Science.gov

Sample records for allens creek-1 reactor

  1. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  2. Screw-Retaining Allen Wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granett, D.

    1985-01-01

    Steadying screws with fingers unnecessary. Crimp in uncompressed spring wire slightly protrudes from one facet of Allen wrench. Compressed spring retains Allen screw. Tool used with Allen-head screws in cramped spaces with little or no room for fingers to hold fastener while turned by wrench.

  3. EPICS: Allen-Bradley hardware reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, G.

    1993-04-05

    This manual covers the following hardware: Allen-Bradley 6008 -- SV VMEbus I/O scanner; Allen-Bradley universal I/O chassis 1771-A1B, -A2B, -A3B, and -A4B; Allen-Bradley power supply module 1771-P4S; Allen-Bradley 1771-ASB remote I/O adapter module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IFE analog input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OFE analog output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IG(D) TTL input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OG(d) TTL output; Allen-Bradley 1771-IQ DC selectable input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OW contact output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IBD DC (10--30V) input module; Allen-Bradley 1771-OBD DC (10--60V) output module; Allen-Bradley 1771-IXE thermocouple/millivolt input module; and the Allen-Bradley 2705 RediPANEL push button module.

  4. Allene ether Nazarov cyclization.

    PubMed

    Tius, Marcus A

    2014-05-01

    The ease of synthesis and the exceptional reactivity of alkoxyallenes has led to their use in a large number of highly diverse applications. This Report describes their use in various versions of the allene ether Nazarov cyclization. Following a brief introduction to the Nazarov cyclization (Section 1), the oxidative cyclization of vinyl alkoxyallenes is discussed first (Section 2). Nazarov cyclizations of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl ketones and of α-alkoxyallenyl vinyl tertiary carbinols are covered (Section 3). The discovery and the subsequent rational design of acetals that serve as chiral auxiliaries on the allene in highly enantioselective Nazarov cyclizations is explained (Section 4). Interrupted Nazarov cyclizations of alkoxyallenes that are generated in situ from the isomerization of propargyl ethers on solid supports are discussed, including the evolution of a highly diastereoselective, chiral auxiliary controlled version of the reaction. Some applications of the methodology to natural products total synthesis have been included so as to provide the reader with benchmarks with which to judge the utility of the methodology. PMID:24196585

  5. Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey

    2007-05-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a pioneering centimeter-wavelength radio telescope that will produce science that cannot be done with any other instrument. The ATA is the first radio telescope designed for commensal observing; it will undertake the most comprehensive and sensitive SETI surveys ever done as well as the deepest and largest area continuum and spectroscopic surveys. Science operations will commence this year with a 42-element array. The ATA will ultimately comprise 350 6-meter dishes at Hat Creek in California, and will make possible large, deep radio surveys that were not previously feasible. The telescope incorporates many new design features including hydroformed antenna surfaces, a log-periodic feed covering the entire range of frequencies from 500 MHz to 11.2 GHz, low noise, wide-band amplifiers with a flat response over the entire band. The full array has the sensitivity of the Very Large Array but with a survey capability that is greater by an order of magnitude due to the wide field of view of the 6-meter dishes. Even with 42 elements, the ATA will be one of the most powerful radio survey telescopes. Science goals include the Five GHz sky survey (FiGSS) to match the 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey within the first year of operation with the 42 element array, and a deep all-sky survey of extragalactic hydrogen to investigate galaxy evolution and intergalactic gas accretion. Transient and variable source surveys, pulsar science, spectroscopy of new molecular species in the galaxy, large-scale mapping of galactic magnetic filaments, and wide-field imaging of comets and other solar system objects are among the other key science objectives of the ATA. SETI surveys will reach sufficient sensitivity to detect an Arecibo planetary radar from 1,000,000 stars to distances of 300 pc.

  6. Allene Functionalization via Bicyclic Methylene Aziridines

    PubMed Central

    Boralsky, Luke A.; Marston, Dagmara; Grigg, R. David; Hershberger, John C.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01

    The oxidative functionalization of olefins is a common method for the formation of vicinal carbon-heteroatom bonds. However, oxidative methods to transform allenes into synthetic motifs containing three contiguous carbon-heteroatom bonds are much less developed. This paper describes the use of bicyclic methylene aziridines (MAs), prepared via intramolecular allene aziridination, as scaffolds for functionalization of all three allene carbons. PMID:21438516

  7. H. Julian Allen: An Appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Walter G.; Boyd, John W.; Bugos, Glenn E.

    2007-01-01

    Harvey Allen is best known as the genius behind the blunt-body concept, published in 1953, which enables spacecraft to return safely home through Earth's dense atmosphere. He was also an extraordinary research leader, who led a world-class research program in hypersonics at the NACA Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. This paper reviews his career as one of America's leading theorists and experimenters, including his engineering education at Stanford, his work on the inverse problem of calculating the airfoil profile to obtain a desired pressure distribution, his hand in constructing wind tunnels and experimental facilities at Ames, and his pioneering and wide-ranging work on atmospheric re-entry. It concludes with an appreciation of his uniquely inspirational style of research management, and of his magnetic personality.

  8. Modular Functionalization of Allenes to Aminated Stereotriads

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Christopher S.; Boralsky, Luke A.; Guzei, Ilia A.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-containing stereotriads- compounds with three adjacent stereodefined carbons- are commonly found in biologically important molecules. However, the preparation of molecules bearing these motifs can be challenging. Herein, we describe a modular oxidation protocol which converts a substituted allene to a triply functionalized amine of the form C-X/C-N/CY. The key step employs a Rh-catalyzed intramolecular conversion of the allene to a strained bicyclic methylene aziridine. This reactive intermediate is further elaborated to the target products, often in one reaction vessel and with effective transfer of the axial chirality of the allene to point chirality in the stereotriad. PMID:22708990

  9. [2+2+1] cyclization of allenes.

    PubMed

    Kitagaki, S; Inagaki, F; Mukai, C

    2014-05-01

    The [2+2+1] cyclization of an alkyne, an alkene and carbon monoxide, i.e., the Pauson-Khand reaction, is one of the most powerful tools for constructing a five-membered ring. In place of the alkene or alkyne part, the use of an allene functionality has proven to make this reaction more valuable for organic synthesis. This review focuses on the origin and progress of the allenic [2+2+1] cyclocarbonylation, including the chirality transfer of the allene and its synthetic applications. PMID:24514744

  10. Van Allen Discovery Most Important

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jastrow, R.

    1959-01-01

    The first step toward the exploration of space occurred approximately 22 months ago as a part of the International Geophysical Year. In the short interval since October, 1957, the new tools of research, the satellite and the space rocket, have produced two unexpected results of fundamental scientific importance. First, instruments placed in the Explorer satellites by James A. Van Allen have revealed the existence of layers of energetic particles in the outer atmosphere. This discovery constitutes the most significant research achievement of the IGY satellite program. The layers may provide the explanation for the aurora and other geophysical phenomena, and they will also influence the design of vehicles for manned space flight, whose occupants must be shielded against their harmful biological effects. Second, the shape of the earth has been determined very accurately with the aid of data from the first Vanguard. As a result of this investigation, we have found that our planet tends toward the shape of a pear, with its stem at the North Pole. This discovery may produce major changes in our ideas on the interior structure of the earth.

  11. Astronaut Allen during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in CCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In the JSC Space Vehicle Mockup Facility, astronaut Andrew M. Allen retrieves gear to rehearse a suit-donning exercise on the middeck. Allen's very realistic environs are provided by the shuttle crew compartment trainer (CCT).

  12. Rejuvenating Allen's Arc with the Geometric Mean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, William A.

    1994-01-01

    Contends that, despite ongoing criticism, Allen's arc elasticity formula remains entrenched in the microeconomics principles curriculum. Reviews the evolution and continuing scrutiny of the formula. Argues that the use of the geometric mean offers pedagogical advantages over the traditional arithmetic mean approach. (CFR)

  13. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  14. Maximal tractable subclasses of Allen`s interval algebra: Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Drakengren, T.; Jonsson, P.

    1996-12-31

    This paper continues Nebel and Burckert`s investigation of Allen`s interval algebra by presenting nine more maximal tractable subclasses of the algebra (provided that P {ne} NP), in addition to their previously reported ORD-Horn subclass. Furthermore, twelve tractable subclasses are identified, whose maximality is riot decided. Four of these can express the notion of sequentiality between intervals, which is not possible in the ORD-Horn algebra. The satisfiability algorithm, which is common for all the algebras, is shown to be linear.

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June 1965 SANCTUARY FROM ENTRANCE - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 19 June 1965 ICONOSTASIS AND CHANDELIER - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  17. Minerva Allen, "A Few Good Words": Interview with Minerva Allen, October 25, 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholer, Bo

    1987-01-01

    Minerva Allen, Assinibone tribal historian and mediator in dealings with off-reservation entities, talks about her poetry, prose, and songs; and her efforts to secure the continuance of tribal languages and traditions. Her role as an educator and writer of textbooks is also discussed. Selected poetry is included. (JMM)

  18. SETI Surveys on the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backus, Peter R.; Kilsdonk, T. N.; ATA Team

    2009-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) is a centimeter-wave array of 42 six-meter dishes that allows simultaneous SETI and other radio astronomy projects. In this paper we report on initial SETI observations using several observation and RFI mitigation strategies. We conducted both "targeted” observations of selected stars and "sky survey” observations of areas of the sky. Some observations were done with the SETI project directing the pointing of the array and others were "commensal,” in a direction selected by another project. In both modes, SETI observations used an independent RF tuning and two synthesized beams pointing at stars or positions in the field of view and tuned to the same frequency band. Results of the two SETI observations were compared and used to excise interference. In some observations, each beam had a null positioned at the center of the other beam. In the long term, we plan to observe one million target stars and survey large sections of the galactic plane over the frequency range from 1 GHz to 10 GHz. Much of this work may be done in parallel with other large-scale surveys. The first phase of the ATA was funded through generous grants from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. UC Berkeley, the SETI Institute, the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0540599), Sun Microsystems, Xilinx, Nathan Myhrvold, Greg Papadopoulos, and other corporations and individual donors contributed additional funding.

  19. Mission Specialist (MS) Allen experiments with beverage on middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Mission Specialist (MS) Allen, using beverage container and drinking straw, experiments with microgravity chararcteristics of orange juice on middeck in front of the Development Flight Instrument (DFI) unit and forward lockers. Allen laughes as he watches the results of his experimentation.

  20. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  1. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  2. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  3. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  4. 33 CFR 80.1440 - Port Allen, Kauai, HI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Port Allen, Kauai, HI. 80.1440 Section 80.1440 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Islands § 80.1440 Port Allen, Kauai, HI. A line drawn...

  5. Freeman Allen: Boston's pioneering physician anesthetist.

    PubMed

    Morris, Samuel D; Morris, Alina J; Rockoff, Mark A

    2014-11-01

    On October 16, 1846 dentist William T. G. Morton successfully demonstrated at the Massachusetts General Hospital that ether could prevent the pain of surgery. For decades afterwards, the administration of anesthesia in the United States was generally relegated to dentists, medical students, junior surgical trainees, or even nonmedical personnel. It was not until the end of the 19th century that a few pioneering physicians began devoting their careers to administering anesthesia to patients, studying ways to make it safer and more effective, and teaching others about its use. One of these individuals was Freeman Allen, who was appointed the first physician anesthetist to the medical staff at the Massachusetts General Hospital and several other major hospitals in Boston. We describe this remarkable man, his contributions to the early development of anesthesiology as a medical specialty, and the true cause of his untimely death. PMID:25329027

  6. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer December 1, 1936 CHEST (North room 3rd floor) (SWISS FURNITURE) - Fort Western, Main Building, Bowman Street, Augusta, Kennebec County, ME

  7. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer December ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey Allen L. Hubbard, Photographer December 1, 1936 CHEST (North room 3rd floor) (SWISS FURNITURE) - Fort Western, Main Building, Bowman Street, Augusta, Kennebec County, ME

  8. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 Gilded Relief Decoration, Detail of Frieze at Base of Chancel Arch - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  9. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 GILDED RELIEF DECORATION ON FACE OF CHANCEL ARCH - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  10. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 AUDITORIUM, FROM BALCONY-- LOOKING NORTHWEST - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  11. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 Auditorium, from Balcony, looking Northeast - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  12. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 31 May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 31 May 1964 WEST (NORMAL AVE.) AND SOUTHEAST (CANALPORT AVE.) ELEVATIONS - Schoenhofen Brewing Company, Powerhouse, 1770 Canalport Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  13. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 3 May ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 3 May 1965 ENTRANCE CANOPY FROM SOUTHWEST - Holy Trinity Russian & Greek Orthodox Church, 1121 North Leavitt Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  14. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: EXTERIOR: WEST (CLARK STREET) AND SOUTH (JACKSON BLVD.) SIDES - U.S. Post Office, Customs House & Sub-Treasury, 218 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  15. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: CENTRAL HALL, LOOKING ACROSS FROM THE SIXTH FLOOR - U.S. Post Office, Customs House & Sub-Treasury, 218 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer, June, 1964 VIEW: CENTRAL HALL, FROM THE SIXTH FLOOR LOOKING NORTHWEST - U.S. Post Office, Customs House & Sub-Treasury, 218 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  17. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 14 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 14 June 1964 TOP THREE FLOORS, MIDDLE BAY, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION - Chicago Criminal Courts Building, 54 West Hubbard Street, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer 24 June 1964 GRAND STAIRWAY, FROM SECOND FLOOR HALL, SHOWING STAINED GLASS WINDOW IN WEST WALL ABOVE LANDING - Francis J. Dewes House, 503 West Wrightwood Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  19. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 STAINED GLASS WINDOW, WEST WINDOW IN SOUTH WALL, FROM BALCONY - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  20. A Summing Up. Allen Memorial Art Museum Addition, Oberlin, Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Progressive Architecture, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Venturi and Rauch's addition to the Allen Art Museum at Oberlin College is in two separate parts: a loft that houses new facilities for the art department and a gallery for contemporary art. (Author/MLF)

  1. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Szilard, L.

    1963-09-10

    A breeder reactor is described, including a mass of fissionable material that is less than critical with respect to unmoderated neutrons and greater than critical with respect to neutrons of average energies substantially greater than thermal, a coolant selected from sodium or sodium--potassium alloys, a control liquid selected from lead or lead--bismuth alloys, and means for varying the quantity of control liquid in the reactor. (AEC)

  2. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1961-07-25

    A means is described for co-relating the essential physical requirements of a fission chain reaction in order that practical, compact, and easily controllable reactors can be built. These objects are obtained by employing a composition of fissionsble isotope and moderator in fluid form in which the amount of fissionsble isotcpe present governs the reaction. The size of the reactor is no longer a critical factor, the new criterion being the concentration of the fissionable isotope.

  3. The conversion of allenes to strained three-membered heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Adams, C S; Weatherly, C D; Burke, E G; Schomaker, J M

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews methods for converting allenes to strained, three-membered methylene heterocycles, and also covers the reactivity of these products. Specifically, the synthesis and reactivity of methylene aziridines, allene oxides/spirodiepoxides, methylene silacyclopropanes, methylene phosphiranes, and methylene thiiranes are described, including applications to the synthesis of complex molecules. Due to the primary focus on heterocyclic motifs, the all-carbon analogue of these species (methylene cyclopropane) is only briefly discussed. PMID:24647416

  4. Chemoselective allene aziridination via Ag(I) catalysis.

    PubMed

    Rigoli, Jared W; Weatherly, Cale D; Vo, Brian T; Neale, Samuel; Meis, Alan R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2013-01-18

    Allene aziridination generates useful bicyclic methylene aziridine scaffolds that can be flexibly transformed into a range of stereochemically complex and densely functionalized amine-containing stereotriads. The scope of this chemistry has been limited by the poor chemoselectivity that often results when typical dinuclear Rh(II) catalysts are employed with homoallenic carbamates. Herein, Ag(I) catalysts that significantly improve the scope and yield of bicyclic methylene aziridines that can be prepared via allene aziridination are described. PMID:23265391

  5. Chemoselective Allene Aziridination via Ag(I) Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Jared W.; Weatherly, Cale D.; Vo, Brian T.; Neale, Samuel; Meis, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Allene aziridination generates useful bicyclic methylene aziridine scaffolds that can be flexibly transformed into a range of stereochemically complex and densely functionalized amine-containing stereotriads. The scope of this chemistry has been limited by the poor chemoselectivity that often results when typical dinuclear Rh(II) catalysts are employed with homoallenic carbamates. Herein, Ag(I) catalysts that significantly improve the scope and yield of bicyclic methylene aziridines that can be prepared via allene aziridination are described. PMID:23265391

  6. Voices: A Conversation with Allen J. Wilcox.

    PubMed

    Jukic, Anne Marie Z

    2016-09-01

    Allen James Wilcox was born on 30 September 1946 in Columbus, OH. He studied medicine at the University of Michigan, graduated in 1973, and after a rotating internship, he completed a master's degree in maternal and child health (1976) and a PhD in epidemiology (1979) at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. After graduation, he went to work at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS, one of the US National Institutes of Health) in Durham, NC, where he has spent his career. He developed a research program in reproductive and perinatal epidemiology, a relatively unexplored area at the time. His studies include the early pregnancy study, which documented the extent of subclinical pregnancy loss in humans and established the fertile days of a woman's menstrual cycle. He served as the Chief of the Epidemiology Branch from 1991 to 2001, and as Editor-in-Chief of the journal EPIDEMIOLOGY from 2001 to 2014. His textbook, Fertility and Pregnancy-An Epidemiologic Perspective, was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. He was elected to the American Epidemiological Society in 1989, and served as its president in 2003. He also served as president of the Society of Pediatric and Perinatal Epidemiological Research (1996) and the president of the Society of Epidemiological Research (1998). He holds adjunct teaching appointments at the University of North Carolina, Harvard University, and the University of Bergen (Norway), which awarded him an honorary doctoral degree in 2008. PMID:27482869

  7. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: Allene and methyl allenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Wang, Yanmei; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical study on the ultrafast excited state dynamics of allene and a series of its methylated analogues (1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene) in order to elucidate the conical intersection mediated dynamics that give rise to ultrafast relaxation to the ground electronic state. We use femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) to probe the coupled electronic-vibrational dynamics following UV excitation at 200 nm (6.2 eV). Ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations are employed to determine the mechanistic details of two competing dynamical pathways to the ground electronic state. In all molecules, these pathways are found to involve as follows: (i) twisting about the central allenic C-C-C axis followed by pyramidalization at one of the terminal carbon atoms and (ii) bending of allene moiety. Importantly, the AIMS trajectory data were used for ab initio simulations of the TRPES, permitting direct comparison with experiment. For each molecule, the decay of the TRPES signal is characterized by short (30 fs, 52 fs, 23 fs) and long (1.8 ps, 3.5 ps, [306 fs, 18 ps]) time constants for 1,2-butadiene, 1,1-dimethylallene, and tetramethylallene, respectively. However, AIMS simulations show that these time constants are only loosely related to the evolution of electronic character and actually more closely correlate to large amplitude motions on the electronic excited state, modulating the instantaneous vertical ionization potentials. Furthermore, the fully substituted tetramethylallene is observed to undergo qualitatively different dynamics, as displacements involving the relatively massive methyl groups impede direct access to the conical intersections which give rise to the ultrafast relaxation dynamics observed in the other species. These results show that the branching between the "twisting" and "bending" pathways can be modified via the selective methylation of the terminal carbon atoms of

  8. 33 CFR 165.T08-0432 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. 165.T08-0432 Section 165.T08-0432... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.T08-0432 Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City... Water Way on the Morgan City—Port Allen route from MM 0 to the Port Allen lock. (b) Effective date....

  9. Reactivity and Chemoselectivity of Allenes in Rh(I)-Catalyzed Intermolecular (5 + 2) Cycloadditions with Vinylcyclopropanes: Allene-Mediated Rhodacycle Formation Can Poison Rh(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Allenes are important 2π building blocks in organic synthesis and engage as 2-carbon components in many metal-catalyzed reactions. Wender and co-workers discovered that methyl substituents on the terminal allene double bond counterintuitively change the reactivities of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with vinylcyclopropanes (VCPs). More sterically encumbered allenes afford higher cycloadduct yields, and such effects are also observed in other Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular cycloadditions. Through density functional theory calculations (B3LYP and M06) and experiment, we explored this enigmatic reactivity and selectivity of allenes in [Rh(CO)2Cl]2-catalyzed intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions with VCPs. The apparent low reactivity of terminally unsubstituted allenes is associated with a competing allene dimerization that irreversibly sequesters rhodium. With terminally substituted allenes, steric repulsion between the terminal substituents significantly increases the barrier of allene dimerization while the barrier of the (5 + 2) cycloaddition is not affected, and thus the cycloaddition prevails. Computation has also revealed the origin of chemoselectivity in (5 + 2) cycloadditions with allene-ynes. Although simple allene and acetylene have similar reaction barriers, intermolecular (5 + 2) cycloadditions of allene-ynes occur exclusively at the terminal allene double bond. The terminal double bond is more reactive due to the enhanced d−π* backdonation. At the same time, insertion of the internal double bond of an allene-yne has a higher barrier as it would break π conjugation. Substituted alkynes are more difficult to insert compared with acetylene, because of the steric repulsion from the additional substituents. This leads to the greater reactivity of the allene double bond relative to the alkynyl group in allene-ynes. PMID:25379606

  10. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance results from the Sheep Creek 1 well, Susitna basin, south-central Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, Richard G.; Lillis, Paul G.; Pawlewicz, Mark J.; Haeussler, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    We used Rock-Eval pyrolysis and vitrinite reflectance to examine the petroleum source potential of rock samples from the Sheep Creek 1 well in the Susitna basin of south-central Alaska. The results show that Miocene nonmarine coal, carbonaceous shale, and mudstone are potential sources of hydrocarbons and are thermally immature with respect to the oil window. In the samples that we studied, coals are more organic-rich and more oil-prone than carbonaceous shales and silty mudstones, which appear to be potential sources of natural gas. Lithologically similar rocks may be present in the deeper parts of the subsurface Susitna basin located west of the Sheep Creek 1 well, where they may have been buried deeply enough to generate oil and (or) gas. The Susitna basin is sparsely drilled and mostly unexplored, and no commercial production of hydrocarbons has been obtained. However, the existence of potential source rocks of oil and gas, as shown by our Rock-Eval results, suggests that undiscovered petroleum accumulations may be present in the Susitna basin.

  11. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Roman, W.G.

    1961-06-27

    A pressurized water reactor in which automatic control is achieved by varying the average density of the liquid moderator-cooiant is patented. Density is controlled by the temperature and power level of the reactor ftself. This control can be effected by the use of either plate, pellet, or tubular fuel elements. The fuel elements are disposed between upper and lower coolant plenum chambers and are designed to permit unrestricted coolant flow. The control chamber has an inlet opening communicating with the lower coolant plenum chamber and a restricted vapor vent communicating with the upper coolant plenum chamber. Thus, a variation in temperature of the fuel elements will cause a variation in the average moderator density in the chamber which directly affects the power level of the reactor.

  12. 76 FR 36318 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route From Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that...; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. (a) Location....

  13. Biosynthesis of allene oxides in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The moss Physcomitrella patens contains C18- as well as C20-polyunsaturated fatty acids that can be metabolized by different enzymes to form oxylipins such as the cyclopentenone cis(+)-12-oxo phytodienoic acid. Mutants defective in the biosynthesis of cyclopentenones showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology and interrupted sporogenesis. The initial step in this biosynthetic route is the conversion of a fatty acid hydroperoxide to an allene oxide. This reaction is catalyzed by allene oxide synthase (AOS) belonging as hydroperoxide lyase (HPL) to the cytochrome P450 family Cyp74. In this study we characterized two AOS from P. patens, PpAOS1 and PpAOS2. Results Our results show that PpAOS1 is highly active with both C18 and C20-hydroperoxy-fatty acid substrates, whereas PpAOS2 is fully active only with C20-substrates, exhibiting trace activity (~1000-fold lower kcat/KM) with C18 substrates. Analysis of products of PpAOS1 and PpHPL further demonstrated that both enzymes have an inherent side activity mirroring the close inter-connection of AOS and HPL catalysis. By employing site directed mutagenesis we provide evidence that single amino acid residues in the active site are also determining the catalytic activity of a 9-/13-AOS – a finding that previously has only been reported for substrate specific 13-AOS. However, PpHPL cannot be converted into an AOS by exchanging the same determinant. Localization studies using YFP-labeled AOS showed that PpAOS2 is localized in the plastid while PpAOS1 may be found in the cytosol. Analysis of the wound-induced cis(+)-12-oxo phytodienoic acid accumulation in PpAOS1 and PpAOS2 single knock-out mutants showed that disruption of PpAOS1, in contrast to PpAOS2, results in a significantly decreased cis(+)-12-oxo phytodienoic acid formation. However, the knock-out mutants of neither PpAOS1 nor PpAOS2 showed reduced fertility, aberrant sporophyte morphology or interrupted sporogenesis. Conclusions Our study

  14. REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1961-10-01

    Thermonuclear reactors, methods, and apparatus are described for controlling and confining high temperature plasma. Main axial confining coils in combination with helical windings provide a rotational transform that avoids the necessity of a figure-eight shaped reactor tube. The helical windings provide a multipolar helical magnetic field transverse to the axis of the main axial confining coils so as to improve the effectiveness of the confining field by counteracting the tendency of the more central lines of force in the stellarator tube to exchange positions with the magnetic lines of force nearer the walls of the tube. (AEC)

  15. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  16. REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spitzer, L. Jr.

    1962-01-01

    The system conteraplates ohmically heating a gas to high temperatures such as are useful in thermonuclear reactors of the stellarator class. To this end the gas is ionized and an electric current is applied to the ionized gas ohmically to heat the gas while the ionized gas is confined to a central portion of a reaction chamber. Additionally, means are provided for pumping impurities from the gas and for further heating the gas. (AEC)

  17. Clarence Allen talks about the responsibilities in earthquake prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1978-01-01

    Dr. Clarence R. Allen is professor of geology and geophysics at the California Institute of Technology. He has been a member of advisory panels to the Executive Office of the President, National Academy of Sciences, National Science Foundation, U.S Geological Survey, UNESCO, California State Mining and Geology Board, and the California Department of Water Resources. Dr. Allen has been President of both the Geological Society of America and the Seismological Society of America (SSA). The title of this interview is based on his presidential address to the SSA in 1976. 

  18. Astronauts Allen and Gemar during extravehicular activity (EVA) training in CCT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronauts Charles D. (Sam) Gemar, and Andrew M. Allen participate in a training exercise at JSC's Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT), located in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility. Gemar sits inside the airlock as Allen reviews procedures for EVA.

  19. Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Robert M.

    1976-10-05

    1. A neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch.

  20. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Allenes with Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Kristina L.; Liu, Gordon T.; Widenhoefer, Ross A.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of a monosubstituted, 1,3-disubstituted, or tetrasubstituted allene with various indoles catalyzed by a 1:1 mixture of a gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex and AgOTf at room temperature leads to hydroarylation with formation of 3-allyl-indoles in modest to good yield. PMID:20305794

  1. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Allenes with Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Kristina L.; Liu, Gordon T.; Widenhoefer, Ross A.

    2009-01-01

    Reaction of a monosubstituted, 1,3-disubstituted, or tetrasubstituted allene with various indoles catalyzed by a 1:1 mixture of a gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex and AgOTf at room temperature leads to hydroarylation with formation of 3-allyl-indoles in modest to good yield. PMID:17428061

  2. James Van Allen and His Namesake NASA Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Hoxie, V. C.; Jaynes, A.; Kale, A.; Kanekal, S. G.; Li, X.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2013-12-01

    In many ways, James A. Van Allen defined and "invented" modern space research. His example showed the way for government-university partners to pursue basic research that also served important national and international goals. He was a tireless advocate for space exploration and for the role of space science in the spectrum of national priorities.

  3. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway: A Centralized Data Access Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sotirelis, T.; Stephens, G. K.; Kessel, R.; Potter, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the Van Allen Probes Space Weather data to users. Over the past years, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes science and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including, simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell, capability of visualizing data from both probes (A & B) on the same plot. In cooperation with all Van Allen Probes Instrument SOCs, the Science Gateway will soon be able to serve higher level data products (Level 3), and to visualize them via the above mentioned HTML5 interface. Users will also be able to create customized CDF files on the fly.

  4. The Evolving Space Weather System—Van Allen Probes Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti, L. J.; Mauk, B. H.; Fox, N. J.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Sotirelis, T. S.; Raouafi, N.-E.; Kessel, R. L.; Becker, H. N.

    2014-10-01

    The overarching goal and purpose of the study of space weather is clear—to understand and address the issues caused by solar disturbances on humans and technological systems. Space weather has evolved in the past few decades from a collection of concerned agencies and researchers to a critical function of the National Weather Service of NOAA. The general effects have also evolved from the well-known telegraph disruptions of the mid-1800s to modern day disturbances of the electric power grid, communications and navigation, human spaceflight and spacecraft systems. The last two items in this list, and specifically the effects of penetrating radiation, were the impetus for the space weather broadcast implemented on NASA's Van Allen Probes' twin pair of satellites, launched in August of 2012 and orbiting directly through Earth's severe radiation belts. The Van Allen Probes mission, formerly the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP), was renamed soon after launch to honor the discoverer of Earth's radiation belts at the beginning of the space age, the late James Van Allen (the spacecraft themselves are still referred to as RBSP-A and RBSP-B). The Van Allen Probes are one part of NASA's Living With a Star program formulated to advance the scientific understanding of the connection between solar disturbances, the resulting heliospheric conditions, and their effects on the geospace and Earth environment.

  5. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Harold Allen, Photographer June 1964 TRIPLE STAINED GLASS WINDOWS AND COLUMN SUPPORTING BALCONY (EAST WINDOWS IN SOUTH WALL OF MAIN FLOOR OF AUDITORIUM) - Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue, 3301 South Indiana Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  6. Obituary: James Alfred Van Allen, 1914-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludwig, George H.; McIlwain, Carl Edwin

    2006-12-01

    James Alfred Van Allen, world-renowned space scientist, died 9 August 2006 at the age of ninety-one. He succumbed to heart failure after a ten-week period of declining health. Van Allen served for his entire sixty-seven-year professional career as an amazingly productive researcher, space science spokesman, inspired teacher, and valued colleague. The realization by him and his associates that charged particles are trapped by the Earth's magnetic field began a whole new field of research, magnetospheric physics. Following that initial discovery, he and his associates quickly extended their observations, first to the inner planets, and then to the rest of the planets and beyond. During his tenure at Iowa, he and his group flew instruments on more than sixty successful Earth satellites and planetary spacecraft, including the first missions to the planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Van Allen's lifetime publication list numbers more than 275, of which many are widely-cited, seminal papers. He was the sole author of more than 125 of those papers. Beyond the research laboratory, Van Allen worked energetically throughout his career in establishing space research as a new branch of human inquiry. He was among the most sought-after as a committee member and adviser, working at the highest levels of government, including the White House and Congress, and at all levels of the national and international research establishments. Many presentations in the non-scientific arena helped to bring the exciting discoveries and challenges of space research to the attention of the general public. James Van Allen (Van to his many friends and colleagues) was born on 7 September 1914 on a small farm near Mount Pleasant, Iowa, the second of four sons of Alfred Morris Van Allen and Alma Olney Van Allen. After high school in Mount Pleasant, he entered Iowa Wesleyan College, majoring in physics and graduating summa cum laude. While there, he was introduced to geophysics

  7. Van Allen Probes: Resolving Fundamental Physics with Practical Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, Aleksandr; Sibeck, David; Fox, Nicola; Mauk, Barry; Kessel, Ramona

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 Re elliptical, low inclination (10°) Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The goal of the mission is to provide understanding of how populations of relativistic electrons and penetrating ions in space form or change in response to variable inputs of energy from the Sun. In this paper we overview the new understanding and discoveries of the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012, which include formation of multiple coherently ordered structures within the outer electron belt and new persistent “zebra stripes” in the inner electron belt.

  8. Isomer-specific combustion chemistry in allene and propyne flames

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Nils; Miller, James A.; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Kasper, Tina; Kohse-Hoeinghaus, Katharina; Wang, Juan; Cool, Terrill A.

    2009-11-15

    A combined experimental and modeling study is performed to clarify the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in flames fueled by the C{sub 3}H{sub 4} isomers allene and propyne. To this end, mole fraction profiles of several flame species in stoichiometric allene (propyne)/O{sub 2}/Ar flames are analyzed by means of a chemical kinetic model. The premixed flames are stabilized on a flat-flame burner under a reduced pressure of 25 Torr (=33.3 mbar). Quantitative species profiles are determined by flame-sampling molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and the isomer-specific flame compositions are unraveled by employing photoionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The temperature profiles are measured by OH laser-induced fluorescence. Experimental and modeled mole fraction profiles of selected flame species are discussed with respect to the isomer-specific combustion chemistry in both flames. The emphasis is put on main reaction pathways of fuel consumption, of allene and propyne isomerization, and of isomer-specific formation of C{sub 6} aromatic species. The present model includes the latest theoretical rate coefficients for reactions on a C{sub 3}H{sub 5} potential [J.A. Miller, J.P. Senosiain, S.J. Klippenstein, Y. Georgievskii, J. Phys. Chem. A 112 (2008) 9429-9438] and for the propargyl recombination reactions [Y. Georgievskii, S.J. Klippenstein, J.A. Miller, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 9 (2007) 4259-4268]. Larger peak mole fractions of propargyl, allyl, and benzene are observed in the allene flame than in the propyne flame. In these flames virtually all of the benzene is formed by the propargyl recombination reaction. (author)

  9. Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and Space Weather Data Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes Science Gateway acts as a centralized interface to the instrument Science Operation Centers (SOCs), provides mission planning tools, and hosts a number of science related activities such as the mission bibliography. Most importantly, the Gateway acts as the primary site for processing and delivering the VAP Space Weather data to users. Over the past year, the web-site has been completely redesigned with the focus on easier navigation and improvements of the existing tools such as the orbit plotter, position calculator and magnetic footprint tool. In addition, a new data plotting facility has been added. Based on HTML5, which allows users to interactively plot Van Allen Probes summary and space weather data. The user can tailor the tool to display exactly the plot they wish to see and then share this with other users via either a URL or by QR code. Various types of plots can be created, including simple time series, data plotted as a function of orbital location, and time versus L-Shell. We discuss the new Van Allen Probes Science Gateway and the Space Weather Data Pipeline.

  10. Global empirical models of plasmaspheric hiss using Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasojevic, M.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Orlova, K.

    2015-12-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is a whistler-mode emission that permeates the Earth's plasmasphere and is a significant driver of energetic electron losses through cyclotron resonant pitch angle scattering. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on the Van Allen Probes mission provides vastly improved measurements of the hiss wave environment including continuous measurements of the wave magnetic field cross-spectral matrix and enhanced low-frequency coverage. Here, we develop empirical models of hiss wave intensity using two years of Van Allen Probes data. First, we describe the construction of the hiss database. Then, we compare the hiss spectral distribution and integrated wave amplitude obtained from Van Allen Probes to those previously extracted from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite mission. Next, we develop a cubic regression model of the average hiss magnetic field intensity as a function of Kp, L, magnetic latitude, and magnetic local time. We use the full regression model to explore general trends in the data and use insights from the model to develop a simplified model of wave intensity for straightforward inclusion in quasi-linear diffusion calculations of electron scattering rates.

  11. Syntheses of allene-modified derivatives of peridinin toward elucidation of the effective role of the allene function in high energy transfer efficiencies in photosynthesis†

    PubMed Central

    Kajikawa, Takayuki; Aoki, Kazuyoshi; Singh, Ram Shanker; Iwashita, Takashi; Kusumoto, Toshiyuki; Frank, Harry A.; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Peridinin is known as the main light-harvesting pigment in photosynthesis in the sea and exhibits exceptionally high energy transfer efficiencies to chlorophyll a. This energy transfer efficiency is thought to be related to the intricate structure of peridinin, which possesses allene and ylidenbutenolide functions in the polyene backbone. There are, however, no studies on the relationship between the structural features of peridinin and its super ability for energy transfer. We then focused on the subjects of why peridinin possesses a unique allene group and how the allene function plays a role in the exceptionally high energy transfer. Toward elucidation of the exact role of the allene function, we now describe the syntheses of three relatively unstable allene-modified derivatives of peridinin along with the results of the Stark spectroscopy of peridinin and the synthesized peridinin derivatives. PMID:19707676

  12. Synergistic Kinetic Resolution and Asymmetric Propargyl Claisen Rearrangement for the Synthesis of Chiral Allenes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangbin; Liu, Xiaohua; Hu, Haipeng; Guo, Jing; Xia, Yong; Lin, Lili; Feng, Xiaoming

    2016-03-14

    The asymmetric propargyl Claisen rearrangement provides a convenient entry to chiral allene motifs. Herein, we describe the development of a kinetic resolution and asymmetric rearrangement of racemic propargyl vinyl ethers. This transformation afforded chiral allene products along with the enantiomerically enriched substrate in good yields with excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity. The complete chirality transfer and facially selective rearrangement enabled the simultaneous construction of an axially chiral allenic unit and a quaternary carbon stereocenter. PMID:26889758

  13. A computational model for the dimerization of allene.

    PubMed

    Skraba, Sarah L; Johnson, Richard P

    2012-12-21

    Computations at the CCSD(T)/6-311+G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory support long-held beliefs that allene dimerization to 1,2-dimethylenecyclobutane proceeds through diradical intermediates rather than a concerted (π)2(s) + (π)2(a) mechanism. Two diastereomeric transition states with orthogonal and skew geometries have been located for C2-C2 dimerization of allene, with predicted barriers of 34.5 and 40.3 kcal/mol, respectively. In dimerization, the outward-facing ligands rotate in a sense opposite to the forming C-C bond. Both transition states lead to nearly orthogonal (D(2)) singlet bisallyl (or tetramethyleneethane) diradical. This diradical has a barrier to planarization of 3.2 kcal/mol through a planar D(2h) geometry and a barrier to methylene rotation of 14.3 kcal/mol. Bisallyl diradical closes through one of four degenerate paths by a conrotatory motion of the methylene groups with a predicted barrier of 15.7 kcal/mol. The low barrier to planarization of bisallyl, and similar barriers for methylene rotation and conrotatory closure are consistent with a stepwise dimerization process which can still maintain stereochemical elements of reactants. These computations support the observation that racemic 1,3-disubstituted allenes, with access to an orthogonal transition state which minimizes steric strain, will dimerize more readily than enantiopure materials and by a mechanism that preferentially bonds M and P enantiomers. PMID:23198916

  14. Neuroinformatics of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Leonard; Li, Yang; Lau, Chris; Feng, David; Bernard, Amy; Sunkin, Susan M; Zeng, Hongkui; Dang, Chinh; Hawrylycz, Michael; Ng, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    The Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas is a mesoscale whole brain axonal projection atlas of the C57Bl/6J mouse brain. Anatomical trajectories throughout the brain were mapped into a common 3D space using a standardized platform to generate a comprehensive and quantitative database of inter-areal and cell-type-specific projections. This connectivity atlas has several desirable features, including brain-wide coverage, validated and versatile experimental techniques, a single standardized data format, a quantifiable and integrated neuroinformatics resource, and an open-access public online database (http://connectivity.brain-map.org/). Meaningful informatics data quantification and comparison is key to effective use and interpretation of connectome data. This relies on successful definition of a high fidelity atlas template and framework, mapping precision of raw data sets into the 3D reference framework, accurate signal detection and quantitative connection strength algorithms, and effective presentation in an integrated online application. Here we describe key informatics pipeline steps in the creation of the Allen Mouse Brain Connectivity Atlas and include basic application use cases. PMID:25536338

  15. Hovering and forward flight energetics in Anna's and Allen's hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Aerodynamic theory predicts that the mechanical costs of flight are lowest at intermediate flight speeds; metabolic costs of flight should trend similarly if muscle efficiency is constant. We measured metabolic rates for nine Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) and two male Allen's hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) feeding during flight from a free-standing mask over a range of airspeeds. Ten of 11 birds exhibited higher metabolic costs during hovering than during flight at intermediate airspeeds, whereas one individual exhibited comparable costs at hovering and during forward flight up to speeds of approximately 7 m s(-1). Flight costs of all hummingbirds increased at higher airspeeds. Relative to Anna's hummingbirds, Allen's hummingbirds exhibited deeper minima in the power curve, possibly due to higher wing loadings and greater associated costs of induced drag. Although feeding at a mask in an airstream may reduce body drag and, thus, the contributions of parasite power to overall metabolic expenditure, these results suggest that hummingbird power curves are characterized by energetic minima at intermediate speeds relative to hovering costs. PMID:20455711

  16. Observations of Whistler-Mode Chorus with Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, William; Hospodarsky, George; Santolik, Ondrej; Kletzing, Craig; Bounds, Scott

    2014-10-01

    The Van Allen Probes mission provides an excellent opportunity to observe whistler-mode chorus and its role in the radiation belts. The plasma wave instrument on the two probes, called Waves, includes six identical waveform receivers covering the frequency range from 10 Hz to 12 kHz. The instrument measures three orthogonal magnetic field components and three orthogonal electric field components of waves. This complement supports wave-normal and Poynting flux analyses of chorus as well as other wave modes that interact with radiation belt particles. Extensive use of burst modes provides multicomponent waveforms enabling the study of individual chorus elements, including their substructure. The early-mission publications confirm the importance of chorus to the local acceleration of electrons in the outer radiation belts. The orbital precession of the twin Van Allen Probes through a complete range of local times now allows for a new survey of the distribution of chorus emissions. Hence, we now have the tools to study chorus from the nonlinear growth in chorus element substructures through synoptic studies of the near-equatorial occurrence of chorus out to a distance of approximately 5.8 Earth radii.

  17. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dedong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Deng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Meng; Li, Haimeng

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to play a crucial role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. However, there is little consensus on which phase of the storm is more favorable for the generation of EMIC waves. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument of EMFISIS suite on board Van Allen Probe A, the occurrences of EMIC waves during geomagnetic storms are investigated in this paper. 76 storms were identified during the period under research, from 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. 50 of the 76 storms observed 124 EMIC wave events, of which 80 are found in the recovery phase, more than those observed in the main phase. Evolution of the distribution characteristics of EMIC waves respect to L and MLT in different geomagnetic phases is investigated, which is found to be consistent with that of the plasmasphere. These results are different from those derived by the observations of the CRRES satellite. The different results may result from the different orbit coverage of the two different satellite missions or from the different activity level of the magnetosphere during the different periods. Few EMIC waves in the dayside sector during the pre-onset periods are observed. It is implied that, to the generation of EMIC waves, the effect of solar wind dynamic pressure in the inner magnetosphere is not so significant as that in the outer magnetosphere.

  18. Modified Mason-Allen Suture Bridge Technique: A New Suture Bridge Technique with Improved Tissue Holding by the Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bong Gun; Cho, Nam Su

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method of suture bridge technique for medial row fixation using a modified Mason-Allen stitch instead of a horizontal mattress. Medial row configuration of the technique is composed of the simple stitch limb and the modified Mason-Allen stitch limb. The limbs are passed through the tendon by a shuttle relay. The simple stitch limb passes the cuff once and the modified Mason-Allen stitch limb passes three times which creates a rip stop that prevents tendon pull-out. In addition, the Mason-Allen suture bridge configuration is basically a knotless technique which has an advantage of reducing a possibility of strangulation of the rotator cuff tendon, impingement or irritation that may be caused by knot. PMID:22949957

  19. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Michael W. Allen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Michael W. Allen, the Chairman and CEO of Allen Interactions, is an architect of interactive multimedia learning and is recognized for his many insights, inventions, and presentations. With over 50 years of experience in e-learning, both in academic and corporate settings, he is known for his role in creating Authorware and overseeing the work of…

  20. Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-75 ONBOARD VIEW --- Astronaut Andrew M. Allen, mission commander, sets up systems for a television downlink on the flight deck of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Allen was joined by four other astronauts and an international payload specialist for more than 16 days of research aboard Columbia. The photograph was taken with a 70mm handheld camera.

  1. The Allen telescope array: Commensal and efficient SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deboer, David R.

    2006-12-01

    The Allen telescope array (ATA) currently under construction affords the possibility of a dedicated and highly efficient SETI program that may be done commensally with other radio astronomy programs. This symbiosis is important in order to maintain and sustain the long-term effort that may be required in order to achieve success as a positive or null result. The technology that is being exploited is the construction of many small elements that allow large fields-of-view at high sensitivity, the use of ultra-wideband front-ends, and the use of flexible digital “intermediate frequency (IF)” systems. The project is under construction in phases, with the first 32 antennas expected to be functional in the fall of 2004, the next 173 dishes operational early 2006, with plans for 350 antennas total within this decade.

  2. Van Allen Probe Charging During the St. Patrick's Day Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Minow, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    The geomagnetic storms on and around March 17, 2015 marked the largest storms seen in the declining phase of the solar cycle to date. We use the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) mass spectrometer on board the Van Allen Probe - A and B satellites to study in detail the charging effects seen on these spacecraft during this time. Ion particle flux data provides information on the magnitude of the charging events using the ion line charging signature due to low energy ions accelerated by the spacecraft potential. Electron flux observations are used to correlate the charging environment with variations in spacecraft potential through the event. We also investigate the density and temperature of ions and electrons during the time of the charging event.

  3. Ion spectral structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferradas, C.; Zhang, J.; Spence, H. E.; Kistler, L. M.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades several missions have recorded the presence of dynamic spectral features of energetic ions in the inner magnetosphere. Previous studies have reported single "nose-like" structures occurring alone and simultaneous nose-like structures (up to three). These ion structures are named after the characteristic shapes of energy bands or gaps in the energy-time spectrograms of in situ measured ion fluxes. They constitute the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. The HOPE mass spectrometer onboard the Van Allen Probes measures energetic hydrogen, helium, and oxygen ions near the inner edge of the plasma sheet, where these ion structures are observed. We present a statistical study of nose-like structures, using 2-years measurements from the HOPE instrument. The results provide important details about the spatial distribution (dependence on geocentric distance), spectral features of the structures (differences among species), and geomagnetic conditions under which these structures occur.

  4. Orion GNC Mitigation Efforts for Van Allen Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Ellis T.; Jackson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Orion Crew Module (CM) is NASA's next generation manned space vehicle, scheduled to return humans to lunar orbit in the coming decade. The Orion avionics and GN&C architectures have progressed through a number of project phases and are nearing completion of a major milestone. The first unmanned test mission, dubbed "Exploration Flight Test One" (EFT-1) is scheduled to launch from NASA Kennedy Space Center late next year and provides the first integrated test of all the vehicle systems, avionics and software. The EFT-1 mission will be an unmanned test flight that includes a high speed re-entry from an elliptical orbit, which will be launched on an expendable launch vehicle (ELV). The ELV will place CM and the ELV upper stage into a low Earth orbit (LEO) for one revolution. After the first LEO, the ELV upper stage will re-ignite and place the combined upper stage/CM into an elliptical orbit whose perigee results in a high energy entry to test CM response in a relatively high velocity, high heating environment. While not producing entry velocities as high as those experienced in returning from a lunar orbit, the trajectory was chosen to provide higher stresses on the thermal protection and guided entry systems, as compared against a lower energy LEO entry. However the required entry geometry with constraints on inclination and landing site result in a trajectory that lingers for many hours in the Van Allen radiation belts. This exposes the vehicle and avionics to much higher levels of high energy proton radiation than a typical LEO or lunar trajectory would encounter. As a result, Van Allen radiation poses a significant risk to the Orion avionics system, and particularly the Flight Control Module (FCM) computers that house the GN&C flight software. The measures taken by the Orion GN&C, Flight Software and Avionics teams to mitigate the risks associated with the Van Allen radiation on EFT-1 are covered in the paper. Background on the Orion avionics subsystem is

  5. Branching Out: Rhodium-Catalyzed Allylation with Alkynes and Allenes.

    PubMed

    Koschker, Philipp; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-08-16

    We present a new and efficient strategy for the atom-economic transformation of both alkynes and allenes to allylic functionalized structures via a Rh-catalyzed isomerization/addition reaction which has been developed in our working group. Our methodology thus grants access to an important structural class valued in modern organic chemistry for both its versatility for further functionalization and the potential for asymmetric synthesis with the construction of a new stereogenic center. This new methodology, inspired by mechanistic investigations by Werner in the late 1980s and based on preliminary work by Yamamoto and Trost, offers an attractive alternative to other established methods for allylic functionalization such as allylic substitution or allylic oxidation. The main advantage of our methodology consists of the inherent atom economy in comparison to allylic oxidation or substitution, which both produce stoichiometric amounts of waste and, in case of the substitution reaction, require prefunctionalization of the starting material. Starting out with the discovery of a highly branched-selective coupling reaction of carboxylic acids with terminal alkynes using a Rh(I)/DPEphos complex as the catalyst system, over the past 5 years we were able to continuously expand upon this chemistry, introducing various (pro)nucleophiles for the selective C-O, C-S, C-N, and C-C functionalization of both alkynes and the double-bond isomeric allenes by choosing the appropriate rhodium/bidentate phosphine catalyst. Thus, valuable compounds such as branched allylic ethers, sulfones, amines, or γ,δ-unsaturated ketones were successfully synthesized in high yields and with a broad substrate scope. Beyond the branched selectivity inherent to rhodium, many of the presented methodologies display additional degrees of selectivity in regard to regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective transformations, with one example even proceeding via a dynamic kinetic resolution. Many advances

  6. [Book review] Green engineering: environmentally conscious design, by David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boustany, R.G.

    2002-01-01

    Review of: Green engineering: Environmentally conscious design / David T. Allen and David R. Shonnard / Prentice-Hall, Inc., One Lake Street, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. 2002. 552 pages. ISBN 0-13-061908-6.

  7. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cross-Cyclotrimerization and Dimerization of Allenes with Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Kazuki; Shibata, Yu; Tanaka, Ken

    2016-06-01

    It has been established that a cationic rhodium(I)/binap complex catalyzes the cross-cyclotrimerization of two molecules of a monosubstituted allene with one molecule of a functionalized alkyne to give 3,6-dialkylidenecyclohex-1-enes. In contrast, the reactions involving di- or trisubstituted allenes and/or unfunctionalized alkynes afforded cross-dimerization products, substituted dendralenes, through β-hydrogen elimination from the corresponding rhodacycles. PMID:27110668

  8. Iron‐catalyzed Cross‐Coupling of Propargyl Carboxylates and Grignard Reagents: Synthesis of Substituted Allenes

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Simon N.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Presented herein is a mild, facile, and efficient iron‐catalyzed synthesis of substituted allenes from propargyl carboxylates and Grignard reagents. Only 1–5 mol % of the inexpensive and environmentally benign [Fe(acac)3] at −20 °C was sufficient to afford a broad range of substituted allenes in excellent yields. The method tolerates a variety of functional groups. PMID:26890161

  9. Diastereoselective Synthesis of the Aminocyclitol Core of Jogyamycin via an Allene Aziridination Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Nels C.; Adams, Christopher S.; Grigg, R. David; Tretbar, Maik; Rigoli, Jared W.; Schomaker, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative allene amination provides rapid access to densely functionalized amine-containing stereotriads through highly reactive bicyclic methyleneaziridine intermediates. This strategy has been demonstrated as a viable approach for the construction of the densely functionalized aminocyclitol core of jogyamycin, a natural product with potent antiprotozoal activity. Importantly, the flexibility of oxidative allene amination will enable the syntheses of modified aminocyclitol analogues of the jogyamycin core. PMID:26741730

  10. Microwave-promoted synthesis of bicyclic azocine-β-lactams from bis(allenes).

    PubMed

    Alcaide, Benito; Almendros, Pedro; Aragoncillo, Cristina; Fernández, Israel; Gómez-Campillos, Gonzalo

    2014-08-01

    A metal-free preparation of structurally novel bicyclic azocine-β-lactams has been developed. The first examples accounting for the preparation of eight-membered rings from bis(allenes) in the absence of metals have been achieved by the thermolysis of nonconjugated 2-azetidinone-tethered bis(allenes) on application of microwave irradiation. This selective carbocyclization reaction has been studied experimentally, and additionally, its mechanism has been investigated by a DFT study. PMID:25010752

  11. (Hetero)aromatics from dienynes, enediynes and enyne-allenes.

    PubMed

    Raviola, Carlotta; Protti, Stefano; Ravelli, Davide; Fagnoni, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The construction of aromatic rings has become a key objective for organic chemists. While several strategies have been developed for the functionalization of pre-formed aromatic rings, the direct construction of an aromatic core starting from polyunsaturated systems is yet a less explored field. The potential of such reactions in the formation of aromatics increased at a regular pace in the last few years. Nowadays, there are reliable and well-established procedures to prepare polyenic derivatives, such as dienynes, enediynes, enyne-allenes and hetero-analogues. This has stimulated their use in the development of innovative cycloaromatizations. Different examples have recently emerged, suggesting large potential of this strategy in the preparation of (hetero)aromatics. Accordingly, this review highlights the recent advancements in this field and describes the different conditions exploited to trigger the process, including thermal and photochemical activation, as well as the use of transition metal catalysis and the addition of electrophiles/nucleophiles or radical species. PMID:27263976

  12. The Allen Telescope Array Search for Electrostatic Discharges on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Marin M.; Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Barott, William C.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Delory, Gregory T.; de Pater, Imke; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array was used to monitor Mars between 2010 March 9 and June 2, over a total of approximately 30 hr, for radio emission indicative of electrostatic discharge. The search was motivated by the report from Ruf et al. of the detection of non-thermal microwave radiation from Mars characterized by peaks in the power spectrum of the kurtosis, or kurtstrum, at 10 Hz, coinciding with a large dust storm event on 2006 June 8. For these observations, we developed a wideband signal processor at the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. This 1024 channel spectrometer calculates the accumulated power and power-squared, from which the spectral kurtosis is calculated post-observation. Variations in the kurtosis are indicative of non-Gaussianity in the signal, which can be used to detect variable cosmic signals as well as radio frequency interference (RFI). During the three-month period of observations, dust activity occurred on Mars in the form of small-scale dust storms; however, no signals indicating lightning discharge were detected. Frequent signals in the kurtstrum that contain spectral peaks with an approximate 10 Hz fundamental were seen at both 3.2 and 8.0 GHz, but were the result of narrowband RFI with harmonics spread over a broad frequency range.

  13. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY SEARCH FOR ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGES ON MARS

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Marin M.; Siemion, Andrew P. V.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; De Pater, Imke; Barott, William C.; Delory, Gregory T.; Werthimer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array was used to monitor Mars between 2010 March 9 and June 2, over a total of approximately 30 hr, for radio emission indicative of electrostatic discharge. The search was motivated by the report from Ruf et al. of the detection of non-thermal microwave radiation from Mars characterized by peaks in the power spectrum of the kurtosis, or kurtstrum, at 10 Hz, coinciding with a large dust storm event on 2006 June 8. For these observations, we developed a wideband signal processor at the Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research. This 1024 channel spectrometer calculates the accumulated power and power-squared, from which the spectral kurtosis is calculated post-observation. Variations in the kurtosis are indicative of non-Gaussianity in the signal, which can be used to detect variable cosmic signals as well as radio frequency interference (RFI). During the three-month period of observations, dust activity occurred on Mars in the form of small-scale dust storms; however, no signals indicating lightning discharge were detected. Frequent signals in the kurtstrum that contain spectral peaks with an approximate 10 Hz fundamental were seen at both 3.2 and 8.0 GHz, but were the result of narrowband RFI with harmonics spread over a broad frequency range.

  14. The Allen Telescope Array as Square Kilometer Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2007-12-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a new radio interferometer that has begun scientific operations in 2007. Many of the technologies, techniques, and observing modes developed for the ATA are directly applicable to the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). The ATA is a pioneer of the LNSD, which refers to a large number (LN) of small diameter (SD) dishes to create the array. This concept underlies nearly all SKA designs. Other relevant technologies are the offset Gregorian ATA antenna, the ATA wideband log periodic feed, transport of broadband data over fiber optic cables, and flexible digital signal processing electronics. The small dishes of the ATA gives it extraordinary wide-field imaging and survey capability but also require new solutions for calibration and imaging. Real time imaging, rapid response to transients, and thinking telescope technology are also under development. Finally, the ATA is developing commensal observing modes, which enable multiple simultaneous science programs, such as SETI, transient surveys, and HI surveys. Opportunities exist for community members to perform scientific investigations as well as develop techniques and technology for the SKA through use of the ATA.

  15. Active and passive microwave measurements in Hurricane Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, V. E.; Bahn, G. S.; Grantham, W. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Jones, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center analysis of the airborne microwave remote sensing measurements of Hurricane Allen obtained on August 5 and 8, 1980 is summarized. The instruments were the C-band stepped frequency microwave radiometer and the Ku-band airborne microwave scatterometer. They were carried aboard a NOAA aircraft making storm penetrations at an altitude of 3000 m and are sensitive to rain rate, surface wind speed, and surface wind vector. The wind speed is calculated from the increase in antenna brightness temperature above the estimated calm sea value. The rain rate is obtained from the difference between antenna temperature increases measured at two frequencies, and wind vector is determined from the sea surface normalized radar cross section measured at several azimuths. Comparison wind data were provided from the inertial navigation systems aboard both the C-130 aircraft at 3000 m and a second NOAA aircraft (a P-3) operating between 500 and 1500 m. Comparison rain rate data were obtained with a rain radar aboard the P-3. Evaluation of the surface winds obtained with the two microwave instruments was limited to comparisons with each other and with the flight level winds. Two important conclusions are drawn from these comparisons: (1) the radiometer is accurate when predicting flight level wind speeds and rain; and (2) the scatterometer produces well behaved and consistent wind vectors for the rain free periods.

  16. Space Weather data processing and Science Gateway for the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, G.; Barnes, R. J.; Weiss, M.; Fox, N. J.; Mauk, B.; Potter, M.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    A near real-time data processing pipeline for the Space Weather broadcast data from the Van Allen Probes is presented. The Van Allen Probes broadcasts a sub-set of the science data in real-time when not downlinking the principal science data. This broadcast is received by several ground stations and relayed to APL in near real time to be ingested into the space weather processing pipeline. This pipeline processes the available level zero space weather data into higher level science data products. These products are made available to the public via the Van Allen Probes Science Gateway website (http://athena.jhuapl.edu). The website acts as pivotal point though which all other instrument SOC's can be accessed. Several other data products (e.g KP/DST indices) and tools (e.g orbit calculator) are made also available to the general public.

  17. Recent Results from the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) onboard the Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Elkington, S. R.; Hoxie, V. C.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.

    2013-05-01

    We describe recent results from the REPT instruments on board Van Allen Probes mission launched on 30 August 2012. The twin spacecraft comprising the Van Allen probes mission are identically instrumented and carry a comprehensive suite of sensors characterizing magnetospheric charged particle populations, electric and magnetic fields and plasma waves. The REPT instruments comprise a well-shielded silicon solid state detector stack, with a state of the art electronics and measure electrons of ~1.5 to > 20 MeV and protons of ~17 to > 100 MeV. The instruments were commissioned 3 days after launch and continue to provide high quality measurements. We describe the Van Allen probes and the REPT instrument and report on the new and unexpected features of the outer zone electron populations observed by REPT.

  18. Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training. In this view, Mission Specialist/Astronaut Joseph P. Allen is in the foreground and Mission Specialist/Astronaut William B. Lenoir is at the top of the photography. Both men are wearing extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) space suits and are weighted down to achieve neutral buoyancy in the 25-ft. deep pool. The background is a full-scale mockup of the Space Shuttle's cargo bay area. Divers assist in the training (35894); Allen goes through a simulation exercise with divers all around (35985); Divers assist the fully suited and tethered Lenoir as he simulates work to be done in the shuttle cargo bay (35986); Lenoir anchors himself to a full-scale mockup of the shuttle orbiter's cargo bay and holds onto a restraining device (35987).

  19. Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Underwater views of STS-5 crewmen Lenoir and Allen during EVA training. Mission Specialist/Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, wearing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) and weighted down to achieve neutral buoyancy, uses a communication system to talk with fellow Mission Specialist/Astronaut William B. Lenoir (out of frame) during underwater simulation of STS-5 extravehicular activity (EVA) (35899); Both mission specialists coordinate their efforts on a chore near the airlock hatch during training. Lenoir is facing the camera. Their background is a full-scale mock-up of the shuttle payload bay (35900); Lenoir works underwater with a portable foot restraint during training underwater. Allen's backpack or mockup for a portable life support system (PLSS) is seen in one corner of the frame (35901).

  20. Spacecraft-level verification of the Van Allen Probes' RF communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowne, M. J.; Srinivasan, D.; Royster, D.; Weaver, G.; Matlin, D.; Mosavi, N.

    This paper presents the verification process, lessons learned, and selected test results of the radio frequency (RF) communication system of the Van Allen Probes, formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP). The Van Allen Probes mission is investigating the doughnut-shaped regions of space known as the Van Allen radiation belts where the Sun interacts with charged particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field. Understanding this dynamic area that surrounds our planet is important to improving our ability to design spacecraft and missions for reliability and astronaut safety. The Van Allen Probes mission features two nearly identical spacecraft designed, built, and operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The RF communication system features the JHU/APL Frontier Radio. The Frontier Radio is a software-defined radio (SDR) designed for spaceborne communications, navigation, radio science, and sensor applications. This mission marks the first spaceflight usage of the Frontier Radio. RF ground support equipment (RF GSE) was developed using a ground station receiver similar to what will be used in flight and whose capabilities provided clarity into RF system performance that was previously not obtained until compatibility testing with the ground segments. The Van Allen Probes underwent EMC, acoustic, vibration, and thermal vacuum testing at the environmental test facilities at APL. During this time the RF communication system was rigorously tested to ensure optimal performance, including system-level testing down to threshold power levels. Compatibility tests were performed with the JHU/APL Satellite Communication Facility (SCF), the Universal Space Network (USN), and the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Successful completion of this program as described in this paper validated the design of the system and demonstrated that it will be able to me

  1. A Century after Van Allen's Birth: Conclusion of Reconnaissance of Radiation Belts in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    On May 1, 1958 in the Great Hall of the US National Academy of Sciences, James A. Van Allen, having instrumented Explorer-1 and follow-on satellites with radiation detectors, announced the discovery of intense radiation at high altitudes above Earth. The press dubbed the doughnut-shaped structures "Van Allen Belts" (VAB). Soon thereafter, the search began for VAB at nearby planets. Mariner 2 flew by Venus in 1962 at a distance of 41,000 km, but no radiation was detected. The Mariner 4 mission to Mars did not observe planet-associated increase in radiation, but scaling arguments with Earth's magnetosphere yielded an upper limit to the ratio of magnetic moments of MM/ME < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1965). Similarly, the Mariner 5 flyby closer to Venus resulted in a ratio of magnetic moments < 0.001 (Van Allen et al, 1967), dealing a blow to the expectation that all planetary bodies must possess significant VAB. The flyby of Mercury in 1974 by Mariner 10 revealed a weak magnetic field, but the presence of durably trapped higher energy particles remained controversial until MESSENGER in 2011.The first flybys of Jupiter by Pioneers 10, 11 in 1973 and 1974, respectively, measured a plethora of energetic particles in Jupiter's magnetosphere and established the fact that their intensities were rotationally modulated. Later flybys of Jupiter and Saturn by the two Voyagers in 1979 and 1981 revealed that those magnetospheres possessed their own internal plasma source(s) and radiation belts. Subsequent discoveries of Van Allen belts at Uranus and Neptune by Voyager 2 demonstrated that VAB are the rule rather than the exception in planetary environments. We now know from the Voyagers and through Energetic Neutral Atom images from Cassini and IBEX that an immense energetic particle population surrounds the heliosphere itself. Thus, the reconnaissance of radiation belts of our solar system has been completed, some 56 years after the discovery of the Van Allen Belts at Earth.

  2. Public health assessment for petitioned public health assessment, Allen Park Clay Mine, Allen Park, Wayne County, Michigan, Region 5. Cerclis No. MID980568711. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-16

    The Allen Park Clay Mine (APCM) landfill is in Wayne County, Michigan, within the city limits of Allen Park. The Ford Motor Company developed a clay mine on the site before 1956. Since 1956, the clay excavations have been backfilled with wastes from the Ford Motor Company Rouge River Plant. Some of the wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust and decanter tank tar sludge) are classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as hazardous. Contaminants, including metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), have been identified in on-site groundwater, storm water runoff, and sediments. ATSDR could not determine if these contaminants were released from the APCM site. Metals have also been found in on-site air. No completed exposure pathways (ways for contaminants to reach the public) have been identified; however, potential exposure pathways do exist.

  3. Experiments in no-impact control of dingoes: comment on Allen et al. 2013

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    There has been much recent debate in Australia over whether lethal control of dingoes incurs environmental costs, particularly by allowing increase of populations of mesopredators such as red foxes and feral cats. Allen et al. (2013) claim to show in their recent study that suppression of dingo activity by poison baiting does not lead to mesopredator release, because mesopredators are also suppressed by poisoning. We show that this claim is not supported by the data and analysis reported in Allen et al.’s paper. PMID:24558973

  4. Experiments in no-impact control of dingoes: comment on Allen et al. 2013.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher N; Crowther, Mathew S; Dickman, Chris R; Letnic, Michael I; Newsome, Thomas M; Nimmo, Dale G; Ritchie, Euan G; Wallach, Arian D

    2014-01-01

    There has been much recent debate in Australia over whether lethal control of dingoes incurs environmental costs, particularly by allowing increase of populations of mesopredators such as red foxes and feral cats. Allen et al. (2013) claim to show in their recent study that suppression of dingo activity by poison baiting does not lead to mesopredator release, because mesopredators are also suppressed by poisoning. We show that this claim is not supported by the data and analysis reported in Allen et al.'s paper. PMID:24558973

  5. Copper-catalyzed regiodivergent silacarboxylation of allenes with carbon dioxide and a silylborane.

    PubMed

    Tani, Yosuke; Fujihara, Tetsuaki; Terao, Jun; Tsuji, Yasushi

    2014-12-24

    A regiodivergent silacarboxylation of allenes under a CO2 atmosphere with PhMe2Si-B(pin) as a silicon source in the presence of a copper catalyst at 70 °C has been developed. The regioselectivity of the reaction is successfully reversed by the proper choice of ligand; carboxylated vinylsilanes are obtained with rac-Me-DuPhos as the ligand, whereas the use of PCy3 affords carboxylated allylsilanes. Thus, two different carboxylated silanes can be selectively and regiodivergently synthesized from a single allene substrate. PMID:25469703

  6. Cascade Copper-Catalyzed 1,2,3-Trifunctionalization of Terminal Allenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wanxiang; Montgomery, John

    2016-08-10

    A cascade cyanation/diborylation of terminal allenes proceeds efficiently with copper catalysis using bis(pinacolato)diboron (B2Pin2) and N-cyano-N-phenyl-p-methylbenzenesulfonamide (NCTS) as reagents. Mechanistic studies suggest that the process proceeds through cyanoborylation of the substituted π-system of the allene followed by hydroboration of the remaining π-component. A wide array of product derivatives may be accessed through site-selective cross-couplings and N-bromosuccinimide-promoted heteroarylations as well as standard oxidative and reductive conversions of the initially obtained adducts. PMID:27438071

  7. Regiodivergent Intermolecular [3+2] Cycloadditions of Vinyl Aziridines and Allenes: Stereospecific Synthesis of Chiral Pyrrolidines.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tao-Yan; Zhu, Chao-Ze; Zhang, Peichao; Wang, Yidong; Wu, Hai-Hong; Feng, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Junliang

    2016-08-26

    The first rhodium-catalyzed intermolecular [3+2] cycloaddition reaction of vinyl aziridines and allenes for the synthesis of enantioenriched functionalized pyrrolidines was realized. [3+2] cycloaddition with the proximal C=C bond of N-allenamides gave 3-methylene-pyrrolidines in high regio- and diastereoselectivity, whereas, 2-methylene-pyrrolidines were obtained as the major products by the cycloadditions of vinyl aziridines with the distal C=C bond of allenes. Use of readily available starting materials, a broad substrate scope, high selectivity, mild reaction conditions, as well as versatile functionalization of the cycloadducts make this approach very practical and attractive. PMID:27485044

  8. Replacement of two amino acids of 9R-dioxygenase-allene oxide synthase of Aspergillus niger inverts the chirality of the hydroperoxide and the allene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sooman, Linda; Wennman, Anneli; Hamberg, Mats; Hoffmann, Inga; Oliw, Ernst H

    2016-02-01

    The genome of Aspergillus niger codes for a fusion protein (EHA25900), which can be aligned with ~50% sequence identity to 9S-dioxygenase (DOX)-allene oxide synthase (AOS) of Fusarium oxysporum, homologues of the Fusarium and Colletotrichum complexes and with over 62% sequence identity to homologues of Aspergilli, including (DOX)-9R-AOS of Aspergillus terreus. The aims were to characterize the enzymatic activities of EHA25900 and to identify crucial amino acids for the stereospecificity. Recombinant EHA25900 oxidized 18:2n-6 sequentially to 9R-hydroperoxy-10(E),12(Z)-octadecadienoic acid (9R-HPODE) and to a 9R(10)-allene oxide. 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS catalyze abstraction of the pro-R hydrogen at C-11, but the direction of oxygen insertion differs. A comparison between twelve 9-DOX domains of 9S- and 9R-DOX-AOS revealed conserved amino acid differences, which could contribute to the chirality of products. The Gly616Ile replacement of 9R-DOX-AOS (A. niger) increased the biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide, whereas the Phe627Leu replacement led to biosynthesis of 9S-HPODE and the 9S(10)-allene oxide as main products. The double mutant (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) formed over 90% of the 9S stereoisomer of HPODE. 9S-HPODE was formed by antarafacial hydrogen abstraction and oxygen insertion, i.e., the original H-abstraction was retained but the product chirality was altered. We conclude that 9R-DOX-AOS can be altered to 9S-DOX-AOS by replacement of two amino acids (Gly616Ile, Phe627Leu) in the DOX domain. PMID:26603902

  9. Enzymatic kinetic resolution of primary allenic alcohols. Application to the total synthesis and stereochemical assignment of striatisporolide A.

    PubMed

    Deska, Jan; Bäckvall, Jan-E

    2009-09-01

    Crude Porcine pancreatic lipase was successfully used for the kinetic resolution of axially chiral primary allenic alcohols providing very high enantioselectivities with E values above 200. This simple access to optically active allenes was applied to the total synthesis of the fungal metabolite (-)-striatisporolide A, allowing its unambiguous stereochemical assignment. PMID:19675888

  10. A Critique of Mark D. Allen's "The Preservation of Verb Subcategory Knowledge in a Spoken Language Comprehension Deficit"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemmerer, David

    2008-01-01

    Allen [Allen, M. (2005). "The preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit." "Brain and Language, 95", 255-264.] reports a single patient, WBN, who, during spoken language comprehension, is still able to access some of the syntactic properties of verbs despite being unable to access some of their semantic…

  11. 76 FR 9636 - Franklin Financial Corporation, Inc., Glen Allen, VA; Approval of Conversion Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Franklin Financial Corporation, Inc., Glen Allen, VA; Approval of Conversion Application Notice is hereby given that on February 11, 2011, the Office of Thrift Supervision approved the..., NE., Atlanta, Georgia 30309. Dated: February 11, 2011. By the Office of Thrift Supervision. Sandra...

  12. Homoallylic amines by reductive inter- and intramolecular coupling of allenes and nitriles

    PubMed Central

    Manojlovic, Marija D

    2011-01-01

    Summary The one-pot hydrozirconation of allenes and nitriles followed by an in situ transmetalation of the allylzirconocene with dimethylzinc or zinc chloride provides functionalized homoallylic amines. An intramolecular version of this process leads to 3-aminotetrahydrofurans and 3-aminotetrahydropyrans. PMID:21804878

  13. Bis-phosphine allene ligand: coordination chemistry and preliminary applications in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Vanitcha, Avassaya; Damelincourt, Cecilia; Gontard, Geoffrey; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Mouriès-Mansuy, Virginie; Fensterbank, Louis

    2016-05-21

    A 1,3-bis-diphenylphosphine allene can give rise to new coordination complexes with palladium, platinum and gold metals. These complexes were fully characterized by NMR, HRMS and X-ray diffraction analysis. For gold(i), the corresponding dinuclear complex has been used in a series of diagnostic catalytic reactions and gave promising preliminary results in asymmetric catalysis. PMID:27104618

  14. Astronauts Joseph Allen rides cherry picker over stowage area/work station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen rides a cherry picker over to a stowage area/work station to wrap up extravehicular activity (EVA) duties above Earth. The cherry picker is a union of the mobile foot restraint and the remote manipulator system (RMS), controlled from inside Discovery's cabin. The Westar VI/PAM-D satellite is pictured secured in Discovery's cargo bay.

  15. Aryl-Allene Cyclization via a Hg(OTf)2-Catalytic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Ueda, Maho; Yamasaki, Naoto; Fujii, Akiyoshi; Sasaki, Ikuo; Igawa, Kazunobu; Kasai, Yusuke; Imagawa, Hiroshi; Nishizawa, Mugio

    2016-06-17

    Hg(OTf)2-catalyzed aryl-allene cyclization accompanied by formation of a quaternary carbon center has been realized. Deuterium-labeling experiments and computational modeling were used to propose a novel catalytic pathway involving direct H-transfer from the aromatic ring to the vinyl mercury moiety followed by mercury 1,2-migration. PMID:27232158

  16. All Together Now: Valerie Allen--U.S. Department of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    When Valerie Allen decided she did not want to be a Montessori teacher any longer, she began work on her MLIS. Immediately she learned concepts she could apply to her new job as information specialist for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN. While the LIS…

  17. Rh(I)-Catalyzed Insertion of Allenes into C-C Bonds of Benzocyclobutenols.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunliang; Liu, Li-Chuan; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Chenran; Zhang, Qing-Wei; He, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Herein we report a Rh(I)-catalyzed two carbon insertion into C-C bonds of benzocyclobutenols by employing symmetrical and unsymmetrical allenes. This reaction provides rapid access to alkylidene tetralins bearing two adjacent stereogenic centers in good yields and diasteroselectivities. PMID:26727276

  18. Magnetospheric Observations from JUNO and the Van Allen Probes on Oct 9, 2013 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    During the Earth Flyby of JUNO on October 9, 2013, the two Van Allen probes will make observations of magnetospheric waves and particles from a near equatorial orbit with apogee near 5.8 RE in the dusk sector. Both the MagEIS and the RBSPICE instruments on the Van Allen probes will measure the radiation belt and the ring current population over an energy range similar to the JEDI instrument on JUNO, which will be used to provide an important calibration of JEDI during the flyby. Measurements at considerable higher energy obtained from the REPT and RPS instruments on the Van Allen probes can be used to investigate the sensitivity of several instruments and other critical components on JUNO to the type of high-energy penetrating particles, to which the satellite will be exposed after orbital insertion in the Jovian magnetosphere. Several other JUNO instruments such as MAG and WAVES will be operational during the flyby allowing comparison with similar measurement on the Van Allen probes. Highlights of the coordinated observations obtained during the JUNO Earth flyby will be presented.

  19. Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora

    SciTech Connect

    Jordanova, Vania K; Miyoshi, Y; Sakaguchi, K; Shiokawa, K; Evans, D S; Connors, M

    2008-01-01

    The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

  20. [4+2] and [4+3] catalytic cycloadditions of allenes.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Mascareñas, José L

    2014-05-01

    This feature review describes the development of catalytic [4+2] and [4+3] cycloadditions of allenes, as efficient and practical methodologies for assembling six and seven-membered cyclic systems. The different methodologies have been classified depending on the type of key reactive intermediate that was proposed in the catalytic cycle. PMID:24643377

  1. Efficient access to cis-decalinol frameworks: copper(i)-catalyzed borylative cyclization of allene cyclohexanediones.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yi-Shuang; Tang, Xiao-Qi; Tao, Jing-Chao; Tian, Ping; Lin, Guo-Qiang

    2016-05-11

    Cu-catalyzed borylative cyclization of allene cyclohexanediones has been described through a tandem β-borylation and intramolecular allylic addition process, affording borylated cis-decalinols with excellent yields and diastereoselectivities. A good enantioselectivity is also achieved in the asymmetric version. The hemiboronate group in the cyclization products could be subjected to several useful transformations. PMID:27116376

  2. A Test of Revised Scales for the Meyer and Allen (1991) Three-Component Commitment Construct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culpepper, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Used confirmatory factor analysis with 2 samples (366 employees and 2,301 nurses) to compare the original and revised versions of the scales developed by J. Meyer and N. Allen (1991) to measure three- component commitment. Results show that substantially improved construct measurement is possible with relatively modest scale revisions. (SLD)

  3. Regioselective Allene Hydrosilylation Catalyzed by NHC Complexes of Nickel and Palladium

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Zachary D.; Li, Wei; Belderrain, Tomás R.; Montgomery, John

    2013-01-01

    Regioselective methods for allene hydrosilylation have been developed, with regioselectivity being governed primarily by choice of metal. Alkenylsilanes are produced via nickel catalysis with larger N-heterocyclic carbene ligands, and allylsilanes are produced via palladium catalysis with smaller N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. These complementary methods allow either regioisomeric product to be obtained with exceptional regiocontrol. PMID:24079389

  4. Free Pulp Transfer for Fingertip Reconstruction—The Algorithm for Complicated Allen Fingertip Defect

    PubMed Central

    Spyropoulou, Georgia-Alexandra; Shih, Hsiang-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: We present a review of all the cases of free toe pulp transfer and an algorithm for application of free pulp transfer in complicated Allen fingertip defect. Methods: Seventeen patients underwent free toe pulp transfer for fingertip reconstruction by the senior author. Twelve cases were Allen type II with oblique pulp defect, 4 were Allen type III, and 1 patient had 2 fingertip injuries classified both as type IV. According to the algorithm presented, for the type III defects where the germinal matrix is still preserved, we use free pulp transfer and nail bed graft to preserve the nail growth instead of toe to hand transfer. For the type IV injuries with multiple defects, a combination of web flap from both big toe and second toe is possible for 1-stage reconstruction. Results: All pulp flaps survived completely. Static 2-point discrimination ranged from 6 to 15 mm (mean: 10.5 mm). No patient presented dysesthesia, hyperesthesia, pain at rest, or cold intolerance. The donor site did not present any nuisances apart from partial skin graft loss in 3 cases. Conclusions: We tried to classify and modify the defects’ reconstruction according to Allen classification. Free toe pulp transfer is a “like with like” reconstruction that provides sensate, glabrous skin with good color and texture match for fingertip trauma, and minimal donor site morbidity compared with traditional toe to hand transfer. PMID:26894009

  5. Complex polycyclic scaffolds by metathesis rearrangement of Himbert arene/allene cycloadducts.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jonathan K; Schmidt, Yvonne; Vanderwal, Christopher D

    2012-11-01

    The intramolecular arene/allene cycloaddition first described 30 years ago by Himbert and Henn permits rapid access to strained polycyclic compounds. Alkene metathesis processes cleanly rearrange appropriately substituted cycloadducts into complex, functional-group-rich polycyclic lactams of potential utility for natural product synthesis and medicinal chemistry. PMID:23067058

  6. Improving the Collection of Student Accounts at Allen County Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geffert, Barbara

    During the past several years, Allen County Community College has experienced a growing number of uncollected student accounts. In an effort to encourage timely payment of student charges, lower the number of students receiving payment deferments, increase cash flow at the beginning of each semester, and reduce the number of bad debts being…

  7. New Results About the Earth’s Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The first great scientific discovery of the Space Age was that the Earth is enshrouded in toroids, or 'belts', of very high-energy magnetically trapped charged particles. Early observations of the radiation environment clearly indicated that the Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons in the energy range 100 keV < E< 1 MeV often populated both the inner and outer zones with a pronounced 'slot' region relatively devoid of energetic electrons existing between them. This two-belt structure for the Van Allen moderate-energy electron component was explained as being due to strong interactions of electrons with electromagnetic waves just inside the cold plasma (plasmapause) boundary. The energy distribution, spatial extent and particle species makeup of the Van Allen belts has been subsequently explored by several space missions. However, recent observations by the NASA dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission have revealed wholly unexpected properties of the radiation belts, especially at highly relativistic (E > 2 MeV) and ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. In this presentation we show using high spatial and temporal resolution data from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) experiment on board the Van Allen Probes that multiple belts can exist concurrently and that an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Using additionally available Van Allen Probes data, we demonstrate that these remarkable features of energetic electrons are not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field. Neither is it likely that human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields might produce such effects. Rather, we conclude from these unique measurements that slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle

  8. Plasma Wave Measurements in Earth's Magnetosphere by Juno, Van Allen Probes, and Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Bolton, S. J.; Gurnett, D. A.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C.; Thorne, R. M.; Pickett, J. S.

    2013-12-01

    On October 9, 2013, Juno will fly within about 550 km of Earth in the process of executing a gravity assist on its way to its eventual arrival at Jupiter in July 2016. Since this will be the only magnetospheric plasma regime Juno will sample prior to arrival at Jupiter, it presents both engineering and scientific opportunities. One of the scientific opportunities is to make observations in the inner magnetosphere at the same time as the twin Van Allen Probes and Cluster. During the Juno flyby, which is on the dusk side at closest approach, the Van Allen Probes' apoapsis is also in the dusk sector. The Cluster orbits favor comparisons on the nightside after Juno's closest approach. Models of the radiation belts suggest that Juno will traverse both the inner and outer belts, albeit at higher latitudes than the low-inclination Van Allen Probes while the Cluster spacecraft are in a rather high inclination orbit. The Waves instrument on Juno utilizes a single electric dipole antenna and a single search coil sensor for measurements of the electric and magnetic components of plasma waves, consequently it will provide wave spectra and brief bursts of waveforms. The Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes, on the other hand makes triaxial electric and magnetic measurements of plasma waves, hence, can determine the propagation characteristics of waves such as the wave-normal angle, Poynting flux, and polarization characteristics of the waves. The Wideband Instrument on Cluster can be configured to capture single axis (electric or magnetic) waveforms at selected times to coincide with Juno and Van Allen Probes burst observations. We will compare observations of whistler-mode emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic emissions in and near the radiation belts from the vantage points of these spacecraft.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Two Geometric Allene Oxide Isomers Synthesized from 9S-Hydroperoxylinoleic Acid by Cytochrome P450 CYP74C3

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Alan R.; Boeglin, William E.; Stec, Donald F.; Voehler, Markus; Schneider, Claus; Cha, Jin K.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized cytochromes P450 or catalase-related hemoproteins transform fatty acid hydroperoxides to allene oxides, highly reactive epoxides leading to cyclopentenones and other products. The stereochemistry of the natural allene oxides is incompletely defined, as are the structural features required for their cyclization. We investigated the transformation of 9S-hydroperoxylinoleic acid with the allene oxide synthase CYP74C3, a reported reaction that unexpectedly produces an allene oxide-derived cyclopentenone. Using biphasic reaction conditions at 0 °C, we isolated the initial products and separated two allene oxide isomers by HPLC at −15 °C. One matched previously described allene oxides in its UV spectrum (λmax 236 nm) and NMR spectrum (defining a 9,10-epoxy-octadec-10,12Z-dienoate). The second was a novel stereoisomer (UV λmax 239 nm) with distinctive NMR chemical shifts. Comparison of NOE interactions of the epoxy proton at C9 in the two allene oxides (and the equivalent NOE experiment in 12,13-epoxy allene oxides) allowed assignment at the isomeric C10 epoxy-ene carbon as Z in the new isomer and the E configuration in all previously characterized allene oxides. The novel 10Z isomer spontaneously formed a cis-cyclopentenone at room temperature in hexane. These results explain the origin of the cyclopentenone, provide insights into the mechanisms of allene oxide cyclization, and define the double bond geometry in naturally occurring allene oxides. PMID:23709224

  10. National uranium resource evaluation: McAllen and Brownsville Quadrangles, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Charepon, A J; Stauber, A J

    1982-06-01

    The McAllen and Brownsville Quadrangles, Texas, were evaluated to a depth of 1500 m to identify geologic environments and delineate areas favorable for uranium deposits. The environments were selected according to criteria established for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Surface studies included investigations of uranium occurrences described in the literature, of locations of aerial radiometric anomalies, of surface exposures, and of locations of anomalous hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance data and collation of information on uranium exploration. Subsurface evaluation of selected geologic units was accomplished by using electric and gamma-ray well logs to construct maps and construct maps and cross sections. In the McAllen Quadrangle, an environment favorable for Texas roll-type sandstone uranium deposits is identified in 36 areas in the Goliad, Fleming-Oakville, Catahoula-Frio, and Whitsett Formations. All other units in both quadrangles are considered unfavorable.

  11. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-02-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  12. Automated determination of electron density from electric field measurements on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina; Kurth, William; Spasojevic, Maria; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    We present the Neural-network-based Upper-hybrid Resonance Determination (NURD) algorithm for automatic inference of the electron number density from plasma wave measurements made onboard NASA's Van Allen Probes mission. A feedforward neural network is developed to determine the upper hybrid resonance frequency, f_{uhr}, from electric field measurements, which is then used to calculate the electron number density. In previous missions, the plasma resonance bands were manually identified, and there have been few attempts to do robust, routine automated detections. We describe the design and implementation of the algorithm and perform an initial analysis of the resulting electron number density distribution obtained by applying NURD to 2.5 years of data collected with the EMFISIS instrumentation suite of the Van Allen Probes mission. Densities obtained by NURD are compared to those obtained by another recently developed automated technique and also to an existing empirical plasmasphere and trough density model.

  13. In situ observations of EMIC waves in O+ band by the Van Allen Probe A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiongdong; Yuan, Zhigang; Wang, Dedong; Li, Haimeng; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Qiao; Zhou, Mingxia; Kletzing, C. A.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-03-01

    Through polarization and spectra analysis of the magnetic field observed by the Van Allen Probe A, we present two typical cases of O+ band electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves in the outer plasmasphere or plasma trough. Although such O+ band EMIC waves are rarely observed, 18 different events of O+ band EMIC waves (16 events in the outer plasmasphere and two events in the plasma trough) are found from September 2012 to August 2014 with observations of the Van Allen Probe A. We find that the preferred region for the occurrence of O+ band EMIC waves is in L = 2-5 and magnetic local time = 03-13, 19-20, which is in accordance with the occurrence region of O+ ion torus. Therefore, our result suggests that the O+ ion torus in the outer plasmasphere during geomagnetic activities should play an important role in the generation of EMIC waves in O+ band.

  14. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  15. A Versatile Room-Temperature Route to Di- and Trisubstituted Allenes Using Flow-Generated Diazo Compounds**

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Jian-Siang; Tran, Duc N; Battilocchio, Claudio; Hawkins, Joel M; Ley, Steven V

    2015-01-01

    A copper-catalyzed coupling reaction between flow-generated unstabilized diazo compounds and terminal alkynes provides di- and trisubstituted allenes. This extremely mild and rapid transformation is highly tolerant of several functional groups. PMID:26013774

  16. Whistler-Mode Waves inside Density Ducts Observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosborough, S.; Bengtson, M.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes satellites launched by NASA in 2012 are currently orbiting in Earth's radiation belts collecting data about electromagnetic waves and charged particles in the near-earth space environment. Whistler-mode waves are naturally occurring right-hand polarized, very-low frequency waves (< 30 kHz), that can efficiently interact with the energetic electrons in the earth's radiation belts magnetosphere and remediate them from the magnetosphere by precipitating these particles into the atmosphere. The important property of the whistler-mode waves is that they can be guided by density inhomogeneities extended along the ambient magnetic field and localized in the direction perpendicular to the field. Such density channels can be formed by the density enhancement or depletion and they are called ducts. The primary goal of our research is to find density duct and whistler waves in the data recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites in the magnetosphere, and to reproduce these data with numerical simulations of time-dependent, two-dimensional electron MHD model. In this paper, we present results from our analysis of the observations performed by the Van Allen Probes satellites on 15 October 2014. Data from the probes show the electric and magnetic fields and plasma density. In this event whistler-mode waves were observed from 01:42 to 01:54 UT inside the localized density enhancement coincided with the flux of energetic electrons. Short time intervals, high concentrated electron density, and electron flux gradient activity make this event very interesting for the investigation. Numerical simulations of the electron MHD model revels reasonable quantitative agreement between numerical results and satellite observations, suggesting that the electromagnetic disturbances recorded by the Van Allen Probes satellites, are the whistler-mode waves indeed.

  17. A neural network approach for identifying particle pitch angle distributions in Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Medeiros, C.; Da Silva, L. A.; Alves, L. R.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jauer, P. R.; Rockenbach, M.; Dal Lago, A.; Silveira, M. V. D.; Marchezi, J. P.; Mendes, O.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Baker, D. N.

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) has been used as a means to comprehend a multitude of different physical mechanisms that lead to flux variations in the Van Allen belts and also to particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere. In this work we developed a neural network-based data clustering methodology that automatically identifies distinct PAD types in an unsupervised way using particle flux data. One can promptly identify and locate three well-known PAD types in both time and radial distance, namely, 90° peaked, butterfly, and flattop distributions. In order to illustrate the applicability of our methodology, we used relativistic electron flux data from the whole month of November 2014, acquired from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board the Van Allen Probes, but it is emphasized that our approach can also be used with multiplatform spacecraft data. Our PAD classification results are in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by standard statistical fitting algorithms. The proposed methodology has a potential use for Van Allen belt's monitoring.

  18. Spacecraft surface charging within geosynchronous orbit observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Larsen, Brian A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Breneman, Aaron; Wygant, John R.; Thomsen, Michelle F.

    2016-02-01

    Using the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) and Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instruments from the Van Allen Probes, we explored the relationship between electron energy fluxes in the eV and keV ranges and spacecraft surface charging. We present statistical results on spacecraft charging within geosynchronous orbit by L and MLT. An algorithm to extract the H+ charging line in the HOPE instrument data was developed to better explore intense charging events. Also, this study explored how spacecraft potential relates to electron number density, electron pressure, electron temperature, thermal electron current, and low-energy ion density between 1 and 210 eV. It is demonstrated that it is imperative to use both EFW potential measurements and the HOPE instrument ion charging line for examining times of extreme spacecraft charging of the Van Allen Probes. The results of this study show that elevated electron energy fluxes and high-electron pressures are present during times of spacecraft charging but these same conditions may also occur during noncharging times. We also show noneclipse significant negative charging events on the Van Allen Probes.

  19. Functional analysis of allene oxide cyclase, MpAOC, in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ohshika, Jun; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Matusuura, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-08-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) is an intermediate in jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. OPDA exerts JA-dependent and JA-independent biological effects; therefore, it is considered a signaling molecule in flowering plants. OPDA is induced by bacterial infection and wounding and inhibits growth in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The functions of OPDA and allene oxide cyclase (AOC) in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha were explored, which represents the most basal lineage of extant land plants. The analysis of OPDA showed that it is present in M. polymorpha and is increased by wounding. OPDA has been suggested to be involved in the response to environmental stresses. Moreover, OPDA showed growth inhibitory activity in M. polymorpha. Nonetheless JA in M. polymorpha was not found in this study. AOC synthesizes OPDA from an unstable allene oxide. A database search of the M. polymorpha genome identified only a putative gene encoding allene oxide cyclase (MpAOC). Recombinant MpAOC showed AOC activity similar to that in flowering plants. MpAOC was localized to chloroplasts, as in flowering plants. Expression of MpAOC was induced by wounding and OPDA treatment, and positive feedback regulation of OPDA was demonstrated in M. polymorpha. Overexpression of MpAOC increased the endogenous OPDA level and suppressed growth in M. polymorpha. These results indicate the role of OPDA as a signaling molecule regulating growth and the response to wounding in the liverwort M. polymorpha. PMID:25892411

  20. The Van Allen Probes first year of discovery and understanding (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.; Fox, N. J.; Sibeck, D. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Kessel, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Van Allen Probes twin spacecraft were launched on 30 August 2012 and inserted into nearly identical, 1.1 x 5.8 RE elliptical, low inclination (10°), 9-hour period Earth orbits with one of the two spacecraft lapping the other about every 2.5 months. The discoveries and understandings achieved by the Van Allen Probes science investigations since the operational mission began on 1 November 2012 are all that we had hoped. The probes are discovering new and unanticipated behaviors of the radiation belts, for example coherently ordered multiple structures, and are revealing quantitatively how and why those behaviors occur. The probes are answering definitely outstanding important questions regarding Earth's inner magnetosphere, for example, the extent to which and the processes by which local acceleration contributes to creation of the belts. With its close 2-month coordination with the BARREL mission of opportunity array of Antarctic balloons, the Probes are contributing greatly to our understanding of the causes of radiation belt loss and the relationship between high and low altitude radiation belt phenomena. In this overview presentation we assess the discoveries and findings of the Van Allen Probes mission following its first year of operation, and provide a guide to the activities and achievements anticipated over the next year.

  1. Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations: a web-based gene expression energy visualization tool.

    PubMed

    Zaldivar, Andrew; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-01-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas-Driven Visualizations (ABADV) is a publicly accessible web-based tool created to retrieve and visualize expression energy data from the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) across multiple genes and brain structures. Though the ABA offers their own search engine and software for researchers to view their growing collection of online public data sets, including extensive gene expression and neuroanatomical data from human and mouse brain, many of their tools limit the amount of genes and brain structures researchers can view at once. To complement their work, ABADV generates multiple pie charts, bar charts and heat maps of expression energy values for any given set of genes and brain structures. Such a suite of free and easy-to-understand visualizations allows for easy comparison of gene expression across multiple brain areas. In addition, each visualization links back to the ABA so researchers may view a summary of the experimental detail. ABADV is currently supported on modern web browsers and is compatible with expression energy data from the Allen Mouse Brain Atlas in situ hybridization data. By creating this web application, researchers can immediately obtain and survey numerous amounts of expression energy data from the ABA, which they can then use to supplement their work or perform meta-analysis. In the future, we hope to enable ABADV across multiple data resources. PMID:24904397

  2. Radition belt dynamics : Recent results from van Allen Probes and future observations from CeREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, Shrikanth; O'Brien, Paul; Baker, Daniel N.; Ogasawara, Keiichi; Fennell, Joseph; Christian, Eric; Claudepierre, Seth; Livi, Stefano; Desai, Mihir; Li, Xinlin; Jaynes, Allison; Turner, Drew; Jones, Ashley; Schiller, Quintin

    2016-07-01

    We describe recent observations of the Earth's radiation belts made by instruments on board the Van Allen Probes mission, particularly the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) and the Magnetic Electron Ion spectrometer (MagEIS). These observations have significantly advanced our understanding of terrestrial radiation belt dynamics. The Van Allen Probes mission comprises two identically instrumented spacecraft which were launched 31 August, 2012 into low-inclination lapping equatorial orbits. The orbit periods are about 9 hours, with perigees and apogees of of ~600 km and 5.8 RE respectively. We discuss the new scientific findings of the Van Allen Probes mission regarding the physics of energization and loss of relativistic electrons and their implications for future low-cost missions, especially CubeSats. We describe the CeREs (a Compact Radiation belt Explorer) CubeSat mission currently being built at the Goddard Space Flight Center, and carrying on board, an innovative instrument, the Miniaturized Electron Proton Telescope (MERiT). The MERiT is a compact low-mass low-power instrument measuring electrons from a few keV to tens of MeV in multiple differential channels. MERiT is optimized to measure electron microbursts with a high time resolution of a few milliseconds. We present and discuss possible future scientific contributions from CeREs.

  3. An Impenetrable Barrier to Ultra-Relativistic Electrons in the Van Allen Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen belts could be delineated into an inner zone dominated by high energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that moderate-energy electrons (E≲1 MeV) often populate both zones with a deep "slot" region between them. This two-belt structure was explained as being due to strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultra-relativistic (E > 5 MeV) kinetic energies. Here we discuss an exceedingly sharp inner boundary exists for ultra-relativistic electrons. Concurrent data reveal that this barrier for inward electron radial transport is not due to a physical boundary within Earth's intrinsic magnetic field nor is it likely that scattering by human-generated electromagnetic transmitter wave fields would inhibit inward radial diffusion. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can conspire to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  4. Ion-molecule reactions in unsaturated hydrocarbons - Allene, propyne, diacetylene, and vinylacetylene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Blake, G. A.; Huntress, W. T., Jr.; Kim, J. K.; Mcewan, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ion-molecule reactions in allene, propyne, diacetylene, and vinylacetylene (1-buten-3-yne) have been studied at near-thermal energies by the technique of ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Rate coefficients and branching ratios are reported for the reactions of C3Hn(+) (n = 1-4) with allene and propyne and for the reactions of C4Hn(+) (n = 0-5) with diacetylene and vinylacetylene. Branching ratios are also given for the reactions of C4Hn(+), C5Hn and C6Hn(+) with propyne and for reactions of C6Hn(+) with diacetylene and vinylacetylene. More than 90 percent of the reactive channels lead to product ions having a larger carbon skeleton than the reactant ion. Evidence for ions with the same m/e ratio having differing reactivities was obtained for C3Hn(+), C6H7(+), and C7H7(+). Ion reaction sequences in allene and propyne were followed at higher pressures (0.0001 torr) to investigate secondary, tertiary, and higher order processes.

  5. Spacecraft surface charging within geosynchronous orbit observed by the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Larsen, Brian A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Breneman, Aaron; Wygant, John R.; Thomsen, Michelle F.

    2016-02-27

    Using the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) and Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instruments from the Van Allen Probes, we explored the relationship between electron energy fluxes in the eV and keV ranges and spacecraft surface charging. We present statistical results on spacecraft charging within geosynchronous orbit by L and MLT. An algorithm to extract the H+ charging line in the HOPE instrument data was developed to better explore intense charging events. Also, this study explored how spacecraft potential relates to electron number density, electron pressure, electron temperature, thermal electron current, and low-energy ion density between 1 and 210 eV.more » It is demonstrated that it is imperative to use both EFW potential measurements and the HOPE instrument ion charging line for examining times of extreme spacecraft charging of the Van Allen Probes. The results of this study show that elevated electron energy fluxes and high-electron pressures are present during times of spacecraft charging but these same conditions may also occur during noncharging times. Furthermore, we also show noneclipse significant negative charging events on the Van Allen Probes.« less

  6. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  7. [A study on Horace N. Allen's medicine and recognition of Korean body].

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Ah

    2011-12-31

    Je Jung Won was the first modern-style Government hospital built by the Korean King Ko-Jong in April 1885, and it was the medical missionary Horace Newton Allen(1858~1932) who made one of the greatest contributions to the establishment of the hospital. Allen was an American missionary. He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a degree in theology in 1881, and completed one-yearcourse at Miami Medical College. In Korea and America he worked as a physician, a missionary, an American diplomatic minister to Korea and a Korean minister's secretary to America. While acting as a mediator between Korea and America, he knew and recorded the domestic and foreign situation of Korea during Gaehwagi(the civilized and enlightened age). Thus to study him is to understand Korea's Gaehwagi as well as to research American medical missionaries. During his stay in Korea(1884~1905), Allen steadily wrote diaries and letters about Korean politics, diplomacy, society, culture, and medicine. Thus his public/private record through diaries and letters(the quantity of these materials amounts to several thousands) supplements the Korean early modern era's historical record. However, until now these materials have received little scholarly attention from researchers except for a few historians of missionary work between Korea and America, or of Korean modern medicine. I intended to use these materials to suggest a new perspective on the study of Korean Gaehwagi. Allen, along with John W. Heron, who came to Seoul on June 21st 1885, treated about 10,460 Korean patients in the first year of the opening of JeJungWon. They made "the first annual report of the Korean Government Hospital". This report explained how Allen and Heron regarded and treated Korean patients. Allen's diaries, letters and other writings offer a realistic view of how the western people actually recognized the Korean people at that time. As a western doctor, Allen had an ambivalent attitude toward Korean medical concepts

  8. Evaluation of effects of groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugh, Connor J.

    2016-01-01

    The Mississippi Embayment Regional Aquifer Study groundwater-flow model was used to simulate the potential effects of future groundwater withdrawals at the proposed Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant in Shelby County, Tennessee. The scenario used in the simulation consisted of a 30-year average withdrawal period followed by a 30-day maximum withdrawal period. Effects of withdrawals at the Allen plant site on the Mississippi embayment aquifer system were evaluated by comparing the difference in simulated water levels in the aquifers at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and at the end of the scenario to a base case without the Allen combined-cycle combustion turbine plant withdrawals. Simulated potentiometric surface declines in the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site were about 7 feet at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11 feet at the end of the scenario. The affected area of the Memphis aquifer at the Allen plant site as delineated by the 4-foot potentiometric surface-decline contour was 2,590 acres at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and 11,380 acres at the end of the scenario. Simulated declines in the underlying Fort Pillow aquifer and overlying shallow aquifer were both less than 1 foot at the end of the 30-year average withdrawal period and the end of the scenario.

  9. Science Highlights from the RBSP-ECT Particle Instrument Suite on NASA's Van Allen Probes Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan

    2014-05-01

    The NASA Van Allen Probes mission includes an instrument suite known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) - Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) suite. RBSP-ECT contains a well-proven complement of particle instruments to ensure the highest quality measurements ever made in the radiation belts and the inner magnetosphere. The coordinated RBSP-ECT particle measurements, analyzed in combination with fields and waves observations and state of-the-art theory and modeling, provide new understanding on the acceleration, global distribution, and variability of radiation belt electrons and ions, key science objectives of NASA's Living With a Star program and the Van Allen Probes mission. The RBSP-ECT suite consists of three highly-coordinated instruments: the Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) spectrometer, the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS), and the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT). Collectively these three instrument types cover comprehensively the full electron and ion spectra from one eV to 10's of MeV with sufficient energy resolution, pitch angle coverage and resolution, and with composition measurements in the critical energy range up to 50 keV and also from a few to 50 MeV/nucleon. All three instruments are based on measurement techniques proven in the radiation belts, then optimized to provide unambiguous separation of ions and electrons and clean energy responses even in the presence of extreme penetrating background environments. In this presentation, we summarize overall ECT science goals and then show scientific results derived from the ECT suite on the dual Van Allen Probes spacecraft to date. Mission operations began only in late October 2012, and we have now achieved significant results. Results presented here will include substantial progress toward resolving primary Van Allen Probes science targets, such as: the relative role of localized acceleration versus transport-generated particle acceleration

  10. Engaging Allene-Derived Zwitterions in an Unprecedented Mode of Asymmetric [3+2]-Annulation Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Muthukumar G; Garcia-Castro, Miguel; Golz, Christopher; Strohmann, Carsten; Kumar, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Catalytic addition of chiral phosphine, that is, (R)- or (S)-SITCP, to an α-substituted allene ester generated a zwitterionic dipole. Under optimized reaction conditions, this dipole could engage isatine-derived N-Boc-ketimines in a novel mode of [3+2] annulation reaction. Pyrrolinyl spirooxindoles are thus afforded in high yields and with excellent enantioselectivities. The unprecedented annulation reaction successfully facilitated the construction of sp(3) -rich and highly substituted 3,2'-pyrrolidinyl spirooxindoles supporting many chiral centers. PMID:27345724

  11. MEDICAL MANAGEMENT OF LEIOMYOMATA AND SUSPECTED ENDOMETRIOSIS IN AN ALLEN'S SWAMP MONKEY (ALLENOPITHECUS NIGROVIRIDUS).

    PubMed

    Jafarey, Yousuf S; Hanley, Christopher S; Berlinski, Ric A; Warner, Connie; Armstrong, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    A 13-yr-old female nulliparous Allen's swamp monkey (Allenopitchecus nigroviridis) presented with intermittent excessive vaginal bleeding, cyclical lethargy, and a history of irregular menstrual cycles. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a subjectively thickened, irregular endometrium, multiple leiomyomata (uterine fibroids), and bilateral anechoic foci on the ovaries. Treatment was initiated with leuprolide acetate i.m. monthly for 6 mo. Recheck ultrasound at 3 mo showed a decrease in leiomyoma diameter and no evidence of active follicles on the ovaries. Eleven months following completion of treatment, clinical signs recurred and the animal was treated with a deslorelin implant. Since implant placement, no vaginal bleeding has been noted. PMID:26667550

  12. Allenes as three-carbon units in catalytic cycloadditions: new opportunities with transition-metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Mascareñas, José Luis

    2011-01-10

    Allenes are very versatile synthetic units that are used in many types of catalytic cycloaddition reactions. Most examples reported so far involve their use as 2C-atom components, whereas their participations as 3C-atom components have been much less frequent. In this concept article, we present an overview of this latter strategy, emphasizing on those more recent contributions involving the use of Pt(II) and Au(I) catalysts, which have uncovered new opportunities in this area. PMID:21207554

  13. Kinetics of the acid-catalyzed hydration of allene and propyne

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, P.; Tidwell, T.T.

    1981-06-19

    The kinetics of the conversion of allene and propyne to acetone in aqueous sulfuric acid have been measured. The solvent isotope effects k/sub H/sup +//k/sub D/sup +// and the dependence of the rates on acidity are consistent with the Ad/sub E/2 mechanism of rate-limiting protonation at the terminal carbons leading to the intermediate 2-propenyl cation CH/sub 3/C/sup +/H=CH/sub 2/ in each case, followed by hydration to the enol and isomerization to acetone. This route is strongly favored by published theoretical studies. (2 tables)

  14. Shielding of manned space stations against Van Allen Belt protons: a preliminary scoping study

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Corbin, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Calculated results are presented to aid in the design of the shielding required to protect astronauts in a space station that is orbiting through the Van Allen proton belt. The geometry considered - a spherical shell shield with a spherical tissue phantom at its center - is only a very approximate representation of an actual space station, but this simple geometry makes it possible to consider a wide range of possible shield materials. Both homogeneous and laminated shields are considered. Also, an approximation procedure - the equivalent thickness approximation - that allows dose rates to be estimated for any shield material or materials from the dose rates for an aluminum shield is presented and discussed.

  15. The Allen Telescope Array: The First Widefield, Panchromatic, Snapshot Radio Camera for Radio Astronomy and SETI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, J.; Backer, D.; Blitz, L.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bower, G. C.; Cheng, C.; Croft, S.; Dexter, M.; Engargiola, G.; Fields, E.; Forster, J.; Gutierrez-Kraybill, C.; Heiles, C.; Helfer, T.; Jorgensen, S.; Keating, G.; Lugten, J.; MacMahon, D.; Milgrome, O.; Thornton, D.; Urry, L.; van Leeuwen, J.; Werthimer, D.; Williams, P. H.; Wright, M.; Tarter, J.; Ackermann, R.; Atkinson, S.; Backus, P.; Barott, W.; Bradford, T.; Davis, M.; Deboer, D.; Dreher, J.; Harp, G.; Jordan, J.; Kilsdonk, T.; Pierson, T.; Randall, K.; Ross, J.; Shostak, S.; Fleming, M.; Cork, C.; Vitouchkine, A.; Wadefalk, N.; Weinreb, S.

    2009-08-01

    The first 42 elements of the Allen Telescope Array (ATA-42) are beginning to deliver data at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory in Northern California. Scientists and engineers are actively exploiting all of the flexibility designed into this innovative instrument for simultaneously conducting surveys of the astrophysical sky and conducting searches for distant technological civilizations. This paper summarizes the design elements of the ATA, the cost savings made possible by the use of COTS components, and the cost/performance trades that eventually enabled this first snapshot radio camera. The fundamental scientific program of this new telescope is varied and exciting; some of the first astronomical results will be discussed.

  16. Chiroptical properties and the racemization of pyrene and tetrathiafulvalene-substituted allene: substitution and solvent effects on racemization in tetrathiafulvalenylallene.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Masashi; Iwata, Seiya; Sone, Yasuto; Endo, Junta; Matsuzawa, Hideyo; Mazaki, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Dissymmetric 1,3-diphenylallene derivative 3 connected with 4,5-bis(methyl-thio)tetrathiafulvalenyl and 1-pyrenyl substituents was prepared and characterized. The molecular structure was determined by X-ray crystallographic analysis. Optical resolution was accomplished using a recycling chiral HPLC, and its chiroptical properties were examined with optical rotation and electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra. The title compound underwent photoracemization under daylight. This behavior was investigated in various solvents and compared with that of 1,3-bis(tetrathiafulvalenyl)allene (bis-TTF-allene) derivative 2. The first-order rate plot of the intensity of the ECD spectra at a given time interval gave the rate of racemization. Mild racemization was observed in polar solvents, whereas a relatively fast rate was obtained in less polar solvents. In addition, the TTF groups of the allene also accelerate the racemization rate. These results suggest that the racemization mechanism occurs via a non-polar diradical structure. PMID:24599123

  17. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Jaynes, A N; Hoxie, V C; Thorne, R M; Foster, J C; Li, X; Fennell, J F; Wygant, J R; Kanekal, S G; Erickson, P J; Kurth, W; Li, W; Ma, Q; Schiller, Q; Blum, L; Malaspina, D M; Gerrard, A; Lanzerotti, L J

    2014-11-27

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. PMID:25428500

  18. Observations and Simulations of Whistler-mode Waves Detected by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtson, M.; Rosborough, S.; Stein, R. L.; Streltsov, A. V.; Matheny, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    In March of 2014, Van Allen Probe A observed several packets of whistler-mode waves while passing through the apogee of an orbit on the dayside magnetosphere. These waves were localized in regions of strong density inhomogeneity. For one observed wave, the wave maximum occurred within the center of the channel formed by a density enhancement. The other two waves were observed on either side of strong density depletion. We first determine the wave characteristics using data from Van Allen Probe A. Then, we use the observations to specify parameters in an electron MHD simulation to model the propagation of whistler-mode waves inside density structures. These observations and simulations demonstrate how whistler-mode waves can become trapped inside density structures, a phenomenon known as ducting. The density ducts serve to guide the whistler-mode waves into the earth's radiation belt while minimizing damping effects. The purpose of this research is to understand the role of density ducts in guiding whistler-mode waves, which will have important applications for remediation of energetic particles from the radiation belt.

  19. Purification and Characterization of Allene Oxide Cyclase from Dry Corn Seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, J.; Hamberg, M.; Miersch, O.; Parthier, B.

    1997-01-01

    Allene oxide cyclase (AOC; EC 5.3.99.6) catalyzes the cyclization of 12,13(S)-epoxy-9(Z),11,15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid to 12-oxo- 10,15(Z)-phytodienoic acid, the precursor of jasmonic acid (JA). This soluble enzyme was purified 2000-fold from dry corn (Zea mays L.) kernels to apparent homogeneity. The dimeric protein has a molecular mass of 47 kD. Allene oxide cyclase activity was not affected by divalent ions and was not feedback-regulated by its product, 12-oxo-l0,15(Z)-phytodienoic acid, or by JA. ([plus or minus])-cis- 12,13-Epoxy-9(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a substrate analog, strongly inhibited the enzyme, with 50% inhibition at 20 [mu]M. Modification of the inhibitor, such as methylation of the carboxyl group or a shift in the position of the epoxy group, abolished the inhibitory effect, indicating that both structural elements and their position are essential for binding to AOC. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which are often used to interfere with JA biosynthesis, did not influence AOC activity. The purified enzyme catalyzed the cyclization of 12,13(S)-epoxy-9(Z),11,15(Z)-octadecatrienoic acid derived from linolenic acid, but not that of 12,13(S)-epoxy-9(Z),11- octadecadienoic acid derived from linoleic acid. PMID:12223729

  20. 'Trunk-like' ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H.; Wolf, R.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Larsen, B.; Niehof, J. T.; MacDonald, E.; Friedel, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic ion spectral features in the inner magnetosphere are the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. In this study, we report 'trunk-like' ion structures observed in situ by the Van Allen Probes on 2 November 2012. The trunk structures are present in heavy ions but not in H+. For the particular event, ion energies in the He+ trunks, located at L = 3.7-2.6, MLT = 8.8-10.3, and MLAT = -2.0-0.03°, vary monotonically from 3.5 to 0.04 keV. It is suggested that the trunk phenomenon is due to a combination of 1) deeper ion injections from storm activity, 2) the longer charge exchange lifetimes of heavy ions than H+, 3) the separation of a narrow layer of ions around the Alfvén layer from other convecting ions, and 4) the trajectory of the Van Allen Probes (i.e., an orbital effect). Both observation analysis and numerical modeling are utilized in the study.

  1. A molecular dynamics examination on mutation-induced catalase activity in coral allene oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    De Luna, Phil; Bushnell, Eric A C; Gauld, James W

    2013-11-27

    Coral allene oxide synthase (cAOS) catalyzes the formation of allene oxides from fatty acid hydroperoxides. Interestingly, its active site differs from that of catalase by only a single residue yet is incapable of catalase activity. That is, it is unable to catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to molecular oxygen and water. However, the single active-site mutation T66V allows cAOS to exhibit catalase activity. We have performed a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in order to gain insights into the differences in substrate (8R-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic) and H2O2 active site binding between wild-type cAOS and the T66V mutant cAOS. It is observed that in wild-type cAOS the active site Thr66 residue consistently forms a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with H2O2 (catalase substrate) and, importantly, with the aid of His67 helps to pull H2O2 away from the heme Fe center. In contrast, in the T66V-cAOS mutant the H2O2 is much closer to the heme's Fe center and now forms a consistent Fe···O2H2 interaction. In addition, the His67···H2O2 distance shortens considerably, increasing the likelihood of a Cpd I intermediate and hence exhibiting catalase activity. PMID:24164352

  2. Ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts: RPS observations and Geant4 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.; George, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer (RPS) aboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft is designed to measure protons from about 60 MeV to multiple GeV, but it is also sensitive to electrons above several MeV. Its Cherenkov subsystem provides energy resolution for protons above a few hundred MeV, and electrons at extremely high energies, around 50 MeV and above, can also produce high levels of Cherenkov light. While mapping protons in the inner Van Allen Belt with RPS, Mazur et al. (Fall 2014 AGU meeting, paper SM22A-02) observed a concentration of particle events around L = 2 with Cherenkov light corresponding to protons at energies well above the limit for stable trapping there. We present a preliminary analysis that shows that the patterns of the Cherenkov light distribution are consistent with these particle events instead being caused by electrons at energies of at least several tens of MeV. This energy range is well above that expected from magnetospheric energization, even by a violent event like the March 1991 shock, which injected electrons peaked around 15 MeV (Looper et al., GRL 1994, doi:10.1029/94GL01586). We discuss the possibility that these electrons are instead due to the decay of pions and muons produced by cosmic-ray interactions with the atmosphere, with a characteristic energy set by the pion rest mass of 140 MeV.

  3. Genetic diversity and structure in the Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura inornata

    PubMed Central

    Aplasca, Andrea C.; Iverson, John B.; Welch, Mark E.; Colosimo, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    The Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana (Cyclura cychlura inornata) is endemic to the Allen Cays, a tiny cluster of islands in the Bahamas. Naturally occurring populations exist on only two cays (<4 ha each). However, populations of unknown origin were recently discovered on four additional cays. To investigate patterns of genetic variation among these populations, we analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial markers for 268 individuals. Analysis of three mitochondrial gene regions (2,328 bp) and data for eight nuclear microsatellite loci indicated low genetic diversity overall. Estimates of effective population sizes based on multilocus genotypes were also extremely low. Despite low diversity, significant population structuring and variation in genetic diversity measures were detected among cays. Genetic data confirm the source population for an experimentally translocated population while raising concerns regarding other, unauthorized, translocations. Reduced heterozygosity is consistent with a documented historical population decline due to overharvest. This study provides the first range-wide genetic analysis of this subspecies. We suggest strategies to maximize genetic diversity during ongoing recovery including additional translocations to establish assurance populations and additional protective measures for the two remaining natural populations. PMID:26989628

  4. Mechanistic Insight into the Copper-Catalyzed Regiodivergent Silacarboxylation of Allenes with CO2.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruming; Hu, Rong; Fu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    DFT calculations were performed to investigate the detailed reaction mechanisms in the copper-catalyzed regiodivergent silacarboxylation of allenes. According to our calculations, the catalysis would bifurcate at the allene silylcupration step, followed by CO2 insertion, eventually leading to the carboxylated vinylsilane or allylsilane products. The gaps between the two silylcupration barriers were predicted to be -2.3, -0.4, and 2.2 kcal mol(-1) when using (rac)-Me-DuPhos, dcpe, and PCy3 (+H2 O) as the ligands, which nicely accounted for the experimental vinylsilane/allylsilane ratios of 93:7, 50:50, and 15:85, respectively. By means of transition-state-energy decomposition, we found that the energy penalty of catalyst deformation into its transition-state geometry was the key factor in determining the direction of the reaction. The switchable regioselectivity by using different P ligands could be ascribed to structural changes of the Cu-Si and Cu-P bonds during the silylcupration process. PMID:27319319

  5. New global loss model of energetic and relativistic electrons based on Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, Ksenia; Shprits, Yuri; Spasojevic, Maria

    2016-02-01

    The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument on the Van Allen Probes provides a vast quantity of fully resolved wave measurements below L = 5.5, a critical region for radiation belt acceleration and loss. EMFISIS data show that plasmaspheric hiss waves can be observed at frequencies as low as 20 Hz and provide three-component magnetic field measurements that can be directly used for electron scattering calculations. Updated models of hiss properties based on statistical analysis of Van Allen Probes data were recently developed. We use these new models to compute and parameterize the lifetime of electrons as a function of kinetic energy, L shell, Kp index, and magnetic local time. We present a detailed analysis of the electron lifetime sensitivity to the model of the wave intensity and spectral distribution. We also compare the results with previous models of electron loss, which were based on single-component electric field measurements from the sweep frequency receiver on board the CRRES satellite.

  6. An impenetrable barrier to ultrarelativistic electrons in the Van Allen radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Hoxie, V. C.; Thorne, R. M.; Foster, J. C.; Li, X.; Fennell, J. F.; Wygant, J. R.; Kanekal, S. G.; Erickson, P. J.; Kurth, W.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Schiller, Q.; Blum, L.; Malaspina, D. M.; Gerrard, A.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-11-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep `slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. There is a region of dense cold plasma around the Earth known as the plasmasphere, the outer boundary of which is called the plasmapause. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary, with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location. Recent observations have revealed unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than five megaelectronvolts). Here we analyse an extended data set that reveals an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport does not arise because of a physical boundary within the Earth's intrinsic magnetic field, and that inward radial diffusion is unlikely to be inhibited by scattering by electromagnetic transmitter wave fields. Rather, we suggest that exceptionally slow natural inward radial diffusion combined with weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere can combine to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate.

  7. Impacts of intense inward and outward ULF wave radial diffusion on the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis; Rae, I. Jonathan; Murphy, Kyle

    2016-07-01

    During geomagnetic storms, the power in ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves can be orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by statistics determined from an entire solar cycle. This is especially true during the main phase and early recovery phase. These periods of enhanced storm-time ULF wave power can have significant impacts on the morphology and structure of the Van Allen belts. Either fast inward or outward radial diffusion can result, depending on the profiles of the electron phase space density and the outer boundary condition at the edge of the belts. Small changes in the time sequence of powerful ULF waves, and the time sequence of any magnetopause shadowing or the recovery of plamasheet sources relative to the ULF wave occurrence, have a remarkable impact on the resulting structure of the belts. The overall impact of the enhanced ULF wave power is profound, but the response can be very different depending on the available source flux in the plasmasheet. We review these impacts by examining ultra-relativistic electron dynamics during seemingly different storms during the Van Allen Probe era, including during the Baker et al. third radiation belt, and show the observed behaviour can be largely explained by differences in the time sequence of events described above.

  8. Genetic diversity and structure in the Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana, Cyclura cychlura inornata.

    PubMed

    Aplasca, Andrea C; Iverson, John B; Welch, Mark E; Colosimo, Giuliano; Hekkala, Evon R

    2016-01-01

    The Endangered Allen Cays Rock Iguana (Cyclura cychlura inornata) is endemic to the Allen Cays, a tiny cluster of islands in the Bahamas. Naturally occurring populations exist on only two cays (<4 ha each). However, populations of unknown origin were recently discovered on four additional cays. To investigate patterns of genetic variation among these populations, we analyzed nuclear and mitochondrial markers for 268 individuals. Analysis of three mitochondrial gene regions (2,328 bp) and data for eight nuclear microsatellite loci indicated low genetic diversity overall. Estimates of effective population sizes based on multilocus genotypes were also extremely low. Despite low diversity, significant population structuring and variation in genetic diversity measures were detected among cays. Genetic data confirm the source population for an experimentally translocated population while raising concerns regarding other, unauthorized, translocations. Reduced heterozygosity is consistent with a documented historical population decline due to overharvest. This study provides the first range-wide genetic analysis of this subspecies. We suggest strategies to maximize genetic diversity during ongoing recovery including additional translocations to establish assurance populations and additional protective measures for the two remaining natural populations. PMID:26989628

  9. Marine ecological-risk assessment pilot study for Allen Harbor, Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.K.; Munns, W.R.; Mueller, C.; Nelson, W.G.; Pesch, G.G.

    1992-01-01

    An ecological risk assessment framework was applied to characterize aquatic risks associated with hazardous waste disposal at Naval Construction Battalion Center (NCBC) Davisville, Rhode Island. An initial screening phase (I) assessed exposure and related that exposure to toxicological endpoints for bivalves, amphipods, sea urchins, and biomarker assays. Results showed little evidence of major contamination in sediments or tissues except for relatively high levels of polychlorinated biphenols (PBC), butyltins compounds (TBT), and fecal coliforms observed in Allen Harbor. Effects were detected in mussel physiology, sea urchin fertilization and development, biomarker responses, and soft shell clam histology. Possible sources of contamination and toxicity from the landfill leachate, surface runoff, and recreational boating were examined using a temporaland spatial sampling scheme. Chemical and toxicological information obtained implicated all three sources as affecting Allen Harbor water quality. Laboratory bioassays of landfill exposure media, employing a variety of marine species using acute and chronic endpoints, are being used to provide data for the development of an exposure-response model for risk to the marine environment. The model will define current risk and provide an interpretive framework for long-term monitoring.

  10. From the IGY to the IHY: A Changing View of the Van Allen Radiation Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.

    2006-12-01

    Discovery of the Van Allen radiation belts by instrumentation flown on Explorer 1 in 1958 was the first major discovery of the Space Age. A view of the belts as static inner and outer zones of energetic particles with different sources, a double-doughnut encircling the Earth, became iconic to the point that their dynamic behavior and solar connection receded from public awareness and apparent scientific import. Then the Cycle 23 maximum in solar activity arrived in 1989-1991, the first approaching the activity level of the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, when the Van Allen belts were first discovered. Delay in launch of the NASA-Air Force Combined Radiation Release and Effects Satellite, following the Challenger accident in 1986, led to having the right instruments in the right orbit at the right time to detect prompt injection of outer belt electrons and solar energetic protons into the `slot region' between the inner and outer belts, forming new trapped populations which lasted for years in an otherwise benign location. This event in March 1991, along with the great geomagnetic storm of March 1989, and our increased dependence on space technology since the early Explorer days, led to a resurgence of interest in the Van Allen radiation belts and understanding of their connectivity to the Sun. Additional instrumentation from NASA's International Solar Terrestrial Physics Program, the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) and IMAGE spacecraft from the Explorer program, NOAA and DOD spacecraft, and improved worldwide linkages of groundbased measurements have contributed much since 1991 to our understanding of the dynamic characteristics of the Van Allen belts. Further, the presence of continuous solar wind measurements beginning with the launch of WIND in 1994, and SOHO images of Coronal Mass Ejections and coronal hole sources of high speed solar wind flow have filled in the connection with solar activity qualitatively anticipated

  11. Microgloma Sanders & Allen, 1973 (Nuculanidae) and Pristigloma Dall, 1900 (Pristiglomidae) (Pelecypoda) in the Campos Basin off Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Benaim, Natalia Pereira; Absalão, Ricardo Silva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract As a secondary result of oil prospecting in Brazil, samples from the Campos Basin continental slope became available. In these samples, specimens of the genera Microgloma Sanders & Allen, 1973 and Pristigloma Dall, 1900 were found. This contribution provides the southernmost record of the genus Microgloma, the first record of Microgloma mirmidina (Dautzenberg & Fischer 1897) from the western Atlantic, the descriptions of Microgloma macaron sp. n. and Microgloma nhanduti sp. n.as new species, and the shallowest record of Pristigloma alba Sanders & Allen 1973. PMID:22287903

  12. Allylic and Allenic Halide Synthesis via NbCl5- and NbBr5-Mediated Alkoxide Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, P. C.; Yao, Lihua; Fleming, Fraser F.

    2009-01-01

    Addition of NbCl5, or NbBr5, to a series of magnesium, lithium, or potassium allylic or propargylic alkoxides directly provides allylic or allenic halides. Halogenation formally occurs through a metalla-halo-[3,3] rearrangement although concerted, ionic, and direct displacement mechanisms appear to operate competitively. Transposition of the olefin is equally effective for allylic alkoxides prepared by nucleophilic addition, deprotonation, or reduction. Experimentally, the niobium pentahalide halogenations are rapid, afford essentially pure E-allylic or allenic halides after extraction, and are applicable to a range of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. PMID:19739606

  13. Allylic and allenic halide synthesis via NbCl(5)- and NbBr(5)-mediated alkoxide rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, P C; Yao, Lihua; Fleming, Fraser F

    2009-10-01

    Addition of NbCl(5) or NbBr(5) to a series of magnesium, lithium, or potassium allylic or propargylic alkoxides directly provides allylic or allenic halides. Halogenation formally occurs through a metalla-halo-[3,3] rearrangement, although concerted, ionic, and direct displacement mechanisms appear to operate competitively. Transposition of the olefin is equally effective for allylic alkoxides prepared by nucleophilic addition, deprotonation, or reduction. Experimentally, the niobium pentahalide halogenations are rapid, afford essentially pure (E)-allylic or -allenic halides after extraction, and are applicable to a range of aliphatic and aromatic alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. PMID:19739606

  14. Use of a New Spirophosphine to Achieve Catalytic Enantioselective [4+1] Annulations of Amines with Allenes to Generate Dihydropyrroles

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Søren; Fu, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    Due in part to the common occurrence of five-membered nitrogen heterocycles in bioactive molecules, the discovery of methods for the enantioselective synthesis of such structures is a useful endeavor. Building on a single example by Tong of a phosphine-catalyzed [4+1] annulation of an amine with an allene that furnished an achiral dihydropyrrole in 22% yield, we have developed, with the aid of a new chiral spirophosphine catalyst, a method with increased utility, specifically, improved yield, enhanced scope (the use of γ-substituted allenes), and good ee. The enantioenriched dihydropyrrole products can be transformed into other interesting families of compounds with very good stereoselectivity. PMID:25780940

  15. On the generation of large amplitude spiky solitons by ultralow frequency earthquake emission in the Van Allen radiation belt

    SciTech Connect

    Mofiz, U. A.

    2006-08-15

    The parametric coupling between earthquake emitted circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in the Van Allen radiation belt is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the modulated radiation envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. For ultralow frequency earthquake emissions large amplitude spiky supersonic bright solitons or subsonic dark solitons are found to be generated in the Van Allen radiation belt, detection of which can be a tool for the prediction of a massive earthquake may be followed later.

  16. Reply to David Kemmerer's "A Critique of Mark D. Allen's "The Preservation of Verb Subcategory Knowledge in a Spoken Language Comprehension Deficit""

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Mark D.; Owens, Tyler E.

    2008-01-01

    Allen [Allen, M. D. (2005). The preservation of verb subcategory knowledge in a spoken language comprehension deficit. "Brain and Language, "95, 255-264] presents evidence from a single patient, WBN, to motivate a theory of lexical processing and representation in which syntactic information may be encoded and retrieved independently of semantic…

  17. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Allene Oxide Synthase, Cytochrome P450 CYP74A2, from Parthenium argentatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxylipins are oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids and pivotal signaling molecules in plants and animals. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a key cytochrome P450 CYP74 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of plant oxylipin jasmonates to convert 13(S)-hydroperoxide to allene oxide. Guayule (Parthenium a...

  18. Acid-catalyzed isomerization of rhenium alkyne complexes to rhenium allene complexes via 1-metallacyclopropene intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, C.P.; Brady, J.T.

    1998-10-12

    The alkyne complexes C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re({eta}{sup 2}-MeC{triple_bond}CMe) (1) and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re({eta}{sup 2}-MeC{triple_bond}CMe) (6) underwent acid-catalyzed isomerization by way of 1-metallacyclopropene intermediates to form the allene complexes C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re({eta}{sup 2}-2,3-MeHC{double_bond}C{double_bond}CH{sub 2}) (5) and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re({eta}{sup 2}-2,3-MeHC{double_bond}C{double_bond}CH{sub 2}) (7). Stoichiometric reaction of 1 with CF{sub 3}CO{sub 2}H initially produced the kinetic addition product C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re[{eta}{sup 2}-(Z)-MeHC{double_bond}CMeO{sub 2}CCF{sub 3}] (8-Z), which slowly isomerized to the thermodynamically more stable E isomer 8-E. The reaction of 6 with CF{sub 3}CO{sub 2}H at {minus}73 C produced only C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}Re[{eta}{sup 2}-(E)-MeHC{double_bond}CMeO{sub 2}CCF{sub 3}] (9-E), which isomerized at -60 C to a 80:20 equilibrium mixture of 9-E and 9-Z. Treatment of 9-E and 9-Z with base led to formation of allene complex 7. The rate of this elimination was independent of base concentration. Labeling studies showed that the 1-metallacyclopropene intermediate C{sub 5}H{sub 5}(CO){sub 2}({eta}{sup 2}-CMeCHMe){sup +}CF{sub 3}CO{sub 2}{sup {minus}} (12-CF{sub 3}CO{sub 2}) undergoes a number of important reactions which include, in order of decreasing relative rates: (1) addition of trifluoroacetate to give enol trifluoroacetate complexes, (2) deprotonation to give complexed allenes, (3) degenerate 1,2-hydride migrations, (4) hydride migrations to give {eta}{sup 3}-allyl complexes, and (5) deprotonation to give complexed alkynes.

  19. Report on the Study of Library Use at Pitt by Professor Allen Kent, et al. (A Pittsburgh Reply).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Murdo J.; Barkowski, Casimir

    This report from the Senate Library Committee at the University of Pittsburgh evaluates a widely publicized study of monograph and periodical use conducted at Pitt by Professor Allen Kent and his associates from 1975-1977. Areas of the study which are examined include structure in text and footnotes, and experimental design, execution, and…

  20. Mechanistic Aspects of the Palladium-Catalyzed Isomerization of Allenic Sulfones to 1-Arylsulfonyl 1,3-Dienes.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Carissa S; Harmata, Michael

    2016-06-01

    When an allenic sulfone is treated under palladium catalysis in the presence of a weak acid, isomerization to a 1-arylsulfonyl 1,3-diene occurs. Investigations of the mechanistic aspects of this isomerization were performed, leading to the mechanism proposed herein. Some further studies of reaction parameters are reported. PMID:27127922

  1. Van Allen Probes, NOAA, and Ground Observations of an Intense Pc 1 Wave Event Extending 12 Hours in MLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Lessard, M.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Gkioulidou, M.; Fennell, J.; Oksavik, K.; Raita, T.

    2014-12-01

    On February 23, 2014 a Pc 1 wave event extending 8 hours in UT and 12 hours in MLT was observed at Halley, Antarctica and Ivalo, Finland in the dawn sector, and by both Van Allen Probes spacecraft from late morning through local noon. The wave activity was stimulated by a gradual 4-hour rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Intense hydrogen band, linearly polarized Pc 1 wave activity (up to 25 nT p-p) with very similar time variations also appeared for over 4 hours at both Van Allen Probes, located ~8 and ~9 hours east of Halley. Waves appeared when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern hemisphere footpoint of the Van Allen Probes (over Siberia) show the presence of 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation. This is the longest-duration and most intense Pc1 event we have yet observed with the Van Allen Probes. The combination of its duration, intensity, and large local time extent (from before 02 to nearly 14 hours MLT) suggests that it might have a significant effect on the ring current, and possibly even electrons in the outer radiation belt.

  2. A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Examination of Reverse Coding Effects in Meyer and Allen's Affective and Continuance Commitment Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magazine, Sherry L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examination of the Affective and Continuance Commitment Scales of J. P. Meyer and N. J. Allen using confirmatory factor analysis for 333 subjects with the LISREL 7 computer program provided strong support across multiple diagnostics for existence of a reverse coding factor defined by the 6 negatively worded scale items. (Author/SLD)

  3. Expression of concern: A unifying mechanism for the rearrangement of vinyl allene oxide geometric isomers to cyclopentenones.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Richard

    2015-12-21

    Expression of concern for 'A unifying mechanism for the rearrangement of vinyl allene oxide geometric isomers to cyclopentenones' by Adán B. González-Pérez et al., Org. Biomol. Chem., 2014, 12, 7694-7701. PMID:26575412

  4. Remarkable new results for high-energy protons and electrons in the inner Van Allen belt regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-04-01

    Early observations indicated that the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts could be separated into an inner zone dominated by high-energy protons and an outer zone dominated by high-energy electrons. Subsequent studies showed that electrons of moderate energy (less than about one megaelectronvolt) often populate both zones, with a deep 'slot' region largely devoid of particles between them. The two-belt radiation structure was explained as arising from strong electron interactions with plasmaspheric hiss just inside the plasmapause boundary with the inner edge of the outer radiation zone corresponding to the minimum plasmapause location.. Recent Van Allen Probes observations have revealed an unexpected radiation belt morphology, especially at ultrarelativistic kinetic energies (more than several megaelectronvolts). The data show an exceedingly sharp inner boundary for the ultrarelativistic electrons right at L=2.8. Additional, concurrently measured data reveal that this barrier to inward electron radial transport is likely due to scattering by powerful human electromagnetic transmitter (VLF) wave fields. We show that weak, but persistent, wave-particle pitch angle scattering deep inside the Earth's plasmasphere due to manmade signals can act to create an almost impenetrable barrier through which the most energetic Van Allen belt electrons cannot migrate. Inside of this distance, the Van Allen Probes data show that high energy (20 -100 MeV) protons have a double belt structure with a stable peak of flux at L~1.5 and a much more variable belt peaking at L~2.3.

  5. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Enrgy Science: A Talk from Leo Holberg and Allen Mills

    ScienceCinema

    Holberg, Leo; Mills, Allen [NIST

    2011-04-28

    Leo Holberg and Allen Mills present a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium honoring Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize in Physics. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.

  6. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Allen Teaching Machine at the Federal Correctional Institution, Lompoc, California. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Harvey L.

    This study evaluated the use of the Allen group teaching machines in a basic skills program (arithmetic, language arts, General Educational Development preparation) at the Federal Correctional Institution (FCI), Lompoc, California. Out of 317 eligible inmates, 172 enrolled. The evaluator interviewed inmates, teachers, and prison administrators,…

  7. Rhodium-Catalyzed Enantioselective Intermolecular Hydroalkoxylation of Allenes and Alkynes with Alcohols: Synthesis of Branched Allylic Ethers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi; Breit, Bernhard

    2016-07-11

    Regio- and enantioselective additions of alcohols to either terminal allenes or internal alkynes provides access to allylic ethers by using a Rh(I) /diphenyl phosphate catalytic system. This method provides an atom-economic way to obtain chiral aliphatic and aryl allylic ethers in moderate to good yield with good to excellent enantioselectivities. PMID:27244349

  8. Penetration of magnetosonic waves into the plasmasphere observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Yihua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    During the small storm on 14-15 April 2014, Van Allen Probe A measured a continuously distinct proton ring distribution and enhanced magnetosonic (MS) waves along its orbit outside the plasmapause. Inside the plasmasphere, strong MS waves were still present but the distinct proton ring distribution was falling steeply with distance. We adopt a sum of subtracted bi-Maxwellian components to model the observed proton ring distribution and simulate the wave trajectory and growth. MS waves at first propagate toward lower L shells outside the plasmasphere, with rapidly increasing path gains related to the continuous proton ring distribution. The waves then gradually cross the plasmapause into the deep plasmasphere, with almost unchanged path gains due to the falling proton ring distribution and higher ambient density. These results present the first report on how MS waves penetrate into the plasmasphere with the aid of the continuous proton ring distributions during weak geomagnetic activities.

  9. EMIC wave spatial and coherence scales as determined from multipoint Van Allen Probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L. W.; Agapitov, O.; Bonnell, J. W.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J.

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves can provide a strong source of energetic electron pitch angle scattering. These waves are often quite localized, thus their spatial extent can have a large effect on their overall scattering efficiency. Using measurements from the dual Van Allen Probes, we examine four EMIC wave events observed simultaneously on the two probes at varying spacecraft separations. Correlation of both the wave amplitude and phase observed at both spacecraft is examined to estimate the active region and coherence scales of the waves. We find well-correlated wave amplitude and amplitude modulation across distances spanning hundreds to thousands of kilometers. Phase coherence persisting 30-60 s is observable during close conjunction events but is lost as spacecraft separations exceed ~1 Earth Radii.

  10. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  11. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L < 3), eroding the plasmasphere and also providing a mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  12. Lobe crossing events observed by the Van Allen Probes as tests of magnetic field line mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, P.; MacDonald, E.; Grande, M.; Glocer, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we examine a series of lobe crossing events witnessed by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft between 0200 and 0515 on November 14th 2012. The events occurred on the flank between 0400 and 0635 local time and at altitudes between 5.6 and 6.2 RE. During the events Dst was less than 100nT with the IMF being strongly southward (Bz = - 15nT) and eastward (By = 20 nT). Other observations at geosynchronous orbit also show lobe crossings at dawn and dusk flanks. These events provide a chance to examine the magnetic field topology in detail and compare it with models. We will show that the spacecraft were in locations with access to the open field lines by comparison to the CRCM + BATS-RUS models as well as comparing spacecraft encounters with the lobe to the predicted magnetic field topology.

  13. Long-duration exohiss waves outside the plasmasphere: observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Su, Z.; Xiao, F.; Zheng, H.; Wang, Y.; He, Z.; Shen, C.; Zhang, M.; Wang, S.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report an exohiss event in the low-density trough region observed by Van Allen Probes on 2 February 2014. These exohiss waves are discovered in the wide MLT distribution [9.1,13.4] and low magnetic latitude, with narrow-band structure and weak intensity compared with plasmaspheric hiss. Using the Continue Waveform Burst Mode data and MAG data on the EMFISIS, we analyze the normal angle, electromagnetic planarity and anti~/parallel-propagating Poynting flux of exohiss wave. The results show indicate that exohiss waves are the result of plasmaspheric hiss leakage into the trough region. The dependence of the proportion of anti~/parallel-propagating Poynting flux on MLT can be explained by Landau damping associated with suprathermal eletrons.

  14. Variability of the Inner Proton Radiation Belt Observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Selesnick, R.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inner radiation belt protons with kinetic energy above 10 MeV are known to be highly stable, with a maximum intensity near L = 1.5 that varies little evenon solar-cycle time scales. However, for L = 2 and above, more rapid changes occur: (1) protons are trapped during solar particle events, (2) steady intensity changes near L = 2 may result from radial diffusion, (3) for L > 2 there are rapid losses during magnetic storms, and (4) the losses are replenished by albedo neutron decay. New measurements from Van Allen Probes describe each of the last three processes in detail (the first has not yet been observed). These data provide new constraints on theories of trapped proton dynamics and improved empirical estimates of transport coefficients for radiation belt modeling.

  15. "Her mouth is medicine": Beth Brant and Paula Gunn Allen's decolonizing queer erotics.

    PubMed

    Burford, Arianne

    2013-01-01

    This article asserts the need to recognize the complexity of the theoretical work of more lesbian Native American writers, focusing specifically Beth Brant (Bay of Quinte Mohawk) and Paula Gunn Allen (Laguna Pueblo). Their poetry and short stories provide a theoretically nuanced analysis of how heteronormativity is intertwined in and dependent on colonialism, and thus a methodology for Queer Theory that requires an understanding of it in relation to colonialism. They reject heteronormative Pocahontas fantasies about Native women, offering a lesbian-based tactic for decolonization through the expression of erotic desire. This article demonstrates the endless possibilities for fierce queer resistance, revolutionary change, and healing from the trauma of genocide and the accompanying colonialist heteropatriarchal disciplining of Native women's bodies. PMID:23514211

  16. Evidence for Nonlinear VLF Wave Physics from Van Allen Probe Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crabtree, C. E.; Tejero, E. M.; Ganguli, G.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    VLF waves in the whistler mode branch in the Earth's radiation belts play a critical role in both the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons. VLF waves are often observed with magnetic field amplitudes that are a significant fraction of the background magnetic field suggesting that nonlinear effects may be important. We develop new Bayesian time-series analysis tools to investigate magnetic and electric field data from the EMFISIS instrument on board the Van Allen Probes. We also validate the analysis techniques through laboratory experiments. We apply these tools to Chorus waves to show that the picture of a single coherent plane wave is insufficient to explain EMFISIS data and that nonlinear collective wave interactions play an important role in moderating Chorus wave growth. We also apply these techniques to show that nonlinear induced scattering by thermal electrons can play a significant role in controlling the propagation of large amplitude lightning generated whistlers inside the plasmasphere.

  17. The Unique Capabilities of the Allen Telescope Array for Pulsar Timing and Gravitational Wave Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlin, Maura

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1982, millisecond pulsars have served as exquisite probes of fundamental physics. I will discuss the most transformative current application of millisecond pulsars: the direct detection of gravitational waves. Timing an array of pulsars could result in the detection of a stochastic background of gravitational waves, most likely resulting from an ensemble of supermassive black hole binaries. The unique capabilities of the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) will make it a very important resource for this experiment. The multi-wavelength coverage will increase sensitivity and enable optimal removal of interstellar propagation affects and the flexibility of scheduling afforded by commensal observing will increase the number of sources times and the cadence at which we can observe each source. I will discuss how these properties complement existing facilities and how including the ATA will increase the sensitivity of the international pulsar timing array.

  18. Fractional Cahn-Hilliard, Allen-Cahn and porous medium equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Goro; Schimperna, Giulio; Segatti, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a fractional variant of the Cahn-Hilliard equation settled in a bounded domain Ω ⊂RN and complemented with homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions of solid type (i.e., imposed in the whole of RN ∖ Ω). After setting a proper functional framework, we prove existence and uniqueness of weak solutions to the related initial-boundary value problem. Then, we investigate some significant singular limits obtained as the order of either of the fractional Laplacians appearing in the equation is let tend to 0. In particular, we can rigorously prove that the fractional Allen-Cahn, fractional porous medium, and fractional fast-diffusion equations can be obtained in the limit. Finally, in the last part of the paper, we discuss existence and qualitative properties of stationary solutions of our problem and of its singular limits.

  19. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons. PMID:26436770

  20. Van Allen Probes Multipoint Measurements of the Spatial and Coherence Scales of EMIC Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, L. W.; Bonnell, J. W.; Agapitov, O. V.; Bortnik, J.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are able to resonate with MeV electrons and cause precipitation loss of radiation belt electrons. EMIC waves can provide a strong source of electron pitch angle diffusion, but the waves are often quite localized - thus the spatial extents of these waves can have a large effect on their overall scattering efficiency. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we characterize the spatial extents of EMIC wave active regions, and how these depend on local time, radial distance, and driver. As the separation between the spacecraft along the orbital track varies in time, with one spacecraft lapping the other every ~70 days, we can determine the correlation between EMIC wave measurements at varying spacecraft separations. During individual events at close approaches (Jan 17 2013, for example - see attached figure), analysis of the detailed wave properties and coherence is performed. These studies provide important information on parameters relevant for determining resonance of EMIC waves with radiation belt electrons.

  1. George Herbert Mead and the Allen controversy at the University of Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    This essay uses previously unpublished correspondence of George Herbert Mead to tell the story of his involvement in the aftermath of a political dispute that took place at the University of Wisconsin during the years 1914-1915. It seeks thereby to clarify the historical significance of an article he published on this controversy in late 1915. Taken together with relevant information about the educational activities of William H. Allen of the New York Bureau of Municipal Research, Mead's correspondence and article throw helpful light upon his understanding of how an educational survey of a university should proceed; they also show how he went about the task of evaluating a failed attempt at such a survey. PMID:17205543

  2. Iridium-catalysed direct C-C coupling of methanol and allenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Joseph; Preetz, Angelika; Mesch, Ryan A.; Krische, Michael J.

    2011-04-01

    Methanol is an abundant (35 million metric tons per year), renewable chemical feedstock, yet its use as a one-carbon building block in fine chemical synthesis is highly underdeveloped. Using a homogeneous iridium catalyst developed in our laboratory, methanol engages in a direct C-C coupling with allenes to furnish higher alcohols that incorporate all-carbon quaternary centres, free of stoichiometric by-products. A catalytic mechanism that involves turnover-limiting methanol oxidation, a consequence of the high energetic demand of methanol dehydrogenation, is corroborated through a series of competition kinetics experiments. This process represents the first catalytic C-C coupling of methanol to provide discrete products of hydrohydroxymethylation.

  3. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D N; Spence, H E; Funsten, H O; Blake, J B

    2015-01-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons. PMID:26436770

  4. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  5. Five Years of SETI with the Allen Telescope Array: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    We discuss recent observations at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) supporting a wide ranging Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). The ATA supports observations over the frequency range 1-10 GHz with three simultaneous phased array beams used in an anticoincidence detector for false positive rejection. Here we summarize observational results over the years 2011-2015 covering multiple campaigns of exoplanet stars, the galactic plane, infrared excess targets, etc. Approximately 2 x 108 signals were identified and classified over more than 5000 hours of observation. From these results we consider various approaches to the rapid identification of human generated interference in the process of the search for a signal with origins outside the radius of the Moon's orbit. We conclude that the multi-beam technique is superb tool for answering the very difficult question of the direction of origin of signals. Data-based simulations of future instruments with more than 3 beams are compared.

  6. Real-time beamforming using high-speed FPGAs at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barott, William C.; Milgrome, Oren; Wright, Melvyn; MacMahon, David; Kilsdonk, Tom; Backus, Peter; Dexter, Matt

    2011-02-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory (HCRO) is a wide-field panchromatic radio telescope currently consisting of 42 offset-Gregorian antennas each with a 6 m aperture, with plans to expand the array to 350 antennas. Through unique back-end hardware, the ATA performs real-time wideband beamforming with independent subarray capabilities and customizable beam shaping. The beamformers enable science observations requiring the full gain of the array, time domain (nonintegrated) output, and interference excision or orthogonal beamsets. In this paper we report on the design of this beamformer, including architecture and experimental results. Furthermore, we address some practical considerations in large-N wideband beamformers implemented on field programmable gate array platforms, including device utilization, methods of calibration and control, and interchip synchronization.

  7. Inner zone electron radial diffusion coefficients - An update with Van Allen Probes MagEIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Paul; Fennell, Joseph; Guild, Timothy; Mazur, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Clemmons, James; Turner, Drew; Blake, Bernard; Roeder, James

    2016-07-01

    Using MagEIS data from NASA's recent Van Allen Probes mission, we estimate the quiet-time radial diffusion coefficients for electrons in the inner radiation belt and slot, for energies up to ~700 keV. We provide observational evidence that energy diffusion is negligible. The main dynamic processes, then, are radial diffusion and elastic pitch angle scattering. We use a coordinate system in which these two modes of diffusion are separable. Then we integrate over pitch angle to obtain a field line content whose dynamics consist of radial diffusion and loss to the atmosphere. We estimate the loss timescale from periods of exponential decay in the time series. We then estimate the radial diffusion coefficient from the temporal and radial variation of the field line content. We show that our diffusion coefficients agree well with previously determined values. Our coefficients are consistent with diffusion by electrostatic impulses, whereas outer zone radial diffusion is thought to be dominated by electromagnetic fluctuations.

  8. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-01

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day-night asymmetry in Earth's magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. Simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. The current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  9. New results from the Colorado CubeSat and comparison with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.

    2013-05-01

    The Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) is a 3-unit (10cm x 10cm x 30cm) CubeSat mission funded by the NSF, launched into a highly inclined (650) low-Earth (490km x 790km) orbit on 09/13/12 as a secondary payload under NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellites (ELaNa) program. CSSWE contains a single science payload, the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile), which is a simplified and miniaturized version of the Relativistic Electron and Proton Telescope (REPT) built at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) of University of Colorado for NASA/Van Allen Probes mission, which consists of two identical spacecraft, launched on 08/30/12, that traverse the heart of the radiation belts in a low inclination (100) orbit. REPTile is designed to measure the directional differential flux of protons ranging from 9 to 40 MeV and electrons from 0.5 to >3.3 MeV. Three-month science mission (full success) was completed on 1/05/13. We are now into the extended mission phase, focusing on data analysis and modeling. REPTile measures a fraction of the total population that has small enough equatorial pitch angles to reach the altitude of CSSWE, thus measuring the precipitating population as well as the trapped population. These measurements are critical for understanding the loss of outer radiation belt electrons. New results from CSSWE and comparison with Van Allen Probes data will be presented. The CSSWE is also an ideal class project, involving over 65 graduate and undergraduate students and providing training for the next generation of engineers and scientists over the full life-cycle of a satellite project.

  10. Pi2 Pulsations Observed by Van Allen Probes: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, E.; Kim, K. H.; Kwon, H. J.; Lee, D. H.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    The plasmaspheric virtual resonance model has been proposed as one of the source mechanisms for low-latitude Pi2 pulsations. Few studies have used simultaneous multipoint observations in space to examine the spatial structure of Pi2 pulsations both inside and outside the plasmasphere. In this study we show multipoint observations for Pi2 pulsations using the Van Allen Probes (RBSP-A and RBSP-B). We focus on the two events that occurred between 1700 and 2000 UT on March 12, 2013, which were simultaneously observed by Van Allen Probes and Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) station in South Korea. By using plasma density measurements, we determined that during this time RBSP-A was located outside the plasmasphere and RBSP-B was located inside it. We found that the poloidal, radial (δBx) and compressional (δBz), magnetic field components, and the azimuthal (Ey) electric field component observed by both RBSP-A and RBSP-B have a high correlation with the H component at BOH for both events. The δBx and δBz oscillations at both RBSP-A and RBSP-B are nearly out of phase with ground Pi2. The Ey -H cross phases at RBSP-A outside the plasmapause and RBSP-B inside the plasmapause are nearly in quadrature for the first Pi2 event. These observations indicate that the Pi2 pulsations exist outside the plasmasphere with a radially standing signature which supports the plasmaspheric virtual resonance model.

  11. Generation and effects of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes on 18 March 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Saikin, A.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Geoffrey, R.; Smith, C. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play a crucial role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. The free energy for EMIC wave generation is usually provided by the temperature anisotropy of the energetic ring current ions. EMIC waves can in turn cause particle energization and losses through resonant wave-particle interactions. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated plasma conditions observed on 18 March 2013. From 0204 to 0211 UT, the Van Allen Probe-B detected He+-band EMIC wave activity in the post-midnight sector (MLT=4.6-4.9) at very low L-shells (L=2.6-2.9). The event occurred right outside the inward-pushed plasmapause in the early recovery phase of an intense geomagnetic storm - min. Dst = -132 nT at 2100 UT on 17 March 2013. During this event, the fluxes of energetic (> 1 keV), anisotropic O+ dominate both the H+ and He+ fluxes in this energy range. Meanwhile, O+ fluxes at low energies (< 0.1 keV) are low compared to H+ and He+ fluxes in the same energy range. The fluxes of <0.1 keV He+ are clearly enhanced during the wave event, indicating a signature of wave heating. To further confirm the association of the observed plasma features with the EMIC waves, we calculate the electron minimum resonant energy (Emin) and pitch angle diffusion coefficient (Dαα) of the EMIC wave packets by using nominal ion composition, derived total ion density from the frequencies of upper hybrid resonance, and measured ambient and wave magnetic field. EMIC wave growth rates are also calculated to evaluate the role of loss-cone distributed ring current ions in the EMIC wave generation.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.; Anderson, H.L.

    1958-09-16

    Means are presenied for increasing the reproduction ratio of a gaphite- moderated neutronic reactor by diminishing the neutron loss due to absorption or capture by gaseous impurities within the reactor. This means comprised of a fluid-tight casing or envelope completely enclosing the reactor and provided with a valve through which the casing, and thereby the reactor, may be evacuated of atmospheric air.

  13. Van Allen Probes Mission Space Academy: Educating middle school students about Earth's mysterious radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, L.; Turney, D.; Matiella Novak, A.; Smith, D.; Simon, M.

    2013-12-01

    How's the weather in space? Why on Earth did NASA send two satellites above Earth to study radiation belts and space weather? To learn the answer to questions about NASA's Van Allen Probes mission, 450 students and their teachers from Maryland middle schools attended Space Academy events highlighting the Van Allen Probes mission. Sponsored by the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) and Discovery Education, the events are held at the APL campus in Laurel, MD. Space Academies take students and teachers on behind-the-scenes exploration of how spacecraft are built, what they are designed to study, and introduces them to the many professionals that work together to create some of NASA's most exciting projects. Moderated by a public relations representative in the format of an official NASA press conference, the daylong event includes a student press conference with students as reporters and mission experts as panelists. Lunch with mission team members gives students a chance to ask more questions. After lunch, students don souvenir clean room suits, enjoy interactive science demonstrations, and tour APL facilities where the Van Allen Probes were built and tested before launch. Students may even have an opportunity to peek inside a clean room to view spacecraft being assembled. Prior to the event, teachers are provided with classroom activities, lesson plans, and videos developed by APL and Discovery Education to help prepare students for the featured mission. The activities are aligned to National Science Education Standards and appropriate for use in the classroom. Following their visit, student journalists are encouraged to write a short article about their field trip; selections are posted on the Space Academy web site. Designed to engage, inspire, and influence attitudes about space science and STEM careers, Space Academies provide an opportunity to attract underserved populations and emphasize that space science is for everyone. Exposing students to a diverse group of

  14. Simultaneous Pi2 observations by the Van Allen Probes inside and outside the plasmasphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamry, E.; Kim, K.-H.; Kwon, H.-J.; Lee, D.-H.; Park, J.-S.; Choi, J.; Hyun, K.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Huang, J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmaspheric virtual resonance (PVR) model has been proposed as one of source mechanisms for low-latitude Pi2 pulsations. Since PVR-associated Pi2 pulsations are not localized inside the plasmasphere, simultaneous multipoint observations inside and outside the plasmasphere require to test the PVR model. Until now, however, there are few studies using simultaneous multisatellite observations inside and outside the plasmasphere for understanding the radial structure of Pi2 pulsation. In this study, we focus on the Pi2 event observed at low-latitude Bohyun (BOH, L = 1.35) ground station in South Korea in the postmidnight sector (magnetic local time (MLT) = 3.0) for the interval from 1730 to 1900 UT on 12 March 2013. By using electron density derived from the frequency of the upper hybrid waves detected at Van Allen Probe-A (VAP-A) and Van Allen Probe-B (VAP-B), the plasmapause is identified. At the time of the Pi2 event, VAP-A was outside the plasmasphere near midnight (00:55 MLT and L =˜ 6), while VAP-B was inside the plasmasphere in the postmidnight sector (02:15 MLT and L =˜ 5). VAP-B observed oscillations in the compressional magnetic field component (Bz) and the dawn-to-dusk electric field component (Ey), having high coherence with the BOH Pi2 pulsation in the H component. The H-Bz and H-Ey cross phases at VAP-B inside the plasmasphere were near -180° and -90°, respectively. These phase relationships among Bz, Ey, and H are consistent with a radially standing oscillation of the fundamental mode reported in previous studies. At VAP-A outside the plasmasphere, Bz oscillations were highly correlated with BOH Pi2 pulsations with ˜-180° phase delay, and the H-Ey cross phase is near -90°. From these two-satellite observations, we suggest that the fundamental PVR mode is directly detected by VAP-A and VAP-B.

  15. Synthesis of 1,3-Dienes via a Sequential Suzuki-Miyaura Coupling/Palladium-Mediated Allene Isomerization Sequence.

    PubMed

    Al-Jawaheri, Yassir; Kimber, Marc C

    2016-07-15

    We report a facile method for the synthesis of 1,3-dienes by a sequential process consisting of a palladium-catalyzed, base-free, Suzuki-Miyaura coupling/isomerization sequence. This sequence couples boronic acids with propargyl alcohols, generating the requisite allene in situ, followed by conversion of the unactivated allene to its 1,3-diene via a hydro-palladation/dehydro-palladation process. This process is general for a range of boronic acids, including boronic acids with electron-donating and -withdrawing groups, as well as heteroarylboronic acids. Key to this process is the boric acid byproduct of the base-free Suzuki-Miyauru coupling, which generates the required palladium-hydrido complex [H-Pd(II)-OB(OH)2] required for the isomerization. PMID:27355240

  16. Generalized Debye-Peierls/Allen-Feldman model for the lattice thermal conductivity of low-dimensional and disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Taishan; Ertekin, Elif

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized model to describe the lattice thermal conductivity of low-dimensional (low-D) and disordered systems. The model is a straightforward generalization of the Debye-Peierls and Allen-Feldman schemes to arbitrary dimensions, accounting for low-D effects such as differences in dispersion, density of states, and scattering. Similar in spirit to the Allen-Feldman approach, heat carriers are categorized according to their transporting capacity as propagons, diffusons, and locons. The results of the generalized model are compared to experimental results when available, and equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations otherwise. The results are in very good agreement with our analysis of phonon localization in disordered low-D systems, such as amorphous graphene and glassy diamond nanothreads. Several unique aspects of thermal transport in low-D and disordered systems, such as milder suppression of thermal conductivity and negligible diffuson contributions, are captured by the approach.

  17. The role of ring current particle injections: Global simulations and Van Allen Probes observations during 17 March 2013 storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yiqun; Jordanova, Vania; Welling, Dan; Larsen, Brian; Claudepierre, Seth G.; Kletzing, Craig

    2014-02-01

    We simulate substorm injections observed by the Van Allen Probes during the 17 March 2013 storm using a self-consistent coupling between the ring current model RAM-SCB and the global MHD model BATS-R-US. This is a significant advancement compared to previous studies that used artificially imposed electromagnetic field pulses to mimic substorm dipolarization and associated inductive electric field. Several substorm dipolarizations and injections are reproduced in the MHD model, in agreement with the timing of shape changes in the AE/AL index. The associated inductive electric field transports plasma sheet plasma to geostationary altitudes, providing the boundary plasma source to the ring current model. It is found that impulsive plasma sheet injections, together with a large-scale convection electric field, are necessary to develop a strong ring current. Comparisons with Van Allen Probes observations show that our model reasonably well captures dispersed electron injections and the global Dst index.

  18. 77 FR 48960 - Foreign-Trade Zone 12-McAllen, TX Notification of Proposed Export Production Activity TST NA Trim...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... Activity TST NA Trim, LLC (Fabric/Leather Lamination and Cutting) Hidalgo, TX The McAllen Foreign Trade... coated) polyester knit, polyester warp knit (pile), polyester and nylon warp knit, and leather (duty...

  19. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor: Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-01

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, we use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a "gold standard," we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies ≲4 MeV. We present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 "St. Patrick's Day" geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.

  20. Copper-Catalyzed Borylative Cross-Coupling of Allenes and Imines: Selective Three-Component Assembly of Branched Homoallyl Amines.

    PubMed

    Rae, James; Yeung, Kay; McDouall, Joseph J W; Procter, David J

    2016-01-18

    A copper-catalyzed three-component coupling of allenes, bis(pinacolato)diboron, and imines allows regio-, chemo-, and diastereoselective assembly of branched α,β-substituted-γ-boryl homoallylic amines, that is, products bearing versatile amino, alkenyl, and borane functionality. Alternatively, convenient oxidative workup allows access to α-substituted-β-amino ketones. A computational study has been used to probe the stereochemical course of the cross-coupling. PMID:26632675

  1. Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) documented in colorado based on recordings of its distinctive echolocation call

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, M.A.; Navo, K.W.; Bonewell, L.; Mosch, C.J.; Adams, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Allen's big-eared bat (Idionycteris phyllotis) inhabits much of the southwestern USA, but has not been documented in Colorado. We recorded echolocation calls consistent with I. phyllotis near La Sal Creek, Montrose County, Colorado. Based on characteristics of echolocation calls and flight behavior, we conclude that the echolocation calls described here were emitted by I. phyllotis and that they represent the first documentation of this species in Colorado.

  2. The Global Positioning System constellation as a space weather monitor. Comparison of electron measurements with Van Allen Probes data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morley, Steven K.; Sullivan, John P.; Henderson, Michael G.; Blake, J. Bernard; Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-02-06

    Energetic electron observations in Earth's radiation belts are typically sparse, and multipoint studies often rely on serendipitous conjunctions. This paper establishes the scientific utility of the Combined X-ray Dosimeter (CXD), currently flown on 19 satellites in the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation, by cross-calibrating energetic electron measurements against data from the Van Allen Probes. By breaking our cross calibration into two parts—one that removes any spectral assumptions from the CXD flux calculation and one that compares the energy spectra—we first validate the modeled instrument response functions, then the calculated electron fluxes. Unlike previous forward modeling of energetic electron spectra, wemore » use a combination of four distributions that together capture a wide range of observed spectral shapes. Moreover, our two-step approach allowed us to identify, and correct for, small systematic offsets between block IIR and IIF satellites. Using the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer and Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope on Van Allen Probes as a “gold standard,” here we demonstrate that the CXD instruments are well understood. A robust statistical analysis shows that CXD and Van Allen Probes fluxes are similar and the measured fluxes from CXD are typically within a factor of 2 of Van Allen Probes at energies inline image4 MeV. Our team present data from 17 CXD-equipped GPS satellites covering the 2015 “St. Patrick's Day” geomagnetic storm to illustrate the scientific applications of such a high data density satellite constellation and therefore demonstrate that the GPS constellation is positioned to enable new insights in inner magnetospheric physics and space weather forecasting.« less

  3. Copper‐Catalyzed Borylative Cross‐Coupling of Allenes and Imines: Selective Three‐Component Assembly of Branched Homoallyl Amines

    PubMed Central

    Rae, James; Yeung, Kay; McDouall, Joseph J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A copper‐catalyzed three‐component coupling of allenes, bis(pinacolato)diboron, and imines allows regio‐, chemo‐, and diastereoselective assembly of branched α,β‐substituted‐γ‐boryl homoallylic amines, that is, products bearing versatile amino, alkenyl, and borane functionality. Alternatively, convenient oxidative workup allows access to α‐substituted‐β‐amino ketones. A computational study has been used to probe the stereochemical course of the cross‐coupling. PMID:26632675

  4. Synthesis and reactivity of a CAAC-aminoborylene adduct: a hetero-allene or an organoboron isoelectronic with singlet carbenes.

    PubMed

    Dahcheh, Fatme; Martin, David; Stephan, Douglas W; Bertrand, Guy

    2014-11-24

    A one-electron reduction of a cyclic (alkyl)(amino)carbene (CAAC)-bis(trimethylsilyl)aminodichloroborane adduct leads to a stable aminoboryl radical. A second one-electron reduction gives rise to a CAAC-aminoborylene adduct, which features an allenic structure. However, in manner similar to that of stable electrophilic singlet carbenes, this compound activates small molecules, such as CO and H2. PMID:25267591

  5. A Wheat Allene Oxide Cyclase Gene Enhances Salinity Tolerance via Jasmonate Signaling1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Naibo; Ai, Xinghui; Wang, Mengcheng; Huang, Zhigang; Xiao, Langtao; Xia, Guangmin

    2014-01-01

    One of the two branches of the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway is catalyzed by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase I, and the other is involved in jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis. The former is known to be active in the response to salinity tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum), but the participation of the latter in this response has not been established as yet. Here, the salinity-responsive bread wheat gene TaAOC1, which encodes an allene oxide cyclase involved in the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway, was constitutively expressed in both bread wheat and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In both species, transgenic lines exhibited an enhanced level of tolerance to salinity. The transgenic plants accumulated a higher content of JA and developed shorter roots. Both the shortened roots and the salinity tolerance were abolished in a background lacking a functional AtMYC2, a key component of the JA and abscisic acid signaling pathway, but were still expressed in a background deficient with respect to abscisic acid synthesis. We provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, suggesting that JA is also involved in the plant salinity response and that the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway has a regulatory role over this response. PMID:24326670

  6. Expression of Allene Oxide Synthase Determines Defense Gene Activation in Tomato1

    PubMed Central

    Sivasankar, Sobhana; Sheldrick, Bay; Rothstein, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Allene oxide synthase (AOS; hydroperoxide dehydratase; EC 4.2.1.92) catalyzes the first step in the biosynthesis of jasmonic acid from lipoxygenase-derived hydroperoxides of free fatty acids. Using the AOS cDNA from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum), in which the role of jasmonic acid in wound-induced defense gene activation has been best described, we examined the kinetics of AOS induction in response to wounding and elicitors, in parallel with that of the wound-inducible PIN II (proteinase inhibitor II) gene. AOS was induced in leaves by wounding, systemin, 12-oxophytodienoic acid, and methyl jasmonate. The levels of AOS mRNA started declining by 4 h after induction, whereas the levels of PIN II mRNA continued to increase up to 20 h after induction. Salicylic acid inhibited AOS and PIN II expression, and the addition of 12-oxophytodienoic acid or methyl jasmonate did not prevent the inhibition of PIN II expression in the presence of salicylic acid. Ethylene induced the expression of AOS, but the presence of ethylene alone did not produce an optimal induction of PIN II. The addition of silver thiosulfate, an ethylene action inhibitor, prevented the wound-induced expression of both AOS and PIN II. Products of hydroperoxide lyase affected neither AOS nor PIN II, but induced expression of prosystemin. Based on these results, we propose an updated model for defense gene activation in tomato. PMID:10759530

  7. Primary Beam and Dish Surface Characterization at the Allen Telescope Array by Radio Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, G. R.; Ackermann, R. F.; Nadler, Z. J.; Blair, Samantha K.; Davis, M. M.; Wright, M. C. H.; Forster, J. R.; Deboer, D. R.; Welch, W. J.; Atkinson, Shannon; Backer, D. C.; Backus, P. R.; Barott, William; Bauermeister, Amber; Blitz, Leo; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Bradford, Tucker; Cheng, Calvin; Croft, Steve; Dexter, Matt; Dreher, John; Engargiola, Greg; Fields, E. D.; Heiles, Carl; Helfer, Tamara; Jordan, Jane; Jorgensen, Susan; Kilsdonk, Tom; Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Keating, Garrett; Law, Casey; Lugten, John; MacMahon, D. H. E.; McMahon, Peter; Milgrome, Oren; Siemion, Andrew; Smolek, Ken; Thornton, Douglas; Pierson, Tom; Randall, Karen; Ross, John; Shostak, Seth; Tarter, J. C.; Urry, Lynn; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Peter K. G.; Whysong, David

    2011-06-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a cm-wave interferometer in California, comprising 42 antenna elements with 6-m diameter dishes. We characterize the antenna optical accuracy using two-antenna interferometry and radio holography. The distortion of each telescope relative to the average is small, with RMS differences of 1% of beam peak value. Holography provides images of dish illumination, characterizing as-built mirror surfaces. Maximal distortions across ~ 2 meter lengths appear to result from mounting stresses or solar radiation. Experimental RMS errors are 0.7 mm at night and 3 mm under worst-case solar illumination. For frequencies 4, 10, and 15 GHz, the nighttime values indicate sensitivity losses of 1, 10 and 20%, respectively. ATA's wide-bandwidth receiver permits observations over a continuous range 0.5-11.2 GHz. We probe the antenna optical gain and beam pattern stability as a function of focus position and observation frequency, concluding that ATA can produce high fidelity images over a decade of simultaneous observation frequencies. We quantify solar heating effects on antenna sensitivity and pointing accuracy. We find that during the day, observations >=5 GHz will suffer some sensitivity loss and it may be necessary to make antenna pointing corrections on a 1-2 hourly basis.

  8. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28more » June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.« less

  9. Electron densities inferred from plasma wave spectra obtained by the Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; De Pascuale, S.; Faden, J. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Thaller, S.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft, launched in August 2012, carry identical scientific payloads. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science suite includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that measures three magnetic and three electric components of plasma waves in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 12 kHz using triaxial search coils and the Electric Fields and Waves triaxial electric field sensors. The Waves instrument also measures a single electric field component of waves in the frequency range of 10 to 500 kHz. A primary objective of the higher-frequency measurements is the determination of the electron density ne at the spacecraft, primarily inferred from the upper hybrid resonance frequency fuh. Considerable work has gone into developing a process and tools for identifying and digitizing the upper hybrid resonance frequency in order to infer the electron density as an essential parameter for interpreting not only the plasma wave data from the mission but also as input to various magnetospheric models. Good progress has been made in developing algorithms to identify fuh and create a data set of electron densities. However, it is often difficult to interpret the plasma wave spectra during active times to identify fuh and accurately determine ne. In some cases, there is no clear signature of the upper hybrid band, and the low-frequency cutoff of the continuum radiation is used. We describe the expected accuracy of ne and issues in the interpretation of the electrostatic wave spectrum.

  10. The seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer van Allen Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; McPherron, R.

    2007-12-01

    It is well known that geomagnetic activity shows a marked seasonal dependence. This effect has been attributed to the seasonal variation of the Earth's dipole tilt angle exposing the magnetosphere to an increased southward component of the interplanetary field (the Russell-McPherron effect) or an increased solar wind velocity (the axial/equinoctial effect). We examine the seasonal dependence of relativistic electron fluxes in the Earth's outer Van Allen belt. An earlier investigation by Baker et. al., (1999) found that the relativistic electron fluxes do show a strong seasonal dependence with the equinoctial electron fluxes being almost three times higher than the solstitial fluxes. We extend this previous investigation using data obtained by sensors onboard SAMPEX. This study of the seasonal dependence is based on data with a higher time resolution as compared to the earlier study. The results of our analysis show that the peak electron fluxes are shifted in time from the nominal equinoctial times. We discuss some possible implications of our observations in the context of electron energization in the Earth's magnetosphere. Baker, D.N., S.G. Kanekal, T.I. Pulkkinen, and J.B. Blake, Equinoctial and solstitial averages of magnetospheric relativistic electrons: A strong semiannual modulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 26, No. 20, 3193-3196, 1999.

  11. A second order operator splitting method for Allen-Cahn type equations with nonlinear source terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Geun; Lee, June-Yub

    2015-08-01

    Allen-Cahn (AC) type equations with nonlinear source terms have been applied to a wide range of problems, for example, the vector-valued AC equation for phase separation and the phase-field equation for dendritic crystal growth. In contrast to the well developed first and second order methods for the AC equation, not many second order methods are suggested for the AC type equations with nonlinear source terms due to the difficulties in dealing with the nonlinear source term numerically. In this paper, we propose a simple and stable second order operator splitting method. A core idea of the method is to decompose the original equation into three subequations with the free-energy evolution term, the heat evolution term, and a nonlinear source term, respectively. It is important to combine these three subequations in proper order to achieve the second order accuracy and stability. We propose a method with a half-time free-energy evolution solver, a half-time heat evolution solver, a full-time midpoint solver for the nonlinear source term, and a half-time heat evolution solver followed by a final half-time free-energy evolution solver. We numerically demonstrate the second order accuracy of the new numerical method through the simulations of the phase separation and the dendritic crystal growth.

  12. Suppression of allene oxide synthase 3 in potato increases degree of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal colonization.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Rafael Jorge León; Navarrete, María Isabel Tamayo; Bote, Juan Antonio Ocampo; Monguio, Salomé Prat; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2016-01-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) is a mutually beneficial interaction among higher plants and soil fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Numerous studies have pointed that jasmonic acid plays an important role in the development of the intraradical fungus. This compound belongs to a group of biologically active compounds known as oxylipins which are derived from the oxidative metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Studies of the regulatory role played by oxylipins in AM colonization have generally focused on jasmonates, while few studies exist on the 9-LOX pathway of oxylipins during AM formation. Here, the cDNA of Allene oxide synthase 3 (AOS3), a key enzyme in the 9-LOX pathway, was used in the RNA interference (RNAi) system to transform potato plants in order to suppress its expression. Results show increases in AOS3 gene expression and 9-LOX products in roots of wild type potato mycorrhizal plants. The suppression of AOS3 gene expression increases the percentage of root with mycorrhizal colonization at early stages of AM formation. AOS3 RNA interference lead to an induction of LOXA and 13-LOX genes, a reduction in AOS3 derived 9-LOX oxylipin compounds and an increase in jasmonic acid content, suggesting compensation between 9 and 13-LOX pathways. The results in a whole support the hypothesis of a regulatory role for the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway during mycorrhization. PMID:26629611

  13. Pulsating aurora observed on the ground and in-situ by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Bounds, S. R.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kurth, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Early observations and theory related to pulsating aurora suggested that the electrons that drive this aurora originate from the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and that a likely process that can scatter these electrons would involve chorus waves. Recent satellite observations during pulsating auroral events have provided important "firsts", including evidence of strong correlations between pulsating auroral patches and in-situ lower-band chorus (THEMIS), as well as correlations with energetic electron precipitation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit (GOES). These results provide important information regarding particle dynamics, leading to a question about how the chorus might be driven. We present observations of the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with a pulsating aurora event, as confirmed by observations on the ground. The in-situ data again show the presence of lower-band chorus. However, magnetic and electric field data also show that the wave bursts coincide with an apparent poloidal field-line resonance, begging the question of whether the resonance might be responsible for driving the VLF waves.

  14. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Relativistic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, V. M. C. E. S.; Vieira, L.; Alves, L. R.; Da Silva, L. A.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B.; Kanekal, S. G.; Silveira, M. D.; Medeiros, C.; Mendes, O., Jr.; Marchezi, J.; Rockenbach, M.; Jauer, P. R.; Gonzalez, W.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    A myriad of physical phenomena occur in the inner magnetosphere, in particular at the Earth's radiation belts, which can be a result of the combination of both internal and external processes. However, the connection between physical processes occurring deep within the magnetosphere and external interplanetary drivers it is not yet well understood. In this work we investigate whether a selected set of interplanetary structures affect the local time distribution of three different classes of high energy electron pitch angle distributions (PADs), namely normal, isotropic, and butterfly. We split this work into two parts: initially we focus on the methodology used which employs a Self-Organized Feature Map (SOFM) neural network for identifying different classes of electron PAD shapes in the Van Allen Probes' Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) data. The algorithm can categorize the input data into an arbitrary number of classes from which three of them appears the most: normal, isotropic and butterfly. Other classes which are related with these three also emerge and deserve to be addressed in detail in future works. We also discuss the uncertainties of the algorithm. Then, we move to the second part where we describe in details the criteria used for selecting the interplanetary events, and also try to investigate the relation between key parameters characterizing such interplanetary structures and the local time distributions of electron PAD shapes.

  15. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  16. Cloning and characterization of peanut allene oxide cyclase gene involved in salt-stressed responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Wang, Y G; Wang, S P; Li, H J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the full-length cDNA encoding allene oxide cyclase (AhAOC) was isolated from peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The deduced amino acid sequence of AhAOC showed high homology with other plant AOCs. The transcript of AhAOC was found to be abundantly expressed in roots. Expression analysis demonstrated that AhAOC was induced by abscisic acid, methyl-jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, salinity, polyethylene glycol, and cold stresses, particularly by high salinity. Overexpression of AhAOC in rice increased root elongation and plant height compared with expression in control plants and conferred tolerance against salinity. Thus, the AhAOC gene may play an important role in increasing the expression of transcription factors (MYB2 and OsONAC045) and functional genes (DREB1F and LEA3) in transgenic rice under salt stress as well as improve stress tolerance through the accumulation of compatible solutes (proline and soluble sugar). The AhAOC gene is a potential resource for enhancing salt tolerance in crop species. PMID:25867379

  17. "Trunk-like" heavy ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.-C.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Wolf, R. A.; Reeves, G.; Skoug, R.; Funsten, H.; Larsen, B. A.; Niehof, J. T.; MacDonald, E. A.; Friedel, R.; Ferradas, C. P.; Luo, H.

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic ion spectral features in the inner magnetosphere are the observational signatures of ion acceleration, transport, and loss in the global magnetosphere. We report "trunk-like" ion structures observed by the Van Allen Probes on 2 November 2012. This new type of ion structure looks like an elephant's trunk on an energy-time spectrogram, with the energy of the peak flux decreasing Earthward. The trunks are present in He+ and O+ ions but not in H+. During the event, ion energies in the He+ trunk, located at L = 3.6-2.6, magnetic local time (MLT) = 9.1-10.5, and magnetic latitude (MLAT) = -2.4-0.09°, vary monotonically from 3.5 to 0.04 keV. The values at the two end points of the O+ trunk are energy = 4.5-0.7 keV, L = 3.6-2.5, MLT = 9.1-10.7, and MLAT = -2.4-0.4°. Results from backward ion drift path tracings indicate that the trunks are likely due to (1) a gap in the nightside ion source or (2) greatly enhanced impulsive electric fields associated with elevated geomagnetic activity. Different ion loss lifetimes cause the trunks to differ among ion species.

  18. Development of a complex instrument measuring dose in the Van Allen belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirn, Attila; Apáthy, István; Bodnár, László; Csőke, Antal; Deme, Sándor; Pázmándi, Tamás

    One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation. The objectives of this project are to develop a complex instrument comprising a Geiger-Muller counter and a three-dimensional (3D) silicon detector telescope (TriTel) in order to characterise the cosmic radiation in the Van Allen belts and to determine the radiation quality factor and the dose equivalent when and where it is feasible. The research and development of TriTel began in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute several years ago. The instrument presented in this paper will be mounted onboard a European satellite (European Student Earth Orbiter, ESEO) in geostationary transfer orbit. Elements of the TriTel system, issues of the electronic block diagram, requirements for the mechanical construction and the main data processing algorithms have been analysed. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to investigate the dead time behaviour of TriTel. In order to give a rough estimation of the expected fluxes of protons and electrons in orbit, calculations were made with the space environment information system online tool.

  19. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; et al

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  20. ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE measurements of interplanetary oxygen injection to the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a significant oxygen-rich interplanetary event was measure by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument. At the same time the Van Allen Probes Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument recorded significant enhancements of oxygen in the inner magnetosphere. We present a detailed analysis of this event utilizing a new method of exploiting the EPAM Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) data to precisely resolve helium and oxygen spectra within the 0.5 to 5 MeV/nuc range. We also present the flux, partial particle pressures, and pitch angle distributions of the ion measurements from RBSPICE. During this event, both EPAM and RBSPICE measured O:He ratios greater than 10:1. The pitch angle distributions from RBSPICE-B show a strong beam of oxygen at an L ~ 5.8 early on March 17th during orbit. The timing between the observations of the oxygen peak at ACE and the beam observed at RBSPICE-B is consistent with the travel-time required for energetic particle transport from L1 to Earth and access to the magnetosphere. We assert that the oxygen seen by RBSPICE during the initial phase of this event is the result of direct injection from the interplanetary medium of energetic ions. This poster contains the observations and detailed calculations to support this assertion.

  1. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B. A.

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energy channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).

  2. Estimates of trapped radiation encountered on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karp, I. M.

    1973-01-01

    Estimates were made of the number of trapped protons and electrons encountered by vehicles on low-thrust trajectories through the Van Allen belts. The estimates serve as a first step in assessing whether these radiations present a problem to on-board sensitive components and payload. The integrated proton spectra and electron spectra are presented for the case of a trajectory described by a vehicle with a constant-thrust acceleration A sub c equal to 0.001 meter/sq sec. This value of acceleration corresponds to a trip time of about 54 days from low earth orbit to synchronous orbit. It is shown that the time spent in the belts and hence the radiation encountered vary nearly inversely with the value of thrust acceleration. Thus, the integrated spectral values presented for the case of A sub c = 0.001 meter/sq sec can be generalized for any other value of thrust acceleration by multiplying them by the factor 0.001/A sub c.

  3. Van Allen Probes observations linking radiation belt electrons to chorus waves during 2014 multiple storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Si; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; He, Yihua; Zhou, Qinghua; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    During 18 February to 2 March 2014, the Van Allen Probes encountered multiple geomagnetic storms and simultaneously observed intensified chorus and hiss waves. During this period, there were substantial enhancements in fluxes of energetic (53.8-108.3 keV) and relativistic (2-3.6 MeV) electrons. Chorus waves were excited at locations L = 4-6.2 after the fluxes of energetic were greatly enhanced, with a lower frequency band and wave amplitudes ˜20-100 pT. Strong hiss waves occurred primarily in the main phases or below the location L = 4 in the recovery phases. Relativistic electron fluxes decreased in the main phases due to the adiabatic (e.g., the magnetopause shadowing) or nonadiabatic (hiss-induced scattering) processes. In the recovery phases, relativistic electron fluxes either increased in the presence of enhanced chorus or remained unchanged in the absence of strong chorus or hiss. The observed relativistic electron phase space density peaked around L∗ = 4.5, characteristic of local acceleration. This multiple-storm period reveals a typical picture that chorus waves are excited by the energetic electrons at first and then produce efficient acceleration of relativistic electrons. This further demonstrates that the interplay between both competing mechanisms of chorus-driven acceleration and hiss-driven scattering often occurs in the outer radiation belts.

  4. The Allen Telescope Array - 42 is More than the Answer to 'Life, the Universe, and Everything'

    SciTech Connect

    Tarter, Jill

    2006-05-03

    42 is also the answer to the question: 'How many antennas are constructed?' After more years of R&D and setting up production lines then we thought it would take, the Allen Telescope Array has begun doing its first science early in 2006. The pace of construction for the remaining 308 antennas will be controlled by the rate at which funds are raised. A small team can build an antenna in the construction tent and place it on a waiting pedestal in just over a day. It's easy, once you know how! The first science programs will be those for which sensitivity is not the limiting factor: a five gigahertz sky survey (FiGSS) for transients and a SETI survey of the inner galactic plane. Pilot surveys will also be conducted to learn how to conduct the commensal observing programs that are enabled by the large field of view, more than a decade of frequency coverage, and four independently tunable IF channels serving data to two spectral imaging correlators and 16 dual-polarization, phased-array beamformers.

  5. A background correction algorithm for Van Allen Probes MagEIS electron flux measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Claudepierre, S. G.; O'Brien, T. P.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Roeder, J. L.; Clemmons, J. H.; Looper, M. D.; Mazur, J. E.; Mulligan, T. M.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-07-14

    We describe an automated computer algorithm designed to remove background contamination from the Van Allen Probes Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) electron flux measurements. We provide a detailed description of the algorithm with illustrative examples from on-orbit data. We find two primary sources of background contamination in the MagEIS electron data: inner zone protons and bremsstrahlung X-rays generated by energetic electrons interacting with the spacecraft material. Bremsstrahlung X-rays primarily produce contamination in the lower energy MagEIS electron channels (~30–500 keV) and in regions of geospace where multi-M eV electrons are present. Inner zone protons produce contamination in all MagEIS energymore » channels at roughly L < 2.5. The background-corrected MagEIS electron data produce a more accurate measurement of the electron radiation belts, as most earlier measurements suffer from unquantifiable and uncorrectable contamination in this harsh region of the near-Earth space environment. These background-corrected data will also be useful for spacecraft engineering purposes, providing ground truth for the near-Earth electron environment and informing the next generation of spacecraft design models (e.g., AE9).« less

  6. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members.

    PubMed

    Otto, Markus; Naumann, Christin; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles. PMID:27135223

  7. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  8. Exercises in Anatomy, Connectivity, and Morphology using Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Philip; Peck, Joshua; Brumberg, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory instruction of neuroscience is often limited by the lack of physical resources and supplies (e.g., brains specimens, dissection kits, physiological equipment). Online databases can serve as supplements to material labs by providing professionally collected images of brain specimens and their underlying cellular populations with resolution and quality that is extremely difficult to access for strictly pedagogical purposes. We describe a method using two online databases, the Neuromorpho.org and the Allen Brain Atlas (ABA), that freely provide access to data from working brain scientists that can be modified for laboratory instruction/exercises. Neuromorpho.org is the first neuronal morphology database that provides qualitative and quantitative data from reconstructed cells analyzed in published scientific reports. The Neuromorpho.org database contains cross species and multiple neuronal phenotype datasets which allows for comparative examinations. The ABA provides modules that allow students to study the anatomy of the rodent brain, as well as observe the different cellular phenotypes that exist using histochemical labeling. Using these tools in conjunction, advanced students can ask questions about qualitative and quantitative neuronal morphology, then examine the distribution of the same cell types across the entire brain to gain a full appreciation of the magnitude of the brain’s complexity. PMID:25838808

  9. Quasi-periodic Whistler Mode Waves Detected by the Van Allen Probes Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hospodarsky, G. B.; Santolik, O.; Nemec, F.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.; Bounds, S. R.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) whistler mode electromagnetic emissions have been detected in Earth's magnetosphere by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) Waves instrument. These emissions typically consist of intervals of enhanced wave power between a few hundred Hz to a few kHz with modulation periods on the order of minutes. These emissions are primarily observed on the dayside and detected between L shells of 3 to 6, though some events are observed down to L shells of ~2. EMFISIS simultaneously measures the vector wave magnetic field and, with the support of the Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) instrument sensors, the vector wave electric field at two locations in Earth's magnetosphere in a continuous survey mode (typically with a 6 second cadence) along with a number of different burst modes to provide high time resolution waveforms (35000 samples per second). These two modes allow a systematic survey of the occurrence of these waves. By measuring all six wave components simultaneously, the wave propagation parameters, such as the wave normal angle and Poynting vector, of these plasma wave emissions are obtained. We will present a statistical survey of the properties of these waves as detected by the Van Allen Probes, examine their occurrence location and use burst data to examine the fine structure of individual events.

  10. Commensal observing with the Allen Telescope array: software command and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Kraybill, Colby; Keating, Garrett K.; MacMahon, David; Williams, Peter K. G.; Harp, Gerald; Ackermann, Robert; Kilsdonk, Tom; Richards, Jon; Barott, William C.

    2010-07-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a Large-Number-Small-Diameter radio telescope array currently with 42 individual antennas and 5 independent back-end science systems (2 imaging FX correlators and 3 time domain beam formers) located at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory (HCRO). The goal of the ATA is to run multiple back-ends simultaneously, supporting multiple science projects commensally. The primary software control systems are based on a combination of Java, JRuby and Ruby on Rails. The primary control API is simplified to provide easy integration with new back-end systems while the lower layers of the software stack are handled by a master observing system. Scheduling observations for the ATA is based on finding a union between the science needs of multiple projects and automatically determining an efficient path to operating the various sub-components to meet those needs. When completed, the ATA is expected to be a world-class radio telescope, combining dedicated SETI projects with numerous radio astronomy science projects.

  11. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Markus; Naumann, Christin; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles. PMID:27135223

  12. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's outer Van Allen belt.

    PubMed

    Baker, D N; Kanekal, S G; Hoxie, V C; Henderson, M G; Li, X; Spence, H E; Elkington, S R; Friedel, R H W; Goldstein, J; Hudson, M K; Reeves, G D; Thorne, R M; Kletzing, C A; Claudepierre, S G

    2013-04-12

    Since their discovery more than 50 years ago, Earth's Van Allen radiation belts have been considered to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is composed predominantly of megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days, depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. The spatially separated inner zone is composed of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (>2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for more than 4 weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage. PMID:23450000

  13. Walk-through survey report at Bona Allen, Inc. , Buford, Georgia, May 27, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Wallingford, K.; Smith, B.

    1981-10-27

    A visit was made to Bona Allen, Inc. near Buford, Georgia to conduct an initial survey of a vegetable tannery. The facility started operation in 1873 and was family owned and operated until 1968. The company employs 130 workers. The company processed native steer hides, and a few cow hides. Hides were preserved by brine curing before arriving at the tannery. The firm manufactures predominately two types of finished leather, strap and skirting leather, both of which are vegetable tanned. The potential existed for worker exposure to a number of chemical substances and physical agents in the working environment. A few compounds with distinctive odors such as ammonia, hydrogen-sulfide, and acids were present on the day of the survey. Direct skin contact was minimized by the use of protective clothing. Inhalation of dusts was minimized by the use of NIOSH approved respirators. Worker exposure to excessive heat was minimized by not requiring any workers to be in the drying area on a full time basis. The authors recommend that measurements of potential exposures should be made to determine the efficiency of the current control techniques in use. The source of the hydrogen-sulfide odor should be determined, and efforts should be made to control it due to the disaster potential of hydrogen-sulfide.

  14. Improved lattice Boltzmann modeling of binary flow based on the conservative Allen-Cahn equation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Feng; Song, Baowei; Sukop, Michael C; Hu, Haibao

    2016-08-01

    The primary and key task of binary fluid flow modeling is to track the interface with good accuracy, which is usually challenging due to the sharp-interface limit and numerical dispersion. This article concentrates on further development of the conservative Allen-Cahn equation (ACE) [Geier et al., Phys. Rev. E 91, 063309 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.91.063309] under the framework of the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), with incorporation of the incompressible hydrodynamic equations [Liang et al., Phys. Rev. E 89, 053320 (2014)10.1103/PhysRevE.89.053320]. Utilizing a modified equilibrium distribution function and an additional source term, this model is capable of correctly recovering the conservative ACE through the Chapman-Enskog analysis. We also simulate four phase-tracking benchmark cases, including one three-dimensional case; all show good accuracy as well as low numerical dispersion. By coupling the incompressible hydrodynamic equations, we also simulate layered Poiseuille flow and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, illustrating satisfying performance in dealing with complex flow problems, e.g., high viscosity ratio, high density ratio, and high Reynolds number situations. The present work provides a reliable and efficient solution for binary flow modeling. PMID:27627416

  15. Can You Hear Me Now? Software Development at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Aaron; Harp, G.

    2013-01-01

    The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is a 42 radio dish array located in Hat Creek, CA and is used to search for traces of Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) and to study the interstellar medium. In order to minimize the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) that leaks into the antennas of the ATA and gain a stronger signal along with a clearer picture of the sky, we must analyze the array to determine which antennas are operating best. Readgains is a new tool that we developed to generate the system temperatures of the dishes and if they are below a given threshold (e.g. 150 K), we use them for observations. We conducted a five week observation of the galaxy 3c286 in order to study the behavior of the array and concluded that most operating antennas are performing well and the ones that were not will be excluded in the next observations. Hat Creek Radio Observatory will continue to use this tool for continuous analysis of the array.

  16. Results from the Fly’s Eye Fast Radio Transient Search at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, Andrew; Bower, G.; Dexter, M.; Foster, G.; Mallard, W.; McMahon, P.; Wagner, M.; Werthimer, D.; Allen Telescope Array Team

    2011-01-01

    The relatively unexplored fast radio transient parameter space is known to be home to a variety of interesting sources, including rotating radio transients (RRATs), γ-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and pulsar giant pulses. In addition, a variety of hypothesized but as yet unobserved phenomena, such as primordial black hole evap- oration (Rees, 1977), prompt emission associated with coalescing massive objects (Hansen & Lyutikov, 2008) and hyper-flares from magnetars (Popov & Postnov, 2007) have been suggested. The announcement by Lorimer et al. of the detection of a powerful ( 30 Jy) and highly dispersed (DM 375 pc cm-3) radio pulse in Parkes multi-beam survey data (Lorimer et al., 2007), and subsequent consternation, have demonstrated both the potential utility of bright radio pulses as probes of the ISM and IGM, as well as the need for wide-field surveys characterizing the fast radio transient population. We present results from the 450-hour Fly’s Eye survey for powerful dispersed radio pulses at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The Fly’s Eye spectrometer processes 44 independent signal paths, each with a bandwidth of 209 MHz centered at 1420 MHz, and produces 128-channel power spectra accumulated for 0.6ms. Independent antenna-pointings of the extant 42-dish ATA yields a maximum total field-of-view of approximately 198 square degrees.

  17. Reaction of cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid Dehalogenase with an Allene Substrate, 2,3-Butadienoate: Hydration Via an Enamine

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Gottfried K.; Johnson, William H.; Huddleston, Jamison P.; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2011-01-01

    cis -3-Chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (cis-CaaD) catalyzes the hydrolytic dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates to yield malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme processes other substrates including an allene (2,3-butadienoate) to produce acetoacetate. In the course of a stereochemical analysis of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed reaction using this allene, the enzyme was unexpectedly inactivated in the presence of NaBH4 by the reduction of a covalent enzyme-substrate bond. Covalent modification was surprising because the accumulated evidence for cis-CaaD dehalogenation favored a mechanism involving direct substrate hydration mediated by Pro-1. However, the results of subsequent mechanistic, pre-steady state and full progress kinetic experiments are consistent with a mechanism in which an enamine forms between Pro-1 and the allene. Hydrolysis of the enamine or an imine tautomer produces acetoacetate. Reduction of the imine species is likely responsible for the observed enzyme inactivation. This is the first reported observation of a tautomerase superfamily member functioning by covalent catalysis. The result may suggest that some fraction of the cis-CaaD-catalyzed dehalogenation of cis-3-haloacrylates also proceeds by covalent catalysis. PMID:22129074

  18. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor in which at least a portion of the moderator is in the form of movable refractory balls is described. In addition to their moderating capacity, these balls may serve as carriers for fissionable material or fertile material, or may serve in a coolant capacity to remove heat from the reactor. A pneumatic system is used to circulate the balls through the reactor.

  20. Research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.; Fox, G.J.

    1996-04-01

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world`s research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted.

  1. CONVECTION REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  2. Location of EMIC Wave Events Relative to the Plasmapause: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetrick, S.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Gkioulidou, M.; Reeves, G. D.; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Many early theoretical studies of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves generated in Earth's magnetosphere predicted that the equatorial plasmapause (PP) would be a preferred location for their generation. However, several large statistical studies in the past two decades, most notably Fraser and Nguyen [2001], have provided little support for this location. In this study we present a survey of the most intense EMIC waves observed by the EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer on the Van Allen Probes-A spacecraft (with apogee at 5.9 RE) from its launch through the end of 2014, and have compared their location with simultaneous electron density data obtained by the EFW electric field instrument and ring current ion flux data obtained by the HOPE and RBSPICE instruments. We show distributions of these waves as a function of distance inside or outside the PP as a function of local time sector, frequency band (H+, He+, or both), and timing relative to magnetic storms and substorms. Most EMIC waves in this data set occurred within 1 RE of the PP in all local time sectors, but very few were limited to ± 0.1 RE, and most of these occurred in the 06-12 MLT sector during non-storm conditions. The majority of storm main phase waves in the dusk sector occurred inside the PP. He+ band waves dominated at most local times inside the PP, and H+ band waves were never observed there. Although the presence of elevated fluxes of ring current protons was common to all events, the configuration of lower energy ion populations varied as a function of geomagnetic activity and storm phase.

  3. Low-harmonic magnetosonic waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Olson, C. N.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Boardsen, S. A.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-08-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves (fast magnetosonic waves), generated at multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (fluxgate and search coil magnetometers and electric field sensors), but most recent studies have used data from search coil sensors, and many have been restricted to high harmonics. We report here on a survey of low-harmonic waves, based on electric and magnetic field data from the Electric Fields and Waves double probe and Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first full precession through all local times, from 1 October 2012 to 13 July 2014. These waves were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause (PP), at L shells from 2.4 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee), and in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Consistent with earlier studies, wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator. Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk, and often occurred within 3 h after substorm injections. Outside the PP occurrence maximized broadly across noon, and inside the PP occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. We confirm recent ray-tracing studies showing wave refraction and/or reflection at PP-like boundaries. Comparison with waveform receiver data indicates that in some cases these low-harmonic magnetosonic wave events occurred independently of higher-harmonic waves; this indicates the importance of including this population in future studies of radiation belt dynamics.

  4. Observations of purely compressional waves in the upper ULF band observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Johnson, J.; Kim, E. H.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves, also denoted fast magnetosonic waves, equatorial noise, and ion Bernstein modes, can both heat thermal protons and accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies. These waves have been observed both in the near-equatorial region in the inner magnetosphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Although these waves have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (DC and AC magnetometers and electric field sensors), most recent studies have used data from AC sensors, and many have been restricted to frequencies above ~50 Hz. We report here on a survey of ~200 of these waves, based on DC electric and magnetic field data from the EFW double probe and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first two years of operation. The high sampling rate of these instruments makes it possible to extend observational studies of the lower frequency population of such waves to lower L shells than any previous study. These waves, often with multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause, in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator and occurred at L shells from below 2 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee). Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk. Outside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized broadly across noon. Inside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. Every event occurred in association with a positive gradient in the HOPE omnidirectional proton flux in the range between 2 keV and 10 keV. The Poynting vector, determined for 8 events, was in all cases directed transverse to B, but with variable azimuth, consistent with earlier models and observations.

  5. Innermost Van Allen Radiation Belt for High Energy Protons at Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The high energy proton radiation belts of Saturn are energetically dominated by the source from cosmic ray albedo neutron decay (CRAND), trapping of protons from beta decay of neutrons emitted from galactic cosmic ray nuclear interactions with the main rings. These belts were originally discovered in wide gaps between the A-ring, Janus/Epimetheus, Mimas, and Enceladus. The narrow F and G rings significant affected the CRAND protons but did not produce total depletion. Voyager 2 measurements subsequently revealed an outermost CRAND proton belt beyond Enceladus. Although the source rate is small, the trapping times limited by radial magnetospheric diffusion are very long, about ten years at peak measured flux inwards of the G ring, so large fluxes can accumulate unless otherwise limited in the trapping region by neutral gas, dust, and ring body interactions. One proposed final extension of the Cassini Orbiter mission would place perikrone in a 3000-km gap between the inner D ring and the upper atmosphere of Saturn. Experience with CRAND in the Earth's inner Van Allen proton belt suggests that a similar innermost belt might be found in this comparably wide region at Saturn. Radial dependence of magnetospheric diffusion, proximity to the ring neutron source, and northward magnetic offset of Saturn's magnetic equator from the ring plane could potentially produce peak fluxes several orders of magnitude higher than previously measured outside the main rings. Even brief passes through such an intense environment of highly penetrating protons would be a significant concern for spacecraft operations and science observations. Actual fluxes are limited by losses in Saturn's exospheric gas and in a dust environment likely comparable to that of the known CRAND proton belts. The first numerical model of this unexplored radiation belt is presented to determine limits on peak magnitude and radial profile of the proton flux distribution.

  6. Electron densities inferred from plasma wave spectra obtained by the Waves instrument on Van Allen Probes

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, W S; De Pascuale, S; Faden, J B; Kletzing, C A; Hospodarsky, G B; Thaller, S; Wygant, J R

    2015-01-01

    The twin Van Allen Probe spacecraft, launched in August 2012, carry identical scientific payloads. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science suite includes a plasma wave instrument (Waves) that measures three magnetic and three electric components of plasma waves in the frequency range of 10 Hz to 12 kHz using triaxial search coils and the Electric Fields and Waves triaxial electric field sensors. The Waves instrument also measures a single electric field component of waves in the frequency range of 10 to 500 kHz. A primary objective of the higher-frequency measurements is the determination of the electron density ne at the spacecraft, primarily inferred from the upper hybrid resonance frequency fuh. Considerable work has gone into developing a process and tools for identifying and digitizing the upper hybrid resonance frequency in order to infer the electron density as an essential parameter for interpreting not only the plasma wave data from the mission but also as input to various magnetospheric models. Good progress has been made in developing algorithms to identify fuh and create a data set of electron densities. However, it is often difficult to interpret the plasma wave spectra during active times to identify fuh and accurately determine ne. In some cases, there is no clear signature of the upper hybrid band, and the low-frequency cutoff of the continuum radiation is used. We describe the expected accuracy of ne and issues in the interpretation of the electrostatic wave spectrum. PMID:26167442

  7. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolik, O.; Clilverd, M.; Rodger, C. J.; Turunen, E.; Tsuchiya, F.

    2015-04-21

    Pulsating auroras show quasi-periodic intensity modulations caused by the precipitation of energetic electrons of the order of tens of keV. It is expected theoretically that not only these electrons but also subrelativistic/relativistic electrons precipitate simultaneously into the ionosphere owing to whistler mode wave-particle interactions. The height-resolved electron density profile was observed with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Tromsø VHF radar on 17 November 2012. Electron density enhancements were clearly identified at altitudes >68 km in association with the pulsating aurora, suggesting precipitation of electrons with a broadband energy range from ~10 keV up to at least 200 keV. The riometer and network of subionospheric radio wave observations also showed the energetic electron precipitations during this period. During this period, the footprint of the Van Allen Probe-A satellite was very close to Tromsø and the satellite observed rising tone emissions of the lower band chorus (LBC) waves near the equatorial plane. Considering the observed LBC waves and electrons, we conducted a computer simulation of the wave-particle interactions. This showed simultaneous precipitation of electrons at both tens of keV and a few hundred keV, which is consistent with the energy spectrum estimated by the inversion method using the EISCAT observations. This result revealed that electrons with a wide energy range simultaneously precipitate into the ionosphere in association with the pulsating aurora, providing the evidence that pulsating auroras are caused by whistler chorus waves. We suggest that scattering by propagating whistler simultaneously causes both the precipitations of subrelativistic electrons and the pulsating aurora.

  8. Externally driven plasmaspheric ULF waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazue; Denton, Richard E.; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig; Wygant, John; Bonnell, John; Dai, Lei; Min, Kyungguk; Smith, Charles W.; MacDowall, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze data acquired by the Van Allen Probes on 8 November 2012, during a period of extended low geomagnetic activity, to gain new insight into plasmaspheric ultralow frequency (ULF) waves. The waves exhibited strong spectral power in the 5-40 mHz band and included multiharmonic toroidal waves visible up to the eleventh harmonic, unprecedented in the plasmasphere. During this wave activity, the interplanetary magnetic field cone angle was small, suggesting that the waves were driven by broadband compressional ULF waves originating in the foreshock region. This source mechanism is supported by the tailward propagation of the compressional magnetic field perturbations at a phase velocity of a few hundred kilometers per second that is determined by the cross-phase analysis of data from the two spacecraft. We also find that the coherence and phase delay of the azimuthal components of the magnetic field from the two spacecraft strongly depend on the radial separation of the spacecraft and attribute this feature to field line resonance effects. Finally, using the observed toroidal wave frequencies, we estimate the plasma mass density for L = 2.6-5.8. By comparing the mass density with the electron number density that is estimated from the spectrum of plasma waves, we infer that the plasma was dominated by H+ ions and was distributed uniformly along the magnetic field lines. The electron density is higher than the prediction of saturated plasmasphere models, and this "super saturated" plasmasphere and the uniform ion distribution are consistent with the low geomagnetic activity that prevailed.

  9. Ring current electron dynamics during geomagnetic storms based on the Van Allen Probes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Baker, D. N.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Larsen, B. A.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2016-04-01

    Based on comprehensive measurements from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron Mass Spectrometer Ion Spectrometer, Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope, and Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment instruments on the Van Allen Probes, comparative studies of ring current electrons and ions are performed and the role of energetic electrons in the ring current dynamics is investigated. The deep injections of tens to hundreds of keV electrons and tens of keV protons into the inner magnetosphere occur frequently; after the injections the electrons decay slowly in the inner belt but protons in the low L region decay very fast. Intriguing similarities between lower energy protons and higher-energy electrons are also found. The evolution of ring current electron and ion energy densities and energy content are examined in detail during two geomagnetic storms, one moderate and one intense. The results show that the contribution of ring current electrons to the ring current energy content is much smaller than that of ring current ions (up to ~12% for the moderate storm and ~7% for the intense storm), and <35 keV electrons dominate the ring current electron energy content at the storm main phases. Though the electron energy content is usually much smaller than that of ions, the enhancement of ring current electron energy content during the moderate storm can get to ~30% of that of ring current ions, indicating a more dynamic feature of ring current electrons and important role of electrons in the ring current buildup. The ring current electron energy density is also shown to be higher at midnight and dawn while lower at noon and dusk.

  10. THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY FLY'S EYE SURVEY FOR FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Siemion, Andrew P.V.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Wagner, Mark I.; Werthimer, Dan; Backer, Don; Foster, Griffin; McMahon, Peter L.; Cordes, Jim; Van Leeuwen, Joeri

    2012-01-10

    The relatively unexplored fast radio transient parameter space is known to be home to a variety of interesting sources, including pulsars, pulsar giant pulses, and non-thermal emission from planetary magnetospheres. In addition, a variety of hypothesized but as-yet-unobserved phenomena such as primordial black hole evaporation and prompt emission associated with coalescing massive objects have been suggested. The 2007 announcement by Lorimer et al. of the detection of a bright (30 Jy) radio pulse that was inferred to be of extragalactic origin and the subsequent consternation have demonstrated both the need for wide-field surveys characterizing the fast-transient parameter space and the potential utility of bright radio pulses as probes of the interstellar medium and intergalactic medium. Here we present results from the 450 hr, 150 deg{sup 2} Fly's Eye survey for bright dispersed radio pulses at the Allen Telescope Array (ATA). The Fly's Eye Spectrometer produces 128 channel power spectra over a 209 MHz bandwidth, centered at 1430 MHz, on 44 independent signal paths originating with 30 independent ATA antennae. Data were dedispersed between 0 and 2000 pc cm{sup -3} and searched for pulses with dispersion measures greater than 50 pc cm{sup -3} between 625 {mu}s and 5 s in duration. No pulses were detected in the survey, implying a limiting rate of less than 2 sky{sup -1} hr{sup -1} for 10 ms duration pulses having apparent energy densities greater than 440 kJy {mu}s, or mean flux densities greater than 44 Jy. Here we present details of the instrument, experiment, and observations, including a discussion of our results in light of other single pulse searches.

  11. Lipoxygenase-allene oxide synthase pathway in octocoral thermal stress response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lõhelaid, H.; Teder, T.; Samel, N.

    2015-03-01

    Marine ecosystems are sensitive to elevated seawater temperature, with stony corals serving as model organisms for temperature-imposed declines in population viability and diversity. Several stress markers, including heat shock proteins, have been used for the detection and prediction of stress responses in stony corals. However, the stress indicators in soft corals remain elusive. In higher animals and plants, oxylipins synthesized by fatty acid di- and monooxygenases contribute to stress-induced signaling; however, the role of eicosanoid pathways in corals remains unclear. The eicosanoid gene specific to corals encodes for a natural fusion protein of allene oxide synthase and lipoxygenase ( AOS- LOX). In this work, using the easily cultivated soft coral Capnella imbricata as the stress response model, we monitored the expression of the AOS-LOX and the formation of arachidonic acid metabolites in response to an acute rise in water temperature. Gene expression profiles of two 70 kDa heat shock proteins ( Hsps: Hsp70 and Grp78) were used as a positive control for the stress response. In comparison with normal seawater temperature (23 °C), AOS- LOXa and Hsps were all up-regulated after modest (28 °C) and severe (31 °C) temperature elevation. While the up-regulation of AOS- LOXa and Grp78 was more sensitive to moderate temperature changes, Hsp70s were more responsive to severe heat shock. Concurrently, endogenous and exogenous AOS-LOXa-derived eicosanoids were up-regulated. Thus, together with the up-regulation of AOS- LOX by other abiotic and biotic stress stimuli, these data implicate AOS-LOX as part of the general stress response pathway in corals.

  12. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-08-01

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst≈-45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst≈-18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8-6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1-0.5fce and a peak spectral density ˜10-4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (˜10-300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ<90° or >90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Moreover, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst≈-45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.

  13. Characterizing Total Radiation Belt Electron Content Using Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C. L.; Spence, H. E.; Boyd, A. J.; Jordan, A.; Paulson, K. W.; Zhang, J.; Blake, J. B.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    The comprehensive particle and wave measurements of the Van Allen Probes enable us to monitor the entire radiation belt near the equator from L-shells of 2.5 to 6. Using the particle measurements, we create an improved, high-level quantity representing the entire outer belt. This quantity, the total radiation belt electron content (TRBEC), is the half-orbit sum of outer belt electrons over the radiation belt energy ranges of importance and all pitch angles using data from RBSP-ECT instrument on board both spacecraft. The goal is to characterize statistically the dynamics of the entire radiation belt by comparing TRBEC with solar wind parameters, magnetospheric waves, and electron seed population. When comparing TRBEC with solar wind velocity, our result shows a triangle-distribution similar to that which Reeves et al. (2011) found using geosynchronous electron flux. We also correlate TRBEC with other solar wind parameters to identify which solar wind conditions effectively enhance or deplete radiation belt electrons. In addition, plasma waves in the inner magnetosphere, via wave-particle interaction, are key elements affecting the dynamics of the radiation belt. Therefore, we compare TRBEC with integrated EMIC and chorus (upper and lower bands) wave power calculated from EMFISIS wave measurements to determine the relative importance between each wave-particle process. Finally, we demonstrate the ~100 keV seed population's characteristics that correspond to the MeV population enhancement. While the gross features of the two populations are similar, the MeV population's dynamics lag behind those of the seed population by 5 to 60 hours, which implies the acceleration or loss processes vary by event.

  14. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolik, O.; et al

    2015-04-21

    Pulsating auroras show quasi-periodic intensity modulations caused by the precipitation of energetic electrons of the order of tens of keV. It is expected theoretically that not only these electrons but also subrelativistic/relativistic electrons precipitate simultaneously into the ionosphere owing to whistler mode wave-particle interactions. The height-resolved electron density profile was observed with the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) Tromsø VHF radar on 17 November 2012. Electron density enhancements were clearly identified at altitudes >68 km in association with the pulsating aurora, suggesting precipitation of electrons with a broadband energy range from ~10 keV up to at least 200 keV. The riometermore » and network of subionospheric radio wave observations also showed the energetic electron precipitations during this period. During this period, the footprint of the Van Allen Probe-A satellite was very close to Tromsø and the satellite observed rising tone emissions of the lower band chorus (LBC) waves near the equatorial plane. Considering the observed LBC waves and electrons, we conducted a computer simulation of the wave-particle interactions. This showed simultaneous precipitation of electrons at both tens of keV and a few hundred keV, which is consistent with the energy spectrum estimated by the inversion method using the EISCAT observations. This result revealed that electrons with a wide energy range simultaneously precipitate into the ionosphere in association with the pulsating aurora, providing the evidence that pulsating auroras are caused by whistler chorus waves. We suggest that scattering by propagating whistler simultaneously causes both the precipitations of subrelativistic electrons and the pulsating aurora.« less

  15. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-08-20

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst ≈ –45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst ≈ –18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 – 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1–0.5fce and a peak spectral density ~10–4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (~10–300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations to show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ < 90° or > 90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Furthermore, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst ≈ –45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.

  16. Van Allen Probes observation and modeling of chorus excitation and propagation during weak geomagnetic activities

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Yihua; Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2015-08-20

    We report correlated data on nightside chorus waves and energetic electrons during two small storm periods: 1 November 2012 (Dst ≈ –45) and 14 January 2013 (Dst ≈ –18). The Van Allen Probes simultaneously observed strong chorus waves at locations L = 5.8 – 6.3, with a lower frequency band 0.1–0.5fce and a peak spectral density ~10–4 nT2/Hz. In the same period, the fluxes and anisotropy of energetic (~10–300 keV) electrons were greatly enhanced in the interval of large negative interplanetary magnetic field Bz. Using a bi-Maxwellian distribution to model the observed electron distribution, we perform ray tracing simulations tomore » show that nightside chorus waves are indeed produced by the observed electron distribution with a peak growth for a field-aligned propagation approximately between 0.3fce and 0.4fce, at latitude <7°. Moreover, chorus waves launched with initial normal angles either θ < 90° or > 90° propagate along the field either northward or southward and then bounce back either away from Earth for a lower frequency or toward Earth for higher frequencies. The current results indicate that nightside chorus waves can be excited even during weak geomagnetic activities in cases of continuous injection associated with negative Bz. Furthermore, we examine a dayside event during a small storm C on 8 May 2014 (Dst ≈ –45) and find that the observed anisotropic energetic electron distributions potentially contribute to the generation of dayside chorus waves, but this requires more thorough studies in the future.« less

  17. Jasmonate biosynthesis and the allene oxide cyclase family of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Stenzel, Irene; Hause, Bettina; Miersch, Otto; Kurz, Tobias; Maucher, Helmut; Weichert, Heiko; Ziegler, Jörg; Feussner, Ivo; Wasternack, Claus

    2003-04-01

    In biosynthesis of octadecanoids and jasmonate (JA), the naturally occurring enantiomer is established in a step catalysed by the gene cloned recently from tomato as a single-copy gene (Ziegler et al., 2000). Based on sequence homology, four full-length cDNAs were isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia coding for proteins with AOC activity. The expression of AOC genes was transiently and differentially up-regulated upon wounding both locally and systemically and was induced by JA treatment. In contrast, AOC protein appeared at constitutively high basal levels and was slightly increased by the treatments. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed abundant occurrence of AOC protein as well as of the preceding enzymes in octadecanoid biosynthesis, lipoxygenase (LOX) and allene oxide synthase (AOS), in fully developed tissues, but much less so in 7-day old leaf tissues. Metabolic profiling data of free and esterified polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid peroxidation products including JA and octadecanoids in wild-type leaves and the jasmonate-deficient mutant OPDA reductase 3 (opr3) revealed preferential activity of the AOS branch within the LOX pathway. 13-LOX products occurred predominantly as esterified derivatives, and all 13-hydroperoxy derivatives were below the detection limits. There was a constitutive high level of free 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) in untreated wild-type and opr3 leaves, but an undetectable-expression of AOC. Upon wounding opr3 leaves exhibited only low expression of AOC, wounded wild-type leaves, however, accumulated JA and AOC mRNA. These and further data suggest regulation of JA biosynthesis by OPDA compartmentalization and a positive feedback by JA during leaf development. PMID:12777050

  18. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fraas, A.P.; Mills, C.B.

    1961-11-21

    A neutronic reactor in which neutron moderation is achieved primarily in its reflector is described. The reactor structure consists of a cylindrical central "island" of moderator and a spherical moderating reflector spaced therefrom, thereby providing an annular space. An essentially unmoderated liquid fuel is continuously passed through the annular space and undergoes fission while contained therein. The reactor, because of its small size, is particularly adapted for propulsion uses, including the propulsion of aircraft. (AEC)

  19. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  20. Observational Search for >10 MeV Electrons in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Van Allen Probes Relativistic Proton Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. E.; Looper, M. D.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Blake, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Any detection of ultra-relativistic electrons (>10 MeV) trapped in the inner magnetosphere is potentially a sensitive indicator of a unique particle acceleration process or of a unique particle source. The 24 March 1991 shock injection of >15 MeV electrons is a classic example of the former, while the latter includes measurements in low Earth orbit of >100 MeV electrons and positrons from cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. In this paper we use new instrumentation on the Van Allen Probes to survey the inner magnetosphere for signatures of ultra-relativistic electrons. The Relativistic Proton Spectrometer, designed primarily for spectroscopy of 60 to 2000 MeV protons in the inner belt, nonetheless is capable of detecting minimum-ionizing electrons in a silicon detector stack. More critical to this survey is the instrument's Cherenkov radiator subsystem whose response to incident electrons ranges from a threshold near 10 MeV and reaches light saturation above 50 MeV. Together with the silicon detector system we are able to explore an energy range that has not been routinely studied in the context of the Earth's magnetosphere. We will report on quiet-time and storm-time signatures in regions of the inner magnetosphere that heretofore have not been explored with an orbit like that of Van Allen Probes. We will also quantitatively compare our electron energy spectra, or flux limits, with other measurements from Van Allen Probes and prior glimpses of high-energy electrons from low Earth orbit.

  1. Adventures on the C3H5O potential energy surface: OH+propyne, OH+allene and related reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.

    2014-06-25

    We mapped out the stationary points and the corresponding conformational space on the C3H5O potential energy surface relevant for the OH + allene and OH + propyne reactions systematically and automatically using the KinBot software at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVQZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We used RRKM-based 1-D master equations to calculate pressure- and temperature-dependent, channel-specific phenomenological rate coefficients for the bimolecular reactions propyne + OH and allene + OH, and for the unimolecular decomposition of the CH3CCHOH, CH3C(OH)CH, CH2CCH2OH, CH2C(OH)CH2 primary adducts, and also for the related acetonyl, propionyl, 2-methylvinoxy, and 3-oxo-1-propyl radicals. The major channel of the bimolecular reactions at highmore » temperatures is the formation propargyl + H2O, which makes the title reactions important players in soot formation at high temperatures. However, below ~1000 K the chemistry is more complex, involving the competition of stabilization, isomerization and dissociation processes. We found that the OH addition to the central carbon of allene has a particularly interesting and complex pressure dependence, caused by the low-lying exit channel to form ketene + CH3 bimolecular products. In this study, we compared our results to a wide range of experimental data and assessed possible uncertainties arising from certain aspects of the theoretical framework.« less

  2. Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and Cluster observations of EMIC waves, ULF pulsations, and an electron flux dropout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R.; Spence, H.; Reeves, G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.; Carr, C.; Santolík, O.

    2016-03-01

    We examined an electron flux dropout during the 12-14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm using observations from seven spacecraft: the two Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)-A (P5), Cluster 2, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) 13, 14, and 15. The electron fluxes for energies greater than 2.0 MeV observed by GOES 13, 14, and 15 at geosynchronous orbit and by the Van Allen Probes remained at or near instrumental background levels for more than 24 h from 12 to 14 November. For energies of 0.8 MeV, the GOES satellites observed two shorter intervals of reduced electron fluxes. The first interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 12-13 November was associated with an interplanetary shock and a sudden impulse. Cluster, THEMIS, and GOES observed intense He+ electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves from just inside geosynchronous orbit out to the magnetopause across the dayside to the dusk flank. The second interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 13-14 November was associated with a solar sector boundary crossing and development of a geomagnetic storm with Dst < -100 nT. At the start of the recovery phase, both the 0.8 and 2.0 MeV electron fluxes finally returned to near prestorm values, possibly in response to strong ultralow frequency (ULF) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes near dawn. A combination of adiabatic effects, losses to the magnetopause, scattering by EMIC waves, and acceleration by ULF waves can explain the observed electron behavior.

  3. Van Allen Probes, THEMIS, GOES, and cluster observations of EMIC waves, ULF pulsations, and an electron flux dropout

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sigsbee, K.; Kletzing, C. A.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R.; Spence, H.; Reeves, G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Green, J. C.; Singer, H. J.; et al

    2016-03-04

    We examined an electron flux dropout during the 12–14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm using observations from seven spacecraft: the two Van Allen Probes, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS)-A (P5), Cluster 2, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) 13, 14, and 15. The electron fluxes for energies greater than 2.0 MeV observed by GOES 13, 14, and 15 at geosynchronous orbit and by the Van Allen Probes remained at or near instrumental background levels for more than 24 h from 12 to 14 November. For energies of 0.8 MeV, the GOES satellites observed two shorter intervalsmore » of reduced electron fluxes. The first interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 12–13 November was associated with an interplanetary shock and a sudden impulse. Cluster, THEMIS, and GOES observed intense He+ electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves from just inside geosynchronous orbit out to the magnetopause across the dayside to the dusk flank. The second interval of reduced 0.8 MeV electron fluxes on 13–14 November was associated with a solar sector boundary crossing and development of a geomagnetic storm with Dst <–100 nT. At the start of the recovery phase, both the 0.8 and 2.0 MeV electron fluxes finally returned to near prestorm values, possibly in response to strong ultralow frequency (ULF) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes near dawn. A combination of adiabatic effects, losses to the magnetopause, scattering by EMIC waves, and acceleration by ULF waves can explain the observed electron behavior.« less

  4. Identification of the source of quasiperiodic VLF emissions using ground-based and Van Allen Probes satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, E. E.; Kozelov, B. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Manninen, J.; Santolik, O.; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G.

    2015-08-01

    We report on simultaneous spacecraft and ground-based observations of quasiperiodic VLF emissions and related energetic-electron dynamics. Quasiperiodic emissions in the frequency range 2-6 kHz were observed during a substorm on 25 January 2013 by Van Allen Probe-A and a ground-based station in the Northern Finland. The spacecraft detected the VLF signals near the geomagnetic equator in the night sector at L = 3.0-4.2 when it was inside the plasmasphere. During the satellite motion toward higher latitudes, the time interval between quasiperiodic elements decreased from 6 min to 3 min. We find one-to-one correspondence between the quasiperiodic elements detected by Van Allen Probe-A and on the ground, which indicates the temporal nature of the observed variation in the time interval between quasiperiodic elements. Multi-component measurements of the wave electric and magnetic fields by the Van Allen Probe-A show that the quasiperiodic emissions were almost circularly right-hand polarized whistler mode waves and had predominantly small (below 30°) wave vector angles with respect to the magnetic field. In the probable source region of these signals (L about 4), we observed synchronous variations of electron distribution function at energies of 10-20 keV and the quasiperiodic elements. In the pause between the quasiperiodic elements pitch angle distribution of these electrons had a maximum near 90°, while they become more isotropic during the development of quasiperiodic elements. The parallel energies of the electrons for which the data suggest direct evidence of the wave-particle interactions is in a reasonable agreement with the estimated cyclotron resonance energy for the observed waves.

  5. Five-membered cyclic metal carbyne: synthesis of osmapentalynes by the reactions of osmapentalene with allene, alkyne, and alkene.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Congqing; Yang, Yuhui; Wu, Jingjing; Luo, Ming; Fan, Jinglan; Zhu, Jun; Xia, Haiping

    2015-06-01

    The synthesis of small cyclic metal carbynes is challenging due to the large angle strain associated with the highly distorted nonlinear triple bonds. Herein, we report a general route for the synthesis of five-membered cyclic metal carbyne complexes, osmapentalynes, by the reactions of an osmapentalene derivative with allene, alkyne, and alkene. Experimental observations and theoretical calculations document the aromaticity in the fused five-membered rings of osmapentalynes. The realization of transforming osmapentalene to osmapentalyne through this general route would not only allow further exploration of metallapentalyne chemistry but also show promising applications of this novel aromatic system with broad absorption band and high molar absorption coefficient. PMID:25917530

  6. Multi-Spacecraft Data Assimilation and Reanalysis During the THEMIS and Van Allen Probes Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Shprits, Y.; Kondrashov, D. A.; Podladchikova, T.; Drozdov, A.; Subbotin, D.

    2013-12-01

    consideration of the innovation vector may lead to a new physical understanding of the radiation belt system, which can later be used to improve our model forecasts. In the current study, we explore the radiation belt dynamics of the current era including data from the THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, GPS satellites, Akebono, NOAA and Cluster spacecraft. Intercalibration is performed between spacecraft on an individual energy channel basis, and in invariant coordinates. The global reanalysis allows an unprecedented analysis of the source-acceleration-transport-loss relationship in Earth's radiation belts. This analysis is used to refine our model capabilities, and to prepare the 3-D reanalysis for real-time data. The global 3-D reanalysis is an important step towards full-scale modeling and operational forecasting of this dynamic region of space.

  7. EDITORIAL: Special issue in honour of J E Allen's 75th birthday

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, R. N.

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics is dedicated to Professor John Allen who has spent most of his professional life in the Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, working on problems in gas discharges and plasma physics. His first degrees and doctorate were taken at Liverpool University in the 1950s where at the time there was an internationally renowned group led by Meek, Craggs and Edels. He then spent some time at Frascati in Italy on secondment from Harwell, helping to build up expertise there. He returned to England in the mid-1960s, first to Cambridge, but he soon migrated to Oxford to University College and the Department of Engineering Science to strengthen a team that already included von Engel, Motz and Woods with more recent reinforcement by Howatson and myself. Thus there was built up both a post-graduate MSc course and what amounted to a graduate school producing many scientists who have since distinguished themselves in all parts of the world. The prospects for success in the quest for fusion and the proximity of Culham Laboratory produced a heady mix. But the timescales lengthened and fashions changed. However, John moved with the times and he and his research students made notable contributions to the understanding of dusty plasmas and to radio-frequency plasmas used in the processing of microchips. The structure at Oxford was such that the recognition of a professorship came late in his career, but his international reputation was well established much earlier. Being freed of tutorial duties he has travelled much in recent years and has been Chairman of the International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (ICPIG) 1999-2001 and directly involved in the international effort to carry out dusty plasma experiments in space under micro-gravity conditions. For my part, having known John as a colleague over the past forty years, he has been a valuable point of reference when one needed someone to comment on new ideas, a

  8. Van Allen Probes observations of dipolarization and its associated O+ flux variations in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent study employing the MDS-1 satellite reveals that magnetic field dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere is not unusual. When the MDS-1 satellite was located at L=3.5-5.0 near the auroral onset longitude (MLT difference of ≤2.5 h), the occurrence probability of local dipolarization was about 16%. Surprisingly, an event was found at L~3.6, far inside the geosynchronous altitude. It was also shown that after the dipolarization, the oxygen ENA flux in the nightside ring current region measured by the IMAGE satellite was predominantly enhanced by a factor of 2-5 and stayed at an enhanced level for more than 1 h, while clear enhancement was scarcely seen in the hydrogen ENA flux. To better understand mechanisms of the selective acceleration of O+ ions during dipolarization, an in-situ measurement of ion fluxes is needed. However, there are few studies investigating H+ and O+ flux variations during dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere. In this study we investigate magnetic field dipolarization and its associated ion flux variations in the deep inner magnetosphere, using magnetic field and ion flux data obtained by the Van Allen Probes. From the magnetic field data recorded on the nightside (1800-0600 MLT) in the inner magnetosphere (L=3.0-6.6) in VDH coordinates, we select substorm-related dipolarization events in which the H component increases by more than 20 nT and the absolute value of the V component decreases by more than 8 nT in 5 minutes. About 150 dipolarization events are identified from 1 October 2012 to 30 June 2015. We find that the dipolarization mostly occurs at L=4.5-6.5 in the premidnight sector (2100-0000 MLT). No events are found at L<4.0. Some dipolarization events are accompanied by O+ flux enhancements in the energy range higher than a few keV, which have the pitch angle distribution peaked around 45 or 135 degrees. We also find that low energy O+ ions often appear after dipolarization with an energy dispersion starting from

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1958-04-22

    A nuclear reactor for isotope production is described. This reactor is designed to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux in a region adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the center of the reactor. The core of the reactor is generally centrally located with respect tn a surrounding first reflector, constructed of beryllium. The beryllium reflector is surrounded by a second reflector, constructed of graphite, which, in tune, is surrounded by a conventional thermal shield. Water is circulated through the core and the reflector and functions both as a moderator and a coolant. In order to produce a greatsr maximum thermal neutron flux adjacent to the periphery of the reactor rather than in the core, the reactor is designed so tbat the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the materials in the reflector is approximately twice the ratio of neutron scattering cross section to neutron absorption cross section averaged over all of the material of the core of the reactor.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.; Johnson, H.W.

    1961-04-01

    BS>A nuclear reactor incorporating fuel rods passing through a moderator and including tubes of a material of higher Thermal conductivity than the fuel in contact with the fuel is described. The tubes extend beyond the active portion of the reactor into contant with a fiuld coolant.

  11. Formation of three new bonds and two stereocenters in acyclic systems by zinc-mediated enantioselective alkynylation of acylsilanes, Brook rearrangement, and ene-allene carbocyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Polina; Katan, Einat; Mathew, Jomon; Kostenko, Arseni; Karni, Miriam; Nijs, Anne; Bolm, Carsten; Apeloig, Yitzhak; Marek, Ilan

    2014-12-19

    Diastereoisomerically pure (dr > 99:1) and enantiomerically enriched (er up to 98:2) substituted propargyl diols possessing a tertiary hydroxyl group were synthesized in a single-pot operation from simple acylsilanes through a combined catalytic enantioselective alkynylation of acylsilanes, followed by an allenyl-Zn-Brook rearrangement and Zn-ene-allene (or Zn-yne-allene) cyclization reaction. Two remarkable features of these reactions are the near complete transfer of chirality in the allenyl-Zn-Brook rearrangement and the highly organized six-membered transition state of the Zn-ene-allene carbocyclization found by DFT calculations. In this process, three new bonds and two new stereogenic centers are created in a single-pot operation in excellent diastereo- and enantiomeric ratios. DFT calculations show that the allenyl-Zn-Brook rearrangement occurs in preference to the classic [1,2]-Zn-Brook rearrangement owing to its significantly lower activation barrier. PMID:25271364

  12. Z-Selective Hydrothiolation of Racemic 1,3-Disubstituted Allenes: An Atom-Economic Rhodium-Catalyzed Dynamic Kinetic Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pritzius, Adrian B; Breit, Bernhard

    2015-12-21

    A Z-selective rhodium-catalyzed hydrothiolation of 1,3-disubstituted allenes and subsequent oxidation towards the corresponding allylic sulfones is described. Using the bidentate 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane (dppb) ligand, Z/E-selectivities up to >99:1 were obtained. The highly atom-economic desymmetrization reaction tolerates functionalized aromatic and aliphatic thiols. Additionally, a variety of symmetric internal allenes, as well as unsymmetrically disubstituted substrates were well tolerated, thus resulting in high regioselectivities. Starting from chiral but racemic 1,3-disubstituted allenes a dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) could be achieved by applying (S,S)-Me-DuPhos as the chiral ligand. The desired Z-allylic sulfones were obtained in high yields and enantioselectivities up to 96 % ee. PMID:26418035

  13. Evolution of Florida Bay islands from a supratidal precursor: evidence from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, T.M.; Merriam, D.F.

    1988-05-01

    Cores from the interior portions of westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key document island nucleation from a supratidal precursor developed on a paralic peat deposit; whereas cores from exterior portions of these islands document development of marine mudbanks, progradation or colonization by mangroves, and supratidal sedimentation. The supratidal precursor beneath these islands consists of eroded remnants of coastal tidal flats or local topographic highs that remained supratidal throughout the Holocene sea-level rise. Sedimentologic and biostratigraphic evidence suggest erosion of mangroves by storms or inundation of mangroves by storm deposits is a common precursor to subsequent sediment aggradation on both islands. If other Florida Bay islands develop from mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks, then data from westernmost Bob Allen Key and Sid Key indicate that nucleation from a supratidal precursor and mangrove colonization of marine mudbanks are both viable mechanisms for island initiation. The absence of evidence of a supratidal nucleus beneath an island can result from (a) island migration and subsequent erosion or (b) insufficient sampling density. Stratigraphic data from Florida Bay are insufficient to discriminate between the relative importance of these two models of island evolution; the authors contend that any model of the evolution of Florida Bay islands must incorporate island nucleation from a supratidal precursor as a viable mechanism for island evolution.

  14. Investigation of solar wind driver effects on electron acceleration and loss in the outer Van Allen belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsavrias, Christos; Li, Wen; Daglis, Ioannis A.; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Georgiou, Marina; Dimitrakoudis, Stavros

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the response of the outer Van Allen belt electrons to various types of solar wind and internal magnetospheric forcing - in particular to Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs), to High Speed Streams (HSS), to geospace magnetic storms of different intensities and to intense magnetospheric substorms. We have employed multi-point particle and field observations in the inner magnetosphere (both in-situ and through ground-based remote sensing), including the Cluster, THEMIS, Van Allen Probes and GOES constellations, the XMM and INTEGRAL spacecraft, and the CARISMA and IMAGE ground magnetometer arrays. The data provide a broad range of particle energies and a wide radial and azimuthal spatial coverage. Observations show that losses of equatorially mirroring electrons are primarily caused by magnetopause shadowing which in turn is achieved by outward diffusion driven by Pc5 ULF waves. Chorus wave activity, on the other hand, seems to be responsible for electron enhancements in the outer radiation belt even in the presence of pronounced outward diffusion.

  15. Global Distribution of Chorus Wave Intensity Directly Measured By Van Allen Probes and Themis and Inferred from Poes Electron Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ni, B.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Angelopoulos, V.; Green, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves play a fundamental role in accelerating seed electrons to highly relativistic energies, as well as causing energetic electron precipitation into the upper atmosphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data and THEMIS high-resolution wave data, which provide extensive coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we construct an empirical global model of chorus wave intensity categorized by various levels of geomagnetic activity. Recently, we have developed a physics-based technique of linking chorus wave intensity and two-directional electron fluxes (30-100 keV) measured at the conjugate low altitudes by POES satellites to show that the inferred chorus wave intensity provides reasonable estimates on the averaged chorus wave intensity. We apply these two different methods, namely (1) the empirical chorus wave model dependent on geomagnetic activity, and (2) the inferred chorus wave intensity from two-directional POES electron measurements, to a few interesting events and evaluate their performance by comparing against in-situ observations of chorus wave intensity from Van Allen Probes and THEMIS. The developed global chorus wave model is critical in quantitatively evaluating the role of chorus waves in radiation belt and ring current electron dynamics.

  16. How quickly, how deeply, and how strongly can dynamical outer boundary conditions impact Van Allen radiation belt morphology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian R.; Ozeke, Louis G.

    2016-06-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength, and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of ultrarelativistic electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the outer radiation belt. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, the temporal dynamics of a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasma sheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought. We show that even on timescales ~1 h, changes in the outer boundary electron population can dramatically alter the radiation belt flux in the heart of the belt. Importantly, these flux changes can at times occur on timescales much faster than the L shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behavior of the Van Allen belts. Overall, we argue in general that the importance of temporal changes in the boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  17. RAM - C P L Simulations of Electron Transport and Plasma Wave Scattering Using Van Allen Probes Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V.; Zhang, J.; Saikin, A.; Albert, J.; Tu, W.; Chen, Y.; Morley, S.; De Pascuale, S.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    The high variability of energetic electron fluxes in the inner magnetosphere remains inadequately explained due to their complex dynamics including competing particle acceleration and loss processes. We study the combined effects from scattering by chorus and EMIC waves and radial transport on ring current and radiation belt dynamics. We use our ring current-atmosphere interactions model that solves the kinetic equation for H+, O+, and He+ ions and electrons and is coupled with a time-dependent 2-D plasmasphere model (RAM-CPL). The plasma boundary conditions are specified from LANL geosynchronous observations. We simulate wave-particle interactions on a global scale as particles drift around the Earth using L and MLT-dependent event-specific chorus and EMIC wave models. The precipitating electron fluxes measured by multiple NOAA satellites are fitted to the equatorial wave measurements made by the EMFISIS instrument on the Van Allen Probes to infer the chorus wave amplitudes on a global scale. The fast dropout of the radiation belts during the October 2012 "double-dip" storm event is investigated and the role of various processes such as outward radial diffusion combined with magnetopause shadowing and enhanced electron precipitation into the atmosphere is evaluated. The simulated cold plasma densities are compared with in situ EMFISIS observations along the Van Allen Probes' orbits showing good agreement.

  18. Propagation properties of plasmaspheric hiss in the radiation belts: first systematic results from the Van Allen probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santolik, Ondrej; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kurth, William S.; Averkamp, Terrance F.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2014-05-01

    The electromagnetic emission of plasmaspheric hiss has been considered to be an important component in the puzzle of the dynamical behavior of Van Allen radiation belts, being held responsible for the slot region between the inner and outer belts. The origin of plasmaspheric hiss is still being debated. A systematic analysis of propagation properties of these waves can provide us with inputs for modeling of radiation belt dynamics. We use new measurements of the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) onboard the Van Allen Probes spacecraft. Multicomponent data processed by the EMFISIS/Waves instrument allow us to systematically estimate the wave polarization and propagation parameters. The survey data of this instrument are recorded with a nearly 100% coverage. This growing data set allows us to determine probability density functions of characteristics of electromagnetic waves in the typical frequency range of plasmaspheric hiss. This work receives EU support through the FP7-Space grant agreement no 284520 for the MAARBLE collaborative research project.

  19. Alkyne versus allene activation in platinum- and gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization of hydroxylated 1,5-allenynes.

    PubMed

    Zriba, Riadh; Gandon, Vincent; Aubert, Corinne; Fensterbank, Louis; Malacria, Max

    2008-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective transformations of 3-hydroxy-1,5-allenynes 1 into a variety of new and potentially useful cyclic compounds have been achieved. Substrates bearing a silyl group at the alkyne moiety undergo purely thermal or Lewis acid catalyzed Alder-ene type transformations into 2-methylene-3-vinylcyclopent-3-enol derivatives 2. When heated in the presence of a catalytic amount of PtCl(2) or PtCl(4), these incipient cyclopentenols could be further transformed into 3-vinylcyclopent-2-enones 3. On the other hand, alkyl-substituted 3-hydroxy-1,5-allenynes proved to be stable under refluxing conditions. Nevertheless, PtCl(2) and PtCl(4) could selectively activate the alkyne moiety of these substrates toward intramolecular nucleophilic attack of the internal allene double bond to yield unprecedented 6-methylenebicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-3-one derivatives 4. With gold-based catalysts, provided that the reaction is carried out in dichloromethane, both Au(I) and Au(III) complexes selectively activate the allene fragment of the substrates toward intramolecular nucleophilic attack of the hydroxyl group to yield 2-ethynyl-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyrans 5. Compounds of type 4 can also be formed with Au(I) and Au(III) complexes if the reaction is carried out in toluene. The reactivity of these new compounds has been partially investigated, and polycyclic ketones were obtained after oxidation under mild conditions or gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization. PMID:18034446

  20. Ring Current Pressure Estimation withRAM-SCB using Data Assimilation and VanAllen Probe Flux Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godinez, H. C.; Yu, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Larsen, B.; Jordanova, V.

    2015-12-01

    Capturing and subsequently modeling the influence of tail plasma injections on the inner magnetosphere is particularly important for understanding the formation and evolution of Earth's ring current. In this study, the ring current distribution is estimated with the Ring Current-Atmosphere Interactions Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) using, for the first time, data assimilation techniques and particle flux data from the Van Allen Probes. The state of the ring current within the RAM-SCB is corrected via an ensemble based data assimilation technique by using proton flux from one of the Van Allen Probes, to capture the enhancement of ring current following an isolated substorm event on July 18 2013. The results show significant improvement in the estimation of the ring current particle distributions in the RAM-SCB model, leading to better agreement with observations. This newly implemented data assimilation technique in the global modeling of the ring current thus provides a promising tool to better characterize the effect of substorm injections in the near-Earth regions. The work is part of the Space Hazards Induced near Earth by Large, Dynamic Storms (SHIELDS) project in Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  1. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Moore, R.V.; Bowen, J.H.; Dent, K.H.

    1958-12-01

    A heterogeneous, natural uranium fueled, solid moderated, gas cooled reactor is described, in which the fuel elements are in the form of elongated rods and are dlsposed within vertical coolant channels ln the moderator symmetrically arranged as a regular lattice in groups. This reactor employs control rods which operate in vertical channels in the moderator so that each control rod is centered in one of the fuel element groups. The reactor is enclosed in a pressure vessel which ls provided with access holes at the top to facilitate loading and unloadlng of the fuel elements, control rods and control rod driving devices.

  3. Ruthenium catalyzed C-C bond formation via transfer hydrogenation: branch-selective reductive coupling of allenes to paraformaldehyde and higher aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Ming-Yu; Skucas, Eduardas; Krische, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation employing 2-propanol as the terminal reductant, 1,1-disubstituted allenes 1a- h engage in reductive coupling to paraformaldehyde to furnish homoallylic alcohols 2a- h. Under identical transfer hydrogenation conditions, 1,1-disubstituted allenes engage in reductive coupling to aldehydes 3a- f to furnish homoallylic alcohols 4a- n. In all cases, reductive coupling occurs with branched regioselectivity to deliver homoallylic alcohols bearing all-carbon quaternary centers. PMID:18533665

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  5. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Hurwitz, H. Jr.; Brooks, H.; Mannal, C.; Payne, J.H.; Luebke, E.A.

    1959-03-24

    A reactor of the heterogeneous, liquid cooled type is described. This reactor is comprised of a central region of a plurality of vertically disposed elongated tubes surrounded by a region of moderator material. The central region is comprised of a central core surrounded by a reflector region which is surrounded by a fast neutron absorber region, which in turn is surrounded by a slow neutron absorber region. Liquid sodium is used as the primary coolant and circulates through the core which contains the fuel elements. Control of the reactor is accomplished by varying the ability of the reflector region to reflect neutrons back into the core of the reactor. For this purpose the reflector is comprised of moderator and control elements having varying effects on reactivity, the control elements being arranged and actuated by groups to give regulation, shim, and safety control.

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Sherman, J.; Sharbaugh, J.E.; Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Palladino, N.J.; DeHuff, P.G.

    1962-10-23

    A nuclear reactor incorporating seed and blanket assemblies is designed. Means are provided for obtaining samples of the coolant from the blanket assemblies and for varying the flow of coolant through the blanket assemblies. (AEC)

  7. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  9. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.

    1960-04-01

    A nuclear reactor is described consisting of blocks of graphite arranged in layers, natural uranium bodies disposed in holes in alternate layers of graphite blocks, and coolant tubes disposed in the layers of graphite blocks which do not contain uranium.

  10. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  11. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Breden, C.R.; Dietrich, J.R.

    1961-06-20

    A water-soluble non-volatile poison may be introduced into a reactor to nullify excess reactivity. The poison is removed by passing a side stream of the water containing the soluble poison to an evaporation chamber. The vapor phase is returned to the reactor to decrease the concentration of soluble poison and the liquid phase is returned to increase the concentration of soluble poison.

  12. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-07-14

    High temperature reactors which are uniquely adapted to serve as the heat source for nuclear pcwered rockets are described. The reactor is comprised essentially of an outer tubular heat resistant casing which provides the main coolant passageway to and away from the reactor core within the casing and in which the working fluid is preferably hydrogen or helium gas which is permitted to vaporize from a liquid storage tank. The reactor core has a generally spherical shape formed entirely of an active material comprised of fissile material and a moderator material which serves as a diluent. The active material is fabricated as a gas permeable porous material and is interlaced in a random manner with very small inter-connecting bores or capillary tubes through which the coolant gas may flow. The entire reactor is divided into successive sections along the direction of the temperature gradient or coolant flow, each section utilizing materials of construction which are most advantageous from a nuclear standpoint and which at the same time can withstand the operating temperature of that particular zone. This design results in a nuclear reactor characterized simultaneously by a minimum critiral size and mass and by the ability to heat a working fluid to an extremely high temperature.

  13. Research reactors - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Comments on Progress Report: A Cost-Benefit Model of Some Critical Library Operations in Terms of Use of Serials (April 29, 1977) by Allen Kent and Others.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas

    In their study of the usage demands placed on journal collections in academic libraries, Allen Kent and coauthors have not adequately considered the long-term variability of those demands in their formulation of a cost-benefit model for the management of journal collections. Though resource-sharing and the matching of periodical acquisitions to…

  15. Density functional theory study of Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activations and intermolecular annulations between benzamide derivatives and allenes.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhong; Huang, Fang; Sun, Chuanzhi; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Jianbiao; Chen, Dezhan

    2015-04-20

    Density functional theory has been applied to gain insight into the Cp*Rh(OAc)2-catalyzed C-H activation and intermolecular annulation of benzamide derivatives with allenes. The study shows that the reactions proceed in three steps: (1) C-H activation induced by Rh catalyst reacting with benzamide derivatives, (2) carborhodation of allene, and (3) regeneration of Rh catalyst. The results indicate that the N-H deprotonation makes the following C-H activation much easier. The regio- and stereoselectivities of 1a (N-pivaloyloxy benzamide)/2a (cyclohexylallene) and 1b (N-pivaloyloxy-4-methyl-benzamide)/2b (1,1-dimethyl allene) depend on the allene carborhodation step. The steric hindrance effect is the dominant factor. We also discuss the reaction mechanism of 1c (N-methoxy benzamide)/2a. The chemoselectivity between 1c/2a is determined by the N-O cleavage step. Replacement of OPiv by OMe leads to loss of the stabilization effect provided by C=O in OPiv. Additionally, Cp*Rh(OAc)(OPiv) is produced in the Cp*Rh(OAc)2 regeneration step, which can work as catalyst as well. PMID:25856513

  16. Broad and Visionary. Commentary on Allen Kent (1977) Information Science. (Journal of Education for Librarianship, 17(3), 131-139)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Marcia J.

    2015-01-01

    Allen Kent was a pioneer in many aspects of library and information science (LIS), and yet, as this author reads Kent's 1977 article, there is not much in it that has become ancient, irrelevant history. The questions he discusses are still alive in the discipline in 2014, whether it is called LIS (library and information science), information…

  17. Modes of Heme-Binding and Substrate Access for Cytochrome P450 CYP74A Revealed by Crystal Structures of Allene Oxide Synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytochrome P450s exist ubiquitously in all organisms and are involved in many biological processes. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a P450 enzyme that plays a key role in the biosynthesis of oxylipin jasmonates which are involved in signal and defense reactions in higher plants. The crystal structure...

  18. Phosphine-Catalyzed β,γ-Umpolung Domino Reaction of Allenic Esters: Facile Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzofuranones Bearing a Chiral Tetrasubstituted Stereogenic Carbon Center.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Shinobu; Kishi, Kenta; Yoshida, Yasushi; Mader, Steffen; Arteaga, Fernando Arteaga; Lee, Shoukou; Hoshino, Manabu; Rueping, Magnus; Fujita, Makoto; Sasai, Hiroaki

    2015-12-14

    An enantio-, diastereo-, regio-, and chemoselective phosphine-catalyzed β,γ-umpolung domino reaction of allenic esters with dienones has been developed for the first time. The designed sequence, involving oxy-Michael and Rauhut-Currier reactions, produced highly functionalized tetrahydrobenzofuranones, bearing a chiral tetrasubstituted stereogenic center, in up to 96 % ee. PMID:26537173

  19. Isomerization of Internal Alkynes to Iridium(III) Allene Complexes via C-H Bond Activation: Expanded Substrate Scope, and Progress towards a Catalytic Methodology.

    PubMed

    Phadke, Neha; Findlater, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of a series of allene complexes (POCOP)Ir(η²-RC=(.)=CR') 1b-4b (POCOP = 2,6-bis(di-tert-butylphosphonito)benzene) via isomerization of internal alkynes is reported. We have demonstrated that the application of this methodology is viable for the isomerization of a wide variety of alkyne substrates. Deuterium labeling experiments support our proposed mechanism. The structures of the allene complexes 1b-4b were determined using spectroscopic data analysis. Additionally, the solid-state molecular structure of complex 2b was determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies and it confirmed the assignment of an iridium-bound allene isomerization product. The rates of isomerization were measured using NMR techniques over a range of temperatures to allow determination of thermodynamic parameters. Finally, we report a preliminary step towards developing a catalytic methodology; the allene may be liberated from the metal center by exposure of the complex to an atmosphere of carbon monoxide. PMID:26569203

  20. Mentoring Excellence in the Kinesiology Academy. National Association of Kinesiology in Higher Education 35th Dudley Allen Sargent Commemorative Lecture 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Duane

    2016-01-01

    This article from the 35th Dudley Allen Sargent Lecture addresses the importance of senior faculty in kinesiology providing holistic guidance to tenure-track faculty to foster excellence in the field. The importance of holistic mentoring of all three faculty roles in higher education is illustrated using research on teaching and learning…

  1. Determining the number of isomers in X-, XY-, XYZ-, and XYZU-substituted D2 d allenes: Additive schemes for calculating enthalpies of vaporization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilov, D. Yu.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2015-02-01

    Using Pólya's theorem, cycle indices are derived that identify the chiral and achiral substitution isomers of an allene (1,2-propadiene). Equations of symmetry that allow us to determine the number of isomers in a series and arrange the isomers according to families, depending on the number of substitution sites, are obtained. Eight- and nine-constant additive schemes based on the similarity between subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of a series of 120 molecules of X-, XY-, XYZ-, and XYZU-substituted allenes and the expansion of polygonal numbers (triangular, tetrahedral, and others) of a Pascal triangle are devised. Enthalpies of vaporization L NBP are calculated for 21 XY- and 120 XYZU-substituted allenes, respectively, not yet studied experimentally. It is shown that each coefficient of the scheme (the number of ways for superpositioning subgraphs with lengths i 1, i 2, ⋯ on molecular graphs of allene) is a result of partitioning triangular, tetrahedral, or four-dimensional tetrahedral numbers of a Pascal triangle.

  2. Enantioselective Amine-Catalyzed [4 + 2] Annulations of Allene Ketones and 2,3-Dioxopyrrolidine Derivatives: Synthesis of 4H-Pyran Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuang; Luo, Yong-Chun; Hu, Xiu-Qin; Wang, Zhu-Yin; Liang, Yong-Min; Xu, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-17

    An efficient cinchona alkaloid-derived amine catalyzed asymmetric [4 + 2] cycloaddition is successfully developed. 4H-Pyran fused pyrrolin-2-one products are readily obtained in moderate to high yields with good enantioselectivites by employing allene ketones and 2,3-dioxopyrrolidine derivatives as substrates. PMID:26102600

  3. The Palladium Catalyzed Asymmetric Addition of Oxindoles and Allenes: an Atom-Economical Versatile Method for the Construction of Chiral Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Xie, Jia; Sieber, Joshua D.

    2011-01-01

    The Pd-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation (AAA) is one of the most useful and versatile methods for asymmetric synthesis known in organometallic chemistry. Development of this reaction over the past 30 years has typically relied on the use of an allylic electrophile bearing an appropriate leaving group to access the reactive Pd(π-allyl) intermediate that goes on to the desired coupling product after attack by the nucleophile present in the reaction. Our group has been interested in developing alternative approaches to access the reactive Pd(π-allyl) intermediate that does not require the use of an activated electrophile, which ultimately generates a stoichiometric byproduct in the reaction that is derived from the leftover leaving group. Along these lines, we have demonstrated that allenes can be used to generate the reactive Pd(π-allyl) intermediate in the presence of an acid cocatalyst, and this system is compatible with nucleophiles to allow for formation of formal AAA products by Pd-catalyzed additions to allenes. This article describes our work regarding the use of oxindoles as carbon-based nucleophiles in a Pd-catalyzed asymmetric addition of oxindoles to allenes (Pd-catalyzed hydrocarbonation of allenes). By using the chiral standard Trost ligand (L1) and 3-aryloxindoles as nucleophiles, this hydrocarbonation reaction provides products with two vicinal stereocenters, with one being quaternary, in excellent chemo-, regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselectivities in high chemical yields. PMID:22070545

  4. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.; Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.M.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-01

    This patent relates to neutronic reactors of the heterogeneous water cooled type, and in particular to a fuel element charging and discharging means therefor. In the embodiment illustrated the reactor contains horizontal, parallel coolant tubes in which the fuel elements are disposed. A loading cart containing a magnzine for holding a plurality of fuel elements operates along the face of the reactor at the inlet ends of the coolant tubes. The loading cart is equipped with a ram device for feeding fuel elements from the magazine through the inlot ends of the coolant tubes. Operating along the face adjacent the discharge ends of the tubes there is provided another cart means adapted to receive irradiated fuel elements as they are forced out of the discharge ends of the coolant tubes by the incoming new fuel elements. This cart is equipped with a tank coataining a coolant, such as water, into which the fuel elements fall, and a hydraulically operated plunger to hold the end of the fuel element being discharged. This inveation provides an apparatus whereby the fuel elements may be loaded into the reactor, irradiated therein, and unloaded from the reactor without stopping the fiow of the coolant and without danger to the operating personnel.

  5. Identification of Non-Linear Space Weather Models of the Van Allen Radiation Belts Using Volterra Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Vassiliadis, D.

    2010-07-01

    Many efforts have been made to develop general dynamical models of the Van Allen radiation belts based on data alone. Early linear prediction filter studies focused on the response of daily-averaged relativistic electrons at geostationary altitudes Nagai 1988, Baker et al. 1990). Vassiliadis et al (2005) extended this technique spatially by incorporating SAMPEX electron flux data into linear prediction filters for a broad range of L-shells from 1.1 to 10.0 RE. Nonlinear state space models (Rigler & Baker 2008) have provided useful initial results on the timescales involved in modeling the impulse-response of the radiation belts. Here, we show how NARMAX models, in conjunction with nonlinear time-delay FIR neural networks (Volterra networks) hold great promise for the development of accurate and fully data-derived space weather specification and forecast tools.

  6. Recent Results From The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) on the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletzing, Craig

    2014-05-01

    The physics of the creation, loss, and transport of radiation belt particles is intimately connected to the electric and magnetic fields which mediate these processes. A large range of field and particle interactions are involved in this physics which are well-measured by the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft launched in 2012. An overview of recent results from the mission focusing on waves and wave-particle interactions measured by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) investigation is presented. We show examples of automated density determination and plasmapause identification as derived from the upper hybrid resonance; low frequency ULF pulsations; EMIC waves with electrostatic harmonics and their occurrence statistics; and whistler mode waves including upper and lower band chorus as well as plasmaspheric hiss and its relation to energetic particles.

  7. Plasmatrough exohiss waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Evidence for leakage from plasmasphere and resonant scattering of radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hui; Su, Zhenpeng; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Xian, Tao; Wang, Shui; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    Exohiss waves are whistler mode hiss observed in the plasmatrough region. We present a case study of exohiss waves and the corresponding background plasma distributions observed by the Van Allen Probes in the dayside low-latitude region. The analysis of wave Poynting fluxes, suprathermal electron fluxes, and cold electron densities supports the scenario that exohiss leaks from the plasmasphere into the plasmatrough. Quasilinear calculations further reveal that exohiss can potentially cause the resonant scattering loss of radiation belt electrons ˜

  8. Commensal Targeted Search and Blind Survey in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence at the Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    The SETI Institute is a world leader in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) with a dedicated cm-wave interferometer array designed especially for SETI, called the Allen Telescope Array. Here we describe a new system which performs an imaging survey for anomalous (narrow band ~ 100 kHz, repeating ~ 1 microsec, short duration ~ 10s) signals that may be indicative of extraterrestrial communication or an unexpected astronomical phenomenon. This imaging survey is performed commensally with a targeted SETI search focusing on individual stars. The application of existing ATA imagers (correlators) here is a prototype for future SETI. Because of the inherent effectiveness of imaging surveys over targeted surveys when using interferometer telescopes, we believe the technology developed here will pave the way for high-efficiency SETI at future large radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  9. A new species of Trichuris Roederer, 1761 (Nematoda: Trichuridae) from Heteromys gaumeri Allen & Chapman (Rodentia: Heteromyidae) in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Panti-May, Jesús Alonso; Robles, María Del Rosario

    2016-09-01

    In Mexico, four species of Trichuris Roederer, 1761 have been recorded in wild rodents belonging to the family Heteromyidae. In the present paper, we describe a new species based on specimens collected from Heteromys gaumeri Allen & Chapman (Heteromyidae: Heteromyinae) in the tropical forests of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Trichuris silviae n. sp. can be differentiated from the congeners described in North and South American rodents by morphological and morphometric features, such as the possession of a wide spicular tube, a thicker proximal cloacal tube, a shorter distal cloacal tube and a cylindrical spicular sheath. This is the first description of a Trichuris spp. from heteromyid rodents in Mexico and the fourth in North America. Despite the broad distribution of Heteromys spp., few cases of Trichuris infection have been reported. Further studies are necessary to verify if the new species is present in other heteromyid rodents in order to increase our knowledge about its geographical and host distribution. PMID:27522370

  10. Study of the utilization of EREP data from the Wabash River Basin. [Allen County and Lake Monroe in Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, L. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of the digitized SL/4 S190A color IR photography proved very difficult. An area within Allen County, including Ft. Wayne, was studied. Eight segments of the study area were clustered separately and the cluster maps were then compared with the photography and maps available. The training areas for the land use classes were selected from the cluster maps. The separability measures (transformed divergence) of the classes indicated that many of the land use classes were not spectrally separable. The classification results bore this out. Visually the resulting classification map was poor, with 67 percent correct data. These results were of significantly lower quality than those obtained for the summertime SL/2 data near Lake Monroe, Indiana. Low contrast between land use classes during the wintertime and the limited spectral range and resolution are the major causes for the poor performance.

  11. Space Geoengineering: James A. Van Allen's Role in Detecting and Disrupting the Magnetosphere, 1958-1962 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    James A. Van Allen’s celebrated discovery of Earth’s radiation belts in 1958 using Explorer 1 and 3 satellites was immediately followed by his agreement to monitor tests of nuclear weapons in space aimed at disrupting the magnetosphere. This is “space geoengineering” on a planetary scale. “Space is radioactive,” noted Van Allen’s colleague Eric Ray, and the military wanted to make it even more radioactive by nuclear detonations that, in time of war might disrupt enemy radio communications from half a world away and damage or destroy enemy intercontinental ballistic missiles. This study of Van Allen’s participation in Project Argus (1958) and Project Starfish (1962) is based on new posthumous accessions to the Van Allen Papers. At the time radio astronomers protested that, “No government has the right to change the environment in any significant way without prior international study and agreement.” Van Allen later regretted his participation in experiments that disrupted the natural magnetosphere. In a larger policy framework, the history of these space interventions and the protests they generated serve as a cautionary tale for today’s geoengineers who are proposing heavy-handed manipulation of the planetary environment as a response to future climate warming. Anyone claiming that geoengineering has not yet been attempted should be reminded of the planetary-scale engineering of these nukes in space. N. Christofilos describing the intended effect of the Argus nuclear explosions on the magnetosphere, which would direct a stream of radioactive particles along magnetic lines of force half a world away.

  12. Computational neuroanatomy: mapping cell-type densities in the mouse brain, simulations from the Allen Brain Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, Pascal

    2015-09-01

    The Allen Brain Atlas of the adult mouse (ABA) consists of digitized expression profiles of thousands of genes in the mouse brain, co-registered to a common three-dimensional template (the Allen Reference Atlas).This brain-wide, genome-wide data set has triggered a renaissance in neuroanatomy. Its voxelized version (with cubic voxels of side 200 microns) is available for desktop computation in MATLAB. On the other hand, brain cells exhibit a great phenotypic diversity (in terms of size, shape and electrophysiological activity), which has inspired the names of some well-studied cell types, such as granule cells and medium spiny neurons. However, no exhaustive taxonomy of brain cell is available. A genetic classification of brain cells is being undertaken, and some cell types have been chraracterized by their transcriptome profiles. However, given a cell type characterized by its transcriptome, it is not clear where else in the brain similar cells can be found. The ABA can been used to solve this region-specificity problem in a data-driven way: rewriting the brain-wide expression profiles of all genes in the atlas as a sum of cell-type-specific transcriptome profiles is equivalent to solving a quadratic optimization problem at each voxel in the brain. However, the estimated brain-wide densities of 64 cell types published recently were based on one series of co-registered coronal in situ hybridization (ISH) images per gene, whereas the online ABA contains several image series per gene, including sagittal ones. In the presented work, we simulate the variability of cell-type densities in a Monte Carlo way by repeatedly drawing a random image series for each gene and solving the optimization problem. This yields error bars on the region-specificity of cell types.

  13. Cytochrome P450-type hydroxylation and epoxidation in a tyrosine-liganded hemoprotein, catalase-related allene oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Boeglin, William E; Brash, Alan R

    2012-07-13

    The ability of hemoproteins to catalyze epoxidation or hydroxylation reactions is usually associated with a cysteine as the proximal ligand to the heme, as in cytochrome P450 or nitric oxide synthase. Catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from the coral Plexaura homomalla, like catalase itself, has tyrosine as the proximal heme ligand. Its natural reaction is to convert 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (8R-HPETE) to an allene epoxide, a reaction activated by the ferric heme, forming product via the Fe(IV)-OH intermediate, Compound II. Here we oxidized cAOS to Compound I (Fe(V)=O) using the oxygen donor iodosylbenzene and investigated the catalytic competence of the enzyme. 8R-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (8R-HETE), the hydroxy analog of the natural substrate, normally unreactive with cAOS, was thereby epoxidized stereospecifically on the 9,10 double bond to form 8R-hydroxy-9R,10R-trans-epoxy-eicosa-5Z,11Z,14Z-trienoic acid as the predominant product; the turnover was 1/s using 100 μm iodosylbenzene. The enantiomer, 8S-HETE, was epoxidized stereospecifically, although with less regiospecificity, and was hydroxylated on the 13- and 16-carbons. Arachidonic acid was converted to two major products, 8R-HETE and 8R,9S-eicosatrienoic acid (8R,9S-EET), plus other chiral monoepoxides and bis-allylic 10S-HETE. Linoleic acid was epoxidized, whereas stearic acid was not metabolized. We conclude that when cAOS is charged with an oxygen donor, it can act as a stereospecific monooxygenase. Our results indicate that in the tyrosine-liganded cAOS, a catalase-related hemoprotein in which a polyunsaturated fatty acid can enter the active site, the enzyme has the potential to mimic the activities of typical P450 epoxygenases and some capabilities of P450 hydroxylases. PMID:22628547

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Christy, R.F.

    1958-07-15

    A nuclear reactor of the homogeneous liquid fuel type is described wherein the fissionable isotope is suspended or dissolved in a liquid moderator such as water. The reactor core is comprised essentially of a spherical vessel for containing the reactive composition surrounded by a reflector, preferably of beryllium oxide. The reactive composition may be an ordinary water solution of a soluble salt of uranium, the quantity of fissionable isotope in solution being sufficient to provide a critical mass in the vessel. The liquid fuel is stored in a tank of non-crtttcal geometry below the reactor vessel and outside of the reflector and is passed from the tank to the vessel through a pipe connecting the two by air pressure means. Neutron absorbing control and safety rods are operated within slots in the reflector adjacent to the vessel.

  15. POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1958-07-01

    A fast nuclear reactor system ls described for producing power and radioactive isotopes. The reactor core is of the heterogeneous, fluid sealed type comprised of vertically arranged elongated tubular fuel elements having vertical coolant passages. The active portion is surrounded by a neutron reflector and a shield. The system includes pumps and heat exchangers for the primary and secondary coolant circuits. The core, primary coolant pump and primary heat exchanger are disposed within an irapenforate tank which is filled with the primary coolant, in this case a liquid metal such as Na or NaK, to completely submerge these elements. The tank is completely surrounded by a thick walled concrete shield. This reactor system utilizes enriched uranium or plutonium as the fissionable material, uranium or thorium as a diluent and thorium or uranium containing less than 0 7% of the U/sup 235/ isotope as a fertile material.

  16. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-10-14

    A method is presented for loading and unloading rod type fuel elements of a neutronic reactor of the heterogeneous, solld moderator, liquid cooled type. In the embodiment illustrated, the fuel rods are disposed in vertical coolant channels in the reactor core. The fuel rods are loaded and unloaded through the upper openings of the channels which are immersed in the coolant liquid, such as water. Unloading is accomplished by means of a coffer dam assembly having an outer sleeve which is placed in sealing relation around the upper opening. A radiation shield sleeve is disposed in and reciprocable through the coffer dam sleeve. A fuel rod engaging member operates through the axial bore in the radiation shield sleeve to withdraw the fuel rod from its position in the reactor coolant channel into the shield, the shield snd rod then being removed. Loading is accomplished in the reverse procedure.

  17. Catalytic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Aaron, Timothy Mark; Shah, Minish Mahendra; Jibb, Richard John

    2009-03-10

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  18. Bioconversion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    McCarty, P.L.; Bachmann, A.

    1992-02-25

    A bioconversion reactor is described for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible. 7 figs.

  19. Bioconversion reactor

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  20. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Nicoll, D.

    1962-04-24

    A control system employed with a high pressure gas cooled reactor in which a control rod is positioned for upward and downward movement into the neutron field from a position beneath the reactor is described. The control rod is positioned by a coupled piston cylinder releasably coupled to a power drive means and the pressurized coolant is directed against the lower side of the piston. The coolant pressure is offset by a higher fiuid pressure applied to the upper surface of the piston and means are provided for releasing the higher pressure on the upper side of the piston so that the pressure of the coolant drives the piston upwardly, forcing the coupled control rod into the ncutron field of the reactor. (AEC)

  1. A tribute to Dr. Robert C. Allen, an inspirational teacher, humanitarian, and friend (Nov. 18, 1950-Mar. 24, 2005).

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Greene, Jill A; Long, William B

    2006-01-01

    Dr. Robert C. Allen was a gifted educator, as well as experienced ophthalmologist, who was a close personal friend of Dr. Edlich at the University of Virginia Health System. While serving on the faculty at the University of Virginia Health System, Dr. Allen proved to be a compassionate physician, who developed close personal relationships with the residents, faculty, and his patients. Dr. Allen was invited by Dr Edlich to be a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Long-Term Effects of Medical Implants. When Dr. Allen told Dr. Edlich that he had ocular melanoma in 2000, this news was a wake-up call to Dr. Edlich on the need to prevent skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Empowered by this news, Dr. Edlich was honored to co-author four articles on skin cancer prevention, as well as the latest article focusing on prevention of ocular melanoma. The Ocular Melanoma Foundation (Richmond, VA (USA)) was founded in 2003 by Dr. Robert C. Allen to increase awareness, enhance education, and provide advocacy among both patients and health care professionals regarding this rare, but potentially lethal cancer. It has a website that provides patient information, up-to-date information and enables communication/ discourse between and among patients and practitioners (admin@ocularmelanoma.org). Dr. Allen died on March 24, 2005, at his home surrounded by family and loved ones. When surgeons are faced with challenging healthcare diseases, Dr. Edlich's mentor, Dr. Owen Wangensteen, advised Dr. Edlich that he should seek the advice and guidance of skilled basic scientists, who are familiar with the problem. Dr. Wangensteen is recognized as the greatest surgical teacher during the 20th century. Consequently, Dr. Edlich enlisted the advice and guidance from the two co-authors of the next article regarding the scientific basis for the selection of sunglasses to prevent the development of cataracts, pterygia, skin cancer, as well as ocular melanoma. Dr. Reichow is a Professor

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Young, G.

    1963-01-01

    This patent covers a power-producing nuclear reactor in which fuel rods of slightly enriched U are moderated by heavy water and cooled by liquid metal. The fuel rods arranged parallel to one another in a circle are contained in a large outer closed-end conduit that extends into a tank containing the heavy water. Liquid metal is introduced into the large conduit by a small inner conduit that extends within the circle of fuel rods to a point near the lower closed end of the outer conduit. (AEC) Production Reactors

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Weinberg, A.W.; Young, G.J.

    1958-04-15

    A nuclear reactor which uses uranium in the form of elongated tubes as fuel elements and liquid as a coolant is described. Elongated tubular uranium bodies are vertically disposed in an efficient neutron slowing agent, such as graphite, for example, to form a lattice structure which is disposed between upper and lower coolant tanks. Fluid coolant tubes extend through the uranium bodies and communicate with the upper and lower tanks and serve to convey the coolant through the uranium body. The reactor is also provided with means for circulating the cooling fluid through the coolant tanks and coolant tubes, suitable neutron and gnmma ray shields, and control means.

  4. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.; Babcock, Dale F.; Menegus, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  5. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wende, Charles W. J.

    1976-08-17

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield.

  6. Sonochemical Reactors.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation. PMID:27573503

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1960-09-27

    A unit assembly is described for a neutronic reactor comprising a tube and plurality of spaced parallel sandwiches in the tube extending lengthwise thereof, each sandwich including a middle plate having a central opening for plutonium and other openings for fertile material at opposite ends of the plate.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  9. Neutronic reactor

    DOEpatents

    Carleton, John T.

    1977-01-25

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wade, E.J.

    1958-09-16

    This patent relates to a reflector means for a neutronic reactor. A reflector comprised of a plurality of vertically movable beryllium control members is provided surrounding the sides of the reactor core. An absorber of fast neutrons comprised of natural uramum surrounds the reflector. An absorber of slow neutrons surrounds the absorber of fast neutrons and is formed of a plurality of beryllium blocks having natural uranium members distributcd therethrough. in addition, a movable body is positioned directly below the core and is comprised of a beryllium reflector and an absorbing member attached to the botiom thereof, the absorbing member containing a substance selected from the goup consisting of natural urantum and Th/sup 232/.

  11. REACTOR MONITORING

    DOEpatents

    Bugbee, S.J.; Hanson, V.F.; Babcock, D.F.

    1959-02-01

    A neutron density inonitoring means for reactors is described. According to this invention a tunnel is provided beneath and spaced from the active portion of the reactor and extends beyond the opposite faces of the activc portion. Neutron beam holes are provided between the active portion and the tunnel and open into the tunnel near the middle thereof. A carriage operates back and forth in the tunnel and is adapted to convey a neutron detector, such as an ion chamber, and position it beneath one of the neutron beam holes. This arrangement affords convenient access of neutron density measuring instruments to a location wherein direct measurement of neutron density within the piles can be made and at the same time affords ample protection to operating personnel.

  12. REACTOR UNLOADING

    DOEpatents

    Leverett, M.C.

    1958-02-18

    This patent is related to gas cooled reactors wherein the fuel elements are disposed in vertical channels extending through the reactor core, the cooling gas passing through the channels from the bottom to the top of the core. The invention is a means for unloading the fuel elements from the core and comprises dump values in the form of flat cars mounted on wheels at the bottom of the core structure which support vertical stacks of fuel elements. When the flat cars are moved, either manually or automatically, for normal unloading purposes, or due to a rapid rise in the reproduction ratio within the core, the fuel elements are permtted to fall by gravity out of the core structure thereby reducing the reproduction ratio or stopping the reaction as desired.

  13. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wade, Elman E.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor including two rotatable plugs and a positive top core holddown structure. The top core holddown structure is divided into two parts: a small core cover, and a large core cover. The small core cover, and the upper internals associated therewith, are attached to the small rotating plug, and the large core cover, with its associated upper internals, is attached to the large rotating plug. By so splitting the core holddown structures, under-the-plug refueling is accomplished without the necessity of enlarging the reactor pressure vessel to provide a storage space for the core holddown structure during refueling. Additionally, the small and large rotating plugs, and their associated core covers, are arranged such that the separation of the two core covers to permit rotation is accomplished without the installation of complex lifting mechanisms.

  14. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-08-19

    A neuclear reactor is described of the heterogeneous type and employing replaceable tubular fuel elements and heavy water as a coolant and moderator. A pluraltty of fuel tubesa having their axes parallel, extend through a tank type pressure vessel which contatns the liquid moderator. The fuel elements are disposed within the fuel tubes in the reaetive portion of the pressure vessel during normal operation and the fuel tubes have removable plug members at each end to permit charging and discharging of the fuel elements. The fuel elements are cylindrical strands of jacketed fissionable material having helical exterior ribs. A bundle of fuel elements are held within each fuel tube with their longitudinal axes parallel, the ribs serving to space them apart along their lengths. Coolant liquid is circulated through the fuel tubes between the spaced fuel elements. Suitable control rod and monitoring means are provided for controlling the reactor.

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1959-12-15

    A reactor which is particularly adapted tu serve as a heat source for a nuclear powered alrcraft or rocket is described. The core of this reactor consists of a porous refractory modera;or body which is impregnated with fissionable nuclei. The core is designed so that its surface forms tapered inlet and outlet ducts which are separated by the porous moderator body. In operation a gaseous working fluid is circulated through the inlet ducts to the surface of the moderator, enters and passes through the porous body, and is heated therein. The hot gas emerges into the outlet ducts and is available to provide thrust. The principle advantage is that tremendous quantities of gas can be quickly heated without suffering an excessive pressure drop.

  16. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Koch, L.J.; Rice, R.E. Jr.; Denst, A.A.; Rogers, A.J.; Novick, M.

    1961-12-01

    An active portion assembly for a fast neutron reactor is described wherein physical distortions resulting in adverse changes in the volume-to-mass ratio are minimized. A radially expandable locking device is disposed within a cylindrical tube within each fuel subassembly within the active portion assembly, and clamping devices expandable toward the center of the active portion assembly are disposed around the periphery thereof. (AEC)

  17. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashby, J.W.

    1958-09-16

    ABS>A graphite moderator structure is presented for a nuclear reactor compriscd of an assembly of similarly orientated prismatic graphite blocks arranged on spaced longitudinal axes lying in common planes wherein the planes of the walls of the blocks are positioned so as to be twisted reintive to the planes of said axes so thatthe unlmpeded dtrect paths in direction wholly across the walls of the blocks are limited to the width of the blocks plus spacing between the blocks.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Grebe, J.J.

    1961-01-24

    A core structure for neutronic reactors adapted for the propulsion of aircraft and rockets is offered. The core is designed for cooling by gaseous media, and comprises a plurality of hollow tapered tubular segments of a porous moderating material impregniated with fissionable fuel nested about a common axis. Alternate ends of the segments are joined. In operation a coolant gas passes through the porous structure and is heated.

  19. REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Ruano, W.J.

    1957-12-10

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which utilize elongited rod type fuel elements immersed in a liquid moderator and shows a design whereby control of the chain reaction is obtained by varying the amount of moderator or reflector material. A central tank for containing liquid moderator and fuel elements immersed therein is disposed within a surrounding outer tank providing an annular space between the two tanks. This annular space is filled with liquid moderator which functions as a reflector to reflect neutrons back into the central reactor tank to increase the reproduction ratio. Means are provided for circulating and cooling the moderator material in both tanks and additional means are provided for controlling separately the volume of moderator in each tank, which latter means may be operated automatically by a neutron density monitoring device. The patent also shows an arrangement for controlling the chain reaction by injecting and varying an amount of poisoning material in the moderator used in the reflector portion of the reactor.

  20. Deeper and earlier penetrations of oxygen ions than protons into the inner magnetosphere Observed by Van Allen probes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitani, K.; Seki, K.; Keika, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    It is observationally known that proton and oxygen ions are main components of the ring current during magnetic storms and that the proton and oxygen ions are considered to have different source and supply mechanisms. However, detailed properties of the ion supply and their dependence on ion species is far from well understood. To characterize the ion supply to the ring current during magnetic storms, we report studies of the properties of energetic proton and oxygen ion phase space densities (PSDs) during the April 23-25, 2013, geomagnetic storm observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. We used energetic ion (~50 - ~600keV protons, ~140 - ~1100keV oxygen) and magnetic field data obtained by the RBSPICE and EMFISIS, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes. We calculated ion PSDs for the specific first adiabatic invariant, mu (0.3 < mu < 12 keV/nT), and ion pitch angles near 90 degrees as a function of L for each spacecraft orbit. The results show that both proton and oxygen ions penetrated directly to L<5 during the main phase of the magnetic storm. Protons with smaller mu values (mu = 0.3 and 0.5 keV/nT) penetrated earlier than those with larger mu values (mu = 1.0 keV/nT). This result appears consistent with the energy dependence of the Alfven layer. The timing of oxygen ion penetration is approximately the same for all mu values (mu = 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 keV/nT). The observations also show that oxygen ions penetrated more deeply in L and earlier in time than protons for the same mu value (mu = 1.0keV/nT). These results suggest that the source of the transported oxygen ions is located closer to the Earth than the inner edge of protons. The results imply the importance of the contribution from subauroral oxygen ions to the storm-time ring current. We will also discuss the possibility of non-adiabatic acceleration of oxygen ions in the inner magnetosphere.

  1. Primary and secondary particle contributions to the depth dose distribution in a phantom shielded from solar flare and Van Allen protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Claiborne, H. C.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been made using the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC to estimate the absorbed dose and dose equivalent distributions in astronauts inside space vehicles bombarded by solar flare and Van Allen protons. A spherical shell shield of specific radius and thickness with a 30-cm-diam. tissue ball at the geometric center was used to simulate the spacecraft-astronaut configuration. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent from primary protons, secondary protons, heavy nuclei, charged pions, muons, photons, and positrons and electrons are given as a function of depth in the tissue phantom. Results are given for solar flare protons with a characteristic rigidity of 100 MV and for Van Allen protons in a 240-nautical-mile circular orbit at 30 degree inclination angle incident on both 20-g/sq cm-thick aluminum and polyethylene spherical shell shields.

  2. Investigating geomagnetic activity dependent sources of 100s of keV electrons in Earth's inner radiation belt using Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. L.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    By providing an unprecedented level of reliability in particle flux observations at low L-shells, NASA's Van Allen Probes mission has yielded a series of discoveries and unanswered questions concerning the inner electron radiation belt. Two such discoveries are: 1) a sharp cutoff in the energy distribution of electrons at ~900 keV, such that fluxes of electrons with energies greater than ~900 keV are below the detectability threshold of the Van Allen Probes' MagEIS instruments and consistent with upper flux limits of multi-MeV electrons calculated using the Van Allen Probes' REPT instruments, and 2) that impulsive injections of up to several hundred keV electrons may act as an activity-dependent source of electrons in the slot and inner radiation belt. In this presentation, we discuss results from phase space density (PSD) analysis of inner zone electrons. Such analysis, which examines PSD as a function of the three adiabatic invariants, effectively removes adiabatic variations in the particle observations allowing one to better identify source and loss processes ongoing in the system. We demonstrate that impulsive injections do indeed act as a source of inner radiation belt electrons and, when combined with losses in the slot region, can result in peaked radial distributions of electron PSD in the inner zone. We briefly discuss the nature of these low-L injections, which penetrate inside the plasmasphere and display strong energy and species dependencies. By examining such injections throughout the Van Allen Probes era, we also i) determine the occurrence rate of injections as a function of electron energy (and first adiabatic invariant), geomagnetic activity level, and L-shell; ii) estimate the contribution of such injections to the inner belt population; and iii) investigate how such injections disrupt coherent banded flux structures in the inner zone known as "zebra stripes".

  3. The Role of ULF Waves in Ring Current and Radiation Belt Dynamics as Revealed by NASA's Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudepierre, S. G.; Mann, I. R.; Takahashi, K.; Toffoletto, F. R.; Wiltberger, M. J.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Fennell, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Van Allen Probes have been on orbit since late-August 2012, precessing through all local times over the first two years of the mission, returning high-quality wave and particle observations in the near-Earth space environment. The Probes reveal radiation belt and ring current dynamics with unrivaled accuracy and resolution, providing unambiguous evidence of resonant wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere (e.g., L<7). It is well known that a class of such wave-particle interactions, namely ultra-low frequency (ULF; ~1-10 mHz) wave interactions, contribute to the radial transport of electrons and protons in this region and thus, the large-scale, global morphology of the radiation belts. We focus our investigations on observations of drift-resonance with shock-induced ULF waves, drift-resonance with localized, monochromatic ULF waves, and ULF fluctuations related to nightside particle injections. We also discuss recent advances in the modeling of ULF waves and the challenges that lie ahead.

  4. Empirical modeling of the storm time innermost magnetosphere using Van Allen Probes and THEMIS data: Eastward and banana currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Roelof, E. C.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; Le, G.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of storm time currents in the inner magnetosphere, including its innermost region inside 4RE, is studied for the first time using a modification of the empirical geomagnetic field model TS07D and new data from Van Allen Probes and Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms missions. It is shown that the model, which uses basis-function expansions instead of ad hoc current modules to approximate the magnetic field, consistently improves its resolution and magnetic field reconstruction with the increase of the number of basis functions and resolves the spatial structure and evolution of the innermost eastward current. This includes a connection between the westward ring current flowing largely at and the eastward ring current concentrated at resulting in a vortex current pattern. A similar pattern coined `banana current' was previously inferred from the pressure distributions based on the energetic neutral atom imaging and first-principles ring current simulations. The morphology of the equatorial currents is dependent on storm phase. During the main phase, it is complex, with several asymmetries forming banana currents. Near SYM-H minimum, the banana current is strongest, is localized in the evening-midnight sector, and is more structured compared to the main phase. It then weakens during the recovery phase resulting in the equatorial currents to become mostly azimuthally symmetric.

  5. Lightning VLF wave propagation from source, through ionosphere to inner magnetosphere using WWLLN and Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Holzworth, R. H.; Brundell, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.; Mozer, F.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Jacobson, A. R.; Hutchins, M. L.; Bonnell, J. W.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Lightning produces strong broadband radio waves, called "sferics", which propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and are detected thousands kilometers away from their source. Global real-time detection of lightning strokes including their time, location and energy, is conducted with the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). In the ionosphere, these sferics couple into very low frequency (VLF) whistler waves which propagate obliquely to the Earth's magnetic field. Lightning generated VLF whistler dispersion in the ionosphere has been previously observed both from thunderstorm rockets and low altitude satellites. Previous studies also show a clear match and related attenuation between sferics detected by WWLLN and VLF whistlers observed by C/NOFS satellite. This global study can now be expanded to the magnetosphere using data from the Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP)) with high sampling rates for vector electric and magnetic fields, and extended altitude cover from ~600km to ~5 Re above the ground. In our work, we will show the one-to-one coincidence between WWLLN sferics and RBSP VLF whistlers. This talk will explore the relationship between these one to one lightning whistler waves with stimulated emissions such as lower hybrid waves, and possible energy deposition as the large amplitude lightning whistlers propagate into the outer magnetosphere.

  6. The two last overviews by Colin Allen Wraight (1945-2014) on energy conversion in photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maróti, Péter; Govindjee

    2016-02-01

    Colin Allen Wraight (1945-2014) was a well-known biophysicist and biochemist of our times-formerly Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Plant Biology, and Head of the Department of Biochemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. (See a detailed Tribute to him by Govindjee et al., Photosynth Res, 2015.) During the latter part of his life, Colin had (1) given an excellent lecture in 2008 on the overall topic of the molecular mechanisms in biological energy conversion, focusing on how an ubiquinone is reduced to ubiquinol at the so-called "two electron gate", and (2) presented a review poster on the design features of long distance proton transport in biological systems, with focus on photosynthetic bacteria (a pdf file of the original is available from one of us, Govindjee). We present here for historical purpose, a complete transcript of his 2008 lecture and his 2013 poster, which have been annotated and expanded by the authors of this paper. The major theme is: electron and proton transfer in biological systems, with emphasis on bacterial reaction centers. The figures, some of which were prepared by us, are presented in sequence for both the lecture and the poster. A common bibliography is provided at the end of the paper, which is divided into two parts: (I) The Lecture; and (II) The Poster. PMID:26216496

  7. Simulations of inner magnetosphere dynamics with an expanded RAM-SCB model and comparisons with Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Yu, Y.; Niehof, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Fennell, J. F.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-04-01

    Simulations from our newly expanded ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB), now valid out to 9 RE, are compared for the first time with Van Allen Probes observations. The expanded model reproduces the storm time ring current buildup due to the increased convection and inflow of plasma from the magnetotail. It matches Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) observations of the trapped high-energy (>50 keV) ion flux; however, it underestimates the low-energy (<10 keV) Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) observations. The dispersed injections of ring current ions observed with the Energetic particle, Composition, and Thermal plasma (ECT) suite at high (>20 keV) energy are better reproduced using a high-resolution convection model. In agreement with Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations, RAM-SCB indicates that the large-scale magnetic field is depressed as close as ˜4.5 RE during even a moderate storm. Regions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability are predicted on the duskside from ˜6 to ˜9 RE, indicating that previous studies confined to geosynchronous orbit may have underestimated their scattering effect on the energetic particles.

  8. ELF/VLF wave propagation at subauroral latitudes: Conjugate observation between the ground and Van Allen Probes A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Calderon, Claudia; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Keika, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Schofield, Ian; Connors, Martin; Kletzing, Craig; Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolik, Ondrej; Kurth, William S.

    2016-06-01

    We report simultaneous observation of ELF/VLF emissions, showing similar spectral and frequency features, between a VLF receiver at Athabasca (ATH), Canada, (L = 4.3) and Van Allen Probes A (Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) A). Using a statistical database from 1 November 2012 to 31 October 2013, we compared a total of 347 emissions observed on the ground with observations made by RBSP in the magnetosphere. On 25 February 2013, from 12:46 to 13:39 UT in the dawn sector (04-06 magnetic local time (MLT)), we observed a quasiperiodic (QP) emission centered at 4 kHz, and an accompanying short pulse lasting less than a second at 4.8 kHz in the dawn sector (04-06 MLT). RBSP A wave data showed both emissions as right-hand polarized with their Poynting vector earthward to the Northern Hemisphere. Using cross-correlation analysis, we did, for the first time, time delay analysis of a conjugate ELF/VLF event between ground and space, finding +2 to +4 s (ATH first) for the QP and -3 s (RBSP A first) for the pulse. Using backward tracing from ATH to the geomagnetic equator and forward tracing from the equator to RBSP A, based on plasmaspheric density observed by the spacecraft, we validate a possible propagation path for the QP emission which is consistent with the observed time delay.

  9. Large-amplitude electric fields in the inner magnetosphere: Van Allen Probes observations of subauroral polarization streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Wolf, R. A.; Zhao, H.; Jaynes, A. N.; Wilder, F. D.; Malaspina, D. M.; Redmon, R.

    2016-06-01

    The subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) is an important magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI) coupling phenomenon that impacts a range of particle populations in the inner magnetosphere. SAPS studies often emphasize ionospheric signatures of fast westward flows, but the equatorial magnetosphere is also affected through strong radial electric fields in the dusk sector. This study focuses on a period of steady southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) during the 29 June 2013 geomagnetic storm where the Van Allen Probes observe a region of intense electric fields near the plasmapause over multiple consecutive outbound duskside passes. We show that the large-amplitude electric fields near the equatorial plane are consistent with SAPS by investigating the relationship between plasma sheet ion and electron boundaries, associated field-aligned currents, and the spatial location of the electric fields. By incorporating high-inclination DMSP data we demonstrate the spatial and temporal variability of the SAPS region, and we suggest that discrete, earthward propagating injections are driving the observed strong electric fields at low L shells in the equatorial magnetosphere. We also show the relationship between SAPS and plasmasphere erosion, as well as a possible correlation with flux enhancements for 100s keV electrons.

  10. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-01

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ˜ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ˜40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ˜3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  11. Statistical properties of plasmaspheric hiss derived from Van Allen Probes data and their effects on radiation belt electron dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Nishimura, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss is known to play an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of radiation belt electrons inside the plasmasphere. Using newly available Van Allen Probes wave data, which provide excellent coverage in the entire inner magnetosphere, we evaluate the global distribution of the hiss wave frequency spectrum and wave intensity for different levels of substorm activity. Our statistical results show that observed hiss peak frequencies are generally lower than the commonly adopted value (~550 Hz), which was in frequent use, and that the hiss wave power frequently extends below 100 Hz, particularly at larger L shells (> ~3) on the dayside during enhanced levels of substorm activity. We also compare electron pitch angle scattering rates caused by hiss using the new statistical frequency spectrum and the previously adopted Gaussian spectrum and find that the differences are up to a factor of ~5 and are dependent on energy and L shell. Moreover, the new statistical hiss wave frequency spectrum including wave power below 100 Hz leads to increased pitch angle scattering rates by a factor of ~1.5 for electrons above ~100 keV at L~5, although their effect is negligible at L ≤ 3. Consequently, we suggest that the new realistic hiss wave frequency spectrum should be incorporated into future modeling of radiation belt electron dynamics.

  12. Modeling gradual diffusion changes in radiation belt electron phase space density for the March 2013 Van Allen Probes case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; Hudson, Mary; Jaynes, Allison; Boyd, Alexander; Malaspina, David; Thaller, Scott; Wygant, John; Henderson, Michael

    2014-10-01

    March 2013 provided the first equinoctial period when all of the instruments on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft were fully operational. This interval was characterized by disturbances of outer zone electrons with two time scales of variation, diffusive and rapid dropout and restoration. A radial diffusion model was applied to the monthlong interval to confirm that electron phase space density is well described by radial diffusion for the whole month at low first invariant ≤ 400 MeV/G but peaks in phase space density observed by the Energetic Particle, Composition, and Thermal Plasma (ECT) instrument suite at higher first invariant are not reproduced by radial transport from a source at higher L. The model does well for much of the monthlong interval, capturing three of four enhancements in phase space density which emerge from the outer boundary, while the strong enhancement following dropout on 17-18 March requires local acceleration at higher first invariant (M=1000 MeV/G versus 200 MeV/G) not included in our model. We have incorporated phase space density from ECT measurement at the outer boundary and plasmapause determination from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument to separate hiss and chorus loss models.

  13. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr<Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr≃Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties. PMID:26167433

  14. Intense low-frequency chorus waves observed by Van Allen Probes: Fine structures and potential effect on radiation belt electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhonglei; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Shen, Chao; Wang, Shui

    2016-02-01

    Frequency distribution is a vital factor in determining the contribution of whistler mode chorus to radiation belt electron dynamics. Chorus is usually considered to occur in the frequency range 0.1-0.8fce_eq (with the equatorial electron gyrofrequency fce_eq). We here report an event of intense low-frequency chorus with nearly half of wave power distributed below 0.1fce_eq observed by Van Allen Probe A on 27 August 2014. This emission propagated quasi-parallel to the magnetic field and exhibited hiss-like signatures most of the time. The low-frequency chorus can produce the rapid loss of low-energy (˜0.1 MeV) electrons, different from the normal chorus. For high-energy (≥0.5 MeV) electrons, the low-frequency chorus can yield comparable momentum diffusion to that of the normal chorus but much stronger (up to 2 orders of magnitude) pitch angle diffusion near the loss cone.

  15. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more » Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  16. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Spence, Harlan E.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  17. Charged Particle Behavior in the Growth and Damping Stages of Ultralow Frequency Waves: Theory and Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Zhou, X.; Zong, Q.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations in the magnetosphere can accelerate electrons via a process called drift resonance. In the conventional drift-resonance theory [Southwood & Kivelson, 1981], a default assumption is that the wave growth rate is time-independent, positive, and extremely small. However, this may not be always the case in the magnetosphere. The ULF waves should have experienced a growth stage when their energy was taken from external and/or internal sources, and as time progresses the waves have to be damped with a negative growth rate. Therefore, a more generalized theory on particle behavior during different stages of ULF waves is required. In this paper, we introduce a time-dependent imaginary wave frequency to accommodate the growth and damping of the waves in the conventional drift-resonance theory, to study the particle interactions with the waves during the entire wave lifespan. We then predict from the generalized theory the particle signatures for different stages of the waves, which agree very well with Van Allen Probe observations. The more generalized theory, therefore, provides a new understanding of wave-particle interactions and ULF wave evolution in the magnetosphere.

  18. Charged particle behavior in the growth and damping stages of ultralow frequency waves: Theory and Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Wang, Zi-Han; Zong, Qiu-Gang; Rankin, Robert; Kivelson, Margaret G.; Chen, Xing-Ran; Blake, J. Bernard; Wygant, John R.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-04-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) electromagnetic waves in Earth's magnetosphere can accelerate charged particles via a process called drift resonance. In the conventional drift resonance theory, a default assumption is that the wave growth rate is time independent, positive, and extremely small. However, this is not the case for ULF waves in the real magnetosphere. The ULF waves must have experienced an earlier growth stage when their energy was taken from external and/or internal sources, and as time proceeds the waves have to be damped with a negative growth rate. Therefore, a more generalized theory on particle behavior during different stages of ULF wave evolution is required. In this paper, we introduce a time-dependent imaginary wave frequency to accommodate the growth and damping of the waves in the drift resonance theory, so that the wave-particle interactions during the entire wave lifespan can be studied. We then predict from the generalized theory particle signatures during different stages of the wave evolution, which are consistent with observations from Van Allen Probes. The more generalized theory, therefore, provides new insights into ULF wave evolution and wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere.

  19. The occurrence, spatial distribution, and wave properties of hydrogen-, helium-, and oxygen-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A.; Zhang, J.; Allen, R. C.; Smith, C. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C.; Jordanova, V.

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the overall dynamics of the Earth's magnetosphere, including the energization and loss of particles. We perform a statistical study of EMIC waves detected by the Van Allen Probes mission to investigate their occurrence, spatial distribution, and properties (e.g., wave power, normal angle, and ellipticity). Magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) onboard Van Allen Probes are used to identify EMIC wave events from the beginning of the mission (September, 2012) to the present. EMIC waves are examined in hydrogen, helium and oxygen bands. So far, about 280 EMIC wave events have been identified over the three different bands. Preliminary results show that hydrogen-band EMIC waves have been primarily observed in the dusk sector, while helium-band EMIC waves have been observed in all Magnetic Local Times (MLTs). Particularly, the Van Allen Probes provide a better resolution of lower frequencies (0.2-0.9 Hz), within which oxygen-band EMIC waves can occur in the inner magnetosphere. This allows us to obtain better insight into the characteristics of this previously largely unavailable band of EMIC waves, and allows for comparisons amongst EMIC waves in different bands.

  20. Storm-time response of the Van Allen radiation belts organized by the large-scale solar wind drivers, energy and distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, Heli; Kilpua, Emilia; Turner, Drew

    2016-04-01

    We study the response of the Van Allen radiation belts during geomagnetic storms. A combination of the long-term geosynchronous observations from GOES (> 2.5 MeV) and energy (tens of keV to 2 MeV) and L-shell (2.5 < L < 6.0) resolved Van Allen Probe observations are used. We demonstrate that the radiation belt response (depletion, no-change, increase) is organized by the large-scale solar wind driver (coronal mass ejection ejecta/sheath, slow-fast stream interface region, fast stream) and that the response is highly dependent on both the electron energy and the L-shell. In addition, we show detailed Van Allen Probe observations from two geomagnetic storms that occurred during two consecutive Carrington rotations of the solar maximum year 2015. Both of these storms involved a slow-fast stream interaction region and a fast stream originating from the same coronal hole. However, the first storm also included a large-scale coronal mass ejection. We study in particular how the added presence of this coronal mass ejection affected the dynamics of the radiation belts.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of allene oxide synthase, cytochrome P450 CYP74A2, from Parthenium argentatum

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Zhenzhan; Li, Lenong; Pan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2008-07-01

    Allene oxide synthase, an atypical cytochrome P450 from Parthenium argentatum, was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Oxylipins are oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids and pivotal signaling molecules in plants and animals. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a key cytochrome P450 CYP74 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of plant oxylipin jasmonates to convert 13(S)-hydroperoxide to allene oxide. Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) AOS, CYP74A2, was expressed in Escherichia coli. Protein was purified using affinity chromatography and size exclusion chromatography, and then crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained from 0.2 M (NH{sub 4})H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}, 50% MPD, 0.1 M Tris, pH 8.5 at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray analysis was carried out, and the crystals were found to belong to the tetragonal space group I422 with cell parameters a = b = 126.5, c = 163.9 Å, and the monoclinic space group C2 with cell parameters a = 336.5, b = 184.2, c = 159.0 Å, β = 118.6°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution from a tetragonal form of crystal using a home X-ray source.

  2. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Rowan, William J.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assmblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters and the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters and the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance.

  3. Nuclear Reactors. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Among the topics discussed are: How Reactors Work; Reactor Design; Research, Teaching, and Materials Testing; Reactors (Research, Teaching and Materials); Production Reactors; Reactors for Electric Power…

  4. ELECTRONUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Lawrence, E.O.; McMillan, E.M.; Alvarez, L.W.

    1960-04-19

    An electronuclear reactor is described in which a very high-energy particle accelerator is employed with appropriate target structure to produce an artificially produced material in commercial quantities by nuclear transformations. The principal novelty resides in the combination of an accelerator with a target for converting the accelerator beam to copious quantities of low-energy neutrons for absorption in a lattice of fertile material and moderator. The fertile material of the lattice is converted by neutron absorption reactions to an artificially produced material, e.g., plutonium, where depleted uranium is utilized as the fertile material.

  5. NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Long, E.; Ashley, J.W.

    1958-12-16

    A graphite moderator structure is described for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor having a vertical orlentation wherein the structure is physically stable with regard to dlmensional changes due to Wigner growth properties of the graphite, and leakage of coolant gas along spaces in the structure is reduced. The structure is comprised of stacks of unlform right prismatic graphite blocks positioned in layers extending in the direction of the lengths of the blocks, the adjacent end faces of the blocks being separated by pairs of tiles. The blocks and tiles have central bores which are in alignment when assembled and are provided with cooperatlng keys and keyways for physical stability.

  6. REACTOR COMPONETN

    DOEpatents

    Creutz, E.C.

    1959-10-27

    A reactor fuel element comprised of a slug of fissionable material disposed in a sheath of corrosion resistantmaterial is described. The sheath is in the form of a tubular container closed at one end and is in tight-fitting engagement with the peripheral sunface of the slug. An inner cap is insented into the open end of the sheath against the slug, which end is then bent around the inner cap and welded thereto. An outer cap is then welded around its peripheny to the bent portion of the container.

  7. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOEpatents

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  8. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  9. Control Means for Reactor

    DOEpatents

    Manley, J. H.

    1961-06-27

    An apparatus for controlling a nuclear reactor includes a tank just below the reactor, tubes extending from the tank into the reactor, and a thermally expansible liquid neutron absorbent material in the tank. The liquid in the tank is exposed to a beam of neutrons from the reactor which heats the liquid causing it to expand into the reactor when the neutron flux in the reactor rises above a predetermincd danger point. Boron triamine may be used for this purpose.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Daniels, F.

    1962-12-18

    A power plant is described comprising a turbine and employing round cylindrical fuel rods formed of BeO and UO/sub 2/ and stacks of hexagonal moderator blocks of BeO provided with passages that loosely receive the fuel rods so that coolant may flow through the passages over the fuels to remove heat. The coolant may be helium or steam and fiows through at least one more heat exchanger for producing vapor from a body of fluid separate from the coolant, which fluid is to drive the turbine for generating electricity. By this arrangement the turbine and directly associated parts are free of particles and radiations emanating from the reactor. (AEC)

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1957-09-17

    A reactor of the type having coolant liquid circulated through clad fuel elements geometrically arranged in a solid moderator, such as graphite, is described. The core is enclosed in a pressure vessel and suitable shielding, wherein means is provided for circulating vapor through the core to superheat the same. This is accomplished by drawing off the liquid which has been heated in the core due to the fission of the fuel, passing it to a nozzle within a chamber where it flashes into a vapor, and then passing the vapor through separate tubes extending through the moderator to pick up more heat developed in the core due to the fission of the fuel, thereby producing superheated vapor.

  12. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Stewart, H.B.

    1958-12-23

    A nuclear reactor of the type speclfically designed for the irradiation of materials is discussed. In this design a central cyllndrical core of moderating material ls surrounded by an active portlon comprlsed of an annular tank contalning fissionable material immersed ln a liquid moderator. The active portion ls ln turn surrounded by a reflector, and a well ls provided in the center of the core to accommodate the materlals to be irradiated. The over-all dimensions of the core ln at least one plane are equal to or greater than twice the effective slowing down length and equal to or less than twlce the effective diffuslon length for neutrons in the core materials.

  13. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Yant, Howard W.; Stinebiser, Karl W.; Anzur, Gregory C.

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid-metal breeder reactor, whose upper internals include outlet modules for channeling the liquid-metal coolant from selected areas of the outlet of the core vertically to the outlet plenum. The modules are composed of a highly-refractory, high corrosion-resistant alloy, for example, INCONEL-718. Each module is disposed to confine and channel generally vertically the coolant emitted from a subplurality of core-component assemblies. Each module has a grid with openings, each opening disposed to receive the coolant from an assembly of the subplurality. The grid in addition serves as a holdown for the assemblies of the corresponding subplurality preventing their excessive ejection upwardly from the core. In the region directly over the core the outlet modules are of such peripheral form that they nest forming a continuum over the core-component assemblies whose outlet coolant they confine. Each subassembly includes a chimney which confines the coolant emitted by its corresponding subassemblies to generally vertical flow between the outlet of the core and the outlet plenum. Each subplurality of assemblies whose emitted coolant is confined by an outlet module includes assemblies which emit lower-temperature coolant, for example, a control-rod assembly, or fertile assemblies, and assemblies which emit coolant of substantially higher temperature, for example, fuel-rod assemblies. The coolants of different temperatures are mixed in the chimneys reducing the effect of stripping (hot-cold temperature fluctuations) on the remainder of the upper internals which are composed typically of AISI-304 or AISI-316 stainless steel.

  14. Survey of radiation belt energetic electron pitch angle distributions based on the Van Allen Probes MagEIS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run; Summers, Danny; Ni, Binbin; Fennell, Joseph F.; Blake, J. Bernard; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2016-02-01

    A statistical survey of electron pitch angle distributions (PADs) is performed based on the pitch angle-resolved flux observations from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) instrument on board the Van Allen Probes during the period from 1 October 2012 to 1 May 2015. By fitting the measured PADs to a sinnα form, where α is the local pitch angle and n is the power law index, we investigate the dependence of PADs on electron kinetic energy, magnetic local time (MLT), the geomagnetic Kp index, and L shell. The difference in electron PADs between the inner and outer belt is distinct. In the outer belt, the common averaged n values are less than 1.5, except for large values of the Kp index and high electron energies. The averaged n values vary considerably with MLT, with a peak in the afternoon sector and an increase with increasing L shell. In the inner belt, the averaged n values are much larger, with a common value greater than 2. The PADs show a slight dependence on MLT, with a weak maximum at noon. A distinct region with steep PADs lies in the outer edge of the inner belt where the electron flux is relatively low. The distance between the inner and outer belt and the intensity of the geomagnetic activity together determine the variation of PADs in the inner belt. Besides being dependent on electron energy, magnetic activity, and L shell, the results show a clear dependence on MLT, with higher n values on the dayside.

  15. Occurrence characteristics of outer zone relativistic electron butterfly distribution: A survey of Van Allen Probes REPT measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Binbin; Zou, Zhengyang; Li, Xinlin; Bortnik, Jacob; Xie, Lun; Gu, Xudong

    2016-06-01

    Using Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) pitch angle resolved electron flux data from September 2012 to March 2015, we investigate in detail the global occurrence pattern of equatorial (|λ| ≤ 3°) butterfly distribution of outer zone relativistic electrons and its potential correlation with the solar wind dynamic pressure. The statistical results demonstrate that these butterfly distributions occur with the highest occurrence rate ~ 80% at ~ 20-04 magnetic local time (MLT) and L > ~ 5.5 and with the second peak (> ~ 50%) at ~ 11-15 MLT of lower L shells ~ 4.0. They can also extend to L = 3.5 and to other MLT intervals but with the occurrence rates predominantly < ~25%. It is further shown that outer zone relativistic electron butterfly distributions are likely to peak between 58° and 79° for L = 4.0 and 5.0 and between 37° and 58° for L = 6.0, regardless of the level of solar wind dynamic pressure. Relativistic electron butterfly distributions at L = 4.0 also exhibit a pronounced day-night asymmetry in response to the Pdyn variations. Compared to the significant L shell and MLT dependence of the global occurrence pattern, outer zone relativistic electron butterfly distributions show much less but still discernable sensitivity to Pdyn, geomagnetic activity level, and electron energy, the full understanding of which requires future attempts of detailed simulations that combine and differentiate underlying physical mechanisms of the geomagnetic field asymmetry and scattering by various magnetospheric waves.

  16. EVALUATING THE CALORIMETER MODEL WITH BROADBAND, CONTINUOUS SPECTRA OF STARBURST GALAXIES OBSERVED WITH THE ALLEN TELESCOPE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Bower, Geoffrey C. E-mail: gbower@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-02-20

    Although the relationship between the far-infrared and centimeter-wave radio luminosities of normal galaxies is one of the most striking correlations in astronomy, a solid understanding of its physical basis is lacking. In one interpretation, the 'calorimeter model', rapid synchrotron cooling of cosmic ray electrons is essential in reproducing the observed linear relationship. Observed radio spectra, however, are shallower than what is expected of cooled synchrotron emission. In 2006, Thompson et al. presented a simple parameterized model to explain how relatively shallow observed spectra might arise even in the presence of rapid synchrotron cooling by accounting for ionization losses and other cooling mechanisms. During the commissioning of the 42 element Allen Telescope Array (ATA), we observed the starburst galaxies M82, NGC 253, and Arp 220 at frequencies ranging from 1 to 7 GHz, obtaining unprecedented broadband continuous radio spectra of these sources. We combine our observations with high-frequency data from the literature to separate the spectra into thermal and nonthermal components. The nonthermal components all steepen in the centimeter-wave regime and cannot be well modeled as simple power laws. The model of Thompson et al. is consistent with our M82 results when plausible parameters are chosen, and our results in fact significantly shrink the space of allowed model parameters. The model is only marginally consistent with our NGC 253 data. Assuming the Thompson et al. model, a steep electron energy injection index of p = -2.5 is ruled out in M82 and NGC 253 to >99% confidence. We describe in detail the observing procedures, calibration methods, analysis, and consistency checks used for broadband spectral observations with the ATA.

  17. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  18. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; et al

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  19. Theoretical study to explain how chirality is stored and evolves throughout the radical cascade rearrangement of enyne-allenes.

    PubMed

    Gaudel-Siri, Anouk; Campolo, Damien; Mondal, Shovan; Nechab, Malek; Siri, Didier; Bertrand, Michèle P

    2014-10-01

    This article reports a theoretical study to explain how the intrinsic property of chirality is retained throughout the radical cascade rearrangement of an enantiopure chiral enyne-allene (bearing one stereogenic center) selected as a model for this family of reactions. Calculations at the MRPT2/6-31G(d)//CASSCF(10,10)/6-31G(d) level of theory were used to determine the entire reaction pathway which includes singlet state diradicals and closed-shell species. The cascade process involves three elementary steps, i.e., by chronological order: Myers-Saito cycloaromatization (M-S), intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer (HAT), and recombination of the resulting biradical. The enantiospecificity of the reaction results from a double transmission of the stereochemical information, from the original center to an axis and eventually from this axis to the final center. The first two steps lead to a transient diradical intermediate which retains the chirality via the conversion of the original static chirogenic element into a dynamic one, i.e., a center into an axis. The only available routes to the final closed-shell tetracyclic product imply rotations around two σ bonds (σ(C-C) and σ(C-N), bonds β and α respectively). The theoretical calculations confirmed that the formation of the enantiomerically pure product proceeds via the nonracemizing rotation around the σ(C-C) pivot. They ruled out any rotation around the second σ(C-N) pivot. The high level of configurational memory in this rearrangement relies on the steric impediment to the rotation around the C-N bond in the chiral native conformation of the diradical intermediate produced from tandem M-S/1,5-HAT. PMID:25198708

  20. Insights into the catalytic mechanism of coral allene oxide synthase: a dispersion corrected density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, Eric A C; Gherib, Rami; Gauld, James W

    2013-06-01

    In this present work the mechanism by which cAOS catalyzes the formation of allene oxide from its hydroperoxy substrate was computationally investigated by using a DFT-chemical cluster approach. In particular, the effects of dispersion interactions and DFT functional choice (M06, B3LYP, B3LYP*, and BP86), as well as the roles of multistate reactivity and the tyrosyl proximal ligand, were examined. It is observed that the computed relative free energies of stationary points along the overall pathway are sensitive to the choice of DFT functional, while the mechanism obtained is generally not. Large reductions in relative free energies for stationary points along the pathway (compared to the initial reactant complex) of on average 46.3 and 97.3 kJ mol(-1) for the doublet and quartet states, respectively, are observed upon going from the M06 to BP86 functional. From results obtained by using the B3LYP* method, well-tested previously on heme-containing systems, the mechanism of cAOS appears to occur with considerably higher Gibbs free energies than that for the analogous pathway in pAOS, possibly due to the presence of a ligating tyrosyl residue in cAOS. Furthermore, at the IEFPCM-B3LYP*/6-311+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/BS1 level of theory the inclusion of dispersion effects leads to the suggestion that the overall mechanism of cAOS could occur without the need for spin inversion. PMID:23676102

  1. O+ ion conic and plasma sheet dynamics observed by Van Allen Probe satellites during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, W. J.; Erickson, P. J.; Yang, J.; Foster, J.; Wygant, J.; Reeves, G.; Kletzing, C.

    2016-05-01

    The Van Allen Probe satellites were near apogee in the late evening local time sector during the 1 June 2013 magnetic storm's main phase. About an hour after crossing the ring current's "nose structure" into the plasma sheet, the satellites encountered a quasiperiodic sequence of 0.08-3 keV O+ ions. Pitch angle distributions of this population consistently peaked nearly antiparallel to the local magnetic field. We interpret this population as O+ conics originating in the northern ionosphere. Sequences began as fairly steady state conic fluxes with energies in the ~ 80 to 100 eV range. Over about a half hour buildup phase, O+ energies peaked near 1 keV. During subsequent release phases lasting ~ 20 min, O+ energies returned to low-energy starting points. We argue these observations reflect repeated formations and dissolutions of downward, magnetically aligned electric fields (ɛ||) layers trapping O+ conics between mirror points within heating layers below and electrostatic barriers above. Nearly identical variations were observed at the locations of both satellites during 9 of these 13 conic cycles. Phase differences between cycles were observed at both spacecraft during the remaining events. Most "buildup" to "release" phase transitions coincided with AL index minima. However, in situ magnetometer measurements indicate only weak dipolarizations of tail-like magnetic fields. The lack of field-aligned reflected O+ and tail-like magnetic fields suggest that both ionospheres may be active. However, Southern Hemisphere origin conics cannot be observed since they would be isotropized and accelerated during neutral sheet crossings.

  2. Van Allen Probe Observations: Near-Earth injections of Mev Electrons Associated with Intense Substorm Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kletzing, C.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Malaspina, D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Takahashi, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Turner, D. L.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Tang, X.; Tao, X.

    2014-12-01

    With their unique orbit, the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) spacecraft are well suited to investigate near-Earth substorm injections that penetrate into the heart of outer radiation belts. Substorms are generally conceived to inject 10s-100s keV electrons but intense substorm electric fields have been shown capable of injecting ~MeV electrons as well at the geosynchronous altitude. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can penetrate to lower L shells and directly contribute to the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt. In this talk, we present RBSP observations of near-Earth substorm injection of MeV relativistic particles and associated intense dipolarization electric field at L ~5.5. The substorm injection occurred during a moderate storm (DST~-30 to -20) with steady solar wind conditions. RBSP-A observed dispersionless injection of electrons from 10s keV up to 3 MeV in the pre-mid night sector (MLT=22UT). The injection was associated with unusually large (60mV/m) dipolarization electric fields that lasted 1 minute. At about the same time, THEMIS-D observed energy-dispersive injection of electrons at energies as high as at least 720keV at L~6.8 in the pre-dawn sector. Injection of energetic protons (~1MeV) and proton drift echos were observed at RBSP-A as well. RBSP-A observed a broad spectrum of nonlinear electric field structures but no whistler waves at the injection. The properties of the observed dipolarization electric field constrain the acceleration mechanism responsible for the MeV electron injection. We will discuss the implications of these observations on the direct impact of substorms on the outer radiation belt.

  3. Redescription of Leptohyphes cornutus Allen, 1967 (Ephemeroptera: Leptohyphidae) and description of three related new species.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jeane M C; Molineri, Carlos; Salles, Frederico F

    2014-01-01

    Leptohyphes cornutus Allen from Brazil (Santa Catarina) and Misiones, Argentina is re-studied from new material and newly diagnosed as follows: tubercles on head (two pairs), pronotum (two pairs, anterior pair very small), and mesonotum (two pairs), abdominal terga without paired tubercles, nor remnants of them; fore femur length/maximum width, 1.4-1.8; tarsal claws denticulation 4-11+1; hind wing pads present in females; gill formula 3/10/8/8/5. Three new species are described from the nymphal stage: 1) Leptohyphes airuoca sp. nov. from Minas Gerais and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) characterized by: i) two paired tubercles on head, two pairs on pronotum, and one pair on mesonotum, abdominal terga VI-IX with single medial tubercle projecting from hind margin; ii) fore femur length/maximum width, 1.7-2.0; iii) tarsal claws denticulation 4+0; iv) hind wing pads absent in female; v) gill formula 3/9/9/7/6. 2) Leptohyphes cornutillus sp. nov. from Espirito Santo (Brazil), with: i) paired tubercles on head (two pairs), pronotum (two pairs, anterior pair very small), and mesonotum (three pairs), abdominal terga with remnants of paired tubercles on hind margin (blunt and short undulations in dorsal view); ii) fore femur length/maximum width, 2.1-2.3; iii) tarsal claws denticulation 6+1; iv) hind wing pads present in females; v) gill formula 3/11/9/9/6. And 3) Leptohyphes nebulosus sp. nov. from Espirito Santo (Brazil), with: i) two paired tubercles on head, one pair on pronotum, and one pair on mesonotum, abdominal terga VI-VII with paired submedian tubercles on hind margin; ii) fore femur length/maximum width, 1.6; iii) tarsal claws denticulation 5+1; iv) hind wing pads present in females; v) gill formula 3/9/9/9/6.  PMID:25544529

  4. A statistical study of whistler waves observed by Van Allen Probes (RBSP) and lightning detected by WWLLN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hao; Holzworth, Robert H.; Brundell, James B.; Jacobson, Abram R.; Wygant, John R.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Bonnell, John

    2016-03-01

    Lightning-generated whistler waves are electromagnetic plasma waves in the very low frequency (VLF) band, which play an important role in the dynamics of radiation belt particles. In this paper, we statistically analyze simultaneous waveform data from the Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes, RBSP) and global lightning data from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Data were obtained between July to September 2013 and between March and April 2014. For each day during these periods, we predicted the most probable 10 min for which each of the two RBSP satellites would be magnetically conjugate to lightning producing regions. The prediction method uses integrated WWLLN stroke data for that day obtained during the three previous years. Using these predicted times for magnetic conjugacy to lightning activity regions, we recorded high time resolution, burst mode waveform data. Here we show that whistlers are observed by the satellites in more than 80% of downloaded waveform data. About 22.9% of the whistlers observed by RBSP are one-to-one coincident with source lightning strokes detected by WWLLN. About 40.1% more of whistlers are found to be one-to-one coincident with lightning if source regions are extended out 2000 km from the satellites footpoints. Lightning strokes with far-field radiated VLF energy larger than about 100 J are able to generate a detectable whistler wave in the inner magnetosphere. One-to-one coincidences between whistlers observed by RBSP and lightning strokes detected by WWLLN are clearly shown in the L shell range of L = 1-3. Nose whistlers observed in July 2014 show that it may be possible to extend this coincidence to the region of L≥4.

  5. MENGA: A New Comprehensive Tool for the Integration of Neuroimaging Data and the Allen Human Brain Transcriptome Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Gaia; Veronese, Mattia; Expert, Paul; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Bertoldo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brain-wide mRNA mappings offer a great potential for neuroscience research as they can provide information about system proteomics. In a previous work we have correlated mRNA maps with the binding patterns of radioligands targeting specific molecular systems and imaged with positron emission tomography (PET) in unrelated control groups. This approach is potentially applicable to any imaging modality as long as an efficient procedure of imaging-genomic matching is provided. In the original work we considered mRNA brain maps of the whole human genome derived from the Allen human brain database (ABA) and we performed the analysis with a specific region-based segmentation with a resolution that was limited by the PET data parcellation. There we identified the need for a platform for imaging-genomic integration that should be usable with any imaging modalities and fully exploit the high resolution mapping of ABA dataset. Aim In this work we present MENGA (Multimodal Environment for Neuroimaging and Genomic Analysis), a software platform that allows the investigation of the correlation patterns between neuroimaging data of any sort (both functional and structural) with mRNA gene expression profiles derived from the ABA database at high resolution. Results We applied MENGA to six different imaging datasets from three modalities (PET, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) targeting the dopamine and serotonin receptor systems and the myelin molecular structure. We further investigated imaging-genomic correlations in the case of mismatch between selected proteins and imaging targets. PMID:26882227

  6. Modeling Loss and Rebuilding of the Earth's Outer Zone Electrons and Comparison with Van Allen Probes Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.; Li, Z.; Paral, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the competition between radiation belt electron energization due to radial transport and loss to the magnetopause and to the atmosphere is critical to understanding the dynamic changes in outer zone radiation belt electron flux response to solar wind drivers. Plasmasheet electron injection, both due to enhanced convection and substorm dipolarization, provides a source population for generation of whistler mode chorus and seed population for local acceleration. We now have available ~22 months of unprecedented measurements in energy and pitch angle resolution of electrons spanning the energy range from injected plasmasheet to multi-MeV electrons from the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft in near-equatorial plane elliptical orbits, with apogee at 5.8 Re; and two Balloon Array for Relativistic Radiation Belt Electron Losses (BARREL) campaigns during January-February 2013 and 2014, each establishing a longitudinal array of precipitation measurements extending to relativistic energies via measured Bremsstrahlung x-rays. In addition to this arsenal of data, a set of modeling tools has been developed to examine dynamics of electrons in the magnetosphere. These tools calculate electron trajectories in time-dependent magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) fields using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global MHD model coupled with the Rice Convection Model to determine the E and B field response to solar wind drivers. With these tools we can follow electron dynamics including response to Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves which cause radial transport and energization for inward radial gradient as well as enhanced loss to the magnetopause for outward gradient. These tools have been applied to date to the large equinoctial storms of fall 2012, spring and fall 2013, in addition to moderate storms during BARREL balloon campaigns in both winters 2013 and 2014. Isolated substorm response can clearly be identified for the latter, while plasmasheet injection of electrons during periods of strong

  7. Diagenesis and cement fabric of gas reservoirs in the Oligocene Vicksburg Formation, McAllen Ranch Field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, R.P.; Lynch, F.L. )

    1990-09-01

    McAllen Ranch field produces natural gas from 12 deep, overpressured sandstone packages, each interpreted to be the deposit of a prograding shelf-edge delta. One hundred and sixty thin sections from 350 ft of core were petrographically described. The sandstones are feldspathic litharenites containing subequal proportions of volcanic rock fragments (VRF), feldspar, and quartz grains. Grain size ranges from very fine to coarse sand. Porosity is mostly secondary, having formed through dissolution of VRF and feldspar grains. There are four major diagenetic facies (portions of core that can be grouped by the predominance of one diagenetic cement and similar appearance in hand specimen): (1) calcite cemented; (2) chlorite cemented, tight; (3) chlorite cemented, porous; and (4) quartz overgrowths, porous. The calcite-cemented facies predominates in very fine grained sandstones and siltstones and encroaches into adjoining sandstones irrespective of grain size. Sparry calcite filled all available pores and replaced some feldspar. Core permeabilities are generally less than 0.01 md, and porosities range from 7 to 15%. Authigenic clay (predominantly chlorite) generally cements sands intermediate in grain size between those cemented by calcite and those cemented by quartz. Two types of diagenetic clay fabric are interbedded, forming distinct alternating bands 0.1 in. to 3 ft thick. Gray, tightly chlorite-cemented bands are macroscopically and microscopically distinct from green, porous chlorite-cemented bands. In the tightly chlorite-cemented facies, permeabilities are less than 0.3 md, and porosities range from 8 to 16%. Small plates of chlorite fill interparticle pores, and secondary pores are rare. In the porous chlorite-cemented facies, dissolution of framework grains and chlorite cement increased porosity, and a second chlorite cement was precipitated. Core permeability ranges from 0.1 to 1 md, and porosities range from 15 to 20%.

  8. Weak kinetic Alfvén waves turbulence during the 14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, Pablo. S.; Pinto, Víctor A.; Viñas, Adolfo F.; Sibeck, David G.; Kurth, William S.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Wygant, John R.

    2015-07-01

    In the dawn sector, L ˜ 5.5 and MLT ˜ 4-7, from 01:30 to 06:00 UT during the 14 November 2012 geomagnetic storm, both Van Allen Probes observed an alternating sequence of locally quiet and disturbed intervals with two strikingly different power fluctuation levels and magnetic field orientations: either small (˜10-2 nT2) total power with strong GSM Bx and weak By or large (˜10 nT2) total power with weak Bx and strong By and Bz components. During both kinds of intervals the fluctuations occur in the vicinity of the local ion gyrofrequencies (0.01-10 Hz) in the spacecraft frame, propagate oblique to the magnetic field, (θ ˜ 60∘), and have magnetic compressibility C=|δB∥|/|δB⊥|˜1, where δB∥ (δB⊥) are the average amplitudes of the fluctuations parallel (perpendicular) to the mean field. Electric field fluctuations are present whenever the magnetic field is disturbed, and large electric field fluctuations follow the same pattern for quiet and disturbed intervals. Magnetic frequency power spectra at both spacecraft correspond to steep power laws ˜f-α with 4 < α < 5 for f ≲ 2 Hz, and 1.1 < α < 1.7 for f≳ 2 Hz, spectral profiles that are consistent with weak kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) turbulence. Electric power is larger than magnetic power for all frequencies above 0.1 Hz, and the ratio increases with increasing frequency. Vlasov linear analysis is consistent with the presence of compressive KAW with k⊥ρi≲1, right-handed polarization and positive magnetic helicity, in the plasma frame, considering a multiion plasma. All these results suggest the presence of weak KAW turbulence which dissipates the energy associated with the intermittent sudden changes in the magnetic field during the main phase of the storm.

  9. Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study on the Formation of the Elusive 2-Methyl-1-silacycloprop-2-enylidene Molecule under Single Collision Conditions via Reactions of the Silylidyne Radical (SiH; X(2)Π) with Allene (H2CCCH2; X(1)A1) and D4-Allene (D2CCCD2; X(1)A1).

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Dangi, Beni B; Maksyutenko, Pavlo; Kaiser, Ralf I; Bertels, Luke W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-12-17

    The crossed molecular beam reactions of the ground-state silylidyne radical (SiH; X(2)Π) with allene (H2CCCH2; X(1)A1) and D4-allene (D2CCCD2; X(1)A1) were carried out at collision energies of 30 kJ mol(-1). Electronic structure calculations propose that the reaction of silylidyne with allene has no entrance barrier and is initiated by silylidyne addition to the π electron density of allene either to one carbon atom (C1/C2) or to both carbon atoms simultaneously via indirect (complex forming) reaction dynamics. The initially formed addition complexes isomerize via two distinct reaction pathways, both leading eventually to a cyclic SiC3H5 intermediate. The latter decomposes through a loose exit transition state via an atomic hydrogen loss perpendicularly to the plane of the decomposing complex (sideways scattering) in an overall exoergic reaction (experimentally: -19 ± 13 kJ mol(-1); computationally: -5 ± 3 kJ mol(-1)). This hydrogen loss yields the hitherto elusive 2-methyl-1-silacycloprop-2-enylidene molecule (c-SiC3H4), which can be derived from the closed-shell cyclopropenylidene molecule (c-C3H2) by replacing a hydrogen atom with a methyl group and the carbene carbon atom by the isovalent silicon atom. The synthesis of the 2-methyl-1-silacycloprop-2-enylidene molecule in the bimolecular gas-phase reaction of silylidyne with allene enriches our understanding toward the formation of organosilicon species in the gas phase of the interstellar medium in particular via exoergic reactions of no entrance barrier. This facile route to 2-methyl-1-silacycloprop-2-enylidene via a silylidyne radical reaction with allene opens up a versatile approach to form hitherto poorly characterized silicon-bearing species in extraterrestrial environments; this reaction class might represent the missing link, leading from silicon-bearing radicals via organosilicon chemistry eventually to silicon-carbon-rich interstellar grains even in cold molecular clouds where temperatures are as

  10. Amplification of anti-diastereoselectivity via Curtin-Hammett effects in ruthenium-catalyzed hydrohydroxyalkylation of 1,1-disubstituted allenes: diastereoselective formation of all-carbon quaternary centers.

    PubMed

    Zbieg, Jason R; McInturff, Emma L; Leung, Joyce C; Krische, Michael J

    2011-02-01

    Under the conditions of ruthenium-catalyzed transfer hydrogenation, 1,1-disubstituted allenes 1a-c and alcohols 2a-g engage in redox-triggered generation of allylruthenium-aldehyde pairs to form products of hydrohydroxyalkylation 3a-g, 4a-g, and 5a-g with complete branched regioselectivity. By exploiting Curtin-Hammett effects, good to excellent levels of anti-diastereoselectivity (4:1 to >20:1) are obtained. Thus, all carbon quaternary centers are formed in a diastereoselective fashion upon carbonyl addition from the alcohol oxidation level in the absence of premetalated nucleophiles or stoichiometric byproducts. Exposure of allene 1b to equimolar quantities of alcohol 2a and aldehyde 6b under standard reaction conditions delivers adducts 4a and 4b in a 1:1 ratio. Similarly, exposure of allene 1b to equimolar quantities of aldehyde 6a and alcohol 2b provides adducts 4a and 4b in an identical equimolar ratio. Exposure of allene 1b to d(2)-p-nitrobenzyl alcohol, deuterio-2a, under standard reaction conditions delivers the product of hydrohydroxyalkylation, deuterio-4a, which incorporates deuterium at the carbinol position (>95% (2)H) and the interior vinylic position (34% (2)H). Competition experiments involving exposure of allene 1b to equimolar quantities of benzylic alcohols 2a and deuterio-2a reveal no significant kinetic effect. The collective data corroborate rapid, reversible alcohol dehydrogenation, allene hydrometalation, and (E)-, (Z)-isomerization of the transient allylruthenium in advance of turnover-limiting carbonyl addition. Notably, analogous allene-aldehyde reductive C-C couplings employing 2-propanol as the terminal reductant display poor levels of anti-diastereoselectivity, suggesting that carbonyl addition is not turnover-limiting in reactions conducted from the aldehyde oxidation level. PMID:21175178

  11. Reactor and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Wheeler, John A.

    1976-08-10

    A nuclear reactor having a flattened reactor activity curve across the reactor includes fuel extending over a lesser portion of the fuel channels in the central portion of the reactor than in the remainder of the reactor.

  12. Reactor safety method

    DOEpatents

    Vachon, Lawrence J.

    1980-03-11

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR MANIPULATING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, L.A.

    1962-08-01

    A cable connecting a control rod in a reactor with a motor outside the reactor for moving the rod, and a helical conduit in the reactor wall, through which the cable passes are described. The helical shape of the conduit prevents the escape of certain harmful radiations from the reactor. (AEC)

  14. Nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Thomson, Wallace B.

    2004-03-16

    A nuclear reactor comprising a cylindrical pressure vessel, an elongated annular core centrally disposed within and spaced from the pressure vessel, and a plurality of ducts disposed longitudinally of the pressure vessel about the periphery thereof, said core comprising an annular active portion, an annular reflector just inside the active portion, and an annular reflector just outside the active a portion, said annular active portion comprising rectangular slab, porous fuel elements radially disposed around the inner reflector and extending the length of the active portion, wedge-shaped, porous moderator elements disposed adjacent one face of each fuel element and extending the length of the fuel element, the fuel and moderator elements being oriented so that the fuel elements face each other and the moderator elements do likewise, adjacent moderator elements being spaced to provide air inlet channels, and adjacent fuel elements being spaced to provide air outlet channels which communicate with the interior of the peripheral ducts, and means for introducing air into the air inlet channels which passes through the porous moderator elements and porous fuel elements to the outlet channel.

  15. Adventures on the C3H5O potential energy surface: OH+propyne, OH+allene and related reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zádor, Judit; Miller, James A.

    2014-06-25

    We mapped out the stationary points and the corresponding conformational space on the C3H5O potential energy surface relevant for the OH + allene and OH + propyne reactions systematically and automatically using the KinBot software at the UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVQZ-F12//M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We used RRKM-based 1-D master equations to calculate pressure- and temperature-dependent, channel-specific phenomenological rate coefficients for the bimolecular reactions propyne + OH and allene + OH, and for the unimolecular decomposition of the CH3CCHOH, CH3C(OH)CH, CH2CCH2OH, CH2C(OH)CH2 primary adducts, and also for the related acetonyl, propionyl, 2-methylvinoxy, and 3-oxo-1-propyl radicals. The major channel of the bimolecular reactions at high temperatures is the formation propargyl + H2O, which makes the title reactions important players in soot formation at high temperatures. However, below ~1000 K the chemistry is more complex, involving the competition of stabilization, isomerization and dissociation processes. We found that the OH addition to the central carbon of allene has a particularly interesting and complex pressure dependence, caused by the low-lying exit channel to form ketene + CH3 bimolecular products. In this study, we compared our results to a wide range of experimental data and assessed possible uncertainties arising from certain aspects of the theoretical framework.

  16. Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Lessard, M. R.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; Singer, H. J.; Omura, Y.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Gkioulidou, M.; Oksavik, K.; Mann, I. R.; Raita, T.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Although most studies of the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on 23 February 2014 that extended over 8 h in UT and over 12 h in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4 h rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 h at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Waves were also observed by ground-based induction magnetometers in Antarctica (near dawn), Finland (near local noon), Russia (in the afternoon), and in Canada (from dusk to midnight). Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern foot point of the Van Allen Probes observed 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation, often over extended L shell ranges; other passes identified a narrow L shell region of precipitation over Canada. Observations of relativistic electrons by the Van Allen Probes showed that the fluxes of more field-aligned and more energetic radiation belt electrons were reduced in response to both the emission over Canada and the more spatially extended emission associated with the compression, confirming the effectiveness of EMIC-induced loss processes for this event.

  17. The occurrence and wave properties of H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J. -C.; Allen, R. C.; Smith, C. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-09-26

    We perform a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected by the Van Allen Probes mission to investigate the spatial distribution of their occurrence, wave power, ellipticity, and normal angle. The Van Allen Probes have been used which allow us to explore the inner magnetosphere (1.1 to 5.8 RE). Magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science on board the Van Allen Probes are used to identify EMIC wave events for the first 22 months of the mission operation (8 September 2012 to 30 June 2014). EMIC waves are examined in H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-bands. Over 700 EMIC wave events have been identified over the three different wave bands (265 H⁺-band events, 438 He⁺-band events, and 68 O⁺-band events). EMIC wave events are observed between L = 2 – 8, with over 140 EMIC wave events observed below L = 4. The results show that H⁺-band EMIC waves have two peak magnetic local time (MLT) occurrence regions: pre-noon (09:00 < MLT ≤ 12:00) and afternoon (15:00 < MLT ≤ 17:00) sectors. He⁺-band EMIC waves feature an overall stronger dayside occurrence. O⁺-band EMIC waves have one peak region located in the morning sector at lower L shells (L < 4). He⁺-band EMIC waves average the highest wave power overall (>0.1 nT²/Hz), especially in the afternoon sector. Ellipticity observations reveal that linearly polarized EMIC waves dominate in lower L shells.

  18. The occurrence and wave properties of H⁺-, He⁺-, and O⁺-band EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J. -C.; Allen, R. C.; Smith, C. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Jordanova, Vania K.

    2015-09-26

    We perform a statistical study of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves detected by the Van Allen Probes mission to investigate the spatial distribution of their occurrence, wave power, ellipticity, and normal angle. The Van Allen Probes have been used which allow us to explore the inner magnetosphere (1.1 to 5.8 RE). Magnetic field measurements from the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science on board the Van Allen Probes are used to identify EMIC wave events for the first 22 months of the mission operation (8 September 2012 to 30 June 2014). EMIC waves are examined in H⁺-,more » He⁺-, and O⁺-bands. Over 700 EMIC wave events have been identified over the three different wave bands (265 H⁺-band events, 438 He⁺-band events, and 68 O⁺-band events). EMIC wave events are observed between L = 2 – 8, with over 140 EMIC wave events observed below L = 4. The results show that H⁺-band EMIC waves have two peak magnetic local time (MLT) occurrence regions: pre-noon (09:00 < MLT ≤ 12:00) and afternoon (15:00 < MLT ≤ 17:00) sectors. He⁺-band EMIC waves feature an overall stronger dayside occurrence. O⁺-band EMIC waves have one peak region located in the morning sector at lower L shells (L < 4). He⁺-band EMIC waves average the highest wave power overall (>0.1 nT²/Hz), especially in the afternoon sector. Ellipticity observations reveal that linearly polarized EMIC waves dominate in lower L shells.« less

  19. The Allen Telescope Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Geoffrey C.; Allen Telescope Array Team

    2010-01-01

    The ATA is a 42-element centimeter wavelength array located in Hat Creek, California and jointly operated by UC Berkeley Radio Astronomy Laboratory and the SETI Institute. Since the ATA dedication in Fall 2007, activities have been focused on commissioning the array, retrofitting a handful of components including the feed, developing an operations model, creation of pipeline processing for correlator imaging data, early science observations, and launching of the major surveys for which the telescope was built. The retrofit of the feed improves feed mechanical robustness as well as high frequency performance. Science programs launched include imaging radio transient and static sky surveys (ATATS and PiGSS), commensal SETI and transient surveys of the Galactic Center, targeted SETI observations of nearby stars, the Fly's Eye transient survey, broadband spectra of nearby star-forming galaxies, polarimetric observations of bright radio sources, observations of hydrogen in nearby galaxies and galaxy groups, molecular line observations in the Galaxy, and observations of Jupiter and the Moon. The baseline Square Kilometer Array (SKA) design, a large-N-small-diameter (LNSD) array with wide-band single-pixel feeds and an offset Gregorian antenna, bears a strong resemblance to the ATA. Additional ATA contributions to the SKA include configuration studies for LNSD arrays, the use of fiber optics for broadband data transmission, the use of flexible FPGA-based digital electronics, passive cooling of antennas, and implementation of commensal observing modes. The ATA is currently used for exploration of calibration and imaging algorithms necessary for the SKA. I will summarize current technical status and performance, the results from early science and surveys, and ATA contributions to SKA development.

  20. Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Validation with conjunctive Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soria-Santacruz, M.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Bortnik, J.; Ni, B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. The interaction of plasmaspheric hiss with radiation belt electrons is commonly evaluated using diffusion codes, which rely on statistical models of wave observations that may not accurately reproduce the instantaneous global wave distribution or the limited in situ satellite wave measurements. This paper evaluates the performance and limitations of a novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron flux observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage in shell and magnetic local time (MLT). We found that, within its limitations, this technique could potentially be used to build a dynamic global model of the plasmaspheric hiss wave intensity. The technique is validated by analyzing the conjunctions between the POES spacecraft and the Van Allen Probes from September 2012 to June 2014. The technique performs well for moderate-to-strong hiss activity (≥30 pT) with sufficiently high electron fluxes. The main source of these limitations is the number of counts of energetic electrons measured by the POES spacecraft capable of resonating with hiss waves. For moderate-to-strong hiss events, the results show that the wave amplitudes from the EMFISIS instruments on board the Van Allen Probes are well reproduced by the POES technique, which provides more consistent estimates than the parameterized statistical hiss wave model based on CRRES data.

  1. Using ACE Observations of Interplanetary Particles and Magnetic Fields as Possible Contributors to Variations Observed at Van Allen Probes during Major events in 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from ACE EPAM including energy spectra of protons, helium, and oxygen will be prepared for coordinated use in estimating the direct and indirect access of energetic particles to inner and outer geomagnetic trapping zones. Complete temporal coverage from ACE at 12 seconds, 5 minutes, 17 minutes, hourly and daily cadences will be used to catalog interplanetary events arriving at Earth including interplanetary magnetic field sector boundaries, interplanetary shocks, and interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs. The first 6 months of 2013 have included both highly disturbed times, March 17 and May 22, and extended quiet periods of little or no variations. Among the specific questions that ACE and Van Allen Probes coordinated observations may aid in resolving are: 1. How much, if any, direct capture of interplanetary energetic particles occurs and what conditions account for it? 2. How much influence do interplanetary field and particle variations have on energization and/or loss of geomagnetically trapped populations? The poster will also present important links and describe methods and important details of access to numerically expressed ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE observations that can be flexibly and easily accessed via the internet for student and senior researcher use.

  2. What have we learned about the energetic particle dynamics in the inner belt and slot region from Van Allen Probes and CSSWE missions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinlin; Baker, Daniel N.; Kanekal, Shrikanth; Fennell, Joseph; Selesnick, Richard; Claudepierre, Seth; Blake, Bernard; Zhao, Hong; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive measurements of energetic protons (10s of MeV) in the inner belt (L<2) and slot region (2Allen Probes, in a geo-transfer-like orbit, revealed new features of these energetic protons in terms of their spectrum distribution, spatial distribution, pitch angle distribution, and their different source populations. Concurrent measurements from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope integrated little experiment (REPTile) on board the Colorado Student Space Weather Experiment (CSSWE) CubeSat, in a highly inclined low Earth orbit, demonstrated that there exist sub-MeV electrons in the inner belt and their flux level is orders of magnitude higher than the background associated with the inner belt protons, while higher energy electron (>1.6 MeV) measurements cannot be distinguished from the background. Analysis on sub-MeV electrons data in the inner belt and slot region from the Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) on board Van Allen Probes revealed rather complicated pitch angle distribution of these energetic electrons, with the 90 deg-minimum (butterfly) pitch angle distribution dominating near the magnetic equator. These are part of a summary of the most recent measurements and understanding of the dynamics of energetic particles in the inner zone and slot region to be exhibited and discussed in this presentation.

  3. A test of Allen's rule in ectotherms: the case of two south American Melanopline Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) with partially overlapping geographic ranges.

    PubMed

    Bidau, Claudio J; Martí, Dardo A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the geographic variation of three morphometric characters in relation to body size in two South American grasshoppers (Acrididae), Dichroplus vittatus Bruner and D. pratensis Bruner to test Allen's rule in these ectotherms. Since both species follow the converse to Bergmann's rule owing to latitudinal and/or altitudinal variation in time available for growth and reproduction, geographic variation in body size proportions of protruding parts may obey to differential allometric growth in different geographic areas. Alternatively, it could reflect true Allenian variation related to thermoregulation. Body proportions were studied by correlation/regression analyses with geographic and climatic variables. In D. pratensis, body proportions increased with latitude and decreased with altitude. These results probably obey to the effects of water balance and seasonality on final body size, and on the allometric growth of the three studied characters not being related to thermoregulation. In D. vittatus, a generally non-significant trend towards the decrease of the mean proportions of all three characters with increasing latitude was observed. Nevertheless, also in this species, it is probable that the environmental gradient responds to seasonality factors (although not to water balance) that affect the length of growing season and, in consequence, body size and its allometric relationships. We conclude that the regularities in the geographic distribution of body proportions of D. pratensis and D. vittatus do not follow Allen's rule in the sense of thermoregulation, and result from variables that determine growing season length and the allometric growth of different body parts. PMID:18813738

  4. The dependence on geomagnetic conditions and solar wind dynamic pressure of the spatial distributions of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikin, A. A.; Zhang, J.-C.; Smith, C. W.; Spence, H. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-05-01

    A statistical examination on the spatial distributions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves observed by the Van Allen Probes against varying levels of geomagnetic activity (i.e., AE and SYM-H) and dynamic pressure has been performed. Measurements taken by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science for the first full magnetic local time (MLT) precession of the Van Allen Probes (September 2012-June 2014) are used to identify over 700 EMIC wave events. Spatial distributions of EMIC waves are found to vary depending on the level of geomagnetic activity and solar wind dynamic pressure. EMIC wave events were observed under quiet (AE ≤ 100 nT, 325 wave events), moderate (100 nT < AE ≤ 300 nT, 218 wave events), and disturbed (AE > 300 nT, 228 wave events) geomagnetic conditions and are primarily observed in the prenoon sector (~800 < MLT ≤ ~1100) at L ≈ 5.5 during quiet activity times. As AE increases to disturbed levels, the peak occurrence rates shift to the afternoon sector (1200 < MLT ≤ 1800) between L = 4 and L = 6. A majority of EMIC wave events (~56%) were observed during nonstorm times (defined by SYM-H). Consistent with the quiet AE levels, nonstorm EMIC waves are observed in the prenoon sector. EMIC waves observed through the duration of a geomagnetic storm are primarily located in the afternoon sector. High solar wind pressure (Pdyn > 3 nPa) correlates to mostly afternoon EMIC wave observations.

  5. Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well. The Boles and Franks model is compatible with a steady supply of original mixed-layer I/S during the depositional history of the McAllen Ranch area. The constant content with depth of calcite, quartz, and potassium feldspar indicates that limited material, if any, is supplied by the shales to surrounding sands. The ions generated by changes within the clay minerals are involved in further clay mineral reactions as outlined above. In addition, magnesium and iron are involved in forming chlorite within the shales.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of allene oxide synthase, cytochrome P450 CYP74A2, from Parthenium argentatum

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Zhenzhan; Li, Lenong; Pan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2008-01-01

    Oxylipins are oxygenated derivatives of fatty acids and pivotal signaling molecules in plants and animals. Allene oxide synthase (AOS) is a key cytochrome P450 CYP74 enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of plant oxylipin jasmonates to convert 13(S)-hydroperoxide to allene oxide. Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) AOS, CYP74A2, was expressed in Escherichia coli. Protein was purified using affinity chromatography and size exclusion chromatography, and then crystallized. Two different crystal forms were obtained from 0.2 M (NH4)H2PO4, 50% MPD, 0.1 M Tris, pH 8.5 at 277 K using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Preliminary X-ray analysis was carried out, and the crystals were found to belong to the tetragonal space group I422 with cell parameters a = b = 126.5, c = 163.9 Å, and the monoclinic space group C2 with cell parameters a = 336.5, b = 184.2, c = 159.0 Å, β = 118.6°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution from a tetragonal form of crystal using a home X-ray source. PMID:18607105

  7. α,β-Double Electrophilic Addition of Allene-1,3-Dicarboxylic Esters for the Construction of Polysubstituted Furans by KI/tert-Butyl Hydroperoxide (TBHP)-Promoted Oxidative Annulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Liang; Wang, Yu; Sun, Pei-Pei; Luo, Xiaoyan; Shen, Zhenlu; Deng, Wei-Ping

    2016-06-27

    An unprecedented KI/tert-butyl hydroperoxide promoted tandem Michael addition/oxidative annulation of allene-1,3-dicarboxylic esters and 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds has been developed. This procedure provides a new, facile, and transition-metal-free synthetic approach to afford polysubstituted furans in moderate to excellent yields (up to 93 %). This method first establishes a α,β-double electrophilic reaction mode of allene-1,3-dicarboxylic esters to form 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds. PMID:27225634

  8. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Lelevkin, V. M. Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V.

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  9. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.; Davison, B.H.

    1993-09-28

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur. 2 figures.

  10. Attrition reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Charles D.; Davison, Brian H.

    1993-01-01

    A reactor vessel for reacting a solid particulate with a liquid reactant has a centrifugal pump in circulatory flow communication with the reactor vessel for providing particulate attrition, resulting in additional fresh surface where the reaction can occur.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR POWER PLANT

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1962-12-25

    This patent relates to a nuclear reactor power plant incorporating an air-cooled, beryllium oxide-moderated, pebble bed reactor. According to the invention means are provided for circulating a flow of air through tubes in the reactor to a turbine and for directing a sidestream of the circu1ating air through the pebble bed to remove fission products therefrom as well as assist in cooling the reactor. (AEC)

  12. Period meter for reactors

    DOEpatents

    Rusch, Gordon K.

    1976-01-06

    An improved log N amplifier type nuclear reactor period meter with reduced probability for noise-induced scrams is provided. With the reactor at low power levels a sampling circuit is provided to determine the reactor period by measuring the finite change in the amplitude of the log N amplifier output signal for a predetermined time period, while at high power levels, differentiation of the log N amplifier output signal provides an additional measure of the reactor period.

  13. Reactor System Transient Code.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-07-14

    RELAP3B describes the behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactors during postulated accidents or power transients, such as large reactivity excursions, coolant losses or pump failures. The program calculates flows, mass and energy inventories, pressures, temperatures, and steam qualities along with variables associated with reactor power, reactor heat transfer, or control systems. Its versatility allows one to describe simple hydraulic systems as well as complex reactor systems.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  16. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, James P.; Scahill, John W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved vortex reactor system for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  18. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-03-02

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  19. High solids fermentation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wyman, Charles E.; Grohmann, Karel; Himmel, Michael E.; Richard, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

  20. University Reactor Instrumentation Grant

    SciTech Connect

    S. M. Bajorek

    2000-02-01

    A noble gas air monitoring system was purchased through the University Reactor Instrumentation Grant Program. This monitor was installed in the Kansas State TRIGA reactor bay at a location near the top surface of the reactor pool according to recommendation by the supplier. This system is now functional and has been incorporated into the facility license.

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Epler, E.P.; Hanauer, S.H.; Oakes, L.C.

    1959-11-01

    A control system is described for a nuclear reactor using enriched uranium fuel of the type of the swimming pool and other heterogeneous nuclear reactors. Circuits are included for automatically removing and inserting the control rods during the course of normal operation. Appropriate safety circuits close down the nuclear reactor in the event of emergency.

  2. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  3. Reactor Dosimetry State of the Art 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voorbraak, Wim; Debarberis, Luigi; D'Hondt, Pierre; Wagemans, Jan

    2009-08-01

    Oral session 1: Retrospective dosimetry. Retrospective dosimetry of VVER 440 reactor pressure vessel at the 3rd unit of Dukovany NPP / M. Marek ... [et al.]. Retrospective dosimetry study at the RPV of NPP Greifswald unit 1 / J. Konheiser ... [et al.]. Test of prototype detector for retrospective neutron dosimetry of reactor internals and vessel / K. Hayashi ... [et al.]. Neutron doses to the concrete vessel and tendons of a magnox reactor using retrospective dosimetry / D. A. Allen ... [et al.]. A retrospective dosimetry feasibility study for Atucha I / J. Wagemans ... [et al.]. Retrospective reactor dosimetry with zirconium alloy samples in a PWR / L. R. Greenwood and J. P. Foster -- Oral session 2: Experimental techniques. Characterizing the Time-dependent components of reactor n/y environments / P. J. Griffin, S. M. Luker and A. J. Suo-Anttila. Measurements of the recoil-ion response of silicon carbide detectors to fast neutrons / F. H. Ruddy, J. G. Seidel and F. Franceschini. Measurement of the neutron spectrum of the HB-4 cold source at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory / J. L. Robertson and E. B. Iverson. Feasibility of cavity ring-down laser spectroscopy for dose rate monitoring on nuclear reactor / H. Tomita ... [et al.]. Measuring transistor damage factors in a non-stable defect environment / D. B. King ... [et al.]. Neutron-detection based monitoring of void effects in boiling water reactors / J. Loberg ... [et al.] -- Poster session 1: Power reactor surveillance, retrospective dosimetry, benchmarks and inter-comparisons, adjustment methods, experimental techniques, transport calculations. Improved diagnostics for analysis of a reactor pulse radiation environment / S. M. Luker ... [et al.]. Simulation of the response of silicon carbide fast neutron detectors / F. Franceschini, F. H. Ruddy and B. Petrović. NSV A-3: a computer code for least-squares adjustment of neutron spectra and measured dosimeter responses / J. G

  4. Neutron behavior, reactor control, and reactor heat transfer. Volume four

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Volume four covers neutron behavior (neutron absorption, how big are nuclei, neutron slowing down, neutron losses, the self-sustaining reactor), reactor control (what is controlled in a reactor, controlling neutron population, is it easy to control a reactor, range of reactor control, what happens when the fuel burns up, controlling a PWR, controlling a BWR, inherent safety of reactors), and reactor heat transfer (heat generation in a nuclear reactor, how is heat removed from a reactor core, heat transfer rate, heat transfer properties of the reactor coolant).

  5. Van Allen Probes observations of intense parallel Poynting flux associated with magnetic dipolarization, conjugate discrete auroral arcs, and energetic particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Tian, S.; Cattell, C. A.; Chaston, C. C.; Mozer, F.; Bonnell, J. W.; Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C.; Hudson, M. K.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Donovan, E.; Spanswick, E.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    We present measurements from the Van Allen Probes, in the near Earth tail, at the outer boundary of the plasma sheet, of a magnetic dipolarization/injection event characterized by unusually strong earthward poynting flux flowing along magnetic field lines with amplitudes of 200 mW/m2 lasting ~ 1 minute. The Poynting flux was conjugate to a 30 km wide discrete auroral arc observed by the THEMIS auroral array. The observations were obtained at 5.8 Re in the pre-midnight sector during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm on 5/01/2013. This brief interval transferred more electromagnetic energy (at the spacecraft position) than that transferred during entire remainder of the main phase of the storm. The parallel Poynting flux coincided with a local section of the "cross tail current sheet" which generated the dipolarization signature. The latitudinal width of the arc, mapped along magnetic field lines, provides an estimate of the spatial scale of the Poynting flux, the electric fields, and the current sheets (parallel and perpendicular). It is estimated that the latitudinal width of the Poynting flux "sheet" was ~600 km or ~1-2 H+ inertial lengths. An estimate of the ∫E·dl across the current sheet along the direction normal to the plasma sheet is ~20-40 kilovolts. The "normal" to the plasma sheet component of the electric field (~70 mV/m) strongly dominated the azimuthal component(which is reponsible for drift energetization). The dipolarization event resulted in the local dispersion-less injection of electrons between 50 keV and ~2 MeV at the Van Allen Probe position. The injection event involved brief (factor of two) local spike in ~2 MeV electron fluxes. Measurements from the Los Alamos geosynchronous spacecraft, displaced eastward from the Van Allen probes, provided evidence for dispersive energy-time electron signatures consistent with injection and energization at the RBSP position. The Poynting flux also coincided with the energy peak in the up

  6. Reactor vessel support system

    DOEpatents

    Golden, Martin P.; Holley, John C.

    1982-01-01

    A reactor vessel support system includes a support ring at the reactor top supported through a box ring on a ledge of the reactor containment. The box ring includes an annular space in the center of its cross-section to reduce heat flow and is keyed to the support ledge to transmit seismic forces from the reactor vessel to the containment structure. A coolant channel is provided at the outside circumference of the support ring to supply coolant gas through the keyways to channels between the reactor vessel and support ledge into the containment space.

  7. Nuclear reactor overflow line

    DOEpatents

    Severson, Wayne J.

    1976-01-01

    The overflow line for the reactor vessel of a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor includes means for establishing and maintaining a continuous bleed flow of coolant amounting to 5 to 10% of the total coolant flow through the overflow line to prevent thermal shock to the overflow line when the reactor is restarted following a trip. Preferably a tube is disposed concentrically just inside the overflow line extending from a point just inside the reactor vessel to an overflow tank and a suction line is provided opening into the body of liquid metal in the reactor vessel and into the annulus between the overflow line and the inner tube.

  8. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Taft, William E.

    1994-01-01

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling.

  9. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  10. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  11. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    ScienceCinema

    Moniz, Ernest [U.S. Energy Secretary

    2014-08-22

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  12. Hydrogeologic framework and water quality of the Vermont Army National Guard Ethan Allen Firing Range, northern Vermont, October 2002 through December 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Stewart F.; Chalmers, Ann; Mack, Thomas J.; Denner, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    The Ethan Allen Firing Range of the Vermont Army National Guard is a weapons-testing and training facility in a mountainous region of Vermont that has been in operation for about 80 years. The hydrologic framework and water quality of the facility were assessed between October 2002 and December 2003. As part of the study, streamflow was continuously measured in the Lee River and 24 observation wells were installed at 19 locations in the stratified drift and bedrock aquifers to examine the hydrogeology. Chemical analyses of surface water, ground water, streambed sediment, and fish tissue were collected to assess major ions, trace elements, nutrients, and volatile and semivolatile compounds. Sampling included 5 surface-water sites sampled during moderate and low-flow conditions; streambed-sediment samples collected at the 5 surface-water sites; fish-tissue samples collected at 3 of the 5 surface-water sites; macroinvertebrates collected at 4 of the 5 surface-water sites; and ground-water samples collected from 10 observation wells, and samples collected at all surface- and ground-water sites. The hydrogeologic framework at the Ethan Allen Firing Range is dominated by the upland mountain and valley setting of the site. Bedrock wells yield low to moderate amounts of water (0 to 23 liters per minute). In the narrow river valleys, layered stratified-drift deposits of sand and gravel of up to 18 meters thick fill the Lee River and Mill Brook Valleys. In these deposits, the water table is generally within 3 meters below the land surface and overall ground-water flow is from east to west. Streamflow in the Lee River averaged 0.72 cubic meters per second (25.4 cubic feet per second) between December 2002 and December 2003. Streams are highly responsive to precipitation events in this mountainous environment and a comparison with other nearby watersheds shows that Lee River maintains relatively high streamflow during dry periods. Concentrations of trace elements and nutrients

  13. Site- and Enantioselective Formation of Allene-Bearing Tertiary or Quaternary Carbon Stereogenic Centers through NHC–Cu-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Byunghyuck; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic enantioselective allylic substitutions that result in exclusive addition of an allenyl group (<2% propargyl addition) and formation of tertiary or quaternary C–C bonds are described. Commercially available allenylboronic acid pinacol ester is used (preparation of a more reactive but less stable boronate derivative not required). Reactions are promoted by 5.0–10 mol % of sulfonate-bearing chiral bidentate N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes of copper, which exhibit the unique ability to furnish chiral products arising from SN2′ mode of addition. The desired allenyl-containing products are generated in up to 95% yield, >98% SN2′ selectivity and 99:1 enantiomeric ratio (er). Site-selective NHC–Cu-catalyzed hydroboration of enantiomerically enriched allenes and conversion to the corresponding β-vinyl ketones demonstrates utility. PMID:22214185

  14. Van Allen Probe measurements of the electric drift E × B/B2 at Arecibo's L = 1.4 field line coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejosne, Solène; Mozer, F. S.

    2016-07-01

    We have used electric and magnetic measurements by Van Allen Probe B from 2013 to 2014 to examine the equatorial electric drift E × B/B2 at one field line coordinate set to Arecibo's incoherent scatter radar location (L = 1.43). We report on departures from the traditional picture of corotational motion with the Earth in two ways: (1) the rotational angular speed is found to be 10% smaller than the rotational angular speed of the Earth, in agreement with previous works on plasmaspheric notches, and (2) the equatorial electric drift displays a dependence in magnetic local time, with a pattern consistent with the mapping of the Arecibo ionosphere dynamo electric fields along equipotential magnetic field lines. The electric fields due to the ionosphere dynamo are therefore expected to play a significant role when discussing, for instance, the structure and dynamics of the plasmasphere or the transport of trapped particles in the inner belt.

  15. Resource management and fertility in Mexico’s Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve: Campos, cash, and contraception in the lobster-fishing village of Punta Allen

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David L.

    2009-01-01

    This case study examines the link between marine resource management, and the universal contraceptive use among married couples in the lobster- fishing village of Punta Allen, located in the Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Several reasons appear to contribute to small desired and actual family sizes. Some of these include a medical clinic staff effective in promoting family planning, cooperative and private resource ownership, changing cultural attitudes, geographical limitations to population and economic growth, and a desire to conserve the environment for aesthetic and economic motives. Lastly, families desired to preserve a sustained balance between benefiting from lobster harvests today and safeguarding this marine resource for their children in the future. PMID:19672473

  16. Novel Estimates of ULF Wave Radial Diffusion of Relativistic Electrons in the Radiation Belts using the Van Allen Probes, THEMIS and GOES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarris, T. E.; Li, X.; Schiller, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-Low Frequency (ULF) waves are critical in radial diffusion processes of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts and their Power Spectral Density as a function of L is an integral part of the radial diffusion coefficients and of assimilative models of the radiation belts. Using simultaneous measurements from two GOES geosynchronous satellites, three spacecraft of the THEMIS constellation and the two Van Allen probes, we calculate the Power Spectral Density of ULF pulsations at different L, through which we provide improved estimates of the diffusion coefficient due to compressional magnetic perturbations as a function of L and Kp. These results can have significant implications in better defining the regions where radial diffusion can be effective vs. the regions where it cannot account for the observed changes in the phase space density of relativistic electrons.

  17. First evidence for chorus at a large geocentric distance as a source of plasmaspheric hiss: Coordinated THEMIS and Van Allen Probes observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Chen, L.; Bortnik, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-01-01

    ray tracing suggests that plasmaspheric hiss can originate from chorus observed outside of the plasmapause. Although a few individual events have been reported to support this mechanism, the number of reported conjugate events is still very limited. Using coordinated observations between Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) and Van Allen Probes, we report on an interesting event, where chorus was observed at a large L shell (~9.8), different from previously reported events at L < 6, but still exhibited a remarkable correlation with hiss observed in the outer plasmasphere (L ~ 5.5). Ray tracing indicates that a subset of chorus can propagate into the observed location of hiss on a timescale of ~5-6 s, in excellent agreement with the observed time lag between chorus and hiss. This provides quantitative support that chorus from large L shells, where it was previously considered unable to propagate into the plasmasphere, can in fact be the source of hiss.

  18. Enrico Fermi Awards Ceremony for Dr. Allen J. Bard and Dr. Andrew Sessler, February 2014 (Presentations, including remarks by Energy Secretary, Dr. Ernest Moniz)

    SciTech Connect

    Moniz, Ernest

    2014-02-03

    The Fermi Award is a Presidential award and is one of the oldest and most prestigious science and technology honors bestowed by the U.S. Government. On February 3, 2014 it was conferred upon two exceptional scientists. The first to be recognized is Dr. Allen J. Bard, 'for international leadership in electrochemical science and technology, for advances in photoelectrochemistry and photocatalytic materials, processes, and devices, and for discovery and development of electrochemical methods including electrogenerated chemiluminescence and scanning electrochemical microscopy.' The other honoree is Dr. Andrew Sessler, 'for advancing accelerators as powerful tools of scientific discovery, for visionary direction of the research enterprise focused on challenges in energy and the environment, and for championing outreach and freedom of scientific inquiry worldwide.' Dr. Patricia Dehmer opened the ceremony, and Dr. Ernest Moniz presented the awards.

  19. Silvanus Bevan the 'Quaker FRS' (1691-1765) apothecary with a note on his contribution to the founding of the pharmaceutical company Allen and Hanbury.

    PubMed

    Morris, John S

    2011-02-01

    Silvanus Bevan was born in Swansea, South Wales, moved to London where he trained as an apothecary, and then in 1715 opened a business at Plough Court off Lombard Street in London. As a committed Quaker he was renowned for honesty and fair-trading and consequently he prospered. In the 1730s he took his brother Timothy as a partner. Silvanus Bevan had practised medicine at his Plough Court pharmacy and, with the arrival of his brother became less involved in pharmacy and increasingly interested in medicine. In 1725 he became a Fellow of the Royal Society. Within the family the pharmacy at Plough Court continued to prosper and became the forerunner of the pharmaceutical company Allen and Hanbury. Marriage into other Quaker families linked Silvanus Bevan with the banking firm Barclays. PMID:21350070

  20. Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Freed, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortgage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed-layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well.

  1. Climatology of the Earth's inner magnetosphere as observed by the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manweiler, J. W.; Patterson, J. D.; Manweiler, R. M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft measures energetic ion and electron particle populations in a species dependent energy range of 10's of KeV up to an MeV. The instrument separates the ion population into component species of protons, helium, and oxygen. This paper presents a climatological survey of RBSPICE measurements over the life of the mission to date. A comparison of spectrographs of the energetic particle populations (e, p, He, and O) is shown against key standard geomagnetic indices. Also shown is a summary of key electron and ion lower energy events based upon a systematic characterization of the type of event. The analyses of these events provide verification of the difference between electron and ion drift orbits and, based upon characterization schemes, show how the different event categories can vary as a function of L and MLT.

  2. Ring opening of cyclopropylidenes to allenes: reactions with bifurcating transition regions, free internal motions, steric hindrances, and long-range dipolar interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Valtazanos, P.; Elbert, S.T.; Ruedenberg, K.

    1986-05-28

    The mechanism of the ring opening of cyclopropylidene to allene, the prototype bond fission of a cyclic carbene due to ring strain, has implications for many organic reactions. We have mapped out the energy surface E(phi,delta/sub 1/,delta/sub 2/) in its entirety where, for each triple of (phi,delta/sub 1/,delta/sub 2/) values, the molecular geometry was optimized with respect to 12 internal coordinates. An examination of the energy surface reveals the following features of the cyclopropylidene ring opening: (i) singlet cyclopropylidene is stable at phi = 59.5/sup 0/ and about 9 kcal/mol lower than the triplet (stable at 65.5/sup 0/). (ii) The CH/sub 2/ planes are perpendicular to the CCC plane (C/sub 2nu/) and approximately remain so during the initial stages of the ring opening. (iii) Shortly before phi reaches 70/sup 0/ the CH/sub 2/ groups begin a disrotatory motion, preserving C/sub s/ symmetry. (iv) Around phi approx. 81/sup 0/, with a disrotatory inclination of about 35/sup 0/, a conrotatory component admixes to the reaction path advance and C/sub s/ symmetry is lost. (v) No inherent preference exists between the two branches. (vi) The bifurcation occurs before the transition states (which are located around (phi,delta/sub 1/,delta/sub 2/) = (81/sup 0/, 50/sup 0/, 120/sup 0/) and (81/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/, 130/sup 0/)) and extremely close to it. (vii) The downhill path from the transition state to the product with phi opening to 180/sup 0/, while conrotatory in a general way, leads across slopes of isoenergetic valleys. (viii) The allene stereoisomerization requires a concerted twisting and bending, the transition state occurring at phi = 133/sup 0/.

  3. Relativistic electron response to the combined magnetospheric impact of a coronal mass ejection overlapping with a high-speed stream: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Jaynes, A.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  4. On the Control of Van Allen Radiation Belt Morphology by Coupling to the Plasmasheet: How Quickly, How Deeply, and How Strongly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ian; Ozeke, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Here we examine the speed, strength and depth of the coupling between dynamical variations of the electron flux at the outer boundary and that in the heart of the radiation belts. Using ULF wave radial diffusion as an exemplar, we show how changing boundary conditions can completely change belt morphology even under conditions of identical wave power. In the case of ULF wave radial diffusion, whether there is a new source population or a sink of electron flux at the outer plasmasheet boundary can generate a completely opposite response which reaches deep into the belt even under identical ULF wave conditions. Very significantly, here we show that such coupling can occur on timescales much faster than previously thought, being as short as one hour or less between the outer boundary and L-shells in the heart of the belts at L˜4 and significantly less than the L-shell revisit time obtained from elliptically orbiting satellites such as the Van Allen Probes. We underline the importance of such boundary condition effects when seeking to identify the physical processes which explain the dominant behaviour of the Van Allen belts. We further examine implications for reaching science closure in identifying causality in radiation belt wave-particle dynamics, and in relation to observational requirements for accurate radiation belt forecasting. Overall we argue in general that the importance of boundary conditions is sometimes overlooked in comparison to the pursuit of (ever) increasingly accurate estimates of wave power and other wave properties used in empirical representations of wave transport and diffusion rates.

  5. Relativistic Electron Response to the Combined Magnetospheric Impact of a Coronal Mass Ejection Overlapping with a High-Speed Stream: Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanekal, S. G.; Baker, D. N.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, W.; Fennell, J. F.; Zheng, Y.; Richardson, I. G.; Jones, A.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Jaynes, A.; Li, X.; Blake, J. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    During early November 2013, the magnetosphere experienced concurrent driving by a coronal mass ejection (CME) during an ongoing high-speed stream (HSS) event. The relativistic electron response to these two kinds of drivers, i.e., HSS and CME, is typically different, with the former often leading to a slower buildup of electrons at larger radial distances, while the latter energizing electrons rapidly with flux enhancements occurring closer to the Earth. We present a detailed analysis of the relativistic electron response including radial profiles of phase space density as observed by both Magnetic Electron and Ion Sensor (MagEIS) and Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope instruments on the Van Allen Probes mission. Data from the MagEIS instrument establish the behavior of lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons which span both intermediary and seed populations during electron energization. Measurements characterizing the plasma waves and magnetospheric electric and magnetic fields during this period are obtained by the Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science instrument on board Van Allen Probes, Search Coil Magnetometer and Flux Gate Magnetometer instruments on board Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms, and the low-altitude Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites. These observations suggest that during this time period, both radial transport and local in situ processes are involved in the energization of electrons. The energization attributable to radial diffusion is most clearly evident for the lower energy (<1 MeV) electrons, while the effects of in situ energization by interaction of chorus waves are prominent in the higher-energy electrons.

  6. Detection of pentatetraene by reaction of the ethynyl radical (C2H) with allene (CH2=C=CH2) at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Goulay, Fabien; Soorkia, Satchin; Meloni, Giovanni; Osborn, David L; Taatjes, Craig A; Leone, Stephen R

    2011-12-14

    The reaction of ethynyl radical (C(2)H) with allene (C(3)H(4)) at room temperature is investigated using an improved synchrotron multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometer (MPIMS) coupled to tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation from the Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The orthogonal-accelerated time-of-flight mass spectrometer (OA-TOF) compared to the magnetic sector mass spectrometer used in a previous investigation of the title reaction (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2007, 9, 4291) enables more sensitive and selective detection of low-yield isomeric products. The C(5)H(4) isomer with the lowest ionization energy, pentatetraene, is now identified as a product of the reaction. Pentatetraene is predicted to be formed based on recent ab initio/RRKM calculations (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2010, 12, 2606) on the C(5)H(5) potential energy surface. However, the computed branching fraction for pentatetraene is predicted to be five times higher than that for methyldiacetylene, whereas experimentally the branching fraction of pentatetraene is observed to be small compared to that of methyldiacetylene. Although H-atom assisted isomerization of the products can affect isomer distribution measurements, isomerization has a negligible effect in this case. The kinetic behavior of the several C(5)H(4) isomers is identical, as obtained by time-dependent photoionization spectra. Even for high allene concentrations (and hence higher H-atom concentrations) no decay of the pentatetraene fraction is observed, indicating that H-assisted isomerization of pentatetraene to methyldiacetylene does not account for the difference between the experimental data and the theoretical branching ratios. PMID:22002654

  7. Sedimentary facies and petrophysical characteristics of cores from the lower Vicksburg gas reservoirs, McAllen Ranch field, Hidalgo County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Langford, R.P.; Maguregui, J. ); Howard, W.E.; Hall, J.D. )

    1990-09-01

    As part of an effort funded by the Gas Research Institute, the Department of Energy, and the State of Texas, and with the cooperation of Shell Oil Co., sandstones in the Vicksburg S (Oligocene) reservoir were cored in the McAllen Ranch gas field in the A. A. McAllen B- 17 and B- 18 wells. Detailed correlation of the cores with petrophysical data illustrates the controls of deposition and diagenesis on reservoir quality. The cores were drilled using oil-based mud, and special care in handling minimized evaporation. Core-derived water saturations were compared with log-calculated water saturations. Special core analyses of cementation factor, saturation exponent, and relative permeability were performed. Thin-section petrography and X-ray diffraction were used to determine mineralogy. The cores consist of prodelta and delta-front facies. Permeability and porosity generally increase with increasing grain size and are greatest in 1 to 2 ft thick zones within massive and laminated beds in the uppermost delta front. Porous intervals increase in abundance upward within the delta-front sandstones. Permeability variation over two orders of magnitude within the reservoir sands corresponds to diagenetic facies within the core. High permeability occurs only within thin bands. Trough cross-stratified sandstone is commonly porous only near the tops of the foresets. Differences in the character of the microresistivity curve of the high-resolution dipmeter log correlate with differences in cementation and with different depositional facies within the cores. Comparison of microresistivity logs and cores allows extrapolation of facies and cement characteristics and resulting reservoir properties to uncored intervals with the objective of maximizing recovery of natural gas.

  8. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  9. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  10. Improved vortex reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

    1995-05-09

    An improved vortex reactor system is described for affecting fast pyrolysis of biomass and Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) feed materials comprising: a vortex reactor having its axis vertically disposed in relation to a jet of a horizontally disposed steam ejector that impels feed materials from a feeder and solids from a recycle loop along with a motive gas into a top part of said reactor. 12 figs.

  11. FLOW SYSTEM FOR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Zinn, W.H.

    1963-06-11

    A reactor is designed with means for terminating the reaction when returning coolant is below a predetermined temperature. Coolant flowing from the reactor passes through a heat exchanger to a lower reservoir, and then circulates between the lower reservoir and an upper reservoir before being returned to the reactor. Means responsive to the temperature of the coolant in the return conduit terminate the chain reaction when the temperature reaches a predetermined minimum value. (AEC)

  12. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Dreffin, R.S.

    1959-12-15

    A control means for a nuclear reactor is described. Particularly a device extending into the active portion of the reactor consisting of two hollow elements coaxially disposed and forming a channel therebetween, the cross sectional area of the channel increasing from each extremity of the device towards the center thereof. An element of neutron absorbing material is slidably positionable within the inner hollow element and a fluid reactor poison is introduced into the channel defined by the two hollow elements.

  14. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, J.

    1996-03-19

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

  15. HOMOGENEOUS NUCLEAR POWER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1959-09-01

    A homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing forced circulation of the liquid fuel is described. The reactor does not require fuel handling outside of the reactor vessel during any normal operation including complete shutdown to room temperature, the reactor being selfregulating under extreme operating conditions and controlled by the thermal expansion of the liquid fuel. The liquid fuel utilized is a uranium, phosphoric acid, and water solution which requires no gus exhaust system or independent gas recombining system, thereby eliminating the handling of radioiytic gas.

  16. Pressurized fluidized bed reactor

    DOEpatents

    Isaksson, Juhani

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1959-02-10

    A reactor system incorporating a reactor of the heterogeneous boiling water type is described. The reactor is comprised essentially of a core submerged adwater in the lower half of a pressure vessel and two distribution rings connected to a source of water are disposed within the pressure vessel above the reactor core, the lower distribution ring being submerged adjacent to the uppcr end of the reactor core and the other distribution ring being located adjacent to the top of the pressure vessel. A feed-water control valve, responsive to the steam demand of the load, is provided in the feedwater line to the distribution rings and regulates the amount of feed water flowing to each distribution ring, the proportion of water flowing to the submerged distribution ring being proportional to the steam demand of the load. This invention provides an automatic means exterior to the reactor to control the reactivity of the reactor over relatively long periods of time without relying upon movement of control rods or of other moving parts within the reactor structure.

  18. Operating US power reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, E.G.

    1982-07-01

    The operation of US power reactors during March and April 1982 is summarized. Events of special note are discussed in the text, and the operational performance of all licensed power reactors is presented. These data are taken from the monthly Operating Units Status Report prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC).

  19. Light water reactor program

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  20. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  1. The Integral Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I. ); Lineberry, M.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Status of French reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  3. Reactor neutrino monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuillier, D.

    2009-03-01

    Nuclear reactors are the most intense man-controlled sources of antineutrinos and as such have hosted number of key physics experiments, from the antineutrino discovery to modern oscillation measurements. At the present time, both detection technology and understanding of fundamental physics are mature enough to think about antineutrinos as a new tool for reactor monitoring. We describe below how antineutrinos can provide online information on reactor operation and amount of plutonium accumulated in the core. Reactors are the only sources of plutonium on earth and this element can be chemically separated from the rest of the nuclear fuel and diverted into nuclear weapons. We present in the next sections the unique features antineutrino detectors could provide to safeguards agencies such as IAEA. We review the worldwide efforts to develop small ( 1m scale) antineutrino detectors dedicated to automated and non-intrusive reactor monitoring.

  4. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  5. Statistics of VLF/ELF emissions at subauroral latitudes in Athabasca, Canada and their correspondence to the Van Allen Probes observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez C, C.; Shiokawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Keika, K.; Ozaki, M.; Schofield, I.; Connors, M. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2014-12-01

    Using a high-sampling rate (100 kHz) loop antenna installed at subauroral latitudes in Athabasca (ATH), Canada (54.7N, 246.7E, L=4) we have been able to continuously monitor VLF/ELF emissions since September 2012. Several types of VLF/ELF emissions were observed, including chorus, hiss and quasi-periodic emissions. We report statistics of VLF/ELF emissions using a one-year data set from November 1, 2012 until October 31, 2013. Using 10 minute and 24 hour spectra, we selected clearly defined emissions with a minimum intensity of 2.10-5 pT2/Hz and recorded their starting time, duration, frequency range and spectral characteristics. This data set allowed us to calculate their occurrence rate as a function of AE, Dst and other geomagnetic parameters. We found similar occurrence rates on the ground in all cases, showing a peak around 07 MLT (7-10%) and a minimum from 18 to 02 MLT (1-3%), in agreement with previous satellite measurements at the geomagnetic equator. However, occurrence rates on the ground can be 8 times lower than those observed at the equator. This could be caused by the ionosphere preventing some frequencies to go all the way through, but could also suggest an interference in the propagation process between the generation region in the geomagnetic equator and the ground. To investigate this, we compared this data set of VLF/ELF emissions with the observations made by the Van Allen Probes near the equatorial plane. We found 77 conjugate events for which the footprints of either the Van Allen Probes A or B (or both) were within 1000 km of ATH. Using the L2 magnetic field data from the EMFISIS instrument (CDF files available at https://emfisis.physics.uiowa.edu/), we were able to determine that the satellites observed VLF/ELF emissions for at least 54 of those events, suggesting that the spatial extent of the emissions is large. Within these events, we found 8 cases showing similar frequency and spectral features on the ground and on the satellite(s). We

  6. Quantifying Energy-Time Dispersion of Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Constrain Their Generation Mechanism: Coordinated Studies Using FIREBIRD, Van Allen Probes, and BARREL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Crew, A. B.; Fennell, J. F.; Klumpar, D. M.; Larsen, B.; Millan, R. M.; Miyoshi, Y.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Reeves, G. D.; Smith, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we quantify properties of relativistic electron precipitation at low altitudes in order to constrain the mechanism(s) for microburst loss occurring in Earth's radiation belt. Though studied for decades, the physical mechanism(s) responsible for the loss of radiation belt particles through microburst precipitation to the atmosphere remains uncertain, and, unquantified in a global sense. Accordingly, we appeal to new measurements from the NSF FIREBIRD (Focused Investigation of Relativistic Electron Burst Intensity Range and Dynamics) mission. FIREBIRD comprises two 1.5U CubeSats launched in early 2015 into identical coplanar polar low altitude orbits; a small spring imparted a slow separation between the two spacecraft upon orbit insertion. Over the course of the mission, the orbits of the two identically-instrumented spacecraft slowly evolve, sampling spatial scales of electron precipitation measured simultaneously at separations of 10's to 1000's of kilometers. FIREBIRD provides electron energy spectra from ~250 keV to > 1MeV, with both high spectral resolution (6 to 12 energy channels) and high temporal resolution (principally operated at ~18 millisecond sampling). To do so, FIREBIRD employs two solid-state detectors on each CubeSat, one an uncollimated detector with a large geometric factor (optimized for weak events) and the other a collimated detector (optimized for intense events). While the primary goal of FIREBIRD is to establish the spatial/temporal coherence of microburst precipitation, it also provides the capability of quantifying on each spacecraft the dispersive properties of microbursts. In this work, we report on the energy-time dispersive qualities of individual bursts, which in turn provide a means for testing models and constraining where and how the bursts are generated. To test these models, we use measurements made near the magnetic equator by the Van Allen Probes mission during times when the two FIREBIRD and two Van Allen

  7. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  8. Effects of Jefferson Road stormwater-detention basin on loads and concentrations of selected chemical constituents in East Branch of Allen Creek at Pittsford, Monroe County, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Discharge and water-quality data collection at East Branch Allen Creek from 1990 through 2000 provide a basis for estimating the effect of the Jefferson Road detention basin on loads and concentrations of chemical constituents downstream from the basin. Mean monthly flow for the 5 years prior to construction of the detention basin (8.71 ft3/s) was slightly lower than after (9.08 ft3/s). The slightly higher mean monthly flow after basin construction may have been influenced by the peak flow for the period of record that occurred in July 1998 or variations in flow diverted from the canal. No statistically significant difference in average monthly mean flow before and after basin installation was indicated. Total phosphorus was the only constituent to show no months with significant differences in load after basin construction. Several constituents showed months with significantly smaller loads after basin construction than before, whereas some constituents showed certain months with smaller and some months with greater loads, after basin construction. Statistical analysis of the 'mean monthly load' for all months before and all months after construction of the detention basin showed only one constituent (ammonia + organic nitrogen) with a significantly lower load after construction and none with higher loads. Median concentrations of ammonia + organic nitrogen showed a statistically significant decrease (from 0.78 mg/L to 0.60 mg/L) after basin installation, as did nitrite + nitrate (from 1.50 mg/L to 0.96 mg/L); in contrast, the median concentration of dissolved chloride increased from 95.5 mg/L before basin installation to 109 mg/L thereafter. A trend analysis of constituent concentrations before and after installation of the detention basin showed that total phosphorus had a downward trend after installation. Analysis of the data collected at East Branch Allen Creek indicates that the Jefferson Road detention basin, in some cases, provides an improvement

  9. Nuclear reactor control column

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-08-10

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  10. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  11. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  12. Slurry reactor design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. ); Akgerman, A. ); Smith, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  13. REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REACTOR BASE, SOUTHEAST CORNER. INTERIOR WILL CONTAIN REACTOR TANK, COOLING WATER PIPES, COOLING AIR DUCTS, AND SHIELDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. 776. Unknown Photographer, 10/1950 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  14. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    SciTech Connect

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  15. Reactor safety assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category.

  16. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Martin Peng, Y.K.M.

    1985-10-03

    The object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with dramatic simplification of plasma confinement design. Another object of this invention is to provide a compact torus fusion reactor with low magnetic field and small aspect ratio stable plasma confinement. In accordance with the principles of this invention there is provided a compact toroidal-type plasma confinement fusion reactor in which only the indispensable components inboard of a tokamak type of plasma confinement region, mainly a current conducting medium which carries electrical current for producing a toroidal magnet confinement field about the toroidal plasma region, are retained.

  17. NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Metcalf, H.E.

    1958-10-14

    Methods of controlling reactors are presented. Specifically, a plurality of neutron absorber members are adjustably disposed in the reactor core at different distances from the center thereof. The absorber members extend into the core from opposite faces thereof and are operated by motive means coupled in a manner to simultaneously withdraw at least one of the absorber members while inserting one of the other absorber members. This feature effects fine control of the neutron reproduction ratio by varying the total volume of the reactor effective in developing the neutronic reaction.

  18. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    DOEpatents

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  19. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  20. Nuclear reactor reflector

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Ronald J.; Land, John T.; Misvel, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear reactor reflector is disclosed that comprises a stack of reflector blocks with vertical water flow passages to cool the reflector. The interface between blocks is opposite support points for reactor fuel rods. Water flows between the reflector and the reactor barrel from passages in a bottom block. The top block contains a flange to limit this flow and the flange has a slot to receive an alignment pin that is welded to the barrel. The pin is held in the slot by two removable shims. Alignment bars extend the length of the stack in slots machined in each block when the stack is assembled.