemble of bias-corrected ECHAM5 outputs and ensemble averaged ECHAM5 output are used as a distributed input for the ECOMAG and SWAP hydrological models. The corresponding ensembles of runoff hydrographs are calculated for two large rivers of the Arctic basin: the Lena and Northern Dvina rivers. A number of runoff statistics including the mean and the standard deviation of annual, monthly and daily runoff, as well as annual runoff trend, are assessed. Uncertainties of runoff statistics caused by internal atmospheric variability are estimated. It is found that uncertainty of the mean and the standard deviation of runoff has a significant seasonal dependence on the maximum during the periods of spring-summer snowmelt and summer-autumn rainfall floods. Noticeable nonlinearity of the hydrological models' results in the ensemble ECHAM5 output is found most strongly expressed for the Northern Dvina River basin. It is shown that the averaging over ensemble members effectively filters the stochastic term related to internal atmospheric variability. Simulated discharge trends are close to normally distributed around the ensemble

  12. Large-basin hydrological response to climate model outputs: uncertainty caused by the internal atmospheric variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfan, A.; Semenov, V. A.; Gusev, E.; Motovilov, Y.; Nasonova, O.; Krylenko, I.; Kovalev, E.

    2015-02-01

    An approach is proposed to assess hydrological simulation uncertainty originating from internal atmospheric variability. The latter is one of three major factors contributing to the uncertainty of simulated climate change projections (along with so-called "forcing" and "climate model" uncertainties). Importantly, the role of the internal atmospheric variability is the most visible over the spatial-temporal scales of water management in large river basins. The internal atmospheric variability is represented by large ensemble simulations (45 members) with the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model. The ensemble simulations are performed using identical prescribed lower boundary conditions (observed sea surface temperature, SST, and sea ice concentration, SIC, for 1979-2012) and constant external forcing parameters but different initial conditions of the atmosphere. The ensemble of the bias-corrected ECHAM5-outputs as well as ensemble averaged ECHAM5-output are used as the distributed input for ECOMAG and SWAP hydrological models. The corresponding ensembles of runoff hydrographs are calculated for two large rivers of the Arctic basin: the Lena and the Northern Dvina rivers. A number of runoff statistics including the mean and the SD of the annual, monthly and daily runoff, as well as the annual runoff trend are assessed. The uncertainties of runoff statistics caused by the internal atmospheric variability are estimated. It is found that the uncertainty of the mean and SD of the runoff has a distinguished seasonal dependence with maximum during the periods of spring-summer snowmelt and summer-autumn rainfall floods. A noticeable non-linearity of the hydrological models' response to the ensemble ECHAM5 output is found most strongly expressed for the Northern Dvine River basin. It is shown that the averaging over ensemble members effectively filters stochastic term related to internal atmospheric variability. The simulated trends are close to normally distributed

  13. The Holocene flood variability of rivers in the Lesser Caucasus region - natural and human causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Suchodoletz, Hans; Zielhofer, Christoph; Faust, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Flooding constitutes a serious hazard for human civilisations. In order to predict future flooding it is necessary to understand the former dynamics of river systems, i.e. causes and triggers for changes of their flood variability during the past. Fluvial sediments are generally good archives for studying flood events at centennial and millennial time scales. However, due to the discontinuous and complex character of fluvial sequences these studies have to be comprehensive and must be compared with other palaeoenvironmental archives from the studied region. Floodplains in the Caucasus area are generally densely populated and regularly hit by strong inundations. This demonstrates the urgent need to understand the flood variability of rivers in this region. Accordingly, during the last years we comparatively studied Holocene fluvial sediments along several rivers in eastern Georgia that originate from the Lesser Caucasus Mountains. These sediments are naturally outcropped in numerous sections and were investigated with geomorphologic, stratigraphic, sedimentologic and geochronologic methods. Our investigations demonstrate that the flood variability of the investigated rivers showed a similar pattern during the first part of the Holocene that obviously followed climatically-controlled vegetation changes. More humid periods were characterized by geomorphic stability indicated by soil formation, whereas more arid periods showed geomorphic activity characterized by the accumulation of fluvial sediments. In difference, the late Holocene pattern of flood variability showed increasing differences between the rivers what indicates a dominant anthropogenic influence during that period. Altogether, it appeared that the natural pattern of flood variability of this region is similar to that of other semi-arid to semi-humid regions.

  14. Consequences of the variability of the CovRS and RopB regulators among Streptococcus pyogenes causing human infections

    PubMed Central

    Friães, Ana; Pato, Catarina; Melo-Cristino, José; Ramirez, Mario

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the importance of covRS and ropB mutations in invasive disease caused by Group A Streptococci (GAS), we determined the sequence of the covRS and ropB genes of 191 isolates from invasive infections and pharyngitis, comprising a diverse set of emm types and multilocus sequence types. The production of SpeB and the activity of NAD glycohydrolase (NADase) and streptolysin S (SLS) were evaluated. The results support the acquisition of null covS alleles (predicted to eliminate protein function), resulting in downregulation of SpeB and upregulation of NADase and SLS, as a mechanism possibly contributing to higher invasiveness. Among the isolates tested, this mechanism was found to be uncommon (10% of invasive isolates) and was not more prevalent among clones with enhanced invasiveness (including M1T1) but occurred in diverse genetic backgrounds. In lineages such as emm64, these changes did not result in upregulation of NADase and SLS, highlighting the diversity of regulatory pathways in GAS. Despite abrogating SpeB production, null alleles in ropB were not associated with invasive infection. The covRS and ropB genes are under stabilising selection and no expansion of isolates carrying null alleles has been observed, suggesting that the presence of these regulators is important for overall fitness. PMID:26174161

  15. WDR73 mutations cause infantile neurodegeneration and variable glomerular kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Vodopiutz, Julia; Seidl, Rainer; Prayer, Daniela; Khan, M. Imran; Mayr, Johannes A.; Streubel, Berthold; Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Hahn, Andreas; Csaicsich, Dagmar; Castro, Christel; Assoum, Mirna; Müller, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Mancini, Grazia M. S.; Sadowski, Carolin E.; Levy, Nicolas; Mégarbané, André; Godbole, Koumudi; Schanze, Denny; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Delague, Valérie; Janecke, Andreas R.; Zenker, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Infantile-onset cerebellar atrophy (CA) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous trait. Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by microcephaly with brain anomalies including CA in some cases, intellectual disability, and early-infantile-onset nephrotic syndrome. Very recently, WDR73 deficiency was identified as the cause of GMS in five individuals. To evaluate the role of WDR73 mutations as a cause of GMS and other forms of syndromic CA, we performed Sanger or exome sequencing in 51 unrelated patients with CA and variable brain anomalies and in 40 unrelated patients with a diagnosis of GMS. We identified 10 patients from three CA and from two GMS families with WDR73 mutations including the original family described with CA, mental retardation, optic atrophy and skin abnormalities (CAMOS). There were five novel mutations, of which two were truncating and three were missense mutations affecting highly conserved residues. Individuals carrying homozygous WDR73 mutations mainly presented with a pattern of neurological and neuroimaging findings as well as intellectual disability, while kidney involvement was variable. We document postnatal onset of CA, a retinopathy, basal ganglia degeneration, and short stature as novel features of WDR73-related disease, and define WDR73-related disease as a new entity of infantile neurodegeneration. PMID:26123727

  16. Variable Clinical Presentation of an MUC1 Mutation Causing Medullary Cystic Kidney Disease Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kmoch, Stanislav; Antignac, Corinne; Robins, Vicki; Kidd, Kendrah; Kelsoe, John R.; Hladik, Gerald; Klemmer, Philip; Knohl, Stephen J.; Scheinman, Steven J.; Vo, Nam; Santi, Ann; Harris, Alese; Canaday, Omar; Weller, Nelson; Hulick, Peter J.; Vogel, Kristen; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederick F.; Tuazon, Jennifer; Deltas, Constantinos; Somers, Douglas; Megarbane, Andre; Kimmel, Paul L.; Sperati, C. John; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Waugh, David A.; McGinn, Stella; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Vylet'al, Petr; Živná, Martina; Hart, Thomas C.; Hart, P. Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives The genetic cause of medullary cystic kidney disease type 1 was recently identified as a cytosine insertion in the variable number of tandem repeat region of MUC1 encoding mucoprotein-1 (MUC1), a protein that is present in skin, breast, and lung tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the distal tubules of the kidney. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the clinical characteristics of families and individuals with this mutation. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Families with autosomal dominant interstitial kidney disease were referred for genetic analysis over a 14-year period. Families without UMOD or REN mutations prospectively underwent genotyping for the presence of the MUC1 mutation. Clinical characteristics were retrospectively evaluated in individuals with the MUC1 mutation and historically affected individuals (persons who were both related to genetically affected individuals in such a way that ensured that they could be genetically affected and had a history of CKD stage IV or kidney failure resulting in death, dialysis, or transplantation). Results Twenty-four families were identified with the MUC1 mutation. Of 186 family members undergoing MUC1 mutational analysis, the mutation was identified in 95 individuals, 91 individuals did not have the mutation, and111 individuals were identified as historically affected. Individuals with the MUC1 mutation suffered from chronic kidney failure with a widely variable age of onset of end stage kidney disease ranging from 16 to >80 years. Urinalyses revealed minimal protein and no blood. Ultrasounds of 35 individuals showed no medullary cysts. There were no clinical manifestations of the MUC1 mutation detected in the breasts, skin, respiratory system, or gastrointestinal tract. Conclusion MUC1 mutation results in progressive chronic kidney failure with a bland urinary sediment. The age of onset of end stage kidney disease is highly variable, suggesting that gene

  17. Bi-allelic CLPB mutations cause cataract, renal cysts, nephrocalcinosis and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, a novel disorder of mitochondrial protein disaggregation.

    PubMed

    Kanabus, Marta; Shahni, Rojeen; Saldanha, José W; Murphy, Elaine; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoff, William Van't; Heales, Simon; Rahman, Shamima

    2015-03-01

    Whole exome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic cause of mitochondrial disease in two siblings with a syndrome of congenital lamellar cataracts associated with nephrocalcinosis, medullary cysts and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Autosomal recessive inheritance in a gene encoding a mitochondrially targeted protein was assumed; the only variants which satisfied these criteria were c.1882C>T (p.Arg628Cys) and c.1915G>A (p.Glu639Lys) in the CLPB gene, encoding a heat shock protein/chaperonin responsible for disaggregating mitochondrial and cytosolic proteins. Functional studies, including quantitative PCR (qPCR) and Western blot, support pathogenicity of these mutations. Furthermore, molecular modelling suggests that the mutations disrupt interactions between subunits so that the CLPB hexamer cannot form or is unstable, thus impairing its role as a protein disaggregase. We conclude that accumulation of protein aggregates underlies the development of cataracts and nephrocalcinosis in CLPB deficiency, which is a novel genetic cause of 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. A common mitochondrial cause for 3-methylglutaconic aciduria appears to be disruption of the architecture of the mitochondrial membranes, as in Barth syndrome (tafazzin deficiency), Sengers syndrome (acylglycerol kinase deficiency) and MEGDEL syndrome (impaired remodelling of the mitochondrial membrane lipids because of SERAC1 mutations). We now propose that perturbation of the mitochondrial membranes by abnormal protein aggregates leads to 3-methylglutaconic aciduria in CLPB deficiency. PMID:25595726

  18. Allele-specific tumor spectrum in pten knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Karikomi, Matt; Naidu, Shan; Rajmohan, Ravi; Caserta, Enrico; Chen, Hui-Zi; Rawahneh, Maysoon; Moffitt, Julie; Stephens, Julie A; Fernandez, Soledad A; Weinstein, Michael; Wang, Danxin; Sadee, Wolfgang; La Perle, Krista; Stromberg, Paul; Rosol, Thomas J; Eng, Charis; Ostrowski, Michael C; Leone, Gustavo

    2010-03-16

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10) cause Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba (BRR) syndromes, two dominantly inherited disorders characterized by mental retardation, multiple hamartomas, and variable cancer risk. Here, we modeled three sentinel mutant alleles of PTEN identified in patients with Cowden syndrome and show that the nonsense Pten(4-5) and missense Pten(C124R) and Pten(G129E) alleles lacking lipid phosphatase activity cause similar developmental abnormalities but distinct tumor spectra with varying severity and age of onset. Allele-specific differences may be accounted for by loss of function for Pten(4-5), hypomorphic function for Pten(C124R), and gain of function for Pten(G129E). These data demonstrate that the variable tumor phenotypes observed in patients with Cowden and BRR syndromes can be attributed to specific mutations in PTEN that alter protein function through distinct mechanisms. PMID:20194734

  19. Catalogue of UBVRI photometry of T Tauri stars and analysis of the causes of their variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, William; Herbst, Debra K.; Grossman, Elan J.; Weinstein, Daryl

    1994-01-01

    A computer-based catalogue of UBVRI photoelectric photometry of T Tauri stars and their earlier type analogs has been compiled. It presently includes over 10 000 entries on 80 stars and will be updated on a regular basis; it is available on Internet. The catalogue is used to analyze the sometimes bizarre light variations of pre-main-sequence stars on time scales of days to months in an attempt to illuminate the nature and causes of the phenomenon. It is useful in discussing their light variations to divide the stars into three groups according to their spectra. These are: weak T Tauri stars (WTTS; spectral class later than K0 and W(sub H-alpha less than 10 A), classical T Tauri stars (CTTS; spectral class later than K0 and W(sub H-alpha) greater than 10 A), and early type T Tauri stars (ETTS; spectral class of K0 or earlier). Three distinct types of variability are displayed by stars in the catalogue. Type I variations are periodic in VRI and undoubtedly caused by rotational modulation of a star with an asymmetric distribution of cool spots on its surface. Irregular flare activity is sometimes seen on such stars in U and B. Type I variations are easiest to see on WTTS but are clearly present on CTTS and ETTS as well. Type II variations are caused by hot 'spots' or zones and, it is argued, result from changes in the excess or 'veiling' continuum commonly attributed to an accretion boundary layer or impact zone of a magnetically channeled accretion flow. This type of variation is seen predominantly or solely in CTTS. A subcategory, designated Type IIp, consists of stars which display periodic variations caused by hot spots. Whereas cool spots may last for hundreds or thousands of rotations, hot spots appear to come and go on a much shorter time scale. This suggests that both unsteady accretion and rotation of the star contribute to Type II variations. It is shown that a third type of variation exists among ETTS, including stars as early as A type. UX Ori is a typical

  20. High-throughput FACS-based mutant screen identifies a gain-of-function allele of the Fusarium graminearum adenylyl cyclase causing deoxynivalenol over-production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ailisa; Benfield, Aurélie H; Stiller, Jiri; Kazan, Kemal; Batley, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Donald M

    2016-05-01

    Fusarium head blight and crown rot, caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum, impose a major threat to global wheat production. During the infection, plants are contaminated with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON), which can be toxic for humans and animals. In addition, DON is a major virulence factor during wheat infection. However, it is not fully understood how DON production is regulated in F. graminearum. In order to identify regulators of DON production, a high-throughput mutant screen using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) of a mutagenised TRI5-GFP reporter strain was established and a mutant over-producing DON under repressive conditions identified. A gain-of-function mutation in the F. graminearum adenylyl cyclase (FAC1), which is a known positive regulator of DON production, was identified as the cause of this phenotype through genome sequencing and segregation analysis. Our results show that the high-throughput mutant screening procedure developed here can be applied for identification of fungal proteins involved in diverse processes. PMID:26932301

  1. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  2. Ataxia and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism with Intrafamilial Variability Caused by RNF216 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Alqwaifly, Mohammed; Bohlega, Saeed

    2016-06-15

    Gordon Holmes syndrome (GHS) is a distinct phenotype of autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia, characterized by ataxia, dementia, reproductive defects and hypogonadism; it has been recently found to be associated with RNF216 mutation. We performed whole-exome sequencing and filtered the resulting novel variants by the coordinates of the shared autozygome. We identified a novel splicing variant in RNF216 that is likely to abolish the canonical splice site at the junction of exon/intron 13 (NM_207111.3:c.2061G>A). We herein report two patients with GHS caused by a novel RNF216 mutation as the first follow up report on RNF216-related GHS, and show interfamilial variability of phenotype supporting the previously reported RNF216-related cases. PMID:27441066

  3. Bi-allelic Truncating Mutations in CEP78, Encoding Centrosomal Protein 78, Cause Cone-Rod Degeneration with Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Namburi, Prasanthi; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Khateb, Samer; Lazar, Csilla H; Kinarty, Yael; Obolensky, Alexey; Erdinest, Inbar; Marks-Ohana, Devorah; Pras, Eran; Ben-Yosef, Tamar; Newman, Hadas; Gross, Menachem; Swaroop, Anand; Banin, Eyal; Sharon, Dror

    2016-09-01

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) are a diverse group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous retinal abnormalities. The present study was designed to identify genetic defects in individuals with an uncommon combination of autosomal recessive progressive cone-rod degeneration accompanied by sensorineural hearing loss (arCRD-SNHL). Homozygosity mapping followed by whole-exome sequencing (WES) and founder mutation screening revealed two truncating rare variants (c.893-1G>A and c.534delT) in CEP78, which encodes centrosomal protein 78, in six individuals of Jewish ancestry with CRD and SNHL. RT-PCR analysis of CEP78 in blood leukocytes of affected individuals revealed that the c.893-1G>A mutation causes exon 7 skipping leading to deletion of 65bp, predicted to result in a frameshift and therefore a truncated protein (p.Asp298Valfs(∗)17). RT-PCR analysis of 17 human tissues demonstrated ubiquitous expression of different CEP78 transcripts. RNA-seq analysis revealed three transcripts in the human retina and relatively higher expression in S-cone-like photoreceptors of Nrl-knockout retina compared to rods. Immunohistochemistry studies in the human retina showed intense labeling of cone inner segments compared to rods. CEP78 was reported previously to interact with c-nap1, encoded by CEP250 that we reported earlier to cause atypical Usher syndrome. We conclude that truncating mutations in CEP78 result in a phenotype involving both the visual and auditory systems but different from typical Usher syndrome. PMID:27588452

  4. Misfolding caused by the pathogenic mutation G47R on the minor allele of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase and chaperoning activity of pyridoxine.

    PubMed

    Montioli, Riccardo; Oppici, Elisa; Dindo, Mirco; Roncador, Alessandro; Gotte, Giovanni; Cellini, Barbara; Borri Voltattorni, Carla

    2015-10-01

    Liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) enzyme, exists as two polymorphic forms, the major (AGT-Ma) and the minor (AGT-Mi) haplotype. Deficit of AGT causes Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1), an autosomal recessive rare disease. Although ~one-third of the 79 disease-causing missense mutations segregates on AGT-Mi, only few of them are well characterized. Here for the first time the molecular and cellular defects of G47R-Mi are reported. When expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant purified G47R-Mi variant exhibits only a 2.5-fold reduction of its kcat, and its apo form displays a remarkably decreased PLP binding affinity, increased dimer-monomer equilibrium dissociation constant value, susceptibility to thermal denaturation and to N-terminal region proteolytic cleavage, and aggregation propensity. When stably expressed in a mammalian cell line, we found ~95% of the intact form of the variant in the insoluble fraction, and proteolyzed (within the N-terminal region) and aggregated forms both in the soluble and insoluble fractions. Moreover, the intact and nicked forms have a peroxisomal and a mitochondrial localization, respectively. Unlike what already seen for G41R-Mi, exposure of G47R-Mi expressing cells to pyridoxine (PN) remarkably increases the expression level and the specific activity in a dose-dependent manner, reroutes all the protein to peroxisomes, and rescues its functionality. Although the mechanism of the different effect of PN on the variants G47R-Mi and G41R-Mi remains elusive, the chaperoning activity of PN may be of value in the therapy of patients bearing the G47R mutation. PMID:26149463

  5. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea: causes and mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, Rune G.

    2016-08-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations in the sea-ice cover, which then cause massive changes in the ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Here we describe the mechanism driving surface temperatures and heat fluxes in the Barents Sea based primarily on analyzes of one global coupled climate model. It is found that the ocean drives the low-frequency changes in surface temperature, whereas the atmosphere compensates the oceanic transport anomalies. The seasonal dependence and the role of individual components of the ocean-atmosphere energy budget are analyzed in detail, showing that seasonally-varying climate mechanisms play an important role. Herein, sea ice is governing the seasonal response, by acting as a lid that opens and closes during warm and cold periods, respectively, thereby modulating the surface heat fluxes.

  6. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  7. Causes for intraseasonal sea surface salinity variability in the western tropical Pacific Ocean and its seasonality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanlong; Han, Weiqing

    2016-01-01

    Pronounced intraseasonal variability (ISV; 20-90 day) of sea surface salinity (SSS) with a standard deviation of 0.12-0.20 psu is detected in the western tropical Pacific Ocean (PO) from measurements of Aquarius/SAC-D satellite. These variations are not spatially uniform but show distinct regional features. The Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) well simulated the observed SSS variations, and a suite of parallel experiments were performed to understand the underlying physical processes. Surface forcing by atmospheric intraseasonal oscillations which are dominated by the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is largely responsible for producing the SSS ISV, while ocean internal variability plays a secondary role. Impact of atmospheric forcing is primarily through precipitation and wind stress-driven oceanic processes. Their relative importance shows spatial variations. They have approximately equal importance in the western equatorial PO west of 155°E and the southwestern tropical PO. Wind stress effect dominates SSS ISV in the equatorial PO east of 155°E, while precipitation effect is larger in the northwestern tropical PO. In comparison, the effect of evaporation induced by wind speed change is smaller. The SSS ISV also shows evident seasonality in some areas, particularly in the far western equatorial basin and southwestern tropical PO. During boreal summer (winter), SSS ISV is enhanced (weakened) in the northwestern PO and weakened (enhanced) in the southwestern PO. Comparing with the strength of atmospheric forcing, seasonal variation of the ocean state, especially the mixed layer depth, is generally more important in causing such seasonality.

  8. Epidemiological isolation causing variable mortality in Island populations during the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, G. Dennis; Hussell, Tracy; Brundage, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Shanks et al. (2012) Epidemiological isolation causing variable mortality in Island populations during the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 417–423. Background  During the 1918 pandemic period, influenza‐related mortality increased worldwide; however, mortality rates varied widely across locations and demographic subgroups. Islands are isolated epidemiological situations that may elucidate why influenza pandemic mortality rates were so variable in apparently similar populations. Objectives  Our objectives were to determine and compare the patterns of pandemic influenza mortality on islands. Methods  We reviewed historical records of mortality associated with the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic in various military and civilian groups on islands. Results and Conclusions  Mortality differed more than 50‐fold during pandemic‐related epidemics on Pacific islands [range: 0·4% (Hawaii) to 22% (Samoa)], and on some islands, mortality sharply varied among demographic subgroups of island residents such as Saipan: Chamorros [12%] and Caroline Islanders [0·4%]. Among soldiers from island populations who had completed initial military training, influenza‐related mortality rates were generally low, for example, Puerto Rico (0·7%) and French Polynesia (0·13%). The findings suggest that among island residents, those who had been exposed to multiple, antigenically diverse respiratory pathogens prior to infection with the 1918 pandemic strain (e.g., less isolated) experienced lower mortality. The continuous circulation of antigenically diverse influenza viruses and other respiratory infectious agents makes widespread high mortality during future influenza pandemics unlikely. PMID:22226378

  9. Causes of variability in plasmasphere rotation rate: IMAGE EUV observations (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvan, D. A.; Moldwin, M.; Sandel, B. R.; Crowley, G.

    2010-12-01

    IMAGE EUV observations demonstrate that the plasmasphere usually does not corotate as assumed in simple convection models, even at low L shells. The prevailing hypothesis states that plasmaspheric subcorotation is due to enhanced auroral zone Joule heating which drives equatorward thermospheric winds. As the neutral thermospheric material moves to lower latitudes, it grows farther from the Earth’s spin axis and turns westward to conserve angular momentum. This induces a westward motion in the ionosphere (a subcorotation), which produces a change in the corotation electric field that maps out to the plasmasphere, causing a subcorotation there as well. We test this hypothesis by searching for a correlation between plasmaspheric rotation rates and several geomagnetic indices (used as proxies for enhanced Joule heating in the auroral zone). We carry out a statistical survey of plasmaspheric rotation rates over several months of IMAGE EUV data in 2001, using two different measurement techniques. Azimuthal features such as “notches” are tracked in local time over a single pass of the IMAGE satellite, both visually and using an automated cross-correlation routine. Each technique provides an estimate of the plasmasphere’s rotation rate. We find a weak correlation between rotation rate and Dst, Kp, AE, the midnight boundary index (MBI), and Joule heating estimates from assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) at L = 2.5, but not at L = 3.5. In general, lower rotation rates correspond to higher auroral and geomagnetic activity. We also make the first direct observation of plasmaspheric superrotation. The rotation rate is found to be highly variable on multi-day timescales, but the typical state of the plasmasphere is subcorotation, with inferred mean values ranging from 88% to 95% of corotation, depending on L shell. In addition, a statistical analysis shows that rotation rates near dusk are generally lower than those at dawn, suggesting that local

  10. On the causes of variability in amounts of airborne grass pollen in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morton, Julian; Bye, John; Pezza, Alexandre; Newbigin, Edward

    2011-07-01

    In Melbourne, Australia, airborne grass pollen is the predominant cause of hay fever (seasonal rhinitis) during late spring and early summer, with levels of airborne grass pollen also influencing hospital admissions for asthma. In order to improve predictions of conditions that are potentially hazardous to susceptible individuals, we have sought to better understand the causes of diurnal, intra-seasonal and inter-seasonal variability of atmospheric grass pollen concentrations (APC) by analysing grass pollen count data for Melbourne for 16 grass pollen seasons from 1991 to 2008 (except 1994 and 1995). Some of notable features identified in this analysis were that on days when either extreme (>100 pollen grains m-3) or high (50-100 pollen grains m-3) levels of grass pollen were recorded the winds were of continental origin. In contrast, on days with a low (<20 pollen grains m-3) concentration of grass pollen, winds were of maritime origin. On extreme and high grass pollen days, a peak in APC occurred on average around 1730 hours, probably due to a reduction in surface boundary layer turbulence. The sum of daily APC for each grass pollen season was highly correlated ( r = 0.79) with spring rainfall in Melbourne for that year, with about 60% of a declining linear trend across the study period being attributable to a reduction of meat cattle and sheep (and hence grazing land) in rural areas around Melbourne. Finally, all of the ten extreme pollen events (3 days or more with APC > 100 pollen grains m-3) during the study period were characterised by an average downward vertical wind anomaly in the surface boundary layer over Melbourne. Together these findings form a basis for a fine resolution atmospheric general circulation model for grass pollen in Melbourne's air that can be used to predict daily (and hourly) APC. This information will be useful to those sectors of Melbourne's population that suffer from allergic problems.

  11. Common variable immunodeficiency diagnosed during the treatment of bronchial asthma: Unusual cause of wheezing

    PubMed Central

    Akaba, Tomohiro; Kondo, Mitsuko; Toriyama, Midori; Kubo, Ayako; Hara, Kaori; Yamada, Takeshi; Yoshinaga, Kentaro; Tamaoki, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency in adults and children. We herein report a case of CVID, who was misdiagnosed with asthma due to wheezing episodes and relatively late onset. A 51-year-old woman had suffered from recurrent upper and lower airway infection for recent 2 years. She repeated wheezing attacks and was treated as asthma exacerbation triggered by infection. She was referred to our hospital for investigation and treatment. Lung function tests showed no reversibility of FEV1 by β-adrenergic agonist, but the increase of V50/V25. Chest CT showed slight to moderate bronchial wall thickening and bronchiectasis. After that, she suffered from pneumonia with wheezing attacks twice a month, and immunodeficiency was strongly suspected. Her blood tests showed marked decreases of all classes of immunoglobulin and nearly lack of memory B cells, NKT cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. She was diagnosed with CVID, and was treated with replacement of gammaglobulin. Thereafter, her wheezing episodes with infection were remarkably improved. Because the delay of diagnosis with CVID likely causes poor mortality and morbidity, a possibility of CVID should be considered in patients with frequent asthma-like symptoms due to recurrent airway infection. PMID:26744651

  12. Mutations in MYH7 cause Multi-minicore Disease (MmD) with variable cardiac involvement.

    PubMed

    Cullup, T; Lamont, P J; Cirak, S; Damian, M S; Wallefeld, W; Gooding, R; Tan, S V; Sheehan, J; Muntoni, F; Abbs, S; Sewry, C A; Dubowitz, V; Laing, N G; Jungbluth, H

    2012-12-01

    Central Core Disease (CCD) and Multi-minicore Disease (MmD) (the "core myopathies") have been mainly associated with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) and the selenoprotein N (SEPN1) gene. A proportion of cases remain unresolved. Mutations in MYH7 encoding the beta myosin heavy chain protein have been implicated in cardiac and, less frequently, skeletal muscle disorders. Here we report four patients from two families with a histopathological diagnosis of MmD, presenting in childhood with slowly progressive muscle weakness, more proximal in Family 1 and more distal in Family 2, and variable degrees of cardiorespiratory impairment evolving later in life. There was also a strong family history of sudden death in the first family. Muscle biopsies obtained in early childhood showed multiple minicores as the most prominent feature. Sequencing of the MYH7 gene revealed heterozygous missense mutations, c.4399C>G; p.Leu1467Val (exon 32) in Family 1 and c.4763G>C; p.Arg1588Pro (exon 34) in Family 2. These findings suggest MYH7 mutations as another cause of a myopathy with multiple cores, in particular if associated with dominant inheritance and cardiac involvement. However, clinical features previously associated with this genetic background, namely a more distal distribution of weakness and an associated cardiomyopathy, may only evolve over time. PMID:22784669

  13. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, L. W.; Wesche, K.; Trachte, K.; Reudenbach, C.; Bendix, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important “water tower” that provides water for nearly 40% of the world’s population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding.

  14. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, L. W.; Wesche, K.; Trachte, K.; Reudenbach, C.; Bendix, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important “water tower” that provides water for nearly 40% of the world’s population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding. PMID:27073126

  15. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, L W; Wesche, K; Trachte, K; Reudenbach, C; Bendix, J

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important "water tower" that provides water for nearly 40% of the world's population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding. PMID:27073126

  16. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Lukas; Wesche, Karsten; Trachte, Katja; Reudenbach, Christoph; Miehe, Georg; Bendix, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    former studies, were not their exclusive driver. Thus, it can be concluded that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the Tibetan Plateau since the new millennium.

  17. Complete Haplotype Sequence of the Human Immunoglobulin Heavy-Chain Variable, Diversity, and Joining Genes and Characterization of Allelic and Copy-Number Variation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Corey T.; Steinberg, Karyn M.; Huddleston, John; Warren, Rene L.; Malig, Maika; Schein, Jacqueline; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Joy, Jeffrey B.; Scott, Jamie K.; Graves, Tina A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Holt, Robert A.; Eichler, Evan E.; Breden, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus (IGH) encodes variable (IGHV), diversity (IGHD), joining (IGHJ), and constant (IGHC) genes and is responsible for antibody heavy-chain biosynthesis, which is vital to the adaptive immune response. Programmed V-(D)-J somatic rearrangement and the complex duplicated nature of the locus have impeded attempts to reconcile its genomic organization based on traditional B-lymphocyte derived genetic material. As a result, sequence descriptions of germline variation within IGHV are lacking, haplotype inference using traditional linkage disequilibrium methods has been difficult, and the human genome reference assembly is missing several expressed IGHV genes. By using a hydatidiform mole BAC clone resource, we present the most complete haplotype of IGHV, IGHD, and IGHJ gene regions derived from a single chromosome, representing an alternate assembly of ∼1 Mbp of high-quality finished sequence. From this we add 101 kbp of previously uncharacterized sequence, including functional IGHV genes, and characterize four large germline copy-number variants (CNVs). In addition to this germline reference, we identify and characterize eight CNV-containing haplotypes from a panel of nine diploid genomes of diverse ethnic origin, discovering previously unmapped IGHV genes and an additional 121 kbp of insertion sequence. We genotype four of these CNVs by using PCR in 425 individuals from nine human populations. We find that all four are highly polymorphic and show considerable evidence of stratification (Fst = 0.3–0.5), with the greatest differences observed between African and Asian populations. These CNVs exhibit weak linkage disequilibrium with SNPs from two commercial arrays in most of the populations tested. PMID:23541343

  18. Balance control impairment in obese individuals is caused by larger balance motor commands variability.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Martin; Teasdale, Normand

    2015-01-01

    It is acknowledged that various factors impaired balance control. Among them, heavy body weight is associated with poor balance control because the location of the center of mass is further away from the ankle joint. Thus, a larger active ankle torque is required to counter the greater gravitational torque. Because balance motor commands have signal-dependent noise whose standard deviation increases with the absolute value of the neural control signal, it was hypothesized that faster center of pressure speed observed in obese individuals would be related to larger balance motor commands variability. A feedback-control model and parametric system identification technique was used to estimate the variability in the balance motor commands and neural controller parameters based on previously published experimental data. Results of the neuromechanical model confirmed that the balance motor commands of obese individuals are more variable than that of lean individuals. PMID:25455209

  19. Genetic factors required to maintain repression of a paramutagenic maize pl1 allele.

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J B; Chandler, V L

    2001-01-01

    A genetic screen identified two novel gene functions required to maintain mitotically and meiotically heritable gene silencing associated with paramutation of the maize purple plant 1 (pl1) locus. Paramutation at pl1 leads to heritable alterations of pl1 gene regulation; the Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele, which typically confers strong pigmentation to juvenile and adult plant structures, changes to a lower expression state termed Pl'-mahogany (Pl'). Paramutation spontaneously occurs at low frequencies in Pl-Rh homozygotes but always occurs when Pl-Rh is heterozygous with Pl'. We identified four mutations that caused increased Pl' pigment levels. Allelism tests revealed that three mutations identified two new maize loci, required to maintain repression 1 (rmr1) and rmr2 and that the other mutation represents a new allele of the previously described mediator of paramutation 1 (mop1) locus. RNA levels from Pl' are elevated in rmr mutants and genetic tests demonstrate that Pl' can heritably change back to Pl-Rh in rmr mutant individuals at variable frequencies. Pigment levels controlled by two pl1 alleles that do not participate in paramutation are unaffected in rmr mutants. These results suggest that RMR functions are intimately involved in maintaining the repressed expression state of paramutant Pl' alleles. Despite strong effects on Pl' repression, rmr mutant plants have no gross developmental abnormalities even after several generations of inbreeding, implying that RMR1 and RMR2 functions are not generally required for developmental homeostasis. PMID:11139517

  20. The parasite that causes whirling disease, Myxobolus cerebralis, is genetically variable within and across spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Lodh, Nilanjan; Kerans, Billie L; Stevens, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of parasite populations on the natural landscape can reveal important aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology and can indicate parasite dispersal across the landscape. Myxobolus cerebralis (Myxozoa: Myxosporea), the causative agent of whirling disease in the definitive host Tubifex tubifex, is native to Eurasia and has spread to more than 25 states in the USA. The small amounts of data available to date suggest that M. cerebralis has little genetic variability. We examined the genetic variability of parasites infecting the definitive host T. tubifex in the Madison River, MT, and also from other parts of North America and Europe. We cloned and sequenced 18S ribosomal DNA and the internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS-1) gene. Five oligochaetes were examined for 18S and five for ITS-1, only one individual was examined for both genes. We found two different 18S rRNA haplotypes of M. cerebralis from five worms and both intra- and interworm genetic variation for ITS-1, which showed 16 different haplotypes from among 20 clones. Comparison of our sequences with those from other studies revealed M. cerebralis from MT was similar to the parasite collected from Alaska, Oregon, California, and Virginia in the USA and from Munich, Germany, based on 18S, whereas parasite sequences from West Virginia were very different. Combined with the high haplotype diversity of ITS-1 and uniqueness of ITS-1 haplotypes, our results show that M. cerebralis is more variable than previously thought and raises the possibility of multiple introductions of the parasite into North America. PMID:22151695

  1. Orthostatic stress causes immediately increased blood pressure variability in women with vasovagal syncope.

    PubMed

    Reulecke, S; Charleston-Villalobos, S; Voss, A; González-Camarena, R; González-Hermosillo, J; Gaitán-González, M J; Hernández-Pacheco, G; Schroeder, R; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2016-04-01

    The cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation has been studied mainly by hemodynamic responses during different physical stressors. In this study, dynamics of autonomic response to an orthostatic challenge was investigated by hemodynamic variables and by diverse linear and nonlinear indices calculated from time series of beat-to-beat intervals (BBI), respiratory cycle duration (RESP), systolic (SYS) and diastolic (DIA) blood pressure. This study included 16 young female patients (SYN) with vasovagal syncope and 12 age-matched female controls (CON). The subjects were enrolled in a head-up tilt (HUT) test, breathing normally, including 5min of baseline (BL, supine position) and 18min of 70° orthostatic phase (OP). To increase the time resolution of the analysis the time series were segmented in five-minute overlapping windows with a shift of 1min. Hemodynamic parameters did not show any statistical differences between SYN and CON. Time domain linear analysis revealed increased respiratory frequency and increased blood pressure variability (BPV) in patients during OP meaning increased sympathetic activity and vagal withdrawal. Frequency domain analysis confirmed a predominance of sympathetic tone by steadily increased values of low over high frequency power in BBI and of low frequency power in SYS and DIA in patients during OP. The nonlinear analysis by symbolic dynamics seemed to be highly suitable for differentiation of SYN and CON in the early beginning of OP, i.e., 5min after tilt-up. In particular the index SYS_plvar3 showed less patterns of low variability in patients reflecting a steadily increase in both BPV and sympathetic activity. The proposed dynamical analysis could lead to a better understanding of the temporal underlying mechanisms in healthy subjects and patients under orthostatic stress. PMID:26775735

  2. A novel mutation of the ACADM gene (c.145C>G) associated with the common c.985A>G mutation on the other ACADM allele causes mild MCAD deficiency: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A female patient, with normal familial history, developed at the age of 30 months an episode of diarrhoea, vomiting and lethargy which resolved spontaneously. At the age of 3 years, the patient re-iterated vomiting, was sub-febrile and hypoglycemic, fell into coma, developed seizures and sequels involving right hemi-body. Urinary excretion of hexanoylglycine and suberylglycine was low during this metabolic decompensation. A study of pre- and post-prandial blood glucose and ketones over a period of 24 hours showed a normal glycaemic cycle but a failure to form ketones after 12 hours fasting, suggesting a mitochondrial β-oxidation defect. Total blood carnitine was lowered with unesterified carnitine being half of the lowest control value. A diagnosis of mild MCAD deficiency (MCADD) was based on rates of 1-14C-octanoate and 9, 10-3H-myristate oxidation and of octanoyl-CoA dehydrogenase being reduced to 25% of control values. Other mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation proteins were functionally normal. De novo acylcarnitine synthesis in whole blood samples incubated with deuterated palmitate was also typical of MCADD. Genetic studies showed that the patient was compound heterozygous with a sequence variation in both of the two ACADM alleles; one had the common c.985A>G mutation and the other had a novel c.145C>G mutation. This is the first report for the ACADM gene c.145C>G mutation: it is located in exon 3 and causes a replacement of glutamine to glutamate at position 24 of the mature protein (Q24E). Associated with heterozygosity for c.985A>G mutation, this mutation is responsible for a mild MCADD phenotype along with a clinical story corroborating the emerging literature view that patients with genotypes representing mild MCADD (high residual enzyme activity and low urinary levels of glycine conjugates), similar to some of the mild MCADDs detected by MS/MS newborn screening, may be at risk for disease presentation. PMID:20923556

  3. Causes of variability in concentrations and diastereomer patterns of hexabromocyclododecanes in indoor dust.

    PubMed

    Harrad, Stuart; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Covaci, Adrian

    2009-04-01

    The temporal evolution of concentrations of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), and pentabromocyclododecenes (PBCDs--degradation products of HBCDs) was studied in separate aliquots of a well-homogenized indoor dust sample. These were: (a) exposed to natural light, and (b) kept in the dark. Results revealed a rapid photolytically-mediated shift from gamma-HBCD to alpha-HBCD that was complete after 1 week of exposure, and a slower degradative loss of HBCDs via elimination of HBr. Under the specific conditions studied in this experiment, calculated half-lives (t(1/2)) showed the decay in SigmaHBCDs concentration was faster in light-exposed samples (t(1/2)=12 weeks), than in light-shielded dust (t(1/2)=26 weeks). Within-room spatial and temporal variability in concentrations and diastereomer patterns were studied in six and three rooms respectively. While in some rooms, little variability was detected, in others it was substantial. In one room, concentrations of SigmaHBCDs and the relative abundance of gamma-HBCD declined dramatically with increasing distance from a TV. The same TV appears to have influenced strongly the temporal variation in that room; with higher concentrations observed in its presence and when the TV was moved closer to the area sampled. Significant negative correlation was observed in one room between concentrations of SigmaHBCDs and dust loading (g dust m(-2) floor), implying "dilution" occurs at higher dust loadings. PMID:19062095

  4. Seasonal renewal time variability in the Curonian Lagoon caused by atmospheric and hydrographical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, G.; Zemlys, P.; Erturk, A.; Razinkova-Baziukas, A.; Mėžinė, J.; Ferrarin, C.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the water exchanges in the Curonian Lagoon based on the hydraulic regime and the atmospheric forcings. A finite element hydrodynamic model has been applied to the Curonian Lagoon to simulate the circulation patterns for ten years. With the help of a transport-diffusion model the salinity distribution and the renewal times of the Curonian Lagoon have been investigated when forced by river runoff, wind and Baltic Sea level fluctuations. The hydrodynamic model has been validated using in situ salinity measurements. Model results show that the variability depends mainly on seasonal changes in hydrographic forcing and on the dominant wind regimes that prevail over the Curonian Lagoon. Exchanges between the southern and the northern part of the lagoon are mostly depended on the wind forcing and are much less influenced by the river discharge. However, when looking at the water renewal time, the most important factor is the river discharge into the lagoon. Other physical forcings are only marginally determining the renewal time, and not even ice cover is able to influence it. Even if ice cover is strongly inhibiting the exchanges between southern and northern lagoon, it is basically not able to change the absolute value of the renewal times.

  5. Seasonal renewal time variability in the Curonian Lagoon caused by atmospheric and hydrographical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Zemlys, Petras; Erturk, Ali; Razinkova-Baziukas, Arturas; Mėžinė, Jovita; Ferrarin, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the water exchanges in the Curonian Lagoon based on the hydraulic regime and the atmospheric forcings. A finite element hydrodynamic model has been applied to the Curonian Lagoon to simulate the circulation patterns for 10 years. With the help of a transport-diffusion model, the salinity distribution and the renewal times of the Curonian Lagoon have been investigated when forced by river runoff, wind, and Baltic Sea level fluctuations. The hydrodynamic model has been validated using in situ salinity measurements. Model results show that the variability depends mainly on seasonal changes in hydrographic forcing and on the dominant wind regimes that prevail over the Curonian Lagoon. Exchanges between the southern and the northern part of the lagoon mostly depend on the wind forcing and are much less influenced by the river discharge. However, when looking at the water renewal time, the most important factor is the river discharge into the lagoon. Other physical forcings only marginally determine the renewal time, and not even ice cover is able to influence it. Even if ice cover strongly inhibits the exchanges between the southern and northern lagoon, it is basically not able to change the absolute value of the renewal times.

  6. Age of oil palm plantations causes a strong change in surface biophysical variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabajo, Clifton; le Maire, Guerric; Knohl, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades, Indonesia has experienced dramatic land transformations with an expansion of oil palm plantations at the expense of tropical forests. As vegetation is a modifier of the climate near the ground these large-scale land transformations are expected to have major impacts on the surface biophysical variables i.e. surface temperature, albedo, and vegetation indices, e.g. the NDVI. Remote sensing data are needed to assess such changes at regional scale. We used 2 Landsat images from Jambi Province in Sumatra/Indonesia covering a chronosequence of oil palm plantations to study the 20 - 25 years life cycle of oil palm plantations and its relation with biophysical variables. Our results show large differences between the surface temperature of young oil palm plantations and forest (up to 9.5 ± 1.5 °C) indicating that the surface temperature is raised substantially after the establishment of oil palm plantations following the removal of forests. During the oil palm plantation lifecycle the surface temperature differences gradually decreases and approaches zero around an oil palm plantation age of 10 years. Similarly, NDVI increases and the albedo decreases approaching typical values of forests. Our results show that in order to assess the full climate effects of oil palm expansion biophysical processes play an important role and the full life cycle of oil palm plantations need to be considered.

  7. Null alleles of the COL5A1 gene of type V collagen are a cause of the classical forms of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (types I and II).

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, U; Atkinson, M; Hoffman, G G; Greenspan, D S; Byers, P H

    2000-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) types I and II, which comprise the classical variety, are well characterized from the clinical perspective, but it has been difficult to identify the molecular basis of the disorder in the majority of affected individuals. Several explanations for this failure to detect mutations have been proposed, including genetic heterogeneity, failure of allele expression, and technical difficulties. Genetic heterogeneity has been confirmed as an explanation for such failure, since causative mutations have been identified in the COL5A1, COL5A2, and tenascin X genes and since they have been inferred in the COL1A2 gene. Nonetheless, in the majority of families with autosomal dominant inheritance of EDS, there appears to be linkage to loci that contain the COL5A1 or COL5A2 genes. To determine whether allele-product instability could explain failure to identify some mutations, we analyzed polymorphic variants in the COL5A1 gene in 16 individuals, and we examined mRNA for the expression of both alleles and for alterations in splicing. We found a splice-site mutation in a single individual, and we determined that, in six individuals, the mRNA from one COL5A1 allele either was not expressed or was very unstable. We identified small insertions or deletions in five of these cell strains, but we could not identify the mutation in the sixth individual. Thus, although as many as one-half of the mutations that give rise to EDS types I and II are likely to lie in the COL5A1 gene, a significant portion of them result in very low levels of mRNA from the mutant allele, as a consequence of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. PMID:10796876

  8. Spatiotemporal variability of the latest frosts in Korean Peninsula and causes of atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Ah; Byun, Hi-Ryong

    2016-02-01

    The spatiotemporal distributions of latest frost dates (LFDs) on the Korean Peninsula and the atmospheric circulation patterns that resulted in the latest frosts (LFs) were investigated through the use of historical records and modern weather observation data. During the modern observation period since 1904, the most recent record of LF was April 28, 2013 at Daegwallyeong. On average, the LF occurred in Korea between March 17 (at Wando) and May 10 (at Daegwallyeong). Positive correlations were found between LFD and altitude and latitude. Additionally, inter- annual variation of LFD showed a trend of progressively earlier dates at 32 of the 48 stations at which data were available. The historic data set consists of the following: 39 records of frosts during the Three-States Period (57 BC-998 AD): 34 records during the Goryeo Dynasty (998-1391), among which the latest record was in July of the lunar calendar: and 498 during the Joseon Dynasty (1392-1928) with one LF dated August 31, 1417 on the solar calendar. Regarding LFD from The Annals of the Joseon Dynasty, April has 11 records, May has 55, June has 46, July has 21, and August has 5 LFD records. Various meteorological causes of the latest LF were then established. Firstly, a cold and humid north-easterly current that originates from high latitudes of more than 50°N and passes through the East Sea is considered one of the dominant causes of LF. Secondly, strong radiative cooling under clear skies is suspected as another important cause. Thirdly, a specific pressure pattern, called the `inverted-S contour' or `North High and South Low (NHSL) pattern' was found to be a favorable condition for LF. Finally the latest LF was not found to be related to monthly or longer-term cold climate, but are instead linked to the abrupt development of a strong ridge over inland Asia and the unusual southward movement of the tall polar cyclone over the North Pacific Ocean.

  9. Clinical relevance of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: Exploring the role of new variants including the first SCAD-disease-causing allele carrying a synonymous mutation.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Rodolfo; Caciotti, Anna; Funghini, Silvia; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Mooney, Sean D; Cai, Binghuang; Proncopio, Elena; Donati, Maria Alice; Baronio, Federico; Bettocchi, Ilaria; Cassio, Alessandra; Biasucci, Giacomo; Bordugo, Andrea; la Marca, Giancarlo; Guerrini, Renzo; Morrone, Amelia

    2016-06-01

    Short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation caused by ACADS gene alterations. SCADD is a heterogeneous condition, sometimes considered to be solely a biochemical condition given that it has been associated with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from no symptoms or signs to metabolic decompensation occurring early in life. A reason for this variability is due to SCAD alterations, such as the common p.Gly209Ser, that confer a disease susceptibility state but require a complex multifactorial/polygenic condition to manifest clinically. Our study focuses on 12 SCADD patients carrying 11 new ACADS variants, with the purpose of defining genotype-phenotype correlations based on clinical data, metabolite evaluation, molecular analyses, and in silico functional analyses. Interestingly, we identified a synonymous variant, c.765G > T (p.Gly255Gly) that influences ACADS mRNA splicing accuracy. mRNA characterisation demonstrated that this variant leads to an aberrant splicing product, harbouring a premature stop codon. Molecular analysis and in silico tools are able to characterise ACADS variants, identifying the severe mutations and consequently indicating which patients could benefit from a long term follow- up. We also emphasise that synonymous mutations can be relevant features and potentially associated with SCADD. PMID:27051597

  10. Clinical relevance of short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) deficiency: Exploring the role of new variants including the first SCAD-disease-causing allele carrying a synonymous mutation

    PubMed Central

    Tonin, Rodolfo; Caciotti, Anna; Funghini, Silvia; Pasquini, Elisabetta; Mooney, Sean D.; Cai, Binghuang; Proncopio, Elena; Donati, Maria Alice; Baronio, Federico; Bettocchi, Ilaria; Cassio, Alessandra; Biasucci, Giacomo; Bordugo, Andrea; la Marca, Giancarlo; Guerrini, Renzo; Morrone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain acyl-coA dehydrogenase deficiency (SCADD) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation caused by ACADS gene alterations. SCADD is a heterogeneous condition, sometimes considered to be solely a biochemical condition given that it has been associated with variable clinical phenotypes ranging from no symptoms or signs to metabolic decompensation occurring early in life. A reason for this variability is due to SCAD alterations, such as the common p.Gly209Ser, that confer a disease susceptibility state but require a complex multifactorial/polygenic condition to manifest clinically. Our study focuses on 12 SCADD patients carrying 11 new ACADS variants, with the purpose of defining genotype–phenotype correlations based on clinical data, metabolite evaluation, molecular analyses, and in silico functional analyses. Interestingly, we identified a synonymous variant, c.765G > T (p.Gly255Gly) that influences ACADS mRNA splicing accuracy. mRNA characterisation demonstrated that this variant leads to an aberrant splicing product, harbouring a premature stop codon. Molecular analysis and in silico tools are able to characterise ACADS variants, identifying the severe mutations and consequently indicating which patients could benefit from a long term follow- up. We also emphasise that synonymous mutations can be relevant features and potentially associated with SCADD. PMID:27051597

  11. Genetic variability of human adenovirus type 8 causing epidemic and sporadic cases of keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Fedaoui, Nadia; Ayed, Narjess Ben; Yahia, Ahlem Ben; Hammami, Walid; Touzi, Henda; Triki, Henda

    2016-06-01

    Human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-8) is a main aetiological agent of keratoconjunctivitis. It has been reported from both epidemic and sporadic cases. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic characteristics and chronological pattern of HAdV-8 strains that have been circulating in Tunisia over a 14-year period. Fourteen HAdV-8 isolates from a keratoconjunctivitis outbreak that occurred in 2000 and from sporadic cases between 2001 and 2013 were studied. Nucleotide sequences from the hexon, fiber and penton base genes were determined, including hypervariable regions of the hexon (loops 1 and 2), the fiber (knob) and the penton base (HVR 1 and RGD loops). The sequences were compared to each other and to those of HAdV-8 strains. The Tunisian sequences were unique when compared to the previously published sequences. Also, despite a relatively low degree of genetic variation in the three genomic regions, phylogenetic analysis and alignment of amino acid sequences showed that the sequence from the year 2000 and two other sequences from the year 2013 were similar to each other and differed from the isolates that circulated in the intervening year by two main amino acid changes in the loop 1 hexon gene and the knob-fiber gene. Our results confirm the genetic variability of HAdV-8 and document the chronological changes of circulating genetic variants. PMID:26957298

  12. Genome variability of human adenovirus type 8 causing epidemic keratoconjunctivitis during 1986-2003 in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xue-Hai; Aoki, Koki; Ariga, Toshihide; Ishida, Susumu; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a contagious acute conjunctivitis associated with community-acquired infection. Human adenovirus type 8 (HAdV-8) is one of the major serotypes isolated from patients with EKC. DNA restriction enzyme analyses were performed to investigate the genetic characteristics of the isolates and their chronological pattern. Methods Viral samples were taken from 11 strains isolated from sporadic cases of EKC and identified as HAdV-8 by the neutralization method with type-specific antiserum against HAdV-8 between 1986 and 2003 in Japan. DNA restriction enzyme analysis included six restriction enzymes: BamHI, HindIII, PstI, SacI, SalI, and SmaI. Results The restriction patterns revealed that the genome types were HAdV-8A and HAdV-8B in 1986, HAdV-8K in 1991, and HAdV-8E in 1996. HAdV-8K was a new genome type revealed with the enzyme SacI. Two strains isolated in 2003 exhibited identical restriction patterns as HAdV-54, which was described in 2008 and collected from Japanese patients in 2000. Conclusions Genetic changes might occur chronologically in HAdV-8. HAdV-8 displays considerable variability. The investigations of these variants might be helpful for defining the evolutionary tendency and to predict future outbreaks of HAdV infection. PMID:22171158

  13. The Nature and Cause of Spectral Variability in LMC X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlen, L.; Smith, D. M.; Scank, J. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a long-term observation campaign of the extragalactic wind-accreting black-hole X-ray binary LMC X-1, using the Proportional Counter Array on the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The observations show that LMC X-1's accretion disk exhibits an anomalous temperature-luminosity relation. We use deep archival RXTE observations to show that large movements across the temperature-luminosity space occupied by the system can take place on time scales as short as half an hour. These changes cannot be adequately explained by perturbations that propagate from the outer disk on a viscous timescale. We propose instead that the apparent disk variations reflect rapid fluctuations within the Compton up-scattering coronal material, which occults the inner parts of the disk. The expected relationship between the observed disk luminosity and apparent disk temperature derived from the variable occultation model is quantitatively shown to be in good agreement with the observations. Two other observations support this picture: an inverse correlation between the flux in the power-law spectral component and the fitted inner disk temperature, and a near-constant total photon flux, suggesting that the inner disk is not ejected when a lower temperature is observed.

  14. Causes of variability in light absorption by particles in snow at sites in Idaho and Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doherty, Sarah J.; Hegg, Dean A.; Johnson, James E.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Dang, Cheng; Warren, Stephen G.

    2016-05-01

    A characterization of black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing particles in snow is presented for three mountain valley sites in Idaho in early 2014 and for one site near Vernal, Utah, in early 2013 and 2014. The focus of the study was on constraining the magnitude and drivers of variations in particulate absorbers in midlatitude U.S. seasonal snow. Mass mixing ratios of BC in newly fallen snow were similar at all three Idaho sites, with a median of 4.7 ± 4.2 ng BC per gram of snow. The median total light-absorbing particulate mixing ratios in new snow, expressed as an equivalent mixing ratio of BC, was 18 ± 23 ng g-1. At the Utah site, which is near sources of both fossil fuel and dust, the mixing ratios of BC varied from 7 to 45 ng g-1 across seven new snowfall samples, and the BC-equivalent mixing ratios varied from 9 to 1500 ng g-1. At all sites, dry deposition and in-snow processes increase the mixing ratio of BC by up to an order of magnitude and increase the mixing ratio of all light-absorbing particulates by up to 2 orders of magnitude, highlighting the importance of capturing these processes for accurately representing snow albedo in climate models. Spatial variability at a range of scales is found to be considerably smaller than the temporal variations at a given site, with implications for the representativeness of field samples used in observation/model comparisons.

  15. Heart Rate Variability as an Indicator of Chronic Stress Caused by Lameness in Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Kulcsár-Huszenicza, Margit; Tőzsér, János

    2015-01-01

    Most experimental studies on animal stress physiology have focused on acute stress, while chronic stress, which is also encountered in intensive dairy cattle farming–e.g. in case of lameness–, has received little attention. We investigated heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) as indicators of the autonomic nervous system activity and fecal glucocorticoid concentrations as the indicator of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in lame (with locomotion scores 4 and 5; n = 51) and non-lame (with locomotion scores 1 and 2; n = 52) Holstein-Friesian cows. Data recorded during the periods of undisturbed lying–representing baseline cardiac activity–were involved in the analysis. Besides linear analysis methods of the cardiac inter-beat interval (time-domain geometric, frequency domain and Poincaré analyses) non-linear HRV parameters were also evaluated. With the exception of standard deviation 1 (SD1), all HRV indices were affected by lameness. Heart rate was lower in lame cows than in non-lame ones. Vagal tone parameters were higher in lame cows than in non-lame animals, while indices of the sympathovagal balance reflected on a decreased sympathetic activity in lame cows. All geometric and non-linear HRV measures were lower in lame cows compared to non-lame ones suggesting that chronic stress influenced linear and non-linear characteristics of cardiac function. Lameness had no effect on fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. Our results demonstrate that HRV analysis is a reliable method in the assessment of chronic stress, however, it requires further studies to fully understand the elevated parasympathetic and decreased sympathetic tone in lame animals. PMID:26270563

  16. Environmental life cycle assessment of grain maize production: An analysis of factors causing variability.

    PubMed

    Boone, Lieselot; Van Linden, Veerle; De Meester, Steven; Vandecasteele, Bart; Muylle, Hilde; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Nemecek, Thomas; Dewulf, Jo

    2016-05-15

    To meet the growing demand, high yielding, but environmentally sustainable agricultural plant production systems are desired. Today, life cycle assessment (LCA) is increasingly used to assess the environmental impact of these agricultural systems. However, the impact results are very diverse due to management decisions or local natural conditions. The impact of grain maize is often generalized and an average is taken. Therefore, we studied variation in production systems. Four types of drivers for variability are distinguished: policy, farm management, year-to-year weather variation and innovation. For each driver, scenarios are elaborated using ReCiPe and CEENE (Cumulative Exergy Extraction from the Natural Environment) to assess the environmental footprint. Policy limits fertilisation levels in a soil-specific way. The resource consumption is lower for non-sandy soils than for sandy soils, but entails however more eutrophication. Farm management seems to have less influence on the environmental impact when considering the CEENE only. But farm management choices such as fertiliser type have a large effect on emission-related problems (e.g. eutrophication and acidification). In contrast, year-to-year weather variation results in large differences in the environmental footprint. The difference in impact results between favourable and poor environmental conditions amounts to 19% and 17% in terms of resources and emissions respectively, and irrigation clearly is an unfavourable environmental process. The best environmental performance is obtained by innovation as plant breeding results in a steadily increasing yield over 25 years. Finally, a comparison is made between grain maize production in Flanders and a generically applied dataset, based on Swiss practices. These very different results endorse the importance of using local data to conduct LCA of plant production systems. The results of this study show decision makers and farmers how they can improve the

  17. Genetic and pathogenic variability of Indian strains of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causing black rot disease in crucifers.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dinesh; Dhar, Shri; Yadava, D K

    2011-12-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Pammel) Dowson (Xcc) causing black rot of crucifers is a serious disease in India and causes >50% crop losses in favorable environmental conditions. Pathogenic variability of Xcc, X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), and X. axonopodis pv. citri (Xac) were tested on 19 cultivars of cruciferae including seven Brassica spp. viz., B. campestris, B. carinata, B. juncea, B. napus, B. nigra, B. oleracea and B. rapa, and Raphanus sativus for two consecutive years viz., 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 under field conditions at Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. Xcc (22 strains) and other species of Xanthomonas (2 strains), they formed three distinct groups of pathogenic variability i.e., Group 1, 2, and 3 under 50% minimum similarity coefficient. All strains of Xcc clustered under Groupl except Xcc-C20. The strains of Xcc further clustered in 6 subgroups viz., A, B, C, D, E, and F based on diseases reaction on host. Genetic variability of 22 strains of Xcc was studied by using Rep-PCR (REP-, BOX- and ERIC-PCR) and 10 strains for hrp (hypersensitive reaction and pathogenecity) gene sequence analysis. Xcc strains comprised in cluster 1, Xac under cluster 2, while Xoo formed separate cluster 3 based on >50% similarity coefficient. Cluster 1 was further divided into 8 subgroups viz., A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and H at 75% similarity coefficient. The hrpF gene sequence analysis also showed distinctness of Xcc strains from other Xanthomonads. In this study, genetic and pathogenic variability in Indian strains of Xcc were established, which will be of immense use in the development of resistant genotypes against this bacterial pathogen. PMID:21956666

  18. Variation in predator species abundance can cause variable selection pressure on warning signaling prey

    PubMed Central

    Valkonen, Janne K; Nokelainen, Ossi; Niskanen, Martti; Kilpimaa, Janne; Björklund, Mats; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    Predation pressure is expected to drive visual warning signals to evolve toward conspicuousness. However, coloration of defended species varies tremendously and can at certain instances be considered as more camouflaged rather than conspicuous. Recent theoretical studies suggest that the variation in signal conspicuousness can be caused by variation (within or between species) in predators' willingness to attack defended prey or by the broadness of the predators' signal generalization. If some of the predator species are capable of coping with the secondary defenses of their prey, selection can favor reduced prey signal conspicuousness via reduced detectability or recognition. In this study, we combine data collected during three large-scale field experiments to assess whether variation in avian predator species (red kite, black kite, common buzzard, short-toed eagle, and booted eagle) affects the predation pressure on warningly and non-warningly colored artificial snakes. Predation pressure varied among locations and interestingly, if common buzzards were abundant, there were disadvantages to snakes possessing warning signaling. Our results indicate that predator community can have important consequences on the evolution of warning signals. Predators that ignore the warning signal and defense can be the key for the maintenance of variation in warning signal architecture and maintenance of inconspicuous signaling. PMID:22957197

  19. A novel homozygous ISPD gene mutation causing phenotype variability in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Giovanni; Saredi, Simona; Sansanelli, Serena; Savadori, Paolo; Canioni, Eleonora; Chiapparini, Luisa; Balestri, Paolo; Malandrini, Alessandro; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Morandi, Lucia; Mora, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Within the group of muscular dystrophies, dystroglycanopathies represent an important subgroup of recessively inherited disorders. Their severity varies from the relatively mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), to the severe congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) with cerebral and ocular involvement. We describe 2 consanguineous children of Pakistani origin, carrying a new homozygous missense mutation c.367G>A (p.Gly123Arg) in the ISPD gene. Mutations in this gene have been recently reported as a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Patient 1 is an 8-year-old female with an intermediate phenotype between CMD and early LGMD; patient 2 is a 20-month-old male and second cousin of patient 1, showing a CMD phenotype. Cognitive development, brain MRI, eye examination, electrocardiogram and echocardiogram were normal in both patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the co-occurrence of both a CMD/early LGMD intermediate phenotype and a CMD within the same family carrying a homozygous ISPD mutation. PMID:25444434

  20. Abiotic and Biotic Stressors Causing Equivalent Mortality Induce Highly Variable Transcriptional Responses in the Soybean Aphid

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Laramy S.; Bickel, Ryan D.; Brisson, Jennifer A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Siegfried, Blair D.; Zera, Anthony J.; Miller, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental stress affects basic organismal functioning and can cause physiological, developmental, and reproductive impairment. However, in many nonmodel organisms, the core molecular stress response remains poorly characterized and the extent to which stress-induced transcriptional changes differ across qualitatively different stress types is largely unexplored. The current study examines the molecular stress response of the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) using RNA sequencing and compares transcriptional responses to multiple stressors (heat, starvation, and plant defenses) at a standardized stress level (27% adult mortality). Stress-induced transcriptional changes showed remarkable variation, with starvation, heat, and plant defensive stress altering the expression of 3985, 510, and 12 genes, respectively. Molecular responses showed little overlap across all three stressors. However, a common transcriptional stress response was identified under heat and starvation, involved with up-regulation of glycogen biosynthesis and molecular chaperones and down-regulation of bacterial endosymbiont cellular and insect cuticular components. Stressor-specific responses indicated heat affected expression of heat shock proteins and cuticular components, whereas starvation altered a diverse set of genes involved in primary metabolism, oxidative reductive processes, nucleosome and histone assembly, and the regulation of DNA repair and replication. Exposure to host plant defenses elicited the weakest response, of which half of the genes were of unknown function. This study highlights the need for standardizing stress levels when comparing across stress types and provides a basis for understanding the role of general vs. stressor specific molecular responses in aphids. PMID:25538100

  1. Variation in predator species abundance can cause variable selection pressure on warning signaling prey.

    PubMed

    Valkonen, Janne K; Nokelainen, Ossi; Niskanen, Martti; Kilpimaa, Janne; Björklund, Mats; Mappes, Johanna

    2012-08-01

    Predation pressure is expected to drive visual warning signals to evolve toward conspicuousness. However, coloration of defended species varies tremendously and can at certain instances be considered as more camouflaged rather than conspicuous. Recent theoretical studies suggest that the variation in signal conspicuousness can be caused by variation (within or between species) in predators' willingness to attack defended prey or by the broadness of the predators' signal generalization. If some of the predator species are capable of coping with the secondary defenses of their prey, selection can favor reduced prey signal conspicuousness via reduced detectability or recognition. In this study, we combine data collected during three large-scale field experiments to assess whether variation in avian predator species (red kite, black kite, common buzzard, short-toed eagle, and booted eagle) affects the predation pressure on warningly and non-warningly colored artificial snakes. Predation pressure varied among locations and interestingly, if common buzzards were abundant, there were disadvantages to snakes possessing warning signaling. Our results indicate that predator community can have important consequences on the evolution of warning signals. Predators that ignore the warning signal and defense can be the key for the maintenance of variation in warning signal architecture and maintenance of inconspicuous signaling. PMID:22957197

  2. Biallelic Mutations in TMEM126B Cause Severe Complex I Deficiency with a Variable Clinical Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alston, Charlotte L; Compton, Alison G; Formosa, Luke E; Strecker, Valentina; Oláhová, Monika; Haack, Tobias B; Smet, Joél; Stouffs, Katrien; Diakumis, Peter; Ciara, Elżbieta; Cassiman, David; Romain, Nadine; Yarham, John W; He, Langping; De Paepe, Boel; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Seneca, Sara; Feichtinger, René G; Płoski, Rafal; Rokicki, Dariusz; Pronicka, Ewa; Haller, Ronald G; Van Hove, Johan L K; Bahlo, Melanie; Mayr, Johannes A; Van Coster, Rudy; Prokisch, Holger; Wittig, Ilka; Ryan, Michael T; Thorburn, David R; Taylor, Robert W

    2016-07-01

    Complex I deficiency is the most common biochemical phenotype observed in individuals with mitochondrial disease. With 44 structural subunits and over 10 assembly factors, it is unsurprising that complex I deficiency is associated with clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) technologies including custom, targeted gene panels or unbiased whole-exome sequencing (WES) are hugely powerful in identifying the underlying genetic defect in a clinical diagnostic setting, yet many individuals remain without a genetic diagnosis. These individuals might harbor mutations in poorly understood or uncharacterized genes, and their diagnosis relies upon characterization of these orphan genes. Complexome profiling recently identified TMEM126B as a component of the mitochondrial complex I assembly complex alongside proteins ACAD9, ECSIT, NDUFAF1, and TIMMDC1. Here, we describe the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in six cases of mitochondrial disease from four unrelated families affected by biallelic (c.635G>T [p.Gly212Val] and/or c.401delA [p.Asn134Ilefs(∗)2]) TMEM126B variants. We provide functional evidence to support the pathogenicity of these TMEM126B variants, including evidence of founder effects for both variants, and establish defects within this gene as a cause of complex I deficiency in association with either pure myopathy in adulthood or, in one individual, a severe multisystem presentation (chronic renal failure and cardiomyopathy) in infancy. Functional experimentation including viral rescue and complexome profiling of subject cell lines has confirmed TMEM126B as the tenth complex I assembly factor associated with human disease and validates the importance of both genome-wide sequencing and proteomic approaches in characterizing disease-associated genes whose physiological roles have been previously undetermined. PMID:27374774

  3. Causes of daily cycle variability of atmospheric pollutants in a western Mediterranean urban site (DAURE campaign)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reche, Cristina; Moreno, Teresa; Viana, Mar; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Pandolfi, Marco; Amato, Fulvio; Pérez, Noemí; Moreno, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    The 2009 DAURE Aerosol Campaign (23-February-2009 to 27-March-2009 and 1-July to 31-July) (see Presentation: Pandolfi et al., section AS3.2) had the objective of characterising the main sources and chemical processes controlling atmospheric pollution due to particulate matter in the Mediterranean site of Barcelona (Spain). An urban and a rural background site were selected in order to describe both kinds of pollution setting. Several parameters were taken into consideration, including the variability of mass concentration in the coarse and fine fractions, particle number, amount of black carbon and the concentration of gaseous pollutants (SO2, H2S, NO, NO2, CO, O3) present. Comparisons between the chemical composition of ambient atmospheric particles during day versus night were made using twelve-hour PM samples. The data shown here are focused on results obtained for the urban site where two main atmospheric settings were distinguishable in winter, namely Atlantic advection versus local air mass recirculation. During the warmer months Saharan dust intrusions added a third important influence on PM background. The data demonstrate that superimposed upon these background influences on city air quality are important local contributions from road traffic, construction-demolition works and shipping. There is also a major local contribution of secondary aerosols, with elevated number of particles occurring at midday (and especially in summer) when nucleation processes are favoured by photochemistry. Concentrations of SO2 peak at different times to the other gaseous pollutants due to regular daytime onshore south-easterly breezes bringing harbour emissions into the city. Road traffic in Barcelona also has a great impact on air quality, as demonstrated by daily and weekly cycles of gaseous pollutants, black carbon and the finer fraction of PM, with peaks being coincident with traffic rush-hours (8-10h and 20-22h), levels of pollution increasing from Monday to Friday, and

  4. Modulation of penetrance by the wild-type allele in dominantly inherited erythropoietic protoporphyria and acute hepatic porphyrias.

    PubMed

    Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Robreau, Anne-Marie; Lyoumi, Said; Lamoril, Jérome; Da Silva, Vasco; Grandchamp, Bernard; Deybach, Jean-Charles

    2004-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that in an autosomal dominant porphyria, erythropoietic protoporphyria (EPP), the coinheritance of a ferrochelatase (FECH) gene defect and of a wild-type low-expressed FECH allele is generally involved in the clinical expression of EPP. This mechanism may provide a model for phenotype modulation by minor variations in the expression of the wild-type allele in the other three autosomal dominant porphyrias that exhibit incomplete penetrance: acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), variegata porphyria (VP) and hereditary coproporphyria (HC), which are caused by partial deficiencies of hydroxy-methyl bilane synthase (HMBS), protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) and coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPO), respectively. Given the dominant mode of inheritance of EPP, VP, AIP and HC, we first confirmed that the 200 overtly porphyric subjects (55 EPP, 58 AIP, 56 VP; 31 HC) presented a single mutation restricted to one allele (20 novel mutations and 162 known mutations). We then analysed the available single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present at high frequencies in the general population and spreading throughout the FECH, HMBS, PPOX and the CPO genes in four case-control association studies. Finally, we explored the functional consequences of polymorphisms on the abundance of wild-type RNA, and used relative allelic mRNA determinations to find out whether low-expressed HMBS, PPOX and the CPO alleles occur in the general population. We confirm that the wild-type low-expressed allele phenomenon is usually operative in the mechanism of variable penetrance in EPP, but conclude that this is not the case in AIP and VP. For HC, the CPO mRNA determinations strongly suggest that normal CPO alleles with low-expression are present, but whether this low-expression of the wild-type allele could modulate the penetrance of a CPO gene defect in HC families remains to be ascertained. PMID:14669009

  5. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency

    PubMed Central

    Castle, John C.; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D.; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  6. Mutated tumor alleles are expressed according to their DNA frequency.

    PubMed

    Castle, John C; Loewer, Martin; Boegel, Sebastian; Tadmor, Arbel D; Boisguerin, Valesca; de Graaf, Jos; Paret, Claudia; Diken, Mustafa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-01-01

    The transcription of tumor mutations from DNA into RNA has implications for biology, epigenetics and clinical practice. It is not clear if mutations are in general transcribed and, if so, at what proportion to the wild-type allele. Here, we examined the correlation between DNA mutation allele frequency and RNA mutation allele frequency. We sequenced the exome and transcriptome of tumor cell lines with large copy number variations, identified heterozygous single nucleotide mutations and absolute DNA copy number, and determined the corresponding DNA and RNA mutation allele fraction. We found that 99% of the DNA mutations in expressed genes are expressed as RNA. Moreover, we found a high correlation between the DNA and RNA mutation allele frequency. Exceptions are mutations that cause premature termination codons and therefore activate nonsense-mediated decay. Beyond this, we did not find evidence of any wide-scale mechanism, such as allele-specific epigenetic silencing, preferentially promoting mutated or wild-type alleles. In conclusion, our data strongly suggest that genes are equally transcribed from all alleles, mutated and wild-type, and thus transcribed in proportion to their DNA allele frequency. PMID:24752137

  7. Understanding the Dynamic and Thermodynamic Causes of Historical Trends in the Intraseasonal Variability of the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Horton, D. E.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon directly affects the lives of over 1/6th of the world's population, being critical for agriculture (>50% of the agricultural lands are still rainfed) and water availability in the subcontinent. The summer monsoon is characterized by a dominant 30-60 day mode of intraseasonal variability causing the occurrence of wet and dry spells over a substantial portion of India during the peak-monsoon months (July-August). We use a 1°x1° gridded rainfall dataset (1951-2011) from the Indian Meteorological Department to quantify changes in the mean and intraseasonal variability of daily summer monsoon rainfall across India. Using a non-parametric statistical methodology to account for temporal correlation in the time-series, we find a statistically significant decreasing trend in rainfall and increasing trend in variability in many regions, and changes in the characteristics of wet and dry spells.Using geopotential heights from the NCEP reanalysis dataset, we apply the Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs) approach (cluster analysis) to define typical upper (200mb) and lower-level (850mb) atmospheric patterns associated with extreme wet and dry conditions in the different sub-regions within India. We identify the extreme wet and dry spell patterns from the precipitation composites associated with the SOM patterns. Next, we link the contribution of the changing frequency of occurrence of the associated atmospheric patterns and increasing moisture availability in response to atmospheric warming to observed trends in these extremes. Lastly, we compare the changes in the frequency of occurrence of these atmospheric patterns in the historical and pre-industrial simulations from a single GCM to examine the influence of global warming on these extremes. Understanding the causes of these observed changes in wet and dry extremes during the monsoon season and responses to increasing global warming are relevant for managing climate-related risks, with particular relevance

  8. Substitution of Aspartate for glycine 1018 in the Type III procollagen (COL3AI) gene causes type IV Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: The mutated allele is present in most blood leukocytes of the asymptomatic and mosaic mother

    SciTech Connect

    Kontusaari, S.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. ); Stolle, C. ); Pope, F.M.

    1992-09-01

    A proband with arterial ruptures and skin changes characteristic of the type IV variant of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was found to have a single-base mutation in the type III procollagen gene, which converted the codon for glycine at amino position 1018 to a codon for aspartate. (Amino acid positions are numbered by the standard convention in which the first glycine of the triple-helical domain of an [alpha] chain is number 1. The numbers of positions in the [alpha]1(III) chains can be converted to positions in the human pro[alpha](III) chain by adding 167.). Nucleotide sequencing of overlapping PCR products in which the two alleles were distinguished demonstrated that the mutation of glycine 1018 was the only mutation that changed the primary structure of type III procollagen. The glycine substitution markedly decreased the amount of type III procollagen secreted into the medium by cultured skin fibroblasts from the proband. It is surprising that the same mutation was found in about 94% of the peripheral blood leukocytes from the proband's asymptomatic 72-year-old mother. Other tissues from the mother contained the mutated allele; it was present in 0%-100% of different samples of hair cells and in about 40% of cells from the oral epithelium. Therefore, the mother was a mosaic for the mutation. Since the mutated allele was present in cells derived from all three germ layers, the results indicated that the mutation arose by the late blastocyst stage of development. The results also indicate that assays of blood leukocytes do not always reveal mosaicism or predict phenotypic involvement of tissues, such as blood vessels, that are derived from the same embryonic cells as are leukocytes. 66 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Biased Allelic Expression in Human Primary Fibroblast Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borel, Christelle; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Santoni, Federico; Delaneau, Olivier; Fort, Alexandre; Popadin, Konstantin Y.; Garieri, Marco; Falconnet, Emilie; Ribaux, Pascale; Guipponi, Michel; Padioleau, Ismael; Carninci, Piero; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.

    2015-01-01

    The study of gene expression in mammalian single cells via genomic technologies now provides the possibility to investigate the patterns of allelic gene expression. We used single-cell RNA sequencing to detect the allele-specific mRNA level in 203 single human primary fibroblasts over 133,633 unique heterozygous single-nucleotide variants (hetSNVs). We observed that at the snapshot of analyses, each cell contained mostly transcripts from one allele from the majority of genes; indeed, 76.4% of the hetSNVs displayed stochastic monoallelic expression in single cells. Remarkably, adjacent hetSNVs exhibited a haplotype-consistent allelic ratio; in contrast, distant sites located in two different genes were independent of the haplotype structure. Moreover, the allele-specific expression in single cells correlated with the abundance of the cellular transcript. We observed that genes expressing both alleles in the majority of the single cells at a given time point were rare and enriched with highly expressed genes. The relative abundance of each allele in a cell was controlled by some regulatory mechanisms given that we observed related single-cell allelic profiles according to genes. Overall, these results have direct implications in cellular phenotypic variability. PMID:25557783

  10. An allelic series of Trp63 mutations defines TAp63 as a modifier of EEC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vernersson Lindahl, Emma; Garcia, Elvin L; Mills, Alea A

    2013-08-01

    Human Ectrodactyly, Ectodermal dysplasia, Clefting (EEC) syndrome is an autosomal dominant developmental disorder defined by limb deformities, skin defects, and craniofacial clefting. Although associated with heterozygous missense mutations in TP63, the genetic basis underlying the variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance of EEC is unknown. Here, we show that mice heterozygous for an allele encoding the Trp63 p.Arg318His mutation, which corresponds to the human TP63 p.Arg279His mutation found in patients with EEC, have features of human EEC. Using an allelic series, we discovered that whereas clefting and skin defects are caused by loss of Trp63 function, limb anomalies are due to gain- and/or dominant-negative effects of Trp63. Furthermore, we identify TAp63 as a strong modifier of EEC-associated phenotypes with regard to both penetrance and expressivity. PMID:23775923

  11. Transposon-based high sequence diversity in Avr-Pita alleles increases the potential for pathogenicity of Magnaporthe oryzae populations.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Thakur, S; Rathour, R; Variar, M; Prashanthi, S K; Singh, A K; Singh, U D; Sharma, V; Singh, N K; Sharma, T R

    2014-06-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae causes rice blast that is one of the most devastating diseases of rice worldwide. Highly variable nature of this fungus has evolved itself against major resistance genes in newly released rice varieties. Understanding the population structure of this fungus is essential for proper utilization of the rice blast resistance genes in rice crop plants. In the present study, we analyzed 133 isolates of M. oryzae from ten countries to find the allelic variation of Avr-Pita gene that is triggering Pita-mediated resistance in rice plant. The diversity analysis of these alleles showed higher level of nucleotide variation in the coding regions than the noncoding regions. Evolutionary analysis of these alleles indicates that Avr-Pita gene is under purifying selection to favor its major alleles in 133 isolates analyzed in this study. We hypothesize that the selection of favorable Avr-Pita allele in these isolates may occur through a genetic mechanism known as recurrent selective sweeps. A total of 22 functional Avr-Pita protein variants were identified in this study. Insertion of Pot3 transposable element into the promoter of Avr-Pita gene was identified in virulent isolates and was suggested that mobility of repeat elements in avirulence genes of M. oryzae seems to help in emergence of new virulent types of the pathogen. Allele-specific markers developed in this study will be helpful to identify a particular type of Avr-Pita allele from M. oryzae population which can form the basis for the deployment of Pita gene in different epidemiological regions. PMID:24633351

  12. Allelic disequilibrium and allele frequency distribution as a function of social and demographic history.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E A; Neel, J V

    1997-01-01

    Allelic disequilibrium between closely linked genes is a common observation in human populations and often gives rise to speculation concerning the role of selective forces. In a previous treatment, we have developed a population model of the expected distribution of rare variants (including private polymorphisms) in Amerindians and have argued that, because of the great expansion of Amerindian numbers with the advent of agriculture, most of these rare variants are of relatively recent origin. Many other populations have similar histories of striking recent expansions. In this treatment, we demonstrate that, in consequence of this fact, a high degree of linkage disequilibrium between two nonhomologous alleles <0.5 cM apart is the "normal" expectation, even in the absence of selection. This expectation is enhanced by the previous subdivision of human populations into relatively isolated tribes characterized by a high level of endogamy and inbreeding. We also demonstrate that the alleles associated with a recessive disease phenotype are expected to exist in a population in very variable frequencies: there is no need to postulate positive selection with respect to the more common disease-associated alleles for such entities as phenylketonuria or cystic fibrosis. PMID:8981963

  13. Somatic mosaicism and variable expressivity.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Trifiro, M A

    2001-02-01

    For more than 50 years geneticists have assumed that variations in phenotypic expression are caused by alterations in genotype. Recent evidence shows that 'simple' mendelian disorders or monogenic traits are often far from simple, exhibiting phenotypic variation (variable expressivity) that cannot be explained entirely by a gene or allelic alteration. In certain cases of androgen insensitivity syndrome caused by identical mutations in the androgen receptor gene, phenotypic variability is caused by somatic mosaicism, that is, somatic mutations that occur only in certain androgen-sensitive cells. Recently, more than 30 other genetic conditions that exhibit variable expressivity have been linked to somatic mosaicism. Somatic mutations have also been identified in diseases such as prostate and colorectal cancer. Therefore, the concept of somatic mutations and mosaicism is likely to have far reaching consequences for genetics, in particular in areas such as genetic counseling. PMID:11173116

  14. Cell membrane causes the lipid bilayers to behave as variable capacitors: A resonance with self-induction of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Monajjemi, Majid

    2015-12-01

    Cell membrane has a unique feature of storing biological energies in a physiologically relevant environment. This study illustrates a capacitor model of biological cell membrane including DPPC structures. The electron density profile models, electron localization function (ELF) and local information entropy have been applied to study the interaction of proteins with lipid bilayers in the cell membrane. The quantum and coulomb blockade effects of different thicknesses in the membrane have also been specifically investigated. It has been exhibited the quantum effects can appear in a small region of the free space within the membrane thickness due to the number and type of phospholipid layers. In addition, from the viewpoint of quantum effects by Heisenberg rule, it is shown the quantum tunneling is allowed in some micro positions while it is forbidden in other forms of membrane capacitor systems. Due to the dynamical behavior of the cell membrane, its capacitance is not fixed which results a variable capacitor. In presence of the external fields through protein trance membrane or ions, charges exert forces that can influence the state of the cell membrane. This causes to appear the charge capacitive susceptibility that can resonate with self-induction of helical coils; the resonance of which is the main reason for various biological pulses. PMID:26529673

  15. Allele frequencies at microsatellite loci: The stepwise mutation model revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Valdes, A.M.; Slatkin, M. ); Freimer, N.B. )

    1993-03-01

    The authors summarize available data on the frequencies of alleles at microsatellite loci in human populations and compare observed distributions of allele frequencies to those generated by a simulation of the stepwise mutation model. They show that observed frequency distributions at 108 loci are consistent with the results of the model under the assumption that mutations cause an increase or decrease in repeat number by one and under the condition that the product Nu, where N is the effective population size and u is the mutation rate, is larger than one. It is also shown that the variance of the distribution of allele sizes is a useful estimator of Nu and performs much better than previously suggested estimators for the stepwise mutation model. In the data, there is no correlation between the mean and variance in allele size at a locus or between the number of alleles and mean allele size, which suggests that the mutation rate at these loci is independent of allele size. 39 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Reconstructing the prior probabilities of allelic phylogenies.

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G Brian

    2002-01-01

    In general when a phylogeny is reconstructed from DNA or protein sequence data, it makes use only of the probabilities of obtaining some phylogeny given a collection of data. It is also possible to determine the prior probabilities of different phylogenies. This information can be of use in analyzing the biological causes for the observed divergence of sampled taxa. Unusually "rare" topologies for a given data set may be indicative of different biological forces acting. A recursive algorithm is presented that calculates the prior probabilities of a phylogeny for different allelic samples and for different phylogenies. This method is a straightforward extension of Ewens' sample distribution. The probability of obtaining each possible sample according to Ewens' distribution is further subdivided into each of the possible phylogenetic topologies. These probabilities depend not only on the identity of the alleles and on 4N(mu) (four times the effective population size times the neutral mutation rate) but also on the phylogenetic relationships among the alleles. Illustrations of the algorithm are given to demonstrate how different phylogenies are favored under different conditions. PMID:12072482

  17. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5′- and 3′-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients. Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3′-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5′-UTR polymorphisms). For neither the 3′- nor the 5′-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance. The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold

  18. Temperature variability caused by internal tides in the coral reef ecosystem of Hanauma bay, Hawai'i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katharine A.; Rocheleau, Greg; Merrifield, Mark A.; Jaramillo, Sergio; Pawlak, Geno

    2016-03-01

    Hanauma Bay Nature Preserve is a shallow bay (<30 m depth) on the island of O'ahu, Hawai'i, offshore of which tidal flow over deep ridge topography (500-1000 m depth) is known to generate semidiurnal frequency internal tides. A field experiment was conducted during March to June 2009 to determine whether the deep internal tides propagate shoreward to influence variability in temperature and currents in the bay environment. Temperature observations in the bay exhibit a diurnal cycle that is strongest near the surface (upper 10 m) and is associated with solar heating. In early summer (May-June), as the upper mixed layer warms and a shallow seasonal thermocline develops, temperature fluctuations in deeper bay waters (>15 m depth) become dominated by large semidiurnal variations (up to 2.7 °C) that are attributed to the internal tide. These temperature drops caused by the internal tide occur consistently twice a day under summer stratification at depths as shallow as 15 m, while smaller temperature drops (up to 1.8 °C) occur occasionally at 5 m. Although semidiurnal band temperatures vary seasonally, semidiurnal band currents exhibit similar magnitudes in spring and summer. This suggests that the weak temperature fluctuations in spring are due to the bay residing entirely in the upper mixed layer at this time of year, while internal tide energy continues to influence currents. Observations made along a cross-shore/vertical transect at the center of the bay with an autonomous underwater vehicle highlight the structure of cold intrusions that fill a large portion of the bay as well as the relationship between temperature, salinity, chlorophyll, and backscatter. Near-bottom, advective heat flux estimates at the mouth of the bay indicate that the internal tide tends to advect cold water into the bay primarily on the northeast side of the bay entrance, with cold water outflow on the opposite side. The observations highlight the role of the internal tide along with

  19. Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat genotyping of Renibacterium salmoninarum, a bacterium causing bacterial kidney disease in salmonid fish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial kidney disease (BKD), caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum, is a bacterial disease of fish, which is both geographically widespread and difficult to control. Previously, application of various molecular typing methods has failed to reliably discriminate between R. salmoninarum isolates originating from different host species and geographic areas. The current study aimed to utilize multilocus variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) to investigate inter-strain variation of R. salmoninarum to establish whether host-specific populations exist in Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout respectively. Such information would be valuable in risk assessment of transmission of R. salmoninarum in a multispecies aquaculture environment. Results The present analysis utilizing sixteen VNTRs distinguished 17 different haplotypes amongst 41 R. salmoninarum isolates originating from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout in Scotland, Norway and the US. The VNTR typing system revealed two well supported groups of R. salmoninarum haplotypes. The first group included R. salmoninarum isolates originating from both Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout circulating in Scottish and Norwegian aquaculture, in addition to the type strain ATCC33209T originating from Chinook salmon in North America. The second group comprised isolates found exclusively in Atlantic salmon, of mainly wild origin, including isolates NCIB1114 and NCIB1116 associated with the original Dee disease in Scotland. Conclusions The present study confirmed that VNTR analysis can be successfully applied to discriminate R. salmoninarum strains. There was no clear distinction between isolates originating from Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout as several haplotypes in group 1 clustered together R. salmoninarum isolates from both species. These findings indicate a potential exchange of pathogens between Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout in Scottish and Norwegian aquaculture during the last 20 years. In a scenario of

  20. Expression and Characterization of Gly-317 Variants of Factor IX Causing Variable Bleeding in Hemophilia B Patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuya; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-06-23

    We recently identified two hemophilia B patients who carried Gly-317 to Arg (FIX-G317R) or Gly-317 to Glu (FIX-G317E) substitutions in their FIX gene. The former mutation caused severe and the latter moderate bleeding in afflicted patients. To understand the molecular basis for the variable clinical manifestation of Gly-317 mutations, we prepared recombinant G317R and G317E derivatives of FIX and compared their kinetic properties to those of recombinant wild-type FIX in appropriate assay systems. Both physiological activators, factor XIa and extrinsic Tenase (factor VIIa-tissue factor), activated both zymogen variants with an ∼1.5-fold elevated K(m); however, extrinsic Tenase activated FIX-G317E with an ∼2-fold improved k(cat). By contrast to zymogen activation, the catalytic activities of both FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E enzymes toward the natural substrate, factor X, were dramatically (>4 orders of magnitude) impaired, but their apparent affinity for interaction with factor VIIIa was only slightly (<2-fold) decreased. Further studies revealed that the reactivity of FIXa-G317R and FIXa-G317E with antithrombin has been impaired 10- and 13-fold, respectively, in the absence and 166- and 500-fold, respectively, in the presence of pentasaccharide. As expected, the clotting activities of FIX variants could not be measured by the aPTT assay. These results implicate a critical role for Gly-317 in maintaining normal catalytic function for FIX/FIXa in the clotting cascade. The results further suggest that improved k(cat) of FIX-G317E activation in the extrinsic pathway together with dramatically impaired reactivity of FIXa-G317E with antithrombin may account for the less severe bleeding phenotype of a hemophilia B patient carrying the FIX-G317E mutation. PMID:26023895

  1. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And H ε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  2. An Allele Real-Coded Quantum Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Hybrid Updating Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Xian; Qian, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Hui-Deng; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    For improving convergence rate and preventing prematurity in quantum evolutionary algorithm, an allele real-coded quantum evolutionary algorithm based on hybrid updating strategy is presented. The real variables are coded with probability superposition of allele. A hybrid updating strategy balancing the global search and local search is presented in which the superior allele is defined. On the basis of superior allele and inferior allele, a guided evolutionary process as well as updating allele with variable scale contraction is adopted. And Hε gate is introduced to prevent prematurity. Furthermore, the global convergence of proposed algorithm is proved by Markov chain. Finally, the proposed algorithm is compared with genetic algorithm, quantum evolutionary algorithm, and double chains quantum genetic algorithm in solving continuous optimization problem, and the experimental results verify the advantages on convergence rate and search accuracy. PMID:27057159

  3. Allelic variation in Salmonella: an underappreciated driver of adaptation and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica causes substantial morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. Infection and intestinal colonization by S. enterica require virulence factors that mediate bacterial binding and invasion of enterocytes and innate immune cells. Some S. enterica colonization factors and their alleles are host restricted, suggesting a potential role in regulation of host specificity. Recent data also suggest that colonization factors promote horizontal gene transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes by increasing the local density of Salmonella in colonized intestines. Although a profusion of genes are involved in Salmonella pathogenesis, the relative importance of their allelic variation has only been studied intensely in the type 1 fimbrial adhesin FimH. Although other Salmonella virulence factors demonstrate allelic variation, their association with specific metadata (e.g., host species, disease or carrier state, time and geographic place of isolation, antibiotic resistance profile, etc.) remains to be interrogated. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in bacteriology have been limited by the paucity of relevant metadata. In addition, due to the many variables amid metadata categories, a very large number of strains must be assessed to attain statistically significant results. However, targeted approaches in which genes of interest (e.g., virulence factors) are specifically sequenced alleviates the time-consuming and costly statistical GWAS analysis and increases statistical power, as larger numbers of strains can be screened for non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with available metadata. Congruence of specific allelic variants with specific metadata from strains that have a relevant clinical and epidemiological history will help to prioritize functional wet-lab and animal studies aimed at determining cause-effect relationships. Such an approach should be applicable to other pathogens that are being collected

  4. Sex differences in the JAK2V617F allele burden in chronic myeloproliferative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Brady L.; Williams, Donna M.; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Rogers, Ophelia; Isaacs, Mary Ann; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Spivak, Jerry L.; Moliterno, Alison R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The JAK2V617F allele burden is a variable measure, determined by the frequency of mitotic recombination events and the expansion of JAK2V617F clones. Since variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden is partly responsible for the distinct phenotypes seen in the myeloproliferative disorders, the objective of this study was to identify modifiers of the allele burden. Design and Methods Blood samples were obtained between May 2005 and January 2009 from 272 patients with essential thrombocytosis, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis. The JAK2V617F allele burden was measured by an allele-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction using DNA from purified neutrophils. Repeated measures, on average 2 years apart, were available for 104 patients. Results Sex, age at diagnosis, and disease duration all independently influenced the JAK2V617F allele burden. When considering all patients with myeloproliferative disorders, women had significantly lower allele burdens than men (P=0.04). In those patients with repeated measures, the increase in allele burden per year between the first and second evaluations was significantly less in females than in males. Among those who experienced disease evolution, females were 4.5 times more likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to polycythemia vera, but 0.23 times as likely to have evolution from essential thrombocytosis to myelofibrosis. Conclusions Sex is an independent factor accounting for variability in the JAK2V617F allele burden. We speculate that lower allele burdens in females reflect a lower frequency of mitotic recombination events in females than in males, and should be considered when evaluating the relationship of allele burden to disease phenotype and also in evaluating responses to JAK2V617F-inhibitors. Because sex may influence genotype and/or clonal expansion, underpinning the variability in JAK2V617F allele burden, it will be important to explore factors that determine susceptibility to

  5. Intraclass and interclass correlations of allele sizes within and between loci in DNA typing data

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, R.; Srinivasan, M.R.; Andrade, M. de )

    1993-02-01

    Nonparametric measures of correlations of DNA fragment lengths within and between variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) loci are proposed to test the hypothesis of random association of allele sizes at VNTR loci. Transformations of these nonparametric correlation measures are suggested to detect deviations of their null expectations caused by population subdivision and errors of measurement of VNTR fragment lengths. Analytic and permutation-based computer simulation studies are performed to show that under the hypothesis of independence of allele sizes the transformed correlation measures are normally distributed, irrespective of the VNTR fragment size distribution in the population even when the number of individuals samples is as low as 100. Power calculations are performed to establish that the current population data on six VNTR loci in the US Hispanic sample are in accordance with the hypothesis of random association of allele sizes within and between loci. Implications of these results in the context of forensic use of DNA typing are also discussed. 29 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Correlated evolution of nucleotide substitution rates and allelic variation in Mhc-DRB lineages of primates

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; de Groot, Natasja G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2009-01-01

    Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key model of genetic polymorphism. Selection pressure by pathogens or other microevolutionary forces may result in a high rate of non-synonymous substitutions at the codons specifying the contact residues of the antigen binding sites (ABS), and the maintenance of extreme MHC allelic variation at the population/species level. Therefore, selection forces favouring MHC variability for any reason should cause a correlated evolution between substitution rates and allelic polymorphism. To investigate this prediction, we characterised nucleotide substitution rates and allelic polymorphism (i.e. the number of alleles detected in relation to the number of animals screened) of several Mhc class II DRB lineages in 46 primate species, and tested for a correlation between them. Results First, we demonstrate that species-specific and lineage-specific evolutionary constraints favour species- and lineage-dependent substitution rate at the codons specifying the ABS contact residues (i.e. certain species and lineages can be characterised by high substitution rate, while others have low rate). Second, we show that although the degree of the non-synonymous substitution rate at the ABS contact residues was systematically higher than the degree of the synonymous substitution rate, these estimates were strongly correlated when we controlled for species-specific and lineage-specific effects, and also for the fact that different studies relied on different sample size. Such relationships between substitution rates of different types could even be extended to the non-contact residues of the molecule. Third, we provide statistical evidence that increased substitution rate along a MHC gene may lead to allelic variation, as a high substitution rate can be observed in those lineages in which many alleles are maintained. Fourth, we show that the detected patterns were independent of phylogenetic constraints. When we used phylogenetic

  7. Two classes of deleterious recessive alleles in a natural population of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Amy R.; Houle, David; McMillan, Kyle; Annable, Rebecca; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2004-01-01

    Natural populations carry deleterious recessive alleles which cause inbreeding depression. We compared mortality and growth of inbred and outbred zebrafish, Danio rerio, between 6 and 48 days of age. Grandparents of the studied fish were caught in the wild. Inbred fish were generated by brother-sister mating. Mortality was 9% in outbred fish, and 42% in inbred fish, which implies at least 3.6 lethal equivalents of deleterious recessive alleles per zygote. There was no significant inbreeding depression in the growth, perhaps because the surviving inbred fish lived under less crowded conditions. In contrast to alleles that cause embryonic and early larval mortality in the same population, alleles responsible for late larval and early juvenile mortality did not result in any gross morphological abnormalities. Thus, deleterious recessive alleles that segregate in a wild zebrafish population belong to two sharply distinct classes: early-acting, morphologically overt, unconditional lethals; and later-acting, morphologically cryptic, and presumably milder alleles. PMID:15451692

  8. Resolution of HLA-B*44:02:01G, -DRB1*14:01:01G and -DQB1*03:01:01G reveals a high allelic variability among 12 European populations.

    PubMed

    Vidan-Jeras, B; Buhler, S; Dubois, V; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Jaatinen, T; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M-L; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Spyropoulou-Vlachou, M; Tordai, A; Viken, M K; Wenda, S; Nunes, J M; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tiercy, J-M

    2014-11-01

    Within the framework of the EU-funded HLA-NET action, an analysis of three G-group alleles, HLA-B*44:02:01G, DRB1*14:01:01G and DQB1*03:01:01G, was undertaken in 12 European populations. Ambiguities were resolved by polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific amplification (PCR-SSP) or PCR-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT) in a total of 5095 individuals. The results of the DRB1*14:01/14:54 ambiguity showed high relative ratios (24-53%) of DRB1*14:01 in Bulgarians, Croatians, Greeks, Italians and Slovenians, contrasting with low ratios (6-13%) in Austrians, Finnish, French, Hungarians, Norwegians and Swiss. Resolution of the B*44:02/44:27 ambiguity showed that B*44:27 had a high relative ratio in Slovenians (25.5%) and Bulgarians (37%) and low in French and Swiss (0.02-1%), and was not observed in Greeks and Italians. The highest relative ratio of DQB1*03:19 was found in Portuguese (11%), by contrast with low ratios (0-3%) in the other five populations. Analysis of the A, B, DRB1 phenotypes and family-derived haplotypes in 1719 and 403 individuals positive for either HLA-B*44:02G or DRB1*14:01G ambiguities, respectively, showed some preferential associations, such as A*26∼DRB1*14:01, B*35∼DRB1*14:01, B*38∼DRB1*14:01 and B*44:27∼DRB1*16. Because these ambiguities are located outside the peptide-binding site, they may not be recognized by alloreactive T-cells. However, because of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), the DRB1*14:01 vs DRB1*14:54 and the B*44:02 vs B*44:27 mismatches are associated to DRB3-, and C-mismatches, respectively. These results are informative for algorithms searching unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. For B*44:27-positive patients, searches are expected to be more successful when requesting donors from Southeastern-European ancestry. Furthermore, the introduction of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-typing strategies that allow resolving exon 4 (for class I) and exon 3 (for class II) polymorphisms can be expected to contribute

  9. American tegumentary leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis: assessment of parasite genetic variability at intra- and inter-patient levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic variability of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis was assessed at intra and interpatient levels of individuals with different clinical manifestations of American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL). Methods Fifty-two samples, of which 13 originated from cutaneous lesions and 39 from mucosal lesions, provided by 35 patients, were examined by low-stringency single-specific-primer PCR (LSSP-PCR) and phenetic analysis. Genetic variability of L. (V.) braziliensis, in kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) signatures, was compared both from different patients and from different lesions of the same patient. Phenetic analysis was performed to evaluate the degree of heterogeneity of the kDNA minicircles. In order to evaluate inter and intrapatient L. (V.) braziliensis genetic variability, the percentage of shared bands and analysis of the coefficients of similarity were analyzed. Results Different genetic profiles, representing kDNA signatures of the parasite, were obtained by LSSP-PCR analysis of each sample. Phenetic analysis grouped genetic profiles of different levels of differentiation from more similar to most divergent. The percentage of shared bands at the inter and intrapatient levels was 77% and 89%, respectively. Comparison of the average inter and intrapatient coefficients of similarity and their standard deviations were statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion Genetic variability at the intrapatient level was less pronounced than that between different patients. A conceptual model was proposed to better understand the complexity at both levels. PMID:23786878

  10. A single exposure to acrolein causes arrhythmogenesis, cardiac electrical dysfunction and decreased heart rate variability in hypertensive rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate an association between cardiovascular morbidity, arrhythmias, and exposure to air toxicants such as acrolein. We hypothesized that a single exposure to acrolein would increase arrhythmias and cause changes in the electrocardiogram (ECG) of hype...

  11. Rare allelic forms of PRDM9 associated with childhood leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hussin, Julie; Sinnett, Daniel; Casals, Ferran; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; de Malliard, Thibault; Busche, Stephan; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Gibson, Greg; Andersson, Anna; Holmfeldt, Linda; Ma, Jing; Wei, Lei; Zhang, Jinghui; Andelfinger, Gregor; Downing, James R.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    One of the most rapidly evolving genes in humans, PRDM9, is a key determinant of the distribution of meiotic recombination events. Mutations in this meiotic-specific gene have previously been associated with male infertility in humans and recent studies suggest that PRDM9 may be involved in pathological genomic rearrangements. In studying genomes from families with children affected by B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), we characterized meiotic recombination patterns within a family with two siblings having hyperdiploid childhood B-ALL and observed unusual localization of maternal recombination events. The mother of the family carries a rare PRDM9 allele, potentially explaining the unusual patterns found. From exomes sequenced in 44 additional parents of children affected with B-ALL, we discovered a substantial and significant excess of rare allelic forms of PRDM9. The rare PRDM9 alleles are transmitted to the affected children in half the cases; nonetheless there remains a significant excess of rare alleles among patients relative to controls. We successfully replicated this latter observation in an independent cohort of 50 children with B-ALL, where we found an excess of rare PRDM9 alleles in aneuploid and infant B-ALL patients. PRDM9 variability in humans is thought to influence genomic instability, and these data support a potential role for PRDM9 variation in risk of acquiring aneuploidies or genomic rearrangements associated with childhood leukemogenesis. PMID:23222848

  12. Invasive Allele Spread under Preemptive Competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasi, J. A.; Korniss, G.; Caraco, T.

    We study a discrete spatial model for invasive allele spread in which two alleles compete preemptively, initially only the "residents" (weaker competitors) being present. We find that the spread of the advantageous mutation is well described by homogeneous nucleation; in particular, in large systems the time-dependent global density of the resident allele is well approximated by Avrami's law.

  13. Ranking of causes lead to road accidents using a new linguistic variable in interval type-2 fuzzy entropy weight of a decision making method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamri, Nurnadiah; Abdullah, Lazim

    2014-07-01

    A linguistic data is a variable whose value is naturally language phase in dealing with too complex situation to be described properly in conventional quantitative expressions. However, all the past researchers on linguistic variables used positive fuzzy numbers in expressing meaning of symbolic word. It seems that positive and negative numbers were never put concurrently in defining linguistic variables. Accordingly, we intend to construct a new positive and negative linguistic variable in interval type-2 fuzzy entropy weight for interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS (IT2 FTOPSIS). This paper uses a new linguistic variable in interval type-2 fuzzy entropy weight to capture the problems on reducing number of road accidents due to all the previously mentioned methods had no discussion about ranking of factors associated with road accidents. Specifically the objective of this paper is to establish rankings of the selected factors associated with road accidents using a new positive and negative linguistic variable and interval type-2 fuzzy entropy weight in interval type-2 fuzzy TOPSIS. This new method is hoped can produce an optimal preference ranking of alternatives in accordance with a set of criterion wise ranking in selection of causes that lead to road accidents. The proposed method produces actionable results that laid the decision-making process. Besides, it does not require a complicated computation procedure and will be beneficial to decision analysis.

  14. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  15. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on water- and foodborne diseases caused by microbiologic agents.

    PubMed

    Rose, J B; Epstein, P R; Lipp, E K; Sherman, B H; Bernard, S M; Patz, J A

    2001-05-01

    Exposure to waterborne and foodborne pathogens can occur via drinking water (associated with fecal contamination), seafood (due to natural microbial hazards, toxins, or wastewater disposal) or fresh produce (irrigated or processed with contaminated water). Weather influences the transport and dissemination of these microbial agents via rainfall and runoff and the survival and/or growth through such factors as temperature. Federal and state laws and regulatory programs protect much of the U.S. population from waterborne disease; however, if climate variability increases, current and future deficiencies in areas such as watershed protection, infrastructure, and storm drainage systems will probably increase the risk of contamination events. Knowledge about transport processes and the fate of microbial pollutants associated with rainfall and snowmelt is key to predicting risks from a change in weather variability. Although recent studies identified links between climate variability and occurrence of microbial agents in water, the relationships need further quantification in the context of other stresses. In the marine environment as well, there are few studies that adequately address the potential health effects of climate variability in combination with other stresses such as overfishing, introduced species, and rise in sea level. Advances in monitoring are necessary to enhance early-warning and prevention capabilities. Application of existing technologies, such as molecular fingerprinting to track contaminant sources or satellite remote sensing to detect coastal algal blooms, could be expanded. This assessment recommends incorporating a range of future scenarios of improvement plans for current deficiencies in the public health infrastructure to achieve more realistic risk assessments. PMID:11359688

  16. Climate variability and change in the United States: potential impacts on water- and foodborne diseases caused by microbiologic agents.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, J B; Epstein, P R; Lipp, E K; Sherman, B H; Bernard, S M; Patz, J A

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to waterborne and foodborne pathogens can occur via drinking water (associated with fecal contamination), seafood (due to natural microbial hazards, toxins, or wastewater disposal) or fresh produce (irrigated or processed with contaminated water). Weather influences the transport and dissemination of these microbial agents via rainfall and runoff and the survival and/or growth through such factors as temperature. Federal and state laws and regulatory programs protect much of the U.S. population from waterborne disease; however, if climate variability increases, current and future deficiencies in areas such as watershed protection, infrastructure, and storm drainage systems will probably increase the risk of contamination events. Knowledge about transport processes and the fate of microbial pollutants associated with rainfall and snowmelt is key to predicting risks from a change in weather variability. Although recent studies identified links between climate variability and occurrence of microbial agents in water, the relationships need further quantification in the context of other stresses. In the marine environment as well, there are few studies that adequately address the potential health effects of climate variability in combination with other stresses such as overfishing, introduced species, and rise in sea level. Advances in monitoring are necessary to enhance early-warning and prevention capabilities. Application of existing technologies, such as molecular fingerprinting to track contaminant sources or satellite remote sensing to detect coastal algal blooms, could be expanded. This assessment recommends incorporating a range of future scenarios of improvement plans for current deficiencies in the public health infrastructure to achieve more realistic risk assessments. PMID:11359688

  17. Variables Associated with Severity of Bacterial Canker and Wilt Caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in Tomato Greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Blank, L; Cohen, Y; Borenstein, M; Shulhani, R; Lofthouse, M; Sofer, M; Shtienberg, D

    2016-03-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis, the causal agent of bacterial canker and wilt of tomato, is considered to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens worldwide. In the year 2000 there was an increase in the number of infected greenhouses and in the severity of the disease in Israel. As part of the effort to cope with the disease, a comprehensive survey was conducted. Scouts recorded disease severity monthly in 681 production units. At the end of the season the scouts met with the growers and together recorded relevant details about the crop and cultural practices employed. The results suggested an absence of anisotropy pattern in the study region. Global Moran's I analysis showed that disease severity had significant spatial autocorrelation. The strongest spatial autocorrelation occurred within a 1,500 m neighborhood, which is comparable to the distance between production units maintained by one grower (Farm). Next, we tested three groups of variables including or excluding the Farm as a variable. When the Farm was included the explained variation increased in all the studied models. Overall, results of this study demonstrate that the most influential factor on bacterial canker severity was the Farm. This variable probably encompasses variation in experience, differences in agricultural practices between growers, and the quality of implementation of management practices. PMID:26623996

  18. Retention of agronomically important variation in germplasm core collections: implications for allele mining

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary targets of allele mining efforts are loci of agronomic importance. Agronomic loci typically exhibit patterns of allelic diversity consistent with a history of natural or artificial selection. Natural or artificial selection causes the distribution of genetic diversity at such loci to d...

  19. Allele surfing promotes microbial adaptation from standing variation.

    PubMed

    Gralka, Matti; Stiewe, Fabian; Farrell, Fred; Möbius, Wolfram; Waclaw, Bartlomiej; Hallatschek, Oskar

    2016-08-01

    The coupling of ecology and evolution during range expansions enables mutations to establish at expanding range margins and reach high frequencies. This phenomenon, called allele surfing, is thought to have caused revolutions in the gene pool of many species, most evidently in microbial communities. It has remained unclear, however, under which conditions allele surfing promotes or hinders adaptation. Here, using microbial experiments and simulations, we show that, starting with standing adaptive variation, range expansions generate a larger increase in mean fitness than spatially uniform population expansions. The adaptation gain results from 'soft' selective sweeps emerging from surfing beneficial mutations. The rate of these surfing events is shown to sensitively depend on the strength of genetic drift, which varies among strains and environmental conditions. More generally, allele surfing promotes the rate of adaptation per biomass produced, which could help developing biofilms and other resource-limited populations to cope with environmental challenges. PMID:27307400

  20. Characterizing spatial and temporal variability of crop yield caused by climate and irrigation in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Baethgen, Walter E.; Wang, Enli; Yu, Qiang

    2011-12-01

    Grain yields of wheat and maize were obtained from national statistics and simulated with an agricultural system model to investigate the effects of historical climate variability and irrigation on crop yield in the North China Plain (NCP). Both observed and simulated yields showed large temporal and spatial variability due to variations in climate and irrigation supply. Wheat yield under full irrigation (FI) was 8 t ha-1 or higher in 80% of seasons in the north, it ranged from 7 to 10 t ha-1 in 90% of seasons in central NCP, and less than 9 t ha-1 in 85% of seasons in the south. Reduced irrigation resulted in increased crop yield variability. Wheat yield under supplemental irrigation, i.e., to meet only 50% of irrigation water requirement [supplemental irrigation (SI)] ranged from 2.7 to 8.8 t ha-1 with the maximum frequency of seasons having the range of 4-6 t ha-1 in the north, 4-7 t ha-1 in central NCP, and 5-8 t ha-1 in the south. Wheat yield under no irrigation (NI) was lower than 1 t ha-1 in about 50% of seasons. Considering the NCP as a whole, simulated maize yield under FI ranged from 3.9 to 11.8 t ha-1 with similar frequency distribution in the range of 6-11.8 t ha-1 with the interval of 2 t ha-1. It ranged from 0 to 11.8 t ha-1, uniformly distributed into the range of 4-10 t ha-1 under SI, and NI. The results give an insight into the levels of regional crop production affected by climate and water management strategies.

  1. Haplotype block structure study of the CFTR gene. Most variants are associated with the M470 allele in several European populations.

    PubMed

    Pompei, Fiorenza; Ciminelli, Bianca Maria; Bombieri, Cristina; Ciccacci, Cinzia; Koudova, Monika; Giorgi, Silvia; Belpinati, Francesca; Begnini, Angela; Cerny, Milos; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Ferec, Claude; Macek, Milan; Modiano, Guido; Pignatti, Pier Franco

    2006-01-01

    An average of about 1700 CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) alleles from normal individuals from different European populations were extensively screened for DNA sequence variation. A total of 80 variants were observed: 61 coding SNSs (results already published), 13 noncoding SNSs, three STRs, two short deletions, and one nucleotide insertion. Eight DNA variants were classified as non-CF causing due to their high frequency of occurrence. Through this survey the CFTR has become the most exhaustively studied gene for its coding sequence variability and, though to a lesser extent, for its noncoding sequence variability as well. Interestingly, most variation was associated with the M470 allele, while the V470 allele showed an 'extended haplotype homozygosity' (EHH). These findings make us suggest a role for selection acting either on the M470V itself or through an hitchhiking mechanism involving a second site. The possible ancient origin of the V allele in an 'out of Africa' time frame is discussed. PMID:16251901

  2. A Computer Simulation Study of Vntr Population Genetics: Constrained Recombination Rules Out the Infinite Alleles Model

    PubMed Central

    Harding, R. M.; Boyce, A. J.; Martinson, J. J.; Flint, J.; Clegg, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    Extensive allelic diversity in variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) has been discovered in the human genome. For population genetic studies of VNTRs, such as forensic applications, it is important to know whether a neutral mutation-drift balance of VNTR polymorphism can be represented by the infinite alleles model. The assumption of the infinite alleles model that each new mutant is unique is very likely to be violated by unequal sister chromatid exchange (USCE), the primary process believed to generate VNTR mutants. We show that increasing both mutation rates and misalignment constraint for intrachromosomal recombination in a computer simulation model reduces simulated VNTR diversity below the expectations of the infinite alleles model. Maximal constraint, represented as slippage of single repeats, reduces simulated VNTR diversity to levels expected from the stepwise mutation model. Although misalignment rule is the more important variable, mutation rate also has an effect. At moderate rates of USCE, simulated VNTR diversity fluctuates around infinite alleles expectation. However, if rates of USCE are high, as for hypervariable VNTRs, simulated VNTR diversity is consistently lower than predicted by the infinite alleles model. This has been observed for many VNTRs and accounted for by technical problems in distinguishing alleles of neighboring size classes. We use sampling theory to confirm the intrinsically poor fit to the infinite alleles model of both simulated VNTR diversity and observed VNTR polymorphisms sampled from two Papua New Guinean populations. PMID:8293988

  3. A new variable phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxia 27 (SCA 27) caused by a deletion in the FGF14 gene.

    PubMed

    Coebergh, J A; Fransen van de Putte, D E; Snoeck, I N; Ruivenkamp, C; van Haeringen, A; Smit, L M

    2014-05-01

    We present a young boy whose mild ataxia and abnormal eye movements repeatedly deteriorated with fever, making him unable to sit or walk during fever episodes. SNP-array analysis identified a 202 kb deletion in chromosome 13q33.1 containing the fibroblast growth factor (FGF)14 gene, which is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) 27. This 13q deletion was also present in the proband's mother and grandmother. The mother was unable to perform tandem gait walking and had abnormal eye movements but had never sought medical attention. The grandmother predominantly had a postural tremor. FGF14 regulates brain sodium channels, especially in the cerebellum. Sodium channels can be fever sensitive. This family demonstrates phenotypic variability of FGF14 deletions (SCA 27), fever sensitivity of ataxia and the added value of SNP-array analysis in making a diagnosis. PMID:24252256

  4. Analytical solution for enhanced recharge around a bedrock exposure caused by deep-aquifer dewatering through a variable thickness aquitard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kompanizare, Mazda; Price, Jonathan S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study an analytical solution was developed to predict steady radially-symmetric percolation rates from an aquifer underlain by a variable thickness aquitard. The solutions consider an aquitard with constant thickness and with radial-symmetrically increasing thickness outward from the center. The solution was used to predict the percolation rate from a peat layer around a bedrock outcrop in the James Bay Lowland near the De Beers Victor diamond mine. In this case the marine sediment layer limited the direct connection between the peat layer and the bedrock as an aquitard. Our zero order solution with constant marine sediment thickness showed the best fit to the steady state water level data of June 2012. It was found that the enhanced recharge around bioherms (i.e., at rates greater than the regional average of 0.7 mm/day) will only occur in marine sediments less than 4.3 m thick, for extreme depressurization of 30 m.

  5. Possible causes for growth variability and summer growth reduction in juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Jung, Alexa Sarina; Freitas, Vânia; Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Witte, Johannes IJ.

    2016-05-01

    Growth variability within individuals and among groups and locations and the phenomenon of summer growth reduction has been described for juvenile flatfish in a variety of European coastal areas whereby the underlying causes still remain elusive. Potential mechanisms were tested for juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, by analysing published and unpublished information from long-term investigations (1986-present). Growth variability did occur and could be explained by differences induced by environmental variability (water temperature), and by non-genetic irreversible adaptation and sex. Dynamic Energy Budget analysis indicated that especially sexually-dimorphic growth in combination with variability in sex ratio could explain most of the variability in growth and the increase in the range of the size of individuals within the population over time. Summer growth reduction was not only observed among 0-group plaice in the intertidal, but also in the subtidal and tidal gullies as well as among I- and II-group plaice. Intraspecific competition for food was not detected but some support for interspecific competition with other predators was found. Also resource competition (due to crowding) with the other abundant epibenthic species (0-, I- and II-group flounder Platichthys flesus; the brown shrimp Crangon crangon; the shore crab Carcinus maenas; the goby species Pomatoschistus minutus and Pomatoschistus microps) could not explain the summer growth reduction. The observed growth reduction coincided with a decrease in stomach content, especially of regenerating body parts of benthic prey items. It is hypothesised that macrozoobenthos becomes less active after the spring phytoplankton bloom, reducing prey availability for juvenile plaice in summer, causing a reduction in food intake and hence in growth.

  6. Null allele, allelic dropouts or rare sex detection in clonal organisms: simulations and application to real data sets of pathogenic microbes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pathogens and their vectors are organisms whose ecology is often only accessible through population genetics tools based on spatio-temporal variability of molecular markers. However, molecular tools may present technical difficulties due to the masking of some alleles (allelic dropouts and/or null alleles), which tends to bias the estimation of heterozygosity and thus the inferences concerning the breeding system of the organism under study. This is especially critical in clonal organisms in which deviation from panmixia, as measured by Wright’s FIS, can, in principle, be used to infer both the extent of clonality and structure in a given population. In particular, null alleles and allelic dropouts are locus specific and likely produce high variance of Wright’s FIS across loci, as rare sex is expected to do. In this paper we propose a tool enabling to discriminate between consequences of these technical problems and those of rare sex. Methods We have performed various simulations of clonal and partially clonal populations. We introduce allelic dropouts and null alleles in clonal data sets and compare the results with those that exhibit increasing rates of sexual recombination. We use the narrow relationship that links Wright’s FIS to genetic diversity in purely clonal populations as assessment criterion, since this relationship disappears faster with sexual recombination than with amplification problems of certain alleles. Results We show that the relevance of our criterion for detecting poorly amplified alleles depends partly on the population structure, the level of homoplasy and/or mutation rate. However, the interpretation of data becomes difficult when the number of poorly amplified alleles is above 50%. The application of this method to reinterpret published data sets of pathogenic clonal microbes (yeast and trypanosomes) confirms its usefulness and allows refining previous estimates concerning important pathogenic agents. Conclusion Our

  7. [Fulfilling of variables in the declarations of external cause of death of children and adolescents in Recife from 1979 to 1995].

    PubMed

    Barros, M D; Ximenes, R; Lima, M L

    2001-01-01

    This article analyzes the completion of death certificates related to external causes in children and adolescents residing in Recife, Pernambuco State, Brazil, from 1979 to 1995. The analysis focused on the extent to which the following variables were filled in: personal data (occupation, level of schooling, medical care, confirmation of diagnosis by post-mortem, and type of violence) and place (location and municipality of both occurrence and death). Using the chi-squared method, quantitative and/or qualitative flaws were found in most of the variables analyzed. In 1995, the "schooling" and "medical care" variables were recorded in only 5.7% and 17.9% of cases, respectively. Mismatches were observed between data on place of death and medical care, as well as between place of accident and number of accidents. The results suggest a dissociation between the objective of including the variable in the death certificate and its social function. The study provides the public sector with support for improved collecting and critical analysis of data in the mortality information system. PMID:11241929

  8. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. ); Boogen, C. )

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  9. A Silenced vanA Gene Cluster on a Transferable Plasmid Caused an Outbreak of Vancomycin-Variable Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Audun; Pedersen, Torunn; Larssen, Kjersti Wik; Bergh, Kåre; Rønning, Torunn Gresdal; Radtke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of vancomycin-variable vanA+ enterococci (VVE) able to escape phenotypic detection by current guidelines and demonstrate the molecular mechanisms for in vivo switching into vancomycin resistance and horizontal spread of the vanA cluster. Forty-eight vanA+ Enterococcus faecium isolates and one Enterococcus faecalis isolate were analyzed for clonality with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and their vanA gene cluster compositions were assessed by PCR and whole-genome sequencing of six isolates. The susceptible VVE strains were cultivated in brain heart infusion broth containing vancomycin at 8 μg/ml for in vitro development of resistant VVE. The transcription profiles of susceptible VVE and their resistant revertants were assessed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Plasmid content was analyzed with S1 nuclease PFGE and hybridizations. Conjugative transfer of vanA was assessed by filter mating. The only genetic difference between the vanA clusters of susceptible and resistant VVE was an ISL3-family element upstream of vanHAX, which silenced vanHAX gene transcription in susceptible VVE. Furthermore, the VVE had an insertion of IS1542 between orf2 and vanR that attenuated the expression of vanHAX. Growth of susceptible VVE occurred after 24 to 72 h of exposure to vancomycin due to excision of the ISL3-family element. The vanA gene cluster was located on a transferable broad-host-range plasmid also detected in outbreak isolates with different pulsotypes, including one E. faecalis isolate. Horizontally transferable silenced vanA able to escape detection and revert into resistance during vancomycin therapy represents a new challenge in the clinic. Genotypic testing of invasive vancomycin-susceptible enterococci by vanA-PCR is advised. PMID:27139479

  10. Variability in the Geographic Distribution of Fires in Interior Alaska Considering Cause, Human Proximity, and Level of Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calef, M. P.; Varvak, A.; McGuire, A. D.; Chapin, T.

    2015-12-01

    The boreal forest of Interior Alaska is characterized by frequent extensive wildfires that have been mapped for the past 70 years. Simple predictions based on this record indicate that area burned will increase as a response to climate warming in Alaska. However, two additional factors have affected the area burned in this time record: the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) switched from cool and moist to warm and dry in the late 1970s and the Alaska Fire Service instituted a fire suppression policy in the late 1980s. Using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and statistics, this presentation evaluates the variability in area burned and fire ignitions in Interior Alaska in space and time with particular emphasis on the human influence via ignition and suppression. Our analysis shows that while area burned has been increasing by 2.4% per year, the number of lightning ignitions has decreased by 1.9 ignitions per year. Human ignitions account for 50% of all fire ignitions in Interior Alaska and are clearly influenced by human proximity: human fires mostly occur close to settlements, highways and in intense fire suppression zones (which are in turn close to human settlements and roads); fires close to settlements, highways and in intense fire suppression zones burn much shorter than fires further away from this sphere of human influence; and 60% of all human fire ignitions in Interior Alaska are concentrated in the Fairbanks area and thereby strongly influence regional analyses. Fire suppression has effectively reduced area burned since it was implemented but the PDO change has also had some influence. Finally, we found that human fires start earlier in the year and burn for a shorter duration than lightning fires. This study provides insights into the importance of human behavior as well as regional climate patterns as large-scale controls on fires over time and across the Alaskan boreal forest.

  11. Rare HLA Drive Additional HIV Evolution Compared to More Frequent Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, David W.; Listgarten, Jennifer; Maley, Stephen N.; Kadie, Carl; Learn, Gerald H.; Nickle, David C.; Heckerman, David E.; Deng, Wenjie; Brander, Christian; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Coovadia, Hoosen; Goulder, Philip J.R.; Korber, Bette T.; Walker, Bruce D.; Mullins, James I.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 can evolve HLA-specific escape variants in response to HLA-mediated cellular immunity. HLA alleles that are common in the host population may increase the frequency of such escape variants at the population level. When loss of viral fitness is caused by immune escape variation, these variants may revert upon infection of a new host who does not have the corresponding HLA allele. Furthermore, additional escape variants may appear in response to the nonconcordant HLA alleles. Because individuals with rare HLA alleles are less likely to be infected by a partner with concordant HLA alleles, viral populations infecting hosts with rare HLA alleles may undergo a greater amount of evolution than those infecting hosts with common alleles due to the loss of preexisting escape variants followed by new immune escape. This hypothesis was evaluated using maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of each gene from 272 full-length HIV-1 sequences. Recent viral evolution, as measured by the external branch length, was found to be inversely associated with HLA frequency in nef (p < 0.02), env (p < 0.03), and pol (p ≤ 0.05), suggesting that rare HLA alleles provide a disproportionate force driving viral evolution compared to common alleles, likely due to the loss of preexisting escape variants during early stages postinfection. PMID:19327049

  12. Identification of alleles of carotenoid pathway genes important for zeaxanthin accumulation in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Uitdewilligen, Jan G. A. M. L.; Kloosterman, Bjorn A.; Hutten, Ronald C. B.; Visser, Richard G. F.; van Eck, Herman J.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated the genetics and molecular biology of orange flesh colour in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). To this end the natural diversity in three genes of the carotenoid pathway was assessed by SNP analyses. Association analysis was performed between SNP haplotypes and flesh colour phenotypes in diploid and tetraploid potato genotypes. We observed that among eleven beta-carotene hydroxylase 2 (Chy2) alleles only one dominant allele has a major effect, changing white into yellow flesh colour. In contrast, none of the lycopene epsilon cyclase (Lcye) alleles seemed to have a large effect on flesh colour. Analysis of zeaxanthin epoxidase (Zep) alleles showed that all (diploid) genotypes with orange tuber flesh were homozygous for one specific Zep allele. This Zep allele showed a reduced level of expression. The complete genomic sequence of the recessive Zep allele, including the promoter, was determined, and compared with the sequence of other Zep alleles. The most striking difference was the presence of a non-LTR retrotransposon sequence in intron 1 of the recessive Zep allele, which was absent in all other Zep alleles investigated. We hypothesise that the presence of this large sequence in intron 1 caused the lower expression level, resulting in reduced Zep activity and accumulation of zeaxanthin. Only genotypes combining presence of the dominant Chy2 allele with homozygosity for the recessive Zep allele produced orange-fleshed tubers that accumulated large amounts of zeaxanthin. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11103-010-9647-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20490894

  13. SETD5 loss-of-function mutation as a likely cause of a familial syndromic intellectual disability with variable phenotypic expression.

    PubMed

    Szczałuba, Krzysztof; Brzezinska, Monika; Kot, Justyna; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Walczak, Anna; Stawiński, Piotr; Werner, Bożena; Płoski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    Loss-of-function de novo mutations in the SETD5 gene, encoding a putative methyltransferase, are an important cause of moderate/severe intellectual disability as evidenced by the results of sequencing large patient cohorts. We present the first familial case of a SETD5 mutation contributing to a phenotype of congenital heart defects and dysmorphic features, with variable expression, in two siblings and their father. Interestingly, the father demonstrated only mild intellectual impairment. Family based exome sequencing combined to careful parental phenotyping may reveal a more complex clinical picture in newly recognized syndromes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27375234

  14. Nomenclature for alleles of the thiopurine methyltransferase gene.

    PubMed

    Appell, Malin L; Berg, Jonathan; Duley, John; Evans, William E; Kennedy, Martin A; Lennard, Lynne; Marinaki, Tony; McLeod, Howard L; Relling, Mary V; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Weinshilboum, Richard; Yeoh, Allen E J; McDonagh, Ellen M; Hebert, Joan M; Klein, Teri E; Coulthard, Sally A

    2013-04-01

    The drug-metabolizing enzyme thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) has become one of the best examples of pharmacogenomics to be translated into routine clinical practice. TPMT metabolizes the thiopurines 6-mercaptopurine, 6-thioguanine, and azathioprine, drugs that are widely used for treatment of acute leukemias, inflammatory bowel diseases, and other disorders of immune regulation. Since the discovery of genetic polymorphisms in the TPMT gene, many sequence variants that cause a decreased enzyme activity have been identified and characterized. Increasingly, to optimize dose, pretreatment determination of TPMT status before commencing thiopurine therapy is now routine in many countries. Novel TPMT sequence variants are currently numbered sequentially using PubMed as a source of information; however, this has caused some problems as exemplified by two instances in which authors' articles appeared on PubMed at the same time, resulting in the same allele numbers given to different polymorphisms. Hence, there is an urgent need to establish an order and consensus to the numbering of known and novel TPMT sequence variants. To address this problem, a TPMT nomenclature committee was formed in 2010, to define the nomenclature and numbering of novel variants for the TPMT gene. A website (http://www.imh.liu.se/tpmtalleles) serves as a platform for this work. Researchers are encouraged to submit novel TPMT alleles to the committee for designation and reservation of unique allele numbers. The committee has decided to renumber two alleles: nucleotide position 106 (G>A) from TPMT*24 to TPMT*30 and position 611 (T>C, rs79901429) from TPMT*28 to TPMT*31. Nomenclature for all other known alleles remains unchanged. PMID:23407052

  15. Causes and consequences of the great strength variability among soft Nankai accretionary prism sediments from offshore SW-Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipp, Michael; Schumann, Kai; Leiss, Bernd; Ullemeyer, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    The Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment of the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is the very first attempt to drill into the seismogenic part of a subduction zone. Offshore SW-Japan the oceanic Philippine sea plate is subducted beneath the continental Eurasian plate causing earthquakes of magnitude 8.0 to 8.5 and related tsunamis with a recurrence rate of 80-100 years. For the tsunamigenic potential of the forearc slope and accreted sediments their mechanical strength, composition and fabrics have been investigated. 19 drill core samples of IODP Expeditions 315, 316 and 333 were experimentally deformed in a triaxial cell under consolidated and undrained conditions at confining pressures of 400-1000 kPa, room temperature, axial shortening rates of 0.01-9.0 mm/min, and up to an axial strain of ˜64% (Stipp et al., 2013). With respect to the mechanical behavior, two distinct sample groups could be distinguished. Weak samples from the upper and middle forearc slope of the accretionary prism show a deviatoric peak stress after only a few percent strain (< 10%) and a continuous stress decrease after a maximum combined with a continuous increase in pore pressure. Strong samples from the accretionary prism toe display a constant residual stress at maximum level or even a continuous stress increase together with a decrease in pore pressure towards high strain (Stipp et al., 2013). Synchrotron texture and composition analysis of the experimentally deformed and undeformed samples using the Rietveld refinement program MAUD indicates an increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing depth down to 523 m below sea floor corresponding to a preferred mineral alignment due to compaction. Experimentally deformed samples have generally stronger textures than related undeformed core samples and they show also increasing strength of the illite and kaolinite textures with increasing axial strain. Mechanically weak samples have a bulk clay plus

  16. Molecular strain typing of Brucella abortus isolates from Italy by two VNTR allele sizing technologies.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Riccardo; Ancora, Massimo; De Massis, Fabrizio; Ciammaruconi, Andrea; Zilli, Katiuscia; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Pittiglio, Valentina; Fillo, Silvia; Lista, Florigio

    2013-10-01

    Brucellosis, one of the most important re-emerging zoonoses in many countries, is caused by bacteria belonging to the genus Brucella. Furthermore these bacteria represent potential biological warfare agents and the identification of species and biovars of field strains may be crucial for tracing back source of infection, allowing to discriminate naturally occurring outbreaks instead of bioterrorist events. In the last years, multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) has been proposed as complement of the classical biotyping methods and it has been applied for genotyping large collections of Brucella spp. At present, the MLVA band profiles may be resolved by automated or manual procedures. The Lab on a chip technology represents a valid alternative to standard genotyping techniques (as agarose gel electrophoresis) and it has been previously used for Brucella genotyping. Recently, a new high-throughput genotyping analysis system based on capillary gel electrophoresis, the QIAxcel, has been described. The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of two DNA sizing equipments, the QIAxcel System and the Lab chip GX, to correctly call alleles at the sixteen loci including one frequently used MLVA assay for Brucella genotyping. The results confirmed that these technologies represent a meaningful advancement in high-throughput Brucella genotyping. Considering the accuracy required to confidently resolve loci discrimination, QIAxcel shows a better ability to measure VNTR allele sizes compared to LabChip GX. PMID:23585050

  17. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Unexpanded and intermediate CAG polymorphisms at the SCA2 locus (ATXN2) in the Cuban population: evidence about the origin of expanded SCA2 alleles.

    PubMed

    Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis C; Santos Falcón, Nieves; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; González Zaldívar, Yanetza; Vázquez Mojena, Yaimee; Almaguer-Gotay, Dennis; Almaguer Mederos, Luis Enrique; Rodríguez Labrada, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The role of short, large or intermediate normal alleles (ANs) of the ataxin-2 gene in generating expanded alleles (EAs) causing spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is poorly understood. It has been postulated that SCA2 prevalence is related to the frequency of large ANs. SCA2 shows the highest worldwide prevalence in Cuban population, which is therefore a unique source for studying the relationship between the frequency of large and intermediate alleles and the frequency of SCA2 mutation. Through genetic polymorphism analyses in a comprehensive sample (~3000 chromosomes), we show that the frequency of large ANs in the ataxin-2 gene is the highest worldwide, although short ANs are also frequent. This highly polymorphic population displayed also high variability in the CAG sequence, featured by loss of the anchor CAA interruption(s). In addition, large ANs showed germinal and somatic instability. Our study also includes related genotypic, genealogical and haplotypic data and provides substantial evidence with regard to the role of large and intermediate alleles in the generation of pathological EAs. PMID:21934711

  19. Unexpanded and intermediate CAG polymorphisms at the SCA2 locus (ATXN2) in the Cuban population: evidence about the origin of expanded SCA2 alleles

    PubMed Central

    Laffita-Mesa, José Miguel; Velázquez-Pérez, Luis C; Santos Falcón, Nieves; Cruz-Mariño, Tania; González Zaldívar, Yanetza; Vázquez Mojena, Yaimee; Almaguer-Gotay, Dennis; Almaguer Mederos, Luis Enrique; Rodríguez Labrada, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The role of short, large or intermediate normal alleles (ANs) of the ataxin-2 gene in generating expanded alleles (EAs) causing spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is poorly understood. It has been postulated that SCA2 prevalence is related to the frequency of large ANs. SCA2 shows the highest worldwide prevalence in Cuban population, which is therefore a unique source for studying the relationship between the frequency of large and intermediate alleles and the frequency of SCA2 mutation. Through genetic polymorphism analyses in a comprehensive sample (∼3000 chromosomes), we show that the frequency of large ANs in the ataxin-2 gene is the highest worldwide, although short ANs are also frequent. This highly polymorphic population displayed also high variability in the CAG sequence, featured by loss of the anchor CAA interruption(s). In addition, large ANs showed germinal and somatic instability. Our study also includes related genotypic, genealogical and haplotypic data and provides substantial evidence with regard to the role of large and intermediate alleles in the generation of pathological EAs. PMID:21934711

  20. alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles as markers of Westeuropean influence in the Baltic Sea region.

    PubMed

    Beckman, L; Sikström, C; Mikelsaar, A; Krumina, A; Kucinskas, V; Beckman, G

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of alpha1-antitrypsin (PI) alleles was studied in an attempt to elucidate migrations and admixture between populations in the Baltic Sea region. The frequency of the PI Z allele, a typically Northwesteuropean marker gene, showed a highly significant regional variation in the Baltic Sea region. The highest frequency (4.5%) was found in the western part of Latvia (Courland). The PI S allele, another marker of Westeuropean influence, also showed an increased frequency in the Courland population. These results indicate that among the populations east of the Baltic Sea the Curonian population has the most pronounced Westeuropean influence. Archaeological data have shown that from the 7th century and for several hundreds of years Courland received immigrations from mainland Sweden and the island of Gotland. We speculate that the increased frequencies of the PI Z alleles and S alleles in Courland may have been caused by these migrations. PMID:9858859

  1. Confounded by sequencing depth in association studies of rare alleles.

    PubMed

    Garner, Chad

    2011-05-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are facilitating large-scale association studies of rare genetic variants. The depth of the sequence read coverage is an important experimental variable in the next-generation technologies and it is a major determinant of the quality of genotype calls generated from sequence data. When case and control samples are sequenced separately or in different proportions across batches, they are unlikely to be matched on sequencing read depth and a differential misclassification of genotypes can result, causing confounding and an increased false-positive rate. Data from Pilot Study 3 of the 1000 Genomes project was used to demonstrate that a difference between the mean sequencing read depth of case and control samples can result in false-positive association for rare and uncommon variants, even when the mean coverage depth exceeds 30× in both groups. The degree of the confounding and inflation in the false-positive rate depended on the extent to which the mean depth was different in the case and control groups. A logistic regression model was used to test for association between case-control status and the cumulative number of alleles in a collapsed set of rare and uncommon variants. Including each individual's mean sequence read depth across the variant sites in the logistic regression model nearly eliminated the confounding effect and the inflated false-positive rate. Furthermore, accounting for the potential error by modeling the probability of the heterozygote genotype calls in the regression analysis had a relatively minor but beneficial effect on the statistical results. PMID:21328616

  2. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Rory L; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M; Meeker, Alan K; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-09-22

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  3. Functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles reveals distinct carrier phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Rory L.; Cidado, Justin; Kim, Minsoo; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Wong, Hong Yuen; Beaver, Julia A.; Cravero, Karen; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather; Heaphy, Christopher M.; Meeker, Alan K.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Clinical genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 is commonly performed to identify specific individuals at risk for breast and ovarian cancers who may benefit from prophylactic therapeutic interventions. Unfortunately, it is evident that deleterious BRCA1 alleles demonstrate variable penetrance and that many BRCA1 variants of unknown significance (VUS) exist. In order to further refine hereditary risks that may be associated with specific BRCA1 alleles, we performed gene targeting to establish an isogenic panel of immortalized human breast epithelial cells harboring eight clinically relevant BRCA1 alleles. Interestingly, BRCA1 mutations and VUS had distinct, quantifiable phenotypes relative to isogenic parental BRCA1 wild type cells and controls. Heterozygous cells with known deleterious BRCA1 mutations (185delAG, C61G and R71G) demonstrated consistent phenotypes in radiation sensitivity and genomic instability assays, but showed variability in other assays. Heterozygous BRCA1 VUS cells also demonstrated assay variability, with some VUS demonstrating phenotypes more consistent with deleterious alleles. Taken together, our data suggest that BRCA1 deleterious mutations and VUS can differ in their range of tested phenotypes, suggesting they might impart varying degrees of risk. These results demonstrate that functional isogenic modeling of BRCA1 alleles could aid in classifying BRCA1 mutations and VUS, and determining BRCA allele cancer risk. PMID:26246475

  4. Analysis of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor polymorphism in west Africa: description of a new allele, ITI*7.

    PubMed

    Caeiro, J L; Liste, I; Vogt, U; Ribeiro, J C

    1994-01-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) phenotypes were classified in the West African population of Cabo Verde by polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing, followed by immunofixation and silver staining. Gene frequencies of the alleles ITI*1, ITI*2, ITI*3, and ITI*4 were calculated to be 0.532, 0.153, 0.307 and 0.002, respectively. A new rare allele, ITI*7, was found, providing evidence for further genetic variability of the ITI protein. The ITI*7 allele frequency has been determined to 0.006. The assumption that allele ITI*3 may be used to characterize populations of African origin is supported by our data. PMID:7532128

  5. Sensitivity of Allelic Divergence to Genomic Position: Lessons from the Drosophila tan Gene

    PubMed Central

    John, Alisha V.; Sramkoski, Lisa L.; Walker, Elizabeth A.; Cooley, Arielle M.; Wittkopp, Patricia J.

    2016-01-01

    To identify genetic variants underlying changes in phenotypes within and between species, researchers often utilize transgenic animals to compare the function of alleles in different genetic backgrounds. In Drosophila, targeted integration mediated by the ΦC31 integrase allows activity of alternative alleles to be compared at the same genomic location. By using the same insertion site for each transgene, position effects are generally assumed to be controlled for because both alleles are surrounded by the same genomic context. Here, we test this assumption by comparing the activity of tan alleles from two Drosophila species, D. americana and D. novamexicana, at five different genomic locations in D. melanogaster. We found that the relative effects of these alleles varied among insertion sites, with no difference in activity observed between them at two sites. One of these sites simply silenced both transgenes, but the other allowed expression of both alleles that was sufficient to rescue a mutant phenotype yet failed to reveal the functional differences between the two alleles. These results suggest that more than one insertion site should be used when comparing the activity of transgenes because failing to do so could cause functional differences between alleles to go undetected. PMID:27449514

  6. Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP): software to facilitate the planning and design of breeding strategies involving mice with conditional alleles.

    PubMed

    Hoffert, Jason D; Pisitkun, Trairak; Miller, R Lance

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic and conditional knockout mouse models play an important role in biomedical research and their use has grown exponentially in the last 5-10 years. Generating conditional knockouts often requires breeding multiple alleles onto the background of a single mouse or group of mice. Breeding these mice depends on parental genotype, litter size, transmission frequency, and the number of breeding rounds. Therefore, a well planned breeding strategy is critical for keeping costs to a minimum. However, designing a viable breeding strategy can be challenging. With so many different variables this would be an ideal task for a computer program. To facilitate this process, we created a Java-based program called Conditional Allele Mouse Planner (CAMP). CAMP is designed to provide an estimate of the number of breeders, amount of time, and costs associated with generating mice of a particular genotype. We provide a description of CAMP, how to use it, and offer it freely as an application. PMID:21870117

  7. APOL1 Null Alleles from a Rural Village in India Do Not Correlate with Glomerulosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Duncan B.; Shegokar, Vijay; Nihalani, Deepak; Rathore, Yogendra Singh; Mallik, Leena; Ashish; Zare, Vasant; Ikizler, H. Omer; Powar, Rajaram; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Among African-Americans, genome wide association revealed a strong correlation between the G1 and G2 alleles of APOL1 (apolipoproteinL1, also called trypanolytic factor) and kidney diseases including focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis, HIV-associated nephropathy and hypertensive nephrosclerosis. In the prevailing hypothesis, heterozygous APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles increase resistance against Trypanosoma that cause African sleeping sickness, resulting in positive selection of these alleles, but when homozygous the G1 and G2 alleles predispose to glomerulosclerosis. While efforts are underway to screen patients for G1 and G2 alleles and to better understand “APOL1 glomerulopathy,” no data prove that these APOL1 sequence variants cause glomerulosclerosis. G1 and G2 correlate best with glomerulosclerosis as recessive alleles, which suggests a loss of function mutation for which proof of causality is commonly tested with homozygous null alleles. This test cannot be performed in rodents as the APOL gene cluster evolved only in primates. However, there is a homozygous APOL1 null human being who lives in a village in rural India. This individual and his family offer a unique opportunity to test causality between APOL1 null alleles and glomerulosclerosis. Methods and Findings We obtained clinical data, blood and urine from this APOL1 null patient and 50 related villagers. Based on measurements of blood pressure, BUN, creatinine, albuminuria, genotyping and immunoblotting, this APOL1 null individual does not have glomerulosclerosis, nor do his relatives who carry APOL1 null alleles. Conclusions This small study cannot provide definitive conclusions but the absence of glomerulosclerosis in this unique population is consistent with the possibility that African-American glomerulosclerosis is caused, not by loss of APOL1 function, but by other mechanisms including a subtle gain of function or by the “genetic hitchhiking” of deleterious mutations in a gene

  8. Is frictional heating needed to cause dramatic weakening of nanoparticle gouge during seismic slip? Insights from friction experiments with variable thermal evolutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Lu; Ma, Shengli; Niemeijer, André R.; Shimamoto, Toshihiko; Platt, John D.

    2016-07-01

    To examine whether faults can be lubricated by preexisting and newly formed nanoparticles, we perform high-velocity friction experiments on periclase (MgO) nanoparticles and on bare surfaces of Carrara marble cylinders/slices, respectively. Variable temperature conditions were simulated by using host blocks of different thermal conductivities. When temperature rises are relatively low, we observe high friction in nano-MgO tests and unexpected slip strengthening following initial weakening in marble slice tests, suggesting that the dominant weakening mechanisms are of thermal origin. Solely the rolling of nanoparticles without significant temperature rise is insufficient to cause dynamic fault weakening. For nano-MgO experiments, comprehensive investigations suggest that flash heating is the most likely weakening mechanism. In marble experiments, flash heating controls the unique evolutions of friction, and the competition between bulk temperature rise and wear-induced changes of asperity contact numbers seems to strongly affect the efficiency of flash heating.

  9. Characterization of the treefrog null allele, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I.

    1992-04-01

    Spring peeper (Hyla crucifer) tadpoles collected from the waste storage area during the Biological and Ecological Site Characterization of the Feed Materials Production Center (FEMP) in 1986 and 1987 appeared to be unique. A null (inactive) allele was found at the glucose phosphate isomerase enzyme locus in significant frequencies (approximately 20%) each year; this allele did not appear to occur in the offsite sample collected approximately 15km from the FEMP. Null alleles at this locus have not been reported in other amphibian populations; when they have been found in other organisms they have invariably been lethal in the homozygous condition.

  10. Characterization of the treefrog null allele

    SciTech Connect

    Guttman, S.I. . Dept. of Zoology)

    1990-12-01

    As part of the authors intensive year-long baseline ecological study, they characterized the degree of genetic polymorphism and heterozygosity in selected Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) populations using electrophoretic techniques. These data are being used as an indicator of stress by comparing populations on and off the FMPC site. The current study was initiated to determine whether this GPI null allele is lethal, when homozygous, in spring peepers. Also, a sampling protocol was implemented to determine whether a linear effect occurs relative to the frequency of the null allele offsite and to determine the origination site of the null allele. 18 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Transvection in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax Gene: A Cbx(1) Mutant Allele Induces Ectopic Expression of a Normal Allele in Trans

    PubMed Central

    Castelli-Gair, J. E.; Micol, J. L.; Garcia-Bellido, A.

    1990-01-01

    In wild-type Drosophila melanogaster larvae, the Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene is expressed in the haltere imaginal discs but not in the majority of cells of the wing imaginal discs. Ectopic expression of the Ubx gene in wing discs can be elicited by the presence of Contrabithorax (Cbx) gain-of-function alleles of the Ubx gene or by loss-of-function mutations in Polycomb (Pc) or in other trans-regulatory genes which behave as repressors of Ubx gene activity. Several Ubx loss-of-function alleles cause the absence of detectable Ubx proteins (UBX) or the presence of truncated UBX lacking the homeodomain. We have compared adult wing phenotypes with larval wing disc UBX patterns in genotypes involving double mutant chromosomes carrying in cis one of those Ubx mutations and the Cbx(1) mutation. We show that such double mutant genes are (1) active in the same cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is expressed, although they are unable to yield functional proteins, and (2) able to induce ectopic expression of a normal homologous Ubx allele in a part of the cells in which the single mutant Cbx(1) is active. That induction is conditional upon pairing of the homologous chromosomes (the phenomenon known as transvection), and it is not mediated by UBX. Depletion of Pc gene products by Pc(3) mutation strongly enhances the induction phenomenon, as shown by (1) the increase of the number of wing disc cells in which induction of the homologous allele is detectable, and (2) the induction of not only a paired normal allele but also an unpaired one. PMID:2121595

  12. Pyrosequencing for Accurate Imprinted Allele Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bing; Damaschke, Nathan; Yao, Tianyu; McCormick, Johnathon; Wagner, Jennifer; Jarrard, David

    2016-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is an epigenetic mechanism that restricts gene expression to one inherited allele. Improper maintenance of imprinting has been implicated in a number of human diseases and developmental syndromes. Assays are needed that can quantify the contribution of each paternal allele to a gene expression profile. We have developed a rapid, sensitive quantitative assay for the measurement of individual allelic ratios termed Pyrosequencing for Imprinted Expression (PIE). Advantages of PIE over other approaches include shorter experimental time, decreased labor, avoiding the need for restriction endonuclease enzymes at polymorphic sites, and prevent heteroduplex formation which is problematic in quantitative PCR-based methods. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of PIE including the ability to detect differences in allelic expression down to 1%. The assay is capable of measuring genomic heterozygosity as well as imprinting in a single run. PIE is applied to determine the status of Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF2) imprinting in human and mouse tissues. PMID:25581900

  13. Dynamic variation in allele-specific gene expression of Paraoxonase-1 in murine and human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Bousiaki, Eleni; Monk, David; Moore, Gudrun E.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Differential allelic expression has been shown to be common in mice, humans and maize, and variability in the expression of polymorphic alleles has been associated with human disease. Here, we describe the differential expression pattern of Paraoxonase-1, a gene involved in lipid metabolism and implicated in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. We measured the expression of the murine Paraoxonase-1 gene (Pon1) in livers at different stages of embryonic development using F1 hybrid crosses and quantified the transcriptional level of both parental alleles. Using human foetal tissues, we analysed the expression of the human orthologue (PON1) and found monoallelic or preferential allelic expression in 6/7 and 4/4 samples from liver and pancreas, respectively. We observed that Pon1 does not show a parent-of-origin preference in its allelic expression, but has dramatic variations in allele-specific expression occurring throughout development. This study has important repercussions in the analysis of haplotypes at disease loci, since it implies that the expression of polymorphic alleles can be unequal and dynamic. PMID:18678600

  14. Frequency and characterization of known and novel RHD variant alleles in 37 782 Dutch D-negative pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Tamara C; Veldhuisen, Barbera; Bijman, Renate; Thurik, Florentine F; Bossers, Bernadette; Cheroutre, Goedele; Jonkers, Remco; Ligthart, Peter; de Haas, Masja; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; van der Schoot, C Ellen

    2016-05-01

    To guide anti-D prophylaxis, Dutch D- pregnant women are offered a quantitative fetal-RHD-genotyping assay to determine the RHD status of their fetus. This allowed us to determine the frequency of different maternal RHD variants in 37 782 serologically D- pregnant women. A variant allele is present in at least 0·96% of Dutch D- pregnant women The D- serology could be confirmed after further serological testing in only 54% of these women, which emphasizes the potential relevance of genotyping of blood donors. 43 different RHD variant alleles were detected, including 15 novel alleles (11 null-, 2 partial D- and 2 DEL-alleles). Of those novel null alleles, one allele contained a single missense mutation (RHD*443C>G) and one allele had a single amino acid deletion (RHD*424_426del). The D- phenotype was confirmed by transduction of human D- erythroblasts, consolidating that, for the first time, a single amino acid change or deletion causes the D- phenotype. Transduction also confirmed the phenotypes for the two new variant DEL-alleles (RHD*721A>C and RHD*884T>C) and the novel partial RHD*492C>A allele. Notably, in three additional cases the DEL phenotype was observed but sequencing of the coding sequence, flanking introns and promoter region revealed an apparently wild-type RHD allele without mutations. PMID:27018217

  15. Frequencies of 23 functionally significant variant alleles related with metabolism of antineoplastic drugs in the chilean population: comparison with caucasian and asian populations.

    PubMed

    Roco, Angela; Quiñones, Luis; Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena; Squicciarini, Valentina; Miranda, Carla; Garay, Joselyn; Farfán, Nancy; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante; Ibarra, Carol; Varela, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cancer incidence rate in Chile is 133.7/100,000 inhabitants and it is the second cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases. Most of the antineoplastic drugs are metabolized to be detoxified, and some of them to be activated. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes can induce deep changes in enzyme activity, leading to individual variability in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The present research describes the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the Chilean population, which might be useful in public health programs for personalized treatment of cancer, and compares these frequencies with those reported for Asian and Caucasian populations, as a contribution to the evaluation of ethnic differences in the response to chemotherapy. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in a group of 253 unrelated Chilean volunteers from the general population. The results showed that CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*3, CYP2D6*3, CYP2C19*3, and CYP3A4*17 variant alleles are virtually absent in Chileans. CYP1A1*2A allele frequency (0.37) is similar to that of Caucasians and higher than that reported for Japanese people. Allele frequencies for CYP3A5*3(0.76) and CYP2C9*3(0.04) are similar to those observed in Japanese people. CYP1A1*2C(0.32), CYP1A2*1F(0.77), CYP3A4*1B(0.06), CYP2D6*2(0.41), and MTHFR T(0.52) allele frequencies are higher than the observed either in Caucasian or in Japanese populations. Conversely, CYP2C19*2 allelic frequency (0.12), and genotype frequencies for GSTT1 null (0.11) and GSTM1 null (0.36) are lower than those observed in both populations. Finally, allele frequencies for CYP2A6*4(0.04), CYP2C8*3(0.06), CYP2C9*2(0.06), CYP2D6*4(0.12), CYP2E1*5B(0.14), CYP2E1*6(0.19), and UGT2B7*2(0.40) are intermediate in relation to those described in Caucasian and in Japanese populations, as expected according to the ethnic origin of the Chilean population. In conclusion, our findings support the idea that ethnic variability must be

  16. Frequencies of 23 Functionally Significant Variant Alleles Related with Metabolism of Antineoplastic Drugs in the Chilean Population: Comparison with Caucasian and Asian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Roco, Ángela; Quiñones, Luis; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Squicciarini, Valentina; Miranda, Carla; Garay, Joselyn; Farfán, Nancy; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante; Ibarra, Carol; Varela, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. The cancer incidence rate in Chile is 133.7/100,000 inhabitants and it is the second cause of death, after cardiovascular diseases. Most of the antineoplastic drugs are metabolized to be detoxified, and some of them to be activated. Genetic polymorphisms of drug-metabolizing enzymes can induce deep changes in enzyme activity, leading to individual variability in drug efficacy and/or toxicity. The present research describes the presence of genetic polymorphisms in the Chilean population, which might be useful in public health programs for personalized treatment of cancer, and compares these frequencies with those reported for Asian and Caucasian populations, as a contribution to the evaluation of ethnic differences in the response to chemotherapy. We analyzed 23 polymorphisms in a group of 253 unrelated Chilean volunteers from the general population. The results showed that CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*3, CYP2D6*3, CYP2C19*3, and CYP3A4*17 variant alleles are virtually absent in Chileans. CYP1A1*2A allele frequency (0.37) is similar to that of Caucasians and higher than that reported for Japanese people. Allele frequencies for CYP3A5*3(0.76) and CYP2C9*3(0.04) are similar to those observed in Japanese people. CYP1A1*2C(0.32), CYP1A2*1F(0.77), CYP3A4*1B(0.06), CYP2D6*2(0.41), and MTHFR T(0.52) allele frequencies are higher than the observed either in Caucasian or in Japanese populations. Conversely, CYP2C19*2 allelic frequency (0.12), and genotype frequencies for GSTT1 null (0.11) and GSTM1 null (0.36) are lower than those observed in both populations. Finally, allele frequencies for CYP2A6*4(0.04), CYP2C8*3(0.06), CYP2C9*2(0.06), CYP2D6*4(0.12), CYP2E1*5B(0.14), CYP2E1*6(0.19), and UGT2B7*2(0.40) are intermediate in relation to those described in Caucasian and in Japanese populations, as expected according to the ethnic origin of the Chilean population. In conclusion, our findings support the idea that ethnic variability must be

  17. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    PubMed

    Soderlund, Carol A; Nelson, William M; Goff, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  18. Allele Workbench: Transcriptome Pipeline and Interactive Graphics for Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soderlund, Carol A.; Nelson, William M.; Goff, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor), where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense), and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available from https://code.google.com/p/allele

  19. Allele dependent silencing of COL1A2 using small interfering RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lindahl, Katarina; Rubin, Carl-Johan; Kindmark, Andreas; Ljunggren, Östen

    2008-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is generally caused by a dominant mutation in Collagen I, encoded by the genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. To date there is no satisfactory therapy for OI, but inactivation of the mutant allele through small interfering RNAs (siRNA) is a promising approach, as siRNAs targeting each allele of a polymorphism could be used for allele-specific silencing irrespective of the location of the actual mutations. In this study we examined the allele dependent effects of several tiled siRNAs targeting a region surrounding an exonic COL1A2 T/C polymorphism (rs1800222) in heterozygous primary human bone cells. Relative abundances of COL1A2 alleles were determined by cDNA sequencing and overall COL1A2 abundance was analyzed by quantitative PCR. One of the siRNAs decreased overall COL1A2 abundance by 71% of which 75% was due to silencing of the targeted T-allele. In conclusion, allele-preferential silencing of Collagen type I genes may be a future therapeutic approach for OI. PMID:19015742

  20. Inferring Selection Intensity and Allele Age from Multilocus Haplotype Structure

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2013-01-01

    It is a challenging task to infer selection intensity and allele age from population genetic data. Here we present a method that can efficiently estimate selection intensity and allele age from the multilocus haplotype structure in the vicinity of a segregating mutant under positive selection. We use a structured-coalescent approach to model the effect of directional selection on the gene genealogies of neutral markers linked to the selected mutant. The frequency trajectory of the selected allele follows the Wright-Fisher model. Given the position of the selected mutant, we propose a simplified multilocus haplotype model that can efficiently model the dynamics of the ancestral haplotypes under the joint influence of selection and recombination. This model approximates the ancestral genealogies of the sample, which reduces the number of states from an exponential function of the number of single-nucleotide polymorphism loci to a quadratic function. That allows parameter inference from data covering DNA regions as large as several hundred kilo-bases. Importance sampling algorithms are adopted to evaluate the probability of a sample by exploring the space of both allele frequency trajectories of the selected mutation and gene genealogies of the linked sites. We demonstrate by simulation that the method can accurately estimate selection intensity for moderate and strong positive selection. We apply the method to a data set of the G6PD gene in an African population and obtain an estimate of 0.0456 (95% confidence interval 0.0144−0.0769) for the selection intensity. The proposed method is novel in jointly modeling the multilocus haplotype pattern caused by recombination and mutation, allowing the analysis of haplotype data in recombining regions. Moreover, the method is applicable to data from populations under exponential growth and a variety of other demographic histories. PMID:23797107

  1. Phenotypic Variability Due to a Novel Glu292Lys Variation in Exon 8 of the BEST1 Gene Causing Best Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Elliott H.; Francis, Peter J.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Weleber, Richard G.; Saperstein, David A.; Farrell, Donald F.; Stone, Edwin M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the phenotypic characteristics of patients with a novel p.E292K mutation in BEST1. Methods Affected individuals underwent ophthalmic examination and testing that included photography, autofluorescence, OCT, and electrophysiological testing. DNA was analyzed for BEST1 mutations. Results Five patients (aged 5–59) expressing the p.E292K mutation in BEST1 were ascertained from three families. EOG light-rise was subnormal in all probands and carriers. Carriers had normal fundus examination, mfERG, visual acuity, and were emmetropic or myopic. Only probands had hyperopia and fundus findings typical of Best macular dystrophy. OCT of vitelliform lesions demonstrated RPE elevation without subretinal fluid; atrophic lesions exhibited disruption of the hyper-reflective outer retina-RPE complex. Intense hyperautofluorescence correlated to the vitelliform lesion. Conclusions Patients with Glu292Lys variation in BEST1 exhibit intra- and interfamilial phenotypic variability. A disproportionate fraction (26%) of Best-disease-causing mutations occur in exon 8, suggesting that the portion of protein encoded by this exon (amino acids 290–316) may be especially important to bestrophin’s function. Relatively good visual acuity with vitelliform lesions can be explained by preservation of the outer retina demonstrated by OCT. Clinical relevance We demonstrate findings that can be seen with novel mutation in this region of BEST1 that carries implications for disease pathogenesis. PMID:19597114

  2. Small 6q16.1 Deletions Encompassing POU3F2 Cause Susceptibility to Obesity and Variable Developmental Delay with Intellectual Disability.

    PubMed

    Kasher, Paul R; Schertz, Katherine E; Thomas, Megan; Jackson, Adam; Annunziata, Silvia; Ballesta-Martinez, María J; Campeau, Philippe M; Clayton, Peter E; Eaton, Jennifer L; Granata, Tiziana; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Hernando, Cristina; Laverriere, Caroline E; Liedén, Agne; Villa-Marcos, Olaya; McEntagart, Meriel; Nordgren, Ann; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Sarret, Catherine; Sciacca, Francesca L; Wright, Ronnie; Kerr, Bronwyn; Glasgow, Eric; Banka, Siddharth

    2016-02-01

    Genetic studies of intellectual disability and identification of monogenic causes of obesity in humans have made immense contribution toward the understanding of the brain and control of body mass. The leptin > melanocortin > SIM1 pathway is dysregulated in multiple monogenic human obesity syndromes but its downstream targets are still unknown. In ten individuals from six families, with overlapping 6q16.1 deletions, we describe a disorder of variable developmental delay, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to obesity and hyperphagia. The 6q16.1 deletions segregated with the phenotype in multiplex families and were shown to be de novo in four families, and there was dramatic phenotypic overlap among affected individuals who were independently ascertained without bias from clinical features. Analysis of the deletions revealed a ∼350 kb critical region on chromosome 6q16.1 that encompasses a gene for proneuronal transcription factor POU3F2, which is important for hypothalamic development and function. Using morpholino and mutant zebrafish models, we show that POU3F2 lies downstream of SIM1 and controls oxytocin expression in the hypothalamic neuroendocrine preoptic area. We show that this finding is consistent with the expression patterns of POU3F2 and related genes in the human brain. Our work helps to further delineate the neuro-endocrine control of energy balance/body mass and demonstrates that this molecular pathway is conserved across multiple species. PMID:26833329

  3. Small 6q16.1 Deletions Encompassing POU3F2 Cause Susceptibility to Obesity and Variable Developmental Delay with Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Kasher, Paul R.; Schertz, Katherine E.; Thomas, Megan; Jackson, Adam; Annunziata, Silvia; Ballesta-Martinez, María J.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Clayton, Peter E.; Eaton, Jennifer L.; Granata, Tiziana; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; Hernando, Cristina; Laverriere, Caroline E.; Liedén, Agne; Villa-Marcos, Olaya; McEntagart, Meriel; Nordgren, Ann; Pantaleoni, Chiara; Pebrel-Richard, Céline; Sarret, Catherine; Sciacca, Francesca L.; Wright, Ronnie; Kerr, Bronwyn; Glasgow, Eric; Banka, Siddharth

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of intellectual disability and identification of monogenic causes of obesity in humans have made immense contribution toward the understanding of the brain and control of body mass. The leptin > melanocortin > SIM1 pathway is dysregulated in multiple monogenic human obesity syndromes but its downstream targets are still unknown. In ten individuals from six families, with overlapping 6q16.1 deletions, we describe a disorder of variable developmental delay, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to obesity and hyperphagia. The 6q16.1 deletions segregated with the phenotype in multiplex families and were shown to be de novo in four families, and there was dramatic phenotypic overlap among affected individuals who were independently ascertained without bias from clinical features. Analysis of the deletions revealed a ∼350 kb critical region on chromosome 6q16.1 that encompasses a gene for proneuronal transcription factor POU3F2, which is important for hypothalamic development and function. Using morpholino and mutant zebrafish models, we show that POU3F2 lies downstream of SIM1 and controls oxytocin expression in the hypothalamic neuroendocrine preoptic area. We show that this finding is consistent with the expression patterns of POU3F2 and related genes in the human brain. Our work helps to further delineate the neuro-endocrine control of energy balance/body mass and demonstrates that this molecular pathway is conserved across multiple species. PMID:26833329

  4. Puroindoline allelic diversity in Indian wheat germplasm and identification of new allelic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Arora, Shaweta; Singh, Kashmir; Garg, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Grain hardness is an important quality trait that influences product development in wheat. This trait is governed by variation in puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB). Our study evaluated 551 Indian wheat germplasm lines for diversity in Pina and Pinb genes. Eighty-two lines were shortlisted for full length sequencing and grain hardness studies. Sequencing studies identified six unknown alleles: two for the Pina gene and four for the Pinb gene. Five of them were novel with non-synonymous changes in the corresponding amino acid sequences. Identified mutations in the deduced mature proteins and their pre- and pro-peptides influenced the hardness characteristics of the grain. We classified these 82 varieties into different hardness categories with reference to international and Indian systems of classification. The majority of Indian wheat varieties were categorized as hard. This study revealed that unexplored Indian wheat germplasm can be a good source of genetic variability for both Pina and Pinb genes, helping in marker-assisted breeding and in obtaining wheat with different textural properties. PMID:26366114

  5. Amyloid mediates the association of apolipoprotein E e4 allele to cognitive function in older people

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Wilson, R; Bienias, J; Berry-Kravis, E; Arnold, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: The neurobiological changes underlying the association of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele with level of cognition are poorly understood. Objective: To test the hypothesis that amyloid load can account for (mediate) the association of the APOE e4 allele with level of cognition assessed proximate to death. Methods: There were 44 subjects with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and 50 without dementia, who had participated in the Religious Orders Study. They underwent determination of APOE allele status, had comprehensive cognitive testing in the last year of life, and brain autopsy at death. The percentage area of cortex occupied by amyloid beta and the density of tau positive neurofibrillary tangles were quantified from six brain regions and averaged to yield summary measures of amyloid load and neurofibrillary tangles. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine whether amyloid load could account for the effect of allele status on level of cognition, controlling for age, sex, and education. Results: Possession of at least one APOE e4 allele was associated with lower level of cognitive function proximate to death (p = 0.04). The effect of the e4 allele was reduced by nearly 60% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load, whereas there was a robust inverse association between amyloid and cognition (p = 0.001). Because prior work had suggested that neurofibrillary tangles could account for the association of amyloid on cognition, we next examined whether amyloid could account for the effect of allele status on tangles. In a series of regression analyses, e4 was associated with density of tangles (p = 0.002), but the effect of the e4 allele was reduced by more than 50% and was no longer significant after controlling for the effect of amyloid load. Conclusion: These findings are consistent with a sequence of events whereby the e4 allele works through amyloid deposition and subsequent tangle formation to

  6. Fine Mapping of Dominant X-Linked Incompatibility Alleles in Drosophila Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Matute, Daniel R.; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions. PMID:24743238

  7. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  8. Tetrasomic Segregation for Multiple Alleles in Alfalfa

    PubMed Central

    Quiros, Carlos F.

    1982-01-01

    Evidence of tetrasomic inheritance in alfalfa, Medicago sativa L. and M. falcata L., for multiple codominant alleles at three isozymic loci is reported in this study. The locus Prx-1 governing anodal peroxidase and the loci Lap-1 and Lap-2 governing anodal leucine-aminopeptidase were studied by starch gel electrophoresis in seedling root tissue or seeds. The progenies from several di-, tri- or tetra-allelic plants belong to the species M. sativa and M. falcata and their hybrids were studied for the segregation of the three genes. In all cases, tetrasomic inheritance of chromosomal-type segregation was observed. In another progeny resulting from the crossing of two plants involving four different alleles at locus Lap-2, tetrasomic segregation with the possible occurrence of double reduction was observed. This study presents direct evidence of autotetraploidy and the existence of tetra-allelic loci in alfalfa. It also supports the concept that the species M. sativa and M. falcata are genetically close enough to be considered biotypes of a common species. PMID:17246077

  9. Temporal Stability of Genetic Variability and Differentiation in the Three-Spined Stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus)

    PubMed Central

    DeFaveri, Jacquelin; Merilä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Temporal variation in allele frequencies, whether caused by deterministic or stochastic forces, can inform us about interesting demographic and evolutionary phenomena occurring in wild populations. In spite of the continued surge of interest in the genetics of three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) populations, little attention has been paid towards the temporal stability of allele frequency distributions, and whether there are consistent differences in effective size (Ne) of local populations. We investigated temporal stability of genetic variability and differentiation in 15 microsatellite loci within and among eight collection sites of varying habitat type, surveyed twice over a six-year time period. In addition, Nes were estimated with the expectation that they would be lowest in isolated ponds, intermediate in larger lakes and largest in open marine sites. In spite of the marked differences in genetic variability and differentiation among the study sites, the temporal differences in allele frequencies, as well as measures of genetic diversity and differentiation, were negligible. Accordingly, the Ne estimates were temporally stable, but tended to be lower in ponds than in lake or marine habitats. Hence, we conclude that allele frequencies in putatively neutral markers in three-spined sticklebacks seem to be temporally stable – at least over periods of few generations – across a wide range of habitat types differing markedly in levels of genetic variability, effective population size and gene flow. PMID:25853707

  10. Several different lactase persistence associated alleles and high diversity of the lactase gene in the admixed Brazilian population.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Deise C; Santos, Sidney E B; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea K C; Hutz, Mara H

    2012-01-01

    Adult-type hypolactasia is a common phenotype caused by the lactase enzyme deficiency. The -13910 C>T polymorphism, located 14 Kb upstream of the lactase gene (LCT) in the MCM6 gene was associated with lactase persistence (LP) in Europeans. This polymorphism is rare in Africa but several other variants associated with lactase persistence were observed in Africans. The aims of this study were to identify polymorphisms in the MCM6 region associated with the lactase persistence phenotype and to determine the distribution of LCT gene haplotypes in 981 individuals from North, Northeast and South Brazil. These polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR based methods and sequencing. The -13779*C,-13910*T, -13937*A, -14010*C, -14011*T LP alleles previously described in the MCM6 gene region that acts as an enhancer for the LCT gene were identified in Brazilians. The most common LP allele was -13910*T. Its frequency was highly correlated with European ancestry in the Brazilian populations investigated. The -13910*T was higher (0.295) in southern Brazilians of European ancestry and lower (0.175) in the Northern admixed population. LCT haplotypes were derived from the 10 LCT SNPs genotyped. Overall twenty six haplotypes previously described were identified in the four Brazilian populations studied. The Multidimensional Scaling analysis showed that Belém, in the north, was closer to Amerindians. Northeastern and southern Afro-descendants were more related with Bantu-speaking South Africans whereas the Southern population with European ancestry grouped with Southern and Northern Europeans. This study shows a high variability considering the number of LCT haplotypes observed. Due to the highly admixed nature of the Brazilian populations, the diagnosis of hypolactasia in Brazil, based only in the investigation of the -13910*T allele is an oversimplification. PMID:23029545

  11. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population? PMID:27279331

  12. Multiple and independent origins of short seeded alleles of GS3 in rice

    PubMed Central

    Takano-Kai, Noriko; Jiang, Hui; Powell, Adrian; McCouch, Susan; Takamure, Itsuro; Furuya, Naruto; Doi, Kazuyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    GRAIN SIZE 3 (GS3) is a cloned gene that is related to seed length. Here we report the discovery of new deletion alleles at the GS3 locus, each of which confer short seed. We selected ten short seeded cultivars from a collection of 282 diverse cultivars. Sequence analysis across the GS3 gene in these ten cultivars identified three novel alleles and a known allele that contain several independent deletion(s) in the fifth exon of GS. These independent deletion variants each resulted in a frameshift mutation that caused a premature stop codon, and they were functionally similar to one another. Each coded for a truncated gene product that behaved as an incomplete dominant allele and conferred a short seeded phenotype. Haplotype analysis of these sequence variants indicated that two of the variants were of japonica origin, and two were from indica. Transformation experiments demonstrated that one of the deletion alleles of GS3 decrease the cell number in the upper epidermis of the glume, resulting in a significant reduction in seed length. The multiple and independent origins of these short seeded alleles indicate that farmers and early breeders imposed artificial selection favoring short seeds. PMID:23641184

  13. Co-selection and replacement of resistance alleles to Lysinibacillus sphaericus in a Culex quinquefasciatus colony.

    PubMed

    Chalegre, Karlos Diogo de Melo; Tavares, Daniella A; Romão, Tatiany P; de Menezes, Heverly Suzany G; Nascimento, Nathaly A; de Oliveira, Cláudia Maria F; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo P; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena N L

    2015-09-01

    The Cqm1 α-glucosidase, expressed within the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito larvae, is the receptor for the Binary toxin (Bin) from the entomopathogen Lysinibacillus sphaericus. Mutations of the Cqm1 α-glucosidase gene cause high resistance levels to this bacterium in both field and laboratory populations, and a previously described allele, cqm1REC, was found to be associated with a laboratory-resistant colony (R2362). This study described the identification of a novel resistance allele, cqm1REC-2, that was co-selected with cqm1REC within the R2362 colony. The two alleles display distinct mutations but both generate premature stop codons that prevent the expression of midgut-bound Cqm1 proteins. Using a PCR-based assay to monitor the frequency of each allele during long-term maintenance of the resistant colony, cqm1REC was found to predominate early on but later was replaced by cqm1REC-2 as the most abundant resistance allele. Homozygous larvae for each allele were then generated that displayed similar high-resistance phenotypes with equivalent low levels of transcript and lack of protein expression for both cqm1REC and cqm1REC-2. In progeny from a cross of homozygous individuals for each allele at a 1 : 1 ratio, analyzed for ten subsequent generations, cqm1REC showed a higher frequency than cqm1REC-2. The replacement of cqm1REC by cqm1REC -2 observed in the R2362 colony, kept for 210 generations, indicates changes in fitness related to traits that are unknown but linked to these two alleles, and constitutes a unique example of evolution of resistance within a controlled laboratory environment. PMID:26131741

  14. HLA-B alleles of the Cayapa of Ecuador: New B39 and B15 alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Garber, T.L.; Butler, L.M.; Watkins, D.I.

    1995-05-01

    Recent data suggest that HLA-B locus alleles can evolve quickly in native South American populations. To investigate further this phenomenon of new HLA-B variants among Amerindians, we studied samples from another South American tribe, the Cayapa from Ecuador. We selected individuals for HLA-B molecular typing based upon their HLA class II typing results. Three new variants of HLA-B39 and one new variant of HLA-B15 were found in the Cayapa: HLA-B*3905, HLA-B*3906, HLA-B*3907, and HLA-B*1522. A total of thirteen new HLA-B alleles have now been found in the four South American tribes studied. Each of these four tribes studied, including the Cayapa, had novel alleles that were not found in any of the other tribes, suggesting that many of these new HLA-B alleles may have evolved since the Paleo-Indians originally populated South America. Each of these 13 new alleles contained predicted amino acid replacements that were located in the peptide binding site. These amino acid replacements may affect the sequence motif of the bound peptides, suggesting that these new alleles have been maintained by selection. New allelic variants have been found for all common HLA-B locus antigenic groups present in South American tribes with the exception of B48. In spite of its high frequency in South American tribes, no evidence for variants of B48 has been found in all the Amerindians studied, suggesting that B48 may have unique characteristics among the B locus alleles. 70 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Microsatellite allele frequencies in humans and chimpanzees, with implications for constraints on allele size.

    PubMed

    Garza, J C; Slatkin, M; Freimer, N B

    1995-07-01

    The distributions of allele sizes at eight simple-sequence repeat (SSR) or microsatellite loci in chimpanzees are found and compared with the distributions previously obtained from several human populations. At several loci, the differences in average allele size between chimpanzees and humans are sufficiently small that there might be a constraint on the evolution of average allele size. Furthermore, a model that allows for a bias in the mutation process shows that for some loci a weak bias can account for the observations. Several alleles at one of the loci (Mfd 59) were sequenced. Differences between alleles of different lengths were found to be more complex than previously assumed. An 8-base-pair deletion was present in the nonvariable region of the chimpanzee locus. This locus contains a previously unrecognized repeated region, which is imperfect in humans and perfect in chimpanzees. The apparently greater opportunity for mutation conferred by the two perfect repeat regions in chimpanzees is reflected in the higher variance in repeat number at Mfd 59 in chimpanzees than in humans. These data indicate that interspecific differences in allele length are not always attributable to simple changes in the number of repeats. PMID:7659015

  16. Restrictive flamenco alleles are maintained in Drosophila melanogaster population cages, despite the absence of their endogenous gypsy retroviral targets.

    PubMed

    Pélisson, Alain; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Terzian, Christophe; Bucheton, Alain

    2007-02-01

    The flamenco (flam) locus, located at 20A1-3 in the centromeric heterochromatin of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome, is a major regulator of the gypsy/mdg4 endogenous retrovirus. In restrictive strains, functional flam alleles maintain gypsy proviruses in a repressed state. By contrast, in permissive strains, proviral amplification results from infection of the female germ line and subsequent insertions into the chromosomes of the progeny. A restrictive/permissive polymorphism prevails in natural and laboratory populations. This polymorphism was assumed to be maintained by the interplay of opposite selective forces; on one hand, the increase of genetic load caused by proviral insertions would favor restrictive flam alleles because they make flies resistant to these gypsy replicative transpositions and, on the other, a hypothetical resistance cost would select against such alleles in the absence of the retrovirus. However, the population cage data presented in this paper do not fit with this simple resistance cost hypothesis because restrictive alleles were not eliminated in the absence of functional gypsy proviruses; on the contrary, using 2 independent flam allelic pairs, the restrictive frequency rose to about 90% in every experimental population, whatever the pair of alleles and the allelic proportions in the initial inoculum. These data suggest that the flam polymorphism is maintained by some strong balancing selection, which would act either on flam itself, independently of the deleterious effect of gypsy, or on a hypothetical flanking gene, in linkage disequilibrium with flam. Alternatively, restrictive flam alleles might also be resistant to some other retroelements that would be still present in the cage populations, causing a positive selection for these alleles. Whatever selective forces that maintain high levels of restrictive alleles independently of gypsy, this unknown mechanism can set up an interesting kind of antiviral innate immunity, at

  17. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  18. Do Heliconius butterfly species exchange mimicry alleles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joel; Kronforst, Marcus R.

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has the potential to transfer beneficial alleles across species boundaries, and there are a growing number of examples in which this has apparently occurred. Recent studies suggest that Heliconius butterflies have transferred wing pattern mimicry alleles between species via hybridization, but ancestral polymorphism could also produce a signature of shared ancestry around mimicry genes. To distinguish between these alternative hypotheses, we measured DNA sequence divergence around putatively introgressed mimicry loci and compared this with the rest of the genome. Our results reveal that putatively introgressed regions show strongly reduced sequence divergence between co-mimetic species, suggesting that their divergence times are younger than the rest of the genome. This is consistent with introgression and not ancestral variation. We further show that this signature of introgression occurs at sites throughout the genome, not just around mimicry genes. PMID:23864282

  19. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  20. Allele-specific expression assays using Solexa

    PubMed Central

    Main, Bradley J; Bickel, Ryan D; McIntyre, Lauren M; Graze, Rita M; Calabrese, Peter P; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2009-01-01

    Background Allele-specific expression (ASE) assays can be used to identify cis, trans, and cis-by-trans regulatory variation. Understanding the source of expression variation has important implications for disease susceptibility, phenotypic diversity, and adaptation. While ASE is commonly measured via relative fluorescence at a SNP, next generation sequencing provides an opportunity to measure ASE in an accurate and high-throughput manner using read counts. Results We introduce a Solexa-based method to perform large numbers of ASE assays using only a single lane of a Solexa flowcell. In brief, transcripts of interest, which contain a known SNP, are PCR enriched and barcoded to enable multiplexing. Then high-throughput sequencing is used to estimate allele-specific expression using sequencing counts. To validate this method, we measured the allelic bias in a dilution series and found high correlations between measured and expected values (r>0.9, p < 0.001). We applied this method to a set of 5 genes in a Drosophila simulans parental mix, F1 and introgression and found that for these genes the majority of expression divergence can be explained by cis-regulatory variation. Conclusion We present a new method with the capacity to measure ASE for large numbers of assays using as little as one lane of a Solexa flowcell. This will be a valuable technique for molecular and population genetic studies, as well as for verification of genome-wide data sets. PMID:19740431

  1. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.

  2. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; et al

    2015-10-30

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population andmore » functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. In conclusion, together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts.« less

  3. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; De Masi, Leon; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S; Fraser, George P; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W Florian; Edwards, Robert A; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R; Rankin, Shelley C; Schifferli, Dieter M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  4. Allelic variation contributes to bacterial host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Min; Han, Xiangan; Masi, Leon De; Zhu, Chunhong; Ma, Xun; Zhang, Junjie; Wu, Renwei; Schmieder, Robert; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Fraser, George P.; Zhao, Shaohua; McDermott, Patrick F.; Weill, François-Xavier; Mainil, Jacques G.; Arze, Cesar; Fricke, W. Florian; Edwards, Robert A.; Brisson, Dustin; Zhang, Nancy R.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Schifferli, Dieter M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular parameters that regulate cross-species transmission and host adaptation of potential pathogens is crucial to control emerging infectious disease. Although microbial pathotype diversity is conventionally associated with gene gain or loss, the role of pathoadaptive nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) has not been systematically evaluated. Here, our genome-wide analysis of core genes within Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genomes reveals a high degree of allelic variation in surface-exposed molecules, including adhesins that promote host colonization. Subsequent multinomial logistic regression, MultiPhen and Random Forest analyses of known/suspected adhesins from 580 independent Typhimurium isolates identifies distinct host-specific nsSNP signatures. Moreover, population and functional analyses of host-associated nsSNPs for FimH, the type 1 fimbrial adhesin, highlights the role of key allelic residues in host-specific adherence in vitro. Together, our data provide the first concrete evidence that functional differences between allelic variants of bacterial proteins likely contribute to pathoadaption to diverse hosts. PMID:26515720

  5. Allelic associations of two polymorphic microsatellites in intron 40 of the human von Willebrand factor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, S.D.J.; De Souza, K.T. ); De Andrade, M.; Chakraborty, R. )

    1994-01-18

    At intron 40 of the von Willebrand factor (vWF) gene, two GATA-repeat polymorphic sites exist that are physically separated by 212 bp. At the first site (vWF1 locus), seven segregating repeat alleles were observed in a Brazilian Caucasian population, and at the second (vWF2 locus) there were eight alleles, detected through PCR amplifications of this DNA region. Haplotype analysis of individuals revealed 36 different haplotypes in a sample of 338 chromosomes examined. Allele frequencies between generations and gender at each locus were not significantly different, and the genotype frequencies were consistent with their Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Linkage disequilibrium between loci is highly significant with positive allele size association; that is, large alleles at the loci tend to occur together, and so do the same alleles. Variability at each locus appeared to have arisen in a stepwise fashion, suggesting replication slippage as a possible mechanism of production of new alleles. However, the authors observed an increased number of haplotypes, in contrast with the predictions of a stepwise production of variation in the entire region, suggesting some form of cooperative changes between loci that could be due to either gene conversion, or a common control mechanism of production of new variation at these repeat polymorphism sites. The high degree of polymorphism (gene diversity values of 72% and 78% at vWF1 and vWF2, respectively, and of 93% at the haplotype level) makes these markers informative for paternity testing, genetic counseling, and individual-identification purposes.

  6. HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles as putative susceptibility markers in congenital toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Paulo Tadashi; Targa, Lília Spaleta; Yamamoto, Lidia; Rodrigues, Jonatas Cristian; Kanunfre, Kelly Aparecida; Okay, Thelma Suely

    2016-05-18

    Host and parasite genotypes are among the factors associated with congenital toxoplasmosis pathogenesis. As HLA class II molecules play a key role in the immune system regulation, the aim of this study was to investigate whether HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles are associated with susceptibility or protection to congenital toxoplasmosis. One hundred and twenty-two fetuses with and 103 without toxoplasmosis were studied. The two study groups were comparable according to a number of socio-demographic and genetic variables. HLA alleles were typed by PCR-SSP. In the HLA-DQA1 region, the allele frequencies showed that *01:03 and *03:02 alleles could confer susceptibility (OR= 3.06, p = 0.0002 and OR= 9.60, p= 0.0001, respectively) as they were more frequent among infected fetuses. Regarding the HLA-DQB1 region, the *05:04 allele could confer susceptibility (OR = 6.95, p < 0.0001). Of the 122 infected fetuses, 10 presented susceptibility haplotypes contrasting with only one in the non-infected group. This difference was not statistically significant after correction for multiple comparison (OR = 9.37, p=0.011). In the casuistic, there were two severely damaged fetuses with high parasite loads determined in amniotic fluid samples and HLA-DQA1 susceptibility alleles. In the present study, a discriminatory potential of HLA-DQA1/B1 alleles to identify susceptibility to congenital toxoplasmosis and the most severe cases has been shown. PMID:26856406

  7. Always look on both sides: Phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily,...

  8. Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth.

    PubMed

    Brookes, K J; Neale, B; Xu, X; Thapar, A; Gill, M; Langley, K; Hawi, Z; Mill, J; Taylor, E; Franke, B; Chen, W; Ebstein, R; Buitelaar, J; Banaschewski, T; Sonuga-Barke, E; Eisenberg, J; Manor, I; Miranda, A; Oades, R D; Roeyers, H; Rothenberger, A; Sergeant, J; Steinhausen, H C; Faraone, S V; Asherson, P

    2008-01-01

    Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD. PMID:17525975

  9. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Joseph S.; Bordowitz, Juliana R.; Bree, Anna C.; Golden, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA. PMID:23918383

  10. Assessment of PAX6 alleles in 66 families with aniridia.

    PubMed

    Bobilev, A M; McDougal, M E; Taylor, W L; Geisert, E E; Netland, P A; Lauderdale, J D

    2016-06-01

    We report on PAX6 alleles associated with a clinical diagnosis of classical aniridia in 81 affected individuals representing 66 families. Allelic variants expected to affect PAX6 function were identified in 61 families (76 individuals). Ten cases of sporadic aniridia (10 families) had complete (8 cases) or partial (2 cases) deletion of the PAX6 gene. Sequence changes that introduced a premature termination codon into the open reading frame of PAX6 occurred in 47 families (62 individuals). Three individuals with sporadic aniridia (three families) had sequence changes (one deletion, two run-on mutations) expected to result in a C-terminal extension. An intronic deletion of unknown functional significance was detected in one case of sporadic aniridia (one family), but not in unaffected relatives. Within these 61 families, single nucleotide substitutions accounted for 30/61 (49%), indels for 23/61 (38%), and complete deletion of the PAX6 locus for 8/61 (13%). In five cases of sporadic aniridia (five families), no disease-causing mutation in the coding region was detected. In total, 23 unique variants were identified that have not been reported in the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) database. Within the group assessed, 92% had sequence changes expected to reduce PAX6 function, confirming the primacy of PAX6 haploinsufficiency as causal for aniridia. PMID:26661695

  11. Increasing long term response by selecting for favorable minor alleles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term response of genomic selection can be improved by considering allele frequencies of selected markers or quantitative trait loci (QTLs). A previous formula to weight allele frequency of favorable minor alleles was tested, and 2 new formulas were developed. The previous formula used nonlinear...

  12. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, O.E.; Pan, D.

    1994-07-19

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating. 2 figs.

  13. Mutant maize variety containing the glt1-1 allele

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Oliver E.; Pan, David

    1994-01-01

    A maize plant has in its genome a non-mutable form of a mutant allele designated vitX-8132. The allele is located at a locus designated as glt which conditions kernels having an altered starch characteristic. Maize plants including such a mutant allele produce a starch that does not increase in viscosity on cooling, after heating.

  14. New primer for specific amplification of the CAG repeat in Huntington disease alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, C.E.; Hodes, M.E.

    1994-09-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat near the 5{prime} end of the gene for Huntington disease (IT15). The CAG repeat is flanked by a variable-length CCG repeat that is included in the amplification product obtained with most currently used primer sets and PCR protocols. Inclusion of this adjacent CCG repeat complicates the accurate assessment of CAG repeat length and interferes with the genotype determination of those individuals carrying alleles in the intermediate range between normal and expanded sized. Due to the GC-rich nature of this region, attempts at designing a protocol for amplification of only the CAG repeat have proved unreliable and difficult to execute. We report here the development of a compatible primer set and PCR protocol that yields consistent amplification of the CAG-repeat region. PCR products can be visualized in ethidium bromide-stained agarose gels for rapid screening or in 6% polyacrylamide gels for determination of exact repeat length. This assay produces bands that can be sized accurately, while eliminating most nonspecific products. Fifty-five specimens examined showed consistency with another well-known method, but one that amplifies the CCG repeats as well. The results we obtained also matched the known carrier status of the donors.

  15. The Role of Cognitive, Metacognitive, and Motivational Variables in Conceptual Change: Preservice Early Childhood Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of the Cause of Lunar Phases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sackes, Mesut

    2010-01-01

    This study seeks to explore and describe the role of cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational variables in conceptual change. More specifically, the purposes of the study were (1) to investigate the predictive ability of a learning model that was developed based on the intentional conceptual change perspective in predicting change in conceptual…

  16. Allelic analysis of sheath blight resistance with association mapping in rice.

    PubMed

    Jia, Limeng; Yan, Wengui; Zhu, Chengsong; Agrama, Hesham A; Jackson, Aaron; Yeater, Kathleen; Li, Xiaobai; Huang, Bihu; Hu, Biaolin; McClung, Anna; Wu, Dianxing

    2012-01-01

    Sheath blight (ShB) caused by the soil-borne pathogen Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases in rice world-wide. Global attention has focused on examining individual mapping populations for quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for ShB resistance, but to date no study has taken advantage of association mapping to examine hundreds of lines for potentially novel QTLs. Our objective was to identify ShB QTLs via association mapping in rice using 217 sub-core entries from the USDA rice core collection, which were phenotyped with a micro-chamber screening method and genotyped with 155 genome-wide markers. Structure analysis divided the mapping panel into five groups, and model comparison revealed that PCA5 with genomic control was the best model for association mapping of ShB. Ten marker loci on seven chromosomes were significantly associated with response to the ShB pathogen. Among multiple alleles in each identified loci, the allele contributing the greatest effect to ShB resistance was named the putative resistant allele. Among 217 entries, entry GSOR 310389 contained the most putative resistant alleles, eight out of ten. The number of putative resistant alleles presented in an entry was highly and significantly correlated with the decrease of ShB rating (r = -0.535) or the increase of ShB resistance. Majority of the resistant entries that contained a large number of the putative resistant alleles belonged to indica, which is consistent with a general observation that most ShB resistant accessions are of indica origin. These findings demonstrate the potential to improve breeding efficiency by using marker-assisted selection to pyramid putative resistant alleles from various loci in a cultivar for enhanced ShB resistance in rice. PMID:22427867

  17. MHC class II alleles and haplotypes in patients with pemphigus vulgaris from India.

    PubMed

    Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Bozón, M V; Salazar, M; Deulofeut, R; Turbay, D; Mehra, N K; Pasricha, J S; Raval, R S; Patel, H; Shah, B K; Bhol, K; Alper, C A; Ahmed, A R; Yunis, E J

    1996-12-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes characterized by an autoantibody response against a keratinocyte adhesion molecule, desmoglein 3, causing acantholysis and blister formation. We compared high resolution MHC class II alleles and haplotype frequencies (HLA-DRB, DQA1 and DQB1) in 37 patients with PV to 89 haplotypes of normal relatives from New Delhi and Ahmedabad. We found that PV patients had significantly increased frequencies of DRB1*1404 (P < 0.0001), DQA1*0101 (P = 0.001), and DQB1*0503 (P < 0.0001). These associations were due to the increased frequencies of the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1404, DRB3*0202, DQA1*0101, DQB1*0503 in patients compared to control haplotypes (p < 0.0001). Also, patients from Ahmedabad had a significant increase in HLA-DQB1*0302 (p = 0.03). An identical amino acid sequence (Leu-Leu-Glu-Arg-Arg-Arg-Ala-Glu), in positions 67-74 of the beta domain of DRB alleles is restricted to some DR14 alleles. Therefore, there are three possible explanations for class II allele involvement in autoantibody in PV patients with class II haplotypes marked by HLA-DR14. First, the class II alleles could be markers for an unidentified susceptibility gene in linkage disequilibrium with them. Second, the primary association could be with DQB1*0503 and the association with HLA-DR14 alleles would be the result of linkage disequilibrium. Third, the HLA-DRB1 locus susceptibility could involve a specific amino acid sequence in the third hypervariable region shared by several HLA-DR14 alleles. PMID:9008309

  18. Fixation probability with multiple alleles and projected average allelic effect on selection.

    PubMed

    Lessard, Sabin; Lahaie, Philippe

    2009-06-01

    The first-order effect of selection on the probability of fixation of an allele, with respect to an intensity of selection s>0 in a diploid population of fixed finite size N, undergoing discrete, non-overlapping generations, is shown to be given by the sum of the average effects of that allele on the coefficient of selection in the current generation and all future generations, given the population state in the current generation. This projected average allelic effect is a weighted sum of average allelic effects in allozygous and autozygous offspring in the initial generation, with weights given in terms of expected coalescence times, under neutrality, for the lineages of two or three gametes chosen at random in the same generation. This is shown in the framework of multiple alleles at one locus, with genotypic values determining either viability or fertility differences, and with either multinomial or exchangeable reproduction schemes. In the limit of weak selection in a large population such that Ns tends to zero, the initial average allelic effects in allozygous offspring and autozygous offspring have the same weight on the fixation probability only in the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent. With frequency-dependent selection in a linear-game-theoretic context with two phenotypes determined by additive gene action, the first-order effect on the fixation probability is a combination of two effects of frequency-independent selection, one in a haploid population, the other in a diploid population. In the domain of application of the Kingman coalescent as the population size goes to infinity and Ns to zero, the first effect is three times more important than the second effect. This explains the one-third law of evolutionary dynamics in this domain, and shows how this law can be extended beyond this domain. PMID:19249322

  19. Preclinical memory profile in Alzheimer patients with and without allele APOE-epsilon4.

    PubMed

    Estévez-González, Armando; García-Sánchez, Carmen; Boltes, Anunciación; Otermín, Pilar; Baiget, Montserrat; Escartín, Antonio; del Rio, Elisabeth; Gironell, Alex; Kulisevsky, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the association between APOE-epsilon4 allele and memory phenotype in the preclinical stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We compared an extensive preclinical memory profile at the baseline evaluation of 2 AD genotype groups: APOE-epsilon4 allele carriers and patients with APOE-epsilon3 homozygosity. Baseline memory performance was carried out at least 2 years (interval of 27.7 +/- 4 months) before AD diagnosis was established, and analysis included different modalities of working memory (visuoperceptive, visuospatial, digit span and processing speed), of declarative memory (recent, verbal learning, prospective and semantic) and of nondeclarative memory (procedural, incidental and priming). We found no significant differences: memory performance was similar in both genotype groups. The presence of the APOE-epsilon4 allele does not seem to be sufficient to cause a distinctive preclinical memory phenotype in AD patients. PMID:15159600

  20. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Brian J.; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Weisman, Caroline M.; Hollister, Jesse D.; Salt, David E.; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-01-01

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata. In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata. This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  1. Borrowed alleles and convergence in serpentine adaptation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Brian J; Lahner, Brett; DaCosta, Jeffrey M; Weisman, Caroline M; Hollister, Jesse D; Salt, David E; Bomblies, Kirsten; Yant, Levi

    2016-07-19

    Serpentine barrens represent extreme hazards for plant colonists. These sites are characterized by high porosity leading to drought, lack of essential mineral nutrients, and phytotoxic levels of metals. Nevertheless, nature forged populations adapted to these challenges. Here, we use a population-based evolutionary genomic approach coupled with elemental profiling to assess how autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa adapted to a multichallenge serpentine habitat in the Austrian Alps. We first demonstrate that serpentine-adapted plants exhibit dramatically altered elemental accumulation levels in common conditions, and then resequence 24 autotetraploid individuals from three populations to perform a genome scan. We find evidence for highly localized selective sweeps that point to a polygenic, multitrait basis for serpentine adaptation. Comparing our results to a previous study of independent serpentine colonizations in the closely related diploid Arabidopsis lyrata in the United Kingdom and United States, we find the highest levels of differentiation in 11 of the same loci, providing candidate alleles for mediating convergent evolution. This overlap between independent colonizations in different species suggests that a limited number of evolutionary strategies are suited to overcome the multiple challenges of serpentine adaptation. Interestingly, we detect footprints of selection in A. arenosa in the context of substantial gene flow from nearby off-serpentine populations of A. arenosa, as well as from A. lyrata In several cases, quantitative tests of introgression indicate that some alleles exhibiting strong selective sweep signatures appear to have been introgressed from A. lyrata This finding suggests that migrant alleles may have facilitated adaptation of A. arenosa to this multihazard environment. PMID:27357660

  2. Characterizing noise structure in single-cell RNA-seq distinguishes genuine from technical stochastic allelic expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Kolodziejczyk, Aleksandra A; Ilicic, Tomislav; Illicic, Tomislav; Teichmann, Sarah A; Marioni, John C

    2015-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq) facilitates identification of new cell types and gene regulatory networks as well as dissection of the kinetics of gene expression and patterns of allele-specific expression. However, to facilitate such analyses, separating biological variability from the high level of technical noise that affects scRNA-seq protocols is vital. Here we describe and validate a generative statistical model that accurately quantifies technical noise with the help of external RNA spike-ins. Applying our approach to investigate stochastic allele-specific expression in individual cells, we demonstrate that a large fraction of stochastic allele-specific expression can be explained by technical noise, especially for lowly and moderately expressed genes: we predict that only 17.8% of stochastic allele-specific expression patterns are attributable to biological noise with the remainder due to technical noise. PMID:26489834

  3. A single nucleotide polymorphism in an exon dictates allele dependent differential splicing of episialin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ligtenberg, M J; Gennissen, A M; Vos, H L; Hilkens, J

    1991-01-01

    The episialin gene (MUC1) encodes an epithelial mucin containing a variable number of repeats with a length of twenty amino acids, resulting in many different alleles that can be subdivided into two size classes. The episialin pre-mRNA uses either one of two neighbouring splice acceptor sites for exon 2, which mainly encodes the repeats. Using the genetic polymorphism of the episialin gene to identify different alleles, we show here that the splice site recognition is allele dependent and is based on a single A/G nucleotide difference in exon 2 eight nucleotides downstream of the second splice acceptor site. Transfection experiments confirm that this polymorphic nucleotide regulates the splice site selection. The identity of this nucleotide is in most cases correlated with one of the size classes of the alleles, indicating that mutations altering the number of repeats seldom arise by unequal cross-over between the repeat regions. Images PMID:2014168

  4. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schierup, M H; Vekemans, X; Christiansen, F B

    1998-01-01

    Expectations for the time scale and structure of allelic genealogies in finite populations are formed under three models of sporophytic self-incompatibility. The models differ in the dominance interactions among the alleles that determine the self-incompatibility phenotype: In the SSIcod model, alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self-incompatibility, and transspecific polymorphism is therefore expected to be equally common. The previously reported directional turnover process of alleles in the SSIdomcod model results in coalescence times lower and substitution rates higher than those in the other models. The SSIdom model assumes strong asymmetries in allelic action, and the most recessive extant allele is likely to be the most recent common ancestor. Despite these asymmetries, the expected shape of the allele genealogies does not deviate markedly from the shape of a neutral gene genealogy. The application of the results to sequence surveys of alleles, including interspecific comparisons, is discussed. PMID:9799270

  5. A pseudodeficiency allele common in non-Jewish Tay-Sachs carriers: Implications for carrier screening

    SciTech Connect

    Triggs-Raine, B.L.; Akerman, B.R.; Gravel, R.A. ); Mules, E.H.; Thomas, G.H.; Dowling, C.E. ); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, J.S.T. ); Natowicz, M.R. ); Grebner, E.E. ); Navon, R.R. ); Welch, J.P. ); Greenberg, C.R. )

    1992-10-01

    Deficiency of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) activity typically results in Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy subjects found to be deficient in Hex A activity (i.e., pseudodeficient) by means of in vitro biochemical tests have been described. The authors analyzed the HEXA gene of one pseudodeficient subject and identified both a C[sub 739]-to-T substitution that changes Arg[sub 247][yields]Trp on one allele and a previously identified Tay-Sachs disease mutation of the second allele. Six additional pseudodeficient subjects were found to have the C[sub 739]-to-T but for none of 36 Jewish enzyme-defined carries who did not have one of three known mutations common to this group. The C[sub 739]-to-T allele, together with a [open quotes]true[close quotes] Tay-Sachs disease allele, causes Hex A pseudodeficiency. Given both the large proportion of non-Jewish carriers with this allele and that standard biochemical screening cannot differentiate between heterozygotes for the C[sub 739]-to-T mutations and Tay-Sachs disease carriers, DNA testing for this mutation in at-risk couples is essential. This could prevent unnecessary or incorrect prenatal diagnoses. 40 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  7. Diversity of lactase persistence alleles in Ethiopia: signature of a soft selective sweep.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Raga, Tamiru O; Liebert, Anke; Zmarz, Pawel; Bekele, Endashaw; Danielsen, E Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Bradman, Neil; Troelsen, Jesper T; Swallow, Dallas M

    2013-09-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (-13910(∗)T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene LCT is responsible for lactase persistence and appears to have been under strong directional selection in the last 5,000 years, evidenced by the widespread occurrence of this allele on an extended haplotype. In Africa and the Middle East, the situation is more complicated and at least three other alleles (-13907(∗)G, rs41525747; -13915(∗)G, rs41380347; -14010(∗)C, rs145946881) in the same LCT enhancer region can cause continued lactase expression. Here we examine the LCT enhancer sequence in a large lactose-tolerance-tested Ethiopian cohort of more than 350 individuals. We show that a further SNP, -14009T>G (ss 820486563), is significantly associated with lactose-digester status, and in vitro functional tests confirm that the -14009(∗)G allele also increases expression of an LCT promoter construct. The derived alleles in the LCT enhancer region are spread through several ethnic groups, and we report a greater genetic diversity in lactose digesters than in nondigesters. By examining flanking markers to control for the effects of mutation and demography, we further describe, from empirical evidence, the signature of a soft selective sweep. PMID:23993196

  8. Explaining the variable penetrance of CNVs: Parental intelligence modulates expression of intellectual impairment caused by the 22q11.2 deletion.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Petra; Duijff, Sasja; Swanenburg de Veye, Henriëtte; Beemer, Frits; Sinnema, Gerben; Breetvelt, Elemi; Schappin, Renske; Vorstman, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    The role of rare genetic variants, in particular copy number variants (CNVs), in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders is becoming increasingly clear. While the list of these disorder-related CNVs continues to lengthen, it has also become clear that in nearly all genetic variants the proportion of carriers who express the associated phenotype is far from 100%. To understand this variable penetrance of CNVs it is important to realize that even the largest CNVs represent only a tiny fraction of the entire genome. Therefore, part of the mechanism underlying the variable penetrance of CNVs is likely the modulatory impact of the rest of the genome. In the present study we used the 22q11DS as a model to examine whether the observed penetrance of intellectual impairment-one of the main phenotypes associated with 22q11DS-is modulated by the intellectual level of their parents, for which we used the parents' highest level of education as a proxy. Our results, based on data observed in 171 children with 22q11DS in the age range of 5-15 years, showed a significant association between estimated parental cognitive level and intelligence in offspring (full scale, verbal and performance IQ), with the largest effect size for verbal IQ. These results suggest that possible mechanisms involved in the variable penetrance observed in CNVs include the impact of genetic background and/or environmental influences. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26953189

  9. Exquisite allele discrimination by toehold hairpin primers

    PubMed Central

    Byrom, Michelle; Bhadra, Sanchita; Jiang, Yu Sherry; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to detect and monitor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in biological samples is an enabling research and clinical tool. We have developed a surprising, inexpensive primer design method that provides exquisite discrimination between SNPs. The field of DNA computation is largely reliant on using so-called toeholds to initiate strand displacement reactions, leading to the execution of kinetically trapped circuits. We have now similarly found that the short toehold sequence to a target of interest can initiate both strand displacement within the hairpin and extension of the primer by a polymerase, both of which will further stabilize the primer:template complex. However, if the short toehold does not bind, neither of these events can readily occur and thus amplification should not occur. Toehold hairpin primers were used to detect drug resistance alleles in two genes, rpoB and katG, in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome, and ten alleles in the Escherichia coli genome. During real-time PCR, the primers discriminate between mismatched templates with Cq delays that are frequently so large that the presence or absence of mismatches is essentially a ‘yes/no’ answer. PMID:24990378

  10. The Regulation of White Locus Expression: A Dominant Mutant Allele at the White Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Paul M.

    1980-01-01

    A new mutant allele (wDZL) at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster is dominant to the wild-type allele, but apparently only when the two alleles are synapsed. When chromosomal rearrangements prevent somatic pairing between the two white alleles, wDZL is rendered recessive to wild type. This observation suggests that the dominance of wDZL is sensitive to a synapsis (transvection) effect. On the basis of this and other properties, it is proposed that wDZL causes the repression of transcription of a synapsed w+ allele, but not of a w+ allele elsewhere in the same nucleus. One model to account for this supposes that wDZL produces a repressor of white-locus transcription. This repressor is presumed to be so unstable that other white genes, removed from wDZL but in the same nucleus, are not detectably repressed. These properties may be simply understood if it is assumed that the repressor produced by the wDZL allele is an RNA molecule. PMID:17249039