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Sample records for allergen challenge responses

  1. Effect of Formaldehyde on Asthmatic Response to Inhaled Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ezratty, Véronique; Bonay, Marcel; Neukirch, Catherine; Orset-Guillossou, Gaëlle; Dehoux, Monique; Koscielny, Serge; Cabanes, Pierre-André; Lambrozo, Jacques; Aubier, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde may lead to exacerbation of asthma. Objectives Our aim in this study was to investigate whether exposure to a low level (500 μg/m3) of formaldehyde enhances inhaled allergen responses. Methods Twelve subjects with intermittent asthma and allergy to pollen were exposed, at rest, in a double-blind crossover study to either formaldehyde or purified air for 60 min. The order of exposure to formaldehyde and air-only was randomized, and exposures were separated by 2 weeks. We also performed an allergen inhalation challenge after each exposure. Airway responsiveness to methacholine and lower airway inflammation (induced sputum) were assessed 8 hr after allergen challenge. Results The median dose of allergen producing a 15% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (PD15FEV1) was 0.80 IR (index of reactivity) after formaldehyde exposure compared with 0.25 IR after air-only exposure (p = 0.06). Formaldehyde exposure did not affect allergen-induced increase in responsiveness to methacholine (p = 0.42). We found no formaldehyde-associated effect on the airway inflammatory response, in particular the eosinophilic inflammatory response, induced by the allergen challenge 8 hr before. Conclusion In this study, exposure to 500 μg/m3 formaldehyde had no significant deleterious effect on airway allergen responsiveness of patients with intermittent asthma; we found a trend toward a protective effect. PMID:17384766

  2. Increased allergen-specific Th2 responses in vitro in atopic subjects receiving subclinical allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, S; Paulie, S; Roquet, A; Ihre, E; Lagging, E; van Hage-Hamsten, M; Härfast, B; Troye-Blomberg, M

    1997-08-01

    The study aimed to determine whether inhalation of subclinical allergen doses-leads to a shift in the balance between T helper (Th) 1 and Th2 cells in asthmatic patients. Elevated IgE requires allergen-specific T cells producing cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4 or IL-13. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) produced by Th1 cells counteracts the effects of IL-4. In nature, allergic persons are often exposed to low levels of allergen, leading to hyperreactivity, but not to acute allergic reactions. In this study, nine allergic persons inhaled low doses of allergen or placebo in a double-blind manner over seven consecutive weekdays. During the study, the bronchial responsiveness to histamine challenge increased, but no subject exhibited asthmatic symptoms. Blood was drawn on days 0, 1, 4, and 9, and the number of IL-4- and IFN-gamma-producing cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay after in vitro stimulation with a low-dose phytohemagglutinin (PHA) mixed with the relevant allergen or with PHA alone. In three of the four subjects receiving allergen, the IL-4/IFN-gamma ratio increased during the time of the study. No increase was seen in the placebo group. No increase was seen in serum IgE levels in any of the groups. We conclude that a shift in the balance between Th1 and Th2 cells can be detected in subjects exposed to subclinical allergen doses. PMID:9284986

  3. Ozone exposure increases eosinophilic airway response induced by previous allergen challenge.

    PubMed

    Vagaggini, Barbara; Taccola, Mauro; Cianchetti, Silvana; Carnevali, Stefano; Bartoli, Maria Laura; Bacci, Elena; Dente, Federico L; Di Franco, Antonella; Giannini, Daniele; Paggiaro, Pier Luigi

    2002-10-15

    We investigated whether exposure to ozone (O(3)) 24 hours after an allergen challenge test would increase airway eosinophilia induced by allergen in subjects with mild asthma with late airway response. Twelve subjects with mild atopic asthma participated in a randomized, single-blind study. Subjects underwent allergen challenge 24 hours before a 2 hour exposure to O(3) (0.27 ppm) or filtered air. Pulmonary function was monitored during the allergen challenge and after the exposure to O(3) or air. Six hours later, induced sputum was collected. After 4 weeks, the experiment was repeated with the same subjects. Allergen induced a comparable late airway response in both challenges. O(3) exposure induced a significant decrease in FVC, FEV(1), and vital capacity, and was associated with a significant increase in total symptom score compared with air exposure. The percentage of eosinophils, but not the percentage of neutrophils, in induced sputum was significantly higher after exposure to O(3) than after exposure to air (p = 0.04). These results indicate that O(3) exposure after a late airway response elicited by allergen challenge can potentiate the eosinophilic inflammatory response induced by the allergen challenge itself in subjects with mild atopic asthma. This observation may help explain the synergistic effect of air pollution and allergen exposure in the exacerbation of asthma. PMID:12379550

  4. The inhaled phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor GSK256066 reduces allergen challenge responses in asthma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    GSK256066 is a selective phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor that can be given by inhalation, minimising the potential for side effects. We evaluated the effects of GSK256066 on airway responses to allergen challenge in mild asthmatics. Methods In a randomised, double blind, cross-over study, 24 steroid naive atopic asthmatics with both early (EAR) and late (LAR) responses to inhaled allergen received inhaled GSK256066 87.5 mcg once per day and placebo for 7 days, followed by allergen challenge. Methacholine reactivity was measured 24 h post-allergen. Plasma pharmacokinetics were measured. The primary endpoint was the effect on LAR. Results GSK256066 significantly reduced the LAR, attenuating the fall in minimum and weighted mean FEV1 by 26.2% (p = 0.007) and 34.3% (p = 0.005) respectively compared to placebo. GSK256066 significantly reduced the EAR, inhibiting the fall in minimum and weighted mean FEV1 by 40.9% (p = 0.014) and 57.2% (p = 0.014) respectively compared to placebo. There was no effect on pre-allergen FEV1 or methacholine reactivity post allergen. GSK256066 was well tolerated, with low systemic exposure; plasma levels were not measurable after 4 hours in the majority of subjects. Conclusions GSK256066 demonstrated a protective effect on the EAR and LAR. This is the first inhaled PDE4 inhibitor to show therapeutic potential in asthma. Trial Registration This study is registered on clinicaltrials.gov NCT00380354 PMID:20193079

  5. Allergic Non-Asthmatic Adults Have Regional Pulmonary Responses to Segmental Allergen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Vanessa J.; Winkler, Tilo; Venegas, Jose G.; Kone, Mamary; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Afshar, Roshi; Cho, Josalyn L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Harris, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Background Allergic non-asthmatic (ANA) adults experience upper airway symptoms of allergic disease such as rhinorrhea, congestion and sneezing without symptoms of asthma. The aim of this study was to utilize PET-CT functional imaging to determine whether allergen challenge elicits a pulmonary response in ANA subjects or whether their allergic disease is truly isolated to the upper airways. Methods In 6 ANA subjects, bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed at baseline and 24h after instillation of an allergen and a diluent in separate lung lobes. After instillation (10h), functional imaging was performed to quantify and compare regional perfusion, ventilation, fractional gas content (Fgas), and glucose uptake rate (Ki) between the baseline, diluent and allergen lobes. BAL cell counts were also compared. Results In ANA subjects, compared to the baseline and diluent lobes, perfusion and ventilation were significantly lower in the allergen lobe (median [inter-quartile range], baseline vs. diluent vs. allergen: Mean-normalized perfusion; 0.87 [0.85–0.97] vs. 0.90 [0.86–0.98] vs. 0.59 [0.55–0.67]; p<0.05. Mean-normalized ventilation 0.89 [0.88–0.98] vs. 0.95 [0.89–1.02] vs. 0.63 [0.52–0.67], p<0.05). In contrast, no significant differences were found in Fgas between baseline, diluent and allergen lobes or in Ki. Total cell counts, eosinophil and neutrophil cell counts (cells/ml BAL) were significantly greater in the allergen lobe compared to the baseline lobe (all P<0.05). Conclusions Despite having no clinical symptoms of a lower airway allergic response (cough and wheeze) allergic non-asthmatic subjects have a pulmonary response to allergen exposure which manifests as reduced ventilation and perfusion. PMID:26640951

  6. Using magnetic resonance imaging to quantify the inflammatory response following allergen challenge in allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Leaker, Brian R; Scadding, Glenis; Jones, C Richard; Barnes, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Current rhinometric and flow assessments measure nasal patency and are often poorly correlated with rhinitis symptoms. To evaluate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a new method to measure inflammatory changes in nasal and sinus mucosa following nasal allergen challenge. A pilot study (n = 6) determined the optimal technical settings for MRI to measure inflammatory change which were then adopted for the main study. This study was a single blind, placebo-controlled, three-way crossover trial in 14 subjects with seasonal allergic rhinitis. Effects of cetirizine, cetirizine and pseudoephedrine (Cet+PE), or placebo on total nasal symptom scores (TNSS), peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), nasal nitric oxide (nNO), acoustic rhinometry, and MRI end points following nasal intranasal allergen challenge were measured. There were significant changes in all parameters after allergen challenge (P < 0.01), except for nNO. MRI end points were less variable and more consistent than PNIF and acoustic rhinometry in detecting changes after allergen challenge. Total nasal airspace volume was the most sensitive and reproducible MRI measurement, with a mean reduction from -5.37 cm(3) (95%CI -7.35, -3.38; P < 0.001), which was maximal 60 min after allergen challenge. A change of one in TNSS corresponded to a change in MRI volume of -0.57 cm(3). There was an improvement in all parameters (except nNO) in subjects taking Cet+PE compared with placebo, however this did not achieve significance probably because of the small study size (overall analysis P > 0.07; comparison of active versus placebo P > 0.09). MRI provides novel insights into the anatomical inflammatory changes post allergen challenge and provides a new method for assessment of nasal patency and objective measurement of inflammatory responses. PMID:26733348

  7. Assessing mucus and airway morphology in response to a segmental allergen challenge using OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Holz, Jasmin A.; Szabari, Margit V.; Hariri, Lida P.; Harris, R. Scott; Cho, Jocelyn L.; Hamilos, Daniel L.; Luster, Andrew D.; Medoff, Benjamin D.; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Asthma affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and the prevalence of the disease appears to be increasing. One of the most important aspects of asthma is the excessive bronchoconstriction that results in many of the symptoms experienced by asthma sufferers, but the relationship between bronchoconstriction and airway morphology is not clearly established. We present the imaging results of a study involving a segmental allergen challenge given to both allergic asthmatic (n = 12) and allergic non-asthmatic (n = 19) human volunteers. Using OCT, we have imaged and assessed baseline morphology in a right upper lobe (RUL) airway, serving as the control, and a right middle lobe (RML) airway, in which the allergen was to be administered. After a period of 24 hours had elapsed following the administration of the allergen, both airways were again imaged and the response morphology assessed. A number of airway parameters were measured and compared, including epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness and buckling, lumen area, and mucus content. We found that at baseline epithelial thickness, mucosal thickness, and mucosal buckling were greater in AAs than ANAs. We also observed statistically significant increases in these values 24 hours after the allergen had been administered for both the ANA and AA sets. In comparison, the control airway which received a diluent showed no statistically significant change.

  8. Comparative responses to nasal allergen challenge in allergic rhinitic subjects with or without asthma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) is useful to study the pathophysiology of rhinitis, and multiple challenges may more adequately approximate natural exposure. Objective To determine the effect of 4 consecutive daily NAC, on clinical and inflammatory parameters in rhinitics with or without asthma. Methods Rhinitic subjects were recruited: 19 with mild asthma and 13 without asthma. Subjects underwent a control challenge (normal saline) followed by 4 consecutive daily NAC. Allergen challenge consisted of spraying the chosen allergen extract into each nostril until a positive nasal response occurred. Symptoms were recorded on a Likert scale, and oral peak expiratory and nasal peak inspiratory flows allowed assessment of a nasal blockage index (NBI), for a period of 7 hours. Induced sputum and nasal lavage were performed on control day and after 1 and 4 days of NAC. Results Compared with the control day, there was a significant increase in symptom scores and NBI 10 minutes after each last daily NAC in both groups (p < 0.05). Symptom scores and NBI were similar for the 2 groups, except for nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea, which were more marked in subjects with asthma and rhinitis, respectively. Nasal lavage eosinophils were increased after 4 days of challenges in both groups, but there was no change in sputum eosinophils. No cumulative effect or any late response were observed in any of the groups over the challenge period. Conclusion Multiple NAC may be a useful tool to study the pathophysiology of allergic rhinitis or its relationships with asthma. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01286129 PMID:21507261

  9. Expression of surface markers on the blood cells during the delayed asthmatic response to allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients with bronchial asthma develop various types of asthmatic response to bronchial challenge with allergen, such as immediate/early asthmatic response (IAR), late asthmatic response (LAR) or delayed asthmatic response (DYAR), because of different immunologic mechanisms. The DYAR, occurring between 24 and 56 hours after the bronchial allergen challenge (p < 0.01), differs from IAR and LAR in clinical as well as immunologic features. This study investigates the expression of CD molecules (markers) on the surface of particular cell populations in the peripheral blood and their changes during the DYAR. In 17 patients developing the DYAR (p < 0.01), the bronchial challenge with allergen was repeated 2–6 weeks later. The repeated DYAR (p < 0.001) was combined with recording of CD molecule expression on various types of blood cells by means of flow cytometry up to 72 hours after the challenge. The results were expressed in percent of the mean relative fluorescence intensity. The DYAR was accompanied by (a) increased expression of CD11b, CD11b/18, CD16,CD32, CD35, CD62E, CD62L, CD64, and CD66b on neutrophils; CD203C on basophils; CD25 and CD62L on eosinophils; CD14, CD16, CD64, and CD86 on monocytes; CD3, CD4, CD8, CD11a, CD18, and CD69 on lymphocytes; CD16, CD56, CD57, and CD94 on natural killer (NK) cells; and CD31, CD41, CD61, CD62P, and CD63 on thrombocytes and (b) decreased expression of CD18 and CD62L on eosinophils, CD15 on neutrophils, and CD40 on lymphocytes. These results suggest involvement of cell-mediated hypersensitivity mechanism, on participation of Th1- lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes, NK cells, and thrombocytes in the DYAR. PMID:24988283

  10. Inhibition of the asthmatic allergen challenge response by the CRTH2 antagonist OC000459.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dave; Cadden, Paul; Hunter, Michael; Pearce Collins, Lisa; Perkins, Mike; Pettipher, Roy; Townsend, Elizabeth; Vinall, Shân; O'Connor, Brian

    2013-01-01

    CRTH2 (chemoattractant receptor expressed on T-helper (Th) type 2 cells) is a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed by Th2 lymphocytes and eosinophils that mediates prostaglandin (PG)D(2)-driven chemotaxis. We studied the efficacy of the oral CRTH2 antagonist OC000459 in steroid-naïve asthmatic patients. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-way crossover study of 16 days' treatment with OC000459 (200 mg twice daily) on the late (LAR) and early (EAR) asthmatic responses to bronchial allergen challenge was conducted, with 16 subjects completing the study. There was a 25.4% (95% CI 5.1-45.6%) reduction in the LAR area under the curve (AUC) for change in forced expiratory volume in 1 s with OC000459 compared with placebo (p=0.018) but no effect on the EAR. Sputum eosinophil counts at 1 day post-allergen challenge were lower after OC000459 treatment (p=0.002). PGD(2)-induced blood eosinophil shape change ex vivo was assessed at day 7 (n=7). The AUC of eosinophil shift for OC000459 was lower than placebo; the mean difference was -33.6% (95% CI -66.8- -0.4%; p=0.048). OC000459 treatment inhibited LAR and post-allergen increase in sputum eosinophils. This CRTH2 antagonist appears to inhibit allergic inflammation in asthma. PMID:22496329

  11. Allergen-induced airway responses.

    PubMed

    Gauvreau, Gail M; El-Gammal, Amani I; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2015-09-01

    Environmental allergens are an important cause of asthma and can contribute to loss of asthma control and exacerbations. Allergen inhalation challenge has been a useful clinical model to examine the mechanisms of allergen-induced airway responses and inflammation. Allergen bronchoconstrictor responses are the early response, which reaches a maximum within 30 min and resolves by 1-3 h, and late responses, when bronchoconstriction recurs after 3-4 h and reaches a maximum over 6-12 h. Late responses are followed by an increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. These responses occur when IgE on mast cells is cross-linked by an allergen, causing degranulation and the release of histamine, neutral proteases and chemotactic factors, and the production of newly formed mediators, such as cysteinyl leukotrienes and prostaglandin D2. Allergen-induced airway inflammation consists of an increase in airway eosinophils, basophils and, less consistently, neutrophils. These responses are mediated by the trafficking and activation of myeloid dendritic cells into the airways, probably as a result of the release of epithelial cell-derived thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines from type 2 helper T-cells. Allergen inhalation challenge has also been a widely used model to study potential new therapies for asthma and has an excellent negative predictive value for this purpose. PMID:26206871

  12. Allergen challenge induces Ifng dependent GTPases in the lungs as part of a Th1 transcriptome response in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Dharajiya, Nilesh; Vaidya, Swapnil; Sinha, Mala; Luxon, Bruce; Boldogh, Istvan; Sur, Sanjiv

    2009-01-01

    According to the current paradigm, allergic airway inflammation is mediated by Th2 cytokines and pro-inflammatory chemokines. Since allergic inflammation is self-limited, we hypothesized that allergen challenge simultaneously induces anti-inflammatory genes to counter-balance the effects of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. To identify these putative anti-inflammatory genes, we compared the gene expression profile in the lungs of ragweed-sensitized mice four hours after challenge with either PBS or ragweed extract (RWE) using a micro-array platform. Consistent with our hypothesis, RWE challenge concurrently upregulated Th1-associated early target genes of the Il12/Stat4 pathway, such as p47 and p65 GTPases (Iigp, Tgtp and Gbp1), Socs1, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Gadd45g with the Th2 genes Il4, Il5, Ccl2 and Ccl7. These Th1-associated genes remain upregulated longer than the Th2 genes. Augmentation of the local Th1 milieu by administration of Il12 or CpG prior to RWE challenge further upregulated these Th1 genes. Abolition of the Th1 response by disrupting the Ifng gene increased allergic airway inflammation and abrogated RWE challenge-induced upregulation of GTPases, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Socs1, but not Gadd45g. Our data demonstrate that allergen challenge induces two sets of Th1-associated genes in the lungs: 1) Ifng-dependent genes such as p47 and p65 GTPases, Socs1, Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 and 2) Ifng-independent Th1-inducing genes like Gadd45g. We propose that allergen-induced airway inflammation is regulated by simultaneous upregulation of Th1 and Th2 genes, and that persistent unopposed upregulation of Th1 genes resolves allergic inflammation. PMID:20027288

  13. High- and low-dose allergen challenges in asthmatic patients using inhaled corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wha-Yong; Southworth, Thomas; Booth, Steven; Singh, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Aims The inhaled allergen challenge model has been used previously to investigate the effects of novel anti-inflammatory drugs in inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)-naïve asthmatics. The aim of this study was to characterize high- and low-dose allergen challenges in asthmatic patients using ICS. Methods Twenty-eight asthmatic patients taking ICS (beclomethasone equivalent <1000 μg day−1) were recruited for high-dose allergen challenge, of whom 10 subsequently also had a repeat low-dose challenge comprising seven allergen challenges. Induced sputum was collected for measurements of cell counts and supernatant biomarkers. Results The high-dose allergen challenge caused an early and late asthmatic response in 19 of 28 patients; the mean maximal fall in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 29.1% (SD 6.2%) and 25.1% (SD 9.6%), respectively. There was also an increase in sputum eosinophils of 6.2% (P = 0.0004), as well as supernatant eosinophil cationic protein levels. The low-dose allergen challenge caused an acute fall in FEV1, but had no effect on FEV1 at 24 h after challenge or sputum measurements. Conclusions The high-dose allergen challenge in asthmatics using ICS induces a late asthmatic response associated with an increase in eosinophilic airway inflammation. This may be a suitable model for studying the effects of novel anti-inflammatory drugs added to maintenance ICS treatment. PMID:25214200

  14. Nasal mucosal blood flow after intranasal allergen challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, K.; Bake, B.; Pipkorn, U.

    1988-03-01

    The nasal mucosal blood flow in patients with allergic rhinitis was determined at nasal allergen challenges with the /sup 133/Xenon washout method. Determinations were made in 12 subjects before and 15 minutes after challenge with diluent and increasing doses of allergen. The time course was followed in eight subjects by means of repeated measurements during 1 hour after a single allergen dose. Finally, the blood flow was measured after unilateral allergen challenge in the contralateral nasal cavity. A dose-dependent decrease in blood flow was found after nasal challenge with increasing doses of allergens, whereas challenge with diluent alone did not induce any changes. The highest allergen dose, which also induced pronounced nasal symptoms, resulted in a decrease in blood flow of 25% (p less than 0.001). The time-course study demonstrated a maximum decrease in blood flow 10 to 20 minutes after challenge and then a gradual return to baseline. Unilateral allergen challenge resulted in a decrease in blood flow in the contralateral, unchallenged nasal cavity, suggesting that part of the allergen-induced changes in blood flow were reflex mediated.

  15. T-cell response to allergens.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening IgE-dependent type 1 hypersensitivity reaction in which multiple organ systems are involved. The existence of allergen exposure and specific IgE are the major contributors to this systemic reaction. The decision of the immune system to respond to allergens is highly dependent on factors including the type and load of allergen, behavior and type of antigen-presenting cells, innate immune response stimulating substances in the same micromilieu, the tissue of exposure, interactions between T and B lymphocytes, costimulators, and genetic propensity known as atopy. Antigen-presenting cells introduce processed allergens to T-helper lymphocytes, where a decision of developing different types of T-cell immunity is given under the influence of several cytokines, chemokines, costimulatory signals and regulatory T cells. Among Th2-type cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 are responsible for class switching in B cells, which results in production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies that bind to specific receptors on mast cells and basophils. After re-exposure to the sensitized allergen, this phase is followed by activation of IgE Fc receptors on mast cells and basophils resulting in biogenic mediator releases responsible for the symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis. Since the discovery of regulatory T cells, the concepts of immune regulation have substantially changed during the last decade. Peripheral T-cell tolerance is a key immunologic mechanism in healthy immune response to self antigens and non-infectious non-self antigens. Both naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible populations of allergen-specific, IL-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells inhibit allergen-specific effector cells and have been shown to play a central role in the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis and the establishment of controlled immune responses. On the other hand, Th17 cells are characterized by their IL-17 (or IL-17A), IL-17F, IL-6

  16. Repeated allergen exposure reduce early phase airway response and leukotriene release despite upregulation of 5-lipoxygenase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergen induced early phase airway response and airway plasma exudation are predominantly mediated by inflammatory mast cell mediators including histamine, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether repeated allergen exposure affects early phase airway response to allergen challenge. Methods A trimellitic anhydride (TMA) sensitized guinea pig model was used to investigate the effects of low dose repeated allergen exposure on cholinergic airway responsiveness, early phase airway response and plasma exudation, as well as local airway production of mast cell derived cysteinyl leukotrienes and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) after allergen challenge. Results Repeated low dose allergen exposure increased cholinergic airway responsiveness. In contrast, early phase airway response and plasma exudation in response to a high-dose allergen challenge were strongly attenuated after repeated low dose allergen exposure. Inhibition of the airway response was unspecific to exposed allergen and independent of histamine receptor blocking. Furthermore, a significant reduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2 was found in the airways of animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen. However, in vitro stimulation of airway tissue from animals repeatedly exposed to a low dose allergen with arachidonic acid and calcium ionophore (A23187) induced production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and TXB2, suggesting enhanced activity of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase pathways. Conclusions The inhibition of the early phase airway response, cysteinyl leukotriene and TXB2 production after repeated allergen exposure may result from unresponsive effector cells. PMID:22439792

  17. Setting Occupational Exposure Limits for Chemical Allergens--Understanding the Challenges.

    PubMed

    Dotson, G S; Maier, A; Siegel, P D; Anderson, S E; Green, B J; Stefaniak, A B; Codispoti, C D; Kimber, I

    2015-01-01

    Chemical allergens represent a significant health burden in the workplace. Exposures to such chemicals can cause the onset of a diverse group of adverse health effects triggered by immune-mediated responses. Common responses associated with workplace exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) chemical allergens range from allergic contact dermatitis to life-threatening cases of asthma. Establishing occupational exposure limits (OELs) for chemical allergens presents numerous difficulties for occupational hygiene professionals. Few OELs have been developed for LMW allergens because of the unique biological mechanisms that govern the immune-mediated responses. The purpose of this article is to explore the primary challenges confronting the establishment of OELs for LMW allergens. Specific topics include: (1) understanding the biology of LMW chemical allergies as it applies to setting OELs; (2) selecting the appropriate immune-mediated response (i.e., sensitization versus elicitation); (3) characterizing the dose (concentration)-response relationship of immune-mediated responses; (4) determining the impact of temporal exposure patterns (i.e., cumulative versus acute exposures); and (5) understanding the role of individual susceptibility and exposure route. Additional information is presented on the importance of using alternative exposure recommendations and risk management practices, including medical surveillance, to aid in protecting workers from exposures to LMW allergens when OELs cannot be established. PMID:26583909

  18. Allergen Challenge Chamber: an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jerzy; Wojas, Oksana; Piekarska, Barbara; Sybilski, Adam; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2015-01-01

    The Allergen Challenge Chamber (ACC) is definitely a serious challenge on the one hand and an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis on the other. The gradual validation of the chamber (according to the test protocol) will allow for standardisation, which is a process undertaken by centres worldwide. The process of designing a consistent system that allows for creating conditions as those in the case of natural inhalation took into account all the aspects (technical specification) necessary to ensure appropriate inhalation. PMID:26755904

  19. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals. PMID:25661054

  20. Translating reference doses into allergen management practice: challenges for stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Crevel, René W R; Baumert, Joseph L; Luccioli, Stefano; Baka, Athanasia; Hattersley, Sue; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B; Ronsmans, Stefan; Timmermans, Frans; Ward, Rachel; Chung, Yong-joo

    2014-05-01

    Risk assessment describes the impact of a particular hazard as a function of dose and exposure. It forms the foundation of risk management and contributes to the overall decision-making process, but is not its endpoint. This paper outlines a risk analysis framework to underpin decision-making in the area of allergen cross-contact. Specifically, it identifies challenges relevant to each component of the risk analysis: risk assessment (data gaps and output interpretation); risk management (clear and realistic objectives); and risk communication (clear articulation of risk and benefit). Translation of the outputs from risk assessment models into risk management measures must be informed by a clear understanding of the model outputs and their limitations. This will lead to feasible and achievable risk management objectives, grounded in a level of risk accepted by the different stakeholders, thereby avoiding potential unintended detrimental consequences. Clear, consistent and trustworthy communications actively involving all stakeholders underpin these objectives. The conclusions, integrating the perspectives of different stakeholders, offer a vision where clear, science-based benchmarks form the basis of allergen management and labelling, cutting through the current confusion and uncertainty. Finally, the paper recognises that the proposed framework must be adaptable to new and emerging evidence. PMID:24491260

  1. Mechanism of airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized Brown Norway rats

    PubMed Central

    Hannon, J P; Tigani, B; Williams, I; Mazzoni, L; Fozard, J R

    2001-01-01

    We have explored the role of allergen sensitization and challenge in defining the response of the airways of the Brown Norway (BN) rat to adenosine. In naïve animals or in rats sensitized to ovalbumin (OA) adenosine induced only weak bronchoconstrictor responses. Challenge of sensitized animals with OA induced a marked airway hyperresponsiveness to adenosine which was not seen with methacholine or bradykinin. The augmented bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine was not affected by acute bivagotomy or atropine nor mimicked by an i.v. injection of capsaicin. It was, however, blocked selectively by disodium cromoglycate methysergide or ketanserin and reduced in animals treated sub-chronically with compound 48/80. The augmented response to adenosine was associated with increases in the plasma concentrations of both histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which were attenuated by pretreatment with disodium cromoglycate, and degranulation of mast cells in the lung. Parenchymal strips from lungs removed from sensitized rats challenged with OA gave augmented bronchoconstrictor responses to adenosine relative to strips from sensitized animals challenged with saline. Responses were inhibited by methysergide and disodium cromoglycate. These data demonstrate a marked augmentation of the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine in actively sensitized BN rats challenged with OA. The augmented response is primarily a consequence of mast cell activation, leading to the release of 5-HT, which in turn induces bronchoconstriction. Our data further suggest the involvement of a discrete lung-based population of mast cells containing and releasing mainly 5-HT and brought into play by prior exposure to allergen. PMID:11264245

  2. Induction of Allergic Responses to Peanut Allergen in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Van Gramberg, Jenna L.; de Veer, Michael J.; O'Hehir, Robyn E.; Meeusen, Els N. T.; Bischof, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Peanut allergy is the leading cause of deaths due to food-induced anaphylaxis but despite continued research, there are currently no specific treatments available. Challenge testing is limited in patients due to the high risk of adverse reactions, emphasising the need for an appropriate animal model. In the present study we examine the induction of allergic responses in a sheep model for peanut allergy. Sheep were sensitised with peanut (PN) extract and in separate injections with ovalbumin (OVA) or house dust mite (HDM) extract. Serum PN-specific IgE responses were detected in 40–50% of immunised sheep, while only 10% (1 of 10 sheep) showed detectable OVA-specific IgE. All PN-allergic sheep tested showed an Ara h 1-specific IgE response, while four out of five allergic sheep showed an Ara h 2-specific IgE response. Animals with high serum IgE levels to HDM were also PN IgE-positive. Of the PN-sensitised animals with high PN-specific IgE, 80% also showed an immediate hypersensitivity reaction following an intradermal PN injection. This new large animal model of peanut allergy may provide a useful tool for future investigations of allergen-associated immune mechanisms and specific immunotherapy. PMID:23284686

  3. Understanding allergic asthma from allergen inhalation tests.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, Donald W; Hargreave, Fredrick E; O'Byrne, Paul M; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    The allergen challenge has evolved, in less than 150 years, from a crude tool used to document the etiology of allergen-induced disease to a well-controlled tool used today to investigate the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of asthma. Highlights of the authors' involvement with the allergen challenge include confirmation of the immunoglobulin E-dependence of the late asthmatic response, importance of (nonallergic) airway hyper-responsiveness as a determinant of the airway response to allergen, identification of allergen-induced increase in airway hyper-responsiveness, documentation of beta(2)-agonist-induced increase in airway response to allergen (including eosinophilic inflammation), advances in understanding the pathophysiology and kinetics of allergen-induced airway responses, and development of a multicentre clinical trial group devoted to using the allergen challenge for investigating promising new therapeutic strategies for asthma. PMID:17948142

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Peanut Allergens in Food Ingredients Used for Oral Food Challenges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Philip E; Sayers, Rebekah L; Gethings, Lee A; Balasundaram, Anuradha; Marsh, Justin T; Langridge, James I; Mills, E N Clare

    2016-06-01

    Profiling allergens in complex food ingredients used in oral food challenges and immunotherapy is crucial for regulatory acceptance. Mass spectrometry based analysis employing data-independent acquisition coupled with ion mobility mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry (DIA-IM-MS) was used to investigate the allergen composition of raw peanuts and roasted peanut flour ingredients used in challenge meals. This comprehensive qualitative and quantitative analysis using label-free approaches identified and quantified 123 unique protein accessions. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 3 were the most abundant proteins and present in approximately equal amounts and were extracted in reduced amounts from roasted peanut flours. The clinically significant allergens Ara h 2 and 6 were less abundant, but relative quantification was unaffected by roasting. Ara h 5 was undetectable in any peanut sample, while the Bet v 1 homologue Ara h 8 and the lipid transfer protein allergen, Ara h 9, were detected in low abundance. The oleosin allergens, Ara h 10 and 11, were moderately abundant in the raw peanuts but were 100-fold less abundant in the defatted roasted peanut flour than the major allergens Ara h 1, 3, 2, and 6. Certain isoforms of the major allergens dominated the profile. The relative quantitation of the major peanut allergens showed little variation between different batches of roasted peanut flour. These data will support future development of targeted approaches for absolute quantification of peanut allergens which can be applied to both food ingredients used in clinical studies and extracts used for skin testing and to identify trace levels of allergens in foods. PMID:27064171

  5. Current challenges facing the assessment of the allergenic capacity of food allergens in animal models.

    PubMed

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; van Bilsen, Jolanda; Głogowski, Robert; López-Expósito, Iván; Bouchaud, Grégory; Blanchard, Carine; Bodinier, Marie; Smit, Joost; Pieters, Raymond; Bastiaan-Net, Shanna; de Wit, Nicole; Untersmayr, Eva; Adel-Patient, Karine; Knippels, Leon; Epstein, Michelle M; Noti, Mario; Nygaard, Unni Cecilie; Kimber, Ian; Verhoeckx, Kitty; O'Mahony, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem of increasing concern. The insufficiency of protein sources for human nutrition in a world with a growing population is also a significant problem. The introduction of new protein sources into the diet, such as newly developed innovative foods or foods produced using new technologies and production processes, insects, algae, duckweed, or agricultural products from third countries, creates the opportunity for development of new food allergies, and this in turn has driven the need to develop test methods capable of characterizing the allergenic potential of novel food proteins. There is no doubt that robust and reliable animal models for the identification and characterization of food allergens would be valuable tools for safety assessment. However, although various animal models have been proposed for this purpose, to date, none have been formally validated as predictive and none are currently suitable to test the allergenic potential of new foods. Here, the design of various animal models are reviewed, including among others considerations of species and strain, diet, route of administration, dose and formulation of the test protein, relevant controls and endpoints measured. PMID:27313841

  6. Controlled Allergen Challenge Facilities and Their Unique Contributions to Allergic Rhinitis Research.

    PubMed

    North, Michelle L; Soliman, Mena; Walker, Terry; Steacy, Lisa M; Ellis, Anne K

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to review advances in basic and clinical allergic rhinitis (AR) research over the past decade that have been conducted using controlled allergen challenge facility (CACF) models of allergen challenge. Databases, including PubMed, Medline, and Web of Science were searched for articles employing an ambient pollen exposure in a controlled facility to study AR, published between 2004 and the present date, using the terms as follows: CACF, Environmental Exposure Unit (EEU), Vienna Challenge Chamber (VCC), Fraunhofer Institute Environmental Challenge Chamber, Atlanta Allergen Exposure Unit, Biogenics Research Chamber, Allergen BioCube, Chiba and Osaka Environmental Challenge Chamber, exposure unit, challenge chamber, or environmental exposure chamber. Articles were then selected for relevance to the goals of the present review, including important contributions toward clinical and/or basic science allergy research. CACFs offer sensitive, specific, and reproducible methodology for allergen challenge. They have been employed since the 1980s and offer distinct advantages over traditional in-season multicentre trials when evaluating new treatments for AR. They have provided clinically applicable efficacy and pharmacologic information about important allergy medications, including antihistamines, decongestants, antileukotrienes, immunotherapies, and nasal steroids. CACF models have also contributed to basic science and novel/experimental therapy research. To date, no direct studies have been conducted comparing outcomes from one CACF to another. Over the past decade, CACF models have played an essential role in investigating the pathophysiology of AR and evaluating new therapies. The future opportunities for this model continue to expand. PMID:26130471

  7. Inhaled allergen bronchoprovocation tests.

    PubMed

    Diamant, Zuzana; Gauvreau, Gail M; Cockcroft, Don W; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Sterk, Peter J; de Jongh, Frans H C; Dahlén, Barbro; O'Byrne, Paul M

    2013-11-01

    The allergen bronchoprovocation test is a long-standing exacerbation model of allergic asthma that can induce several clinical and pathophysiologic features of asthma in sensitized subjects. Standardized allergen challenge is primarily a research tool, and when properly conducted by qualified and experienced investigators, it is safe and highly reproducible. In combination with validated airway sampling and sensitive detection techniques, allergen challenge allows the study of several features of the physiology of mainly TH2 cell-driven asthma in relation to the kinetics of the underlying airway pathology occurring during the allergen-induced late response. Furthermore, given the small within-subject variability in allergen-induced airway responses, allergen challenge offers an adequate disease model for the evaluation of new (targeted) controller therapies for asthma in a limited number of subjects. In proof-of-efficacy studies thus far, allergen challenge showed a fair positive predicted value and an excellent negative predictive value for the actual clinical efficacy of new antiasthma therapies, underscoring its important role in early drug development. In this review we provide recommendations on challenge methods, response measurements, sample size, safety, and harmonization for future applications. PMID:24119772

  8. Gene-metabolite expression in blood can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Yamamoto, Masatsugu; Kam, Sarah H Y; Ruan, Jian; Gauvreau, Gail M; O'Byrne, Paul M; FitzGerald, J Mark; Schellenberg, Robert; Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Kanagaratham, Cynthia; De Sanctis, Juan B; Radzioch, Danuta; Tebbutt, Scott J

    2013-01-01

    Some asthmatic individuals undergoing allergen inhalation challenge develop an isolated early response whereas others develop a dual response (early plus late response). In the present study we have used transcriptomics (microarrays) and metabolomics (mass spectrometry) of peripheral blood to identify molecular patterns that can discriminate allergen-induced isolated early from dual asthmatic responses. Peripheral blood was obtained prior to (pre-) and 2 hours post allergen inhalation challenge from 33 study participants. In an initial cohort of 14 participants, complete blood counts indicated significant differences in neutrophil and lymphocyte counts at pre-challenge between early and dual responders. At post-challenge, significant genes (ALOX15, FADS2 and LPCAT2) and metabolites (lysolipids) were enriched in lipid metabolism pathways. Enzymes encoding for these genes are involved in membrane biogenesis and metabolism of fatty acids into pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators. Correlation analysis indicated a strong negative correlation between ALOX15, FADS2, and IL5RA expression with 2-arachidonoylglycerophosphocholine levels in dual responders. However, measuring arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid levels in a validation cohort of 19 participants indicated that the free form of DHA (nmoles/µg of protein) was significantly (p = 0.03) different between early and dual responders after allergen challenge. Collectively these results may suggest an imbalance in lipid metabolism which dictates pro- (anti-) inflammatory and pro-resolving mechanisms. Future studies with larger sample sizes may reveal novel mechanisms and therapeutic targets of the late phase asthmatic response. PMID:23844124

  9. Plethysmography Phenotype QTL in Mice Before and After Allergen Sensitization and Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kelada, Samir N. P.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic asthma is common airway disease that is characterized in part by enhanced airway constriction in response to nonspecific stimuli. Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple loci associated with asthma risk in humans, but these studies have not accounted for gene–environment interactions, which are thought to be important factors in asthma. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that regulate responses to a common human allergen, we applied a house dust mite mouse (HDM) model of allergic airway disease (AAD) to 146 incipient lines of the Collaborative Cross (CC) and the CC founder strains. We employed a longitudinal study design in which mice were phenotyped for response to the bronchoconstrictor methacholine both before and after HDM sensitization and challenge using whole body plethysmography (WBP). There was significant variation in methacholine responsiveness due to both strain and HDM treatment, as reflected by changes in the WBP parameter enhanced pause. We also found that distinct QTL regulate baseline [chromosome (Chr) 18] and post-HDM (Chr 19) methacholine responsiveness and that post-HDM airway responsiveness was correlated with other features of AAD. Finally, using invasive measurements of airway mechanics, we tested whether the Chr 19 QTL affects lung resistance per se using C57BL/6J mice and a consomic strain but found that QTL haplotype did not affect lung resistance. We conclude that aspects of baseline and allergen-induced methacholine responsiveness are associated with genetic variation, and that robust detection of airway resistance QTL in genetically diverse mice will be facilitated by direct measurement of airway mechanics. PMID:27449512

  10. Correlations between complaints, inflammatory cells and mediator concentrations in nasal secretions after nasal allergen challenge and during natural allergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Clement, P; Smitz, J; De Waele, M; Derde, M P

    1995-03-01

    A quantitative determination of the inflammatory mediators was performed and correlated with complaints and the measurement of the inflammatory cells in nasal secretions of 18 seasonal allergic rhinitis patients (group 1) outside the pollen season and 40 symptomatic patients (group 2) with seasonal allergic rhinitis during the pollen season. Ten nonallergic subjects (group 3) were also studied as a normal control group. In group 1, 17 (94%) out of 18 patients had an immediate response of nasal symptoms accompanied by a significant increase of histamine, leukotriene C4 (LTC4), and tryptase 5 min after nasal allergen challenge (NAC). One hour later, a simultaneous increase was seen both in the percentage of the eosinophils and in the eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) concentration. The eosinophil count reached a peak 2 h after NAC with a duration of 8 h, while the highest ECP level was reached only after 24 h with no clear-cut plateau. In group 2, a high percentage of eosinophils was observed. Mostly one observed significantly (p < 0.01) higher concentrations of ECP, LTC4 and histamine but not of tryptase than the baseline values of group 1. The authors concluded that during the pollen season allergic rhinitis reflects mainly a chronic state of allergic inflammation of the nasal mucosa involving various inflammatory components induced by one or more episodes of early-phase type allergic reaction. Infiltration of eosinophils and consequently release of the various late-phase inflammatory mediators into the nasal secretions are certainly believed to be the predominant pathophysiologic condition in the patients. PMID:7888790

  11. Protease inhibitor reduces airway response and underlying inflammation in cockroach allergen-induced murine model.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sanjay; Arora, Naveen

    2015-04-01

    Protease(s) enhances airway inflammation and allergic cascade. In the present study, effect of a serine protease inhibitor was evaluated in mouse model of airway disease. Mice were sensitized with cockroach extract (CE) or Per a 10 and treated with 4-(2-aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) 1 h before or after challenge to measure airway response. Mice were euthanized to collect bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood, and lung to evaluate inflammation. AEBSF treatment significantly reduced the AHR in allergen-challenged mice in dose-dependent manner (p≤ 0.01). IgE (p≤0.05) and Th2 cytokines (p≤0.05) were significantly reduced in treated mice. AEBSF treatment lowered total cell (p≤0.05), eosinophil (p≤0.05), and neutrophil (p≤0.05) in BALF and lung tissue. Oxidative stress parameters were impaired on treatment in allergen-challenged mice (p≤0.05). AEBSF had therapeutic effect in allergen-induced airway resistance and underling inflammation and had potential for combination or as add-on therapy for respiratory diseases. PMID:25052477

  12. [Hemodynamic response to cotton allergen exposure in the industrial environment].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, N S; Usol'tsev, B G; Orlova, O A

    1983-03-01

    The methods of functional diagnosis (mechanocardiography, rheoencephalography) were used to examine the responses of the central and craniocerebral hemodynamics to inhalations of specific cotton allergens in female workers of a textile factory with different grades of sensitization. It was discovered that both the initial level and response pattern on the part of the cardiovascular system and craniocerebral circulation depend to a certain measure on the level of background reactivity. The data obtained enable prognosing the status of the cardiovascular system and taking measures aimed at its correction in subjects sensitized to cotton dust, who continue working in cotton industry. PMID:6830989

  13. Levodropropizine (LD) activity in allergic asthmatic patients, challenged with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, metacholine and allergen-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Bossi, R; Banfi, P; Filipazzi, V; Castelli, C; Braga, P C

    1994-04-01

    The antitussive compound Levodropropizine (LD) is active in animal bronchoconstriction induced by histamine and capsaicin and in man protects from bronchoconstriction induced by capsaicin. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of action of LD given at 60 mg t.i.d. as oral drops, for 8 days by means of specific bronchial challenges (allergens) and of aspecific challenges acting via different receptors and fibers (i.e. metacholine via cholinergic receptors and ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW) via histamine and neuropeptide release). The study design is randomized, double-blind, cross-over versus placebo in 30 allergic asthmatic patients. Baseline bronchial tone and bronchoconstrictor response to metacholine (MCh) were not modified by active treatment nor by placebo. On the contrary, in airway responsiveness to UNDW, the active treatment showed an antagonist effect against induced bronchoconstriction of 59% [activity ratio (AR) as antilog = 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.54; p < or = 0.05] in comparison to no effect for placebo. Similarly, in airway responsiveness to specific allergen, active treatment antagonized the bronchoconstrictor effect of grass pollen by 83% and of various allergens (dermatophagoides and grass pollen) by 72%, i.e. AR of 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.045-0.65; p < 0.01) and of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.07-1.04; p < 0.05), respectively. No antagonist effect was evident with placebo at all times. Besides inhibiting cough, LD is also partially effective in inhibiting bronchial hyperreactive response against specific allergen and UNDW bronchoconstriction. Hence, LD might act by partly inhibiting histamine and neuropeptide release. PMID:10184318

  14. Treatment with Pyranopyran-1, 8-Dione Attenuates Airway Responses in Cockroach Allergen Sensitized Asthma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  15. Treatment with pyranopyran-1, 8-dione attenuates airway responses in cockroach allergen sensitized asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Park, Min-Sun; Jung, Kyung-Hwa; Song, Joohyun; Kim, You Ah; Cho, Hi Jae; Min, Byung-Il; Bae, Hyunsu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic allergic asthma is characterized by Th2-typed inflammation, and contributes to airway remodeling and the deterioration of lung function. Viticis Fructus (VF) has long been used in China and Korea as a traditional herbal remedy for treating various inflammatory diseases. Previously, we have isolated a novel phytochemical, pyranopyran-1, 8-dione (PPY), from VF. This study was conducted to evaluate the ability of PPY to prevent airway inflammation and to attenuate airway responses in a cockroach allergen-induced asthma model in mice. The mice sensitized to and challenged with cockroach allergen were treated with oral administration of PPY. The infiltration of total cells, eosinophils and lymphocytes into the BAL fluid was significantly inhibited in cockroach allergen-induced asthma mice treated with PPY (1, 2, or 10 mg/kg). Th2 cytokines and chemokine, such as IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin in BAL fluid were also reduced to normal levels following treatment with PPY. In addition, the levels of IgE were also markedly suppressed after PPY treatment. Histopathological examination demonstrated that PPY substantially inhibited eosinophil infiltration into the airway, goblet cell hyperplasia and smooth muscle hypertrophy. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PPY possesses a potent efficacy on controlling allergic asthma response such as airway inflammation and remodeling. PMID:24489937

  16. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  17. Ant allergens and hypersensitivity reactions in response to ant stings.

    PubMed

    Potiwat, Rutcharin; Sitcharungsi, Raweerat

    2015-12-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions caused by ant stings are increasingly recognized as an important cause of death by anaphylaxis. Only some species of ants ( e.g. Solenopsis spp., Myrmecia spp., and Pachycondyla spp.) cause allergic reactions. Ant species are identified by evaluating the morphologic structures of worker ants or by molecular techniques. Ant venom contains substances, including acids and alkaloids, that cause toxic reactions, and those from Solenopsis invicta or the imported fire ant have been widely studied. Piperidine alkaloids and low protein contents can cause local reactions (sterile pustules) and systemic reactions (anaphylaxis). Imported fire ant venoms are cross-reactive; for example, the Sol i 1 allergen from S. invicta has cross-reactivity with yellow jacket phospholipase. The Sol i 3 allergen is a member of the antigen 5 family that has amino acid sequence identity with vespid antigen 5. The clinical presentations of ant hypersensitivity are categorized into immediate and delayed reactions: immediate reactions, such as small local reactions, large local reactions, and systemic reactions, occur within 1-4 hours after the ant stings, whereas delayed reactions, such as serum sickness and vasculitis, usually occur more than 4 hours after the stings. Tools for the diagnosis of ant hypersensitivity are skin testing, serum specific IgE, and sting challenge tests. Management of ant hypersensitivity can be divided into immediate (epinephrine, corticosteroids), symptomatic (antihistamines, bronchodilators), supportive (fluid resuscitation, oxygen therapy), and preventive (re-sting avoidance and immunotherapy) treatments. PMID:26708389

  18. Innate and Adaptive Immune Response to Fungal Products and Allergens.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock; Barnes, Charles S; Portnoy, Jay M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to fungi and their products is practically ubiquitous, yet most of this is of little consequence to most healthy individuals. This is because there are a number of elaborate mechanisms to deal with these exposures. Most of these mechanisms are designed to recognize and neutralize such exposures. However, in understanding these mechanisms it has become clear that many of them overlap with our ability to respond to disruptions in tissue function caused by trauma or deterioration. These responses involve the innate and adaptive immune systems usually through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and the production of cytokines that are considered inflammatory accompanied by other factors that can moderate these reactivities. Depending on different genetic backgrounds and the extent of activation of these mechanisms, various pathologies with resulting symptoms can ensue. Complicating this is the fact that these mechanisms can bias toward type 2 innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, to understand what we refer to as allergens from fungal sources, we must first understand how they influence these innate mechanisms. In doing so it has become clear that many of the proteins that are described as fungal allergens are essentially homologues of our own proteins that signal or cause tissue disruptions. PMID:26755096

  19. Intranasal mite allergen induces allergic asthma-like responses in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Shibamori, Masafumi; Ogino, Keiki; Kambayashi, Yasuhiro; Ishiyama, Hironobu

    2006-01-25

    Airway responses induced by intranasal administration of mite allergen without adjuvant were studied in NC/Nga mice. A crude extract of Dermatophagoides farinae (Df) was administered for 5 consecutive days and a single intranasal challenge booster dose was given 1 week after the last sensitization. 24 h after the single challenge, the airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was measured and the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed for numbers of eosinophils and neutrophils, and both cytokine and chemokine levels. There were marked increases in number of eosinophils in the BALF, AHR, Th2 cytokines (IL-5 and IL-13), and chemokine (eotaxin-1 and eotaxin-2) levels in the BALF following Df exposure. C57BL/6N, A/J, BALB/c, and CBA/JN mouse strains were also exposed to Df crude extract, but all of the measured responses were strongest in NC/Nga mice. Furthermore, Df-exposed NC/Nga mice showed the goblet cell hyperplasia, pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation, and increases in both total serum IgE and Df-specific IgG1. After intranasal exposure of NC/Nga mice to crude extract of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, the BALF eosinophilia and AHR were similar to responses induced by Df. None of the study parameters were increased in response to intranasal exposure to ovalbumin. These data demonstrated that NC/Nga mice developed allergic asthma-like responses after intranasal exposure to mite allergens. PMID:16229861

  20. Maternal respiratory sensitization and gestational allergen exposure does not affect subsequent pup responses to homologous or heterologous allergen.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Haykal-Coates, Najwa; Ward, Marsha D W

    2010-03-01

    Evidence suggests that the predisposition towards atopy begins early in life. Maternal allergy has been associated with an increased risk of the development of allergic disease in offspring. Some studies suggest that the development of childhood atopy may also be influenced by prenatal allergen exposure. In this study, a respiratory allergen exposure model was used to determine the impact of maternal sensitization (with or without additional exposures during pregnancy) on subsequent pup responses to homologous or heterologous allergen. Female BALB/c mice received two intratracheal aspiration (IA) exposures to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS) prior to breeding. Some mice also received three additional exposures during pregnancy. Control mothers did not receive treatment. Young adult offspring received three IA exposures to MACA, house dust mite extract (HDM) or HBSS. Offspring sensitized as young adults to either HDM or MACA developed an airway inflammatory response, including increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid lactate dehydrogenase activity, total protein and total and differential cell counts compared to offspring exposed to HBSS. Increased airway responsiveness to methacholine was observed in pups treated with HDM but not with MACA. Maternal sensitization status (with or without gestational allergen exposure) had no effect on offspring response to either MACA or HDM. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that IA administration of MACA or HDM extract to young adult BALB/c mice induces the development of an inflammatory airway response. In contrast to previous reports, neither maternal sensitization nor gestational allergen exposure could be demonstrated to have a clear effect on offspring sensitization. This discrepancy may be a function of the respiratory sensitization and exposure protocol used in this study, which mimics natural sensitization more closely than do parenteral routes of exposure. PMID

  1. Allergen-encoded signals that control allergic responses

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Hui-Ying; Landers, Cameron; Li, Evan; Porter, Paul; Kheradmand, Farrah; Corry, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose is to review the important recent advances made in how innate immune cells, microbes, and the environment contribute to the expression of allergic disease, emphasizing the allergen-related signals that drive allergic responses. Recent findings The last few years have seen crucial advances in how innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells group 2 and airway epithelial cells and related molecular pathways through organismal proteinases and innate immune cytokines, such as thymic stromal lymphopoietin, IL-25, and IL-33 contribute to allergy and asthma. Simultaneously with these advances, important progress has been made in our understanding of how the environment, and especially pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria, viruses, helminths, and especially fungi derived from the natural and built environments, either promote or inhibit allergic inflammation and disease. Of specific interest are how lipopolysaccharide mediates its antiallergic effect through the ubiquitin modifying factor A20 and the antiallergic activity of both helminths and protozoa. Summary Innate immune cells and molecular pathways, often activated by allergen-derived proteinases acting on airway epithelium and macrophages as well as additional unknown factors, are essential to the expression of allergic inflammation and disease. These findings suggest numerous future research opportunities and new opportunities for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. PMID:26658015

  2. Airway uric acid is a sensor of inhaled protease allergens and initiates type 2 immune responses in respiratory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kenichiro; Iijima, Koji; Elias, Martha K; Seno, Satoshi; Tojima, Ichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kurabayashi, Masahiko; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-05-01

    Although type 2 immune responses to environmental Ags are thought to play pivotal roles in asthma and allergic airway diseases, the immunological mechanisms that initiate the responses are largely unknown. Many allergens have biologic activities, including enzymatic activities and abilities to engage innate pattern-recognition receptors such as TLR4. In this article, we report that IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin were produced quickly in the lungs of naive mice exposed to cysteine proteases, such as bromelain and papain, as a model for allergens. IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin sensitized naive animals to an innocuous airway Ag OVA, which resulted in production of type 2 cytokines and IgE Ab, and eosinophilic airway inflammation when mice were challenged with the same Ag. Importantly, upon exposure to proteases, uric acid (UA) was rapidly released into the airway lumen, and removal of this endogenous UA by uricase prevented type 2 immune responses. UA promoted secretion of IL-33 by airway epithelial cells in vitro, and administration of UA into the airways of naive animals induced extracellular release of IL-33, followed by both innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses in vivo. Finally, a potent UA synthesis inhibitor, febuxostat, mitigated asthma phenotypes that were caused by repeated exposure to natural airborne allergens. These findings provide mechanistic insights into the development of type 2 immunity to airborne allergens and recognize airway UA as a key player that regulates the process in respiratory mucosa. PMID:24663677

  3. Effects of nasal allergen challenge on dynamic viscoelasticity of nasal mucus.

    PubMed

    Hattori, M; Majima, Y; Ukai, K; Sakakura, Y

    1993-04-01

    The effects of nasal provocation on the rheologic properties of nasal mucus were investigated in patients with allergic rhinitis provoked by house dust. The elastic modulus (G') and the dynamic viscosity (eta') of nasal mucus were determined by an oscillating sphere magnetic rheometer. Before and after the allergen challenge, G' increased, whereas eta' decreased with increasing oscillatory frequency; these findings indicate that the nasal mucus under these conditions is a non-newtonian fluid and has the cross-linked gel-like nature typical of mucus. Both G' and eta' values after nasal provocation were significantly lower than before. The values of G' and eta' after allergen challenge were in the optimal viscoelasticity range for mucociliary transport. PMID:8476173

  4. Dose-response relationships between mouse allergen exposure and asthma morbidity among urban children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Torjusen, E N; Diette, G B; Breysse, P N; Curtin-Brosnan, J; Aloe, C; Matsui, E C

    2013-08-01

    Home mouse allergen exposure is associated with asthma morbidity, but little is known about the shape of the dose-response relationship or the relevance of location of exposure within the home. Asthma outcome and allergen exposure data were collected every 3 months for 1 year in 150 urban children with asthma. Participants were stratified by mouse sensitization, and relationships between continuous measures of mouse allergen exposure and outcomes of interest were analyzed. Every tenfold increase in the bed mouse allergen level was associated with an 87% increase in the odds of any asthma-related health care use among mouse-sensitized [Odds Ratio (95% CI): 1.87 (1.21-2.88)], but not non-mouse-sensitized participants. Similar relationships were observed for emergency department visit and unscheduled doctor visit among mouse-sensitized participants. Kitchen floor and bedroom air mouse allergen concentrations were also associated with greater odds of asthma-related healthcare utilization; however, the magnitude of the association was less than that observed for bed mouse allergen concentrations. In this population of urban children with asthma, there is a linear dose-response relationship between mouse allergen concentrations and asthma morbidity among mouse-sensitized asthmatics. Bed and bedroom air mouse allergen exposure compartments may have a greater impact on asthma morbidity than other compartments. PMID:23067271

  5. Exposure to allergen and diesel exhaust particles potentiates secondary allergen-specific memory responses promoting asthma susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Eric B.; Biagini Myers, Jocelyn M.; Acciani, Thomas H.; Ryan, Patrick H.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Ruff, Brandy; LeMasters, Grace K.; Bernstein, David I.; Lockey, James; LeCras, Timothy D.; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to traffic pollution particulate matter, predominantly diesel exhaust particles (DEP), increases risk for asthma and asthma exacerbation, however the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective To examine the impact of DEP exposure on the generation and persistence of allergen-specific memory T-cells in asthma and translate these findings by determining the impact of early DEP exposure on the prevalence of allergic asthma in children. Methods The impact of DEP on HDM-specific memory responses was determined using an asthma model. Data from children enrolled in the Cincinnati Childhood Allergy and Air Pollution Study (CCAAPS) birth cohort were analyzed to determine the impact of the DEP exposure on asthma outcomes. Results DEP co-exposure with HDM resulted in persistent Th2/Th17 CD127+ effector/memory cells in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes of adult and neonatal mice. After 7 weeks of rest, a single exposure to HDM resulted in airway hyperresponsiveness and increased levels of Th2 cytokines in only mice that had been previously exposed to both HDM and DEP versus HDM alone. Based on these data, we examined whether DEP exposure was similarly associated increased asthma prevalence in children in the presence or absence of allergen exposure/sensitization in the CCAAPS birth cohort. Early life exposure to high DEP was associated with significantly increased asthma prevalence among allergic children, but not among non-allergic children. Conclusion These findings suggest that DEP exposure results in accumulation of allergen specific Th2/Th17 cells in the lungs, potentiating secondary allergen recall responses and promoting the development of allergic asthma. PMID:25748065

  6. Lanolin allergy: history, epidemiology, responsible allergens, and management.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bailey; Warshaw, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Allergy to lanolin has been recognized by dermatologists for decades. This review summarizes the history, epidemiology, and allergenicity of lanolin and its derivatives. "The lanolin paradox" and the safety of pharmaceutical-grade lanolin products are also discussed. PMID:18413106

  7. Prevention of non-specific airway hyperreactivity after allergen challenge in guinea-pigs by the PAF receptor antagonist SDZ 64-412.

    PubMed Central

    Havill, A. M.; Van Valen, R. G.; Handley, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Allergen challenge by aerosol in sensitized guinea-pigs elicited non-specific airway hyperreactivity assessed by reactivity to i.v. histamine or acetylcholine. Airway hyperreactivity to histamine persisted for at least 48 h and was accompanied by pulmonary eosinophilia as determined by bronchoalveolar lavage cell analysis. 2. Airway hyperreactivity was independent of vagal reflex mechanisms since it was not abrogated by bilateral vagotomy. 3. The novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist SDZ 64-412 inhibited the development of airway hyperreactivity, as measured 24 h after aerosol allergen challenge, when given as a single treatment orally 2 h before allergen challenge. The PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 as well as methylprednisolone and ketotifen also showed efficacy in preventing development of airway hyperreactivity. 4. Neither the two PAF antagonists nor ketotifen had any effect on bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophil numbers. Methylprednisolone was the only substance which readily prevented eosinophil recruitment in addition to airway hyperreactivity. 5. We conclude that allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity in guinea-pigs is inhibited by prophylactic anti-asthma drugs and specific PAF receptor antagonists, thus demonstrating a pivotal role of PAF in this response. There was a lack of correlation between airway hyperreactivity and the presence of BAL eosinophils. PMID:2328403

  8. Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed Central

    Hourihane, J. O.; Bedwani, S. J.; Dean, T. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts. DESIGN: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil. SETTING: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital. SUBJECTS: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils. RESULTS: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil. PMID:9133891

  9. Identification of IgE-binding peptide and critical amino acids of Jatropha curcas allergen involved in allergenic response.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Livia Maia; de Oliveira, Natalia Deus; Damatta, Renato Augusto; do Nascimento, Viviane Veiga; Soares, Thais Pacheco; Machado, Olga Lima Tavares

    2016-01-01

    Increasing energy demand has spurred interest in the use of biofuels. Jatropha curcas (physic nut), an inedible oilseed, is a potential source of bioenergy. The seeds, however, contain allergens such as Jat c 1, a 2S albumin that can induce hypersensitivity reactions in humans and result in allergic diseases. Recent advances in identifying and characterizing plant allergens and, in particular, their immunoglobulin E (IgE)-binding epitopes have produced a wealth of information. We identified IgE-binding regions and the critical amino acids involved in the degranulation of mast cells and the release of histamine, preliminary steps for the prevention and treatment of this allergy. Four IgE-binding regions were identified in the sequence of Jat c 1. We identified and demonstrated the fundamental role of two glutamic acid residues in IgE binding. The sequence LEKQLEEGEVGS produces a random loop on the most exposed part of Jat c 1. This region is important to the stimulation of the allergic response. The possibility of using this information to produce vaccines and other pharmacological agents for allergy treatment is discussed. PMID:27119058

  10. Challenges and trends in the determination of selected chemical contaminants and allergens in food.

    PubMed

    Krska, Rudolf; Becalski, Adam; Braekevelt, Eric; Koerner, Terry; Cao, Xu-Liang; Dabeka, Robert; Godefroy, Samuel; Lau, Ben; Moisey, John; Rawn, Dorothea F K; Scott, Peter M; Wang, Zhongwen; Forsyth, Don

    2012-01-01

    This article covers challenges and trends in the determination of some major food chemical contaminants and allergens, which-among others-are being monitored by Health Canada's Food Directorate and for which background levels in food and human exposure are being analyzed and calculated. Eleven different contaminants/contaminant groups and allergens have been selected for detailed discussion in this paper. They occur in foods as a result of: use as a food additive or ingredient; processing-induced reactions; food packaging migration; deliberate adulteration; and/or presence as a chemical contaminant or natural toxin in the environment. Examples include acrylamide as a food-processing-induced contaminant, bisphenol A as a food packaging-derived chemical, melamine and related compounds as food adulterants and persistent organic pollutants, and perchlorate as an environmental contaminant. Ochratoxin A, fumonisins, and paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins are examples of naturally occurring toxins whereas sulfites, peanuts, and milk exemplify common allergenic food additives/ingredients. To deal with the increasing number of sample matrices and analytes of interest, two analytical approaches have become increasingly prevalent. The first has been the development of rapid screening methods for a variety of analytes based on immunochemical techniques, utilizing ELISA or surface plasmon resonance technology. The second is the development of highly sophisticated multi-analyte methods based on liquid chromatography coupled with multiple-stage mass spectrometry for identification and simultaneous quantification of a wide range of contaminants, often with much less requirement for tedious cleanup procedures. Whereas rapid screening methods enable testing of large numbers of samples, the multi analyte mass spectrometric methods enable full quantification with confirmation of the analytes of interest. Both approaches are useful when gathering surveillance data to determine

  11. IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin mediate immune pathology in response to chronic airborne allergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Koji; Kobayashi, Takao; Hara, Kenichiro; Kephart, Gail M; Ziegler, Steven F; McKenzie, Andrew N; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-08-15

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens in the atmospheric environment. These allergens may trigger a complex network of immune responses in the airways, resulting in asthma and other chronic airway diseases. In this study, we investigated the immunological mechanisms involved in the pathological changes induced by chronic exposure to multiple airborne allergens. Naive mice were exposed intranasally to a combination of common airborne allergens, including the house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus, for up to 8 wk. These allergens acted synergistically and induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, specific IgE Ab production, type 2 cytokine response, and airway hyperresponsiveness in 4 wk, followed by airway remodeling in 8 wk. Increased lung infiltration of T cells, B cells, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells was observed. CD4(+) T cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells contributed to the sources of IL-5 and IL-13, suggesting involvement of both innate and adaptive immunity in this model. The lung levels of IL-33 increased quickly within several hours after allergen exposure and continued to rise throughout the chronic phase of inflammation. Mice deficient in IL-33R (Il1rl1(-/-)) and thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (Tslpr(-/-)) showed significant reduction in airway inflammation, IgE Ab levels, and airway hyperresponsiveness. In contrast, mice deficient in IL-25R or IL-1R showed minimal differences as compared with wild-type animals. Thus, chronic exposure to natural airborne allergens triggers a network of innate and adaptive type 2 immune responses and airway pathology, and IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin most likely play key roles in this process. PMID:25015831

  12. Development of asthmatic inflammation in mice following early-life exposure to ambient environmental particulates and chronic allergen challenge

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Cristan; Siegle, Jessica S.; Shadie, Alexander M.; Nikolaysen, Stina; Garthwaite, Linda; Hansbro, Nicole G.; Foster, Paul S.; Kumar, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Childhood exposure to environmental particulates increases the risk of development of asthma. The underlying mechanisms might include oxidant injury to airway epithelial cells (AEC). We investigated the ability of ambient environmental particulates to contribute to sensitization via the airways, and thus to the pathogenesis of childhood asthma. To do so, we devised a novel model in which weanling BALB/c mice were exposed to both ambient particulate pollutants and ovalbumin for sensitization via the respiratory tract, followed by chronic inhalational challenge with a low mass concentration of the antigen. We also examined whether these particulates caused oxidant injury and activation of AEC in vitro. Furthermore, we assessed the potential benefit of minimizing oxidative stress to AEC through the period of sensitization and challenge by dietary intervention. We found that characteristic features of asthmatic inflammation developed only in animals that received particulates at the same time as respiratory sensitization, and were then chronically challenged with allergen. However, these animals did not develop airway hyper-responsiveness. Ambient particulates induced epithelial injury in vitro, with evidence of oxidative stress and production of both pro-inflammatory cytokines and Th2-promoting cytokines such as IL-33. Treatment of AEC with an antioxidant in vitro inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to these particulates. Ambient particulates also induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression following administration to weanling mice. However, early-life dietary supplementation with antioxidants did not prevent the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in animals that were exposed to particulates, sensitized and challenged. We conclude that injury to airway epithelium by ambient environmental particulates in early life is capable of promoting the development of an asthmatic inflammatory response in sensitized and antigen-challenged mice

  13. Challenges in testing genetically modified crops for potential increases in endogenous allergen expression for safety.

    PubMed

    Panda, R; Ariyarathna, H; Amnuaycheewa, P; Tetteh, A; Pramod, S N; Taylor, S L; Ballmer-Weber, B K; Goodman, R E

    2013-02-01

    Premarket, genetically modified (GM) plants are assessed for potential risks of food allergy. The major risk would be transfer of a gene encoding an allergen or protein nearly identical to an allergen into a different food source, which can be assessed by specific serum testing. The potential that a newly expressed protein might become an allergen is evaluated based on resistance to digestion in pepsin and abundance in food fractions. If the modified plant is a common allergenic source (e.g. soybean), regulatory guidelines suggest testing for increases in the expression of endogenous allergens. Some regulators request evaluating endogenous allergens for rarely allergenic plants (e.g. maize and rice). Since allergic individuals must avoid foods containing their allergen (e.g. peanut, soybean, maize, or rice), the relevance of the tests is unclear. Furthermore, no acceptance criteria are established and little is known about the natural variation in allergen concentrations in these crops. Our results demonstrate a 15-fold difference in the major maize allergen, lipid transfer protein between nine varieties, and complex variation in IgE binding to various soybean varieties. We question the value of evaluating endogenous allergens in GM plants unless the intent of the modification was production of a hypoallergenic crop. PMID:23205714

  14. Allergens and Activation of the Toll-Like Receptor Response.

    PubMed

    Monie, Tom P; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) provide a crucial function in the detection of exogenous and endogenous danger signals. The Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were the first family of PRRs to be discovered and have been extensively studied since. Whilst TLRs remain the best characterized family of PRRs there is still much to be learnt about their mode of activation and the mechanisms of signal transduction they employ. Much of our understanding of these processes has been gathered through the use of cell based signaling assays utilizing specific gene-reporters or cytokine secretion based readouts. More recently it has become apparent that the repertoire of ligands recognized by these receptors may be wider than originally assumed and that their activation may be sensitized, or at least modulated by the presence of common household allergens such as the cat dander protein Fel d 1, or the house dust mite allergen Der p 2. In this chapter we provide an overview of the cell culture and stimulation processes required to study TLR signaling in HEK293 based assays and in bone marrow-derived macrophages. PMID:26803639

  15. Clinical trial design, nasal allergen challenge models, and considerations of relevance to pediatrics, nasal polyposis, and different classes of medication.

    PubMed

    Akerlund, Anders; Andersson, Morgan; Leflein, Jeffrey; Lildholdt, Torben; Mygind, Niels

    2005-03-01

    Clinical trials in allergic rhinitis present several specific difficulties. In seasonal pollen-related disease, there are variations between subjects in the extent of pollen sensitization, individual variations in exposure to pollen even within a set area because of lifestyle differences, and variations between different areas in pollen counts and weather patterns. Thus, large patient numbers are needed in multicenter trials to account for such variations when the standard endpoint is symptom reporting. Furthermore, a pollen season may be relatively short (eg, lasting 6-8 weeks), and the pollen count is inconsistent during this period. Crossover study designs are thus inappropriate, and trials are usually conducted with a parallel-group design. This further increases the trial sample size as it reduces statistical power. These large patient numbers must be recruited over a very short period. Perennial house dust mite-sensitive allergic rhinitis presents other problems. Although there is less disease variation, it is appreciated that symptoms may be induced by nonallergic as well as allergic mechanisms because of the nasal hyperresponsiveness. The nonallergic symptoms may not be modified by treatments based on allergic disease mechanisms. Thus, symptom outcomes--although relevant to the patient--may not adequately reflect the pharmacologic efficacy of the specific intervention. To control variability and focus on allergic disease mechanisms, nasal allergen challenge has been used in drug development. Single-dose challenges in the laboratory or in a pollen chamber, which allow many volunteers to be studied at the same time, have proven useful in the evaluation of drugs that afford acute symptom relief. However, such challenges incompletely model naturally occurring disease, in which the repeated daily exposure to allergen modifies the mucosal inflammatory cell profile and in particular promotes the epithelial accumulation of effector cells. This alters the response

  16. ASSESSMENT OF IMMUNE RESPONSES TO PENICILLIUM CHRYSOGENUM AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ITS ALLERGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of immune responses to Penicillium chrysogenum and characterization of its allergens

    Yongjoo Chung1, Michael E Viana2, Lisa B Copeland3, and MaryJane K Selgrade3, Marsha D W Ward3. 1 UNC, SPH, Chapel Hill, NC, 2NCSU, CVM, Raleigh, NC, 3US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP,...

  17. The pollen enigma: modulation of the allergic immune response by non-allergenic, pollen-derived compounds.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Stefanie; Behrendt, Heidrun; Ring, Johannes; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The question what makes an allergen an allergen puzzled generations of researchers. Pollen grains of anemophilous plants are the most important allergen carriers in ambient air, and pollinosis is a highly prevalent multi-organ disease in civilized countries. In the past, research on the allergenicity of pollen has mainly focused on elucidating genetic predisposing factors and on defining certain structural characteristics of pollen derived allergens. Recently, studies extended to the analysis of non-allergenic, adjuvant mediators co-released from pollen. Besides active proteases and oxidases, extracts of pollen contain low molecular weight molecules like pollen-associated lipid mediators or adenosine exhibiting a potential to stimulate and modulate cultured human immune cells. This article reviews our current knowledge on non-allergenic, protein and non-protein compounds from pollen and their in vitro and in vivo effects on the allergic immune response. To ultimately judge the physiological relevance of these compounds, a systematic approach will be needed comparing their releasability, content and activity in different, allergenic and non-allergenic, pollen species. System biology such as proteome and metabolome analysis will be a useful future approach to better understand pollen biology. PMID:22390694

  18. Repeated exposure to an ambient level of NO2 enhances asthmatic response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose.

    PubMed

    Strand, V; Svartengren, M; Rak, S; Barck, C; Bylin, G

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of NO2 and allergen on lung function in a repeated exposure model. For 4 subsequent days, 16 subjects with mild asthma and allergy to birch or grass pollen were exposed at rest to either purified air or 500 microg x m(-3) NO2 for 30 min in an exposure chamber. Four hours later, an individually determined nonsymptomatic allergen dose was inhaled. Lung function (forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)) was measured by a portable spirometer at early phase (EP) 15 min after allergen and at late phase (LP) 3-10 h after allergen. Subjective symptoms and medication were followed by diary cards. Asthmatic response was significantly increased after repeated exposure to NO2 and allergen compared to air and allergen. The 4-day mean fall in FEV1 after NO2 was at EP -25% versus -0.4% for air (p=0.02) and at LP -4.4% versus -1.9% for air (p=0.01, ANOVA). An increase in EP response was seen already after a single NO2 exposure (p=0.03). There was a tendency (p=0.07) towards increased night-time symptoms of asthma after NO2 plus allergen. Although the effects were small, the results indicate that a repeated short exposure to an ambient level of NO2 enhances the airway response to a nonsymptomatic allergen dose. PMID:9701406

  19. Vitamin D Supplementation Reduces Induction of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Allergen Sensitized and Challenged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberly D.; Hall, Sannette C.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease of the lung associated with airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), airway obstruction and airway remodeling. Airway remodeling involves differentiation of airway epithelial cells into myofibroblasts via epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to intensify the degree of subepithelial fibrosis. EMT involves loss in E-cadherin with an increase in mesenchymal markers, including vimentin and N-cadherin. There is growing evidence that vitamin D has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects are still unclear. In this study, we examined the contribution of vitamin D on the AHR, airway inflammation and expression of EMT markers in the airways of mice sensitized and challenged with a combination of clinically relevant allergens, house dust mite, ragweed, and Alternaria (HRA). Female Balb/c mice were fed with vitamin D-sufficient (2000 IU/kg) or vitamin D-supplemented (10,000 IU/kg) diet followed by sensitization with HRA. The density of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), lung histology, and expression of EMT markers by immunofluorescence were examined. Vitamin D-supplementation decreased AHR, airway inflammation in the BALF and the features of airway remodeling compared to vitamin D-sufficiency in HRA-sensitized and -challenged mice. This was accompanied with increased expression of E-cadherin and decreased vimentin and N-cadherin expression in the airways. These results indicate that vitamin D may be a beneficial adjunct in the treatment regime in allergic asthma. PMID:26872336

  20. Identification and characterization of a second major peanut allergen, Ara h II, with use of the sera of patients with atopic dermatitis and positive peanut challenge.

    PubMed

    Burks, A W; Williams, L W; Connaughton, C; Cockrell, G; O'Brien, T J; Helm, R M

    1992-12-01

    Peanuts are frequently a cause of food hypersensitivity reactions in children. Serum from nine patients with atopic dermatitis and a positive double-blind, placebo-controlled, food challenge to peanut were used in the process of identification and purification of the peanut allergens. Identification of a second major peanut allergen was accomplished with use of various biochemical and molecular techniques. Anion exchange chromatography of the crude peanut extract produced several fractions that bound IgE from the serum of the patient pool with positive challenges. By measuring antipeanut specific IgE and by IgE-specific immunoblotting we have identified an allergic component that has two closely migrating bands with a mean molecular weight of 17 kd. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of this fraction revealed it to have a mean isoelectric point of 5.2. According to allergen nomenclature of the IUIS Subcommittee for Allergen Nomenclature this allergen is designated, Ara h II (Arachis hypogaea). PMID:1460200

  1. Allergen structures and epitopes.

    PubMed

    Meno, K H

    2011-07-01

    Human type 1 hypersensitivity diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis are characterized by allergen-specific IgE antibodies produced in allergic individuals after allergen exposure. IgE antibodies bound to receptors on the surface of effector cells trigger an allergic response by interacting with three-dimensional (conformational) epitopes on the allergen surface. Crystal structures are available for complexes of antibody specifically bound to five allergens, from birch pollen, bee venom, cockroach, cow's milk and timothy grass pollen. The details of the antibody-allergen interaction extending all the way to atomic resolution are available from such complexes. In vitro investigations using recombinant monoclonal antibodies and human basophils show that binding affinity is a key to triggering the allergic response. Continued molecular characterization of antibody-allergen interactions is paving the way for the use of recombinant allergens in allergen-specific diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:21668845

  2. A fungal protease allergen provokes airway hyper-responsiveness in asthma.

    PubMed

    Balenga, Nariman A; Klichinsky, Michael; Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C; Zhao, Ming; Jude, Joseph; Laviolette, Michel; Panettieri, Reynold A; Druey, Kirk M

    2015-01-01

    Asthma, a common disorder that affects >250 million people worldwide, is defined by exaggerated bronchoconstriction to inflammatory mediators including acetylcholine (ACh), bradykinin and histamine-also termed airway hyper-responsiveness. Nearly 10% of people with asthma have severe, treatment-resistant disease, which is frequently associated with immunoglobulin-E sensitization to ubiquitous fungi, typically Aspergillus fumigatus (Af). Here we show that a major Af allergen, Asp f13, which is a serine protease, alkaline protease 1 (Alp 1), promotes airway hyper-responsiveness by infiltrating the bronchial submucosa and disrupting airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. Alp 1-mediated ECM degradation evokes pathophysiological RhoA-dependent Ca(2+) sensitivity and bronchoconstriction. These findings support a pathogenic mechanism in asthma and other lung diseases associated with epithelial barrier impairment, whereby ASM cells respond directly to inhaled environmental allergens to generate airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:25865874

  3. Allergic inflammatory response to short ragweed allergenic extract in HLA-DQ transgenic mice lacking CD4 gene.

    PubMed

    Chapoval, Svetlana P; Iijima, Koji; Marietta, Eric V; Smart, Michele K; Chapoval, Andrei I; Andrews, Amy G; David, Chella S

    2002-01-15

    To investigate the role of HLA-DQ molecules and/or CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, we generated HLA-DQ6 and HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice lacking endogenous class II (Abeta(null)) and CD4 genes and challenged them intranasally with short ragweed allergenic extract (SRW). We found that DQ6/CD4(null) mice developed a strong eosinophilic infiltration into the bronchoalveolar lavage and lung tissue, while DQ8/CD4(null) mice were normal. However, neither cytokines nor eosinophil peroxidase in the bronchoalveolar lavage of DQ6/CD4(null) mice was found. In addition, the airway reactivity to methacholine was elevated moderately in DQ6/CD4(null) mice compared with the high response in DQ/CD4(+) counterparts and was only partially augmented by CD4(+) T cell transfer. The DQ6/CD4(null) mice showed Th1/Th2-type cytokines and SRW-specific Abs in the immune sera in contrast to a direct Th2 response observed in DQ6/CD4(+) mice. The proliferative response of spleen mononuclear cells and peribronchial lymph node cells demonstrated that the response to SRW in DQ6/CD4(null) mice was mediated by HLA-DQ-restricted CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) T cells. FACS analysis of PBMC and spleen mononuclear cells demonstrated an expansion of double-negative (DN) CD4(-)CD8(-)TCRalphabeta(+) T cells in SRW-treated DQ6/CD4(null) mice. These cells produced IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IFN-gamma when stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3. IL-5 ELISPOT assay revealed that DN T cells were the cellular origin of IL-5 in allergen-challenged DQ6/CD4(null) mice. Our study shows a role for HLA-DQ-restricted CD4(+) and DN T cells in the allergic response. PMID:11777987

  4. CTLA-4 recombinant protein genetically fused to canine Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha enhances allergen specific lymphocyte responses in experimentally sensitized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yasunaga, Sho; Tsukui, Toshihiro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2004-06-01

    Vaccination with a recombinant antigen fused to a targeting molecule is a potential strategy for inducing efficient immune responses. For the therapeutic purpose of allergic diseases in dogs, a DNA construct which expresses recombinant fusion protein with two functional domains, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA-4) and Fcepsilon receptor Ialpha, was developed to bridge antigen-presenting cells and IgE-allergen complex. The recombinant fusion protein expressed by the DNA construct was demonstrated to retain the ability to bind monocytes in PBMC and dog IgE, respectively. Additionally, the recombinant protein induced enhancement of allergen-induced lymphoproliferation in experimentally sensitized dogs under conditions of suboptimal allergen stimulation. These results indicated that the DNA construct could enhance allergen-induced immune responses in vivo, implying its usefulness for perspective application in immunotherapy in dogs. PMID:15240934

  5. Induction of colitis in mice with food allergen-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-Jing; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal chronic inflammation is unclear. Food allergy plays an important role in the induction of intestinal inflammation. This study aims to test a hypothesis that food allergy initiates colitis. In this study, BALB/c mice were sensitized to a common food allergen, ovalbumin (OVA) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. The colon epithelial barrier function was assessed with Ussing chamber technique. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain molecule-4 (TIM4) in dendritic cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that allergen-related colitis was induced in mice as shown by heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colon mucosa, loss of body weight of mice, increases in myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, OVA-specific IgE in the colon tissue. The colon epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised in colitis group mice, which was mimicked by exposure the colon mucosa to CT in Ussing chamber. High frequency of TIM4(+) dendritic cells was detected in the colon mucosa of colitis mice. Exposure of dendritic cells to CT markedly increased the expression of TIM4. We conclude that IBD-like inflammation can be induced in the mouse colon by the food allergen-related immune response. PMID:27604348

  6. Induction of colitis in mice with food allergen-specific immune response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jing; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Feng, Bai-Sui; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of intestinal chronic inflammation is unclear. Food allergy plays an important role in the induction of intestinal inflammation. This study aims to test a hypothesis that food allergy initiates colitis. In this study, BALB/c mice were sensitized to a common food allergen, ovalbumin (OVA) with cholera toxin (CT) as an adjuvant. The colon epithelial barrier function was assessed with Ussing chamber technique. Expression of T cell immunoglobulin mucin domain molecule-4 (TIM4) in dendritic cells was evaluated by flow cytometry, RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that allergen-related colitis was induced in mice as shown by heavy infiltration of inflammatory cells in the colon mucosa, loss of body weight of mice, increases in myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4, OVA-specific IgE in the colon tissue. The colon epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised in colitis group mice, which was mimicked by exposure the colon mucosa to CT in Ussing chamber. High frequency of TIM4+ dendritic cells was detected in the colon mucosa of colitis mice. Exposure of dendritic cells to CT markedly increased the expression of TIM4. We conclude that IBD-like inflammation can be induced in the mouse colon by the food allergen-related immune response. PMID:27604348

  7. Peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Jappe, Uta

    2014-01-01

    The earliest known evidence of peanut farming dates back 7,600 years. With a prevalence of roughly 1%, peanut allergy is a diagnostic and treatment challenge, but is also a very good model for studying all aspects of food allergy, including its molecular basis and pathomechanisms. Therefore, the very starting point for elucidating all these aspects is the identification of peanut allergens with subsequent clearing of their structure and their preparation as pure recombinant and/or natural allergens. This is the basis for in vitro diagnostic tests as well as the development of immunotherapeutic drugs. With regard to class I food allergy, peanut allergy affects by far the largest group of patients. In peanuts, 12 allergens have been identified and their molecular characteristics are described herein. Ara h 1, Ara h 3.01 and Ara h 3.02 (the former Ara h 4) belong to the cupin superfamily. The conglutins Ara h 2, Ara h 6 and Ara h 7, and the non-specific lipid transfer protein Ara h 9 belong to the prolamin superfamily. Ara h 5 (profilin) and Ara h 8 (Bet v 1-homologous protein) cause class II food allergies and are associated with inhalation allergy to pollen via the sequential and/or conformational similarity of molecules. Two peanut oleosins are listed as Ara h 10 and Ara h 11 and two defensins as Ara h 12 and Ara h 13 by the WHO/IUIS Allergen Nomenclature Subcommittee. The effect of the above-specified allergens has to be considered in the context of their matrix, which is influenced by processing factors and the individual's immune system. PMID:24925406

  8. Allergen nomenclature*

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The revised nomenclature for allergens is presented together with proposed nomenclatures for (a) allergen genes, mRNAs and cDNAs, and (b) recombinant and synthetic peptides of allergenic interest. PMID:7955031

  9. Link between Epigenomic Alterations and Genome-Wide Aberrant Transcriptional Response to Allergen in Dendritic Cells Conveying Maternal Asthma Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mikhaylova, Lyudmila; Zhang, Yiming; Kobzik, Lester; Fedulov, Alexey V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the link between epigenome-wide methylation aberrations at birth and genomic transcriptional changes upon allergen sensitization that occur in the neonatal dendritic cells (DC) due to maternal asthma. We previously demonstrated that neonates of asthmatic mothers are born with a functional skew in splenic DCs that can be seen even in allergen-naïve pups and can convey allergy responses to normal recipients. However, minimal-to-no transcriptional or phenotypic changes were found to explain this alteration. Here we provide in-depth analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation profiles and RNA transcriptional (microarray) profiles before and after allergen sensitization. We identified differentially methylated and differentially expressed loci and performed manually-curated matching of methylation status of the key regulatory sequences (promoters and CpG islands) to expression of their respective transcripts before and after sensitization. We found that while allergen-naive DCs from asthma-at-risk neonates have minimal transcriptional change compared to controls, the methylation changes are extensive. The substantial transcriptional change only becomes evident upon allergen sensitization, when it occurs in multiple genes with the pre-existing epigenetic alterations. We demonstrate that maternal asthma leads to both hyper- and hypomethylation in neonatal DCs, and that both types of events at various loci significantly overlap with transcriptional responses to allergen. Pathway analysis indicates that approximately 1/2 of differentially expressed and differentially methylated genes directly interact in known networks involved in allergy and asthma processes. We conclude that congenital epigenetic changes in DCs are strongly linked to altered transcriptional responses to allergen and to early-life asthma origin. The findings are consistent with the emerging paradigm that asthma is a disease with underlying epigenetic changes. PMID:23950928

  10. Allergen nomenclature.

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, D. G.; Goodfriend, L.; King, T. P.; Lowenstein, H.; Platts-Mills, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    This article presents a nomenclature system for allergens which has been officially recommended by the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS). The nomenclature is based on proposals of the IUIS Sub-Committee for Allergen Nomenclature and is applicable to highly purified, well-characterized allergens and to non-purified or partially purified allergenic extracts. PMID:3492310

  11. GENDERED CHALLENGE, GENDERED RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    KELLY, ERIN L.; AMMONS, SAMANTHA K.; CHERMACK, KELLY; MOEN, PHYLLIS

    2010-01-01

    This article integrates research on gendered organizations and the work-family interface to investigate an innovative workplace initiative, the Results-Only Work Environment (ROWE), implemented in the corporate headquarters of Best Buy, Inc. While flexible work policies common in other organizations “accommodate” individuals, this initiative attempts a broader and deeper critique of the organizational culture. We address two research questions: How does this initiative attempt to change the masculinized ideal worker norm? And what do women's and men's responses reveal about the persistent ways that gender structures work and family life? Data demonstrate the ideal worker norm is pervasive and powerful, even as employees begin critically examining expectations regarding work time that have historically privileged men. Employees' responses to ROWE are also gendered. Women (especially mothers) are more enthusiastic, while men are more cautious. Ambivalence about and resistance to change is expressed in different ways depending on gender and occupational status. PMID:20625518

  12. Comparative Education: Challenge and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Gail P.; Altbach, Philip G.

    1986-01-01

    Examines research reported in major books and journals of comparative education since 1977, focusing on challenges to established research traditions and the field's responses. Highlights work directing attention to new subjects of inquiry and challenging the nation-state as the exclusive research framework, input-output models and dominant…

  13. Basophil response to peanut allergens in Mediterranean peanut-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, C; Gomez, F; Aranda, A; Koppelman, S J; Diaz-Perales, A; Blanca-López, N; Blazquez, A B; Blanca, M; Torres, M J

    2014-07-01

    Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 are important sensitizers in peanut allergy. Ara h 9 has also been shown to be relevant in the Mediterranean area. We evaluated the basophil response to peanut allergens and Pru p 3 in Mediterranean patients: Group 1, peanut and peach allergy; Group 2, peanut allergy and tolerance to peach; Group 3, peach allergy and tolerance to peanut; Group 4, nonallergic subjects that tolerate both peanut and peach. Compared to controls (Group 4), there was an increased basophil activation with Ara h 2 (P = 0.031) and Pru p 3 (P = 0.009) in Group 1 and with Ara h 1 (P = 0.016), Ara h 2 (P = 0.001), and Ara h 9 (P = 0.016) in Group 2. Importantly, only Ara h 2 showed an increased activation (P = 0.009) in Group 2 compared to Group 3. Ara h 2 is the best discriminating allergen for peanut allergy diagnosis in a Mediterranean population showing two patterns: patients also allergic to peach, responding to Ara h 2 and Pru p 3, and patients allergic only to peanut, responding to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 9. PMID:24816395

  14. The Key Events Dose-Response Framework: A Foundation for Examining Variability in Elicitation Thresholds for Food Allergens

    PubMed Central

    TAYLOR, STEVE L.; GENDEL, STEVEN M.; HOUBEN, GEERT F.; JULIEN, ELIZABETH

    2009-01-01

    Food allergies are caused by immunological reactions in individuals sensitized to normal protein components of foods. For any given sensitized individual, the severity of a reaction is generally assumed to be proportional to the dose of allergenic protein. There is substantial clinical evidence that “threshold” doses exist for the elicitation of an allergic reaction; however, the threshold (i.e., lowest dose that elicits a reaction) varies substantially across the sensitized population. Current approaches to protecting sensitized individuals from exposure to food allergens are highly qualitative (i.e., they rely on food avoidance). The Key Events Dose-Response Framework is an analytical approach for refining understanding of the biological basis of the dose-response. Application of this approach to food allergy provides a foundation for a more rigorous quantitative understanding of variability in allergic response. This study reviews the allergic disease process and the current approaches to identifying thresholds for food allergens. The pathway of key biological events occurring between food intake and allergic response is considered, along with factors that may determine the nature and severity of response to food allergens. Data needs, as well as implications for identifying thresholds, and for characterizing variability in thresholds, are also discussed. PMID:19690998

  15. Patterns of IgE responses to multiple allergen components and clinical symptoms at age 11 years

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Angela; Lazic, Nevena; Belgrave, Danielle C.M.; Johnson, Phil; Bishop, Christopher; Mills, Clare; Custovic, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between sensitization to allergens and disease is complex. Objective We sought to identify patterns of response to a broad range of allergen components and investigate associations with asthma, eczema, and hay fever. Methods Serum specific IgE levels to 112 allergen components were measured by using a multiplex array (Immuno Solid-phase Allergen Chip) in a population-based birth cohort. Latent variable modeling was used to identify underlying patterns of component-specific IgE responses; these patterns were then related to asthma, eczema, and hay fever. Results Two hundred twenty-one of 461 children had IgE to 1 or more components. Seventy-one of the 112 components were recognized by 3 or more children. By using latent variable modeling, 61 allergen components clustered into 3 component groups (CG1, CG2, and CG3); protein families within each CG were exclusive to that group. CG1 comprised 27 components from 8 plant protein families. CG2 comprised 7 components of mite allergens from 3 protein families. CG3 included 27 components of plant, animal, and fungal origin from 12 protein families. Each CG included components from different biological sources with structural homology and also nonhomologous proteins arising from the same biological source. Sensitization to CG3 was most strongly associated with asthma (odds ratio [OR], 8.20; 95% CI, 3.49-19.24; P < .001) and lower FEV1 (P < .001). Sensitization to CG1 was associated with hay fever (OR, 12.79; 95% CI, 6.84-23.90; P < .001). Sensitization to CG2 was associated with both asthma (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 2.05-6.29) and hay fever (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.38-4.61). Conclusions Latent variable modeling with a large number of allergen components identified 3 patterns of IgE responses, each including different protein families. In 11-year-old children the pattern of response to components of multiple allergens appeared to be associated with current asthma and hay fever but not eczema. PMID

  16. Rhinovirus infection of allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice induces eotaxin release from functionally polarized macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nagarkar, Deepti R; Bowman, Emily R; Schneider, Dina; Wang, Qiong; Shim, Jee; Zhao, Ying; Linn, Marisa J; McHenry, Christina L; Gosangi, Babina; Bentley, J Kelley; Tsai, Wan C; Sajjan, Umadevi S; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Hershenson, Marc B

    2010-08-15

    Human rhinovirus is responsible for the majority of virus-induced asthma exacerbations. To determine the immunologic mechanisms underlying rhinovirus (RV)-induced asthma exacerbations, we combined mouse models of allergic airways disease and human rhinovirus infection. We inoculated OVA-sensitized and challenged BALB/c mice with rhinovirus serotype 1B, a minor group strain capable of infecting mouse cells. Compared with sham-infected, OVA-treated mice, virus-infected mice showed increased lung infiltration with neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages, airway cholinergic hyperresponsiveness, and increased lung expression of cytokines including eotaxin-1/CCL11, IL-4, IL-13, and IFN-gamma. Administration of anti-eotaxin-1 attenuated rhinovirus-induced airway eosinophilia and responsiveness. Immunohistochemical analysis showed eotaxin-1 in the lung macrophages of virus-infected, OVA-treated mice, and confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed colocalization of rhinovirus, eotaxin-1, and IL-4 in CD68-positive cells. RV inoculation of lung macrophages from OVA-treated, but not PBS-treated, mice induced expression of eotaxin-1, IL-4, and IL-13 ex vivo. Macrophages from OVA-treated mice showed increased expression of arginase-1, Ym-1, Mgl-2, and IL-10, indicating a shift in macrophage activation status. Depletion of macrophages from OVA-sensitized and -challenged mice reduced eosinophilic inflammation and airways responsiveness following RV infection. We conclude that augmented airway eosinophilic inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in RV-infected mice with allergic airways disease is directed in part by eotaxin-1. Airway macrophages from mice with allergic airways disease demonstrate a change in activation state characterized in part by altered eotaxin and IL-4 production in response to RV infection. These data provide a new paradigm to explain RV-induced asthma exacerbations. PMID:20644177

  17. EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (UVR) ON THE RESPIRATORY ALLERGIC RESPONSES OF BALB/C MICE TO A FUNGAL ALLERGEN. M D W Ward, D M Sailstad, D L Andrews, E H Boykin, and MJ K Selgrade. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Developmen...

  18. Pharmacological characterization of the late phase reduction in lung functions and correlations with microvascular leakage and lung edema in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Mauser, Peter J; House, Aileen; Jones, Howard; Correll, Craig; Boyce, Christopher; Chapman, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    Late phase airflow obstruction and reduction in forced vital capacity are characteristic features of human asthma. Airway microvascular leakage and lung edema are also present in the inflammatory phase of asthma, but the impact of this vascular response on lung functions has not been precisely defined. This study was designed to evaluate the role of increased lung microvascular leakage and edema on the late phase changes in forced vital capacity (FVC) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in allergen-challenged Brown Norway rats using pharmacological inhibitors of the allergic inflammatory response. Rats were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin aerosol and forced expiratory lung functions (FVC, PEF) and wet and dry lung weights were measured 48 h after antigen challenge. Ovalbumin challenge reduced FVC (63% reduction) and PEF (33% reduction) and increased wet (65% increase) and dry (51% increase) lung weights. The antigen-induced reduction in FVC and PEF was completely inhibited by oral treatment with betamethasone and partially attenuated by inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism including indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), 7-TM and MK-7246 (CRTH2 antagonists) and montelukast (CysLT1 receptor antagonist). Antagonists of histamine H1 receptors (mepyramine) and 5-HT receptors (methysergide) had no significant effects indicating that these pre-formed mast cell mediators were not involved. There was a highly significant (P < 0.005) correlation for the inhibition of FVC reduction and increase in wet and dry lung weights by these pharmacological agents. These results strongly support the hypothesis that lung microvascular leakage and the associated lung edema contribute to the reduction in forced expiratory lung functions in antigen-challenged Brown Norway rats and identify an important role for the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid metabolism in these responses. PMID:23523662

  19. Lipocalins as allergens.

    PubMed

    Mäntyjärvi, R; Rautiainen, J; Virtanen, T

    2000-10-18

    The term allergy refers to clinical conditions caused by an inappropriate immune response to innocuous proteins in genetically predisposed persons. Allergens of animal origin are responsible for a significant proportion of allergies. In recent years, it has become evident that practically all respiratory animal allergens characterized at the molecular level belong to the lipocalin family of proteins. The current list comprises the major allergens of horse, cow, dog, mouse, rat and cockroach as well as beta-lactoglobulin of cow's milk. While the molecular structure of all these allergens is known, far less information is available regarding their immunological characteristics. Knowing the way the immune system recognizes these allergens and reacts to them might, however, be the key for discovering the common denominator of the allergenicity of lipocalins. The human body contains numerous endogenous lipocalins, and the immune system has to adapt to their presence. We have proposed that under these conditions the immune response against the lipocalin allergens which are structurally related to endogenous lipocalins might be the pathway to allergy in genetically predisposed persons. The same might well apply also to other allergens with homologous endogenous counterparts. PMID:11058771

  20. Tree nut allergens.

    PubMed

    Roux, Kenneth H; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K

    2003-08-01

    Allergic reactions to tree nuts can be serious and life threatening. Considerable research has been conducted in recent years in an attempt to characterize those allergens that are most responsible for allergy sensitization and triggering. Both native and recombinant nut allergens have been identified and characterized and, for some, the IgE-reactive epitopes described. Some allergens, such as lipid transfer proteins, profilins, and members of the Bet v 1-related family, represent minor constituents in tree nuts. These allergens are frequently cross-reactive with other food and pollen homologues, and are considered panallergens. Others, such as legumins, vicilins, and 2S albumins, represent major seed storage protein constituents of the nuts. The allergenic tree nuts discussed in this review include those most commonly responsible for allergic reactions such as hazelnut, walnut, cashew, and almond as well as those less frequently associated with allergies including pecan, chestnut, Brazil nut, pine nut, macadamia nut, pistachio, coconut, Nangai nut, and acorn. PMID:12915766

  1. Allergenic Can f 1 and its human homologue Lcn-1 direct dendritic cells to induce divergent immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Posch, Beate; Irsara, Christian; Gamper, Fabian S; Herrmann, Martin; Bindreither, Daniel; Fuchs, Dietmar; Reider, Norbert; Redl, Bernhard; Heufler, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Why and when the immune system skews to Th2 mediated allergic immune responses is still poorly characterized. With two homologous lipocalins, the major respiratory dog allergen Can f 1 and the human endogenous, non-allergenic Lipocalin-1, we investigated their impact on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). The two lipocalins had differential effects on DC according to their allergenic potential. Compared to Lipocalin-1, Can f 1 persistently induced lower levels of the Th1 skewing maturation marker expression, tryptophan breakdown and interleukin (IL)-12 production in DC. As a consequence, T cells stimulated by DC treated with Can f 1 produced more of the Th2 signature cytokine IL-13 and lower levels of the Th1 signature cytokine interferon-γ than T cells stimulated by Lipocalin-1 treated DC. These data were partially verified by a second pair of homologous lipocalins, the cat allergen Fel d 4 and its putative human homologue major urinary protein. Our data indicate that the crosstalk of DC with lipocalins alone has the potential to direct the type of immune response to these particular antigens. A global gene expression analysis further supported these results and indicated significant differences in intracellular trafficking, sorting and antigen presentation pathways when comparing Can f 1 and Lipocalin-1 stimulated DC. With this study we contribute to a better understanding of the induction phase of a Th2 immune response. PMID:26218644

  2. Current challenges in detecting food allergens by shotgun and targeted proteomic approaches: a case study on traces of peanut allergens in baked cookies.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Nørgaard, Jørgen; Maquet, Alain

    2012-02-01

    There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via selective reaction monitoring. Peanut presence through detection of the proteotypic Ara h 3/4 peptides AHVQVVDSNGNR (m/z 432.5, 3+) and SPDIYNPQAGSLK (m/z 695.4, 2+) was confirmed and the developed method was able to detect peanut presence at trace levels (≥10 μg peanut g(-1) matrix) in baked cookies. PMID:22413066

  3. Current Challenges in Detecting Food Allergens by Shotgun and Targeted Proteomic Approaches: A Case Study on Traces of Peanut Allergens in Baked Cookies

    PubMed Central

    Pedreschi, Romina; Nørgaard, Jørgen; Maquet, Alain

    2012-01-01

    There is a need for selective and sensitive methods to detect the presence of food allergens at trace levels in highly processed food products. In this work, a combination of non-targeted and targeted proteomics approaches are used to illustrate the difficulties encountered in the detection of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 from a representative processed food matrix. Shotgun proteomics was employed for selection of the proteotypic peptides for targeted approaches via selective reaction monitoring. Peanut presence through detection of the proteotypic Ara h 3/4 peptides AHVQVVDSNGNR (m/z 432.5, 3+) and SPDIYNPQAGSLK (m/z 695.4, 2+) was confirmed and the developed method was able to detect peanut presence at trace levels (≥10 μg peanut g−1 matrix) in baked cookies. PMID:22413066

  4. Allergenic properties and differential response of walnut subjected to processing treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Walnut is one of the most frequently involved foods in anaphylactic reactions. We investigated changes in walnut allergenicity after physical treatments by in vitro techniques and physiologically relevant assays. Changes in the allergenicity of walnut subjected to high pressure and thermal/pressur...

  5. Mammalian lipocalin allergens--insights into their enigmatic allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Virtanen, T; Kinnunen, T; Rytkönen-Nissinen, M

    2012-04-01

    allow a strong anti-allergenic immune response against them. PMID:22093088

  6. FLLL31, a derivative of curcumin, attenuates airway inflammation in a multi-allergen challenged mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shaopeng; Cao, Shuhua; Jiang, Rentao; Liu, Renping; Bai, Jinye; Hou, Qi

    2014-07-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription protein 3 (STAT3), one of the major regulators of inflammation, plays multiple roles in cellular transcription, differentiation, proliferation, and survival in human diseases. Dysregulation of STAT3 is related to the severe airway inflammation associated with asthma. FLLL31 is a newly developed compound based on the herbal medicine curcumin, which specifically suppresses the activation of STAT3. However, the function of FLLL31 on inflammatory diseases, especially on the regulation of airway inflammation, has not been fully studied. In our prior investigations, we developed a mouse model that was challenged with a mixture of DRA allergens (including house dust mite, ragweed, and Aspergillums species) to mimic the severe airway inflammation observed in human patients. In this study, we performed a series of experiments on the inflammatory regulation activities of FLLL31 in both in vitro cultured cells and our in vivo DRA-challenged mouse model. Our results show that FLLL31 exhibits anti-inflammatory effects on macrophage activation, lymphocyte differentiation, and pro-inflammatory factor production. Importantly, FLLL31 significantly inhibited airway inflammation and recruitment of inflammatory cells in the DRA-challenged mouse model. Based on these results, we conclude that FLLL31 is a potential therapeutic agent that can be used against severe airway inflammation diseases. PMID:24819716

  7. Helminth infection alters IgE responses to allergens structurally related to parasite proteins

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L.; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactivity between environmental allergens and helminth proteins has been demonstrated, though the clinically-related implications of this cross-reactivity have not been addressed. To investigate the impact of molecular similarity among allergens and cross-reactive homologous helminth proteins in IgE-based serologic assessment of allergic disorders in helminth-infected population, we performed Immunocap™ tests in filarial-infected and non-infected individuals for IgE measurements to allergen extracts that contained proteins with high levels of homology with helminth proteins and IgE against representative recombinant allergens with and without helminth homologues were performed. The impact of helminth infection on the levels and function of the IgE to these specific homologous and non-homologous allergens was corroborated in an animal model. We found that having a tissue-invasive filarial infection increased the serological prevalence of Immunocap™ identified IgE directed against house dust mite and cockroach, but not against timothy grass, the latter with few allergens with homologues in helminth infection. IgE ELISA confirmed that filaria-infected individuals had higher IgE prevalences to those recombinant allergens that had homologues in helminths. Mice infected with helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus displayed increased levels of IgE and positive skin tests to allergens with homologues in the parasite. These results show that cross-reactivity among allergens and helminth proteins can have practical implications altering serologic approaches to allergen testing and brings a new perspective to the Hygiene Hypothesis. PMID:25404363

  8. Helminth infection alters IgE responses to allergens structurally related to parasite proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Ribeiro-Gomes, Flávia L; Bennuru, Sasisekhar; Nutman, Thomas B

    2015-01-01

    Immunological cross-reactivity between environmental allergens and helminth proteins has been demonstrated, although the clinically related implications of this cross-reactivity have not been addressed. To investigate the impact of molecular similarity among allergens and cross-reactive homologous helminth proteins in IgE-based serologic assessment of allergic disorders in a helminth-infected population, we performed ImmunoCAP tests in filarial-infected and noninfected individuals for IgE measurements to allergen extracts that contained proteins with high levels of homology with helminth proteins as well as IgE against representative recombinant allergens with and without helminth homologs. The impact of helminth infection on the levels and function of the IgE to these specific homologous and nonhomologous allergens was corroborated in an animal model. We found that having a tissue-invasive filarial infection increased the serological prevalence of ImmunoCAP-identified IgE directed against house dust mite and cockroach, but not against timothy grass, the latter with few allergens with homologs in helminth infection. IgE ELISA confirmed that filaria-infected individuals had higher IgE prevalences to those recombinant allergens that had homologs in helminths. Mice infected with the helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus displayed increased levels of IgE and positive skin tests to allergens with homologs in the parasite. These results show that cross-reactivity among allergens and helminth proteins can have practical implications, altering serologic approaches to allergen testing and bringing a new perspective to the "hygiene hypothesis." PMID:25404363

  9. A proprietary blend of quail egg for the attenuation of nasal provocation with a standardized allergenic challenge: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Benichou, Annie-Claude; Armanet, Marion; Bussière, Anthony; Chevreau, Nathalie; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Tétard, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Occasional rhinitis symptoms caused by exposure to pollution or allergens is a growing concern. Based first on empirical observation of a lesser occurrence of allergies in quail farmers and then scientific works on ovomucoids properties, we developed a dietary supplement for the relief of such occasional rhinitis symptoms. The objective of the study was to determine whether one acute oral dose of the study product attenuates nasal provocation and other allergy-related symptoms after exposure to a standardized allergenic challenge as compared to placebo. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in a randomized, double-blind, two-arm crossover, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. One acute dose of either the active study product (proprietary blend of quail egg) or placebo was given concomitantly to the standardized allergenic challenge. The primary endpoint was peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) measurement and the secondary endpoints were subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for allergy-related symptoms, as well as immunoglobulin E count. Forty-three healthy subjects were enrolled and evaluable in a per protocol analysis. A gradual increase in PNIF from nadir up to Time 120 reflected the normal, gradual recovery from nasal obstruction induced by allergenic challenge for both the active and the placebo groups. At all postchallenge time points, the active group had higher PNIF values compared to the placebo group, indicating that the active product was associated with fewer symptoms and reduced intensity of these symptoms. The active product resulted also in statistically significant improvements of most of the subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on VAS scores. No adverse events occurred during the study. In conclusion, the dietary supplement consisting of proprietary blend made of quail eggs provides fast and efficient relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms caused by the most common outdoor and indoor

  10. A proprietary blend of quail egg for the attenuation of nasal provocation with a standardized allergenic challenge: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Benichou, Annie-Claude; Armanet, Marion; Bussière, Anthony; Chevreau, Nathalie; Cardot, Jean-Michel; Tétard, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Occasional rhinitis symptoms caused by exposure to pollution or allergens is a growing concern. Based first on empirical observation of a lesser occurrence of allergies in quail farmers and then scientific works on ovomucoids properties, we developed a dietary supplement for the relief of such occasional rhinitis symptoms. The objective of the study was to determine whether one acute oral dose of the study product attenuates nasal provocation and other allergy-related symptoms after exposure to a standardized allergenic challenge as compared to placebo. Healthy subjects were recruited to participate in a randomized, double-blind, two-arm crossover, placebo-controlled, clinical trial. One acute dose of either the active study product (proprietary blend of quail egg) or placebo was given concomitantly to the standardized allergenic challenge. The primary endpoint was peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) measurement and the secondary endpoints were subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores for allergy-related symptoms, as well as immunoglobulin E count. Forty-three healthy subjects were enrolled and evaluable in a per protocol analysis. A gradual increase in PNIF from nadir up to Time 120 reflected the normal, gradual recovery from nasal obstruction induced by allergenic challenge for both the active and the placebo groups. At all postchallenge time points, the active group had higher PNIF values compared to the placebo group, indicating that the active product was associated with fewer symptoms and reduced intensity of these symptoms. The active product resulted also in statistically significant improvements of most of the subjects' perceived feelings of well-being based on VAS scores. No adverse events occurred during the study. In conclusion, the dietary supplement consisting of proprietary blend made of quail eggs provides fast and efficient relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms caused by the most common outdoor and indoor

  11. The innate response to peanut extract in ovine afferent lymph and its correlation with allergen sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Van Gramberg, Jenna L; Bischof, Robert J; O'Hehir, Robyn E; de Veer, Michael J; Meeusen, Els N

    2015-07-01

    The innate response generated after initial allergen exposure is crucial for polarising adaptive immunity, but little is known about how it drives an atopic or type-2 immune response. The present study characterises the response of skin-draining afferent lymph in sheep following injection with peanut (PN) extract in the presence or absence of aluminium hydroxide (AlOH) adjuvant. Lymph was collected and innate cell populations characterised over an 84 h time period. The innate response to PN extract in afferent lymph displayed an early increase in neutrophils and monocytes without any changes in the dendritic cell (DC) population. PN antigen was transported by neutrophils and monocytes for the first 36 h, after which time DCs were the major antigen trafficking cells. AlOH adjuvant gradually increased antigen uptake by DCs at the later time points. Following lymphatic characterisation, sheep were sensitised with PN extract by three subcutaneous injections of PN in AlOH, and the level of PN-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) was determined. Sheep with higher levels of steady-state DCs in afferent lymph showed increased monocytic recruitment in afferent lymph and reduced PN-specific IgE following sensitisation. In addition, DCs from afferent lymph that had ingested PN antigen increased the expression of monocyte chemoattractant mRNA. The results of this study show that the innate response to PN extract involves a dynamic change in cell populations in the afferent lymph over time. In addition, DCs may determine the strength of the initial inflammatory cell response, which in turn may determine the nature of the antigen-specific adaptive response. PMID:25666095

  12. Redefining the major peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yonghua; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    Food allergy has become a major public health concern in westernized countries, and allergic reactions to peanuts are particularly common and severe. Allergens are defined as antigens that elicit an IgE response, and most allergenic materials (e.g., pollens, danders, and foods) contain multiple allergenic proteins. This has led to the concept that there are "major" allergens and allergens of less importance. "Major allergens" have been defined as allergens that bind a large amount of IgE from the majority of patients and have biologic activity. However, the ability of an allergen to cross-link complexes of IgE and its high-affinity receptor FcεRI (IgE/FcεRI), which we have termed its allergic effector activity, does not correlate well with assays of IgE binding. To identify the proteins that are the most active allergens in peanuts, we and others have employed in vitro model assays of allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE/FcεRI complexes and have demonstrated that the most potent allergens are not necessarily those that bind the most IgE. The importance of a specific allergen can be determined by measuring the allergic effector activity of that allergen following purification under non-denaturing conditions and by specifically removing the allergen from a complex allergenic extract either by chromatography or by specific immunodepletion. In our studies of peanut allergens, our laboratory has found that two related allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, together account for the majority of the effector activity in a crude peanut extract. Furthermore, murine studies demonstrated that Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are not only the major elicitors of anaphylaxis in this system, but also can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic mice. As a result of these observations, we propose that the definition of a major allergen should be based on the potency of that allergen in assays of allergic effector activity and demonstration that removal of that allergen from an extract results in

  13. Pollen Lipidomics: Lipid Profiling Exposes a Notable Diversity in 22 Allergenic Pollen and Potential Biomarkers of the Allergic Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamed Elfatih H.; Lui, Jan Hsi; Palnivelu, Ravishankar; Naclerio, Robert M.; Preuss, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    lipids vary greatly among allergenic species and contain many molecules that have stimulatory or regulatory effects on immune responses. PMID:23469025

  14. The effects of inhaled corticosteroids on intrinsic responsiveness and histology of airways from infant monkeys exposed to house dust mite allergen and ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Plopper, Charles G.; Peake, Janice L.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2008-01-15

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to treat infants with asthma, some with intermittent asthma. We previously showed that exposing infant monkeys to allergen/ozone resulted in asthma-like characteristics of their airways. We evaluated the effects of ICS on histology and intrinsic responsiveness of allergen/ozone-exposed and normal infant primate airways. Infant monkeys were exposed by inhalation to (1) filtered air and saline, (2) house dust mite allergen (HDMA) + ozone and saline, (3) filtered air and ICS (budesonide) or (4) HDMA + ozone and ICS. Allergen/ozone exposures started at 1 month and ICS at 3 months of age. At 6 months of age, methacholine-induced changes in luminal area of airways in proximal and distal lung slices were determined using videomicrometry, followed by histology of the same slices. Proximal airway responsiveness was increased by allergen/ozone and by ICS. Eosinophil profiles were increased by allergen/ozone in both proximal and distal airways, an effect that was decreased by ICS in distal airways. In both allergen/ozone- and air-exposed monkeys, ICS increased the number of alveolar attachments in distal airways, decreased mucin in proximal airways and decreased epithelial volume in both airways. ICS increased smooth muscle in air-exposed animals while decreasing it in allergen/ozone-exposed animals in both airways. In proximal airways, there was a small but significant positive correlation between smooth muscle and airway responsiveness, as well as between alveolar attachments and responsiveness. ICS change morphology and function in normal airways as well as allergen/ozone-exposed airways, suggesting that they should be reserved for infants with active symptoms.

  15. IgE response to two new allergen proteins of Solanum melongena L. (eggplant).

    PubMed

    Hoseini-Alfatemi, Seyedeh Mahsan; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2015-12-01

    A number of allergens from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) have been previously identified. In this study, we could detect IgE reactivity of two allergic subjects' sera towards two protein bands of molecular mass of about 35 and 15 kDa. As IgE were reactive to both raw and cooked eggplant extracts, a heat-stable nature of these novel allergens is apparent. PMID:26455782

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Studies of the Fate of Intranasal Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Rimmer, Janet; Santos, Conceição; Yli-Panula, Eija; Noronha, Virginia; Viander, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Background The precise way in which allergen is handled by the nose is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine recovery of Der p 1 allergen following nasal administration and to determine whether Der p 1 can be detected in nasal biopsies after natural exposure and nasal challenge to allergen. Methods (1) 20 nonatopic non-rhinitics were challenged with Der p 1 and recovery was measured by ELISA in the nasal wash, nasal mucus and induced sputum up to 30 minutes. Particulate charcoal (<40 μm) served as control. (2) In 8 subjects (5 atopics), 30 to 60 minutes after challenge histological localisation of Der p 1 in the nasal mucosal epithelium, subepithelial mucous glands and lamina propria was performed. Co-localisation of Der p 1 with macrophages and IgE-positive cells was undertaken. Results (1) Less than 25% of total allergen was retrievable after aqueous or particulate challenge, most from the nasal mucus during 1-5 min after the challenge. The median of carbon particles recovered was 9%. (2) Prechallenge Der p 1 staining was associated with the epithelium and subepithelial mucous glands. After challenge there was a trend for greater Der p 1 deposition in atopics, but both atopics and nonatopics showed increases in the number of Der p 1 stained cells and stained tissue compartments. In atopics, increased eosinophils, macrophages and IgE positive cells co-localized with Der p 1 staining. Conclusions Der p 1 allergen is detected in nasal tissue independent of atopic status after natural exposure. After challenge the nose effectively retains allergen, which remains mucosally associated; in atopics there is greater Der p 1 deposition and inflammatory response than in nonatopics. These results support the hypothesis that nasal mucus and tissue act as a reservoir for the inhaled Der p 1 allergen leading to a persistent allergic inflammatory response in susceptible individuals. PMID:25969994

  17. Organismal Responses to Hypoxemic Challenges.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert S; Dehghani, Gholam A; Kiihl, Samara

    2015-01-01

    As a counterpoint to the volumes of beautiful work exploring how the carotid bodies (CBs) sense and transduce stimuli into neural traffic, this study explored one organismal reflex response to such stimulation. We challenged the anesthetized, paralyzed, artificially ventilated cat with two forms of acute hypoxemia: 10 % O(2)/balance N(2) (hypoxic hypoxia [HH] and carbon monoxide hypoxia [COH]). HH stimulates both CBs and aortic bodies (ABs), whereas COH stimulates only the ABs. Our design was to stimulate both with HH (HHint), then to stimulate only the ABs with COH (COHint); then, after aortic depressor nerve transaction, only the CBs with HH (HHabr), and finally neither with COH (COHabr). We recorded whole animal responses from Group 1 cats (e.g., cardiac output, arterial blood pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure/and vascular resistance) before and after sectioning the aortic depressor nerves. From Group 2 cats (intact) and Group 3 cats (aortic body resected) we recorded the vascular resistance in several organs (e.g., brain, heart, spleen, stomach, pancreas, adrenal glands, eyes). The HHint challenge was the most effective at keeping perfusion pressures adequate to maintain homeostasis in the face of a systemic wide hypoxemia with locally mediated vasodilation. The spleen and pancreas, however, showed a vasoconstrictive response. The adrenals and eyes showed a CB-mediated vasodilation. The ABs appeared to have a significant impact on the pulmonary vasculature as well as the stomach. Chemoreceptors via the sympathetic nervous system play the major role in this organism's response to hypoxemia. PMID:26303472

  18. Immune response studies with Wuchereria bancrofti vespid allergen homologue (WbVAH) in human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Anand, Setty Balakrishnan; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam; Thangadurai, Mani; Prabhu, Prince R; Kaliraj, Perumal; Ramaswamy, Kalyanasundaram

    2007-09-01

    A homologue of Brugia malayi venom allergen (BmVAH) was cloned from the infective stages (L3) of Wuchereria bancrofti. Sequence analysis showed 90% sequence identity between WbVAH and BmVAH. Recombinant WbVAH was then expressed and purified. VAH from other nematode parasites is being evaluated as potential vaccine candidates. Because W. bancrofti infections are more prevalent than B. malayi, it will significantly benefit using W. bancrofti antigens for vaccine development. In this study, we have evaluated the human immune responses to rWbVAH in putatively immune individuals who live in the endemic regions (endemic normal, EN) to determine the vaccine potential of WbVAH. These responses were then compared to those in infected individuals (microfilaraemic, MF and chronic pathology, CP). Results show that EN subjects carry WbVAH-specific IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 circulating antibodies. It is interesting to note that CP patients also carried antibodies against WbVAH that was mainly of the IgG3 isotype. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from EN individuals responded strongly to rWbVAH by proliferating and secreting IFN-gamma. PBMC from MF patients also proliferated in response to rWbVAH but secreted mainly IL-10. Thus, there was a clear dichotomy in the cytokine production by infected patients vs individuals who are putatively immune (EN). Although vaccine potential of WbVAH has not been established yet, our findings suggest that WbVAH mediated immune responses in EN individuals is primarily Th1-biased. Further vaccination studies are underway in animal models to determine the role of WbVAH in protective immunity against W. bancrofti and B. malayi infections. PMID:17558521

  19. Mechanisms of subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Soyer, Ozge U; Akdis, Mubeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only curative approach in the treatment of allergic diseases defined up-to-date. Peripheral T-cell tolerance to allergens, the goal of successful allergen-SIT, is the primary mechanism in healthy immune responses to allergens. By repeated administration of increased doses of the causative allergen, allergen-SIT induces a state of immune tolerance to allergens through the constitution of T regulatory (Treg) cells, including allergen-specific interleukin (IL)-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg cells; induction of suppressive cytokines, such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor β; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4 and IgA; and suppression of mast cells, basophils, eosinophils, and inflammatory dendritic cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the mechanisms of allergen-SIT with emphasis on the roles of Treg cells in allergen-SIT. PMID:21530813

  20. Bronchial biopsy evidence for leukocyte infiltration and upregulation of leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesion molecules 6 hours after local allergen challenge of sensitized asthmatic airways.

    PubMed Central

    Montefort, S; Gratziou, C; Goulding, D; Polosa, R; Haskard, D O; Howarth, P H; Holgate, S T; Carroll, M P

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the mucosal changes occurring in bronchial biopsies from six atopic asthmatics 5-6 h after local endobronchial allergen challenge and compared them with biopsies from saline-challenged segments from the same subjects at the same time point. All the subjects developed localized bronchoconstriction in the allergen-challenged segment and had a decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) (P < 0.01) and a decrease in their methacholine provocative concentration of agonist required to reduce FEV1 from baseline by 20% (P < 0.05) 24 h postchallenge. At 6 h we observed an increase in neutrophils (P = 0.03), eosinophils (P = 0.025), mast cells (P = 0.03), and CD3+ lymphocytes (P = 0.025), but not in CD4+ or CD8+ lymphocyte counts. We also detected an increase in endothelial intercellular adhesion molecule type 1 (P < 0.05) and E-selectin (P < 0.005), but not vascular cell adhesion molecule type 1 expression with a correlative increase in submucosal and epithelial LFA+ leucocytes (P < 0.01). Thus, in sensitized asthmatics, local endobronchial allergen instillation leads to an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate of the airway mucosa that involves upregulation of specific adhesion molecules expressed on the microvasculature. Images PMID:7512980

  1. Mucosal delivery of allergen peptides expressed by Lactococcus lactis inhibit allergic responses in a BALB/c mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ai, Chunqing; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Ding, Junrong; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Tian, Fengwei; Zhao, Jianxin; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is considered to be the only curative treatment of allergy, but its safety is always affected by immunologic properties and quality of allergen. Recombinant allergen derivative could be a potential therapeutic strategy, but clinical studies showed that macromolecular derivatives could not avoid T cell-mediated side effects. In this study, five Der p2-derived peptides (DPs) containing major T cell epitopes of Der p2 were first artificially synthesized. Compared with Der p2 macromolecular derivative DM, these DPs not only fully eliminated IgE-binding capacity but also reduced T cells reactivity, suggesting these DPs could be better therapeutic molecules. For their application in vivo, Lactococcus lactis was engineered to express these DPs, and their protective effects were evaluated in BALB/c mice models. Western blot showed that all DPs could be produced in the recombinant strains. Mucosal delivery of these strains could inhibit Der p2-induced allergic responses in Der p2-sensitized mice, characterized by a reduction in specific IgE antibody and lung inflammatory responses. These protective effects were associated with an increase of specific IgG2a in serum and regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes. On the whole, the suppressive effect induced by the DP mixture could be better than single DP, but a bit weaker than DM. These DPs could be promising candidate molecules for active vaccination and induction of tolerance, and thus promote the development of non-allergenic peptide in the treatment and prevention of allergy. PMID:26621801

  2. Immune Responses in Healthy and Allergic Individuals Are Characterized by a Fine Balance between Allergen-specific T Regulatory 1 and T Helper 2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Verhagen, Johan; Taylor, Alison; Karamloo, Fariba; Karagiannidis, Christian; Crameri, Reto; Thunberg, Sarah; Deniz, Günnur; Valenta, Rudolf; Fiebig, Helmut; Kegel, Christian; Disch, Rainer; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immune responses to nonpathogenic environmental antigens lead to either allergy or nonharmful immunity are unknown. Single allergen-specific T cells constitute a very small fraction of the whole CD4+ T cell repertoire and can be isolated from the peripheral blood of humans according to their cytokine profile. Freshly purified interferon-γ–, interleukin (IL)-4–, and IL-10–producing allergen-specific CD4+ T cells display characteristics of T helper cell (Th)1-, Th2-, and T regulatory (Tr)1–like cells, respectively. Tr1 cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals; in contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific IL-4–secreting T cells in allergic individuals. Tr1 cells use multiple suppressive mechanisms, IL-10 and TGF-β as secreted cytokines, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 and programmed death 1 as surface molecules. Healthy and allergic individuals exhibit all three allergen-specific subsets in different proportions, indicating that a change in the dominant subset may lead to allergy development or recovery. Accordingly, blocking the suppressor activity of Tr1 cells or increasing Th2 cell frequency enhances allergen-specific Th2 cell activation ex vivo. These results indicate that the balance between allergen-specific Tr1 cells and Th2 cells may be decisive in the development of allergy. PMID:15173208

  3. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Protects Lungs from Cockroach Allergen-Induced Inflammation by Modulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Zhou, Yufeng; Qiu, Lipeng; Do, Danh C; Zhao, Yilin; Cui, Zhuang; Wang, Heng; Liu, Xiaopeng; Saradna, Arjun; Cao, Xu; Wan, Mei; Gao, Peisong

    2015-12-15

    Exposure to cockroach allergen leads to allergic sensitization and increased risk of developing asthma. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a receptor for many common environmental contaminants, can sense not only environmental pollutants but also microbial insults. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells with the capacity to modulate immune responses. In this study, we investigated whether AhR can sense cockroach allergens and modulate allergen-induced lung inflammation through MSCs. We found that cockroach allergen-treated AhR-deficient (AhR(-/-)) mice showed exacerbation of lung inflammation when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), an AhR agonist, significantly suppressed allergen-induced mouse lung inflammation. MSCs were significantly reduced in cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice as compared with WT mice, but increased in cockroach allergen-challenged WT mice when treated with TCDD. Moreover, MSCs express AhR, and AhR signaling can be activated by cockroach allergen with increased expression of its downstream genes cyp1a1 and cyp1b1. Furthermore, we tracked the migration of i.v.-injected GFP(+) MSCs and found that cockroach allergen-challenged AhR(-/-) mice displayed less migration of MSCs to the lungs compared with WT. The AhR-mediated MSC migration was further verified by an in vitro Transwell migration assay. Epithelial conditioned medium prepared from cockroach extract-challenged epithelial cells significantly induced MSC migration, which was further enhanced by TCDD. The administration of MSCs significantly attenuated cockroach allergen-induced inflammation, which was abolished by TGF-β1-neutralizing Ab. These results suggest that AhR plays an important role in protecting lungs from allergen-induced inflammation by modulating MSC recruitment and their immune-suppressive activity. PMID:26561548

  4. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R.; Henstridge, Darren C.; Febbraio, Mark A.; O’Hehir, Robyn E.; Rolland, Jennifer M.; Hardy, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a ‘western’ diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  5. High Fat Diet Inhibits Dendritic Cell and T Cell Response to Allergens but Does Not Impair Inhalational Respiratory Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pizzolla, Angela; Oh, Ding Yuan; Luong, Suzanne; Prickett, Sara R; Henstridge, Darren C; Febbraio, Mark A; O'Hehir, Robyn E; Rolland, Jennifer M; Hardy, Charles L

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity has risen to epidemic proportions in recent decades, most commonly attributed to an increasingly sedentary lifestyle, and a 'western' diet high in fat and low in fibre. Although non-allergic asthma is a well-established co-morbidity of obesity, the influence of obesity on allergic asthma is still under debate. Allergic asthma is thought to result from impaired tolerance to airborne antigens, so-called respiratory tolerance. We sought to investigate whether a diet high in fats affects the development of respiratory tolerance. Mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks showed weight gain, metabolic disease, and alteration in gut microbiota, metabolites and glucose metabolism compared to age-matched mice fed normal chow diet (ND). Respiratory tolerance was induced by repeated intranasal (i.n.) administration of ovalbumin (OVA), prior to induction of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) by sensitization with OVA in alum i.p. and subsequent i.n. OVA challenge. Surprisingly, respiratory tolerance was induced equally well in HFD and ND mice, as evidenced by decreased lung eosinophilia and serum OVA-specific IgE production. However, in a pilot study, HFD mice showed a tendency for impaired activation of airway dendritic cells and regulatory T cells compared with ND mice after induction of respiratory tolerance. Moreover, the capacity of lymph node cells to produce IL-5 and IL-13 after AAI was drastically diminished in HFD mice compared to ND mice. These results indicate that HFD does not affect the inflammatory or B cell response to an allergen, but inhibits priming of Th2 cells and possibly dendritic cell and regulatory T cell activation. PMID:27483441

  6. Cardiovascular response to thermoregulatory challenges.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuiqing; Yavar, Zubin; Sun, Qinghua

    2015-12-01

    A growing number of extreme climate events are occurring in the setting of ongoing climate change, with an increase in both the intensity and frequency. It has been shown that ambient temperature challenges have a direct and highly varied impact on cardiovascular health. With a rapidly growing amount of literature on this issue, we aim to review the recent publications regarding the impact of cold and heat on human populations with regard to cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality/morbidity while also examining lag effects, vulnerable subgroups, and relevant mechanisms. Although the relative risk of morbidity/mortality associated with extreme temperature varied greatly across different studies, both cold and hot temperatures were associated with a positive mean excess of cardiovascular deaths or hospital admissions. Cause-specific study of CVD morbidity/mortality indicated that the sensitivity to temperature was disease-specific, with different patterns for acute and chronic ischemic heart disease. Vulnerability to temperature-related mortality was associated with some characteristics of the populations, including sex, age, location, socioeconomic condition, and comorbidities such as cardiac diseases, kidney diseases, diabetes, and hypertension. Temperature-induced damage is thought to be related to enhanced sympathetic reactivity followed by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renin-angiotensin system, as well as dehydration and a systemic inflammatory response. Future research should focus on multidisciplinary adaptation strategies that incorporate epidemiology, climatology, indoor/building environments, energy usage, labor legislative perfection, and human thermal comfort models. Studies on the underlying mechanism by which temperature challenge induces pathophysiological response and CVD await profound and lasting investigation. PMID:26432837

  7. New strategies for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Carnés, Jerónimo; Robinson, Douglas S

    2008-06-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy, consisting in the administration of increasing amounts of offending allergens into sensitive patients was first used nearly one hundred years ago and remains in use worldwide for treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. It has been recognised as the only effective treatment for type I allergic diseases when the appropriate quantities of allergens are used. The immunological mechanisms by which specific immunotherapy is effective include the modulation of T cells and the response of B-cells and is accompanied by significant decreases of specific IgE and increases in allergen specific IgG antibodies, mainly IgG4. While specific allergen injection immunotherapy is highly effective and the most common way of administration other routes such as oral or intranasal ways have been considered as and alternative to subcutaneous injections. During the last century, allergenic vaccines have been prepared using individual allergens adsorbed to different adjuvant substances. These vaccines have demonstrated efficacy and good results in different clinical trials. However, many novel approaches to allergen immunotherapy have been developed in the last years in order to increase the safety and efficacy of allergenic vaccines. In that way, different and modern vaccines have been prepared including more purified products such as depigmented allergen extracts; allergoids, consisting on big molecules of thousands of kDa, which contain all the individual allergens and show a significant decrease in severe adverse reactions; peptides or small aminoacid sequences; recombinant allergens; hypoallergenic vaccines where the IgE binding sites have been modified; or allergen-CpG fusion molecules. New presentations are under study and new treatments will be developed in the near future with the objective that the prevention of allergic disease may become a reality. The review article also discuss recent patent related to the field. PMID:19075996

  8. Fungal allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Horner, W E; Helbling, A; Salvaggio, J E; Lehrer, S B

    1995-01-01

    Airborne fungal spores occur widely and often in far greater concentrations than pollen grains. Immunoglobulin E-specific antigens (allergens) on airborne fungal spores induce type I hypersensitivity (allergic) respiratory reactions in sensitized atopic subjects, causing rhinitis and/or asthma. The prevalence of respiratory allergy to fungi is imprecisely known but is estimated at 20 to 30% of atopic (allergy-predisposed) individuals or up to 6% of the general population. Diagnosis and immunotherapy of allergy to fungi require well-characterized or standardized extracts that contain the relevant allergen(s) of the appropriate fungus. Production of standardized extracts is difficult since fungal extracts are complex mixtures and a variety of fungi are allergenic. Thus, the currently available extracts are largely nonstandardized, even uncharacterized, crude extracts. Recent significant progress in isolating and characterizing relevant fungal allergens is summarized in the present review. Particularly, some allergens from the genera Alternaria, Aspergillus, and Cladosporium are now thoroughly characterized, and allergens from several other genera, including some basidiomycetes, have also been purified. The availability of these extracts will facilitate definitive studies of fungal allergy prevalence and immunotherapy efficacy as well as enhance both the diagnosis and therapy of fungal allergy. PMID:7621398

  9. Airway epithelial cells initiate the allergen response through transglutaminase 2 by inducing IL-33 expression and a subsequent Th2 response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a post-translational protein-modifying enzyme that catalyzes the transamidation reaction, producing crosslinked or polyaminated proteins. Increased TG2 expression and activity have been reported in various inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammation-associated pulmonary fibrosis, and autoimmune encephalitis. In particular, TG2 from epithelial cells is important during the initial inflammatory response in the lung. In this study, we evaluated the role of TG2 in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma, particularly whether TG2 affects initial activation signaling leading to Th2 differentiation against antigens. Methods We induced allergic asthma by ovalbumin sensitization and intranasal challenge in wild-type (WT) BALB/c and TG2-deficient mice. Broncheoalveolar lavage fluid cells and intracellular cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. Interleukin (IL)-33 and TG2 expression in lung epithelial cells was detected by confocal microscopy. Results Airway responsiveness was attenuated in TG2-deficient mice compared to that in the WT control. In addition, recruitment of eosinophils and Th2 and Th17 differentiation decreased in TG2-deficient mice. Treatment with cysteamine, a transglutaminase inhibitor, also reduced airway hypersensitivity, inflammatory cell recruitment, and T helper cell differentiation. TG2-deficient mice showed reduced IL-33 expression following induction of allergic asthma compared to those in the WT control. Conclusions We found that pulmonary epithelial cells damaged by allergens triggered TG2-mediated IL-33 expression leading to type 2 responses by recruiting both innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. PMID:23496815

  10. Imaging Inflammation in Asthma: Real Time, Differential Tracking of Human Neutrophil and Eosinophil Migration in Allergen Challenged, Atopic Asthmatics in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lukawska, Joanna J.; Livieratos, Lefteris; Sawyer, Barbara M.; Lee, Tak; O'Doherty, Michael; Blower, Philip J.; Kofi, Martin; Ballinger, James R.; Corrigan, Christopher J.; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Mullen, Gregory E.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to study differential inflammatory cellular migration, particularly of eosinophils and neutrophils, in asthma and how this is influenced by environmental stimuli such as allergen exposure and the effects of anti asthma therapy. Methods We isolated blood neutrophils and eosinophils from 12 atopic asthmatic human volunteers (Group 1 — four Early Allergic Responders unchallenged (EAR); Group 2 — four Early and Late Allergic Responders (LAR) challenged; Group 3 — four EAR and LAR challenged and treated with systemic corticosteroids) using cGMP CD16 CliniMACS. Cells were isolated prior to allergen challenge where applicable, labelled with 99mTc-HMPAO and then re-infused intravenously. The kinetics of cellular influx/efflux into the lungs and other organs were imaged via scintigraphy over 4 h, starting at 5 to 6 h following allergen challenge where applicable. Results Neutrophils and eosinophils were isolated to a mean (SD) purity of 98.36% (1.09) and 96.31% (3.0), respectively. Asthmatic neutrophils were activated at baseline, mean (SD) CD11bHigh cells 46 (10.50) %. Isolation and radiolabelling significantly increased their activation to > 98%. Eosinophils were not activated at baseline, CD69+ cells 1.9 (0.6) %, increasing to 38 (3.46) % following isolation and labelling. Analysis of the kinetics of net eosinophil and neutrophil lung influx/efflux conformed to a net exponential clearance with respective mean half times of clearance 6.98 (2.18) and 14.01 (2.63) minutes for Group 1, 6.03 (0.72) and 16.04 (2.0) minutes for Group 2 and 5.63 (1.20) and 14.56 (3.36) minutes for Group 3. These did not significantly differ between the three asthma groups (p > 0.05). Conclusions Isolation and radiolabelling significantly increased activation of eosinophils (CD69) and completely activated neutrophils (CD11bHigh) in all asthma groups. Net lung neutrophil efflux was significantly slower than that of eosinophils in all asthma study groups. There

  11. House Dust Mite-Derived Chitin Enhances Th2 Cell Response to Inhaled Allergens, Mainly via a TNF-α-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Pyo; Lee, Sang-Min; Choi, Hyun-Il; Kim, Min-Hye; Jeon, Seong Gyu; Jang, Myoung Ho; Jee, Young-Koo; Yang, Sanghwa; Cho, Young-Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chitin is a potent adjuvant in the development of immune response to inhaled allergens in the airways. According to other studies, chitin is known as multi-faced adjuvants which can induce Th2 responses. Recently, we found that TNF-α is a key mediator in the development of Th2 cell response to inhaled allergens. Here, we evaluated the immunologic mechanisms in the development of airway hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens, enhanced by house dust mite (HDM)-derived chitin. Methods The role of TNF-α and TLRs was evaluated in an airway hypersensitivity mouse model induced by a sensitization with an allergen (ovalbumin, OVA) and HDM-derived chitin using mice with the null mutation of target genes. Results The present study showed that airway sensitization with HDM-derived chitin plus OVA enhanced OVA-induced airway inflammation v. OVA alone. This phenotype was associated with the increased expression of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines and also with the enhanced production of OVA-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a. As for T cell responses, OVA-specific Th2 cell response, enhanced by chitin, was abolished by the treatment of chitinase, whereas Th1 and Th17 cell responses enhanced by this treatment. Moreover, the null mutation of the TNF-α gene revealed similar effects as the chitinase treatment. In contrast, all the OVA-specific T cell responses, enhanced by chitin, were blocked by the absence of TLR2, but not of TLR1, TLR4, or TLR6. Conclusions In conclusion, these data suggest that HDM-derived chitin may enhance airway hypersensitivity to inhaled allergens, via the TLR2-dependent pathway, and that chitin-induced TNF-α can be a key mediator in the development of Th2 cell response to inhaled allergens. PMID:27126730

  12. Allergen-Experienced Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Acquire Memory-like Properties and Enhance Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Gonzalez, Itziar; Mathä, Laura; Steer, Catherine A; Ghaedi, Maryam; Poon, Grace F T; Takei, Fumio

    2016-07-19

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) in the lung are stimulated by inhaled allergens. ILC2s do not directly recognize allergens but they are stimulated by cytokines including interleukin (IL)-33 released by damaged epithelium. In response to allergens, lung ILC2s produce T helper 2 cell type cytokines inducing T cell-independent allergic lung inflammation. Here we examined the fate of lung ILC2s upon allergen challenges. ILC2s proliferated and secreted cytokines upon initial stimulation with allergen or IL-33, and this phase was followed by a contraction phase as cytokine production ceased. Some ILC2s persisted long after the resolution of the inflammation as allergen-experienced ILC2s and responded to unrelated allergens more potently than naive ILC2s, mediating severe allergic inflammation. The allergen-experienced ILC2s exhibited a gene expression profile similar to that of memory T cells. The memory-like properties of allergen-experienced ILC2s may explain why asthma patients are often sensitized to multiple allergens. PMID:27421705

  13. Outdoor allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, H A; Rogers, C A

    2000-01-01

    Outdoor allergens are an important part of the exposures that lead to allergic disease. Understanding the role of outdoor allergens requires a knowledge of the nature of outdoor allergen-bearing particles, the distributions of their source, and the nature of the aerosols (particle types, sizes, dynamics of concentrations). Primary sources for outdoor allergens include vascular plants (pollen, fern spores, soy dust), and fungi (spores, hyphae). Nonvascular plants, algae, and arthropods contribute small numbers of allergen-bearing particles. Particles are released from sources into the air by wind, rain, mechanical disturbance, or active discharge mechanisms. Once airborne, they follow the physical laws that apply to all airborne particles. Although some outdoor allergens penetrate indoor spaces, exposure occurs mostly outdoors. Even short-term peak outdoor exposures can be important in eliciting acute symptoms. Monitoring of airborne biological particles is usually by particle impaction and microscopic examination. Centrally located monitoring stations give regional-scale measurements for aeroallergen levels. Evidence for the role of outdoor allergens in allergic rhinitis is strong and is rapidly increasing for a role in asthma. Pollen and fungal spore exposures have both been implicated in acute exacerbations of asthma, and sensitivity to some fungal spores predicts the existence of asthma. Synergism and/or antagonism probably occurs with other outdoor air particles and gases. Control involves avoidance of exposure (staying indoors, preventing entry of outdoor aerosols) as well as immunotherapy, which is effective for pollen but of limited effect for spores. Outdoor allergens have been the subject of only limited studies with respect to the epidemiology of asthma. Much remains to be studied with respect to prevalence patterns, exposure and disease relationships, and control. PMID:10931783

  14. Allergenic properties and differential response of walnut subjected to processing treatments.

    PubMed

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Maleki, Soheila J; Rodríguez, Julia; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Teuber, Suzanne S; Wallowitz, Mikhael L; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Linacero, Rosario; Burbano, Carmen; Novak, Natalija; Cuadrado, Carmen; Crespo, Jesús F

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in walnut allergenicity after processing treatments by in vitro techniques and physiologically relevant assays. The allergenicity of walnuts subjected to high hydrostatic pressure and thermal/pressure treatments was evaluated by IgE-immunoblot and antibodies against walnut major allergen Jug r 4. The ability of processed walnut to cross-link IgE on effector cells was evaluated using a rat basophil leukaemia cell line and by skin prick testing. Susceptibility to gastric and duodenal digestion was also evaluated. The results showed that walnuts subjected to pressure treatment at 256 kPa, 138 °C, were able to diminish the IgE cross-linking capacity on effector cells more efficiently than high pressure treated walnuts. IgE immunoblot confirmed these results. Moreover, higher susceptibility to digestion of pressure treated walnut proteins was observed. The use of processed walnuts with decreased IgE binding capacity could be a potential strategy for walnut tolerance induction. PMID:24679763

  15. Suppression of allergic inflammation by allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells depends on the induction of Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kui; Bi, Yuttian; Sun, Kun; Xia, Junbo; Wang, Yan; Wang, Changzheng

    2008-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play important roles in regulating allergic inflammation. To analyse if allergen-DNA-modified dendritic cells (DC) can suppress allergic responses and what roles Treg cells play in DC-based allergen-specific immunotherapy. Immature DC were transfected with retrovirus encoding Der p2 DNA, and administered to mice that sensitized and challenged with Der p2 protein. After Treg cells were depleted with anti-CD25 mAb, mice were re-challenged to observe the airway inflammation, and Treg cells in spleen CD4(+) T cells. And responses of spleen CD4(+) T cells to Der p2 were determined. Co-culture of naïve CD4(+) T cells with allergen-modified DC induced Foxp3+ Tregs. Sensitized and challenged mice developed allergic airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and decreased Foxp3(+) Tregs. Treatment with allergen-modified-DC suppressed airway inflammation and Th2 responses, and increased IL-10 and IFN-gamma production and Foxp3(+) Tregs significantly; and eliminated the responses of CD4(+) T cells to allergen. Administration of anit-CD25 mAb eliminated all the effects of modified-DC except for the increasing of IFN-gamma. Allergen-modified DC can induce immune tolerance to allergens and reverse the established Th2 responses induced by allergen, with dependence on the induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs. PMID:18201369

  16. Enhancement of allergic skin wheal responses and in vitro allergen-specific IgE production by computer-induced stress in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-04-01

    Computer-induced stress enhanced allergen-specific skin wheal responses in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) while it failed to do so in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). Computer-induced stress also enhanced plasma levels of substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in patients with AD, but not with AR. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with combination of IL-4, IL-10, anti-CD40 mAb, and allergen produced allergen-specific IgE production in both patients with AD and AR. Computer-induced stress enhanced allergen-specific IgE production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with AD, but not from patients with AR. This is the first report that computer-induced stress enhances allergen-specific responses with concomitant increase of plasma levels of SP and VIP specifically in patients with AD. Since AD is often aggravated by stress, these finding may have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of AD. PMID:12676575

  17. Aircraft Emergencies: Challenge and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burian, Barbara K.

    2010-01-01

    Emergency and abnormal situations in aviation present flight crews with a number of challenges. Checklists are essential tools that have been developed to assist them to meet these challenges. However, in order for checklists to be most effective in these situations they must be designed with the operational and situational demands of emergencies and abnormal conditions in mind as well as human performance capabilities and limitations under high stress and workload.

  18. FoxP3 Tregs Response to Sublingual Allergen Specific Immunotherapy in Children Depends on the Manifestation of Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Głodkowska-Mrówka, Eliza; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades allergic diseases has become a major health problem worldwide. The only specific treatment to date is allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Although it was shown that ASIT generates allergen-tolerant T cells, detailed mechanism underlying its activity is still unclear and there is no reliable method to monitor its effectiveness. The aim of our study was to evaluate ASIT influence on the frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) Tregs in allergic children with various clinical manifestations. The relative number of FoxP3 Tregs in 32 blood samples from allergic children at baseline and/or after 1 year of ASIT was assessed by flow cytometry. In the entire studied group, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs did not increase 1 year after ASIT. Nevertheless, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs after ASIT significantly increased in children with respiratory allergy (conjunctivitis, asthma, and rhinitis) coexisting with nonrespiratory manifestations (food allergy and/or atopic dermatitis), whereas, in patients with respiratory allergy only, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs decreased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing various differential FoxP3 Tregs response to ASIT in allergic children. FoxP3 Tregs number could be useful in treatment monitoring. Further studies are warranted to confirm these observations. PMID:26457309

  19. FoxP3 Tregs Response to Sublingual Allergen Specific Immunotherapy in Children Depends on the Manifestation of Allergy.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Głodkowska-Mrówka, Eliza; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades allergic diseases has become a major health problem worldwide. The only specific treatment to date is allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Although it was shown that ASIT generates allergen-tolerant T cells, detailed mechanism underlying its activity is still unclear and there is no reliable method to monitor its effectiveness. The aim of our study was to evaluate ASIT influence on the frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) Tregs in allergic children with various clinical manifestations. The relative number of FoxP3 Tregs in 32 blood samples from allergic children at baseline and/or after 1 year of ASIT was assessed by flow cytometry. In the entire studied group, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs did not increase 1 year after ASIT. Nevertheless, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs after ASIT significantly increased in children with respiratory allergy (conjunctivitis, asthma, and rhinitis) coexisting with nonrespiratory manifestations (food allergy and/or atopic dermatitis), whereas, in patients with respiratory allergy only, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs decreased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing various differential FoxP3 Tregs response to ASIT in allergic children. FoxP3 Tregs number could be useful in treatment monitoring. Further studies are warranted to confirm these observations. PMID:26457309

  20. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure attenuates airway immune inflammatory responses to surrogate and common environmental allergens in mice, despite evidence of increased systemic sensitization.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Clinton S; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Fattouh, Ramzi; Dawe, David E; Vujicic, Neda; Richards, Carl D; Jordana, Manel; Inman, Mark D; Stampfli, Martin R

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of mainstream cigarette smoke exposure (MTS) on allergic sensitization and the development of allergic inflammatory processes. Using two different experimental murine models of allergic airways inflammation, we present evidence that MTS increased cytokine production by splenocytes in response to OVA and ragweed challenge. Paradoxically, MTS exposure resulted in an overall attenuation of the immune inflammatory response, including a dramatic reduction in the number of eosinophils and activated (CD69+) and Th2-associated (T1ST2+) CD4 T lymphocytes in the lung. Although MTS did not impact circulating levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1, we observed a striking reduction in OVA-specific IgG2a production and significantly diminished airway hyperresponsiveness. MTS, therefore, plays a disparate role in the development of allergic responses, inducing a heightened state of allergen-specific sensitization, but dampening local immune inflammatory processes in the lung. PMID:16116169

  1. Immunosuppression in Early Postnatal Days Induces Persistent and Allergen-Specific Immune Tolerance to Asthma in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Yong; Wang, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory condition with high morbidity, and effective treatments for asthma are limited. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can only induce peripheral immune tolerance and is not sustainable. Exploring new therapeutic strategies is of great clinical importance. Recombinant adenovirus (rAdV) was used as a vector to make cells expressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig) a soluble CTLA4 immunoglobulin fusion protein. Dendritic cells (DCs) were modified using the rAdVs together with allergens. Then these modified DCs were transplanted to mice before allergen sensitization. The persistence and specificity of immune tolerance were evaluated in mice challenged with asthma allergens at 3 and 7 months. DCs modified by CTLA4Ig showed increased IL-10 secretion, decreased IL-12 secretion, and T cell stimulation in vitro. Mice treated with these DCs in the early neonatal period developed tolerance against the allergens that were used to induce asthma in the adult stage. Asthma symptoms, lung damage, airway reactivity, and inflammatory response all improved. Humoral immunity indices showed that this therapeutic strategy strongly suppressed mice immune responses and was maintained for as long as 7 months. Furthermore, allergen cross-sensitization and challenge experiments demonstrated that this immune tolerance was allergen-specific. Treatment with CTLA4Ig modified DCs in the early neonatal period, inducing persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice. Our results suggest that it may be possible to develop a vaccine for asthma. PMID:25860995

  2. Immunosuppression in early postnatal days induces persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Zhang, Jin; Lu, Yong; Wang, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory condition with high morbidity, and effective treatments for asthma are limited. Allergen-specific immunotherapy can only induce peripheral immune tolerance and is not sustainable. Exploring new therapeutic strategies is of great clinical importance. Recombinant adenovirus (rAdV) was used as a vector to make cells expressing cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-immunoglobulin (CTLA4Ig) a soluble CTLA4 immunoglobulin fusion protein. Dendritic cells (DCs) were modified using the rAdVs together with allergens. Then these modified DCs were transplanted to mice before allergen sensitization. The persistence and specificity of immune tolerance were evaluated in mice challenged with asthma allergens at 3 and 7 months. DCs modified by CTLA4Ig showed increased IL-10 secretion, decreased IL-12 secretion, and T cell stimulation in vitro. Mice treated with these DCs in the early neonatal period developed tolerance against the allergens that were used to induce asthma in the adult stage. Asthma symptoms, lung damage, airway reactivity, and inflammatory response all improved. Humoral immunity indices showed that this therapeutic strategy strongly suppressed mice immune responses and was maintained for as long as 7 months. Furthermore, allergen cross-sensitization and challenge experiments demonstrated that this immune tolerance was allergen-specific. Treatment with CTLA4Ig modified DCs in the early neonatal period, inducing persistent and allergen-specific immune tolerance to asthma in adult mice. Our results suggest that it may be possible to develop a vaccine for asthma. PMID:25860995

  3. Mechanistic analysis of challenge-response experiments.

    PubMed

    Shotwell, M S; Drake, K J; Sidorov, V Y; Wikswo, J P

    2013-09-01

    We present an application of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression in the context of biomedical response-to-challenge experiments, a field where these methods are underutilized. In this type of experiment, a system is studied by imposing an experimental challenge, and then observing its response. The combination of mechanistic modeling and nonlinear longitudinal regression has brought new insight, and revealed an unexpected opportunity for optimal design. Specifically, the mechanistic aspect of our approach enables the optimal design of experimental challenge characteristics (e.g., intensity, duration). This article lays some groundwork for this approach. We consider a series of experiments wherein an isolated rabbit heart is challenged with intermittent anoxia. The heart responds to the challenge onset, and recovers when the challenge ends. The mean response is modeled by a system of differential equations that describe a candidate mechanism for cardiac response to anoxia challenge. The cardiac system behaves more variably when challenged than when at rest. Hence, observations arising from this experiment exhibit complex heteroscedasticity and sharp changes in central tendency. We present evidence that an asymptotic statistical inference strategy may fail to adequately account for statistical uncertainty. Two alternative methods are critiqued qualitatively (i.e., for utility in the current context), and quantitatively using an innovative Monte-Carlo method. We conclude with a discussion of the exciting opportunities in optimal design of response-to-challenge experiments. PMID:23859366

  4. Allergen Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rael, Efren

    2016-09-01

    Allergies affect a large proportion of the population. Allergies can adversely affect productivity, sleep, and quality of life and can lead to life-threatening reactions. Allergies can spread to affect multiple organ systems. Allergen immunotherapy is the only therapy that can change the natural history of allergic disease. PMID:27545737

  5. PI3K and ERK1/2 kinase inhibition potentiate protease inhibitor to attenuate allergen induced Th2 immune response in mouse.

    PubMed

    Saw, Sanjay; Arora, Naveen

    2016-04-01

    Proteases affect immune response by activating PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase. In present study, therapeutic effect of PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase inhibitor in combination with serine protease inhibitor was evaluated in cockroach extract (CE) induced airway inflammatory disease. Mice were sensitized on day 0, 7 and 14 and challenged on day 27, 28 and 29 with CE. Mice were given PI3K, ERK1/2 and the p38 kinase inhibitor (iPI3K, iERK1/2 and the ip38) alone or with serine protease inhibitor 4-(2-Aminoethyl) benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF), 1h before challenge. On day 30 airway resistance of mice were determined and euthanized to collect blood, BAL fluid and lung for analysis. CE immunized mice showed PI3K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase activation, increased airway resistance, cellular infiltration, Th2 cytokines IgE and IgG1. AEBSF given to mice reduced the CE induced allergic response. AEBSF given in combination of iPI3K/iERK1/2 reduced cellular infiltration in lungs. Furthermore, iPI3K/iERK1/2 with AEBSF significantly reduced the CE induced Th2 cytokines in comparison to monotherapy of kinase inhibitor and AEBSF (P<0.05). The combination of iPI3K/iERK1/2 with AEBSF enhanced IL-12 level that could further provide a mean of Th2 reduction. Best effect in reduction of allergic response in mice was observed on administration of AEBSF with iPI3K. Conclusively, the combination of PI3K kinase inhibitor with AEBSF reduced allergen induced airway response and has therapeutic potential for add-on therapy in allergic airway disease. PMID:26905476

  6. Allergen challenge sensitizes TRPA1 in vagal sensory neurons and afferent C-fiber subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenyu; Hu, Youtian; Yu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Jiefeng; Fan, Xiaoming; Tse, Chung-Ming; Myers, Allen C; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Li, Xingde; Yu, Shaoyong

    2015-03-15

    Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) is a newly defined cationic ion channel, which selectively expresses in primary sensory afferent nerve, and is essential in mediating inflammatory nociception. Our previous study demonstrated that TRPA1 plays an important role in tissue mast cell activation-induced increase in the excitability of esophageal vagal nodose C fibers. The present study aims to determine whether prolonged antigen exposure in vivo sensitizes TRPA1 in a guinea pig model of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Antigen challenge-induced responses in esophageal mucosa were first assessed by histological stains and Ussing chamber studies. TRPA1 function in vagal sensory neurons was then studied by calcium imaging and by whole cell patch-clamp recordings in 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labeled esophageal vagal nodose and jugular neurons. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in vagal nodose and jugular C-fiber neuron subtypes using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Antigen challenge significantly increased infiltrations of eosinophils and mast cells in the esophagus. TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced calcium influx in nodose and jugular neurons was significantly increased, and current densities in esophageal DiI-labeled nodose and jugular neurons were also significantly increased in antigen-challenged animals. Prolonged antigen challenge decreased esophageal epithelial barrier resistance, which allowed intraesophageal-infused AITC-activating nodose and jugular C fibers at their nerve endings. Collectively, these results demonstrated that prolonged antigen challenge sensitized TRPA1 in esophageal sensory neurons and afferent C fibers. This novel finding will help us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying esophageal sensory and motor dysfunctions in EoE. PMID:25591867

  7. Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Preschool-Aged Children: Development of Immunoglobulin E and Immunoglobulin G4 Responses to Parasite Allergen-Like Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Sousa-Figueiredo, Jose C.; Jones, Frances M.; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Betson, Martha; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell; Dunne, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) responses are upregulated during chronic schistosome infection and during allergy. These responses are tightly regulated during schistosomiasis. We have previously shown that IgE regulation depends on the extent and length of exposure to individual parasite allergen-like proteins. Here we compare the development of IgE and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) responses to the differentially expressed allergen-like proteins SmTAL1 and SmTAL2 among preschool-aged children from 2 villages with different levels of Schistosoma mansoni transmission. We found a lack of SmTAL1 responsiveness among all children, but evidence for IgG4-dependent IgE-SmTAL2 desensitization in both villages, occurring earlier among children from the village where the level of transmission was greater. Findings provide insights into the development and regulation of allergic-type immune responses. PMID:23125445

  8. Direct contact between dendritic cells and bronchial epithelial cells inhibits T cell recall responses towards mite and pollen allergen extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Papazian, D; Wagtmann, V R; Hansen, S; Würtzen, P A

    2015-08-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AECs) form a polarized barrier along the respiratory tract. They are the first point of contact with airborne antigens and are able to instruct resident immune cells to mount appropriate immune responses by either soluble or contact-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesize that a healthy, polarized epithelial cell layer inhibits inflammatory responses towards allergens to uphold homeostasis. Using an in-vitro co-culture model of the airway epithelium, where a polarized cell layer of bronchial epithelial cells can interact with dendritic cells (DCs), we have investigated recall T cell responses in allergic patients sensitized to house dust mite, grass and birch pollen. Using allergen extract-loaded DCs to stimulate autologous allergen-specific T cell lines, we show that AEC-imprinted DCs inhibit T cell proliferation significantly of Bet v 1-specific T cell lines as well as decrease interleukin (IL)-5 and IL-13 production, whereas inhibition of Phl p 5-specific T cells varied between different donors. Stimulating autologous CD4(+) T cells from allergic patients with AEC-imprinted DCs also inhibited proliferation significantly and decreased production of both T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines upon rechallenge. The inhibitory effects of AECs' contact with DCs were absent when allergen extract-loaded DCs had been exposed only to AECs supernatants, but present after direct contact with AECs. We conclude that direct contact between DCs and AECs inhibits T cell recall responses towards birch, grass and house dust mite allergens in vitro, suggesting that AECs-DC contact in vivo constitute a key element in mucosal homeostasis in relation to allergic sensitisation. PMID:25707463

  9. Allergic airways disease develops after an increase in allergen capture and processing in the airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    von Garnier, Christophe; Wikstrom, Matthew E; Zosky, Graeme; Turner, Debra J; Sly, Peter D; Smith, Miranda; Thomas, Jennifer A; Judd, Samantha R; Strickland, Deborah H; Holt, Patrick G; Stumbles, Philip A

    2007-11-01

    Airway mucosal dendritic cells (AMDC) and other airway APCs continuously sample inhaled Ags and regulate the nature of any resulting T cell-mediated immune response. Although immunity develops to harmful pathogens, tolerance arises to nonpathogenic Ags in healthy individuals. This homeostasis is thought to be disrupted in allergic respiratory disorders such as allergic asthma, such that a potentially damaging Th2-biased, CD4(+) T cell-mediated inflammatory response develops against intrinsically nonpathogenic allergens. Using a mouse model of experimental allergic airways disease (EAAD), we have investigated the functional changes occurring in AMDC and other airway APC populations during disease onset. Onset of EAAD was characterized by early and transient activation of airway CD4(+) T cells coinciding with up-regulation of CD40 expression exclusively on CD11b(-) AMDC. Concurrent enhanced allergen uptake and processing occurred within all airway APC populations, including B cells, macrophages, and both CD11b(+) and CD11b(-) AMDC subsets. Immune serum transfer into naive animals recapitulated the enhanced allergen uptake observed in airway APC populations and mediated activation of naive allergen-specific, airway CD4(+) T cells following inhaled allergen challenge. These data suggest that the onset of EAAD is initiated by enhanced allergen capture and processing by a number of airway APC populations and that allergen-specific Igs play a role in the conversion of normally quiescent AMDC subsets into those capable of inducing airway CD4(+) T cell activation. PMID:17947647

  10. Dermatophagoides farinae Allergens Diversity Identification by Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    An, Su; Chen, Lingling; Long, Chengbo; Liu, Xiaoyu; Xu, Xuemei; Lu, Xingre; Rong, Mingqiang; Liu, Zhigang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    The most important indoor allergens for humans are house dust mites (HDM). Fourteen Dermatophagoides farinae allergens (Der f 1–3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 13–18, and 22) are reported although more than 30 allergens have been estimated in D. farinae. Seventeen allergens belonging to 12 different groups were identified by a procedure of proteomics combined with two-dimensional immunoblotting from D. farina extracts. Their sequences were determined by Edman degradation, mass spectrometry analysis, and cDNA cloning. Their allergenicities were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay inhibition tests, immunoblots, basophil activation test, and skin prick tests. Eight of them are the first report as D. farinae allergens. The procedure of using a proteomic approach combined with a purely discovery approach using sera of patients with broad IgE reactivity profiles to mite allergens was an effective method to investigate a more complete repertoire of D. farinae allergens. The identification of eight new D. farinae allergens will be helpful for HDM allergy diagnosis and therapy, especially for patients without response for HDM major allergens. In addition, the current work significantly extendedthe repertoire of D. farinae allergens. PMID:23481662

  11. Efficacy and safety of olopatadine hydrochloride 0.77% in patients with allergic conjunctivitis using a conjunctival allergen-challenge model

    PubMed Central

    Torkildsen, Gail; Narvekar, Abhijit; Bergmann, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptom relief for the duration of 24 hours after treatment would benefit patients with allergic conjunctivitis. Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of olopatadine 0.77% with vehicle or olopatadine 0.2% in patients with allergic conjunctivitis in a conjunctival allergen-challenge clinical study. Patients and methods In this Phase III, multicenter, double-masked, parallel-group, randomized trial, patients with allergic conjunctivitis received olopatadine 0.77%, its vehicle, or olopatadine 0.2%, administered once at visits 3A (day 0), 4A (day 14 ±2), and 5 (day 21 +3). Allergic conjunctivitis-associated sign and symptom assessments included ocular itching, conjunctival redness, total redness, chemosis, and tearing scores. Adverse events and ocular safety parameters were also assessed. Results A total of 202 qualifying patients were randomized. Olopatadine 0.77% was superior (P<0.001) to vehicle for treatment of ocular itching at 3, 5, and 7 minutes postchallenge at onset of action and 16- and 24-hour duration of action. Conjunctival redness mean scores were significantly lower for olopatadine 0.77% versus vehicle at all three post-conjunctival allergen-challenge time points: onset (−1.52 to −1.48; P<0.001), 16 hours (−1.50 to −1.38; P<0.01), and 24 hours (−1.58 to −1.38; P<0.05). At 24 hours, olopatadine 0.77% was superior to olopatadine 0.2% at all three postchallenge time points for ocular itching (P<0.05), conjunctival redness (P<0.05), and total redness (P<0.05). No clinically relevant differences in safety parameters or adverse events were observed between the treatment groups. Conclusion Olopatadine 0.77% is superior to both its vehicle and olopatadine 0.2% for the treatment of allergen-mediated ocular itching and conjunctival redness. Ocular itching symptom relief is maintained over 24 hours, supporting once-daily dosing and demonstrating a comparable safety profile to olopatadine 0.2%. PMID:26392751

  12. Improved detection of allergen-specific T-cell responses in allergic contact dermatitis through the addition of 'cytokine cocktails'.

    PubMed

    Moed, Helen; von Blomberg, Mary; Bruynzeel, Derk P; Scheper, Rik; Gibbs, Susan; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis of allergic hypersensitivity is skin patch testing with the suspected allergens. This diagnostic tool, however, has distinct disadvantages, and therefore the development of alternative or complementary in vitro tests is of great importance. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of an in vitro test method, as developed earlier for nickel allergy, to detect allergen-specific T cells in the blood of patients allergic to frequent sensitizers (chromate, cobalt, paraphenylenediamine, fragrances and chloromethyl-isothiazolinone). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of allergic patients and healthy controls were cultured in the absence or presence of allergen. Additionally, type 1 (IL-7 and IL-12) or type 2 (IL-7 and IL-4) stimulating cytokines were added; after 6-day proliferation, IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretions were determined. Without the addition of cytokines, consistent allergen-induced proliferation was observed in PBMCs of nickel-allergic patients only. By contrast, the addition of type 1 or type 2 stimulating cytokines resulted in a significantly enhanced allergen-specific proliferation for all allergens tested (sensitivity increased from 26 to 43% or 38%, respectively, P < 0.05). In these cultures, allergen-induced IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretion was also significantly increased, compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05, for IFN-gamma sensitivity 79%, specificity 93%; for IL-5 sensitivity 74%, specificity 81%). In conclusion, these results demonstrate an increased proliferative capacity and cytokine production by allergen-specific T cells from allergic patients, but not of healthy individuals upon stimulation with allergens in combination with type 1 or 2 skewing cytokines. The present data warrant further exploration of the application of this test to a broader set of allergens. PMID:16026586

  13. [Allergen analysis].

    PubMed

    Röder, Martin; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental requirement when testing for and ensuring compliance with legally required labelling regulations is the reliable analysis of food allergens. This can be carried out by means of either DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or protein detection. Protein detection has the advantage of directly detecting the allergenic component and can currently be carried out using immunological (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA])/lateral flow devices [LFD]) or mass spectrometry-based techniques. DNA detection is indirect, but allows the presence of food allergens to be validated through the use of another marker. Each method has its pros and cons, which have to be considered on a case-by-case basis. ELISA is quantitative, quick and easy to carry out and has high sensitivity. LFD testing is ideal for industrial applications, as the tests can be carried out on-site. Both antibody-based tests may have problems with processed foods and false positive results. Mass-spectrometric techniques show a lot of promise, but are currently still time-consuming and complex to carry out. They also run into problems with processed foods and their degree of sensitivity is matrix and parameter dependent. For these reasons, this technique is only occasionally used. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides the highest specificity and, depending on the target sequence, a very good to good level of sensitivity. Despite the high stability of DNA, PCR is still subject to the influence of processing and matrix related factors. Due to natural variation and production-related changes in the structures relevant in the process of detection, all methods exhibit a relatively high level of uncertainty of measurement. At present, there is no method which provides the absolute correct quantification. However, by means of laboratory-based analyses it is possible to calibrate for the allergen in question and thus be able to make reliable measurements using methods that are already available. PMID

  14. Effect of CD8+ T-cell depletion on bronchial hyper-responsiveness and inflammation in sensitized and allergen-exposed Brown-Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, T J; MacAry, P A; Kemeny, D M; Chung, K F

    1999-03-01

    We examined the role of CD8+ T cells in a Brown-Norway rat model of asthma, using a monoclonal antibody to deplete CD8+ T cells. Ovalbumin (OA)-sensitized animals were given anti-CD8 antibody (0.5 mg/rat) intravenously 1 week prior to exposure to 1% OA aerosol and were studied 18-24 hr after aerosol exposure. Following administration of anti-CD8 antibody, CD8+ cells were reduced to <1% of total lymphocytes in whole blood and in spleen. In sensitized animals, OA exposure induced bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR), accumulation of eosinophils, lymphocytes and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and also an increase in tissue eosinophils and CD2+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in airways. Anti-CD8 antibody caused a further increase in allergen-induced BHR (P<0.03, compared with sham-treated animals), together with a significant increase in eosinophil number in BAL fluid (P<0.05). While CD2+ and CD4+ T cells in airways were not affected by anti-CD8 treatment, the level of CD8+ T cells was significantly reduced in sensitized, saline-exposed animals (P<0.04, compared with sham-treated rats), and sensitized and OA-challenged rats (P<0.002, compared with sham-treated rats). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, an increase of T helper (Th)2 cytokine [interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5], and also of Th1 cytokine [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-2], mRNA in the lung of sensitized and OA-exposed animals was found; after CD8+ T-cell depletion, Th1 cytokine expression was significantly reduced (P<0.02), while Th2 cytokine expression was unchanged. CD8+ T cells have a protective role in allergen-induced BHR and eosinophilic inflammation, probably through activation of the Th1 cytokine response. PMID:10233723

  15. Responsibilities, opportunities and challenges in geophysical exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Rytle, R.J.

    1982-05-04

    Geophysical exploration for engineering purposes is conducted to decrease the risk in encountering site uncertainties in construction of underground facilities. Current responsibilities, opportunities and challenges for those with geophysical expertise are defined. These include: replacing the squiggly line format, developing verification sites for method evaluations, applying knowledge engineering and assuming responsibility for crucial national problems involving rock mechanics expertise.

  16. Complex effects of vitamin E and vitamin C supplementation on in vitro neonatal mononuclear cell responses to allergens.

    PubMed

    Wassall, Heather J H; Devereux, Graham; Seaton, Anthony; Barker, Robert N

    2013-09-01

    Low maternal dietary vitamin E (but not vitamin C) intake during pregnancy has been associated with increased in vitro cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC) proliferative responses, childhood wheezing and asthma. We investigated whether these associations reflect direct effects of vitamin E by investigating the effects of supplementing CBMC cultures with physiological concentrations of vitamin E. CBMC from seventy neonates were cultured supplemented with either nothing, α-tocopherol or ascorbic acid. Proliferative, IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β responses were measured. In general, vitamin E supplementation was associated with a trend for reduced proliferative responses after stimulation with antigens and house dust mite, and with increased proliferation after stimulation with timothy grass allergen. There was a trend for CBMC cultures to exhibit decreased secretion of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4. Supplementation with vitamin C had no effect on CBMC proliferation, but increased IFN-γ and IL-4 production, and decreased IL-10 production. In conclusion, in vitro vitamin E and C supplementation of CBMC modifies neonatal immune function, but not in a manner predicted by observational epidemiological studies. The observed associations between vitamin E and childhood respiratory disease are complex, and the nature and form of nutritional intervention need to be carefully considered before inclusion in trials. PMID:24067384

  17. Beta 2-microglobulin-dependent T cells are dispensable for allergen-induced T helper 2 responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Rogers, K H; Lewis, D B

    1996-10-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta+ T cells of the T helper cell (Th)2 phenotype produce the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 that promote IgE production and eosinophilic inflammation. IL-4 may play an important role in mediating the differentiation of antigenically naive alpha/beta+ T cells into Th2 cells. Murine NK1.1+ (CD4+ or CD4-CD8-) alpha/beta+ T cells comprise a beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m)-dependent cell population that rapidly produces IL-4 after cell activation in vitro and in vivo and has been proposed as a source of IL-4 for Th2 cell differentiation. alpha/beta+ CD8+ T cells, most of which require beta 2m for their development, have also been proposed as positive regulators of allergen-induced Th2 responses. We tested whether beta 2m-dependent T cells were essential for Th2 cell-mediated allergic reactions by treating wild-type, beta 2m-deficient (beta 2m -/-), and IL-4-deficient (IL-4 -/-) mice of the C57BL/6 genetic background with ovalbumin (OVA), using a protocol that induces robust allergic pulmonary disease in wild-type mice. OVA-treated beta 2m -/- mice had circulating levels of total and OVA-specific IgE, pulmonary eosinophilia, and expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA in bronchial lymph node tissue similar to that of OVA-treated wild-type mice. In contrast, these responses in OVA-treated IL-4 -/- mice were all either undetectable or markedly reduced compared with wild-type mice, confirming that IL-4 was required in this allergic model. These results indicate that the NK1.1+ alpha/beta+ T cell population, as well as other beta 2m-dependent populations, such as most peripheral alpha/beta+ CD8+ T cells, are dispensable for the Th2 pulmonary response to protein allergens. PMID:8879221

  18. Prevalence of sensitization to food allergens and challenge proven food allergy in patients visiting allergy centers in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Inam, Muhammad; Shafique, Rubaba Hamid; Roohi, Nabila; Irfan, Muhammad; Abbas, Shahid; Ismail, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the prevalence of food allergy in the adult allergic patients of Rawalpindi and Islamabad , Pakistan, based on self-report, skin prick test (SPT) and oral food challenge test (OFC). SPT was used for the estimation of sensitization to wheat, egg, milk, beef, chicken, mutton, fish, corn, lentils, rice, soya, peanut and banana. Among 689 patients, 39.19 % showed sensitivity to one or more foods, where, sensitization to wheat (156; 22.6 %) was highest, followed by egg (148; 21.48 %) and milk (138; 20.03 %). Sensitization to various proteins ranged between 15.53-15.97 %, while lentils, corn, rice, soya and peanut sensitization was 15.4, 16, 12.5, 12 and 11.5 % respectively. Only 7.1 % patients were SPT positive for banana allergen. SPT was performed in patients with self-reported food allergy (341/689) and also with no self-reported history of food allergy (348/689). SPT results were positive in 69.8 % of the self-report group, whereas, in the patients with no self-reported food allergy 9.2 % were found sensitized to one or more tested food allergens. 101 patients were recruited for OFC, 61 % of these were confirmed of food allergy. The prevalence of food allergy in the study population was 9 %. Food specific OFC results show that wheat allergy is affecting 1.6 % (95 % CI 0.9-2.84 %) of the total allergy patients, followed by egg allergy 1.31 % (95 % CI 0.70-2.47 %). Furthermore, corn allergy, rice allergy and peanut allergy were 1.02, 0.87 and 0.73 %, respectively. In conclusion, wheat allergy is the most prevalent, followed by egg, chicken, beef and fish allergy, respectively. PMID:27563525

  19. Analysis of epitope-specific immune responses induced by vaccination with structurally folded and unfolded recombinant Bet v 1 allergen derivatives in man.

    PubMed

    Pree, Ines; Reisinger, Jürgen; Focke, Margit; Vrtala, Susanne; Pauli, Gabrielle; van Hage, Marianne; Cromwell, Oliver; Gadermaier, Elisabeth; Egger, Cornelia; Reider, Norbert; Horak, Friedrich; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2007-10-15

    Previously, we have constructed recombinant derivatives of the major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, with a more than 100-fold reduced ability to induce IgE-mediated allergic reactions. These derivatives differed from each other because the two recombinant Bet v 1 fragments represented unfolded molecules whereas the recombinant trimer resembled most of the structural fold of the Bet v 1 allergen. In this study, we analyzed the Ab (IgE, IgG subclass, IgA, IgM) response to Bet v 1, recombinant and synthetic Bet v 1-derived peptides in birch pollen allergic patients who had been vaccinated with the derivatives or adjuvant alone. Furthermore, we studied the induction of IgE-mediated skin responses in these patients using Bet v 1 and Bet v 1 fragments. Both types of vaccines induced a comparable IgG1 and IgG4 response against new sequential epitopes which overlap with the conformational IgE epitopes of Bet v 1. This response was 4- to 5-fold higher than that induced by immunotherapy with birch pollen extract. Trimer more than fragments induced also IgE responses against new epitopes and a transient increase in skin sensitivity to the fragments at the beginning of therapy. However, skin reactions to Bet v 1 tended to decrease one year after treatment in both actively treated groups. We demonstrate that vaccination with folded and unfolded recombinant allergen derivatives induces IgG Abs against new epitopes. These data may be important for the development of therapeutic as well as prophylactic vaccines based on recombinant allergens. PMID:17911617

  20. Allergenic response to squid (Todarodes pacificus) tropomyosin Tod p1 structure modifications induced by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Qian, Bingjun; Zhang, Yifeng; Liu, Zhenmin; Zhao, Yanyun

    2015-02-01

    The structural and allergenic modifications of tropomyosin Tod p1 (TMTp1) in fresh squids induced by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) were investigated. The α-helix in TMTp1 decreased along with increasing pressure from 200 to 600 MPa, where almost 53% α-helix was converted into β-sheet and random coils at 600 MPa. The free sulfhydryl group dropped significantly as pressure went up, but the surface hydrophobicity increased at 200 and 400 MPa, while it slightly decreased at 600 MPa. Based on in vitro gastrointestinal digestion test, digestibility of TMTp1 was promoted by HHP treatment, in which 400 and 600 MPa were more effective in reducing the allergenicity than 200 MPa based on indirect ELISA. This study suggested that HHP can decrease allergenicity of TMTp1 by protein unfolding and secondary structure modification, thus providing potential for alleviating allergenicity of squid. PMID:25530105

  1. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2011-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific method of treatment. The mechanisms of action of allergen-specific immunotherapy include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T-and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes, and migration of eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells to tissues, as well as release of their mediators. Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been identified as key regulators of immunologic processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in patients undergoing allergen-specific immunotherapy. Naturally occurring forkhead box protein 3-positive CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible T(R)1 cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector T(H)1, T(H)2, and T(H)17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils; and suppression of effector T-cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and Treg cell subsets. PMID:21211639

  2. The major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 induces different responses in dendritic cells of birch pollen allergic and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Smole, Ursula; Radauer, Christian; Lengger, Nina; Svoboda, Martin; Rigby, Neil; Bublin, Merima; Gaier, Sonja; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a fundamental role in shaping the immune response to allergens. The events that lead to allergic sensitization or tolerance induction during the interaction of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and dendritic cells are not very well studied. Here, we analyzed the uptake of Bet v 1 and the cross-reactive celery allergen Api g 1 by immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMoDCs) of allergic and normal donors. In addition, we characterized the allergen-triggered intracellular signaling and transcriptional events. Uptake kinetics, competitive binding, and internalization pathways of labeled allergens by iMoDCs were visualized by live-cell imaging. Surface-bound IgE was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Allergen- and IgE-induced gene expression of early growth response genes and Th1 and Th2 related cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Phosporylation of signaling kinases was analyzed by Western blot. Internalization of Bet v 1 by iMoDCs of both donor groups, likely by receptor-mediated caveolar endocytosis, followed similar kinetics. Bet v 1 outcompeted Api g 1 in cell surface binding and uptake. MoDCs of allergic and healthy donors displayed surface-bound IgE and showed a pronounced upregulation of Th2 cytokine- and NFκB-dependent genes upon non-specific Fcε receptor cross-linking. In contrast to these IgE-mediated responses, Bet v 1-stimulation increased transcript levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 but not of NFκB-related genes in MoDCs of BP allergic donors. Cells of healthy donors were either unresponsive or showed elevated mRNA levels of Th1-promoting chemokines. Moreover, Bet v 1 was able to induce Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation in BP allergics but only a slight p38 activation in normal donors. In conclusion, our data indicate that Bet v 1 favors the activation of a Th2 program only in DCs of BP allergic individuals. PMID:25635684

  3. The Major Birch Pollen Allergen Bet v 1 Induces Different Responses in Dendritic Cells of Birch Pollen Allergic and Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Smole, Ursula; Radauer, Christian; Lengger, Nina; Svoboda, Martin; Rigby, Neil; Bublin, Merima; Gaier, Sonja; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a fundamental role in shaping the immune response to allergens. The events that lead to allergic sensitization or tolerance induction during the interaction of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and dendritic cells are not very well studied. Here, we analyzed the uptake of Bet v 1 and the cross-reactive celery allergen Api g 1 by immature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (iMoDCs) of allergic and normal donors. In addition, we characterized the allergen-triggered intracellular signaling and transcriptional events. Uptake kinetics, competitive binding, and internalization pathways of labeled allergens by iMoDCs were visualized by live-cell imaging. Surface-bound IgE was detected by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Allergen- and IgE-induced gene expression of early growth response genes and Th1 and Th2 related cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by real-time PCR. Phosporylation of signaling kinases was analyzed by Western blot. Internalization of Bet v 1 by iMoDCs of both donor groups, likely by receptor-mediated caveolar endocytosis, followed similar kinetics. Bet v 1 outcompeted Api g 1 in cell surface binding and uptake. MoDCs of allergic and healthy donors displayed surface-bound IgE and showed a pronounced upregulation of Th2 cytokine- and NFκB-dependent genes upon non-specific Fcε receptor cross-linking. In contrast to these IgE-mediated responses, Bet v 1-stimulation increased transcript levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 but not of NFκB-related genes in MoDCs of BP allergic donors. Cells of healthy donors were either unresponsive or showed elevated mRNA levels of Th1-promoting chemokines. Moreover, Bet v 1 was able to induce Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK activation in BP allergics but only a slight p38 activation in normal donors. In conclusion, our data indicate that Bet v 1 favors the activation of a Th2 program only in DCs of BP allergic individuals. PMID:25635684

  4. Buckwheat anaphylaxis: an unusual allergen in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tsung-Chi; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Wen, Da-Chin; Kao, Yu-Hsuan; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to buckwheat is common in Korea, Japan, and some other Asian countries. However, buckwheat is not a common allergen in Taiwan. We report a woman with asthma who had anaphylactic shock, generalized urticaria, and an acute exacerbation of asthma five minutes after ingesting buckwheat. The patient underwent skin prick and Pharmacia CAP testing (Uppsala, Sweden) for specific IgE to buckwheat, white sesame and soybean as well as other common allergens in Taiwan including Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp), D. farinae (Df), cat and dog dander, cockroach, egg white, cow milk and codfish. The patient had a strongly positive skin prick test response to buckwheat and positive reactions to Dp and latex. Specific IgE results were class 6 for buckwheat, class 4 for Dp and Df, and class 2 for dog dander, wheat, sesame and soybean. Results of an open food challenge with white sesame and soybean were negative. Although buckwheat is a rare allergen in Taiwan, it can cause extremely serious reactions and should be considered in patients presenting with anaphylaxis after exposure to buckwheat. PMID:17136883

  5. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2007-04-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has been used for almost a century as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the only curative and specific method of treatment. Administration of appropriate concentrations of allergen extracts has been shown to be reproducibly effective when patients are carefully selected. The mechanisms by which allergen-SIT has its effects include the modulation of T-cell and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells. The balance between allergen-specific T-regulatory (Treg) and T(H)2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergic and healthy immune responses against allergens. Treg cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in sensitized healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific T(H)2 cells in patients with allergy. The induction of a tolerant state in peripheral T cells represents an essential step in allergen-SIT. Peripheral T-cell tolerance is characterized mainly by generation of allergen-specific Treg cells leading to suppressed T-cell proliferation and T(H)1 and T(H)2 cytokine responses against the allergen. This is accompanied by a significant increase in allergen-specific IgG(4), and also IgG(1) and IgA, and a decrease in IgE in the late stage of the disease. In addition, decreased tissue infiltration of mast cells and eosinophils and their mediator release including circulating basophils takes place. Current understanding of mechanisms of allergen-SIT, particularly the role of Treg cells in peripheral tolerance, may enable novel treatment strategies. PMID:17321578

  6. A revisit to cockroach allergens.

    PubMed

    Sookrung, Nitat; Chaicumpa, Wanpen

    2010-01-01

    Among cockroaches (CR) that live in people's homes, two species, i.e., German CR (Blattella germanica) and American CR (Periplaneta americana) predominate in temperate and tropical areas, respectively. CR is an important source of inhalant indoor allergens that sensitize atopic subjects to (localized) type I hypersensitivity or atopy including allergic rhinitis and atopic asthma. In Thailand the predominant CR species is P. americana. CR allergens are found throughout CR infested houses; the number found in kitchens correlates with the degree of CR infestation while sensitization and reactivation of the allergic morbidity are likely to occur in the living room and bedroom. Levels of the CR allergens in homes of CR allergic Thais, measured by using locally made quantification test kits, revealed that the highest levels occur in dust samples collected from the wooden houses of urban slums and in the cool and dry season. CR allergens are proteins that may be derived from any anatomical part of the insect at any developmental stage. The allergens may be also from CR secretions, excretions, body washes or frass. The proteins may be the insect structural proteins, enzymes or hormones. They may exist as dimers/multimers and/or in different isoforms. Exposure to CR allergens in infancy leads to allergic morbidity later in life. Clinical symptoms of CR allergy are usually more severe and prolonged than those caused by other indoor allergens. The mechanisms of acute and chronic airway inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) have been addressed including specific IgE- and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms, i.e., role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2). Participation of various allergen activated-CD4+ T cells of different sublineages, i.e., Th2, Th17, Th22, Th9, Th25, Tregs/Th3 as well as invariant NKT cells, in asthma pathogenesis have been mentioned. The diagnosis of CR allergy and the allergy intervention by CR population control are also discussed. PMID:21038777

  7. Cockroach allergen exposure and risk of asthma.

    PubMed

    Do, D C; Zhao, Y; Gao, P

    2016-04-01

    Cockroach sensitization is an important risk factor for the development of asthma. However, its underlying immune mechanisms and the genetic etiology for differences in allergic responses remain unclear. Cockroach allergens identification and their expression as biologically active recombinant proteins have provided a basis for studying the mechanisms regarding cockroach allergen-induced allergic sensitization and asthma. Glycans in allergens may play a crucial role in the immunogenicity of allergic diseases. Protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, Toll-like receptor (TLR), and C-type lectin receptors have been suggested to be important for the penetration of cockroach allergens through epithelial cells to mediate allergen uptake, dendritic cell maturation, antigen-presenting cell (APC) function in T-cell polarization, and cytokine production. Environmental pollutants, which often coexist with the allergen, could synergistically elicit allergic inflammation, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation and signaling may serve as a link between these two elements. Genetic factors may also play an important role in conferring the susceptibility to cockroach sensitization. Several genes have been associated with cockroach sensitization and asthma-related phenotypes. In this review, we will discuss the epidemiological evidence for cockroach allergen-induced asthma, cockroach allergens, the mechanisms regarding cockroach allergen-induced innate immune responses, and the genetic basis for cockroach sensitization. PMID:26706467

  8. Sputum RNA signature in allergic asthmatics following allergen bronchoprovocation test

    PubMed Central

    Zuiker, Rob G.J.A.; Tribouley, Catherine; Diamant, Zuzana; Boot, J. Diderik; Cohen, Adam F.; Van Dyck, K.; De Lepeleire, I.; Rivas, Veronica M.; Malkov, Vladislav A.; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Ruddy, Marcella K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Inhaled allergen challenge is a validated disease model of allergic asthma offering useful pharmacodynamic assessment of pharmacotherapeutic effects in a limited number of subjects. Objectives To evaluate whether an RNA signature can be identified from induced sputum following an inhaled allergen challenge, whether a RNA signature could be modulated by limited doses of inhaled fluticasone, and whether these gene expression profiles would correlate with the clinical endpoints measured in this study. Methods Thirteen non-smoking, allergic subjects with mild-to-moderate asthma participated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, 2-period cross-over study following a single-blind placebo run-in period. Each period consisted of three consecutive days, separated by a wash-out period of at least 3 weeks. Subjects randomly received inhaled fluticasone ((FP) MDI; 500 mcg BID×5 doses in total) or placebo. On day 2, house dust mite extract was inhaled and airway response was measured by FEV1 at predefined time points until 7 h post-allergen. Sputum was induced by NaCl 4.5%, processed and analysed at 24 h pre-allergen and 7 and 24 h post-allergen. RNA was isolated from eligible sputum cell pellets (<80% squamous of 500 cells), amplified according to NuGEN technology, and profiled on Affymetrix arrays. Gene expression changes from baseline and fluticasone treatment effects were evaluated using a mixed effects ANCOVA model at 7 and at 24 h post-allergen challenge. Results Inhaled allergen-induced statistically significant gene expression changes in sputum, which were effectively blunted by fluticasone (adjusted p<0.025). Forty-seven RNA signatures were selected from these responses for correlation analyses and further validation. This included Th2 mRNA levels for cytokines, chemokines, high-affinity IgE receptor FCER1A, histamine receptor HRH4, and enzymes and receptors in the arachidonic pathway. Individual messengers from the 47 RNA signatures correlated significantly

  9. Two Allergen Model Reveals Complex Relationship Between IgE Cross-Linking and Degranulation

    PubMed Central

    Handlogten, Michael W.; Deak, Peter E.; Bilgicer, Basar

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allergy is an immune response to complex mixtures of multiple allergens yet current models use a single synthetic allergen. Multiple allergens were modeled using two well-defined tetravalent allergens each specific for a distinct IgE thus enabling a systematic approach to evaluate the effect of each allergen and percent of allergen specific IgE on mast cell degranulation. We found the overall degranulation response caused by two allergens is additive for low allergen concentrations or low percent specific IgE, does not change for moderate allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE, and is reduced for high allergen concentrations with moderate to high percent specific IgE. These results provide further evidence that supra-optimal IgE cross-linking decreases the degranulation response and establishes the two allergen model as a relevant experimental system to elucidate mast cell degranulation mechanisms. PMID:25308278

  10. Evaluation of IgG subclass responses against Dermatophagoides farinae allergens in healthy and atopic dogs.

    PubMed

    Hou, Chia-Chun; Day, Michael J; Nuttall, Timothy J; Hill, Peter B

    2006-04-01

    A semiquantitative chemiluminescent Western blot analysis system was developed and validated to evaluate antigen-specific IgG subclass responses to electrophoretically separated proteins of Dermatophagoides farinae in healthy and atopic dogs. Both groups mounted similar D. farinae-specific IgG1 and IgG4 responses to multiple antigens, but IgG2 and IgG3 responses were difficult to detect. The most commonly recognized bands in both groups were 18 and 98 kDa antigens for IgG1 and 18, 45, 66, 98, 130 and 180 kDa for IgG4. The number of bands recognized per dog did not differ significantly, but significantly more atopic dogs had an IgG1 response to a 180 kDa protein. The overall D. farinae-specific IgG1 and IgG4 responses were slightly higher, but not significantly different, in the healthy group. The results suggest that some antigens produced by D. farinae can induce different subclass responses. However, as most of these responses are seen in both healthy and atopic dogs, they are likely to merely represent recognition of foreign proteins presented to the immune system, rather than involvement in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The role of the 180 kDa antigen warrants further study. PMID:16515652

  11. Effects of Treatment on IgE Responses against Parasite Allergen-Like Proteins and Immunity to Reinfection in Childhood Schistosome and Hookworm Coinfections

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Frances M.; Wilson, Shona; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Mwatha, Joseph K.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Dunne, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Naturally occurring human immunity to both schistosomiasis and hookworm infection has been associated with IgE responses against parasite allergen-like proteins. Since the two helminths frequently coinfect the same individuals, there is growing advocacy for their concurrent treatment. However, both helminths are known to exert strong immunomodulatory effects; therefore, coinfected individuals could have immune responses different from those characteristically seen in monoinfected individuals. In this study, we measured changes in IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 responses to schistosome and hookworm antigens, including the allergen-like proteins Schistosoma mansoni tegumental-allergen-like 1 protein (SmTAL1), SmTAL2, and Necator americanus Ancylostoma-secreted protein-2 (Na-ASP-2), following concurrent treatment of schoolchildren coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Antibody responses to schistosome egg (soluble egg antigen and SmTAL2) or somatic adult hookworm (AHW) antigens either decreased after treatment or were unchanged, whereas those to schistosome worm antigens (soluble worm antigen and SmTAL1) increased. The observed different effects of treatment likely reflect the different modes of drug action and sites of infection for these two helminths. Importantly, there was no evidence that the simultaneous treatment of coinfected children with praziquantel and albendazole affected schistosome- and hookworm-specific humoral responses differently from those characteristic of populations in which only one organism is endemic; schistosome- and hookworm-specific responses were not associated, and there was no evidence for cross-regulation. Posttreatment increases in the levels of IgE to schistosome worm antigens were associated with lower Schistosoma mansoni reinfection intensity, while no associations between humoral responses to AHW antigen and protection from hookworm reinfection were observed in this sample of school-aged children. PMID:23071136

  12. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  13. Effect of topical applications of budesonide and azelastine on nasal symptoms, eosinophil count and mediator release in atopic patients after nasal allergen challenge during the pollen season.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Smitz, J; De Waele, M; Clement, P

    1997-10-01

    We studied the activity of a topical form of a corticosteroid (budesonide) and an antihistamine (azelastine) in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis by including an assessment of mediator concentrations and the percentage of eosinophils in the nasal secretions before and after the treatment. Nasal allergen challenge (NAC) during the season was performed to mimic an acute attack of allergic rhinitis and to objectively evaluate the effect of the drugs on the early-phase reaction. The study compared in a randomized way (2 parallel groups) the effect of budesonide (Rhinocort Aqua) and azelastine (Allergodil nasal spray) in a group of 14 patients during the pollen season. The study showed that azelastine significantly reduced sneezing, total nasal resistance and increased nasal airflow even when significant increases in histamine, tryptase and leukotriene C4 (LTC4) concentrations in nasal secretions were evidenced immediately after NAC. Budesonide showed a strong (p<0.05) decrease in infiltration and activation of eosinophils, and on tryptase and LTC4 release after NAC. These effects (not for LTC4) lasted at least for 1 week after therapy. Azelastine is a powerful topical antihistamine, while budesonide appears to be a potent long-acting anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:9338613

  14. Cloning of cockroach allergen, Bla g 4, identifies ligand binding proteins (or calycins) as a cause of IgE antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Arruda, L K; Vailes, L D; Hayden, M L; Benjamin, D C; Chapman, M D

    1995-12-29

    An allergen cloned from a Blattella germanica (German cockroach) cDNA library, encoded a 182-amino acid protein of 20,904 Da. This protein, designated B. germanica allergen 4 (Bla g 4), was expressed as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The prevalence of serum IgE antibody to recombinant Bla g 4 in 73 cockroach allergic patients with asthma ranged from 40% (antigen binding radioimmunoassay) to 60% (plaque immunoassay). Cockroach allergic patients gave positive intradermal skin tests to recombinant Bla g 4 at concentrations of 10(-3)-10(-5) micrograms/ml, whereas non-allergic controls, or cockroach allergic patients with no detectable serum IgE antibody to Bla g 4, gave negative skin tests to 1 microgram/ml. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern analysis identified a 523-base pair DNA encoding Bla g 4 in both B. germanica and Periplaneta americana (American cockroach). However, Northern analysis showed that mRNA encoding Bla g 4 was transcribed in B. germanica but not in P. americana, suggesting that allergen expression was species specific. Sequence similarity searches showed that Bla g 4 was a ligand binding protein or calycin and unexpectedly revealed that this family contained several important allergens: beta-lactoglobulin, from cow milk, and rat and mouse urinary proteins. Although the overall sequence homology between these proteins was low (approximately 20%), macromolecular modeling techniques were used to generate two models of the tertiary structure of Bla g 4, based on comparisons with the x-ray crystal coordinates of bilin binding protein and rodent urinary proteins. The results show that members of the calycin protein family can cause IgE antibody responses by inhalation or ingestion and are associated with asthma and food hypersensitivity. PMID:8537384

  15. The Discovery of Potent, Selective, and Reversible Inhibitors of the House Dust Mite Peptidase Allergen Der p 1: An Innovative Approach to the Treatment of Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Blocking the bioactivity of allergens is conceptually attractive as a small-molecule therapy for allergic diseases but has not been attempted previously. Group 1 allergens of house dust mites (HDM) are meaningful targets in this quest because they are globally prevalent and clinically important triggers of allergic asthma. Group 1 HDM allergens are cysteine peptidases whose proteolytic activity triggers essential steps in the allergy cascade. Using the HDM allergen Der p 1 as an archetype for structure-based drug discovery, we have identified a series of novel, reversible inhibitors. Potency and selectivity were manipulated by optimizing drug interactions with enzyme binding pockets, while variation of terminal groups conferred the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic attributes required for inhaled delivery. Studies in animals challenged with the gamut of HDM allergens showed an attenuation of allergic responses by targeting just a single component, namely, Der p 1. Our findings suggest that these inhibitors may be used as novel therapies for allergic asthma. PMID:25365789

  16. Proteomic analysis of major and minor allergens from isolated pollen cytoplasmic granules.

    PubMed

    Abou Chakra, Oussama R; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Demey Thomas, Emmanuelle; Vinh, Joëlle; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Poncet, Pascal; Sénéchal, Hélène

    2012-02-01

    Grass pollen is one of the most important vectors of aeroallergens. Under atmospheric conditions, pollen grains can release pollen cytoplasmic granules (PCGs). The allergens associated with these intrinsic subfractions induce, in laboratory animals as well as in asthmatic patients, allergic and inflammatory responses. The objectives of this study were to characterize the PCGs' intrinsic allergens and to compare them with those of pollen grains. The water-soluble proteins were extracted from pollen grains and their PCGs. IgE-binding proteins were analyzed and characterized through an allergomic strategy: 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1-DE and 2-DE), immunoblotting, using grass-pollen-sensitized patient sera, mass spectrometry (MS) analysis, and database searching. Several of the allergens listed in the IUIS nomenclature, Phl p 1, 4, 5, 6, and 12, were detected in pollen and PCG extracts, whereas Phl p 11 was found only in PCGs, and Phl p 2 as well as Phl p 13 were found only in pollen extract. Some other allergens not listed in the IUIS nomenclature were also characterized in both pollen and PCG extracts. Since the major grass pollen allergens were found in PCGs and because of their small size, these submicronic particles should be considered as very potent sensitizing and challenging respirable vectors of allergens. PMID:22188203

  17. Response of herb processing workers to work-related airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Dutkiewicz, J; Skórska, C; Milanowski, J; Mackiewicz, B; Krysińska-Traczyk, E; Dutkiewicz, E; Matuszyk, A; Sitkowska, J; Golec, M

    2001-01-01

    A group of 51 herb processing workers employed in a big herb processing facility located in eastern Poland were examined by the skin and precipitin tests with, respectively, 4 and 17 extracts of microorganisms associated with organic dusts. Out of this number, 32 workers were examined by the skin test with 7 extracts of selected herbs processed in the facility. All the subjects were asked about the occurrence of work-related symptoms. 32 healthy office workers were examined with microbial extracts as a reference group. The herb processing workers showed a high proportion of early skin reactions (after 20 min) to the extract of Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis (41.2%), significantly higher compared to the reference group (p<0.01). At all time intervals (20 min, 8 hrs, 24 hrs), the workers responded with a high frequency to the extract of Bacillus subtilis (respectively 72.5%, 64.7%, and 15.7%), significantly greater compared to the reference group (respectively p<0.001, p<0.001, and p<0.05). No significant differences were found between the groups of herb processing workers and referents in skin response to the extracts of Streptomyces albus and Alternaria alternata and, except for the extract of Pantoea agglomerans, in the frequency of positive precipitin reactions to microbial antigens. In the skin test with herb extracts, the highest response among workers were caused by the extracts of chamomile flowers and nettle leaves which evoked 40-65% of positive skin reactions at all time intervals. 39 out of 51 interviewed herb processing workers (76.5%) reported the occurrence of work-related general, respiratory and skin symptoms. The positive skin reactions occurred more frequently among symptomatic workers which suggests that the specific immunologic response might be implicated in etiopathogenesis of work-related symptoms in examined workers. However, in most cases the differences did not attain a significance level which indicates that there is no

  18. Allergen-Specific CD4(+) T Cells in Human Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ling, Morris F; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    In allergic asthma, aeroallergen exposure of sensitized individuals mobilizes robust innate and adaptive airway immune responses, stimulating eosinophilic airway inflammation and the activation and infiltration of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells into the airways. Allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells are thought to be central players in the asthmatic response as they specifically recognize the allergen and initiate and orchestrate the asthmatic inflammatory response. In this article, we briefly review the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of human allergic airway inflammation in allergic individuals, discuss the use of allergen-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers to characterize allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells, and highlight current gaps in knowledge and directions for future research pertaining to the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in human asthma. PMID:27027948

  19. Allergenic potential of novel foods.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Clive

    2005-11-01

    Concerns have been expressed that the introduction of novel foods into the diet might lead to the development of new food allergies in consumers. Novel foods can be conveniently divided into GM and non-GM categories. Decision-tree approaches (e.g. International Life Sciences Institute-International Food Biotechnology Council and WHO/FAO) to assess the allergenic potential of GM foods were developed following the discovery, during product development, of the allergenic potential of GM soyabean expressing a gene encoding a storage protein from Brazil nut (Bertolletia excelsa). Within these decision trees considerations include: the source of the transgene; amino acid homology with known allergens; cross-reactivity with IgE from food-allergic individuals; resistance to proteolysis; prediction using animal models of food allergy. Such decision trees are under constant review as new knowledge and improved models emerge, but they provide a useful framework for the assessment of the allergenic potential of GM foods. For novel non-GM foods the assessment of allergenic potential is more subjective; some foods or food ingredients will need no assessment other than a robust protein assay to demonstrate the absence of protein. Where protein is present in the novel non-GM food, hazard and risk assessments need to be made in terms of the quantity of protein that might be consumed, the identity of individual protein components and their relationships to known food allergens. Where necessary, this assessment would extend to serum screening for potential cross-reactivities, skin-prick tests in previously-sensitised individuals and double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges. PMID:16313692

  20. Resistin-Like Molecule–α Regulates IL-13–Induced Chemokine Production but Not Allergen-Induced Airway Responses

    PubMed Central

    Munitz, Ariel; Cole, Eric T.; Karo-Atar, Danielle; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2012-01-01

    Resistin-like molecule α (Relm-α) is one of the most up-regulated gene products in allergen- and parasite-associated Th2 responses. Localized to alternatively activated macrophages, Relm-α was shown to exert an anti-inflammatory effect in parasite-induced Th2 responses, but its role in experimental asthma remains unexplored. Here, we analyzed the cellular source, the IL-4 receptors required to stimulate Relm-α production, and the role of Relm-α after experimental asthma induction by IL-4, IL-13, or multiple experimental regimes, including ovalbumin and Aspergillus fumigatus immunization. We demonstrate that Relm-α was secreted into the airway lumen, dependent on both the IL-13 receptor–α1 chain and likely the Type I IL-4 receptor, and differentially localized to epithelial cells and myeloid cells, depending on the specific cytokine or aeroallergen trigger. Studies performed with Retnla gene–targeted mice demonstrate that Relm-α was largely redundant in terms of inducing the infiltration of Th2 cytokines, mucus, and inflammatory cells into the lung. These results mirror the dispensable role that other alternatively activated macrophage products (such as arginase 1) have in allergen-induced experimental asthma and contrast with their role in the setting of parasitic infections. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the distinct utilization of IL-4/IL-13 receptors for the induction of Relm-α in the lungs. The differential regulation of Relm-α expression is likely determined by the relative expression levels of IL-4, IL-13, and their corresponding receptors, which are differentially expressed by divergent cells (i.e., epithelial cells and macrophages.) Finally, we identify a largely redundant functional role for Relm-α in acute experimental models of allergen-associated Th2 immune responses. PMID:22246861

  1. Standardization and Regulation of Allergen Products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Julia; Vieths, Stefan; Kaul, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Product-specific standardization is of prime importance to ensure persistent quality, safety, and efficacy of allergen products. The regulatory framework in the EU has induced great advancements in the field in the last years although national implementation still remains heterogeneous. Scores of methods for quantification of individual allergen molecules are developed each year and also the challenging characterization of chemically modified allergen products is progressing. However, despite the unquestionable increase in knowledge and the subsequent improvements in control of quality parameters of allergen products, an important aim has not been reached yet, namely cross-product comparability. Still, comparison of allergen product potency, either based on total allergenic activity or individual allergen molecule content, is not possible due to a lack of standard reference preparations in conjunction with validated standard methods. This review aims at presenting the most recent developments in product-specific standardization as well as activities to facilitate cross-product comparability in the EU. PMID:26874849

  2. Peanut allergens: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Montealegre, Cristina; Marina, Maria Luisa; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Peanut is recognized as a potent food allergen producing one of the most frequent food allergies. This fact has originated the publication of an elevated number of scientific reports dealing with peanut allergens and, especially, the prevalence of peanut allergy. For this reason, the information available on peanut allergens is increasing and the debate about peanut allergy is always renewed. This article reviews the information currently available on peanut allergens and on the techniques used for their chemical characterization. Moreover, a general overview on the current biotechnological approaches used to reduce or eliminate peanut allergens is also provided. PMID:23638932

  3. Responses to Microbial Challenges by SLAMF Receptors

    PubMed Central

    van Driel, Boaz Job; Liao, Gongxian; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2016-01-01

    The SLAMF family (SLAMF) of cell surface glycoproteins is comprised of nine glycoproteins and while SLAMF1, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 are self-ligand receptors, SLAMF2 and SLAMF4 interact with each other. Their interactions induce signal transduction networks in trans, thereby shaping immune cell–cell communications. Collectively, these receptors modulate a wide range of functions, such as myeloid cell and lymphocyte development, and T and B cell responses to microbes and parasites. In addition, several SLAMF receptors serve as microbial sensors, which either positively or negatively modulate the function of macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, and NK cells in response to microbial challenges. The SLAMF receptor–microbe interactions contribute both to intracellular microbicidal activity as well as to migration of phagocytes to the site of inflammation. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on how the SLAMF receptors and their specific adapters SLAM-associated protein and EAT-2 regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to microbes. PMID:26834746

  4. Bystander suppression to unrelated allergen sensitization through intranasal administration of tolerogenic exosomes in mouse.

    PubMed

    Prado, Noela; Cañamero, Marta; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2010-07-01

    Exosomes represent a new family of bioactive nanovesicles (30-100 nm in diameter) secreted by different cell types whose appealing features can be exploited for designing vaccines in the context of several human diseases. We previously reported the potential of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF)-derived tolerogenic exosomes (Exo(Tol)) to be used as a nasal allergy vaccine in a mouse model of sensitization to Ole e 1, the main allergen of olive pollen. The aim of the study was to investigate whether such nanovesicles specific to Ole e 1 can also prevent the sensitization to other unrelated allergen, as Bet v 1 from birch pollen. Exo(Tol) were isolated from BALF of mice tolerized against Ole e 1 and used in a prophylactic approach. BALB/c mice were intranasally pretreated with Exo(Tol) one week before sensitization/challenge with Bet v 1, and the magnitude of allergen-specific response was analyzed. Intranasal pretreatment with Exo(Tol) resulted in significant inhibition of both specific IgE and IgG1 antibodies levels. Moreover, T cells from mice pretreated with Exo(Tol) showed a reduction in IL-5 and IL-13 (Th2 cytokines) production. Lung inflammatory response triggered by unrelated allergen-challenge was also significantly reduced after pretreatment: perivascular/peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia and mucus secretion. In conclusion, Exo(Tol) specific to Ole e 1, in addition to inhibit specific immune response to this allergen, blocked the allergic response to a second unrelated allergen such as Bet v 1. The in vivo "bystander suppression" that we herein describe for Exo(Tol) may have implications for the treatment of allergy based on mucosal tolerance induction. PMID:20478618

  5. Allergens in veterinary medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, R. S.; Janda, J.; Jensen-Jarolim, E.; Rhyner, C.; Marti, E.

    2015-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. PMID:26280544

  6. Allergens in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Mueller, R S; Janda, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E; Rhyner, C; Marti, E

    2016-01-01

    Allergic diseases in animals are increasingly gaining importance in veterinary practice and as research models. For intradermal testing and allergen immunotherapy, a good knowledge of relevant allergens for the individual species is of great importance. Currently, the knowledge about relevant veterinary allergens is based on sensitization rates identified by intradermal testing or serum testing for allergen-specific IgE; crude extracts are the basis for most evaluations. Only a few studies provide evidence about the molecular structure of (particularly) dust mite, insect and mould allergens in dogs and horses, respectively. In those species, some major allergens differ from those in humans. This position paper summarizes the current knowledge about relevant allergens in dogs, cats and horses. PMID:26280544

  7. Purified Timothy grass pollen major allergen Phl p 1 may contribute to the modulation of allergic responses through a pleiotropic induction of cytokines and chemokines from airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Röschmann, K I L; van Kuijen, A-M; Luiten, S; Jonker, M J; Breit, T M; Fokkens, W J; Petersen, A; van Drunen, C M

    2012-01-01

    By definition, allergens are proteins with the ability to elicit powerful T helper lymphocyte type 2 (Th2) responses, culminating in immunoglobulin (Ig)E antibody production. Why specific proteins cause aberrant immune responses has remained largely unanswered. Recent data suggest that there may be several molecular paths that may affect allergenicity of proteins. The focus of this study is the response of airway epithelium to a major allergen from Phleum pratense Phl p 1. Instead of focusing on a few genes and proteins that might be affected by the major allergen, our aim was to obtain a broader view on the immune stimulatory capacity of Phl p 1. We therefore performed detailed analysis on mRNA and protein level by using a microarray approach to define Phl p 1-induced gene expression. We found that this allergen induces modulation and release of a broad range of mediators, indicating it to be a powerful trigger of the immune system. We were able to show that genes belonging to the GO cluster ‘cell communication’ were among the most prominent functional groups, which is also reflected in cytokines and chemokines building centres in a computational model of direct gene interaction. Further detailed comparison of grass pollen extract (GPE)- and Phl p 1-induced gene expression might be beneficial with regard to the application of single components within diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:22288584

  8. Challenges and Responses to Asian Food Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Paul P. S.; Oliveros, Jurise A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Food security is a complex phenomenon made up of multiple dimensions — food availability, physical access to food, economic access to food, food utilization — each of which has a stability dimension which underpins it. This review provides details on these dimensions and links them to two published indices which provide assessments of the state of food security in a country. The paper further provides analyses of the main supply and demand factors in the food security equation. Food security faces natural and anthropogenic threats such as loss of productive land and water, climate change and declining crop productivity, all of which are potentially amenable to solutions provided by science and technology. Demographic and accompanying diet changes further exacerbate the demands made on the natural resource base for food production. Finally, possible responses to the challenges confronting a secured food future are discussed from technological, policy and system level perspectives.

  9. Recent progress in allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Aria, Kayhan T

    2008-03-01

    The efficacy of allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with or without seasonal bronchial asthma and anaphylaxis caused by the sting of the hymenoptera class of insects has been clearly demonstrated in numerous well-designed, placebo-controlled trials. Immunotherapy whether by subcutaneous injection of allergen extract or by oral/sublingual routes modifies peripheral and mucosal TH2 responses in favour of TH1 responses and augments IL-10 synthesis by TRegs both locally and by peripheral T cells. Recent researches into the cellular and molecular basis of allergic reactions have advanced our understanding of the mechanisms involved in allergic diseases. They have also helped the development of innovative approaches that are likely to further improve the control of allergic responses in the future. Novel approaches to immunotherapy that are currently being explored include the use of peptide-based allergen preparations, which do not bind IgE and therefore do not activate mast cells, but reduce both Th1 and Th2-cytokine synthesis, while increasing levels of IL-10. Alternative strategies include the use of adjuvants, such as nucleotide immunostimulatory sequences derived from bacteria CpG or monophosphoryl lipid A that potentiate Th1 responses. Blocking the effects of IgE using anti-IgE such as omalizumab, a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively binds to IgE, has been shown to be a useful strategy in the treatment of allergic asthma and rhinitis. The combination of anti-IgE-monoclonal antibody omalizumab with allergen immunotherapy has proved beneficial for the treatment of allergic diseases, offering improved efficacy, limited adverse effects, and potential immune-modifying effects. This combination may also accelerate the rapidity by which immunotherapy induces TReg cells. If allergic diseases are due to a lack of allergen-specific TReg cells, then effective therapies should target the induction and the

  10. A Fusion Protein Consisting of the Vaccine Adjuvant Monophosphoryl Lipid A and the Allergen Ovalbumin Boosts Allergen-Specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 Responses In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Lothar; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Vieths, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The detoxified TLR4-ligand Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA) is the first approved TLR-agonist used as adjuvant in licensed vaccines but has not yet been explored as part of conjugated vaccines. Objective. To investigate the immune-modulating properties of a fusion protein consisting of MPLA and Ovalbumin (MPLA : Ova). Results. MPLA and Ova were chemically coupled by stable carbamate linkage. MPLA : Ova was highly pure without detectable product-related impurities by either noncoupled MPLA or Ova. Light scattering analysis revealed MPLA : Ova to be aggregated. Stimulation of mDC and mDC : DO11.10 CD4+ TC cocultures showed a stronger activation of both mDC and Ova-specific DO11.10 CD4+ TC by MPLA : Ova compared to the mixture of both components. MPLA : Ova induced both strong proinflammatory (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokine responses from mDCs while also boosting allergen-specific Th1, Th2, and Th17 cytokine secretion. Conclusion. Conjugation of MPLA and antigen enhanced the immune response compared to the mixture of both components. Due to the nonbiased boost of Ova-specific Th2 and Th17 responses while also inducing Th1 responses, this fusion protein may not be a suitable vaccine candidate for allergy treatment but may hold potential for the treatment of other diseases that require a strong stimulation of the host's immune system (e.g., cancer). PMID:27340679

  11. Allergen-specific immune response suppresses interleukin 10 expression in B cells via increasing micro-RNA-17-92 cluster.

    PubMed

    Geng, Xiao-Rui; Qiu, Shu-Qi; Yang, Li-Tao; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Gui; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zeng, Lu; Li, Xiao-Xi; Mo, Li-Hua; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10-expressing B cells play a critical role in the immune homeostasis in the body; its regulation has not been fully understood. Micro-RNA (miR)-17-92 cluster has strong regulation in the immunity. This study tests a hypothesis that miR-17-92 cluster suppresses IL-10 expression in B cells. In this study, peripheral B cells were collected from patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). The B cells were treated with specific allergens, dust mite extracts, in the culture. The expressions of miR-17-92 cluster and IL-10 in the culture were assessed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that the levels of miR-19a, but not the rest of the 5 members (miR-17, miR-18a, miR-19b, miR-20a, and miR-92a), were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from AR patients as than in B cells from healthy participants. Exposure of B cells from AR patients to specific allergen, dust mite extracts, significantly increased the levels if miR-19a and suppressed the expression of IL-10 in B cells. The levels of histone deacetylase 11 and acetylated H3K9 were higher, and the RNA polymerase II and c-Maf (the IL-10 transcription factor) were lower, at the IL-10 promoter locus. In conclusion, miR-19a mediates the allergen-specific immune response-decreased IL-10 expression in B cells. PMID:27491928

  12. Epicutaneous Allergic Sensitization by Cooperation between Allergen Protease Activity and Mechanical Skin Barrier Damage in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Sakiko; Takai, Toshiro; Iida, Hideo; Maruyama, Natsuko; Ochi, Hirono; Kamijo, Seiji; Nishioka, Izumi; Hara, Mutsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2016-07-01

    Allergen sources such as mites, insects, fungi, and pollen contain proteases. Airway exposure to proteases induces allergic airway inflammation and IgE/IgG1 responses via IL-33-dependent mechanisms in mice. We examined the epicutaneous sensitization of mice to a model protease allergen, papain; the effects of tape stripping, which induces epidermal barrier dysfunction; and the atopic march upon a subsequent airway challenge. Papain painting on ear skin and tape stripping cooperatively promoted dermatitis, the skin gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, up-regulation of serum total IgE, and papain-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Epicutaneous sensitization induced T helper (Th) 2 cells and Th17 differentiation in draining lymph nodes. Ovalbumin and protease inhibitor-treated papain induced no or weak responses, whereas the co-administration of ovalbumin and papain promoted ovalbumin-specific IgE/IgG1 induction. Wild-type and IL-33-deficient mice showed similar responses in the epicutaneous sensitization phase. The subsequent airway papain challenge induced airway eosinophilia and maintained high papain-specific IgE levels in an IL-33-dependent manner. These results suggest that allergen source-derived protease activity and mechanical barrier damage such as that caused by scratching cooperatively promote epicutaneous sensitization and skin inflammation and that IL-33 is dispensable for epicutaneous sensitization but is crucial in the atopic march upon a subsequent airway low-dose encounter with protease allergens. PMID:26987428

  13. Food processing and allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Verhoeckx, Kitty C M; Vissers, Yvonne M; Baumert, Joseph L; Faludi, Roland; Feys, Marcel; Flanagan, Simon; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Holzhauser, Thomas; Shimojo, Ryo; van der Bolt, Nieke; Wichers, Harry; Kimber, Ian

    2015-06-01

    Food processing can have many beneficial effects. However, processing may also alter the allergenic properties of food proteins. A wide variety of processing methods is available and their use depends largely on the food to be processed. In this review the impact of processing (heat and non-heat treatment) on the allergenic potential of proteins, and on the antigenic (IgG-binding) and allergenic (IgE-binding) properties of proteins has been considered. A variety of allergenic foods (peanuts, tree nuts, cows' milk, hens' eggs, soy, wheat and mustard) have been reviewed. The overall conclusion drawn is that processing does not completely abolish the allergenic potential of allergens. Currently, only fermentation and hydrolysis may have potential to reduce allergenicity to such an extent that symptoms will not be elicited, while other methods might be promising but need more data. Literature on the effect of processing on allergenic potential and the ability to induce sensitisation is scarce. This is an important issue since processing may impact on the ability of proteins to cause the acquisition of allergic sensitisation, and the subject should be a focus of future research. Also, there remains a need to develop robust and integrated methods for the risk assessment of food allergenicity. PMID:25778347

  14. New Trends in Food Allergens Detection: Toward Biosensing Strategies.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rita C; Barroso, M Fátima; González-García, María Begoña; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2016-10-25

    Food allergens are a real threat to sensitized individuals. Although food labeling is crucial to provide information to consumers with food allergies, accidental exposure to allergenic proteins may result from undeclared allergenic substances by means of food adulteration, fraud or uncontrolled cross-contamination. Allergens detection in foodstuffs can be a very hard task, due to their presence usually in trace amounts, together with the natural interference of the matrix. Methods for allergens analysis can be mainly divided in two large groups: the immunological assays and the DNA-based ones. Mass spectrometry has also been used as a confirmatory tool. Recently, biosensors appeared as innovative, sensitive, selective, environmentally friendly, cheaper and fast techniques (especially when automated and/or miniaturized), able to effectively replace the classical methodologies. In this review, we present the advances in the field of food allergens detection toward the biosensing strategies and discuss the challenges and future perspectives of this technology. PMID:25779935

  15. Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 allergen bound to 8-OH modified adenine reduces the Th2-mediated airway inflammation without inducing a Th17 response and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Sara; Nencini, Francesca; Filì, Lucia; Occhiato, Ernesto G; Romagnani, Sergio; Parronchi, Paola; Maggi, Enrico; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2016-09-01

    8-OH modified adenine bound to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (nDer p2-Conj), a novel allergen-TLR7 agonist conjugate, improves murine airway inflammation in priming and therapeutic settings, however no data are known on the activity of this construct on Th17 cells. The aim of the study was to evaluate if nDer p2-Conj elicited in vivo Th17 cells and Th17-driven autoimmune responses, by using both short- and long-term priming and therapeutic protocols in a nDer p2-driven model of murine airway inflammation. The conjugate induced the in vitro production of cytokines favouring the Th17 polarization by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. In short-term protocols, the priming or treatment with the conjugate ameliorated the airway inflammation by shifting Th2 allergen-specific cells into T cells producing IFN-γ, IL-10, but not IL-17A. Similar results were found in long-term protocol where the conjugate down-regulated airway inflammation without any evidence of autoimmune response and B cell compartment expansion. nDer p2-Conj also failed to shorten the spontaneous onset of diabetes on conjugates-primed NOD/LtJ mice. We found that neutrophils in BALF, ROR-γt and IL-17A expression in lungs were increased in conjugate-treated IL-10KO mice. These data emphasize the role of conjugate-driven IL-10 production, which can regulate the activity of memory Th17 cells and prevent the onset of autoimmune response. PMID:27475304

  16. Computational detection of allergenic proteins attains a new level of accuracy with in silico variable-length peptide extraction and machine learning

    PubMed Central

    Soeria-Atmadja, D.; Lundell, T.; Gustafsson, M. G.; Hammerling, U.

    2006-01-01

    The placing of novel or new-in-the-context proteins on the market, appearing in genetically modified foods, certain bio-pharmaceuticals and some household products leads to human exposure to proteins that may elicit allergic responses. Accurate methods to detect allergens are therefore necessary to ensure consumer/patient safety. We demonstrate that it is possible to reach a new level of accuracy in computational detection of allergenic proteins by presenting a novel detector, Detection based on Filtered Length-adjusted Allergen Peptides (DFLAP). The DFLAP algorithm extracts variable length allergen sequence fragments and employs modern machine learning techniques in the form of a support vector machine. In particular, this new detector shows hitherto unmatched specificity when challenged to the Swiss-Prot repository without appreciable loss of sensitivity. DFLAP is also the first reported detector that successfully discriminates between allergens and non-allergens occurring in protein families known to hold both categories. Allergenicity assessment for specific protein sequences of interest using DFLAP is possible via ulfh@slv.se. PMID:16977698

  17. PEANUT ALLERGENS AND PROCESSING

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been suggested that boiling or frying peanuts leads to less allergenic products than roasting. In this study, we have compared the fate of the major peanut allergens in the context of peanuts subjected to boiling, frying, or roasting. As opposed to previous work, both the soluble and insolubl...

  18. Peanut Allergens and Processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been suggested that boiling or frying of peanuts lead to less allergenic products than roasting. In this study, we have compared the fate of the major peanut allergens in the context of peanuts subjected to boiling, frying, or roasting. As opposed to previous work, both the soluble and insolu...

  19. Dimerization of lipocalin allergens

    PubMed Central

    Niemi, Merja H.; Rytkönen-Nissinen, Marja; Miettinen, Ilja; Jänis, Janne; Virtanen, Tuomas; Rouvinen, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalins are one of the most important groups of inhalant animal allergens. The analysis of structural features of these proteins is important to get insights into their allergenicity. We have determined two different dimeric crystal structures for bovine dander lipocalin Bos d 2, which was earlier described as a monomeric allergen. The crystal structure analysis of all other determined lipocalin allergens also revealed oligomeric structures which broadly utilize inherent structural features of the β-sheet in dimer formation. According to the moderate size of monomer-monomer interfaces, most of these dimers would be transient in solution. Native mass spectrometry was employed to characterize quantitatively transient dimerization of two lipocalin allergens, Bos d 2 and Bos d 5, in solution. PMID:26346541

  20. The Ethical Challenges of Socially Responsible Science.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B; Elliott, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    Social responsibility is an essential part of the responsible conduct of research that presents difficult ethical questions for scientists. Recognizing one's social responsibilities as a scientist is an important first step toward exercising social responsibility, but it is only the beginning, since scientists may confront difficult value questions when deciding how to act responsibly. Ethical dilemmas related to socially responsible science fall into at least three basic categories: 1) dilemmas related to problem selection, 2) dilemmas related to publication and data sharing, and 3) dilemmas related to engaging society. In responding to these dilemmas, scientists must decide how to balance their social responsibilities against other professional commitments and how to avoid compromising their objectivity. In this article, we will examine the philosophical and ethical basis of social responsibility in science, discuss some of the ethical dilemmas related to exercising social responsibility, and make five recommendations to help scientists deal with these issues. PMID:26193168

  1. The Ethical Challenges of Socially Responsible Science

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B.; Elliott, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Social responsibility is an essential part of the responsible conduct of research that presents difficult ethical questions for scientists. Recognizing one’s social responsibilities as a scientist is an important first step toward exercising social responsibility, but it is only the beginning, since scientists may confront difficult value questions when deciding how to act responsibly. Ethical dilemmas related to socially responsible science fall into at least three basic categories: 1) dilemmas related to problem selection, 2) dilemmas related to publication and data sharing, and 3) dilemmas related to engaging society. In responding to these dilemmas, scientists must decide how to balance their social responsibilities against other professional commitments and how to avoid compromising their objectivity. In this article, we will examine the philosophical and ethical basis of social responsibility in science, discuss some of the ethical dilemmas related to exercising social responsibility, and make five recommendations to help scientists deal with these issues. PMID:26193168

  2. Challenging Constitutional Authority: African American Responses to "Scott v. Sandford."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDorman, Todd F.

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates the importance of extra-legal texts in contextualizing and challenging judicial authority by analyzing Black Abolitionist responses to "Scott v. Sandford" (the "Dred Scott" decision). Concludes that responses to Dred Scott demonstrate how legally excluded classes may persuasively challenge constitutional authority and have…

  3. Mesenteric lymph node transcriptome profiles in BALB/c mice sensitized to three common food allergens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Food allergy is a serious health concern among infants and young children. Although immunological mechanism of food allergy is well documented, the molecular mechanism(s) involved in food allergen sensitization have not been well characterized. Therefore, the present study analyzed the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) transcriptome profiles of BALB/c mice in response to three common food allergens. Results Microarray analysis identified a total of 1361, 533 and 488 differentially expressed genes in response to β-lactoglobulin (BLG) from cow's milk, ovalbumin (OVA) from hen's egg white and peanut agglutinin (PNA) sensitizations, respectively (p < 0.05). A total of 150 genes were commonly expressed in all antigen sensitized groups. The expression of seven representative genes from microarray experiment was validated by real-time RT-PCR. All allergens induced significant ear swelling and serum IgG1 concentrations, whereas IgE concentrations were increased in BLG- and PNA-treated mice (p < 0.05). Treatment with OVA and PNA significantly induced plasma histamine concentrations (p < 0.05). The PCA demonstrated the presence of allergen-specific IgE in the serum of previously sensitized and challenged mice. Conclusions Immunological profiles indicate that the allergen dosages used are sufficient to sensitize the BALB/c mice and to conduct transcriptome profiling. Microarray studies identified several differentially expressed genes in the sensitization phase of the food allergy. These findings will help to better understand the underlying molecular mechanism(s) of food allergen sensitizations and may be useful in identifying the potential biomarkers of food allergy. PMID:21211037

  4. Mechanisms underlying allergy vaccination with recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Hundred years ago therapeutic vaccination with allergen-containing extracts has been introduced as a clinically effective, disease-modifying, allergen-specific and long-lasting form of therapy for allergy, a hypersensitivity disease affecting more than 25% of the population. Today, the structures of most of the disease-causing allergens have been elucidated and recombinant hypoallergenic allergen derivatives with reduced allergenic activity have been engineered to reduce side effects during allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). These recombinant hypoallergens have been characterized in vitro, in experimental animal models and in clinical trials in allergic patients. This review provides a summary of the molecular, immunological and preclinical evaluation criteria applied for this new generation of allergy vaccines. Furthermore, we summarize the mechanisms underlying SIT with recombinant hypoallergens which are thought to be responsible for their therapeutic effect. PMID:22100888

  5. Prevention of Birch Pollen-Related Food Allergy by Mucosal Treatment with Multi-Allergen-Chimers in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoflehner, Elisabeth; Hufnagl, Karin; Schabussova, Irma; Jasinska, Joanna; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Bohle, Barbara; Maizels, Rick M.; Wiedermann, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Background Among birch pollen allergic patients up to 70% develop allergic reactions to Bet v 1-homologue food allergens such as Api g 1 (celery) or Dau c 1 (carrot), termed as birch pollen-related food allergy. In most cases, specific immunotherapy with birch pollen extracts does not reduce allergic symptoms to the homologue food allergens. We therefore genetically engineered a multi-allergen chimer and tested if mucosal treatment with this construct could represent a novel approach for prevention of birch pollen-related food allergy. Methodology BALB/c mice were poly-sensitized with a mixture of Bet v 1, Api g 1 and Dau c 1 followed by a sublingual challenge with carrot, celery and birch pollen extracts. For prevention of allergy sensitization an allergen chimer composed of immunodominant T cell epitopes of Api g 1 and Dau c 1 linked to the whole Bet v 1 allergen, was intranasally applied prior to sensitization. Results Intranasal pretreatment with the allergen chimer led to significantly decreased antigen-specific IgE-dependent β-hexosaminidase release, but enhanced allergen-specific IgG2a and IgA antibodies. Accordingly, IL-4 levels in spleen cell cultures and IL-5 levels in restimulated spleen and cervical lymph node cell cultures were markedly reduced, while IFN-γ levels were increased. Immunomodulation was associated with increased IL-10, TGF-β and Foxp3 mRNA levels in NALT and Foxp3 in oral mucosal tissues. Treatment with anti-TGF-β, anti-IL10R or anti-CD25 antibodies abrogated the suppression of allergic responses induced by the chimer. Conclusion Our results indicate that mucosal application of the allergen chimer led to decreased Th2 immune responses against Bet v 1 and its homologue food allergens Api g 1 and Dau c 1 by regulatory and Th1-biased immune responses. These data suggest that mucosal treatment with a multi-allergen vaccine could be a promising treatment strategy to prevent birch pollen-related food allergy. PMID:22768077

  6. Allergens Induce the Release of Lactoferrin by Neutrophils from Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Inmaculada; Chamorro, Cristina; Aroca, Rocío; Prados, Manuel; Bobadilla, Pedro; Rodríguez, David; Palacios, Ricardo; Monteseirín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the evidence that Lactoferrin (Lf) is involved in allergic asthma processes, it is unknown whether neutrophils can be one of the main cellular sources of this key inflammatory mediator directly in response of an IgE mediated stimulus. The present study was undertaken to analyze this question. Methods Neutrophils from healthy subjects (n = 34) and neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients (n = 102) were challenged in vitro with specific allergens to which the patients were sensitized, PAF, or agonist mAbs against IgE-receptors, and the levels of Lf were measured in the culture supernatant. The levels of serum IgE together with the severity of symptoms were also analyzed. Results Lf was released into the culture supernatant of neutrophils from allergic asthmatic patients in response to allergens and PAF. This response was highly allergen-specific, and did not happen in neutrophils from healthy donors. Allergen effect was mimicked by Abs against FcεRI and galectin-3 but not by FcεRII. The levels of released Lf correlated well with the levels of serum specific IgE and severity of asthma symptoms. These observations represent a novel view of neutrophils as an important source of Lf in allergic asthma. Importantly, the levels of released Lf by neutrophils could therefore be used to evaluate disease severity in allergic asthmatic patients. PMID:26488881

  7. Protective Effects of the Polyphenol Sesamin on Allergen-Induced TH2 Responses and Airway Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Shen, Mei-Lin; Zhou, Ning; Lee, Chen-Chen; Kao, Shung-Te; Wu, Dong Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a lifelong airway condition that affects people of all ages. In recent decades, asthma prevalence continues to increase globally, with an estimated number of 250,000 annual deaths attributed to the disease. Although inhaled corticosteroids and β-adrenergic receptor agonists are the primary therapeutic avenues that effectively reduce asthma symptoms, profound side effects may occur in patients with long-term treatments. Therefore, development of new therapeutic strategies is needed as alternative or supplement to current asthma treatments. Sesamin is a natural polyphenolic compound with strong anti-oxidative effects. Several studies have reported that sesamin is effective in preventing hypertension, thrombotic tendency, and neuroinflammation. However, it is still unknown whether sesamin can reduce asthma-induced allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Our study has revealed that sesamin exhibited significant anti-inflammatory effects in ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma model. We found that treatments with sesamin after OVA sensitization and challenge significantly decreased expression levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-13, and serum IgE. The numbers of total inflammatory cells and eosinophils in BALF were also reduced in the sesamin-treated animals. Histological results demonstrated that sesamin attenuated OVA-induced eosinophil infiltration, airway goblet cell hyperplasia, mucus occlusion, and MUC5AC expression in the lung tissue. Mice administered with sesamin showed limited increases in AHR compared with mice receiving vehicle after OVA challenge. OVA increased phosphorylation levels of IκB-α and nuclear expression levels of NF-κB, both of which were reversed by sesamin treatments. These data indicate that sesamin is effective in treating allergic asthma responses induced by OVA in mice. PMID:24755955

  8. Challenges to understand plant responses to wind.

    PubMed

    Onoda, Yusuke; Anten, Niels P R

    2011-07-01

    Understanding plant response to wind is complicated as this factor entails not only mechanical stress but also affects leaf microclimate. In a recent study, we found that plant responses to mechanical stress (MS) may be different and even in the opposite direction to those of wind. MS-treated Plantago major plants produced thinner more elongated leaves while those in wind did the opposite. The latter can be associated with the drying effect of wind as is further supported by data on petiole anatomy presented here. These results indicate that plant responses to wind will depend on the extent of water stress. It should also be recognized that the responses to wind may differ between different parts of a plant and between plant species. Physiological research on wind responses should thus focus on the signal sensing and transduction of both the mechanical and drought signals associated with wind, and consider both plant size and architecture. PMID:21617382

  9. Allergen composition analysis and allergenicity assessment of Chinese peanut cultivars.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhihua; Zhou, Ningling; Xiong, Faqian; Li, Xin; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Tang, Ronghua; Chen, Hongbing

    2016-04-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is among the eight major food allergens in the world. Several attempts have been made to decrease or eliminate the allergenicity of peanut. Systemic screening of thousands of peanut cultivars may identify peanut with low allergenicity. In this study, the allergen compositions of 53 Chinese peanut cultivars were characterized, and their allergenicity to sera IgE of Chinese patients and in a mouse model was assessed. Contents of total protein and allergens were quantified by SDS-PAGE and densitometry analysis on gel. Although the contents of allergens broadly varied among cultivars, they were related to one another. The IgE binding capacity of cultivars was tested by ELISA, and their allergenicity was further evaluated in a mouse model by oral sensitization. Results showed that the allergenicity of peanut was affected by allergen composition rather than a single allergen. Peanut cultivars with low allergenicity may contain more Ara h 3/4 (24 kDa), Ara h 2 and less Ara h 3/4 (43, 38, and 36 kDa), Ara h 6. Screening based on allergen composition would facilitate the identification of low-allergenic peanut. PMID:26593515

  10. *Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens fol...

  11. Biomarkers of Acute Respiratory Allergen Exposure: Screening For Sensitization Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: An in vitro assay to identify respiratory sensitizers will provide a rapid screen and reduce animal use. The study goal was to identify biomarkers that differentiate allergen versus non-allergen responses following an acute exposure. Methods: Female BALB/c mice rec...

  12. Allergens in the Lab.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Thomas M.

    1987-01-01

    Points out the health and legal implications related to laboratory substances that could cause allergic reactions. Presents a list of potential cosmetic allergens and irritants. Includes precautionary measures dealing with allergy situations. (ML)

  13. Allergens and thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Shuaib M; Pulimood, Thomas B

    2009-09-01

    Thunderstorm-related asthma is increasingly recognized in many parts of the world. This review focuses on important advances in the understanding of the mechanism of the role of allergens, in particular fungal spores such as Alternaria, in asthma epidemics associated with thunderstorms. From our observations, we have proposed that the prerequisites for this phenomenon are as follows: 1) a sensitized, atopic, asthmatic individual; 2) prior airway hyperresponsiveness before a sudden, large allergen exposure; 3) a large-scale thunderstorm with cold outflow occurring at a time and location during an allergen season in which large numbers of asthmatics are outdoors; and 4) sudden release of large amounts of respirable allergenic fragments, particularly fungal spores such as Alternaria. PMID:19671382

  14. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  15. Mold Allergens in Respiratory Allergy: From Structure to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Twaroch, Teresa E; Curin, Mirela; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Allergic reactions to fungi were described 300 years ago, but the importance of allergy to fungi has been underestimated for a long time. Allergens from fungi mainly cause respiratory and skin symptoms in sensitized patients. In this review, we will focus on fungi and fungal allergens involved in respiratory forms of allergy, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Fungi can act as indoor and outdoor respiratory allergen sources, and depending on climate conditions, the rates of sensitization in individuals attending allergy clinics range from 5% to 20%. Due to the poor quality of natural fungal allergen extracts, diagnosis of fungal allergy is hampered, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is rarely given. Several factors are responsible for the poor quality of natural fungal extracts, among which the influence of culture conditions on allergen contents. However, molecular cloning techniques have allowed us to isolate DNAs coding for fungal allergens and to produce a continuously growing panel of recombinant allergens for the diagnosis of fungal allergy. Moreover, technologies are now available for the preparation of recombinant and synthetic fungal allergen derivatives which can be used to develop safe vaccines for the treatment of fungal allergy. PMID:25840710

  16. Mold allergens in respiratory allergy: from structure to therapy.

    PubMed

    Twaroch, Teresa E; Curin, Mirela; Valenta, Rudolf; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-05-01

    Allergic reactions to fungi were described 300 years ago, but the importance of allergy to fungi has been underestimated for a long time. Allergens from fungi mainly cause respiratory and skin symptoms in sensitized patients. In this review, we will focus on fungi and fungal allergens involved in respiratory forms of allergy, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. Fungi can act as indoor and outdoor respiratory allergen sources, and depending on climate conditions, the rates of sensitization in individuals attending allergy clinics range from 5% to 20%. Due to the poor quality of natural fungal allergen extracts, diagnosis of fungal allergy is hampered, and allergen-specific immunotherapy is rarely given. Several factors are responsible for the poor quality of natural fungal extracts, among which the influence of culture conditions on allergen contents. However, molecular cloning techniques have allowed us to isolate DNAs coding for fungal allergens and to produce a continuously growing panel of recombinant allergens for the diagnosis of fungal allergy. Moreover, technologies are now available for the preparation of recombinant and synthetic fungal allergen derivatives which can be used to develop safe vaccines for the treatment of fungal allergy. PMID:25840710

  17. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy and immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-01-01

    Substantial progress in understanding mechanisms of immune regulation in allergy, asthma, autoimmune diseases, tumors, organ transplantation and chronic infections has led to a variety of targeted therapeutic approaches. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) has been used for 100 years as a desensitizing therapy for allergic diseases and represents the potentially curative and specific way of treatment. The mechanisms by which allergen-AIT has its mechanisms of action include the very early desensitization effects, modulation of T- and B-cell responses and related antibody isotypes as well as inhibition of migration of eosinophils, basophils and mast cells to tissues and release of their mediators. Regulatory T cells (Treg) have been identified as key regulators of immunological processes in peripheral tolerance to allergens. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to a regulatory phenotype appears as a key event in the development of healthy immune response to allergens and successful outcome in AIT. Naturally occurring FoxP3(+) CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and inducible type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells contribute to the control of allergen-specific immune responses in several major ways, which can be summarized as suppression of dendritic cells that support the generation of effector T cells; suppression of effector Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells; suppression of allergen-specific IgE, and induction of IgG4; suppression of mast cells, basophils and eosinophils and suppression of effector T cell migration to tissues. New strategies for immune intervention will likely include targeting of the molecular mechanisms of allergen tolerance and reciprocal regulation of effector and regulatory T cell subsets. PMID:26023323

  18. Challenging Neorealism: A Response to Hammersley

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John K.; Hodkinson, Phil

    2009-01-01

    How researchers can go about judging, or adjudicating among, different knowledge claims recently has become a highly contested issue. In this response to Hammersley, we argue that he has not been able to justify his neorealist position that we can/must appeal to an independently existing reality, which can be known as it really is, to sort out our…

  19. Schools and Marketization: Cultural Challenges and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foskett, Nicholas H.

    1998-01-01

    Develops an analytical methodology for service organizations by examining four key cultural and managerial developments: understandings of markets and marketing held within the school; organizational responses to the market; use of analytical tools; and development of appropriate marketing strategies. Shows variations in schools' development of a…

  20. School Book Selection: Procedures, Challenges and Responses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenke, Larry L.

    The Tulsa, Oklahoma, board of education has adopted as policy an academic freedom statement that was developed by a committee composed of board members, administrators, teachers, and librarians. The prelude to the statement contains six important points dealing with (1) the need for such a policy statement, (2) school responsibility, (3)…

  1. Documentary Linguistics: Methodological Challenges and Innovatory Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thieberger, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Seeing the present situation, I think that, at the very least, it behooves us as scientists and as human beings to work responsibly both for the future of our science and for the future of our languages, not so much for reward according to the fashion of the day, but for the sake of posterity. What we need to do now stares us in the face. If we do…

  2. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hiroyuki; Soyka, Michael B; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT) is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1) cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases. PMID:22409879

  3. Hierarchy and molecular properties of house dust mite allergens.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Wayne R

    2015-10-01

    The allergenic load of house dust mite allergy is largely constituted by a few proteins with a hierarchical pattern of allergenicity. The serodominant specificities are the group 1&2 and the group 23 faecal allergens. The collective IgE binding to the group 1&2 allergens can measure unequivocal HDM sensitisation better than HDM extracts although discrepancies have been found in regions with complex acarofauna suggesting a need to investigate the specificity with allergen components. The group 4, 5, 7&21 allergens that each induce responses in about 40% of subjects are mid-tier allergens accounting for most of the remaining IgE binding. Their titres are proportional to the concomitant responses to Der p1&2. Group 2 allergen variants have different antibody binding. Body proteins only occasionally induce sensitisation although a higher prevalence of binding by atopic dermatitis patients provides a new avenue of research. A broad spectrum of IgE binding has been associated with diverse symptoms but not with the severity of asthma which is associated with low IgG antibody. Some allergens such as the group 14 large lipid binding proteins and the recently described proteins Der f 24-33, need further investigation but with the cognoscence that other denominated allergens have been found to be minor sensitisers by comparative quantitative analyses. Scabies is a confounder for diagnosis with extracts, inducing cross-reactive antibodies with Der p 4&20 as is seafood allergy with cross reactivity to Der p 10 a minor HDM allergen. The HDM genome sequence can now be used to verify allelic and paralogous variations. PMID:26433526

  4. Novel developments in the mechanisms of immune tolerance to allergens.

    PubMed

    Eiwegger, Thomas; Gruber, Saskia; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2012-10-01

    Allergy is the result of a disbalanced immune response to environmental innocuous antigens. Despite of accumulating data to define the pathomechanisms that take place in case of allergic diseases a detailed understanding of sequence of events that lead to the "normal" scenario of tolerance development are still under debate. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only causal treatment of allergic diseases. It modifies the immune response to a particular antigen to achieve tolerance against the symptom-causing allergen. This process is considered to mirror physiological peripheral tolerance induction. A number of immunological changes have been described to occur under allergen immunotherapy, including the generation of allergen-specific regulatory T cells, the induction of allergen-specific IgG4, an increase in the Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio and decreased activation and function of effector cells such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. PMID:23095863

  5. Peanut oral immunotherapy modifies IgE and IgG4 responses to major peanut allergens

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Brian P.; Lin, Jing; Kulis, Michael; Fu, Zhiyan; Steele, Pamela H.; Jones, Stacie M.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Gimenez, Gustavo; Bardina, Ludmilla; Sampson, Hugh A.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2012-01-01

    Background Peanut-allergic subjects have highly stable pathologic antibody repertoires to the immunodominant B cell epitopes of the major peanut allergens Ara h 1-3. Objective We used a peptide microarray technique to analyze the effect of treatment with peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) on such repertoires. Methods Measurements of total peanut-specific IgE (psIgE) and psIgG4 were made with CAP-FEIA. We analyzed sera from 22 OIT subjects and 6 controls and measured serum specific IgE and IgG4 binding to epitopes of Ara h 1-3 using a high-throughput peptide microarray technique. Antibody affinity was measured using a competitive peptide microarray as previously described. Results At baseline, psIgE and psIgG4 diversity were similar between subjects and controls, and there was broad variation in epitope recognition. After a median 41 months of OIT, polyclonal psIgG4 increased from a median 0.3 mcg/mL (IQR 0.1-0.43) at baseline to 10.5 mcg/mL (3.95-45.48) (p<0.0001) and included de novo specificities. PsIgE was reduced from a median baseline of 85.45 kUA/L (23.05-101.0) to 7.75 kUA/L (2.58-30.55) (p<0.0001). Affinity was unaffected. Although the psIgE repertoire contracted in most OIT-treated subjects, several subjects generated new IgE specificities even as the total psIgE decreased. Global epitope-specific shifts from IgE to IgG4 binding occurred, including at an informative epitope of Ara h 2. Conclusion OIT differentially alters Ara h 1-3 binding patterns. These changes are variable between subjects, not observed in controls, and include a progressive polyclonal increase in IgG4, with concurrent reduction in IgE amount and diversity. PMID:23199605

  6. Specific allergen immunotherapy attenuates allergic airway inflammation in a rat model of Alstonia scholaris pollen induced airway allergy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Moitra, Saibal; Hazra, Iman; Mondal, Somnath; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grains are well established to be an important cause of respiratory allergy. Current pharmacologic therapies for allergic asthma do not cure the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only treatment method which re-directs the immune system away from allergic response leading to a long lasting effect. The mechanism by which immunotherapy achieves this goal is an area of active research world-wide. The present experimental study was designed to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation based on a relevant human allergen, Alstonia scholaris pollen, and to establish the immunological and cellular features of specific allergen immunotherapy using this same pollen extract. Our results revealed that Alstonia scholaris pollen sensitization and challenge causes eosinophilic airway inflammation with mucin hypersecretion. This is associated with increased total IgE, increased expression of FcɛRI on lung mast cells and increased levels of IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 as confirmed by ELISA, in-situ immunofluorescence and FACS assay. Allergen specific immunotherapy reduced airway inflammation and also decreased total IgE level, FcɛRI expression, IL-4, IL-5 & IL-13 levels. It was further noted that the reduction of these levels was more by intra-nasal route than by intra-peritoneal route. Thus we present a novel animal model of Alstonia scholaris pollen allergic disease and specific allergen immunotherapy which will pave the way towards the development of better treatment modalities. PMID:26667977

  7. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  8. Passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies for treatment and prevention of allergy

    PubMed Central

    Flicker, Sabine; Linhart, Birgit; Wild, Carmen; Wiedermann, Ursula; Valenta, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    IgE antibody-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population worldwide. To investigate therapeutic and preventive effects of passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies on allergy in mouse models we used clinically relevant pollen allergens. In a treatment model, mice were sensitized to the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 and to the major grass pollen allergens, Phl p 1 and Phl p 5 and then received passive immunization with rabbit IgG antibodies specific for the sensitizing or an unrelated allergen. In a prevention model, mice obtained passive immunization with allergen-specific rabbit IgG before sensitization. Kinetics of the levels of administered IgG antibodies, effects of administered allergen-specific IgG on allergen-specific IgE reactivity, the development of IgE and IgG responses and on immediate allergic reactions were studied by ELISA, rat basophil leukaemia degranulation assays and skin testing, respectively. Treated mice showed an approximately 80% reduction of allergen-specific IgE binding and basophil degranulation which was associated with the levels of administered allergen-specific IgG antibodies. Preventive administration of allergen-specific IgG antibodies suppressed the development of allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 antibody responses as well as allergen-induced basophil degranulation and skin reactivity. Our results show that passive immunization with allergen-specific IgG antibodies is effective for treatment and prevention of allergy to clinically important pollen allergens in a mouse model and thus may pave the road for the clinical application of allergen-specific antibodies in humans. PMID:23182706

  9. The BCN Challenge to Compatibilist Free Will and Personal Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Sie, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Many philosophers ignore developments in the behavioral, cognitive, and neurosciences that purport to challenge our ideas of free will and responsibility. The reason for this is that the challenge is often framed as a denial of the idea that we are able to act differently than we do. However, most philosophers think that the ability to do otherwise is irrelevant to responsibility and free will. Rather it is our ability to act for reasons that is crucial. We argue that the scientific findings indicate that it is not so obvious that our views of free will and responsibility can be grounded in the ability to act for reasons without introducing metaphysical obscurities. This poses a challenge to philosophers. We draw the conclusion that philosophers are wrong not to address the recent scientific developments and that scientists are mistaken in formulating their challenge in terms of the freedom to do otherwise. PMID:21124755

  10. Immunological mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, C A

    2011-06-01

    The studies on the mechanisms of specific immunotherapy (SIT) point out its targets that decide on the efficacy of SIT and hence might be used for its further improvement. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the beneficial effects of immunotherapy. The knowledge of the mechanisms underlying allergic diseases and curative treatment possibilities has experienced exciting advances over the last three decades. Studies in several clinical trials in allergen-SIT have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state against allergens in many ways represents a key step in the development of a healthy immune response against allergens. Several cellular and molecular mechanisms have been demonstrated: allergen-specific suppressive capacities of both inducible subsets of CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box P3(+) T-regulatory and IL-10-secreting type 1 T-regulatory cells increase in peripheral blood; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells, and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4. This review aims at the better understanding of the observed immunological changes associated with allergen SIT. PMID:21466562

  11. The Community Challenge: The Learning Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bawden, Richard

    In this presentation I intend to narrate a story that has its particular origins in three strategic decisions collectively taken, almost 20 years ago now, by a small group of educators within a small agricultural polytechnic located on the urban/rural fringe of Australia's largest city. It is a story which arises out of the integrated thoughts and actions of an academic community, which, tired of its marginal status, decided in the late 1970s, to profoundly and concurrently transform itself as a School of Agriculture in three fundamental ways: (a) to change its own focus from production agriculture to responsible rural development, (b) to change its own emphasis from a teaching approach based on courses to one of learning based on projects, and (c) to change its own prevailing reductionist paradigm to embrace an holistic one. The mission became one of helping people in rural communities across the state, to learn their way forward to better futures, in the face of the immensely complex, dynamic, and slowly degrading environments - socio-economic, politico-cultural and bio-physical - in which they increasingly recognised they were deeply embedded. The intent would thus become that of helping people to see their worlds differently as a prelude for doing things differently - essentially more systemically. The context for this grand enterprise is captured in the aphorism 'if we always see how we've always seen, we'll always be who we've always been'! Changing the way we collectively construe ourselves means collectively changing the way we think about ourselves, to lead in turn, to changing the way we collectively act.

  12. Early Exposure to Respiratory Allergens by Placental Transfer and Breastfeeding

    PubMed Central

    Macchiaverni, Patricia; Ynoue, Leandro H.; Arslanian, Christina; Verhasselt, Valérie; Condino-Neto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between allergen exposure and the onset of or protection from allergic diseases remains unclear. Many factors could be related to immunological responses, such as the age when the exposure occurs, type of allergen, timing, dose, and allergen route. In this study, we investigated whether exposure to respiratory allergens could occur in pregnancy or early life. In particular, we assessed whether Der p 1 and Blo t 5, as well as specific antibodies against these allergens, could be detected in 90 paired cord blood and colostrum samples. Der p 1 was detected in 58.6% of colostrum and 29% of cord blood samples, whereas Blot 5 was positive in 41.3% and 9.6% of the samples, respectively. Similar to specific IgA, which could be detected in all samples for both mites, specific IgG was found in a high number of colostrum samples, 93.5% and 94.8% for Dp and Bt, respectively. Although allergens were not detected in all cord blood samples, a high percentage of them (≥95%) were positive for specific IgM to both mites in cord blood samples, suggesting that neonates can be exposed and sensitized to airborne allergens during pregnancy. Many studies have attempted to correlate allergen exposure or its prevention in early infancy with the onset of or protection from allergic diseases. However, conflicting and inconsistent data do not show a clear correlation with or suggest a way to prevent allergen sensitization. Nevertheless, these unconvincing results could be better understood if the relationship with many aspects of allergen exposure after pregnancy could be clarified. Thus, it is necessary to address basic issues related to allergen exposure, including the development of reproducible, standardized and reliable methods, and to determine how and where the exposure occurs. PMID:26398234

  13. Positive reaction to allergen (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  14. [Current contact allergens].

    PubMed

    Geier, J; Uter, W; Lessmann, H; Schnuch, A

    2011-10-01

    Ever-changing exposure to contact allergens, partly due to statutory directives (e.g. nickel, chromate, methyldibromo glutaronitrile) or recommendations from industrial associations (e.g. hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde), requires on-going epidemiologic surveillance of contact allergy. In this paper, the current state with special focus in fragrances and preservatives is described on the basis of data of the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology (IVDK) of the year 2010. In 2010, 12,574 patients were patch tested in the dermatology departments belonging to the IVDK. Nickel is still the most frequent contact allergen. However the continuously improved EU nickel directive already has some beneficial effect; sensitization frequency in young women is dropping. In Germany, chromate-reduced cement has been in use now for several years, leading to a decline in chromate sensitization in brick-layers. Two fragrance mixes are part of the German baseline series; they are still relevant. The most important fragrances in these mixes still are oak moss absolute and hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. However, in relation to these leading allergens, sensitization frequency to other fragrances contained in the mixes seems to be increasing. Among the preservatives, MCI/MI has not lost its importance as contact allergen, in contrast to MDBGN. Sources of MCI/MI sensitization obviously are increasingly found in occupational context. Methylisothiazolinone is a significant allergen in occupational settings, and less frequently in body care products. PMID:21901563

  15. Use of Humanised Rat Basophilic Leukaemia Cell Line RS-ATL8 for the Assessment of Allergenicity of Schistosoma mansoni Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Alanine, Daniel G. W.; Stretton, Owen; Ali Ali, Eman; Al-Barwary, Nafal; Wang, Xiaowei; Doenhoff, Michael J.; Mari, Adriano; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Dunne, David W.; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Oliveira, Guilherme C.; Alcocer, Marcos J. C.; Falcone, Franco H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Parasite-specific IgE is thought to correlate with protection against Schistosoma mansoni infection or re-infection. Only a few molecular targets of the IgE response in S. mansoni infection have been characterised. A better insight into the basic mechanisms of anti-parasite immunity could be gained from a genome-wide characterisation of such S. mansoni allergens. This would have repercussions on our understanding of allergy and the development of safe and efficacious vaccinations against helminthic parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings A complete medium- to high-throughput amenable workflow, including important quality controls, is described, which enables the rapid translation of S. mansoni proteins using wheat germ lysate and subsequent assessment of potential allergenicity with a humanised Rat Basophilic Leukemia (RBL) reporter cell line. Cell-free translation is completed within 90 minutes, generating sufficient amounts of parasitic protein for rapid screening of allergenicity without any need for purification. Antigenic integrity is demonstrated using Western Blotting. After overnight incubation with infected individuals' serum, the RS-ATL8 reporter cell line is challenged with the complete wheat germ translation mixture and Luciferase activity measured, reporting cellular activation by the suspected allergen. The suitability of this system for characterization of novel S. mansoni allergens is demonstrated using well characterised plant and parasitic allergens such as Par j 2, SmTAL-1 and the IgE binding factor IPSE/alpha-1, expressed in wheat germ lysates and/or E. coli. SmTAL-1, but not SmTAL2 (used as a negative control), was able to activate the basophil reporter cell line. Conclusion/Significance This method offers an accessible way for assessment of potential allergenicity of anti-helminthic vaccine candidates and is suitable for medium- to high-throughput studies using infected individual sera. It is also suitable for the study of the

  16. [Allergenicity of lupin flour].

    PubMed

    Leduc, V; Moneret-Vautrin, D A; Guérin, L

    2002-06-01

    Lupin flour is used in human food for its high quality nutritional and functional qualities. The frequency of crossed allergy between lupin flour and peanuts, both members of the family of Leguminosae, is strong, since 68% of patients who are allergic to peanut have shown positive reactions to lupin flour when tested by TPO-DA. Cases of isolated allergy to lupin flour without pre-existence of peanut allergy as well as workplace asthma by inhalation are also rarely seen. The specific allergens of lupin and those that participate in crosses with peanut have been studied by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot. The diversity of allergens contained in different lupin flour has also been studied. Further, the detection of lupin flour in a "pizza" flour which induced a strong allergic reaction exposed its eventual implication as a masked allergen. PMID:12134645

  17. Moral responsibility and respect for autonomy: meeting the communitarian challenge.

    PubMed

    Guathier, C C

    2000-12-01

    The principle of respect for autonomy has come under increasing attack both within health care ethics, specifically, and as part of the more general communitarian challenge to predominantly liberal values. This paper will demonstrate the importance of respect for autonomy for the social practice of assigning moral responsibility and for the development of moral responsibility as a virtue. Guided by this virtue, the responsible exercise of autonomy may provide a much-needed connection between the individual and the community. PMID:11702770

  18. An overview of fruit allergy and the causative allergens.

    PubMed

    Hassan, A K G; Venkatesh, Y P

    2015-11-01

    Plant allergens, being one of the most widespread allergenic substances, are hard to avoid. Hence, their identification and characterization are of prime importance for the diagnosis and treatment of food allergy. The reported allergies to fruits mainly evoke oral allergy syndrome caused by the presence of cross-reactive IgE to certain pollens and thus, allergy to fruits has also been linked to particular pollens. Many fruit allergies are being studied for their causative allergens, and are being characterized. Some tropical or exotic fruits are responsible for region-specific allergies for which only limited information is available, and generally lack allergen characterization. From a survey of the literature on fruit allergy, it is clear that some common fruits (apple, peach, musk melon, kiwi fruit, cherry, grape, strawberry, banana, custard apple, mango and pomegranate) and their allergens appear to be at the center of current research on food allergy. The present review focuses on common fruits reported as allergenic and their identified allergens; a brief description of allergens from six rare/tropical fruits is also covered. PMID:26549334

  19. Structural insights into the IgE mediated responses induced by the allergens Hev b 8 and Zea m 12 in their dimeric forms

    PubMed Central

    Mares-Mejía, Israel; Martínez-Caballero, Siseth; Garay-Canales, Claudia; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Lara-González, Samuel; Ortega, Enrique; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of allergens plays an important role in IgE-mediated reactions, as effective crosslinking of IgE- FcεRI complexes on the cell membrane is dependent on the number of exposed B-cell epitopes in a single allergen molecule or on the occurrence of identical epitopes in a symmetrical arrangement. Few studies have attempted to experimentally demonstrate the connection between allergen dimerization and the ability to trigger allergic reactions. Here we studied plant allergenic profilins rHev b 8 (rubber tree) and rZea m 12 (maize) because they represent an important example of cross-reactivity in the latex-pollen-food syndrome. Both allergens in their monomeric and dimeric states were isolated and characterized by exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry and were used in immunological in vitro experiments. Their crystal structures were solved, and for Hev b 8 a disulfide-linked homodimer was found. Comparing the structures we established that the longest loop is relevant for recognition by IgE antibodies, whereas the conserved regions are important for cross-reactivity. We produced a novel monoclonal murine IgE (mAb 2F5), specific for rHev b 8, which was useful to provide evidence that profilin dimerization considerably increases the IgE-mediated degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia cells. PMID:27586352

  20. Structural insights into the IgE mediated responses induced by the allergens Hev b 8 and Zea m 12 in their dimeric forms.

    PubMed

    Mares-Mejía, Israel; Martínez-Caballero, Siseth; Garay-Canales, Claudia; Cano-Sánchez, Patricia; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Lara-González, Samuel; Ortega, Enrique; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela

    2016-01-01

    Oligomerization of allergens plays an important role in IgE-mediated reactions, as effective crosslinking of IgE- FcεRI complexes on the cell membrane is dependent on the number of exposed B-cell epitopes in a single allergen molecule or on the occurrence of identical epitopes in a symmetrical arrangement. Few studies have attempted to experimentally demonstrate the connection between allergen dimerization and the ability to trigger allergic reactions. Here we studied plant allergenic profilins rHev b 8 (rubber tree) and rZea m 12 (maize) because they represent an important example of cross-reactivity in the latex-pollen-food syndrome. Both allergens in their monomeric and dimeric states were isolated and characterized by exclusion chromatography and mass spectrometry and were used in immunological in vitro experiments. Their crystal structures were solved, and for Hev b 8 a disulfide-linked homodimer was found. Comparing the structures we established that the longest loop is relevant for recognition by IgE antibodies, whereas the conserved regions are important for cross-reactivity. We produced a novel monoclonal murine IgE (mAb 2F5), specific for rHev b 8, which was useful to provide evidence that profilin dimerization considerably increases the IgE-mediated degranulation in rat basophilic leukemia cells. PMID:27586352

  1. Structural and functional localization of airway effects from episodic exposure of infant monkeys to allergen and/or ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Joad, Jesse P. . E-mail: jesse.joad@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Kott, Kayleen S.; Bric, John M.; Peake, Janice L.; Plopper, Charles G.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Gershwin, Laurel J.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2006-08-01

    Both allergen and ozone exposure increase asthma symptoms and airway responsiveness in children. Little is known about how these inhalants may differentially modify airway responsiveness in large proximal as compared to small distal airways. We evaluated whether bronchi and respiratory bronchioles from infant monkeys exposed episodically to allergen and/or ozone differentially develop intrinsic hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and whether eosinophils and/or pulmonary neuroendocrine cells play a role. Infant monkeys were exposed episodically for 5 months to: (1) filtered air, (2) aerosolized house dust mite allergen, (3) ozone 0.5 ppm, or (4) house dust mite allergen + ozone. Studying the function/structure relationship of the same lung slices, we evaluated methacholine airway responsiveness and histology of bronchi and respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, intrinsic responsiveness was increased by allergen exposure, an effect reduced by bombesin antagonist. In respiratory bronchioles, intrinsic airway responsiveness was increased by allergen + ozone exposure. Eosinophils were increased by allergen and allergen + ozone exposure in bronchi and by allergen exposure in respiratory bronchioles. In both airways, exposure to allergen + ozone resulted in fewer tissue eosinophils than did allergen exposure alone. In bronchi, but not in respiratory bronchioles, the number of eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells correlated with airway responsiveness. We conclude that episodically exposing infant monkeys to house dust mite allergen with or without ozone increased intrinsic airway responsiveness to methacholine in bronchi differently than in respiratory bronchioles. In bronchi, eosinophils and neuroendocrine cells may play a role in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness.

  2. High-fat diet promotes lung fibrosis and attenuates airway eosinophilia after exposure to cockroach allergen in mice.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao Na; Greenberg, Yana; Hosseinkhani, M Reza; Long, Eric K; Bahaie, Nooshin S; Rao, Amrita; Ha, Sung Gil; Rao, Savita P; Bernlohr, David A; Sriramarao, P

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor for asthma but the mechanistic basis for this association is not well understood. In the current study, the impact of obesity on lung inflammatory responses after allergen exposure was investigated. C57BL/6 mice maintained on a high-fat diet (HFD) or a normal diet (ND) after weaning were sensitized and challenged with cockroach allergen (CRA). Airway inflammation was assessed based on inflammatory cell recruitment, measurement of lung Th1-Th2 cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and other proinflammatory mediators as well as airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). CRA-challenged mice fed a HFD exhibited significantly decreased allergen-induced airway eosinophilia along with reduced lung IL-5, IL-13, LTC4, CCL11, and CCL2 levels as well as reduced mucus secretion and smooth muscle mass compared to ND fed mice. However, allergen-challenged HFD fed mice demonstrated significantly increased PAI-1 and reduced PGE2 levels in the lung relative to corresponding ND fed mice. Interestingly, saline-exposed HFD fed mice demonstrated elevated baseline levels of TGF-β1, arginase-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and lung collagen expression associated with decreased lung function compared to corresponding ND fed mice. These studies indicate that a HFD inhibits airway eosinophilia while altering levels of PAI-1 and PGE2 in response to CRA in mice. Further, a HFD can lead to the development of lung fibrosis even in the absence of allergen exposure which could be due to innate elevated levels of specific profibrotic factors, potentially affecting lung function during asthma. PMID:24102347

  3. Multiplex detection of food allergens and gluten.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chung Y; Nowatzke, William; Oliver, Kerry; Garber, Eric A E

    2015-05-01

    To help safeguard the food supply and detect the presence of undeclared food allergens and gluten, most producers and regulatory agencies rely on commercial test kits. Most of these are ELISAs with a few being PCR-based. These methods are very sensitive and analyte specific, requiring different assays to detect each of the different food allergens. Mass spectrometry offers an alternative approach whereby multiple allergens may be detected simultaneously. However, mass spectrometry requires expensive equipment, highly trained analysts, and several years before a quantitative approach can be achieved. Using multianalyte profiling (xMAP®) technology, a commercial multiplex test kit based on the use of established antibodies was developed for the simultaneous detection of up to 14 different food allergens plus gluten. The assay simultaneously detects crustacean seafood, egg, gluten, milk, peanut, soy, and nine tree nuts (almond, Brazil nut, cashew, coconut, hazelnut, macadamia, pine nut, pistachio, and walnut). By simultaneously performing multiple tests (typically two) for each analyte, this magnetic bead-based assay offers built-in confirmatory analyses without the need for additional resources. Twenty-five of the assays were performed on buffer extracted samples, while five were conducted on samples extracted using reduced-denatured conditions. Thus, complete analysis for all 14 allergens and gluten requires only two wells of a 96-well microtiter plate. This makes it possible to include in a single analytical run up to 48 samples. All 30 bead sets in this multiplex assay detected 5 ng/mL of food allergen and gluten with responses greater than background. In addition, 26 of the bead sets displayed signal/noise ratios of five or greater. The bead-based design makes this 30-plex assay expandable to incorporate new antibodies and capture/detector methodologies by ascribing these new detectors to any of the unassigned bead sets that are commercially available. PMID

  4. Allergenicity of processed food.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food allergies have become a major public health issue in many countries. In the U.S. it is estimated that approximately 150 individuals die each year from accidental ingestion of an allergic food. As a result, the federal government recently passed the food allergen labeling law which went into ef...

  5. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  6. Allergenic pollen and pollen allergy in Europe.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Cecchi, L; Bonini, S; Nunes, C; Annesi-Maesano, I; Behrendt, H; Liccardi, G; Popov, T; van Cauwenberge, P

    2007-09-01

    The allergenic content of the atmosphere varies according to climate, geography and vegetation. Data on the presence and prevalence of allergenic airborne pollens, obtained from both aerobiological studies and allergological investigations, make it possible to design pollen calendars with the approximate flowering period of the plants in the sampling area. In this way, even though pollen production and dispersal from year to year depend on the patterns of preseason weather and on the conditions prevailing at the time of anthesis, it is usually possible to forecast the chances of encountering high atmospheric allergenic pollen concentrations in different areas. Aerobiological and allergological studies show that the pollen map of Europe is changing also as a result of cultural factors (for example, importation of plants such as birch and cypress for urban parklands), greater international travel (e.g. colonization by ragweed in France, northern Italy, Austria, Hungary etc.) and climate change. In this regard, the higher frequency of weather extremes, like thunderstorms, and increasing episodes of long range transport of allergenic pollen represent new challenges for researchers. Furthermore, in the last few years, experimental data on pollen and subpollen-particles structure, the pathogenetic role of pollen and the interaction between pollen and air pollutants, gave new insights into the mechanisms of respiratory allergic diseases. PMID:17521313

  7. Offshore oil spill response practices and emerging challenges.

    PubMed

    Li, Pu; Cai, Qinhong; Lin, Weiyun; Chen, Bing; Zhang, Baiyu

    2016-09-15

    Offshore oil spills are of tremendous concern due to their potential impact on economic and ecological systems. A number of major oil spills triggered worldwide consciousness of oil spill preparedness and response. Challenges remain in diverse aspects such as oil spill monitoring, analysis, assessment, contingency planning, response, cleanup, and decision support. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current situations and impacts of offshore oil spills, as well as the policies and technologies in offshore oil spill response and countermeasures. Correspondingly, new strategies and a decision support framework are recommended for improving the capacities and effectiveness of oil spill response and countermeasures. In addition, the emerging challenges in cold and harsh environments are reviewed with recommendations due to increasing risk of oil spills in the northern regions from the expansion of the Arctic Passage. PMID:27393213

  8. Cultivar specific changes in peanut (Arachis hypogae L.) yield, biomass, and allergenicity in response to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intraspecific variation in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, [CO2], could, potentially, be used as a means to begin selection for improved quantitative or qualitative characteristics for a given crop. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a leguminous crop of global importance;...

  9. Strategic Responses to Financial Challenges. Strategic Decisions. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauptman, Arthur M.

    1998-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of institutions of higher education offers guidelines for strategic financial decisions required in light of the financial challenges higher education faces in the 1990s and beyond. "Strategic response" is defined as a decision that requires changing a major policy, program, or practice and involves some risk. Five…

  10. Exploring Interoperability as a Multidimensional Challenge for Effective Emergency Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santisteban, Hiram

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this research was to further an understanding of how the federal government is addressing the challenges of interoperability for emergency response or crisis management (FEMA, 2009) by informing the development of standards through the review of current congressional law, commissions, studies, executive orders, and…

  11. New routes for allergen immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Pål; von Moos, Seraina; Mohanan, Deepa; Kündig, Thomas M; Senti, Gabriela

    2012-10-01

    IgE-mediated allergy is a highly prevalent disease in the industrialized world. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) should be the preferred treatment, as it has long lasting protective effects and can stop the progression of the disease. However, few allergic patients choose to undergo SIT, due to the long treatment time and potential allergic adverse events. Since the beneficial effects of SIT are mediated by antigen presenting cells inducing Th1, Treg and antibody responses, whereas the adverse events are caused by mast cells and basophils, the therapeutic window of SIT may be widened by targeting tissues rich in antigen presenting cells. Lymph nodes and the epidermis contain high density of dendritic cells and low numbers of mast cells and basophils. The epidermis has the added benefit of not being vascularised thereby reducing the chances of anaphylactic shock due to leakage of allergen. Hence, both these tissues represent highly promising routes for SIT and are the focus of discussion in this review. PMID:23095873

  12. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity. PMID:22523502

  13. [Recombinant allergens for diagnosis and specific immunotherapy--value in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Couderc, Rémy; Just, Jocelyne

    2013-03-01

    Identification of culprit allergens is important for prophylactic measures and specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT). Since the late 1980s, the use of molecular cloning technology has led to a major improvement in our knowledge of epitopes involved in IgE-mediated allergy, and has also allowed in vitro production of recombinant allergens of interest for the diagnosis of allergenic sensitization. It has also improved our understanding of allergen cross-reactivity, which can be responsible for severe clinical manifestations, particularly in children with food allergy and allergic asthma. Better knowledge of molecular and cellular mechanisms of allergenic sensitization, based on the use of natural or modified recombinant allergens, has led to the development of effective SIT strategies which, in the foreseeable future, could provide genuine cure, therefore avoiding use of symptomatic therapeutics, starting very early in childhood. PMID:25163347

  14. The Seed Biotinylated Protein of Soybean (Glycine max): A Boiling-Resistant New Allergen (Gly m 7) with the Capacity To Induce IgE-Mediated Allergic Responses.

    PubMed

    Riascos, John J; Weissinger, Sandra M; Weissinger, Arthur K; Kulis, Michael; Burks, A Wesley; Pons, Laurent

    2016-05-18

    Soybean is a common allergenic food; thus, a comprehensive characterization of all the proteins that cause allergy is crucial to the development of effective diagnostic and immunotherapeutic strategies. A cDNA library was constructed from seven stages of developing soybean seeds to investigate candidate allergens. We searched the library for cDNAs encoding a seed-specific biotinylated protein (SBP) based on its allergenicity in boiled lentils. A full-length cDNA clone was retrieved and expressed as a 75.6-kDa His-tagged recombinant protein (rSBP) in Escherichia coli. Western immunoblotting of boiled bacterial extracts demonstrated specific IgE binding to rSBP, which was further purified by metal affinity and anion exchange chromatographies. Of the 23 allergic sera screened by ELISA, 12 contained IgEs specific to the purified rSBP. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed a predominantly unordered structure consistent with SBP's heat stability. The natural homologues (nSBP) were the main proteins isolated from soybean and peanut embryos after streptavidin affinity purification, yet they remained low-abundance proteins in the seed as confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Using capture ELISAs, the soybean and peanut nSBPs were bound by IgEs in 78 and 87% of the allergic sera tested. The soybean nSBP was purified to homogeneity and treatments with different denaturing agents before immunoblotting highlighted the diversity of its IgE epitopes. In vitro activation of basophils was assessed by flow cytometry in a cohort of peanut-allergic children sensitized to soybean. Stronger and more frequent (38%) activations were induced by nSBP-soy compared to the major soybean allergen, Gly m 5. SBPs may represent a novel class of biologically active legume allergens with the structural resilience to withstand many food-manufacturing processes. PMID:27108990

  15. Soybean flour asthma: detection of allergens by immunoblotting

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, R.K.; Schroeckenstein, D.; Meier-Davis, S.; Balmes, J.; Rempel, D.

    1988-08-01

    A 43-year-old woman developed asthma 6 years after beginning work in a food-processing plant in which soybean flour was used as a protein extender. Symptoms of sneezing, coughing, and wheezing would begin within minutes of exposure to soybean flour and resolve 2 hours after exposure ceased. Skin tests were positive to a soy extract prepared from the flour. Airway hyperreactivity was confirmed by a positive bronchial challenge to methacholine. Bronchial challenge with soybean flour produced an immediate increase in specific airway resistance from 5.0 to 22.7 L. cm of H2O/L/sec. There was no response to challenge with lactose. The patient's allergic response to soy-flour extract was further characterized by several immunologic methods. IgE binding to soy-flour protein by direct RAST was 5.98 times that of a normal control serum. The soy-flour extract was separated by dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four protein bands were detected in the crude soy-flour extract. After immunoblotting and subsequent autoradiography, nine proteins with molecular weights ranging from 54,500 to 14,875 were found. Cross-reactivity studies with other legumes demonstrated apparent immunologic identity between a component in green pea extract and a soybean protein with a molecular weight of 17,000. The clinical significance of this cross-reactivity is not known. We conclude that in this case of occupational asthma to soybean flour, multiple allergens were involved. Immunoblotting may be useful in identifying the allergens involved in occupational asthma.

  16. Environmental tobacco smoke, indoor allergens, and childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, D R

    2000-01-01

    Both environmental tobacco smoke and indoor allergens can exacerbate already established childhood albeit primarily through quite disparate mechanisms. In infancy and childhood, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure is associated with measures of decreased flow in the airways, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and increased respiratory infections, but the relationship between ETS and allergy is poorly understood. Indoor allergens from dust mite, cockroach, and cat can be associated with asthma exacerbation in children sensitized to the specific allergens. The precise role of either ETS or indoor allergens in the development of asthma is less well understood. The strong and consistent association between ETS and asthma development in young children may relate to both prenatal and postnatal influences on airway caliber or bronchial responsiveness. Dust mite allergen levels predict asthma in children sensitized to dust mite. The tendency to develop specific IgE antibodies to allergens (sensitization) is associated with and may be preceded by the development of a T-helper (Th)2 profile of cytokine release. The importance of either ETS or indoor allergens in the differentiation of T cells into a Th2-type profile of cytokine release or in the localization of immediate-type allergic responses to the lung is unknown. This article evaluates the strength of the evidence that ETS or indoor allergens influence asthma exacerbation and asthma development in children. We also selectively review data for the effectiveness of allergen reduction in reducing asthma symptoms and present a potential research agenda regarding these two broad areas of environmental exposure and their relationship to childhood asthma. PMID:10931782

  17. Cerebral Response to Peripheral Challenge with a Viral Mimetic.

    PubMed

    Konat, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    It has been well established that peripheral inflammation resulting from microbial infections profoundly alters brain function. This review focuses on experimental systems that model cerebral effects of peripheral viral challenge. The most common models employ the induction of the acute phase response via intraperitoneal injection of a viral mimetic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC). The ensuing transient surge of blood-borne inflammatory mediators induces a "mirror" inflammatory response in the brain characterized by the upregulated expression of a plethora of genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory/stress proteins. These inflammatory mediators modify the activity of neuronal networks leading to a constellation of behavioral traits collectively categorized as the sickness behavior. Sickness behavior is an important protective response of the host that has evolved to enhance survival and limit the spread of infections within a population. However, a growing body of clinical data indicates that the activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain may constitute a serious comorbidity factor for neuropathological conditions. Such comorbidity has been demonstrated using the PIC paradigm in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease, prion disease and seizures. Also, prenatal or perinatal PIC challenge has been shown to disrupt normal cerebral development of the offspring resulting in phenotypes consistent with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. Remarkably, recent studies indicate that mild peripheral PIC challenge may be neuroprotective in stroke. Altogether, the PIC challenge paradigm represents a unique heuristic model to elucidate the immune-to-brain communication pathways and to explore preventive strategies for neuropathological disorders. PMID:26526143

  18. Setting Occupational Exposure Limits for Chemical Allergens—Understanding the Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dotson, G. S.; Maier, A.; Siegel, P. D.; Anderson, S. E.; Green, B. J.; Stefaniak, A. B.; Codispoti, C. D.; Kimber, I.

    2015-01-01

    Chemical allergens represent a significant health burden in the workplace. Exposures to such chemicals can cause the onset of a diverse group of adverse health effects triggered by immune-mediated responses. Common responses associated with workplace exposures to low molecular weight (LMW) chemical allergens range from allergic contact dermatitis to life-threatening cases of asthma. Establishing occupational exposure limits (OELs) for chemical allergens presents numerous difficulties for occupational hygiene professionals. Few OELs have been developed for LMW allergens because of the unique biological mechanisms that govern the immune-mediated responses. The purpose of this article is to explore the primary challenges confronting the establishment of OELs for LMW allergens. Specific topics include: (1) understanding the biology of LMW chemical allergies as it applies to setting OELs; (2) selecting the appropriate immune-mediated response (i.e., sensitization versus elicitation); (3) characterizing the dose (concentration)-response relationship of immune-mediated responses; (4) determining the impact of temporal exposure patterns (i.e., cumulative versus acute exposures); and (5) understanding the role of individual susceptibility and exposure route. Additional information is presented on the importance of using alternative exposure recommendations and risk management practices, including medical surveillance, to aid in protecting workers from exposures to LMW allergens when OELs cannot be established. PMID:26583909

  19. Lung-derived innate cytokines: new epigenetic targets of allergen-specific sublingual immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pishdadian, Abbas; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Gholamin, Mehran; Nasiraie, Leila Roozbeh; Hosseinpour, Mitra; Moghadam, Malihe; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Sublingual allergen-specific immunotherapy is a safe and effective method for treatment of IgE-mediated respiratory allergies; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study was planned to test whether sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) can exert epigenetic mechanisms through which the airway allergic responses can be extinguished. Materials and Methods: BALB/c mice were sensitized intraperitoneally and challenged intranasally. Then, they received sublingual treatment with recombinant Che a 2 (rChe a 2), a major allergen of Chenopodium album. After SLIT, allergen-specific antibodies in sera, cytokine profiles of spleen cell cultures, mRNA and protein expression of lung-derived IL-33, IL-25, and TSLP (thymic stromal lymphopoietin), and histone modifications of these three genes were assessed. Results: Following Immunotherapy, systemic immune responses shifted from Th2 to Th1 profile as demonstrated by significant decrease in IgE and IL-4 and substantial increase in IgG2a and IFN-γ. At local site, mRNA and protein levels of lung-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-33 and TSLP were markedly down-regulated following SLIT that was associated with marked enrichment of trimethylated lysine 27 of histone H3 at promoter regions of these two cytokines. Conclusion: In our study, sublingual immunotherapy with recombinant allergen effectively attenuated allergic immune responses, at least partly, by induction of distinct histone modifications at specific loci. Additionally, the lung-derived pro-allergic cytokines IL-33 and TSLP could be promising mucosal candidates for either monitoring allergic conditions or therapeutic approaches. PMID:27096066

  20. Bystander immunotherapy as a strategy to control allergen-driven airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, S; Lazzari, A; Kanda, A; Fleury, S; Dombrowicz, D; Glaichenhaus, N; Julia, V

    2015-07-01

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), lung infiltration of Th2 cells, and high levels of IgE. To date, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment that effectively alleviates clinical symptoms and has a long-term effect after termination. Unfortunately, SIT is unsuitable for plurisensitized patients, and highly immunogenic allergens cannot be used. To overcome these hurdles, we sought to induce regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg) specific to an exogenous antigen that could be later activated as needed in vivo to control allergic responses. We have established an experimental approach in which mice tolerized to ovalbumin (OVA) were sensitized to the Leishmania homolog of receptors for activated c kinase (LACK) antigen, and subsequently challenged with aerosols of LACK alone or LACK and OVA together. Upon OVA administration, AHR and allergic airway responses were strongly reduced. OVA-induced suppression was mediated by CD25(+) Treg, required CTLA-4 and ICOS signaling and resulted in decreased numbers of migrating airway dendritic cells leading to a strong impairment in the proliferation of allergen-specific Th2 cells. Therefore, inducing Treg specific to a therapeutic antigen that could be further activated in vivo may represent a safe and novel curative approach for allergic asthma. PMID:25425267

  1. Clinical and electrophysiological responses to dietary challenge in migraineurs.

    PubMed

    Lai, C W; Dean, P; Ziegler, D K; Hassanein, R S

    1989-03-01

    Thirty eight patients with a history of diet-induced migraine were studied with recording of clinical responses, electroencephalography in resting state, in response to photic stimulation, and to hyperventilation and visual evoked potentials. Tests were carried out on an initial baseline day and on a second day, after challenge with chocolate, red wine, cheese, and fasting. Lateralized headache occurred in sixteen subjects (42%), four with scintillating scotomata. Electroencephalograms were abnormal on Day 1 and/or Day 2 in twelve subjects (32%), most abnormalities being non-specific slow waves. In three cases there were paroxysmal features. Electroencephalographic response to hyperventilation was calibrated and was found to be exaggerated in eight subjects (21%) on either Day 1 or Day 2; such response was not related to the occurrence of a headache. Photic simulation showed high frequency driving response (so called "H" response) in all 16 individuals who developed headache but in only 14 out of 22 (64%) who did not (p less than 0.01). Pattern reversal visual evoked responses were normal and failed to show any difference in latency or amplitude between headache responders and non-responders. PMID:2708047

  2. Molecular characterization of recombinant T1, a non-allergenic periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) protein, with sequence similarity to the Bet v 1 plant allergen family.

    PubMed Central

    Laffer, Sylvia; Hamdi, Said; Lupinek, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Grote, Monika; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Scheiner, Otto; Kraft, Dietrich; Rideau, Marc; Valenta, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    More than 25% of the population suffer from Type I allergy, an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity disease. Allergens with homology to the major birch ( Betula verrucosa ) pollen allergen, Bet v 1, belong to the most potent elicitors of IgE-mediated allergies. T1, a cytokinin-inducible cytoplasmic periwinkle ( Catharanthus roseus ) protein, with significant sequence similarity to members of the Bet v 1 plant allergen family, was expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant T1 (rT1) did not react with IgE antibodies from allergic patients, and failed to induce basophil histamine release and immediate-type skin reactions in Bet v 1-allergic patients. Antibodies raised against purified rT1 could be used for in situ localization of natural T1 by immunogold electron microscopy, but did not cross-react with most of the Bet v 1-related allergens. CD analysis showed significant differences regarding secondary structure and thermal denaturation behaviour between rT1 and recombinant Bet v 1, suggesting that these structural differences are responsible for the different allergenicity of the proteins. T1 represents a non-allergenic member of the Bet v 1 family that may be used to study structural requirements of allergenicity and to engineer hypo-allergenic plants by replacing Bet v 1-related allergens for primary prevention of allergy. PMID:12656672

  3. Stability of patch test allergens.

    PubMed

    Joy, Nicole Marie; Rice, Kristen R; Atwater, Amber Reck

    2013-01-01

    Patch testing is widely used in evaluating suspected contact dermatitis. One major component of a quality patch test result is a dependable, predictable allergen supply. The allergen needs to be present at a sufficient concentration to elicit a reaction in an allergic patient. To better understand the stability of patch-test allergens, we completed a systematic review of the literature. We found that there is variability in stability among patch-test allergens and that although a few have been shown to be stable, many degrade when in storage. In most cases, expiration dates should be honored. In addition, allergen panels should be prepared as close to the time of patch test application as is possible. PMID:24030367

  4. Current Domain Challenges in the Emergency Response Community

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Burtner, Edwin R.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2011-05-08

    This paper describes the development of a framework targeted to technology providers in order to better understand the grand domain challenges of the emergency response and management community (EM). In developing this framework, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain and corroborated these findings with current literature. We are currently examining relationships and dependencies within the framework. A thorough understanding of these gaps and dependencies will allow for a more informed approach prioritizing research, developing tools, and applying technology to enhance performance in the EM community.

  5. Ecological Acclimation and Hydrologic Response: Problem Complexity and Modeling Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Srinivasan, V.; Le, P. V. V.; Drewry, D.

    2012-04-01

    Elevated CO2 in the atmosphere leads to a number of acclimatory responses in different vegetation types. These may be characterized as structural such as vegetation height or foliage density, ecophysiological such as reduction in stomatal conductance, and biochemical such as photosynthetic down-regulation. Furthermore, the allocation of assimilated carbon to different vegetation parts such as leaves, roots, stem and seeds is also altered such that empirical allometric relations are no longer valid. The extent and nature of these acclimatory responses vary between C3 and C4 vegetation and across species. These acclimatory responses have significant impact on hydrologic fluxes both pertaining to water and energy with the possibility of large-scale hydrologic influence. Capturing the pathways of acclimatory response to provide accurate ecohydrologic response predictions requires incorporating subtle relationships that are accentuated under elevated CO2. The talk will discuss the challenges of modeling these as well as applications to soybean, maize and bioenergy crops such as switchgrass and miscanthus.

  6. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. PMID:26725152

  7. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  8. Profiling the host response to malaria vaccination and malaria challenge.

    PubMed

    Dunachie, Susanna; Hill, Adrian V S; Fletcher, Helen A

    2015-09-29

    A vaccine for malaria is urgently required. The RTS,S vaccine represents major progress, but is only partially effective. Development of the next generation of highly effective vaccines requires elucidation of the protective immune response. Immunity to malaria is known to be complex, and pattern-based approaches such as global gene expression profiling are ideal for understanding response to vaccination and protection against disease. The availability of experimental sporozoite challenge in humans to test candidate malaria vaccines offers a precious opportunity unavailable for other current targets of vaccine research such as HIV, tuberculosis and Ebola. However, a limited number of transcriptional profiling studies in the context of malaria vaccine research have been published to date. This review outlines the background, existing studies, limits and opportunities for gene expression studies to accelerate malaria vaccine research. PMID:26256528

  9. Profiling the host response to malaria vaccination and malaria challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dunachie, Susanna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Fletcher, Helen A.

    2015-01-01

    A vaccine for malaria is urgently required. The RTS,S vaccine represents major progress, but is only partially effective. Development of the next generation of highly effective vaccines requires elucidation of the protective immune response. Immunity to malaria is known to be complex, and pattern-based approaches such as global gene expression profiling are ideal for understanding response to vaccination and protection against disease. The availability of experimental sporozoite challenge in humans to test candidate malaria vaccines offers a precious opportunity unavailable for other current targets of vaccine research such as HIV, tuberculosis and Ebola. However, a limited number of transcriptional profiling studies in the context of malaria vaccine research have been published to date. This review outlines the background, existing studies, limits and opportunities for gene expression studies to accelerate malaria vaccine research. PMID:26256528

  10. Bioinformatics Approaches to Classifying Allergens and Predicting Cross-Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Schein, Catherine H.; Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Braun, Werner

    2007-01-01

    The major advances in understanding why patients respond to several seemingly different stimuli have been through the isolation, sequencing and structural analysis of proteins that induce an IgE response. The most significant finding is that allergenic proteins from very different sources can have nearly identical sequences and structures, and that this similarity can account for clinically observed cross-reactivity. The increasing amount of information on the sequence, structure and IgE epitopes of allergens is now available in several databases and powerful bioinformatics search tools allow user access to relevant information. Here, we provide an overview of these databases and describe state-of-the art bioinformatics tools to identify the common proteins that may be at the root of multiple allergy syndromes. Progress has also been made in quantitatively defining characteristics that discriminate allergens from non-allergens. Search and software tools for this purpose have been developed and implemented in the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP, http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/). SDAP contains information for over 800 allergens and extensive bibliographic references in a relational database with links to other publicly available databases. SDAP is freely available on the Web to clinicians and patients, and can be used to find structural and functional relations among known allergens and to identify potentially cross-reacting antigens. Here we illustrate how these bioinformatics tools can be used to group allergens, and to detect areas that may account for common patterns of IgE binding and cross-reactivity. Such results can be used to guide treatment regimens for allergy sufferers. PMID:17276876

  11. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hiroaki; Yokooji, Tomoharu; Taogoshi, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut. PMID:26433529

  12. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse✩

    PubMed Central

    McAlexander, M. Allen; Gavett, Stephen H.; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  13. Vagotomy reverses established allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to methacholine in the mouse.

    PubMed

    McAlexander, M Allen; Gavett, Stephen H; Kollarik, Marian; Undem, Bradley J

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the role of vagal reflexes in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity. Mice were actively sensitized to ovalbumin then exposed to the allergen via inhalation. Prior to ovalbumin inhalation, mice also received intratracheally-instilled particulate matter in order to boost the allergic response. In control mice, methacholine (i.v.) caused a dose-dependent increase in respiratory tract resistance (RT) that only modestly decreased if the vagi were severed bilaterally just prior to the methacholine challenge. Sensitized and challenged mice, however, manifested an airway reactivity increase that was abolished by severing the vagi prior to methacholine challenge. In an innervated ex vivo mouse lung model, methacholine selectively evoked action potential discharge in a subset of distension-sensitive A-fibers. These data support the hypothesis that the major component of the increased airway reactivity in inflamed mice is due to a vagal reflex initiated by activation of afferent fibers, even in response to a direct (i.e., smooth muscle)-acting muscarinic agonist. PMID:25842220

  14. Mechanisms of allergen specific immunotherapy--T-cell tolerance and more.

    PubMed

    Jutel, M; Akdis, M; Blaser, K; Akdis, C A

    2006-07-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of tolerance are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. The balance between allergen-specific T-regulatory (Treg) cells and T helper 2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergic and healthy immune response against allergens. Treg cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific T helper 2 cells in allergic individuals. A decrease in interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 production by allergen-specific CD4+ T cells due to the induction of peripheral T cell tolerance is the most essential step in allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against the major allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, such as cytokines like IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and cell surface molecules like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1 and histamine receptor 2. There is considerable rationale for targeting T cells to increase efficacy of SIT. Such novel approaches include the use of modified allergens produced using recombinant DNA technology and adjuvants or additional drugs, which may increase the generation of allergen-specific peripheral tolerance. By the application of the recent knowledge in Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, more rational and safer approaches are awaiting for the future of prevention and cure of allergic diseases. PMID:16792576

  15. Grass Pollen Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Rosa; Hayward, Barbara J.

    1962-01-01

    Cocksfoot and Timothy pollen extracts are each found to contain at least fifteen components antigenic in rabbits. Most of these can also be allergens for man, but only a few are regularly so. These `principal' allergens have now been isolated in highly purified form. Procedures are given for a simple method of preparing extracts for clinical purposes and for the partial separation, concentration and purification of the allergens by means of differential extractions of the pollens and by means of ultrafiltration, isoelectric precipitation and salt fractionations (at acid and neutral pH) of the extracts. Isoelectric precipitations gave highly pigmented acid complexes, two of which moved as single sharp peaks at pH 7.4 in free electrophoresis, but proved to be hardly active by skin tests. Acid NaCl fractionation of the remainder resulted for Cocksfoot and Timothy in the isolation of a nearly white powder (T21.111121112 = T21B) which was weight for weight 1000–10,000 times as active as the pollen from which it had been derived. The powders have retained their activity for 7 years. By gel diffusion tests, they were found to contain two antigens (one in each preparation) which were immunologically partially related, but the Timothy preparation contained in addition the `innermost' `twin' antigens specific for Timothy that we had discovered previously in the crude extracts by gel diffusion methods. Skin reactions could be elicited in hay-fever subjects by prick tests with concentrations of 10-9–10-8 g./ml., which is equivalent to intradermal injections of 10-11–10-10 mg. and represents a 300-fold purification with respect to the concentrates of crude pollen extracts prepared by ultrafiltration and dialysis. Fractionation on DEAE-cellulose of one of the highly purified Timothy preparations (T21.11112112 = T21A) and other, crude Timothy and Cocksfoot extracts resulted in considerable and reproducible separation of the various antigens, with no indication of the

  16. Interactions of allergens and irritants in susceptible populations in producing lung dysfunction: implications for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, A T; Peters, S P

    2001-01-01

    Environmental agents, when applied in combination or sequentially, can induce a wide variety of adverse health effects in humans. To determine the effects of sequential allergen challenge and acid exposure on human bronchial epithelial cell function, we subjected normal, nonallergic control and ragweed-allergic individuals to bronchoscopic segmental ragweed challenge in vivo. We harvested bronchial epithelial cells by brush biopsy both before challenge and 24 hr after challenge and exposed cells to an acid stress in vitro (pH 5 for 3 hr), followed by a 1-hr recovery period at normal pH. In normal, nonallergic subjects, segmental allergen challenge produced no effects on ciliary activity; pH 5 exposure produced reduced ciliary activity (a decrease in the percent of the initially active area), with significant recovery after cells were returned to a normal pH. Ciliary activity from allergic subjects was also inhibited by pH 5 exposure; however, activity was not recovered when cells were placed in medium of normal pH. Ciliary activity in allergics who developed a stress response postantigen challenge, as determined by an induction of the 27 kDa stress (heat shock) protein, displayed no ciliary dysfunction when exposed to a pH 5 stress. In this case, a stress sufficient to provoke a heat shock (stress) protein (HSP) response (but not one that produced more severe lung injury and did not provoke an HSP response) protected cells from a subsequent acid stress. Because of our observations and recent findings reported in the literature, we suggest that in order to define the wide variety of health effects of environmental agents, control as well as at-risk populations should be studied and the ability to define potentially beneficial as well as detrimental effects should be built into the experimental design. Inclusion of different and novel end points also should be considered. PMID:11544171

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  18. Comparison of allergen-induced changes in bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation between mildly allergic asthma patients and allergic rhinitis patients.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M J; Olaguibel, J M; Garcia, B E; Tabar, A I; Urbiola, E

    2000-06-01

    Bronchial eosinophilic inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) are the main features of allergic asthma (AA), but they have also been demonstrated in allergic rhinitis (AR), suggesting a continuity between both diseases. In spite of not fully reproducing natural allergenic exposure, the allergen bronchial provocation test (A-BPT) has provided important knowledge of the pathophysiology of AA. Our aim was to verify the existence of a behavior of AA and AR airways different from the allergen bronchial challenge-induced airway eosinophilic inflammation and BHR changes. We studied a group of 31 mild and short-evolution AA and 15 AR patients, sensitized to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. The A-BPT was performed with a partially biologically standardized D. pteronyssinus extract, and known quantities of Der p 1 were inhaled. Peripheral blood (eosinophils and ECP) and induced sputum (percentage cell counts, ECP, albumin, tryptase, and interleukin [IL]-5) were analyzed, before and 24 h after A-BPT. Methacholine BHR, assessed before and 32 h after the A-BPT, was defined by M-PD20 values and, when possible, by maximal response plateau (MRP). The A-BPT was well tolerated by all the patients. AA presented a lower Der p 1 PD20 and a higher occurrence of late-phase responses (LPR). M-PD20 values decreased in AA, but not in AR, patients. MRP values increased in both groups. Eosinophils numbers and ECP levels increased in blood and sputum from both AA and AR, but only the absolute increment of sputum ECP levels was higher in AA than AR patients (P = 0.025). The A-BPT induced no change in sputum albumin, tryptase, or IL-5 values. We conclude as follows: 1) In spite of presenting a lower degree of bronchial sensitivity to allergen, AR patients responded to allergen inhalation with an eosinophilic inflammation enhancement very similar to that observed among AA. 2) MRP levels increased in both AA and AR patients after allergen challenge; however, M-PD20 values

  19. Gas exchange responses to bronchodilators following methacholine challenge in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roisin, R; Bencowitz, H Z; Ziegler, M G; Wagner, P D

    1984-10-01

    To determine how and why different bronchodilators affect ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) relationships differently in experimental asthma, 10 anesthetized dogs were exposed 3 times each (2-1/2 h apart) to aerosolized 1% methacholine over 3 to 5 min. Mechanical, hemodynamic, gas exchange, and catecholamine concentration measurements were made before challenge, and 10, 20, 30, and 135 min after challenge. Fifteen min after challenge the dogs were exposed to aerosolized epinephrine, isoproterenol, salbutamol, or isotonic saline in random order. The worsened V/Q inequality after isoproterenol paralleled increased cardiac output (QT) and decreased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Because of increased QT, arterial PO2 (PaO2) did not fall in spite of the increased V/Q inequality. After administration of isoproterenol, improvement in air-flow obstruction was always associated with significantly less increase in mean PaO2 and more V/Q inequality than after saline. After epinephrine and salbutamol a similar significant decrease in airflow obstruction was associated with only slightly more V/Q mismatching than after saline. The effects of epinephrine on low V/Q ratio areas, shunt, PaO2, QT, heart rate, and PVR were less and of shorter duration than those of isoproterenol. Salbutamol resulted in changes similar to but more persistent than those induced by epinephrine. All variables approached prechallenge values within 2 h after bronchodilator administration, regardless of agent used. These studies show that in a repeatable canine asthma model, randomized administration of epinephrine, isoproterenol, and salbutamol produce different gas exchange responses in spite of similar improvements in air-flow obstruction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6435488

  20. Carers' Responses to Challenging Behaviour: A Comparison of Responses to Named and Unnamed Vignettes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dagnan, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Background: The evidence supporting the application of Weiner's motivational model of helping to the behaviour of carers' of people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour is inconsistent. One suggested reason for this is that many studies use stimuli that might generate different responses from those to actual instances of…

  1. Implementation challenges in translating pivotal response training into community settings.

    PubMed

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Stahmer, Aubyn C; Reed, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Reisinger, Erica; Mandell, David

    2013-12-01

    Implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) for children with autism is challenging for teachers because these practices are often complex, requiring significant training and resources that are not available in most school settings. This brief investigation was designed to identify areas of strength and difficulty for teachers implementing one such EBP, pivotal response training (PRT). Observational data were gathered from 41 teachers participating in two separate investigations involving PRT. Despite differences in training procedures, teachers demonstrated similarities in areas of strength (clear opportunities/instruction and child choice) and difficulty (turn taking and multiple cues). These findings suggest next steps toward systematic adaptation of PRT for classroom use. The research may serve as a model for the process of adapting EBPs for practice settings. PMID:23619949

  2. Pollen Allergens for Molecular Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Pablos, Isabel; Wildner, Sabrina; Asam, Claudia; Wallner, Michael; Gadermaier, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Pollen allergens are one of the main causes of type I allergies affecting up to 30 % of the population in industrialized countries. Climatic changes affect the duration and intensity of pollen seasons and may together with pollution contribute to increased incidences of respiratory allergy and asthma. Allergenic grasses, trees, and weeds often present similar habitats and flowering periods compromising clinical anamnesis. Molecule-based approaches enable distinction between genuine sensitization and clinically mostly irrelevant IgE cross-reactivity due to, e. g., panallergens or carbohydrate determinants. In addition, sensitivity as well as specificity can be improved and lead to identification of the primary sensitizing source which is particularly beneficial regarding polysensitized patients. This review gives an overview on relevant pollen allergens and their usefulness in daily practice. Appropriate allergy diagnosis is directly influencing decisions for therapeutic interventions, and thus, reliable biomarkers are pivotal when considering allergen immunotherapy in the context of precision medicine. PMID:27002515

  3. Cockroach allergy and allergen-specific immunotherapy in asthma: Potential and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Bassirpour, Gillian; Zoratti, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide a summary and discussion of cockroach allergy and clinical trials of cockroach allergen immunotherapy. Recent findings Cockroach allergen exposure among sensitized children is increasingly recognized as a key factor contributing to asthma morbidity. Recent trials suggest that cockroach immunotherapy has promise as a treatment strategy with studies demonstrating immunomodulatory and clinical effects. However, a few obstacles need to be overcome to realize the full potential of this treatment modality as cockroach allergic patients often exhibit complex sensitization patterns to multiple cockroach-associated proteins and an immunodominant allergen has not been identified. These factors have made it difficult to produce standardized cockroach allergen extracts that are potent and provide the broad allergen profiles needed for optimal treatment. There have been important advances in the identification and cloning of cockroach allergens and several strategies are being developed to provide therapeutic cockroach allergen products with enhanced clinical efficacy. Summary Allergen immunotherapy has the capability of modulating the immune response to cockroach allergen and has potential as a valuable treatment modality. Further studies of the clinical efficacy along with the development of improved therapeutic products are needed to advance our knowledge and realize the full potential of this promising therapy. PMID:25144264

  4. House dust exposure mediates gut microbiome Lactobacillus enrichment and airway immune defense against allergens and virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Kei E; Demoor, Tine; Rauch, Marcus; Faruqi, Ali A; Jang, Sihyug; Johnson, Christine C; Boushey, Homer A; Zoratti, Edward; Ownby, Dennis; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Lynch, Susan V

    2014-01-14

    Exposure to dogs in early infancy has been shown to reduce the risk of childhood allergic disease development, and dog ownership is associated with a distinct house dust microbial exposure. Here, we demonstrate, using murine models, that exposure of mice to dog-associated house dust protects against ovalbumin or cockroach allergen-mediated airway pathology. Protected animals exhibited significant reduction in the total number of airway T cells, down-regulation of Th2-related airway responses, as well as mucin secretion. Following dog-associated dust exposure, the cecal microbiome of protected animals was extensively restructured with significant enrichment of, amongst others, Lactobacillus johnsonii. Supplementation of wild-type animals with L. johnsonii protected them against both airway allergen challenge or infection with respiratory syncytial virus. L. johnsonii-mediated protection was associated with significant reductions in the total number and proportion of activated CD11c(+)/CD11b(+) and CD11c(+)/CD8(+) cells, as well as significantly reduced airway Th2 cytokine expression. Our results reveal that exposure to dog-associated household dust results in protection against airway allergen challenge and a distinct gastrointestinal microbiome composition. Moreover, the study identifies L. johnsonii as a pivotal species within the gastrointestinal tract capable of influencing adaptive immunity at remote mucosal surfaces in a manner that is protective against a variety of respiratory insults. PMID:24344318

  5. Prophylactic mRNA Vaccination against Allergy Confers Long-Term Memory Responses and Persistent Protection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hattinger, E.; Scheiblhofer, S.; Roesler, E.; Thalhamer, T.; Thalhamer, J.; Weiss, R.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, mRNA vaccines have been introduced as a safety-optimized alternative to plasmid DNA-based vaccines for protection against allergy. However, it remained unclear whether the short persistence of this vaccine type would limit memory responses and whether the protective immune response type would be maintained during recurrent exposure to allergen. We tested the duration of protective memory responses in mice vaccinated with mRNA encoding the grass pollen allergen Phl p 5 by challenging them with recombinant allergen, 3.5, 6, and 9 months after vaccination. In a second experiment, vaccinated mice were repeatedly challenged monthly with aerosolized allergen over a period of 7 months. Antibody and cytokine responses as well as lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were assessed. mRNA vaccination induced robust TH1 memory responses for at least 9 months. Vaccination efficiently suppressed TH2 cytokines, IgE responses, and lung eosinophilia. Protection was maintained after repeated exposure to aerosolized allergen and no TH1 associated pathology was observed. Lung function remained improved compared to nonvaccinated controls. Our data clearly indicate that mRNA vaccination against Phl p 5 induces robust, long-lived memory responses, which can be recalled by allergen exposure without side effects. mRNA vaccines fulfill the requirements for safe prophylactic vaccination without the need for booster immunizations. PMID:26557723

  6. In silico allergenicity prediction of several lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Garino, Cristiano; Coïsson, Jean Daniel; Arlorio, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) are common allergens and they are particularly widespread within the plant kingdom. They have a highly conserved three-dimensional structure that generate a strong cross-reactivity among the members of this family. In the last years several web tools for the prediction of allergenicity of new molecules based on their homology with known allergens have been released, and guidelines to assess potential allergenicity of proteins through bioinformatics have been established. Even if such tools are only partially reliable yet, they can provide important indications when other kinds of molecular characterization are lacking. The potential allergenicity of 28 amino acid sequences of LTPs homologs, either retrieved from the UniProt database or in silico deduced from the corresponding EST coding sequence, was predicted using 7 publicly available web tools. Moreover, their similarity degree to their closest known LTP allergens was calculated, in order to evaluate their potential cross-reactivity. Finally, all sequences were studied for their identity degree with the peach allergen Pru p 3, considering the regions involved in the formation of its known conformational IgE-binding epitope. Most of the analyzed sequences displayed a high probability to be allergenic according to all the software employed. The analyzed LTPs from bell pepper, cassava, mango, mungbean and soybean showed high homology (>70%) with some known allergenic LTPs, suggesting a potential risk of cross-reactivity for sensitized individuals. Other LTPs, like for example those from canola, cassava, mango, mungbean, papaya or persimmon, displayed a high degree of identity with Pru p 3 within the consensus sequence responsible for the formation, at three-dimensional level, of its major conformational epitope. Since recent studies highlighted how in patients mono-sensitized to peach LTP the levels of IgE seem directly proportional to the chance of developing cross

  7. Review on immunotherapy in airway allergen sensitised patients.

    PubMed

    van der Valk, J P M; de Jong, N W; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2015-07-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a more than 100-year-old treatment in particular for birch pollen, grass pollen, house dust mite and cat dander sensitised allergic patients. The mechanism of allergen-specific immunotherapy is complex. Different hypotheses have been postulated to explain the mode of action, such as a decrease of the number of tissue mast cells, eosinophils and basophils, an increase of IgG4 and IgA synthesis, a shift from Th2 to Th1 cells and an increase in the number and function of IL-10 producing T-regulatory cells (T-reg). All these immunological effects may contribute to immune tolerance and long-term changes in the immune system. The efficacy and safety of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with pollen and house dust mite have been investigated in many trials, meta-analyses and reviews. Nowadays grass pollen SLIT and SCIT, and birch pollen and house dust mite SCIT are implemented in clinical practice to treat therapy-resistant patients. However, the treatment is not effective for all patients and often not without side effects. Therefore, the development of new, safer and more effective immunotherapies is needed. These are approached along novel routes, including improved administration, combined treatment with immune response modifiers, fusion with immune response modifiers, allergen coupled to adjuvants and reconstruction of natural extracts with multiple recombinant allergens or with modified allergens. These developments are promising, but more research is required to implement them in clinical practice. PMID:26228190

  8. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  9. Pneumococcal components induce regulatory T cells that attenuate the development of allergic airways disease by deviating and suppressing the immune response to allergen.

    PubMed

    Thorburn, Alison N; Brown, Alexandra C; Nair, Prema M; Chevalier, Nina; Foster, Paul S; Gibson, Peter G; Hansbro, Philip M

    2013-10-15

    The induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress aberrant inflammation and immunity has potential as a therapeutic strategy for asthma. Recently, we identified key immunoregulatory components of Streptococcus pneumoniae, type 3 polysaccharide and pneumolysoid (T+P), which suppress allergic airways disease (AAD) in mouse models of asthma. To elucidate the mechanisms of suppression, we have now performed a thorough examination of the role of Tregs. BALB/c mice were sensitized to OVA (day 0) i.p. and challenged intranasal (12-15 d later) to induce AAD. T+P was administered intratracheally at the time of sensitization in three doses (0, 12, and 24 h). T+P treatment induced an early (36 h-4 d) expansion of Tregs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and later (12-16 d) increases in these cells in the lungs, compared with untreated allergic controls. Anti-CD25 treatment showed that Treg-priming events involving CD25, CCR7, IL-2, and TGF-β were required for the suppression of AAD. During AAD, T+P-induced Tregs in the lungs displayed a highly suppressive phenotype and had an increased functional capacity. T+P also blocked the induction of IL-6 to prevent the Th17 response, attenuated the expression of the costimulatory molecule CD86 on myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and reduced the number of DCs carrying OVA in the lung and mediastinal lymph nodes. Therefore, bacterial components (T+P) drive the differentiation of highly suppressive Tregs, which suppress the Th2 response, prevent the Th17 response and disable the DC response resulting in the effective suppression of AAD. PMID:24048894

  10. Modification of house dust mite allergens by monomethoxypolyethylene glycol. Allergenicity measured by in vitro and in vivo methods.

    PubMed

    Mosbech, H; Dreborg, S; Påhlman, I; Stahl Skov, P; Steringer, I; Weeke, B

    1988-01-01

    In animal models, allergen modification by coupling to monomethoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) molecules can reduce allergenicity of the extract and makes the allergen capable of suppressing boosted IgE response. To investigate in a human system the degree of attenuation implied by a mPEG modification of a house dust mite (Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus) extract, 55 adults with asthma caused by house dust mites were tested by skin prick test (SPT) and histamine release assay (HR). RAST inhibition was performed on sera from 6 additional patients. Modified extract containing 0.42 mmol mPEG/g protein was used for the analyses. In order to get the same response of the two extracts when assessed by HR and SPT, a median increase in concentration of 10-fold of the mPEG-modified extract compared to the unmodified extract was needed. Interindividual variation was limited. Sixty-four to 72% needed a dose increase within +/- half a decade from this value. In 42-49% of the patients, results from SPT and HR deviated less than half a decade. The relative potency of the modified extract as measured by RAST inhibition was reduced to 17-78% (mean 39%). Reduced allergenicity would by itself mean less side effects in immunotherapy. When planning such therapy it is important to know that mPEG modification reduces the allergenicity to a similar extent in a majority of patients. PMID:2448247

  11. Use of a Canine Model of Atopic Dermatitis to Investigate the Efficacy of a CCR4 Antagonist in Allergen-Induced Skin Inflammation in a Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Murray, Clare; Ahrens, Kim; Devalaraja, Matt; Dymond, Mike; Fagura, Malbinder; Hargreaves, Adam; Holt, Alison; Peers, Ian; Price, Sally; Reens, Jaimini; Riley, Rob; Marsella, Rosanna

    2016-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by infiltration of skin homing lymphocytes into the dermis. Most of these lymphocytes express the chemokine receptor CCR4, and the frequency of blood CCR4(+) lymphocytes correlates with AD disease severity. Canine AD is a pruritic inflammatory condition that shows many features of the human disease, including CCR4 overexpression. Therefore, we tested a potent selective CCR4 antagonist in an allergen challenge model of canine AD, both clinically and histologically, to investigate whether this chemokine pathway plays a role in the inflammatory response. Using a four-period randomized cross-over study design, 14 beagles were challenged with allergen and clinically monitored. Biopsy samples were taken before and after allergen challenge. A clear reduction of clinical scores was observed with oral prednisolone (P < 0.0001) but not for the CCR4 inhibitor. A subset of the dogs (5/13) showed partial inhibition (30-49%) of the clinical signs with CCR4 inhibitor treatment, and this finding was supported by the results of histopathologic analysis of skin biopsy samples. This partial response is consistent with redundancy in chemokine pathways and highlights the need for therapies blocking multiple pathways. This study shows the utility of this canine model of AD for testing new therapeutic agents. PMID:26876716

  12. Crystal structure of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Profilins from numerous species are known to be allergens, including food allergens, such as peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergen Ara h 5, and pollen allergens, such as birch allergen Bet v 2. Patients with pollen allergy can also cross-react to peanut. Structural characterization of allergens will al...

  13. Challenges and Opportunities in Geocuration for Disaster Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Burks, J. E.; McGrath, K.; Ramachandran, R.; Goodman, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Following a significant disaster event, a wide range of resources and science teams are leveraged to aid in the response effort. Often, these efforts include the acquisition and use of non-traditional data sets, or the generation of prototyped products using new image analysis techniques. These efforts may also include acquisition and hosting of remote sensing data sets from domestic and international partners - from the public or private sector - which differ from standard remote sensing holdings, or may be accompanied by specific licensing agreements that limit their use and dissemination. In addition, at time periods well beyond the initial disaster event, other science teams may incorporate airborne or field campaign measurements that support the assessment of damage but also acquire information necessary to address key science questions about the specific disaster or a broader category of similar events. The immediate need to gather data and provide information to the response effort can result in large data holdings that require detailed curation to improve the efficiency of response efforts, but also ensure that collected data can be used on a longer time scale to address underlying science questions. Data collected in response to a disaster event may be thought of as a "field campaign" - consisting of traditional data sets managed through physical or virtual holdings, but also a larger number of ad hoc data collections, derived products, and metadata, including the potential for airborne or ground-based data collections. Appropriate metadata and documentation are needed to ensure that derived products have traceability to their source data, along with documentation of algorithm authors, versions, and outcomes so that others can reproduce their results, and to ensure that data sets remain available and well-documented for longer-term analysis that may in turn create new products relevant to understanding a type of disaster, or support future recovery efforts

  14. Broadening Our Understanding and Assessment of Personal and Social Responsibility: A Challenge to Researchers and Practitioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trosset, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Higher education literature has focused narrowly on social responsibility to the exclusion of personal responsibility. This chapter challenges higher education researchers and practitioners to include behaviors related to personal responsibility in their research and educational agendas.

  15. Active Ageing in CIS Countries: Semantics, Challenges, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Alexandre; Zaidi, Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Although the CIS countries are connected together by the legacy of breaking away from the Soviet Union, they have had a distinctive transition course and are rather diverse in terms of the population ageing challenges and policy responses in place. The commonality is that a comprehensive national strategy on ageing is lacking, and many of necessary reforms were put aside owing to political uncertainties, lack of societal consensus, and financial instability. The notion of active ageing is associated with the term “accelerated ageing,” which is understood to be an individual living a life under harsh living conditions or a society experiencing rapid increases in the relative number of older persons, and therefore it carries a negative connotation. Yet, in the same spirit as the European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations 2012, the CIS countries have initiated sectoral programmes towards enhancing employment of older workers, social participation of older people in the society in a wider sense and also measures promoting health and independent living of older persons. PMID:23346109

  16. Mentoring health researchers globally: Diverse experiences, programmes, challenges and responses.

    PubMed

    Cole, Donald C; Johnson, Nancy; Mejia, Raul; McCullough, Hazel; Turcotte-Tremblay, Anne-Marie; Barnoya, Joaquin; Falabella Luco, María Soledad

    2016-10-01

    Mentoring experiences and programmes are becoming increasingly recognised as important by those engaged in capacity strengthening in global health research. Using a primarily qualitative study design, we studied three experiences of mentorship and eight mentorship programmes for early career global health researchers based in high-income and low- and middle-income countries. For the latter, we drew upon programme materials, existing unpublished data and more formal mixed-method evaluations, supplemented by individual email questionnaire responses. Research team members wrote stories, and the team assembled and analysed them for key themes. Across the diverse experiences and programmes, key emergent themes included: great mentors inspire others in an inter-generational cascade, mentorship is transformative in personal and professional development and involves reciprocity, and finding the right balance in mentoring relationships and programmes includes responding creatively to failure. Among the challenges encountered were: struggling for more level playing fields for new health researchers globally, changing mindsets in institutions that do not have a culture of mentorship and building collaboration not competition. Mentoring networks spanning institutions and countries using multiple virtual and face-to-face methods are a potential avenue for fostering organisational cultures supporting quality mentorship in global health research. PMID:26234691

  17. Household Arthropod Allergens in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong

    2009-01-01

    Arthropods are important in human health, which can transmit pathogens to humans, parasitize, or produce important allergens. Allergy prevalence becomes higher in Korea recently as well as other developed countries in contrast to a decrease of infectious diseases. Allergic diseases caused by household arthropods have increased dramatically during the last few decades since human beings spend more their time for indoor activities in modernized life style. Household arthropods are one of the most common causes of allergic diseases. Biological characterization of household arthropods and researches on their allergens will provide better understanding of the pathogenesis of allergic diseases and suggest new therapeutic ways. Therefore, studies on arthropods of allergenic importance can be considered one of the major research areas in medical arthropodology and parasitology. Here, the biology of several household arthropods, including house dust mites and cockroaches, the 2 most well known arthropods living indoor together with humans worldwide, and characteristics of their allergens, especially the research activities on these allergens performed in Korea, are summarized. PMID:19885330

  18. Recombinant allergens for specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Oliver; Häfner, Dietrich; Nandy, Andreas

    2011-04-01

    Recombinant DNA technology provides the means for producing allergens that are equivalent to their natural counterparts and also genetically engineered variants with reduced IgE-binding activity. The proteins are produced as chemically defined molecules with consistent structural and immunologic properties. Several hundred allergens have been cloned and expressed as recombinant proteins, and these provide the means for making a very detailed diagnosis of a patient's sensitization profile. Clinical development programs are now in progress to assess the suitability of recombinant allergens for both subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy. Recombinant hypoallergenic variants, which are developed with the aim of increasing the doses that can be administered while at the same time reducing the risks for therapy-associated side effects, are also in clinical trials for subcutaneous immunotherapy. Grass and birch pollen preparations have been shown to be clinically effective, and studies with various other allergens are in progress. Personalized or patient-tailored immunotherapy is still a very distant prospect, but the first recombinant products based on single allergens or defined mixtures could reach the market within the next 5 years. PMID:21377719

  19. Categorisation of protein respiratory allergens: the case of Subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Basketter, David A

    2014-04-01

    Characterisation of the relative sensitizing potency of protein and chemical allergens remains challenging, particularly for materials causing allergic sensitization of the respiratory tract. There nevertheless remains an appetite, for priority setting and risk management, to develop paradigms that distinguish between individual respiratory allergens according to perceptions of the hazards and risks posed to human health. One manifestation thereof is recent listing of certain respiratory allergens as Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) under the provisions of REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals). Although priority setting is a laudable ambition, it is important the process is predicated on evidence-based criteria that are transparent, understood and owned. The danger is that in the absence of rigorous criteria unwanted precedents can be created, and confidence in the process is compromised. A default categorisation of sensitisers as SVHC requiring assessment under the authorisation process is not desirable. We therefore consider here the value and limitations of selective assignment of certain respiratory allergens as being SVHC. The difficulties of sustaining such designations in a sound and equitable way is discussed in the context of the challenges that exist with respect to assessment of potency, and information available regarding the effectiveness of exposure-based risk management. PMID:24534002

  20. Ethosome formulations of known contact allergens can increase their sensitizing capacity.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jacob Torp; Vogel, Stefan; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Simonsson, Carl; Johansen, Jeanne D; Andersen, Klaus E

    2010-07-01

    Vesicular systems, such as liposomes and ethosomes, are used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical products to encapsulate ingredients, to protect ingredients from degradation, to increase bioavailability, and to improve cosmetic performance. Some reports have suggested that formulation of cosmetic ingredients in vesicular carrier systems may increase their contact allergy elicitation potential in humans. However, no sensitization studies have been published. We formulated two model contact allergens (isoeugenol and dinitrochlorobenzene) in ethosomes and investigated the sensitization response using a modified local lymph node assay (LLNA). The results were compared with those for the same allergens in similar concentrations and vehicles without ethosomes. Both allergens encapsulated in 200-300 nm ethosomes showed increased sensitizing potency in the murine assay compared with the allergens in solution without ethosomes. Empty ethosomes were non-sensitizing according to LLNA. The clinical implications are so far uncertain, but increased allergenicity from ethosome-encapsulated topical product ingredients cannot be excluded. PMID:20574602

  1. Removing peanut allergens by tannic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tannic acid (TA) is known to bind and form insoluble complexes with proteins, including peanut allergens; however, whether such complexes would dissociate and release the allergens at pH 2 and 8 (i.e., gastric and intestinal pH) is not clear. Release of the allergens in the gut could lead to absorpt...

  2. CLINICALLY RELEVANT IGE-CROSS-REACTIVITY OF NUT ALLERGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    All data resulting from this study will be catalogued in SDAP .This work will generate important information relating the structure/ physicochemical properties of cross-reactive IgE epitopes to clinical response, and model factors that underlie allergen recognition by the immu...

  3. Identification and characterization of major cat allergen Fel d 1 mimotopes on filamentous phage carriers.

    PubMed

    Luzar, Jernej; Molek, Peter; Šilar, Mira; Korošec, Peter; Košnik, Mitja; Štrukelj, Borut; Lunder, Mojca

    2016-03-01

    Cat allergy is one of the most prevalent allergies worldwide and can lead to the development of rhinitis and asthma. Thus far, only allergen extracts from natural sources have been used for allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, extracts and whole allergens in immunotherapy present an anaphylaxis risk. Identification of allergen epitopes or mimotopes has an important role in development of safe and effective allergen-specific immunotherapy. Moreover, with a suitable immunogenic carrier, the absence of sufficient immune response elicited by short peptides could be surmounted. In this study, we identified five structural mimotopes of the major cat allergen Fel d 1 by immunoscreening with random peptide phage libraries. The mimotopes were computationally mapped to the allergen surface, and their IgE reactivity was confirmed using sera from cat-allergic patients. Importantly, the mimotopes showed no basophil activation of the corresponding cat-allergic patients, which makes them good candidates for the development of hypoallergenic vaccine. As bacteriophage particles are becoming increasingly recognized as immunogenic carriers, we constructed bacteriophage particles displaying multiple copies of each selected mimotope on major phage coat protein. These constructed phages elicited T cell-mediated immune response, which was predominated by the type 1 T cell response. Mimotopes alone contributed to the type 1 T cell response by promoting IL-2 production. Fel d 1 mimotopes, as well as their filamentous phage immunogenic carriers, represent promising candidates in the development of hypoallergenic vaccine against cat allergy. PMID:26908079

  4. Determinants of efficacy and safety in epicutaneous allergen immunotherapy: summary of three clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Senti, G; von Moos, S; Tay, F; Graf, N; Johansen, P; Kündig, T M

    2015-01-01

    The results of our third trial on epicutaneous allergen-specific immunotherapy (EPIT) will be presented and discussed in the context of our previous trials. This monocentric, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase I/IIa trial included 98 patients with grass pollen rhinoconjunctivitis. Prior to the pollen season 2009, patients received six patches (allergen extract: n = 48; placebo: n = 50) with weekly intervals, administered onto tape-stripped skin. Allergen EPIT produced a median symptom improvement of 48% in 2009 and 40% in the treatment-free follow-up year 2010 as compared to 10% and 15% improvement after placebo EPIT (P = 0.003). After allergen EPIT but not placebo EPIT, conjunctival allergen reactivity was significantly decreased and allergen-specific IgG4 responses were significantly elevated (P < 0.001). In conclusion, our three EPIT trials found that allergen EPIT can ameliorate hay fever symptoms. Overall, treatment efficacy appears to be determined by the allergen dose. Local side-effects are determined by the duration of patch administration, while risk of systemic allergic side-effects is related to the degree of stratum corneum disruption. PMID:25704072

  5. Fish Allergens at a Glance: Variable Allergenicity of Parvalbumins, the Major Fish Allergens

    PubMed Central

    Kuehn, Annette; Swoboda, Ines; Arumugam, Karthik; Hilger, Christiane; Hentges, François

    2014-01-01

    Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand, some individuals have IgE antibodies directed against unique, species-specific parvalbumin epitopes, and these patients show clinical symptoms only with certain fish species. Furthermore, different parvalbumin isoforms and isoallergens are present in the same fish and might display variable allergenicity. This was shown for salmon homologs, where only a single parvalbumin (beta-1) isoform was identified as allergen in specific patients. In addition to the parvalbumins, several other fish proteins, enolases, aldolases, and fish gelatin, seem to be important allergens. New clinical and molecular insights advanced the knowledge and understanding of fish allergy in the last years. These findings were useful for the advancement of the IgE-based diagnosis and also for the management of fish allergies consisting of advice and treatment of fish-allergic patients. PMID:24795722

  6. Allergenic compounds on the inner and outer surfaces of natural latex gloves: MALDI mass spectrometry and imaging of proteinous allergens.

    PubMed

    Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2009-01-01

    Natural latex gloves are the cause of a severe health problem to an increasing number of healthcare workers or patients due to the presence of protein allergens as Hevein or Rubber Elongation Factor (REF). One of the most challenging problems is the in situ localization of theses allergens in, e.g. gloves, to estimate the allergenic potential of the latex material. A sample preparation protocol applying a binary matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) matrix containing alpha-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHCA) and 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHB) on trifluoro acetic acid (TFA) etched latex glove surfaces allowed the direct determination (exact molecular weight) of Hevein, REF and a truncated form of REF (tREF) within nine different brands of natural latex gloves by means of MALDI-TOF-MS in the linear mode. MALDI mass spectrometry demonstrated that Hevein, tREF and REF were present on the inner surfaces (in direct contact with the skin) of many, but not all, investigated gloves without any prior extraction procedure. Additionally, different isoforms of the allergen Hevein were detected (exhibiting ragged C-termini). tREF and REF could always be detected beside each other, but were not observed on every latex glove sample, which contained Hevein. It was also demonstrated that there is a significant difference in terms of proteins and polymers between inner and outer surfaces of gloves, which helps to explain the different allergenic potential of these.MALDI imaging allowed for the first time the unambiguous localization of all three allergens in parallel and showed that Hevein was present on 36% of the investigated area of a latex glove with a certain localization, whereupon, tREF and REF were only found on 25% of the investigated material. PMID:18720446

  7. Guidelines for the use of allergen immunotherapy. Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To recommend guidelines for the use of allergen immunotherapy to treat allergies in patients for whom allergen avoidance and drug therapy have not been sufficiently effective. OPTIONS: High-dose or low-dose allergen immunotherapy for the treatment of IgE-mediated allergy to insect stings, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. OUTCOMES: Clinical evaluation of symptoms, objective measurement of reactions to nasal or bronchial allergen challenge, immunologic changes as a result of allergen immunotherapy and, among patients with anaphylactic reactions to stinging insects, clinical outcome of intentional sting challenge. EVIDENCE: A search of MEDLINE was conducted to identify articles that presented results of allergen immunotherapy. Proceedings of symposia held by international subcommittees and of consensus meetings, as well as references obtained from these sources, were reviewed. The articles were grouped according to their main subject: immunologic effects, specific allergies, the results of randomized placebo-controlled clinical trials, types of allergen extract and protocols for allergen immunotherapy, adverse effects and deficiencies of allergen immunotherapy. VALUES: Each member of the working group assessed the importance of such issues as basic immunologic effects, clinical efficacy, adverse effects and inappropriate use; the working group then arrived at a consensus. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Implementation of these guidelines would lead to the appropriate use of allergen immunotherapy and control inappropriate treatment, which could result in adverse effects and increased costs of services for patients with allergies. RECOMMENDATIONS: Allergen immunotherapy with specific, standardized allergenic materials, administered in high-dose schedules, is effective in patients with an allergy to insect stings or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, and in some patients with asthma, who have been correctly diagnosed through a meticulous history corroborated

  8. Allergen-triggered airway hyperresponsiveness and lung pathology in mice sensitized with the biopesticide Metarhizium anisopliae.

    PubMed

    Ward, M D; Madison, S L; Sailstad, D M; Gavett, S H; Selgrade, M K

    2000-02-21

    Metarhizium anisopliae is an entomopathogenic fungus recently licensed for indoor control of cockroaches, a major source of allergens. While M. anisopliae has been shown to be non-infectious and non-toxic to mammals there has been only limited research on potential allergenicity. Using a mouse model, we previously demonstrated allergic immune and inflammatory responses to this agent. The present study was designed to determine whether these responses were associated with changes in pulmonary responses, lung pathology, and the cytokine profile in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Soluble factors from fungal components were combined in equal protein amounts to form M. anisopliae crude antigen (MACA). BALB/C mice were intratracheally (i.t.) challenged with 10 microg MACA 14 days post intraperitoneal sensitization with 25 microg fungal antigen in aluminum hydroxide adjuvant. Physiological and cellular changes were examined. The mice were tested for airway hyperresponsiveness before (No Chal) and after (1, 3, and 8 days post challenge (DPIT)) MACA IT challenge. Subsequently, serum, BALF and the lungs were harvested. All treatment groups concurrently demonstrated significant non-specific pulmonary inflammation (neutrophil influx) and increased pulmonary sensitivity to methacholine (Mch) at 1 DPIT MACA challenge. Where as both adjuvant treated and naïve mice airway responses had returned to near normal levels by 3 DPIT, mice which were previously sensitized with MACA were still hyperresponsive to Mch challenge at 3 and 8 DPIT. This hyperresponsiveness correlates with eosinophil and lymphocyte influx, which is maximal at 3 DPIT and still elevated at 8 DPIT. Interleukin (IL) 5 was elevated for all treatment groups at 1 DPIT but only the MACA sensitized mice maintained elevated levels for both 3 and 8 DPIT. Furthermore, MACA sensitized mice had a more extensive inflammatory histopathology at all examined time points with peribronchial and perivascular infiltrates, like

  9. Treatment with 8-OH-modified adenine (TLR7 ligand)-allergen conjugates decreases T helper type 2-oriented murine airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nencini, Francesca; Pratesi, Sara; Petroni, Giulia; Filì, Lucia; Cardilicchia, Elisa; Casini, Andrea; Occhiato, Ernesto Giovanni; Calosi, Laura; Bani, Daniele; Romagnani, Sergio; Maggi, Enrico; Parronchi, Paola; Vultaggio, Alessandra

    2015-08-01

    A strategy to improve allergen-specific immunotherapy is to employ new adjuvants stably linked to allergens. The study is addressed to evaluate the in vivo and in vitro effects of allergens [natural Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus 2 (nDer p 2) and ovalbumin (OVA)] chemically bound to an 8-OH-modified adenine. Humoral and cellular responses were analysed in allergen-sensitized and challenged mice by using conjugates (Conj) in a therapeutic setting. The in vitro activity of the conjugates on cytokine production induced by bone marrow dendritic cells and the co-culture system was also investigated. The nDer p 2-Conj treatment in nDer p 2-primed and challenged BALB/c mice reduced the numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung, airway allergen-driven interleukin-13 (IL-13) production in lung mononuclear cells and IgE, in comparison with nDer p 2-treated mice. The increase of IgG2a paralleled that of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-10 in allergen-stimulated spleen cells. Similar effects were elicited by treatment with OVA-Conj in an OVA-driven BALB/c model. The nDer p 2-Conj or OVA-Conj redirected memory T helper type 2 cells towards the production of IL-10 and IFN-γ also in C57BL/6 mice and when subcutaneously administered. Interleukin-10, IL-12 and IL-27 were produced in vitro by Conj-stimulated bone marrow dendritic cells, whereas IL-10 and IFN-γ were up-regulated in co-cultures of CD11c(+) and CD4(+) T cells from Conj-treated mice stimulated with allergen. Cytofluorometric analysis indicated that the Conj expanded IFN-γ- and IL-10- producing memory T cells. The Conj effects on IL-10(-/-) and IL-12(-/-) mice confirmed the role of IL-10 and IFN-γ in inducing a protective and balanced redirection the T helper type 2-mediated airway inflammation. PMID:25930741

  10. Sensitization profiles to purified plant food allergens among pediatric patients with allergy to banana.

    PubMed

    Palacin, Arantxa; Quirce, Santiago; Sanchez-Monge, Rosa; Bobolea, Irina; Diaz-Perales, Araceli; Martin-Muñoz, Flora; Pascual, Cristina; Salcedo, Gabriel

    2011-03-01

    Banana fruit allergy is well known, but neither immunoglobulin E recognition patterns to purified plant food allergens nor true prevalences of putative banana allergens have been established. This study aimed to characterize β-1,3-glucanase and thaumatin-like protein (TLP) as banana allergens, testing them, together with other plant food allergens, in 51 children with allergic reactions after banana ingestion and both positive specific IgE and skin prick test (SPT) to banana. Banana β-1,3-glucanase and TLP were isolated and characterized. Both banana allergens, together with kiwifruit TLP Act d 2, avocado class I chitinase Pers a 1, palm pollen profilin Pho d 2 and peach fruit lipid transfer protein (LTP) Pru p 3, were tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. Banana β-1,3-glucanase (Mus a 5) was glycosylated, whereas banana TLP (Mus a 4) was not, in contrast with its homologous kiwi allergen Act d 2. Specific IgE to both banana allergens, as well as to peach Pru p 3, was found in over 70% of sera from banana-allergic children, and Mus a 4 and Pru p 3 provoked positive SPT responses in 6 of the 12 tested patients, whereas Mus a 5 in only one of them. Both peptidic epitopes and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants were involved in the IgE-binding to Mus a 5, whereas cross-reactivity between Mus a 4 and Act d 2 was only based on common IgE protein epitopes. Profilin Pho d 2 elicited a relevant proportion of positive responses on in vitro (41%) and in vivo (58%) tests. Therefore, Mus a 4 and LTP behave as major banana allergens in the study population, and profilin seems to be also a relevant allergen. Mus a 5 is an equivocal allergenic protein, showing high IgE-binding to its attached complex glycan, and low in vivo potency. PMID:21284746

  11. Ole e 13 is the unique food allergen in olive: Structure-functional, substrates docking, and molecular allergenicity comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Lopez, J C; Robles-Bolivar, P; Lopez-Valverde, F J; Lima-Cabello, E; Kotchoni, S O; Alché, J D

    2016-05-01

    Thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs) are enzymes with important functions in pathogens defense and in the response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Last identified olive allergen (Ole e 13) is a TLP, which may also importantly contribute to food allergy and cross-allergenicity to pollen allergen proteins. The goals of this study are the characterization of the structural-functionality of Ole e 13 with a focus in its catalytic mechanism, and its molecular allergenicity by extensive analysis using different molecular computer-aided approaches covering a) functional-regulatory motifs, b) comparative study of linear sequence, 2-D and 3D structural homology modeling, c) molecular docking with two different β-D-glucans, d) conservational and evolutionary analysis, e) catalytic mechanism modeling, and f) IgE-binding, B- and T-cell epitopes identification and comparison to other allergenic TLPs. Sequence comparison, structure-based features, and phylogenetic analysis identified Ole e 13 as a thaumatin-like protein. 3D structural characterization revealed a conserved overall folding among plants TLPs, with mayor differences in the acidic (catalytic) cleft. Molecular docking analysis using two β-(1,3)-glucans allowed to identify fundamental residues involved in the endo-1,3-β-glucanase activity, and defining E84 as one of the conserved residues of the TLPs responsible of the nucleophilic attack to initiate the enzymatic reaction and D107 as proton donor, thus proposing a catalytic mechanism for Ole e 13. Identification of IgE-binding, B- and T-cell epitopes may help designing strategies to improve diagnosis and immunotherapy to food allergy and cross-allergenic pollen TLPs. PMID:27017426

  12. Subcutaneous Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergen Is Dependent on Mast Cells but Not IL-33: Distinct Mechanisms between Subcutaneous and Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Shimura, Sakiko; Ochi, Hirono; Maruyama, Natsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Protease activity of papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen homologous to mite major allergens, is essential to IgE/IgG1 production and lung eosinophilia induced by intranasal papain administration in mice, and IL-33 contributes to these responses. In this work, we investigate skin and Ab responses induced by s.c. papain administration into ear lobes and responses induced by subsequent airway challenge with papain. Subcutaneous papain injection induced swelling associated with increased epidermal thickness, dermal inflammation, serum IgE/IgG1 responses, and Th2 cytokine production in draining lymph node cells restimulated in vitro. These responses were markedly less upon s.c. administration of protease inhibitor-treated papain. Results obtained by using mast cell-deficient mice and reconstitution of tissue mast cells suggested the contribution of mast cells to papain-specific IgE/IgG1 responses and eosinophil infiltration. The responses were equivalent between wild-type and IL-33(-/-) mice. After the subsequent airway challenge, the s.c. presensitized wild-type mice showed more severe lung eosinophilia than those without the presensitization. The presensitized IL-33(-/-) mice showed modest lung eosinophilia, which was absent without the presensitization, but its severity and IgE boost by the airway challenge were markedly less than the presensitized wild-type mice, in which protease activity of inhaled papain contributed to the responses. The results suggest that mechanisms for the protease-dependent sensitization differ between skin and airway and that cooperation of mast cell-dependent, IL-33-independent initial sensitization via skin and protease-induced, IL-33-mediated mechanism in re-exposure via airway to protease allergens maximizes the magnitude of the transition from skin inflammation to asthma in natural history of progression of allergic diseases. PMID:27001956

  13. Allergen and irritant control: importance and implementation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, H S

    1998-01-01

    The Expert Panel Report 2. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma (1) begins its section on controlling factors that precipitate or worsen asthma with the statement: "For successful long-term asthma management, it is essential to identify and reduce exposures to relevant allergens and irritants and to control other factors that have been shown to increase asthma symptoms and/or precipitate asthma exacerbations." The presence of allergy to indoor allergens and certain seasonal fungal spores has been found to be a risk factor for asthma in epidemiologic studies around the world. Generally between 70% and 85% of asthmatic populations studied have been reported to have positive skin-prick tests. Exposure of allergic patients to inhalant allergens increases airway inflammation, airway hyper-responsiveness, asthma symptoms, need for medication, severe attacks, and even death due to asthma. Environmental tobacco smoke exposure has been shown to increase the prevalence of childhood asthma and to increase asthma symptoms and bronchial hyperresponsiveness while reducing pulmonary function in children chronically exposed. Exposure to other indoor irritants, largely products of unvented combustion, has also been found to increase asthma symptoms. Outdoor air pollution increases asthma symptoms; levels of specific pollutants correlate with emergency room visits and hospitalization for asthma. Rhinitis/sinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux are commonly associated with asthma, and treatment of these conditions has been shown to improve asthma. In patients sensitive to aspirin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or metabisulfites, exposure to these agents can precipitate severe attacks of asthma. Viral infections are common causes for exacerbations of asthma. Infections with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae contribute to acute exacerbations and perhaps to long-term morbidity, as well. This chapter will discuss preventive and therapeutic measures

  14. Emergent and unusual allergens in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, David; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis from cosmetics is a common problem that is occasionally caused by new or rare allergens. When a patient has a positive patch test to a cosmetic product but to none of the common or commercially available allergens, it is important to further patch-test this patient to the ingredients of the product. Thorough testing with the breakdown of ingredients, usually obtained through cooperation with the manufacturer, often allows identification of the culprit allergen in the cosmetic product. In this article, we discuss emerging or rare allergens discovered by this method, including nail lacquer and lipstick allergens, copolymers, shellac, alkyl glucosides, glycols, protein derivatives, idebenone, and octocrylene. PMID:20487655

  15. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors DCs are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence DCs behavior through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarize current understanding of how allergens are recognized by DCs and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitization and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signaling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitization hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases. PMID:24204367

  16. Allergens causing atopic diseases in canine.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hwa-Young; Kang, Hyung-Seok; Bhang, Dong-Ha; Kim, Min-Kue; Hwang, Cheol-Yong; Han, Hong-Ryul

    2002-12-01

    Canine atopic skin disease is seasonal or sometimes non-seasonal immune-mediated skin disease which occurs commonly in Korea. The definite clinical sign is systemic pruritus, especially on periocular parts, external ear, interdigit spaces and lateral flank. For diagnosis of this dermatitis, complete history taking followed by intradermal skin test and serum in vitro IgE test needs to be performed. Allergen selection for the diagnosis and treatment of atopic dermatitis should be varied geographically. In this study, with intradermal skin test(IDST) the prevalence of atopic disease and what allergens are involved in are researched. Allergens used for IDST included 26 allergen extracts from six allergen groups: grasses, trees, weeds, molds, epidermal allergens and environmental allergens. The number of allergens was 42 in which the positive and negative controls are included. The most common positive allergen reaction was the house dust mites on IDST(22/35, 63%). The other positive allergen reactions were to flea(3/35, 9%), molds(1/35, 3%), house dusts(2/35, 6%), feathers (1/35, 3%), cedar/juniper(1/35, 3%), timothy grass(1/35, 3%) and dandelion(1/35, 3%). In this study, the most prevalent allergen causing atopic dermatitis in dogs in Korea was the house dust mites followed by the flea. PMID:12819384

  17. Distinguishing seasonal androgen responses from male-male androgen responsiveness-revisiting the Challenge Hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Landys, Meta M; Wingfield, John C

    2007-04-01

    Androgen levels show strong patterns throughout the year in male vertebrates and play an important role in the seasonal modulation of the frequency, intensity and persistence of aggression. The Challenge Hypothesis (Wingfield, J.C., Hegner, R.E., Dufty, A.M., Ball, G.F., 1990. The "Challenge Hypothesis": Theoretical implications for patterns of testosterone secretion, mating systems, and breeding strategies. Am. Nat. 136, 829-846) predicts that seasonal patterns in androgen levels vary as a function of mating system, male-male aggression and paternal care. Although many studies have addressed these predictions, investigators have often assumed that the ratio of the breeding season maximum and breeding baseline concentrations (termed "androgen responsiveness") reflects hormonal responses due to social stimulation. However, increasing evidence suggests that seasonal androgen elevations are not necessarily caused by social interactions between males. Here, we separate the seasonal androgen response (R(seasonal)) and the androgen responsiveness to male-male competition (R(male-male)) to begin to distinguish between different kinds of hormonal responses. We demonstrate that R(seasonal) and R(male-male) are fundamentally different and should be treated as separate variables. Differences are particularly evident in single-brooded male birds that show no increase in plasma androgen levels during simulated territorial intrusions (STIs), even though R(seasonal) is elevated. In multiple-brooded species, STIs typically elicit a rise in androgens. We relate these findings to the natural history of single- and multiple-brooded species and suggest a research approach that could be utilized to increase our understanding of the factors that determine different types of androgen responses. This approach does not only include R(seasonal) and R(male-male), but also the androgen responsiveness to receptive females (R(male-female)) and to non-social environmental cues (R

  18. New insights into ragweed pollen allergens.

    PubMed

    Bordas-Le Floch, Véronique; Groeme, Rachel; Chabre, Henri; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Nony, Emmanuel; Mascarell, Laurent; Moingeon, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Pollen allergens from short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) cause severe respiratory allergies in North America and Europe. To date, ten short ragweed pollen allergens belonging to eight protein families, including the recently discovered novel major allergen Amb a 11, have been recorded in the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS) allergen database. With evidence that other components may further contribute to short ragweed pollen allergenicity, a better understanding of the allergen repertoire is a requisite for the design of proper diagnostic tools and efficient immunotherapies. This review provides an update on both known as well as novel candidate allergens from short ragweed pollen, identified through a comprehensive characterization of the ragweed pollen transcriptome and proteome. PMID:26383916

  19. Grass pollen allergens globally: the contribution of subtropical grasses to burden of allergic respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Davies, J M

    2014-06-01

    Grass pollens of the temperate (Pooideae) subfamily and subtropical subfamilies of grasses are major aeroallergen sources worldwide. The subtropical Chloridoideae (e.g. Cynodon dactylon; Bermuda grass) and Panicoideae (e.g. Paspalum notatum; Bahia grass) species are abundant in parts of Africa, India, Asia, Australia and the Americas, where a large and increasing proportion of the world's population abide. These grasses are phylogenetically and ecologically distinct from temperate grasses. With the advent of global warming, it is conceivable that the geographic distribution of subtropical grasses and the contribution of their pollen to the burden of allergic rhinitis and asthma will increase. This review aims to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the current global knowledge of (i) regional variation in allergic sensitivity to subtropical grass pollens, (ii) molecular allergenic components of subtropical grass pollens and (iii) allergic responses to subtropical grass pollen allergens in relevant populations. Patients from subtropical regions of the world show higher allergic sensitivity to grass pollens of Chloridoideae and Panicoideae grasses, than to temperate grass pollens. The group 1 allergens are amongst the allergen components of subtropical grass pollens, but the group 5 allergens, by which temperate grass pollen extracts are standardized for allergen content, appear to be absent from both subfamilies of subtropical grasses. Whilst there are shared allergenic components and antigenic determinants, there are additional clinically relevant subfamily-specific differences, at T- and B-cell levels, between pollen allergens of subtropical and temperate grasses. Differential immune recognition of subtropical grass pollens is likely to impact upon the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy of patients who are primarily sensitized to subtropical grass pollens. The literature reviewed herein highlights the clinical need to standardize allergen preparations for both

  20. Allergen-Specific Cytokine Polarization Protects Shetland Ponies against Culicoides obsoletus-Induced Insect Bite Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Meulenbroeks, Chantal; van der Lugt, Jaco J; van der Meide, Nathalie M A; Willemse, Ton; Rutten, Victor P M G; Zaiss, Dietmar M W

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds, which is caused by bites of the insect Culicoides obsoletus (C. obsoletus). We investigated the allergen-specific immune status of individual horses that had either been diagnosed to be healthy or to suffer of IBH. Following intradermal allergen injection, skin biopsies were taken of IBH-affected and healthy ponies and cytokine expression was determined by RT-PCR. In addition, allergen-specific antibody titers were measured and cytokine expression of in vitro stimulated, allergen-specific CD4 T-cells was determined. 24 hrs after allergen injection, a significant increase in mRNA expression of the type-2 cytokine IL-4 was observed in the skin of IBH-affected Shetland ponies. In the skin of healthy ponies, however, an increase in IFNγ mRNA expression was found. Analysis of allergen-specific antibody titers revealed that all animals produced allergen-specific antibodies, and allergen-specific stimulation of CD4 T-cells revealed a significant higher percentage of IFNγ-expressing CD4 T-cells in healthy ponies compared to IBH-affected ponies. These data indicate that horses not affected by IBH, in contrast to the so far established dogma, are not immunologically ignorant but have a Th1-skewed allergen-specific immune response that appears to protect against IBH-associated symptoms. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of a natural situation, in which an allergen-specific immune skewing is protective in an allergic disorder. PMID:25901733

  1. Pulmonary Allergic Responses Augment IL-13 Secretion by Circulating Basophils yet Suppress IFN-alpha from Plasmacytoid DCs

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, John T.; Bieneman, Anja P.; Chichester, Kristin L.; Breslin, Linda; Xiao, HuiQing; Liu, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Allergic inflammatory processes may have the capacity to propagate systemically through the actions of circulating leukocytes. Consequently, basophils from allergic individuals are often “primed”, as evidenced by their hyper-responsiveness in vitro. IFN-α, secreted predominately by plasmacytoid DCs, suppresses basophil priming for IL-13 production in vitro. Objective This study sought in vivo correlates, arising during experimental allergen challenge, that support an “axis-interplay” between basophils and pDCs. Methods Using segmental allergen challenge in the lung, the immune responses of both cell types from blood were investigated in volunteers (n=10) before and 24h after allergen exposure. These responses were then correlated with inflammatory parameters measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. Results In blood, segmental allergen challenge significantly augmented IL-13 secretion by basophils induced by IL-3 (p=0.009) yet reduced IFN-α secreted by plasmacytoid dendritic cells stimulated with CpG (p=0.018). Both parameters were negatively correlated (p=0.0015), at least among those subjects secreting the latter. Circulating basophil IL-13 responses further correlated with post-segmental allergen challenge bronchoalveolar lavage parameters including IL-13 protein (p=0.04), basophil (p=0.051), eosinophil (p=0.0018) and total cell counts (p<0.003). Basophil and IL-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage likewise correlated (p=0.0002). Conclusions These results support a mechanism of immune regulation whereby allergen reduces innate immune responses and IFN-α production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells, resulting in enhanced inflammation and basophil cytokine production at sites of allergen exposure. PMID:20184608

  2. Induction of immune tolerance in asthmatic mice by vaccination with DNA encoding an allergen-cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 combination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Huang, Gang; Hu, Bo; Song, Yong; Shi, Yi

    2011-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potential treatment for allergic diseases. We constructed an allergen-cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4)-encoding DNA vaccine, administered it directly to antigen-presenting cells (APCs), and investigated its ability and mechanisms to ameliorate allergic airway inflammation in an asthmatic mouse model. An allergen-CTLA-4 DNA plasmid (OVA-CTLA-4-pcDNA₃.₁) encoding an ovalbumin (OVA) and the mouse CTLA-4 extracellular domain was constructed and transfected into COS-7 cells to obtain the fusion protein OVA-CTLA-4, which was able to bind the B7 ligand on dendritic cells (DCs), and induced CD25⁺ Foxp3⁺ regulatory T (Treg) cells by the coculture of naive CD4⁺ T cells with DCs in vitro. In an animal study, BALB/c mice were sensitized and challenged with OVA to establish the asthmatic model. Vaccination with a high dose of OVA-CTLA-4-pcDNA₃.₁ significantly decreased interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-5 levels and eosinophil counts and prevented OVA-induced reduction of the gamma interferon level in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In addition, these mice suffered less severe airway inflammation and had lower levels of OVA-specific IgE and IgG1 titers in serum. Also, high-dose OVA-CTLA-4-pcDNA₃.₁ vaccination inhibited the development of airway hyperreactivity and prevented OVA-induced reduction of the percentages of Foxp3⁺ Treg cells in the spleen. Our results indicate that a high dose of allergen-CTLA-4-encoding DNA vaccine was more effective in preventing an allergen-induced Th2-skewed immune response through the induction of Treg cells and may be a new alternative therapy for asthma. PMID:21346053

  3. Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of dendritic cells induces interleukin-10 producing allergen-specific T cells in vitro but fails to prevent allergic airway disease.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Birgit; Freund, Tobias; Rha, Ro-Dug; Dittrich, Anna-Maria; Quarcoo, David; Hutloff, Andreas; Hamelmann, Eckard

    2009-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in directing naive T cells towards a Th1/Th2 or regulatory T cells (Treg) cell phenotype. In this context, interleukin (IL)-10 has been shown to exhibit immune regulatory capacities. The aim of this study was to delineate the influence of high-IL-10-producing DCs on DC-T-cell interactions in inhibiting allergen-induced airway inflammation and hyperreactivity in a murine model of allergic airway disease. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) were generated from hemopoietic progenitors by culture with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and stimulated with ovalbumin (OVA) +/- lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The effects of ovalbumin-pulsed BMDCs on cytokine production by allergen-specific naive T cells were studied in vitro. The development of airway inflammation in Balb/c mice was determined after intranasal administration of BMDCs in vivo. LPS stimulation of BMDCs strongly enhanced IL-10 production. Coculture of LPS-modulated DCs exhibiting increased IL-10 production with allergen-specific naive T cells reduced the production of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-5, but enhanced the production of IL-10. After blockade with anti-IL-10 plus anti-IL-10-receptor antibodies, the level of IFN-gamma and IL-5 production by cocultured T cells was restored, underlining the regulatory function of IL-10. Intranasal administration of high-IL-10-producing LPS-stimulated, OVA-primed BMDCs prior to repetitive airway allergen challenges resulted in an even enhanced airway inflammation. These data demonstrate that increased IL-10 production by DCs may be a critical element for T-cell activation and differentiation in the context of allergen-induced immune responses in vitro. However, this DC modulation did not translate into suppression of allergic airway disease in vivo. PMID:19415548

  4. Evidence of a novel allergenic protein Narcin in the bulbs of Narcissus tazetta

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Amar; Shokeen, Akshita; Sharma, Pradeep; Kaushik, Sanket; Mitra, Dipendra K; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2013-01-01

    Several plant-derived allergens have been identified which result in the formation of immunoglobulin E antibodies. Primarily, these allergens belong to the protein families including seed storage proteins, structural proteins and pathogenesis-related proteins. Several allergens are also reported from flower bulbs which cause contact dermatitis. Such symptoms are highly common with the bulb growers handling different species of Narcissus. Narcissus toxicity is also reported if the bulbs are consumed accidentally. The present study aimed to characterize the protein from the bulbs of Narcissus tazetta responsible for its allergenic response. A 13 kDa novel allergenic protein, Narcin was isolated from the bulbs of Narcissus tazetta. The protein was extracted using ammonium sulfate fractionation. The protein was further purified by anion exchange chromatography followed by gel filtration chromatography. The N-terminal sequence of the first 15 amino-acid residues was determined using Edman degradation. The allergenicity of the protein was measured by cytokine production using flow cytometry in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Further estimation of total IgE was performed by ELISA method. This novel protein was found to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines and thus induce allergy by elevating total IgE level. The novel protein, Narcin isolated from Narcissus tazetta was found to exhibit allergenic properties. PMID:23936740

  5. Thresholds of allergenic proteins in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Hourihane, Jonathan O'B. . E-mail: J.Hourihane@soton.ac.uk; Knulst, Andre C.

    2005-09-01

    Threshold doses or Estimated Eliciting Doses (EEDs) represent an important new field of research in food allergy. Clinicians and regulators have embraced some toxicological concepts such as LOAEL and NOAEL and applied them to an area of significant clinical uncertainty and interest. The impact of intrinsic human factors (e.g., asthma and exercise) and extrinsic event factors (e.g., season, location and especially dose of allergen) on a future allergic reaction in the community needs to be considered carefully when interpreting results of clinical and research low-dose food challenges. The ongoing cooperation of food allergy research groups in medicine, food science and government will surely deliver results of the highest importance to the wider communities of allergology, food science and technology and the increasing number of allergic consumers.

  6. Attenuated Allergenic Activity of Ovomucoid After Electrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kido, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Ovomucoid (OMC) is the most prominent allergen causing hen's egg allergy, containing disulfide (S-S) bonds that may be responsible for its allergic action. As S-S bonds may be reduced during electrolysis, this study was undertaken to evaluate modulation of the allergic action of OMC after electrolysis. Electrolysis was carried out for 1% OMC containing 1% sodium chloride for 30 minutes with a voltage difference of 90 V, 0.23 A (30 mA/cm2). Protein assays, amino acid measurement, and mass spectrometry in untreated OMC and OMC on both the anode and cathode sides after electrolysis were performed. Moreover, 21 patients with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy were evaluated by using the skin prick test (SPT) for untreated OMC and OMC after electrolysis. The allergic action of OMC was reduced after electrolysis on both the anode and cathode sides when evaluated by the SPT. The modifications of OMC on electrolysis caused the loss of 2 distinct peptide fragments (57E-63K and 123H-128R) as seen on matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The total free SH groups in OMC were increased on the cathode side. Although the regions of S-S broken bonds were not determined in this study, the change in S-S bonds in OMC on both the anode and cathode sides may reduce the allergenic activity. PMID:26333707

  7. Attenuated Allergenic Activity of Ovomucoid After Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Kido, Jun; Matsumoto, Tomoaki

    2015-11-01

    Ovomucoid (OMC) is the most prominent allergen causing hen's egg allergy, containing disulfide (S-S) bonds that may be responsible for its allergic action. As S-S bonds may be reduced during electrolysis, this study was undertaken to evaluate modulation of the allergic action of OMC after electrolysis. Electrolysis was carried out for 1% OMC containing 1% sodium chloride for 30 minutes with a voltage difference of 90 V, 0.23 A (30 mA/cm²). Protein assays, amino acid measurement, and mass spectrometry in untreated OMC and OMC on both the anode and cathode sides after electrolysis were performed. Moreover, 21 patients with IgE-mediated hen's egg allergy were evaluated by using the skin prick test (SPT) for untreated OMC and OMC after electrolysis. The allergic action of OMC was reduced after electrolysis on both the anode and cathode sides when evaluated by the SPT. The modifications of OMC on electrolysis caused the loss of 2 distinct peptide fragments (57E-63K and 123H-128R) as seen on matrix-associated laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The total free SH groups in OMC were increased on the cathode side. Although the regions of S-S broken bonds were not determined in this study, the change in S-S bonds in OMC on both the anode and cathode sides may reduce the allergenic activity. PMID:26333707

  8. Implementation Challenges in Translating Pivotal Response Training into Community Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica; Stahmer, Aubyn C.; Reed, Sarah; Schreibman, Laura; Reisinger, Erica; Mandell, David

    2013-01-01

    Implementing evidence-based practices (EBPs) for children with autism is challenging for teachers because these practices are often complex, requiring significant training and resources that are not available in most school settings. This brief investigation was designed to identify areas of strength and difficulty for teachers implementing one…

  9. CP-Cultivar Development Program: Challenges and Responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of the CP-Cultivar Development Program is to release high-yielding, stress- tolerant cultivars for the Florida sugarcane industry. To meet this goal, two major challenges have recently emerged: 1. it has become increasingly apparent that brown and orange sugarcane rusts are having a major i...

  10. Soil management challenges in response to climatic change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agriculture has tremendous potential to help solve global food, feed, fiber, and bioenergy challenges and respond to changing climatic conditions provided we do not compromise our soil, water and air resources. This presentation will examine soil management, defined by the Soil Science Society of Am...

  11. Allergens as immunomodulatory proteins: the cat dander protein Fel d 1 enhances TLR activation by lipid ligands.

    PubMed

    Herre, Jurgen; Grönlund, Hans; Brooks, Heather; Hopkins, Lee; Waggoner, Lisa; Murton, Ben; Gangloff, Monique; Opaleye, Olaniyi; Chilvers, Edwin R; Fitzgerald, Kate; Gay, Nick; Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare

    2013-08-15

    Allergic responses can be triggered by structurally diverse allergens. Most allergens are proteins, yet extensive research has not revealed how they initiate the allergic response and why the myriad of other inhaled proteins do not. Among these allergens, the cat secretoglobulin protein Fel d 1 is a major allergen and is responsible for severe allergic responses. In this study, we show that similar to the mite dust allergen Der p 2, Fel d 1 substantially enhances signaling through the innate receptors TLR4 and TLR2. In contrast to Der p 2, however, Fel d 1 does not act by mimicking the TLR4 coreceptor MD2 and is not able to bind stably to the TLR4/MD2 complex in vitro. Fel d 1 does, however, bind to the TLR4 agonist LPS, suggesting that a lipid transfer mechanism may be involved in the Fel d 1 enhancement of TLR signaling. We also show that the dog allergen Can f 6, a member of a distinct class of lipocalin allergens, has very similar properties to Fel d 1. We propose that Fel d 1 and Can f 6 belong to a group of allergen immunomodulatory proteins that enhance innate immune signaling and promote airway hypersensitivity reactions in diseases such as asthma. PMID:23878318

  12. Production of recombinant allergens in plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A large percentage of allergenic proteins are of plant origin. Hence, plant-based expression systems are considered ideal for the recombinant production of certain allergens. First attempts to establish production of plant-derived allergens in plants focused on transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana infected with recombinant viral vectors. Accordingly, allergens from birch and mugwort pollen, as well as from apple have been expressed in plants. Production of house dust mite allergens has been achieved by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tobacco plants. Beside the use of plants as production systems, other approaches have focused on the development of edible vaccines expressing allergens or epitopes thereof, which bypasses the need of allergen purification. The potential of this approach has been convincingly demonstrated for transgenic rice seeds expressing seven dominant human T cell epitopes derived from Japanese cedar pollen allergens. Parallel to efforts in developing recombinant-based diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, different gene-silencing approaches have been used to decrease the expression of allergenic proteins in allergen sources. In this way hypoallergenic ryegrass, soybean, rice, apple, and tomato were developed. PMID:21258627

  13. Food Allergens: Is There a Correlation between Stability to Digestion and Allergenicity?

    PubMed

    Bøgh, Katrine Lindholm; Madsen, Charlotte Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Food allergy is a major health problem in the Western countries, affecting 3-8% of the population. It has not yet been established what makes a dietary protein a food allergen. Several characteristics have been proposed to be shared by food allergens. One of these is resistance to digestion. This paper reviews data from digestibility studies on purified food allergens and evaluates the predictive value of digestibility tests on the allergenic potential. We point out that food allergens do not necessarily resist digestion. We discuss how the choice of in vitro digestibility assay condition and the method used for detection of residual intact protein as well as fragments hereof may greatly influence the outcome as well as the interpretation of results. The finding that digests from food allergens may retain allergenicity, stresses the importance of using immunological assays for evaluating the allergenic potential of food allergen digestion products. Studies assessing the allergenicity of digestion products, by either IgE-binding, elicitation or sensitizing capacity, shows that digestion may abolish, decrease, have no effect, or even increase the allergenicity of food allergens. Therefore, the predictive value of the pepsin resistance test for assessing the allergenic potential of novel proteins can be questioned. PMID:25607526

  14. Allergen immunotherapy with nanoparticles containing lipopolysaccharide from Brucella ovis.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Sara; Gamazo, Carlos; San Roman, Beatriz; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, Maria Luisa; Espuelas, Socorro; Irache, Juan M

    2008-11-01

    The adjuvant and protective capacity against anaphylactic shock of the association between rough lipopolysaccharide of Brucella ovis (LPS) coencapsulated with ovalbumin (OVA), as a model allergen, in Gantrez AN nanoparticles was investigated. Several strategies were performed in order to study the adjuvant effect of the LPS either encapsulated or coating the nanoparticles. OVA, as well as LPS, was incorporated either during the manufacturing process (OVA-encapsulated or LPS-encapsulated nanoparticles, respectively) or after the preparation (OVA-coated or LPS-coated nanoparticles, respectively). After the administration of 10 microg of OVA incorporated in the different formulations, all the nanoparticles, with or without LPS, were capable of amplifying the immune response (IgG(1) and IgG(2a)). However, in a model of sensitized mice to OVA, the formulation with OVA and LPS-entrapped inside the nanoparticles administered intradermally in three doses of 3 microg of OVA each was the only treatment that totally protected the mice from death after a challenge with an intraperitoneal injection of OVA. In contrast, the control group administered with OVA adsorbed onto a commercial alhydrogel adjuvant showed 80% mortality. These results are highly suggestive for the valuable use of Gantrez nanoparticles combined with rough LPS of B. ovis in immunotherapy. PMID:18582571

  15. The influence of European legislation on the use of diagnostic test allergens for nasal allergen provocation in routine care of patients with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Klimek, L; Hammerbacher, A S; Hellings, P W; Fokkens, W J; Hoffmann, H J; Muraro, A; Papadopoulos, N

    2015-09-01

    In patients with allergic rhinitis (AR), the nasal provocation test (NPT) is the standard procedure to evaluate the clinical response of the nasal mucosa to allergens with a high specificity and sensitivity. In AR, it is the only test that really measures the response of the diseased mucosa to allergens while skin prick test and serum IgE confirm the clinical suspicion of sensitization. Moreover, it is of special relevance in the detection of patients with Local Allergic Rhinitis (LAR), where general sensitization cannot be measured. For the evaluation of therapeutic interventions, NPT has been used for the clinical monitoring of antiallergic drugs and allergen specific immunotherapy. Legislation within the European Union (EU) defines allergens used for diagnostic tests like NPT to be medicinal products according to Directive 2001/83 EC, but national law is considering these products to be medicinal devices in a number of EU countries. Thus, NPT products are governed by different legislations and therefore standards throughout the EU. In consequence, allergens used for diagnostic purposes need different registrations and Marketing Authorization by national authorities. After a transition period, regulations of EU Directives are to be implemented in national law by all member states. At the moment, most EU countries have not fully implemented these Directives, however, it can be expected that most countries will implement it and enforce their rules within the next years. This development has a tremendous impact on the availability of diagnostic allergens for NPT in Europe and will make make nasal provocation testing very difficult if not impossible. We describe the current situation of diagnostic allergens under the special legislative conditions in the EU with special focus on allergen products used for NPT and the consequences for the diagnosis of AR and LAR. PMID:26363167

  16. Vitamin E prevents NRF2-suppression by allergen in asthmatic alveolar macrophages in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Dworski, Ryszard; Han, Wei; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Hoskins, Aimee; Freeman, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease associated with increased generation of reactive oxidant species and disturbed antioxidant defenses. NRF2 is the master transcription factor that regulates the expression of Phase II antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. Disruption of NRF2 augments oxidative stress and inflammation in a mouse model of asthma suggesting a protective role of NRF2 in the lungs in vivo. Yet, little is known about the regulation and function of NRF2 in human asthmatics. Using segmental allergen challenge, a well established experimental model of IgE-mediated asthma exacerbation in human atopic asthmatics, we investigated the effect of a specific allergen and the modulatory role of vitamin E on NRF2 and a NRF2-target gene, superoxide dismutase, in alveolar macrophages recovered from the airways at 24h after allergen instillation in vivo. Allergen-provoked airway inflammation in sensitive asthmatics caused a profound inhibition of macrophage NRF2 activity and superoxide dismutase, rendering them incapable of responding to the NRF2 inducers. Prolonged treatment with high doses of the antioxidant vitamin E lessened this allergen-induced drop in alveolar macrophage NRF2. These results are the first to demonstrate that NRF2 expression in human asthmatics is compromised upon allergen challenge but can be rescued by vitamin E in vivo. PMID:21605660

  17. The future of IAEA safeguards: challenges and responses

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F; Budlong - Sylvester, Kory W

    2011-01-01

    For nearly two decades, the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) has been transforming its safeguards system to address the challenges posed by undeclared nuclear programs, the associated revelation of an extensive non-State nuclear procurement network and other issues, including past limits to its verification mandate and the burden of noncompliance issues. Implementing the new measures, including those in the Additional Protocol, and integrating new and old safeguards measures, remains a work in progress. Implementation is complicated by factors including the limited teclmological tools that are available to address such issues as safeguarding bulk handling facilities, detection of undeclared facilities/activities, especially related to enrichment, etc. As this process continues, new challenges are arising, including the demands of expanding nuclear power production worldwide, so-called safeguards by design for a new generation of facilities, the possible IAEA role in a fissile material cutoff treaty and other elements of the arms control and disarmament agenda, the possible role in 'rollback' cases, etc. There is no doubt safeguards will need to evolve in the future, as they have over the last decades. In order for the evolutionary path to proceed, there will inter alia be a need to identify technological gaps, especially with respect to undeclared facilities, and ensure they are filled by adapting old safeguards technologies, by developing and introducing new and novel safeguards teclmologies and/or by developing new procedures and protocols. Safeguards will also need to respond to anticipated emerging threats and to future, unanticipated threats. This will require strategic planning and cooperation among Member States and with the Agency. This paper will address challenges to IAEA safeguards and the technological possibilities and R&D strategies needed to meet those challenges in the context of the forty-year evolution of safeguards, including the ongoing

  18. New Ethical Challenges within Environmental and Sustainability Education: A Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    One of the major points to grow out of the four papers presented in this issue is how to think of education in relation to the various challenges facing the biosphere, facing the future of human and other than human life forms, and facing the sheer difficulties of planning what to do about them. The differences in the role of education, of course,…

  19. Challenges of an automated spectral responsivity characterization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Greg

    2013-01-01

    An essential part of characterizing and improving imaging system performance and modeling is the determination of spectral responsivity; namely the spectral band-shape and out-of-band response. These complicated measurements have heretofore been difficult to make with consistency with do-it-yourself solutions. To address this industry-wide problem, Labsphere has developed an automated spectral response measurement stations, incorporating several techniques to enhance accuracy and ease of use. This presentation will cover the physics and considerations behind the scaling of these types of systems and the experimental methodology required to assure absolute traceability, as well as some of the lessons learned along the way.

  20. Inhalation of stable dust extract prevents allergen induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Peters, M; Kauth, M; Schwarze, J; Körner‐Rettberg, C; Riedler, J; Nowak, D; Braun‐Fahrländer, C; von Mutius, E; Bufe, A; Holst, O

    2006-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiological studies have shown that growing up on a traditional farm provides protection from the development of allergic disorders such as hay fever and allergic asthma. We present experimental evidence that substances providing protection from the development of allergic diseases can be extracted from dust collected in stables of animal farms. Methods Stable dust was collected from 30 randomly selected farms located in rural regions of the Alps (Austria, Germany and Switzerland). The dust was homogenised with glass beads and extracted with physiological sodium chloride solution. This extract was used to modulate immune response in a well established mouse model of allergic asthma. Results Treatment of mice by inhalation of stable dust extract during sensitisation to ovalbumin inhibited the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and airway eosinophilia upon challenge, as well as the production of interleukin 5 by splenocytes and of antigen specific IgG1 and IgE. Dust extract also suppressed the generation of human dendritic cells in vitro. The biological activity of the dust extract was not exclusively mediated by lipopolysaccharide. Conclusions Stable dust from animal farms contains strong immune modulating substances. These substances can interfere with the development of both cellular and humoral immunity against allergens, thus suppressing allergen sensitisation, airway inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness in a murine model of allergic asthma. PMID:16244088

  1. Production and analysis of recombinant tree nut allergens.

    PubMed

    Willison, Leanna N; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2014-03-01

    Allergic reactions to tree nuts are a growing global concern as the number of affected individuals continues to rise. Unlike some food allergies, tree nuts can cause severe reactions that persist throughout life. The tree nuts discussed in this review include those most commonly responsible for allergic reactions: cashew, almond, hazelnut, walnut, pecan, Brazil nut, pistachio, and chestnut. The native allergenic proteins derived from tree nuts are frequently difficult to isolate and purify and may not be adequately represented in aqueous nut protein extracts. Consequently, defined recombinant allergens have become useful reagents in a variety of immunoassays aimed at the diagnosis of tree nut allergy, assessing cross-reactivity between various nuts and other seeds, mapping of IgE binding epitopes, and analyzing the effects of the food matrix, food processing, and gastric digestion on allergenicity. This review describes the approaches that can be used for the production of recombinant tree nut allergens and addresses key issues associated with their production and downstream applications. PMID:23911839

  2. A review of allergy and allergen specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bidad, Katayoon; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Farid, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Since 20th century, when allergy was defined, an ongoing attempt for discovering the mechanisms underlying it and its treatment began. Defining allergens as well as cells such as regulatory T-cells and characterizing the antibodies involved in the pathogenesis (including blocking antibodies) have helped very much towards a better understanding of the immunologic process. However, allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT), as a specific curative treatment for allergy also dates back to the beginning of the previous century and has progressed considerably during these years. SIT similar to natural immunomodulation, directs the immune response towards tolerance. New strategies in this field, such as using recombinant allergens, T- and B-cell-epitope-containing peptides, and DNA vaccination have shown promising results. Sublingual immunotherapy, although not yet FDA-approved, as an alternative strategy in SIT has demonstrated efficacy as well as safety. Furthermore, allergen extracts, their standardization and their modification have also been the focus of much research. Undoubtedly, specific immunotherapy is proven to be an efficacious method to treat allergy, so its cost-effectiveness should be estimated in developing countries in order to include it in the country's health priorities. Informing physicians about the new anti-vaccination movement is also crucial. PMID:21358009

  3. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  4. Allergen-specific immunotherapy in pediatric allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Yukselen, Ayfer

    2016-07-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) is the only curative way that can change the immunologic response to allergens and thus can modify the natural progression of allergic diseases. There are some important criteria which contributes significantly on efficacy of AIT, such as the allergen extract used for treatment, the dose and protocol, patient selection in addition to the severity and control of asthma. The initiation of AIT in allergic asthma should be considered in intermittent, mild and moderate cases which coexisting with other allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis, and in case of unacceptable adverse effects of medications. Two important impact of AIT; steroid sparing effect and preventing from progression to asthma should be taken into account in pediatric asthma when making a decision on starting of AIT. Uncontrolled asthma remains a significant risk factor for adverse events and asthma should be controlled both before and during administration of AIT. The evidence concerning the efficacy of subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) for treatment of pediatric asthma suggested that SCIT decreases asthma symptoms and medication scores, whereas SLIT can ameliorate asthma symptoms. Although the effectiveness of SCIT has been shown for both seasonal and perennial allergens, the data for SLIT is less convincing for perennial allergies in pediatric asthma. PMID:27489785

  5. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  6. Allergen immunotherapy in polysensitized patient.

    PubMed

    Hrubiško, M; Špičák, V

    2016-05-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only therapeutic method with positive impact on natural course of allergic disease - affecting clinical development (including the progression of rhinitis to asthma) and new sensitisations. The actual problem is the increasing number of patients manifesting poly-sensitivity in allergy skin tests and / or in specific IgE tests. Usually, AIT is not recommended in such individuals. The objective we are facing is that in many patients tested as poly-reactive, we have to distinguish in which cases it is a true polysensitization, and when it is due to cross-reactivity of specific IgE antibodies induced by panallergens. This may really determine when AIT may be an appropriate course of action. The article focuses on this problem in more detail, applying the long time Czech and Slovak experience with allergy testing and allergen immunotherapy. PMID:27152601

  7. Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Anne-Regine; Scheurer, Stephan; Vieths, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The currently known food allergens are assigned to a relatively small number of protein families. Food allergens grouped into protein families share common functional and structural features that can be attributed to the allergenic potency and potential cross-reactivity of certain proteins. Molecular data, in terms of structural information, biochemical characteristics and clinical relevance for each known allergen, including isoforms and variants, are mainly compiled into four open-access databases. Allergens are designated according to defined criteria by the World Health Organization and the International Union of Immunological Societies Allergen Nomenclature Sub-committee. Food allergies are caused by primary sensitisation to the disease-eliciting food allergens (class I food allergen), or they can be elicited as a consequence of a primary sensitisation to inhalant allergens and subsequent IgE cross-reaction to homologous proteins in food (class II food allergens). Class I and class II allergens display different clinical significance in children and adults and are characterised by different molecular features. In line with this, high stability when exposed to gastrointestinal digestion and heat treatment is attributed to many class I food allergens that frequently induce severe reactions. The stability of a food allergen is determined by its molecular characteristics and can be influenced by structural (chemical) modifications due to thermal processing. Moreover, the immunogenicity and allergenicity of food allergens further depends on specific T cell and B cell epitopes. Although the T cell epitope pattern can be highly diverse for individual patients, several immuno-prominent T cell epitopes have been identified. Such conserved T cell epitopes and IgE cross-reactive B cell epitopes contribute to cross-reactivity between food allergens of the same family and to clinical cross-reactivity, similar to the birch pollen-food syndrome. PMID:26022861

  8. Food Allergens in Mattress Dust in Norwegian Homes - A Potentially Important Source of Allergen Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bertelsen, Randi J.; Fæste, Christiane K.; Granum, Berit; Egaas, Eliann; London, Stephanie J.; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Carlsen, Karin C. Lødrup; Løvik, Martinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Sensitization to food allergens and food allergic reactions are mostly caused by ingesting the allergen, but can also occur from exposure via the respiratory tract or the skin. Little is known about exposure to food allergens in the home environment. Objective To describe the frequency of detection of allergens from fish, egg, milk, and peanut in mattress dust collected from homes of 13 year old adolescents, and secondly to identify home characteristics associated with the presence of food allergen contamination in dust. Methods Food allergens were measured by dot blot analysis in mattress dust from 143 homes in Oslo, Norway. We analyzed associations between home characteristics (collected by parental questionnaires and study technicians) and food allergens by multivariate regression models. Results Fish allergen was detected in 46%, peanut in 41%, milk in 39%, and egg allergen in 22% of the mattress dust samples; only three samples contained none of these allergens. All four food allergens were more frequently detected in mattresses in small dwellings (<100m2) than larger dwellings (≥130 m2); 63-71% of the small dwellings (n=24) had milk, peanut, and fish allergens in the samples compared to 33-44% of the larger dwellings (n=95). Milk, peanut, and egg allergens were more frequently detected in homes with bedroom and kitchen on the same floor as compared with different floors; with odds ratios of 2.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 5.6) for milk, 2.4 (95% CI: 1.0, 6.1) for peanut, and 3.1 (95% CI: 1.3, 7.5) for egg allergens. Conclusions and clinical relevance Food allergens occurred frequently in beds in Norwegian homes, with dwelling size and proximity of kitchen and bedroom as the most important determinants. Due to the amount of time children spend in the bedroom, mattress dust may be an important source of exposure to food allergens. PMID:24304208

  9. [Significance of inhaled environmental allergens].

    PubMed

    Zochert, J

    1983-01-01

    Whereas the importance of pollen as inhalative allergens has been largely investigated and is generally known, the experience in the frequency and the role of the sensibilization with air-borne fungi is relatively limited. In 720 patients with Asthma bronchiale the degree of sensitization has been tested with various extracts of air-borne fungi of SSW Dresden (mould mixture, aspergillin, mucor, cladosporium and penicillium and alternaria). The most frequent and also the strongest reactions were found with alternaria and the smallest part of positive skin reactions with penicillium. An isolated sensitization with mould has been demonstrated in 20 per cent of the cases. In 60 per cent of the tested patients a manifest mould allergy was shown by means of the Inhalative Allergen Test, the most favourable correlation between Intracutaneous Test (ICT) and Inhalative Test (IAT) was found with alternaria (76%). A conformance between ICT and basophils degranulation test (BDT) was stated in 69% of the cases. The aim should be comparable tests with allergen extracts without irritative effects and qualitative measurements of air-borne fungi. PMID:6649704

  10. Scientific Challenges to Free Will and Moral Responsibility

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Here, I review work from three lines of research in cognitive science often taken to threaten free will and moral responsibility. This work concerns conscious deciding, the experience of acting, and the role of largely unnoticed situational influences on behavior. Whether this work in fact threatens free will and moral responsibility depends on how we ought to interpret it, and depends as well on the nature of free and responsible behavior. I discuss different ways this work has been interpreted and argue that though work on conscious deciding and the experience of acting presents no real threat, work on situational influences is more difficult to dismiss. This work may present a real threat, and it may require us to revise our commonsense understanding of free and responsible behavior. But this work may also present ways to augment free and responsible behavior. Determining whether and how advancing science threatens, enhances, or simply describes free will is an ongoing task for scientists and philosophers alike. PMID:26146511

  11. Response of inbred mice to aerosol challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Musa, S A; Kim, Y; Hashim, R; Wang, G Z; Dimmer, C; Smith, D W

    1987-08-01

    An autosomal dominant gene (Bcg), which maps to mouse chromosome 1, has been shown to confer on mice resistance to attenuated Mycobacterium bovis BCG Montreal, Salmonella typhimurium, and Leishmania donovani. Most animal models used for the study of the Bcg gene have involved intravenous injection of a large number of microorganisms (greater than 10(4) CFU). The present study examines the effect of the Bcg gene on the resistance of inbred mice to challenge via the respiratory route with 5 to 10 CFU of virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The number of tubercle bacilli recovered from the lung lobes indicates that the growth kinetics of the microorganism did not differ between BCG-resistant and BCG-susceptible strains of mice. The number of tubercle bacilli recovered from the spleen was also similar among strains. Although there were reproducible differences in the time of first recovery of bacilli from the spleen, these differences appeared to be unrelated to the expression of the Bcg gene. When mice were challenged with purified protein derivative, all strains responded similarly as observed by measurements of footpad swelling. PMID:3112014

  12. Developing Responsive Teachers: A Challenge for a Demographic Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Eugene; Arias, M. Beatriz; Harris Murri, Nancy J.; Serna, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors reflect on the preparation of teachers for English learners (ELs) and articulate the importance of enhancing teacher knowledge through contact and collaboration with diverse ethnolinguistic communities. The authors build on recent research on the preparation of teachers for cultural responsiveness and linguistic…

  13. Benefits and Challenges of School-Based Crisis Response Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Marsha; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Offers a rationale for the importance of school-based intervention in crisis and emergency situations, outlining a model for crisis response policies and procedures. Discusses benefits to schools of developing a team to implement the model, obstacles that can impede full implementation, and strategies for minimizing identified obstacles. (SM)

  14. Family health nursing: a response to the global health challenges.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul; Duffy, Tim; Johnston, Brian; Banks, Pauline; Harkess-Murphy, Eileen; Martin, Colin R

    2013-02-01

    The European Family Health Nursing Project is a revitalized World Health Organization initiative led by the University of the West of Scotland. Partner countries include Armenia, Austria, Germany, Italy, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, and Spain. European Union Lifelong Learning funding was received in 2011 to facilitate a consistency of approach in the development of a definition of family health nursing, required core competencies and capabilities, and consequent education and training requirements. Global health challenges have informed the development of the project: increasingly aging populations, the increasing incidence in noncommunicable diseases that are currently the main cause of death, and the significant progress made in the way health systems have developed to meet the demands in relation to access and equality of health services. Governments and policy makers should develop a health workforce based on the principles of teamwork and interdisciplinarity while recognizing the core contribution of the "specialist generalist" role in the primary care setting. PMID:23288887

  15. BDNF mediates adaptive brain and body responses to energetic challenges.

    PubMed

    Marosi, Krisztina; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-02-01

    Emerging findings suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) serves widespread roles in regulating energy homeostasis by controlling patterns of feeding and physical activity, and by modulating glucose metabolism in peripheral tissues. BDNF mediates the beneficial effects of energetic challenges such as vigorous exercise and fasting on cognition, mood, cardiovascular function, and on peripheral metabolism. By stimulating glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis BDNF bolsters cellular bioenergetics and protects neurons against injury and disease. By acting in the brain and periphery, BDNF increases insulin sensitivity and parasympathetic tone. Genetic factors, a 'couch potato' lifestyle, and chronic stress impair BDNF signaling, and this may contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Novel BDNF-focused interventions are being developed for obesity, diabetes, and neurological disorders. PMID:24361004

  16. Response to Rift Valley Fever in Tanzania: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Fyumagwa, Robert D; Ezekiel, Mangi J; Nyaki, Athanas; Mdaki, Maulid L; Katale, Zablon B; Moshiro, Candida; Keyyu, Julius D

    2011-12-01

    Rift Valley Fever (RVF) is an arthropod borne viral disease affecting livestock (cattle, sheep, goats and camels), wildlife and humans caused by Phlebovirus. The disease occurs in periodic cycles of 4-15 years associated with flooding from unusually high precipitations in many flood-prone habitats. Aedes and Culex spp and other mosquito species are important epidemic vectors. Because of poor living conditions and lack of knowledge on the pathogenesis of RVF, nomadic pastoralists and agro-pastoralists are at high risk of contracting the disease during epidemics. RVF is a professional hazard for health and livestock workers because of poor biosafety measures in routine activities including lack of proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Direct exposure to infected animals can occur during handling and slaughter or through veterinary and obstetric procedures or handling of specimens in laboratory. The episodic nature of the disease creates special challenges for its mitigation and control and many of the epidemics happen when the governments are not prepared and have limited resource to contain the disease at source. Since its first description in 1930s Tanzania has recorded six epidemics, three of which were after independence in 1961. However, the 2007 epidemic was the most notable and wide spread with fatal human cases among pastoralists and agro-pastoralists concurrent with high livestock mortality. Given all the knowledge that exist on the epidemiology of the disease, still the 2006/2007 epidemic occurred when the government of Tanzania was not prepared to contain the disease at source. This paper reviews the epidemiology, reporting and outbreak-investigation, public awareness, preparedness plans and policy as well as challenges for its control in Tanzania. PMID:26591988

  17. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H.; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca2+ elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca2+ elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca2+ entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  18. Allergens stimulate store-operated calcium entry and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jairaman, Amit; Maguire, Chelsea H; Schleimer, Robert P; Prakriya, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant immune responses to environmental allergens including insect allergens from house dust mites and cockroaches contribute to allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma in susceptible individuals. Airway epithelial cells (AECs) play a critical role in this process by sensing the proteolytic activity of allergens via protease-activated receptors (PAR2) to initiate inflammatory and immune responses in the airway. Elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) is an important signaling event in this process, yet the fundamental mechanism by which allergens induce Ca(2+) elevations in AECs remains poorly understood. Here we find that extracts from dust mite and cockroach induce sustained Ca(2+) elevations in AECs through the activation of Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels encoded by Orai1 and STIM1. CRAC channel activation occurs, at least in part, through allergen mediated stimulation of PAR2 receptors. The ensuing Ca(2+) entry then activates NFAT/calcineurin signaling to induce transcriptional production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8. These findings highlight a key role for CRAC channels as regulators of allergen induced inflammatory responses in the airway. PMID:27604412

  19. The direct peptide reactivity assay: selectivity of chemical respiratory allergens.

    PubMed

    Lalko, Jon F; Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank; Foertsch, Leslie M; Api, Anne Marie; Dearman, Rebecca J

    2012-10-01

    It is well known that some chemicals are capable of causing allergic diseases of the skin and respiratory tract. Commonly, though not exclusively, chemical allergens are associated with the selective development of skin or respiratory sensitization. The reason for this divergence is unclear, although it is hypothesized that the nature of interactions between the chemical hapten and proteins is influential. The direct peptide reactivity assay (DPRA) has been developed as a screen for the identification of skin-sensitizing chemicals, and here we describe the use of this method to explore whether differences exist between skin and respiratory allergens with respect to their peptide-binding properties. Known skin and respiratory sensitizers were reacted with synthetic peptides containing either lysine (Lys) or cysteine (Cys) for 24 h. The samples were analyzed by HPLC/UV, and the loss of peptide from the reaction mixture was expressed as the percent depletion compared with the control. The potential for preferential reactivity was evaluated by comparing the ratio of Lys to Cys depletion (Lys:Cys ratio). The results demonstrate that the majority of respiratory allergens are reactive in the DPRA, and that in contrast to most skin-sensitizing chemicals, preferentially react with the Lys peptide. These data suggest that skin and respiratory chemical allergens can result in different protein conjugates, which may in turn influence the quality of induced immune responses. Overall, these investigations reveal that the DPRA has considerable potential to be incorporated into tiered testing approaches for the identification and characterization of chemical respiratory allergens. PMID:22713598

  20. The Challenge for Gene Therapy: Innate Immune Response to Adenoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Thaci, Bart; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Adenoviruses are the most commonly used vectors for gene therapy. Despite the promising safety profile demonstrated in clinical trials, the efficacy of using adenoviruses for gene therapy is poor. A major hurdle to adenoviral-mediated gene therapy is the innate immune system. Cell-mediated recognition of viruses via capsid components or nucleic acids has received significant attention, principally thought to be regulated by the toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antiviral innate immune responses are initiated by the infected cell, which activates the interferon (IFN) response to block viral replication, while simultaneously releasing chemokines to attract neutrophils, mononuclear- and natural killer-cells. While the IFN and cellular recruitment pathways are activated and regulated independently of each other, both are required to overcome immune escape mechanisms by adenoviruses. Recent work has shown that the generation of adenoviral vectors lacking specific transcriptionally-active regions decreases immune system activation and increases the chance for immune escape. In this review, we elucidate how adenoviral vector modifications alter the IFN and innate inflammatory pathway response and propose future targets with clinically-translational relevance. PMID:21399236

  1. Influence of temperament on inflammatory cytokine responses of cattle to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously reported that temperament influenced rectal temperature, sickness scores, and cortisol and epinephrine concentrations following an LPS challenge. Temperamental bulls displayed less sickness, fever and less of an epinephrine response 1 hour after an LPS challenge when compared to calm a...

  2. Exposure to food allergens through inflamed skin promotes intestinal food allergy via the TSLP-basophil axis

    PubMed Central

    Noti, Mario; Kim, Brian S.; Siracusa, Mark C.; Rak, Gregory D.; Kubo, Masato; Moghaddam, Amin E.; Sattentau, Quentin A.; Comeau, Michael R.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Artis, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to food allergens through a disrupted skin barrier has been recognized as a potential factor in the increasing prevalence of food allergy. Objective To test the immunological mechanisms by which epicutaneous sensitization to food allergens predisposes to intestinal food allergy. Methods Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) or peanut on an atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion followed by intragastric antigen challenge. Antigen-specific serum IgE levels and Th2 cytokine responses were measured by ELISA. Expression of type-2 cytokines and mast cell proteases in the intestine were measured by real-time PCR. Accumulation of basophils in the skin and mast cells in the intestine was examined by flow cytometry. In vivo basophil depletion was achieved by diphtheria toxin treatment of Baso-DTR mice. For cell transfer studies, the basophil population was expanded in vivo by hydrodynamic tail vein injection of thymic stromal lymphopoietin cDNA plasmid. Results Sensitization to food allergens through an atopic dermatitis-like skin lesion is associated with an expansion of TSLP-elicited basophils in the skin that promote antigen-specific Th2 cytokine responses, elevated antigen-specific serum IgE levels and the accumulation of mast cells in the intestine promoting the development of intestinal food allergy. Critically, disruption of TSLP responses or depletion of basophils reduced the susceptibility to intestinal food allergy while transfer of TSLP-elicited basophils into intact skin promoted disease. Conclusion Epicutaneous sensitization on a disrupted skin barrier is associated with the accumulation of TSLP-elicited basophils that are necessary and sufficient to promote antigen-induced intestinal food allergy. PMID:24560412

  3. Education and the Environment -- Needs, Challenges and Responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, F. M.

    2008-12-01

    As the world's populations and human impact on the planet increases, the need for public understanding of science and geography has never been greater. This understanding must go beyond gathering data and looking at statistics; we now must understand the increasingly complex connections that face us - from climate change to decreases in species diversity, from population growth to changes in living standards. In addition, new scientific discoveries are becoming more critical to our decisions and options for the future. Yet, on average it can take up to ten years for "new" scientific discoveries to be included in textbooks. To assure that our society is best prepared for the challenges it faces, our education systems must address these issues and provide the groundwork of instruction for basic understanding of our world, our dependence on its health and the changes human activities can make. This presentation will discuss what the National Geographic Society provides to better understand our environment and its future. Discussion and handouts will include formal k-12 lesson plans and "Classroom Companions", special features and maps that illustrate fundamental scientific concepts, videos that provide insight into possible future impacts of human activities, "Climate Change PTA Kits" that extend learning to families and change in educational policy in states like California that seek to increase access to environmental education in the classroom.

  4. Summary of the ACS symposium on Advances in Food Allergen Detection.

    PubMed

    Ross, Mark M; Jackson, Lauren

    2013-06-19

    A symposium titled "Advances in Food Allergen Detection" was held at the 243rd National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in March 2012 in San Diego, CA, and was sponsored by the ACS Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The purpose of the symposium was to convene the leaders in the food allergen analysis field for presentations on, and discussions of, the state of the art, new developments, and critical challenges in the detection and quantitation of allergenic proteins in foods. Twenty-five presentations were delivered by speakers representing academic, government, and industrial institutions in 10 countries. The presentations covered all aspects of food allergens, including a historical progress review, regulatory policies, clinical practices, food-processing effects, food production equipment cross-contamination and cleaning, and the performance of several food allergen analytical strategies and technologies. This paper is intended to provide a brief summary of the presentations as well as a record of the proceedings of the symposium, which was deemed a great success in advancing food allergen analysis. PMID:23167825

  5. Establishment of Reference Doses for residues of allergenic foods: report of the VITAL Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steve L; Baumert, Joseph L; Kruizinga, Astrid G; Remington, Benjamin C; Crevel, Rene W R; Brooke-Taylor, Simon; Allen, Katrina J; Houben, Geert

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, an expert panel was assembled to establish appropriate Reference Doses for allergenic food residues as a part of the VITAL (Voluntary Incidental Trace Allergen Labeling) program of The Allergen Bureau of Australia & New Zealand (ABA). These Reference Doses would guide advisory labeling decisions for use on food labels. Individual NOAELs and LOAELs were obtained from clinical challenges of food-allergic subjects. Statistical dose-distribution models (log-normal, log-logistic, Weibull) were applied to the individual NOAELs and LOAELs for each allergenic food. The Reference Doses, in terms of mg of total protein from the allergenic food, were based upon either the ED01 (for peanut, cow's milk), the 95% lower confidence interval of the ED05 (for wheat, soybean, cashew, shrimp, sesame seed, mustard, and lupine), or both (egg, hazelnut) using all appropriate statistical dose-distribution models. Reference Doses were established for 11 allergenic foods ranging from 0.03 mg for egg protein to 10mg for shrimp protein. Reference Doses were not established for fish or celery due to poor model fits with existing data. Reference Doses were not established for other tree nuts beyond hazelnut and cashew because of the absence of data on NOAELs and LOAELs from individual subjects. PMID:24184597

  6. The HIV epidemic in China: history, response, and challenge.

    PubMed

    He, Na; Detels, Roger

    2005-01-01

    The first case of AIDS was reported in 1985 in China, but by the early 21st century, the government estimated that there were 840,000 citizens living with HIV/AIDS. The number is increasing rapidly. The major risk groups are injection drug users (IDUSs; 43%) and former plasma donors (27%), but rates among heterosexual groups are rising rapidly. Sentinel surveillance was initiated in 1986, and now includes IDUs, men-who-have-sex-with-men, sexually transmitted disease clinic attendees, antenatal women, long-distance truck drivers, and sex workers. Although the government was slow to respond to the epidemic in the late 20th century, it has made a vigorous response in the early 21st century. Components of that response include implementation and evaluation of harm reduction programs for IDUs, education to increase knowledge and reduce stigma, treatment and social support for rural and poor HIV/AIDS patients, widespread testing, and increased funding for HIV/AIDS programs. International agencies have been generous in their support of the government initiatives. To successfully combat the epidemic, China needs to develop and train the necessary infrastructure to implement its intervention programs, particularly in the rural areas, to vigorously combat stigma and discrimination, support research especially in the universities and research institutions other than the China Centers for Disease Control, develop a system for efficient exchange of research and program information, and update legislation to reflect the current situation. PMID:16354555

  7. Can we explain the allergenicity of peanuts on the basis of the three-dimensional structure of its allergens and use the information to devise means of eliminating peanut allergy?

    PubMed

    Mikita, Cecilia P; Padlan, Eduardo A

    2012-11-01

    Helical bundles are found in all the known structures of peanut allergens. The peptide fragments, which survive gastrointestinal digestion of the allergens and are absorbed intact, are hypothesized to reassociate and form stable helical bundles in the circulation, which could elicit a specific IgE response resulting in peanut allergy. The hypothesis is supported by the finding of a diminished allergenicity of an isoform of the peanut allergen, Ara h 3, which has a major deletion. A very probable consequence of this deletion is the reduced tendency to form a stable helix bundle. The discovery of structurally disrupted isoforms of the other peanut allergens and the breeding of plants that contain only those isoforms could lead to the elimination of peanut allergy. PMID:22910770

  8. The indoor air and asthma: the role of cat allergens

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Libby A.; Erwin, Elizabeth A.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A. E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The objective is to discuss recent progress in our understanding of the role of the indoor environment in asthma, focusing on the special role of cat allergens. Recent findings Sensitization to Fel d 1 is the dominant event in inhalant responses to cat; however, there are also IgE responses to the lipocalin (Fel d 4), to cat albumin (Fel d 2), and to the oligosaccharide galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal) on cat IgA (Fel d 5w) and other molecules. The dose response and routes of sensitization for these allergens are now thought to be diverse. It is important to remember that exposure outside a house with a cat is sufficient to cause sensitization. Furthermore, the only solid evidence about a role in asthma relates to Fel d 1. Recently, it has been shown that tolerance associated with early exposure to cats can persist to age 18 and that IgE to alpha-gal (on cat IgA) is not related to asthma. In addition, a recent study of anti-IgE reinforces the evidence that IgE antibodies to indoor allergens make a major contribution to asthma severity. Summary Exposure to Fel d 1 in a home with a cat is far higher than the levels necessary to induce an allergic (IgE antibody) response. In keeping with that, children may develop tolerance, which can be long-lived. In addition, there is increasing evidence that IgE antibodies to an inhalant allergen, such as Fel d 1, dust mite, or cockroach, are causally related to lung inflammation and asthma. PMID:22081090

  9. Deciphering the roles of specific wheat grain proteins in flour functionality, allergenic potential and the response of the grain to the growth environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Among the wheat gluten proteins, the omega-5 gliadins show some of the most notable changes in response to post-anthesis fertilizer or high temperatures during grain development. These proteins are also associated with the serious food allergy wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA). RN...

  10. Environmentally Responsible Aviation - Real Solutions for Environmental Challenges Facing Aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Fayette; Thomas, Russell; Burley, Casey; Nickol, Craig; Lee, Chi-Ming; Tong, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The combined reality of persistently strong growth in air traffic and the vital economic role of the air transport system result in continued demand for the progress of technology for the reduction of aircraft noise, emissions of oxides of nitrogen, and fuel burn. NASA s Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project has set aggressive goals in these three areas including a noise goal of 42 dB cumulative below the Stage 4 certification level. The goal for the reduction of oxides of nitrogen is 75% below the current standard. The fuel burn reduction goal is 50% below that of a current state-of-the-art aircraft. Furthermore, the overall goal of ERA is to mature technologies that will meet these goals simultaneously and with a timeframe of 2020 for technical readiness. This paper outlines the key technologies and the progress achieved to date toward the goals.

  11. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  12. Psychoanalysis as a science: a response to the new challenges.

    PubMed

    Wallerstein, R S

    1986-07-01

    Few theoretical issues in psychoanalysis have been more constantly argued than the status of our discipline as a science. For long the attack has been from the logical positivists and the extensions of their argument by Karl Popper. Over recent decades the debate about the place of our metapsychology has intensified the concerns about our scientific status. In this paper I respond briefly to the logical positivist, the Popperian, and the information-processing systems theory arguments and then develop at greater length a response to the two current, most widespread philosophy-of-science assaults upon our credibility as science, that of the hermeneuticists (Ricoeur, Habermas, Gadamer, and others), and the newest, that of the philosopher, Adolf Grünbaum. PMID:3749396

  13. Glove-derived foreign proteins induce allergen-specific IgE in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Busch, Marion; Schröder, Claudia; Baron, Jens-Malte; Ott, Hagen; Bruckner, Thomas; Diepgen, Thomas L; Mahler, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Currently, most medical gloves are produced with a low content of natural rubber latex (NRL) protein. However, they may be substituted by proteins of foreign origin to maintain specific properties of the material. The aim of this study was to investigate the allergenicity and immunogenicity of unexpected proteins (i.e., soy and casein) compared with NRL proteins in a murine model in BALB/c mice. All respective allergen sources (extracts from three brands of NRL gloves, soy, and casein) were able to induce significant allergen-specific IgE and IgG(1) responses. On average, the highest IgE induction occurred after immunization with NRL, followed by soy and casein. Certain individuals from each treatment group exhibited levels of specific IgE as high as due to NRL. To analyze further specific IgE responses on a single allergen level, we established a microarray based on recombinant allergens for allergen-specific murine IgE detection. Besides specific IgE against rHev b 3, -6, -7, -8, and -11, specific IgE against kappa-casein could be detected in mice immunized with NRL glove extract, indicating a sensitization potential of the contained foreign protein. The substitution of genuine latex proteins by proteins of foreign origin may lead to a shift and de novo increase in sensitization to the finished products. PMID:18049454

  14. [From the allergen-recognition by antibodies to new therapeutic concepts].

    PubMed

    Hantusch, Brigitte; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2008-01-01

    Cross-linking of IgE antibodies through allergens is a basic event in type I allergy and leads to the immediate release of mediators like histamine, responsible for allergic symptoms like rhino-conjunctivitis or asthma. Critical for the binding of allergens to IgE are the IgE-epitopes, which represent a congregation of several amino acid residues often derived from different regions of the allergen. By means of the mimotope-technology, we isolated peptides from phage libraries, which were able to structurally mimic IgE-epitopes of the plant allergens Bet v 1 (birch) and Phl p 5a (timothy grass). Hence, these are candidates for an epitope-specific immunotherapy. In this mode of immunotherapy, it is the aim to induce IgG antibodies directed exclusively against the IgE-epitopes of allergens without induction of anaphylactogenic IgG species, and without the risk of anaphylaxis through cross-linking of IgE. Immunizing mice, we applied the mimotopes displayed on bacteriophages as well as on alternative carrier systems to enhance their antigenicity. With these systems it was possible to elicit an allergen-specific immune response, which was also accompanied by the appropriate T-cell help. Mimotopes resemble a promising concept for an epitope-tailored immunotherapy of allergic patients. PMID:18286245

  15. Abr, a negative regulator of Rac, attenuates cockroach allergen-induced asthma in a mouse model1

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Dapeng; Fei, Fei; Lim, Min; Yu, Min; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Abr deactivates Rac, a master molecular switch that positively regulates many immune cell functions, by converting it to its GDP-bound conformation. Here we report that in the absence of Abr function, cockroach allergen (CRA)-immunized mice experienced a fatal asthma attack when challenged with CRA. The asthma in abr−/− mice was characterized by increased pulmonary mucus production, elevated serum IgE and leukocyte airway infiltration. Decreased pulmonary compliance was further documented by increased airway resistance upon methacholine challenge. Peribronchial and bronchio-alveolar lavage eosinophils, key cells associated with allergic asthma, were increased in abr−/− mice, but adoptive transfer of this cell type from immunized mice to naïve controls followed by CRA challenge showed that eosinophils are not primarily responsible for differences in airway resistance between controls and abr null mutants. CD4+ T cell numbers in the airways of CRA-challenged abr−/− mice were also significantly increased compared to controls, as were the Th2 T cell-secreted cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in total lung. Interestingly, when control and abr−/− CD4+ T cells from CRA-immunized mice were transferred to wild type animals, airway resistance upon challenge with CRA was significantly higher in mice transplanted with T cells lacking Abr function. CD4+ T cells from CRA-immunized and challenged abr−/− mice contained elevated levels of activated Rac-GTP, compared to wild type controls. Functionally, abr−/− CD4+ T cells from CRA-exposed mice showed significantly enhanced chemotaxis towards CCL21. These results identify Abr-regulated CD4+ T cell migration as an important component of severe cockroach allergen evoked allergic asthma in mice. PMID:24058174

  16. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  17. Evaluating variability of allergens in commodity crops.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crops with significant food allergen issues, include legumes, peanut and soybean, cereal grains, such as wheat and maize, and tree nuts (walnut, Brazil nut, among other phylogenetically diverse species) (Teuber et al. 2006). Officially recognized allergenic proteins may include one or multiple prot...

  18. Reducing food allergenicity at the molecular level.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food allergens are a significant worldwide public health issue. Estimates for the prevalence of food allergies are around 1-2 % of the total population and up to 8 % of children; although, the prevalence may vary between populations and age groups. Peanuts are one of the most allergenic foods. The...

  19. Vaccine-Induced Antibody Responses Prevent the Induction of Interferon Type I Responses Upon a Homotypic Live Virus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Chan, J; Babb, R; David, S C; McColl, S R; Alsharifi, M

    2016-03-01

    During acute viral infections, innate immunity provides essential protective measures to minimize virus dissemination and regulate adaptive immunity. This helps to successfully eliminate the pathogen and establish long-term memory. Here, we investigated the effect of vaccine-induced antibody responses on the induction of IFN-I responses and the associated lymphocyte activation using influenza A virus vaccination and challenge models. Mice were vaccinated with gamma-irradiated influenza A virus (γ-FLU) and challenged three weeks later with live virus. Our data show a significant reduction in IFN-I responses and lymphocyte activation following a homotypic virus challenge. We confirmed the role of vaccine-induced antibody responses in the observed impairment of IFN-I and the associated lymphocyte activation using adoptive transfer of immune sera and the administration of sera-treated viruses prior to challenge. Overall, we addressed a fundamental concept in immunology and provided experimental data illustrating the inhibition of IFN-I responses in vaccinated animals upon a homotypic virus challenge. PMID:26715418

  20. Late-developing rostral ventrolateral medullary surface responses to cardiovascular challenges during sleep.

    PubMed

    Richard, Christopher A; Rector, David M; Macey, Paul M; Ali, Noorjahan; Harper, Ronald M

    2003-09-19

    Pressor and depressor manipulations are usually followed by compensatory autonomic, respiratory, somatomotor or arousal responses that limit the extent of blood pressure change. Of neural sites participating in blood pressure control, the rostral ventrolateral medullary surface (RVLMS) contributes significantly, and exhibits rapid-onset overall activity declines and increases to pressor and depressor challenges, respectively. In addition, longer-latency physiological responses develop that further compensate for the homeostatic challenge; some of these later influences are associated with arousal. Late-developing RVLMS activity changes accompanying physiologic responses that normalize a cardiovascular manipulation may provide insights into compensatory neural mechanisms during sleep following sustained or extreme blood pressure changes. We used intrinsic optical imaging procedures in seven unanesthetized adult cats to examine RVLMS and control site responses to pressor and depressor challenges during sleep that resulted in somatomotor, respiratory, heart rate or electroencephalographic indications of late-developing (post-baroreflex) compensatory responses. Although initial RVLMS responses differed in direction between pressor and depressor challenges, neural activity increased later in both manipulations, coincident with overt physiological manifestations indicative of compensatory responses, including arousal. Arousal occurred in 44% of blood pressure challenges. Comparable late-developing neural activity increases were not apparent in control sites. Latencies of late RVLMS responses during rapid eye movement sleep were significantly longer than in quiet sleep for pressor challenges. The pattern of the late RVLMS responses was not dependent on arousal, and suggests that the RVLMS participates in both the early baroreflex response and the late-developing compensatory actions. PMID:12957369

  1. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  2. Challenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-09-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy.

  3. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  4. Hymenoptera allergens: from venom to "venome".

    PubMed

    Spillner, Edzard; Blank, Simon; Jakob, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In Western Europe, Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA) primarily relates to venoms of the honeybee and the common yellow jacket. In contrast to other allergen sources, only a few major components of Hymenoptera venoms had been characterized until recently. Improved expression systems and proteomic detection strategies have allowed the identification and characterization of a wide range of additional allergens. The field of HVA research has moved rapidly from focusing on venom extract and single major allergens to a molecular understanding of the entire "venome" as a system of unique and characteristic components. An increasing number of such components has been identified, characterized regarding function, and assessed for allergenic potential. Moreover, advanced expression strategies for recombinant production of venom allergens allow selective modification of molecules and provide insight into different types of immunoglobulin E reactivities and sensitization patterns. The obtained information contributes to an increased diagnostic precision in HVA and may serve for monitoring, re-evaluation, and improvement of current therapeutic strategies. PMID:24616722

  5. Malaysia and harm reduction: the challenges and responses.

    PubMed

    Reid, Gary; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Sran, Sangeeta Kaur

    2007-03-01

    In Malaysia the response to illicit drug use has been largely punitive with the current goal of the Malaysian government being to achieve a drug-free society by 2015. This paper outlines the results of a desk-based situation assessment conducted over a 3-week period in 2004. Additional events, examined in 2005, were also included to describe more recent policy developments and examine how these came about. Despite punitive drug policy there has been a substantial rise in the number of drug users in the country. Over two-thirds of HIV/AIDS cases are among injecting drug users (IDUs) and there has been an exponential rise in the number of cases reported. Further, data suggest high risk drug use practices are widespread. Harm reduction initiatives have only recently been introduced in Malaysia. The successful piloting of substitution therapies, in particular methadone and buprenorphine, is cause for genuine hope for the rapid development of such interventions. In 2005 the government announced it will allow methadone maintenance programmes to operate beyond the pilot phase and needle and syringe exchange programmes will be established to serve the needs of IDUs. PMID:17689356

  6. Death and best interests: a response to the legal challenge

    PubMed Central

    Baines, Paul

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper I argued that we do not have an objective conception of best interests and that this is a particular problem because the courts describe that they use an ‘…objective approach or test. That test is the best interests of the patient’ when choosing for children. I further argued that there was no obvious way in which we could hope to develop an objective notion of best interests. As well as this, I argued that a best-interest-based approach was a particular problem around the time of death of some children. A response from a legal perspective argued that, while there is not a clear conception of objective best interests, the courts have a well-described approach to finding a child's objective best interests. In this paper, I argue that without clear agreement on an objective conception of best interests, the courts are unable to locate an objective sense of best interests and that the solutions do not solve the problems that were identified in the initial paper ‘Death and best interests’. PMID:21666740

  7. Immune response of sows and their offspring to pseudorabies virus: serum neutralization response to vaccination and field virus challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J C; Thawley, D G; Solorzano, R F

    1984-01-01

    One month prior to breeding, sows were vaccinated with an attenuated pseudorabies virus vaccine or challenged with a field strain of pseudorabies virus. A third group of sows were not vaccinated or challenged before breeding. Pigs from these sows were vaccinated at 3, 6, or 12 weeks of age and challenged with virulent virus three weeks later. One pig from each litter served as an unvaccinated, unchallenged control. Serum neutralization titers of these pigs were monitored from birth until 22 weeks of age. Titers of the sows were monitored through breeding, gestation and farrowing. The maximum prefarrowing anti-pseudorabies virus titer in the field virus challenged sows occurred four weeks following challenge. A significant decline in titers occurred at farrowing. Titers rose from one week postfarrowing and then declined. Titers in the field virus infected sows were consistently two to threefold greater than those of the vaccinated sows. The maximum prefarrowing anti-pseudorabies virus titer in the vaccinated sows occurred six weeks following vaccination. The geometric mean titer in these sow's then decreased and increased for two weeks after farrowing. The results in the pigs can be summarized as follows: Pigs from control sows had a greater serological response following field virus challenge than following vaccination with a modified live virus. Pigs from control sows responded serologically to vaccination at 3, 6 and 12 weeks of age. Pigs from control sows which were challenged at 6, 9 and 15 weeks of age had similar antibody responses. Pigs from vaccinated sows had no increase in titer following vaccination at three and six weeks of age. Titers increased when these pigs were vaccinated at 12 weeks of age. There was no significant increase in mean titers of pigs from challenged sows following vaccination at 3, 6 and 12 weeks of age. Vaccinated pigs from control and vaccinated sows had a secondary response following challenge three weeks after vaccination

  8. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: Screening for sensitization potential

    SciTech Connect

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M.; Copeland, Lisa B.; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D.W.

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naive individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approx 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods.

  9. Biomarkers of acute respiratory allergen exposure: screening for sensitization potential.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M; Copeland, Lisa B; Vallanat, Beena; Boykin, Elizabeth; Ward, Marsha D W

    2010-04-15

    Effective hazard screening will require the development of high-throughput or in vitro assays for the identification of potential sensitizers. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify potential biomarkers that differentiate the response to allergens vs non-allergens following an acute exposure in naïve individuals. Female BALB/c mice received a single intratracheal aspiration exposure to Metarhizium anisopliae crude antigen (MACA) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) or HBSS alone. Mice were terminated after 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was evaluated to determine total and differential cellularity, total protein concentration and LDH activity. RNA was isolated from lung tissue for microarray analysis and qRT-PCR. MACA administration induced a rapid increase in BALF neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and total protein compared to BSA or HBSS. Microarray analysis demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in cytokine production, signaling, inflammatory cell recruitment, adhesion and activation in 3 and 12 h MACA-treated samples compared to BSA or HBSS. Further analyses allowed identification of approximately 100 candidate biomarker genes. Eleven genes were selected for further assessment by qRT-PCR. Of these, 6 demonstrated persistently increased expression (Ccl17, Ccl22, Ccl7, Cxcl10, Cxcl2, Saa1), while C3ar1 increased from 6-24 h. In conclusion, a single respiratory exposure of mice to an allergenic mold extract induces an inflammatory response which is distinct in phenotype and gene transcription from the response to a control protein. Further validation of these biomarkers with additional allergens and irritants is needed. These biomarkers may facilitate improvements in screening methods. PMID:20045013

  10. Reproducibility of pre-syncopal responses to repeated orthostatic challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Grasser, Erik; Roessler, Andreas; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    Aims: To study individual patterns of hemodynamic adjustments in subjects reaching orthostatically induced presyncope and to observe whether these are reproducible across three runs. Procedures and methods: 10 healthy young males were subjected to extreme cardiovascular stress three times: Graded orthostatic stress (GOS), consisting of head-up tilt combined with lower body negative pressure, was used to achieve a pre-syncopal end-point. All test runs were separated by two week intervals. Orthostatic effects on cardiac and vascular function were continuously monitored and standing times noted. Results: Across the group, heart rate (HR) increased 112 percent, while mean arterial blood pressure dropped by 15 percent, pulse pressure by 36 percent, and stroke volume index by 51 percent on average from supine control to presyncope. Repetitions of the orthostatic protocols did not influence standing times of test persons from the 1st to the 3rd trial (15 plus minus 6 to 17 plus minus 7 min). Some individuals responded either with an increase in HR only, while the others with combined HR and total peripheral resistance increase, albeit shortly, and this individual specifc pattern was observed across the three runs of combined GOS. Conclusion: Strategies for maintaining blood pressure in response to central hypovolemia in subjects induced by orthostatic stress are different between subjects. However, the same individual specific hemodynamic mechanism is employed each time to maintain the blood pressure when reconfronted by this stress. Individual patterns of hemodynamic adjustments to orthostatic stress are highly reproducible when these subjects reach pre-syncope three times.

  11. Creating community responsibility for child protection: possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Daro, Deborah; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2009-01-01

    Deborah Daro and Kenneth Dodge observe that efforts to prevent child abuse have historically focused on directly improving the skills of parents who are at risk for or engaged in maltreatment. But, as experts increasingly recognize that negative forces within a community can overwhelm even well-intentioned parents, attention is shifting toward creating environments that facilitate a parent's ability to do the right thing. The most sophisticated and widely used community prevention programs, say Daro and Dodge, emphasize the reciprocal interplay between individual-family behavior and broader neighborhood, community, and cultural contexts. The authors examine five different community prevention efforts, summarizing for each both the theory of change and the empirical evidence concerning its efficacy. Each program aims to enhance community capacity by expanding formal and informal resources and establishing a normative cultural context capable of fostering collective responsibility for positive child development. Over the past ten years, researchers have explored how neighborhoods influence child development and support parenting. Scholars are still searching for agreement on the most salient contextual factors and on how to manipulate these factors to increase the likelihood parents will seek out, find, and effectively use necessary and appropriate support. The current evidence base for community child abuse prevention, observe Daro and Dodge, offers both encouragement and reason for caution. Although theory and empirical research suggest that intervention at the neighborhood level is likely to prevent child maltreatment, designing and implementing a high-quality, multifaceted community prevention initiative is expensive. Policy makers must consider the trade-offs in investing in strategies to alter community context and those that expand services for known high-risk individuals. The authors conclude that if the concept of community prevention is to move beyond the

  12. Listening to mozart reduces allergic skin wheal responses and in vitro allergen-specific IgE production in atopic dermatitis patients with latex allergy.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    In atopic dermatitis patients with latex allergy, listening to Mozart reduced skin wheal responses induced by latex, but not by histamine, whereas listening to Beethoven failed to produce similar results. Listening to Mozart also decreased in vitro total IgE and latex-specific IgE production with concomitant skewing of the cytokine pattern toward the Th1 type, that is, an increase in Th1 cytokine production and decrease in Th2 cytokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, whereas listening to Beethoven failed to do so. These results suggest that therapy using specific types of music may be an effective treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:14977243

  13. Evolution and Ontogeny of Stress Response to Social Challenges in the Human Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flinn, Mark V.

    2006-01-01

    The stress response systems of the human child are highly sensitive to social challenges. Because stress hormones can have negative developmental and health consequences, this presents an evolutionary paradox: Why would natural selection have favored mechanisms that elevate stress hormone levels in response to psychosocial stimuli? Two…

  14. Angus and Romosinuano steers exhibit differential acute phase responses following an endotoxin challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our primary objective was to elucidate the acute phase response in cattle while evaluating potential genetic differences between two diverse Bos taurus breeds [Angus (AG) and Romosinuano (RO)] in response to an endotoxin challenge. The Romosinuano is a tropically adapted Bos taurus breed developed i...

  15. NEUROTOXIC EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS: DATA GAPS THAT CHALLENGE DOSE-RESPONSE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neurotoxic effects of environmental agents: Data gaps that challenge dose-response estimation
    S Gutter*, P Mendola+, SG Selevan**, D Rice** (*UNC Chapel Hill; +US EPA, NHEERL; **US EPA, NCEA)

    Dose-response estimation is a critical feature of risk assessment. It can be...

  16. Allergen Atlas: a comprehensive knowledge center and analysis resource for allergen information

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Joo Chuan; Lim, Shen Jean; Muh, Hon Cheng; Chew, Fook Tim; Tammi, Martti T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: A variety of specialist databases have been developed to facilitate the study of allergens. However, these databases either contain different subsets of allergen data or are deficient in tools for assessing potential allergenicity of proteins. Here, we describe Allergen Atlas, a comprehensive repository of experimentally validated allergen sequences collected from in-house laboratory, online data submission, literature reports and all existing general-purpose and specialist databases. Each entry was manually verified, classified and hyperlinked to major databases including Swiss-Prot, Protein Data Bank (PDB), Gene Ontology (GO), Pfam and PubMed. The database is integrated with analysis tools that include: (i) keyword search, (ii) BLAST, (iii) position-specific iterative BLAST (PSI-BLAST), (iv) FAO/WHO criteria search, (v) graphical representation of allergen information network and (vi) online data submission. The latest version contains information of 1593 allergen sequences (496 IUIS allergens, 978 experimentally verified allergens and 119 new sequences), 56 IgE epitope sequences, 679 links to PDB structures and 155 links to Pfam domains. Availability: Allergen Atlas is freely available at http://tiger.dbs.nus.edu.sg/ATLAS/. Contact: martti@nus.edu.sg. PMID:19213741

  17. Colonoscopic allergen provocation (COLAP): a new diagnostic approach for gastrointestinal food allergy.

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, S C; Mayer, J; Wedemeyer, J; Meier, P N; Zeck-Kapp, G; Wedi, B; Kapp, A; Cetin, Y; Gebel, M; Manns, M P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical relevance of gastrointestinal food allergy in adults is largely unknown because the mechanisms are poorly understood and the diagnosis is difficult to confirm. AIMS: To improve the diagnostic means for confirming intestinal food allergy on an objective basis, a new colonoscopic allergen provocation (COLAP) test was developed. PATIENTS: The COLAP test was performed in 70 adult patients with abdominal symptoms suspected to be related to food allergy, and in five healthy volunteers. METHODS: During the COLAP test, the caecal mucosa was challenged endoscopically with three food antigen extracts, a buffer control, and a positive control (histamine). The mucosal weal and flare reaction was registered semiquantitatively 20 minutes after challenge, and tissue biopsy specimens were examined for mast cell and eosinophil activation. RESULTS: No severe systemic anaphylactic reactions were found in response to intestinal challenge. The COLAP test was positive to at least one food antigen in 54 of 70 patients (77%), whereas no reaction in response to antigen was found in healthy volunteers. Antigen induced weal and flare reactions were correlated with intestinal mast cell and eosinophil activation, as well as with patients' history of adverse reactions to food, but not with serum concentrations of total or specific IgE or skin test results. CONCLUSION: The COLAP test may be a useful diagnostic measure in patients with suspected intestinal food allergy and may provide a new tool for the study of underlying mechanisms. Images PMID:9245928

  18. Effects of NO2 and Ozone on Pollen Allergenicity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Ulrike; Ernst, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes the available data of the air pollutants NO2 and ozone on allergenic pollen from different plant species, focusing on potentially allergenic components of the pollen, such as allergen content, protein release, IgE-binding, or protein modification. Various in vivo and in vitro studies on allergenic pollen are shown and discussed. PMID:26870080

  19. Using magnetic beads to reduce reanut allergens from peanut extracts.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferric irons (Fe3+) and phenolic compounds have been shown to bind to peanut allergens. An easy way to isolate peanut allergens is by use of magnetic beads attached with or without phenolics to capture peanut allergens or allergen-Fe3+ complexes, thus, achieving the goal of producing peanut extracts...

  20. Effects of NO2 and Ozone on Pollen Allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Ulrike; Ernst, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes the available data of the air pollutants NO2 and ozone on allergenic pollen from different plant species, focusing on potentially allergenic components of the pollen, such as allergen content, protein release, IgE-binding, or protein modification. Various in vivo and in vitro studies on allergenic pollen are shown and discussed. PMID:26870080

  1. Effects of salbutamol and enantiomers on allergen-induced asthmatic reactions and airway hyperreactivity.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, F J; Zuidhof, A B; Kok, L; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    2005-05-01

    Salbutamol consists of a racemic mixture of R- and S-salbutamol. R-salbutamol (levalbuterol) is the active bronchodilating enantiomer, whereas S-salbutamol is thought to be pharmacologically inactive or to exert adverse effects. This study evaluated the bronchoprotective effects of inhalation of therapeutically relevant doses of the racemate and individual enantiomers in guinea pigs. It was found that basal airway reactivity to histamine was similarly reduced 30 min after inhalation of equivalent doses of RS- and R-salbutamol; this protective effect disappeared within 3 h. Inhalation of RS- and R-salbutamol 30 min before and 5.5 h after allergen challenge suppressed allergen-induced airway hyperreactivity to histamine after the early and late asthmatic reaction, completely inhibiting the early asthmatic reaction and tending to reduce the development of the late asthmatic reaction. At 5 h after allergen challenge, the inhibition of airway hyperreactivity was more pronounced in animals treated with R-salbutamol compared to racemate-treated animals. Both basal airway reactivity and allergen-induced hyperreactivity were not affected by S-salbutamol. Inflammatory cell infiltration was not affected by the racemate or the individual enantiomers. In conclusion, inhalation of therapeutically relevant doses of R- and RS-salbutamol effectively suppress allergen-induced airway reactivity after the early and late asthmatic reactions, the R-enantiomer being slightly more potent with respect to early airway reactivity than the racemate. No adverse effects were observed for the S-enantiomer. PMID:15863644

  2. Mass spectrometry-based identification of allergens from Curvularia pallescens, a prevalent aerospore in India.

    PubMed

    Dey, Debarati; Saha, Bodhisattwa; Sircar, Gaurab; Ghosal, Kavita; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta

    2016-07-01

    The worldwide prevalence of fungal allergy in recent years has augmented mining allergens from yet unexplored ones. Curvularia pallescens (CP) being a dominant aerospore in India and a major sensitiser on a wide range of allergic population, pose a serious threat to human health. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel allergens from CP in our present study. A cohort of 22 CP-sensitised patients was selected by positive Skin prick grade. Individual sera exhibited elevated specific IgE level and significant histamine release on a challenge with antigenic extract of CP. First gel-based profiling of CP proteome was done by 1- and 2-dimensional gel. Parallel 1- and 2-dimensional immunoblot were performed applying individual as well as pooled patient sera. Identification of the sero-reactive spots from the 2-dimensional gel was found to be challenging as CP was not previously sequenced. Hence, mass spectrometry-based proteomic workflow consisting of conventional database search was not alone sufficient. Therefore, de novo sequencing preceded homology search was implemented for further identification. Altogether 11 allergenic proteins including Brn-1, vacuolar protease, and fructose-bis-phosphate aldolase were identified with high statistical confidence (p<0.05). This is the first study to report on any allergens from CP. This kind of proteome-based analysis provided a catalogue of CP allergens that would lead an improved way of diagnosis and therapy of CP-related allergy. PMID:27003473

  3. Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced airway inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Broytman, Oleg; Braun, Rudolf K; Morgan, Barbara J; Pegelow, David F; Hsu, Pei-Ning; Mei, Linda S; Koya, Ajay K; Eldridge, Marlowe; Teodorescu, Mihaela

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea aggravates asthma, but its mechanisms are unknown. Chronic intermittent hypoxia is one hallmark feature of sleep apnea. In this study, we tested the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced inflammation in rats. Four groups (n = 9-11/group) of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized Brown-Norway rats underwent intermittent hypoxia (10% oxygen, 30 cycles/h, 10 h/d) or normoxia for 30 days concurrent with weekly OVA or vehicle challenges. Lung physiology, differential leukocyte counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, and histology (Picro Sirius Red staining for collagen content) were compared between groups 2 days after the last challenge. Gene expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells was quantified by quantitative PCR. Compared with normoxia, chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the FEV0.1/FVC ratio (P = 0.005), peak expiratory flow (P = 0.002), and mean midexpiratory flow (P = 0.004), predominantly in medium and large airways; decreased the baseline eosinophil number (P = 0.01) and amplified the effect of OVA on monocyte number (P = 0.02 for the interaction); in proximal airways, increased (P = 0.008), whereas in distal airways it decreased (P = 0.004), collagen density; induced qualitative emphysematous changes in lung periphery; and increased expression of the M2 macrophage marker YM-1 and augmented OVA-induced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters immune response to allergen toward a more TH-1-predominant cellular phenotype with collagen deposition and matrix degradation, leading to airflow limitation. These findings highlight the potential of sleep apnea to aggravate airway dysfunction in patients with preexistent asthma. PMID:25004109

  4. Characterization and evaluation of a Sarcoptes scabiei allergen as a candidate vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Sarcoptic mange caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei is a worldwide disease affecting both humans and animals. Here we report the molecular characterization and evaluation of a recombinant S. scabiei tropomyosin (SsTm) protein in a vaccination trial in rabbits. Methods The full-length cDNA was cloned in a bacterial pET vector, and the recombinant protein was expressed in BL21 (DE3) cells and purified. Using specific rabbit antiserum, tropomyosin was localized immunohistochemically in mite tissue sections. Vaccination trials with the recombiant SsTm was carried out in New Zealand rabbits. Results The full-length open reading frame (ORF) of the 852 bp cloned gene from S. scabiei encodes a 32.9 kDa protein. The amino acid sequence showed 98.94%, 97.89% and 98.59% homology to Dermatophagoides farina and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 10 allergens and Psoroptes ovis tropomyosin, respectively. Tropomyosin was localized immunohistochemically in mite tissue sections mainly in the mouthparts, legs and integument of the epidermis. The predicted cross-reactivity of SsTm indicated that it is an allergenic protein. While vaccination with the recombiant SsTm resulted in high levels of specific IgG (P < 0.01), a low IgE antibody response and no significant protection against S. scabiei challenge were observed. After challenge, specific IgG levels remained significantly higher than the control (P < 0.01), while changes of total IgE levels were not significant (P > 0.05). However, the lesion areas in the vaccination group decreased at the end of the experiment compared with controls. Conclusions Although vaccination with recombinant SsTm did not efficiently control sarcoptic mange in rabbits, the immunogenic properties of tropomyosin suggest it may be developed as a vaccine with alternative adjuvants or delivery methods. PMID:22897929

  5. Structural, biological, and evolutionary relationships of plant food allergens sensitizing via the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mills, E N Clare; Jenkins, John A; Alcocer, Marcos J C; Shewry, Peter R

    2004-01-01

    The recently completed genome sequence of the model plant species Arabidopsis has been estimated to encode over 25,000 proteins, which, on the basis of their function, can be classified into structural and metabolic (the vast majority of plant proteins), protective proteins, which defend a plant against invasion by pathogens or feeding by pests, and storage proteins, which proved a nutrient store to support germination in seeds. It is now clear that almost all plant food allergens are either protective or storage proteins. It is also becoming evident that those proteins that trigger the development of an allergic response through the gastrointestinal tract belong primarily to two large protein superfamilies: (1) The cereal prolamin superfamily, comprising three major groups of plant food allergens, the 2S albumins, lipid transfer proteins, and cereal alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors, which have related structures, and are stable to thermal processing and proteolysis. They include major allergens from Brazil nut, peanuts, fruits, such as peaches, and cereals, such as rice and wheat; (2) The cupin superfamily, comprising the major globulin storage proteins from a number of plant species. The globulins have been found to be allergens in plant foods, such as peanuts, soya bean, and walnut; (3) The cyteine protease C1 family, comprising the papain-like proteases from microbes, plants, and animals. This family contains two notable allergens that sensitize via the GI tract, namely actinidin from kiwi fruit and the soybean allergen, Gly m Bd 30k/P34. This study describes the properties, structures, and evolutionary relationships of these protein families, the allergens that belong to them, and discusses them in relation to the role protein structure may play in determining protein allergenicity. PMID:15540651

  6. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, Janneane F.; Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Beckett, William S.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2009-08-15

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 {mu}g/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 {mu}g/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for {>=}10.0 {mu}g/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  7. Allergens of Arachis hypogaea and the effect of processing on their detection by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Amjad; Shah, Farooq; Hamayun, Muhammad; Ahmad, Ayaz; Hussain, Anwar; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are an emerging public health problem in industrialized areas of the world. They represent a considerable health problem in these areas because of the relatively high number of reported cases. Usually, food allergens are proteins or glycoproteins with a molecular mass ranging from 10 to 70 kDa. Among the food allergies, peanut is accounted to be responsible for more than 50% of the food allergy fatalities. Threshold doses for peanut allergenic reactions have been found to range from as low as 100 µg to 1 g of peanut protein, which equal to 400 µg to 4 g peanut meal. Allergens from peanut are mainly seed storage proteins that are composed of conglutin, vicilin, and glycinin families. Several peanut proteins have been identified to induce allergic reactions, particularly Ara h 1-11. This review is mainly focused on different classes of peanut allergens, the effect of thermal and chemical treatment of peanut allergens on the IgY binding and detectability of these allergens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to provide knowledge for food industry. PMID:26931300

  8. Allergens of Arachis hypogaea and the effect of processing on their detection by ELISA

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Amjad; Shah, Farooq; Hamayun, Muhammad; Ahmad, Ayaz; Hussain, Anwar; Waqas, Muhammad; Kang, Sang-Mo; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Food allergies are an emerging public health problem in industrialized areas of the world. They represent a considerable health problem in these areas because of the relatively high number of reported cases. Usually, food allergens are proteins or glycoproteins with a molecular mass ranging from 10 to 70 kDa. Among the food allergies, peanut is accounted to be responsible for more than 50% of the food allergy fatalities. Threshold doses for peanut allergenic reactions have been found to range from as low as 100 µg to 1 g of peanut protein, which equal to 400 µg to 4 g peanut meal. Allergens from peanut are mainly seed storage proteins that are composed of conglutin, vicilin, and glycinin families. Several peanut proteins have been identified to induce allergic reactions, particularly Ara h 1–11. This review is mainly focused on different classes of peanut allergens, the effect of thermal and chemical treatment of peanut allergens on the IgY binding and detectability of these allergens by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to provide knowledge for food industry. PMID:26931300

  9. A novel IgE-binding epitope of cat major allergen, Fel d 1.

    PubMed

    Tasaniyananda, Natt; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee; Seesuay, Watee; Sakolvaree, Yuwaporn; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Sookrung, Nitat

    2016-02-12

    Information on the antigenic repertoire, especially the IgE-binding epitopes of an allergen is important for understanding the allergen induced immune response and cross-reactivity, as well as for generating the hypoallergenic variants for specific component resolved immunotherapy/diagnosis (CRIT and CRD). Data on the IgE-binding epitopes of cat allergens are scarce. In this study, a novel IgE-binding epitope of the cat major allergen, Fel d 1, was identified. Mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific to the Fel d 1 was produced. Computerized intermolecular docking was used for determining the residues of the Fel d 1 bound by the specific MAb. The presumptive surface exposed residues of the Fel d 1 intrigued by the MAb are located on the chain 1. They are: L34 and T37 (helix 1); T39 (between helices 1 and 2); P40, E42 and E45 (helix 2); R61, K64, N65 and D68 (helix 3); and E73 and K76 (helix 4). The MAb competed efficiently with the cat allergic patients' serum IgE for Fel d 1 binding in the competitive IgE binding assay, indicating allergenicity of the MAb epitope. The newly identified allergenic epitope of the Fel d 1 is useful in a design of the CRIT and CRD for cat allergy. PMID:26797272

  10. Characterization of a new subtype of allergen in dermatophagoides farinae—Der f 28

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jian-Li; Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Yu-Lan; Sun, Bao-Qing; Gao, An-Jian; Liu, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Background House dust mites (HDMs) are the major sources of indoor allergens which induce asthma, dermatitis, rhinitis, and some other allergic diseases. Close to 30 sub-allergens have been identified. Methods Through analyzing the full genome sequence of dust mite, a new allergen whose primary structure belongs to the heat shock protein family was identified. The sequence of this allergen was determined by cDNA cloning. The allergenicity was assayed by skin prick test, Western-blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results r-Der f 28 bound to serum IgE from mite allergic patients. Positive responses to r-Der f 28 were shown in 11.5% by skin prick testing from 26 DM-allergic patients. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum specific IgE and IL-4 were significantly increased in allergic asthma mouse model sensitized to r-Der f 28. Conclusions Der f 28 is a new subtype of allergen in dermatophagoides farinae. PMID:26623108

  11. Effects of autoclaving and high pressure on allergenicity of hazelnut proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hazelnut is reported as a causative agent of allergic reactions. However it is also an edible nut with health benefits. The allergenic characteristics of hazelnut-samples after autoclaving (AC) and high-pressure (HHP) processing have been studied and are also presented here. Previous studies demonstrated that AC treatments were responsible for structural transformation of protein structure motifs. Thus, structural analyses of allergen proteins from hazelnut were carried out to observe what is occurring in relation to the specific-IgE recognition of the related allergenic proteins. The aims of this work are to evaluate the effect of AC and HHP processing on hazelnut in vitro allergenicity using human-sera and to analyse the complexity of hazelnut allergen-protein structures. Methods Hazelnut-samples were subjected to AC and HHP processing. The specific IgE- reactivity was studied in 15 allergic clinic-patients via western blotting analyses. A series of homology-based-bioinformatics 3D-models (Cora 1, Cora 8, Cora 9 and Cora 11) were generated for the antigens included in the study to analyse the co mplexity of their protein structure. This study is supported by the Declaration of Helsinki and subsequent ethical guidelines. Results A severe reduction in vitro in allergenicity to hazelnut after AC processing was observed in the allergic clinic-patients studied. The specific-IgE binding of some of the described immunoreactive hazelnut protein-bands: Cora 1 ~18KDa, Cora 8 ~9KDa, Cora 9 ~35-40KDa and Cora 11 ~47-48 KDa decreases. Furthermore a relevant glycosylation was assigned and visualized via structural analysis of proteins (3D-modelling) for the first time in the protein-allergen Cora 11 showing a new role which could open a new door for allergenicity-unravellings. Conclusion Hazelnut allergenicity-studies in vivo via Prick-Prick and other means using AC processing are crucial to verify the data we observed via in vitro analyses. Glycosylation studies

  12. Serum-IgE-facilitated allergen presentation in atopic disease.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, F L; Joost van Neerven, R J; van Katwijk, M; Bos, J D; Kapsenberg, M L

    1993-04-15

    The occurrence of facilitated Ag presentation (FAP) was investigated in atopic disease using an in vitro model in which the ability of CD23-expressing EBV-B cells was tested to present Der p II, a major allergen of housedust mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, to cells of autologous Der p II-specific CD4+ T lymphocyte clones. Purified Der p II protein was immune complexed with Ig by preincubation in sera from atopic patients containing Der p II-specific IgE. Incubation of EBV-B cells with these complexes before using the cells as APC results in proliferation of the Der p II-specific T cells at a 1000-fold lower Der p II concentration than required for T cell activation by presentation of uncomplexed Der p II. FAP is not evident using sera from allergic and nonallergic control donors not containing Der p II-specific IgE. FAP is mediated by IgE and not by IgG, because it can be blocked completely by preincubating the serum from atopics with polyclonal anti-IgE and not with polyclonal anti-IgG. After pulsing EBV-B with precomplexed Der p II at 4 degrees C, FAP is as strong as after incubation at 37 degrees C, suggesting that FAP is the result of facilitated trapping of IgE-complexed allergen. CD23 was involved in facilitated trapping of the complexes, because FAP is blocked by preincubation of EBV-B with anti-CD23. In contrast to FAP of Der p II, which was mediated by all Der p II-specific sera tested, only one of four sera containing cat allergen-specific IgE was appropriate to mediate FAP to cat allergen-specific T cell clones. Inasmuch as FAP enables functional presentation of allergen in vivo at doses as low as several nanograms, FAP may contribute to the continuing of chronic allergic reactions in response to minute doses of aeroallergens, especially housedust mite allergens, in the environment. PMID:8468493

  13. Relationship between histamine and physiological changes during the early response to nasal antigen provocation.

    PubMed

    Baroody, F M; Ford, S; Proud, D; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Lichtenstein, L; Naclerio, R M

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the temporal relationships of mediator release and physiological changes during the early response to allergen, we challenged allergic individuals intranasally with antigen and followed their responses. This was done by using small filter paper disks to challenge one nostril and collect secretions from both the challenged and the contralateral nostril, thus enabling us to evaluate the nasonasal reflex. There was a significant increase in sneezing after allergen challenge that peaked within 2 min and returned to baseline. The weights of nasal secretions as well as nasal symptoms increased immediately and remained significantly elevated for 20 min in both nostrils. Nasal airway resistance increased slowly, reaching its peak at approximately 6 min after challenge on the ipsilateral side, but it did not change on the contralateral side. Histamine levels peaked 30 s after removal of the allergen disk on the side of challenge, whereas albumin levels peaked after those of histamine. Lactoferrin paralleled the increase in secretion weights and occurred in both nostrils. Increasing doses of antigen produced dose-dependent increases in all parameters, whereas control challenges produced no response. These studies describe a human model for the evaluation of the allergic response that is capable of simultaneously measuring mediator release and the physiological response, including the nasonasal reflex. This model should prove useful in studying the mechanism of allergic rhinitis in humans. PMID:9931205

  14. Contact Dermatitis, Patch Testing, and Allergen Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Burkemper, Nicole M

    2015-01-01

    In patients presenting with a complaint of rash, contact dermatitis is often the underlying diagnosis making it an entity with which health care providers should be familiar. Contact dermatitis can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. In a patient suspected of having allergic contact dermatitis, patch testing can be done to identify specific allergens. Education focused on allergen avoidance and safe products is an integral part of treatment for the contact dermatitis patient. Knowledge of the most common allergens is helpful for clinicians to be able to provide this education. PMID:26455061

  15. Purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of 26kDa protein, a major allergen from Cicer arietinum.

    PubMed

    Verma, Alok Kumar; Sharma, Akanksha; Kumar, Sandeep; Gupta, Rinkesh Kumar; Kumar, Dinesh; Gupta, Kriti; Giridhar, B H; Das, Mukul; Dwivedi, Premendra D

    2016-06-01

    Chickpea (CP), a legume of the family Fabaceae, is an important nutrient-rich food providing protein, essential amino acids, vitamins, dietary fibre, and minerals. Unfortunately, several IgE-binding proteins in CP have been detected that are responsible for allergic manifestations in sensitized population. Therefore, the prevalence of CP induced allergy prompted us towards purification, characterization and allergenicity assessment of a major ∼26kDa protein from chickpea crude protein extract (CP-CPE). Purification of CP 26kDa protein was done using a combination of fractionation and anion exchange chromatography. This protein was further characterized as "Chain A, crystal structure of a plant albumin" from Cicer arietinum with Mol wt 25.8kDa by Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Further, allergenic potential of purified 25.8kDa protein was assessed using in vivo and in vitro model. Purified protein showed IgE-binding capacity with sensitized BALB/c mice and CP allergic patient's sera. Enhanced levels of specific and total IgE, MCP-1, MCPT-1, myeloperoxidase, histamine, prostaglandin D2, and cysteinyl leukotriene were found in sera of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. Further, expressions of Th2 cytokines (i.e. IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), transcription factors (i.e. GATA-3, STAT-6, SOCS-3) and mast cell signaling proteins (Lyn, cFgr, Syk, PLC-γ2, PI-3K, PKC) were also found increased at mRNA and protein levels in the intestines of mice treated with CP ∼26kDa protein. In addition, enhanced release of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, cysteinyl leukotriene and prostaglandin D2 were observed in RBL2H3 cell line when treated (125μg) with CP 26kDa protein. Conclusively, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed the allergenic potential of purified CP 26kDa protein. Being a potential allergen, plant albumin may play a pivotal role in CP induced allergenicity. Current study will be helpful for better development of therapeutic approaches to

  16. Allergens involved in occupational asthma caused by baby's breath (Gypsophila paniculata).

    PubMed

    Schroeckenstein, D C; Meier-Davis, S; Yunginger, J W; Bush, R K

    1990-08-01

    Although the floral industry deals with many potential allergens, few examples of occupational asthma exist in this industry. A 22-year-old florist experienced symptoms of rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma on exposure to baby's breath. To determine the contribution of baby's breath to the patient's symptoms, an extract of baby's breath was prepared. Prick skin tests with a 1:10(-5) wt/vol concentration of the extract produced an immediate response, whereas nonexposed atopic and normal control subjects did not react. The patient's asthmatic response to baby's breath was confirmed by bronchial challenge that caused an immediate fall in FEV1 of 26.2% from baseline after inhalation of 88 breath units of the extract. With a direct RAST, the patient's serum bound 38 times the amount of IgE bound by the negative control. IgE binding in the RAST was inhibited by the baby's breath extract but not by unrelated inhibitors (ragweed and tree pollens). Immunoblotting demonstrated IgE binding to 13 protein bands in the extract with molecular weights ranging from 11.5 to 68 kd. Serum from a patient previously reported to have sensitivity to baby's breath recognized five protein bands. Three proteins with molecular weights of 27, 31, and 37 kd were recognized by both patients' sera. We conclude that this patient developed IgE-mediated sensitivity to multiple allergens in baby's breath. This study confirms the importance of this plant as a potential cause of occupational asthma in the floral industry. PMID:2384649

  17. Enhanced approaches for identifying Amadori products:application to peanut allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dry roasting of peanuts is suggested to influence allergenic sensitization due to formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) on peanut proteins. Identifying AGEs is technically challenging. The AGE composition of peanut proteins was probed with nanoLC-ESI-MS and MS/MS analyses. Amadori ...

  18. Addressing Challenges in Studies of Behavioral Responses of Whales to Noise.

    PubMed

    Cato, Douglas H; Dunlop, Rebecca A; Noad, Michael J; McCauley, Robert D; Kniest, Eric; Paton, David; Kavanagh, Ailbhe S

    2016-01-01

    Studying the behavioral response of whales to noise presents numerous challenges. In addition to the characteristics of the noise exposure, many factors may affect the response and these must be measured and accounted for in the analysis. An adequate sample size that includes matching controls is crucial if meaningful results are to be obtained. Field work is thus complicated, logistically difficult, and expensive. This paper discusses some of the challenges and how they are being met in a large-scale multiplatform project in which humpback whales are exposed to the noise of seismic air guns. PMID:26610954

  19. Antigenic Determinants of the Bilobal Cockroach Allergen Bla g 2.

    PubMed

    Woodfolk, Judith A; Glesner, Jill; Wright, Paul W; Kepley, Christopher L; Li, Mi; Himly, Martin; Muehling, Lyndsey M; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chapman, Martin D; Pomés, Anna

    2016-01-29

    Bla g 2 is a major indoor cockroach allergen associated with the development of asthma. Antigenic determinants on Bla g 2 were analyzed by mutagenesis based on the structure of the allergen alone and in complex with monoclonal antibodies that interfere with IgE antibody binding. The structural analysis revealed mechanisms of allergen-antibody recognition through cation-π interactions. Single and multiple Bla g 2 mutants were expressed in Pichia pastoris and purified. The triple mutant K132A/K251A/F162Y showed an ∼100-fold reduced capacity to bind IgE, while preserving the native molecular fold, as proven by x-ray crystallography. This mutant was still able to induce mast cell release. T-cell responses were assessed by analyzing Th1/Th2 cytokine production and the CD4(+) T-cell phenotype in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. Although T-cell activating capacity was similar for the KKF mutant and Bla g 2 based on CD25 expression, the KKF mutant was a weaker inducer of the Th2 cytokine IL-13. Furthermore, this mutant induced IL-10 from a non-T-cell source at higher levels that those induced by Bla g 2. Our findings demonstrate that a rational design of site-directed mutagenesis was effective in producing a mutant with only 3 amino acid substitutions that maintained the same fold as wild type Bla g 2. These residues, which were involved in IgE antibody binding, endowed Bla g 2 with a T-cell modulatory capacity. The antigenic analysis of Bla g 2 will be useful for the subsequent development of recombinant allergen vaccines. PMID:26644466

  20. Allergenic evaluation of Malassezia furfur crude extracts.

    PubMed

    Gandra, R F; Melo, T A; Matsumoto, F E; Pires, M F C; Croce, J; Gambale, W; Paula, C R

    2002-01-01

    Crude extracts of the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur were obtained from 2, 6, 10 and 28 day old cultures. The in vitro cultivation periods corresponded, respectively, to the lag phase, middle of the log phase, end of log phase and the decline phase of the growth curve, which was based on viable cell counts obtained with a fluorescent viability test. Biochemical analyses showed that the protein and carbohydrate contents were greater in day 10 extracts. Seventy patients with different allergic manifestations and 30 healthy volunteers were skin prick tested using the extracts. Of these, thirteen (18.57%) patients gave positive responses. SDS PAGE gradient electrophoretic profiles of the preparations indicated that the 28 day extracts contained the greatest number of protein bands with molecular weights ranging mostly between 30 and 94 kDa. Immunoblots incubated with individual patient sera showed that four IgE binding M. furfur allergens of approximately 88, 61, 52 and 39 kDa were present in the 28 day extracts. The components identified could be used for detecting IgE mediated responses to M. furfur among individuals affected with different allergic conditions. PMID:12650593

  1. De-novo Onset of Eosinophilic Esophagitis After Large Volume Allergen Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, W. Asher; Jerath, Maya R.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated condition believed to have an allergic component, but the timing of the initial allergen triggers that cause the disease is poorly understood. While the clinical presentation of EoE is often of longstanding symptoms, in animal models, acute exposure to an allergen challenge successfully produces EoE. In this report, we present three cases of individuals who developed esophageal eosinophilia and EoE shortly after a clearly identified exposure to aeroallergens. These cases highlight the allergic etiology of EoE, and provide a link from humans to the previously described experimental mechanisms. PMID:23799220

  2. Allergens as Immuno-Modulatory Proteins: the cat dander protein Fel d 1 enhances Toll-like receptor activation by lipid ligands

    PubMed Central

    Herre, Jurgen; Grönlund, Hans; Brooks, Heather; Hopkins, Lee; Waggoner, Lisa; Murton, Ben; Gangloff, Monique; Opaleye, Olaniyi; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Fitzgerald, Kate; Gay, Nick; Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Allergic responses can be triggered by structurally diverse allergens. Most allergens are proteins yet extensive research has not revealed how they initiate the allergic response and why the myriad of other inhaled proteins do not. Amongst these allergens, the cat secretoglobulin protein Fel d 1, is the major allergen and responsible for severe allergic responses. In this study we show that like the mite dust allergen Der p 2, Fel d 1 substantially enhances signalling through the innate receptors TLR4 and TLR2. In contrast to Der p 2 however, Fel d 1 does not act by mimicking the TLR4 co-receptor MD2 and is not able to bind stably to the TLR4/MD2 complex in vitro. Fel d 1 does however, bind to the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that a lipid transfer mechanism may be involved in the Fel d 1 enhancement of TLR signalling. We also show that the dog allergen Can f 6, a member of a distinct class of lipocalin allergens, has very similar properties to Fel d 1. We propose that Fel d 1 and Can f 6 belong to a group of allergen immunomodulatory proteins (IMPs) that enhance innate immune signalling and promote airway hypersensitivity reactions in diseases such as asthma. PMID:23878318

  3. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  4. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  5. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  6. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  7. 21 CFR 680.1 - Allergenic Products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... use of the mold as a source material for Allergenic Products, in accordance with 21 CFR 601.2, the... capable of determining the good health of the animals. (iii) Immunization against tetanus. Animals of...

  8. [Animal models for assessment of GMO allergenicity: advantages and limitations].

    PubMed

    Adel-Patient, K; Wal, J M

    2004-03-01

    Incidence of IgE-mediated allergic reactions to foods is increasing as well as the severity of associated symptoms and numerous foods are now incriminated, probably in relation with modifications of dietary habits and increased exposure to new or modified food ingredients. Therefore, the introduction on the market of food composed of or derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) raised the question of their potential allergenicity. Particularly with regards to the allergenicity of a newly expressed protein, it is necessary to obtain, from several steps in the risk assessment process, a cumulative body of evidence which minimises any uncertainty. This may include the use of animal model despite no fully reliable validated model is available yet. Such animal models should allow to address 3 major issues: Is the novel protein a sensitizer, i.e. does it possess intrinsic properties that allow to sensitize a predisposed individual? Is the protein an elicitor i.e. is it able to elicit an allergic reaction in a sensitised individual? And is the protein an adjuvant, i.e. can it facilitate or enhance the sensitisation to an other protein? Animal models under investigation currently include mice, rats and guinea pigs but models such as dogs and swine also appeared a few years ago. The aim is to mimic the mechanism and characteristics of the sensitisation phase and/or the elicitation phase of the allergic reaction as it occurs in atopic humans. They are necessary because sensitisation studies can obviously not be done in human and because in vitro tests cannot reproduce the complexity of the immune system. We propose a mouse model which mimics both phases of the allergic reaction. It has permitted to evidence that biochemical and clinical manifestations occuring during the active phases of the allergic reaction differ according to the structure of the allergen used for the challenge. This may allow to compare the allergenic potential of a genetically modified protein

  9. Cardiorespiratory responses of Hi Fit and Low Fit subjects to mental challenge during exercise.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, E O; Webb, H E; Weldy, M L; Fabianke, E C; Orndorff, G R; Starks, M A

    2006-12-01

    The influence of psychological states on physiological responses during exercise is of considerable importance to individuals for which the efficiency of energy production is critical to occupational performance. Numerous studies have shown that aerobic fitness is associated with enhanced cardiovascular efficiency at rest and that responses to mental stress demonstrate evidence of increased sensitivity (relative increase in HR response) and enhanced efficiency (a decrease in absolute HR). However, the effect of aerobic fitness and its impact on cardiorespiratory (CR) responses to psychological stress during exercise has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was three-fold; (1) to examine during exercise, anxiety, effort sense, and CR responses to a mental challenge, (2) to examine anxiety and heart rate (HR) responses from rest to exercise with mental challenge between below average fitness (Low Fit) and well-above average fitness (Hi Fit) individuals (exercising at similar relative intensities), and (3) to examine anxiety, effort sense, and CR responses of Low Fit and Hi Fit individuals to a mental challenge during exercise at a similar relative intensity. Twelve Low Fit and eleven Hi Fit subjects participated in two, 32-minute cycle ergometer rides at 65 % of VO2max. In the mental challenge condition (MCC), subjects rode while participating in mentally challenging tasks (Stroop Color-Word task and mental arithmetic) from min 6 to min 14 of the protocol. In the no mental challenge condition (NMCC), subjects exercised at the same intensity and duration without a stressor. Subjects were counter-balanced between fitness levels and condition. HR, VE, VE/VO2, RR, VO2, RER, effort sense (RPE), and state anxiety (SAI) were assessed at 5, 14, 24, and 30 min. SAI was also assessed at - 5 min before exercise and after 15 min of recovery. In addition, the NASA task load index (NTLX) was used to assess perceived overall workload. SAI increased

  10. Sexually dimorphic innate immunological responses of pre-pubertal Brahman cattle following an intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jeffery A; Burdick Sanchez, Nicole C; Hulbert, Lindsey E; Ballou, Michael A; Dailey, Jeffery W; Caldwell, Lisa C; Vann, Rhonda C; Welsh, Thomas H; Randel, Ronald D

    2015-08-15

    This study was designed to characterize potential sexually dimorphic immunological responses following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in beef cattle. Six female (heifers) and five male (bulls) Brahman calves (average age=253 ± 19.9 and 288 ± 47.9 days; average body weight=194 ± 11 kg and 247 ± 19 kg for heifers and bulls, respectively) were challenged with LPS (0.25 μg LPS/kg body weight). Following administration of LPS, all cattle displayed increased sickness behavior beginning at 0.5h, with heifers on average displaying less sickness behavior than bulls. A febrile response was observed in all animals following LPS administration, with a maximum response observed from 4 to 5.5h. The average rectal temperature response was greater in heifers than bulls. In all cattle there were elevated serum concentrations of cortisol from 0.5 to 8h, TNF-α from 1 to 2.5h, IL-6 from 2 to 8h, and IFN-γ from 2.5 to 7h after LPS challenge. Additionally, serum concentrations of TNF-α were greater in heifers than bulls from 1.5 to 2h after the LPS challenge. Concentrations of IFN-γ were also greater on average in bulls than heifers. Leukopenia occurred from 1 to 8h, with a decreased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio for the first 5h among all calves. These data demonstrate the existence of a sexually dimorphic acute-phase response in pre-pubertal Brahman calves. Specifically, heifers may have a more robust acute response to LPS challenge, even though bulls display more signs of sickness. PMID:26144890

  11. Hydrolysed egg displays strong decrease in allergenicity and is well tolerated by egg-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Ballmer-Weber, B K; Brockow, K; Fiocchi, A; Theler, B; Vogel, L; Ring, J; Szépfalusi, Z; Mazzina, O; Schaller, R; Fritsché, R; Vissers, Y M; Nutten, S

    2016-05-01

    Food allergies are believed to be on the rise, and currently, management relies on the avoidance of the food. Hen's egg allergy is after cow's milk allergy the most common food allergy; eggs are used in many food products and thus difficult to avoid. A technological process using a combination of enzymatic hydrolysis and heat treatment was designed to produce modified hen's egg with reduced allergenic potential. Biochemical (SDS-PAGE, Size exclusion chromatography and LC-MS/MS) and immunological (ELISA, immunoblot, RBL-assays, animal model) analysis showed a clear decrease in intact proteins as well as a strong decrease of allergenicity. In a clinical study, 22 of the 24 patients with a confirmed egg allergy who underwent a double-blind food challenge with the hydrolysed egg remained completely free of symptoms. Hydrolysed egg products may be beneficial as low-allergenic foods for egg-allergic patients to extent their diet. PMID:26836363

  12. Characterization of Der f 29, a new allergen from dermatophagoides farinae

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Congli; Fan, Xiaoqin; Li, Meng; Xing, Peng; Liu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Yulan; Zhang, Min; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    More than 30 allergens have been identified from Dermatophagoides farina (D. farina), which is one of the main species of house dust mites. The mite allergens are an important factor contributing to allergic disease in the world. As the detection and identification of new allergens is critical for the diagnosis or treatment of allergic diseases, we sought to characterize the profilin of D. farina (Der f 29) in this study. The results showed that 21% of allergic patients displayed positive results in skin prick test with recombinant Der f 29 (rDer f 29) as the specific allergen; specific IgE reactivity to rDer f 29 was shown by Western Blot and ELISA. In addition, rDer f 29 induced bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) to produce T cells immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain protein 4 (TIM4). Moreover, an allergic asthma mouse model was established by challenging with rDer f 29. Airway hyperresponsiveness, serum specific IgE, IgG1, eosinophil infiltration in the allergic mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the cytokines interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (INF-γ) from spleen cells were markedly increased; the histology showed severe inflammation in the lung. In conclusion, Der f 29 is identified as a new type of the house dust mite allergen. PMID:26328014

  13. Topical skin treatment with Fab fragments of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody suppresses allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice.

    PubMed

    Sae-Wong, Chutha; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Kangsanant, Sureeporn; Yoshino, Shin

    2016-05-15

    Fab fragments (Fabs), which lack effector functions due to the absence of the Fc portion, maintain the ability to bind to specific allergens. In the present study, we examined whether Fabs of an allergen-specific IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were able to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in mice. BALB/c mice passively sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgE mAb were repeatedly challenged with OVA applied to the skin after sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment. Fabs prepared by the digestion of anti-OVA IgG1 mAb (O1-10) with papain were applied to the skin 30min before the OVA challenges followed by measurement of clinical symptoms including erythema/hemorrhage, edema, scarring/dryness, and excoriation/erosion of the skin. Treatment with O1-10 Fabs, but not intact O1-10, showed inhibition of clinical symptoms (P<0.01) induced by the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice; O1-10 Fabs suppressed histological changes such as epidermal hyperplasia (P<0.01) and the accumulation of mast cells (P<0.01) and neutrophils (P<0.01). Furthermore, treatment with O1-10 Fabs inhibited the increase in levels of IL-13 (P<0.01) and IL-17A production (P<0.05) in the lymph nodes of the sensitized mice. Additionally, the increased level of OVA in serum following the repeated OVA challenges in the sensitized mice was reduced by the treatment (P<0.05). These results suggest that topical application of pathogenic allergen-specific IgG1 mAb Fabs to the skin of mice is effective in suppressing allergen-induced atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions, suggesting that allergen-specific mAb Fabs could be used as a tool to regulate allergen-induced atopic dermatitis. PMID:26970183

  14. Next generation of food allergen quantification using mass spectrometric systems.

    PubMed

    Koeberl, Martina; Clarke, Dean; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-08-01

    Food allergies are increasing worldwide and becoming a public health concern. Food legislation requires detailed declarations of potential allergens in food products and therefore an increased capability to analyze for the presence of food allergens. Currently, antibody-based methods are mainly utilized to quantify allergens; however, these methods have several disadvantages. Recently, mass spectrometry (MS) techniques have been developed and applied to food allergen analysis. At present, 46 allergens from 11 different food sources have been characterized using different MS approaches and some specific signature peptides have been published. However, quantification of allergens using MS is not routinely employed. This review compares the different aspects of food allergen quantification using advanced MS techniques including multiple reaction monitoring. The latter provides low limits of quantification for multiple allergens in simple or complex food matrices, while being robust and reproducible. This review provides an overview of current approaches to analyze food allergens, with specific focus on MS systems and applications. PMID:24824675

  15. Combined Systems Approaches Reveal Highly Plastic Responses to Antimicrobial Peptide Challenge in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowska, Justyna; Vermeer, Louic S.; Rogers, Geraint B.; Rehnnuma, Nabila; Amos, Sarah-Beth T. A.; Koller, Garrit; McArthur, Michael; Bruce, Kenneth D.; Mason, A. James

    2014-01-01

    Obtaining an in-depth understanding of the arms races between peptides comprising the innate immune response and bacterial pathogens is of fundamental interest and will inform the development of new antibacterial therapeutics. We investigated whether a whole organism view of antimicrobial peptide (AMP) challenge on Escherichia coli would provide a suitably sophisticated bacterial perspective on AMP mechanism of action. Selecting structurally and physically related AMPs but with expected differences in bactericidal strategy, we monitored changes in bacterial metabolomes, morphological features and gene expression following AMP challenge at sub-lethal concentrations. For each technique, the vast majority of changes were specific to each AMP, with such a plastic response indicating E. coli is highly capable of discriminating between specific antibiotic challenges. Analysis of the ontological profiles generated from the transcriptomic analyses suggests this approach can accurately predict the antibacterial mode of action, providing a fresh, novel perspective for previous functional and biophysical studies. PMID:24789011

  16. Allergenicity attributes of different peanut market types.

    PubMed

    Koppelman, Stef J; Jayasena, Shyamali; Luykx, Dion; Schepens, Erik; Apostolovic, Danijela; de Jong, Govardus A H; Isleib, Thomas G; Nordlee, Julie; Baumert, Joe; Taylor, Steve L; Cheng, Hsiaopo; Maleki, Soheila

    2016-05-01

    Four different market classes of peanut (Runner, Virginia Spanish, and Valencia) are commonly consumed in Western countries, but for some consumers peanuts are a main cause of food-induced anaphylaxis. Limited information is available on the comparative allergenicity of these distinct market classes. The aim of this study was to compare allergenicity attributes of different peanut cultivars. The protein content and protein profiles were highly comparable for all tested cultivars. All cultivar samples contained the major allergens Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3 and Ara h 6, as assessed by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC, although some minor differences in major allergen content were found between samples. All samples were reactive in commercial ELISAs for detection and quantification of peanut protein. IgE-binding potency differed between samples with a maximum factor of 2, indicating a highly comparable allergenicity. Based on our observations, we conclude that peanuts from the main market types consumed in Western countries are highly comparable in their allergenicity attributes, indicating that safety considerations with regard to peanut allergy are not dependent on the peanut cultivar in question. PMID:26921497

  17. Cross-reactivity of peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-04-01

    Peanut seeds are currently widely used as source of human food ingredients in the United States of America and in European countries due to their high quality protein and oil content. This article describes the classification and molecular biology of peanut seed allergens with particular reference to their cross-reactivities. Currently, the IUIS allergen nomenclature subcommittee accepts 12 peanut allergens. Two allergens belong to the cupin and four to the prolamin superfamily, and six are distributed among profilins, Bet v 1-like proteins, oleosins, and defensins. Clinical observations frequently report an association of peanut allergy with allergies to legumes, tree nuts, seeds, fruits and pollen. Molecular cross-reactivity has been described between members of the Bet v 1-like proteins, the non-specific lipid transfer proteins, and the profilins. This review also addresses the less well-studied cross-reactivity between cupin and prolamin allergens of peanuts and of other plant food sources and the recently discovered cross-reactivity between peanut allergens of unrelated protein families. PMID:24554241

  18. Removing peanut allergens by tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2012-10-01

    Tannic acid (TA) forms insoluble complexes with proteins. The aims here were to remove major peanut allergens as insoluble TA complexes and determine if they would dissociate and release the allergens at pH 2 and 8 (gut pH). Release of the allergens in the gut could lead to absorption and consequently an allergic reaction. TA (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml) was added to a peanut butter extract (5 mg/ml; pH 7.2), stirred, and centrifuged. The precipitates were then suspended in buffer at pH 2, centrifuged, re-suspended at pH 8, and centrifuged. Supernatants from each step were analysed by SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and Western blots. The effect of NaCl (1M) on complexes was also determined. Results showed that complexes formed at a TA concentration >0.5 mg/ml did not release major peanut allergens at pH 2 and 8, regardless of 1M NaCl being present or not. IgE binding of the extracts was reduced substantially, especially at a TA concentration of 1-2 mg/ml. Animal or clinical studies are still needed before TA can find an application in the development of low-allergen peanut products/beverages or the removal of peanut allergens due to accidental ingestion. PMID:25005968

  19. Using Testimonial Response to Frame the Challenges and Possibilities of Risky Historical Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damico, James; Apol, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Literature that vividly and explicitly describes (often in the form of testimonies from one or more characters) traumatic and/or catastrophic events of human history poses particular challenges for readers. This article proposes testimonial response as one approach to responding to these "risky historical texts." By way of introducing "testimonial…

  20. Enhancement of the acute phase response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in steers supplemented with chromium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty steers received a premix that added 0 (control) or 0.2 mg/kg of chromium (KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) to the total diet on a dry matter basis for 55 d. Steer...

  1. The Benefits and Challenges of Culturally Responsive EFL Critical Literature Circles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredricks, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Though some research has shown what applying a culturally relevant framework entails in an American context, and occasionally in an EFL setting, there is still too little research on how students respond to critical, culturally responsive pedagogy. More insight is needed into the specific challenges and benefits of critical approaches in diverse…

  2. One Response to the Challenges Posed by the NYS Participation in Government Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Gary J.; Scheira, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Describes one high school's response to challenges posed by the New York State Participation in Government course. Describes the course that requires students to assume an active role in examining government policies. Suggests that community leaders speak to students on why and how to become involved and make a positive impact. (DK)

  3. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  4. THE MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE: THE U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S RESPONSE TO INVASIVE SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responding to the scientific and regulatory challenges of invasive species in a variety of ways. One response has been to use existing programs and regulations, as appropriate, to address invasive species. A recent example is th...

  5. The Small Rural School Principalship: Key Challenges and Cross-School Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Karen; White, Simone

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the responses of school principals of small rural schools in Victoria, Australia to leadership challenges they identify as characteristic of these contexts. The research is an exercise in grounded theory building, with the focus on the principalship as it is enacted in small rural settings. The article also seeks to trace the…

  6. Temporal pattern of the stress hormone and cytokine response in pigs following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed the pattern of immune and stress response following a LPS challenge. Crossbred pigs (n=28 pigs, 2 males and 2 females from 7 litters) were obtained at weaning (21 to 28 d of age). Pigs were transferred to a climate controlled facility, placed into individual pens and allowed ad l...

  7. Chromium supplementation enhances the metabolic response of steers to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromiumProprionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) supplementation on the metabolic response to LPS challenge was examined. Steers (n=20; 235±4 kg body weight (BW)) received a premix that added 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg Cr to the total diet (DM (dry matter) basis) for ...

  8. Chromium supplementation enhances the acute phase response of steers to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study examined the effect of chromium supplementation on the response of steers to an LPS challenge. Twenty crossbred steers (235±4 kg BW) received 0 ppb (Control; C) or 200 ppb chromium propionate (CHR) for 55 days. Steers were fitted with jugular catheters and rectal temperature (RT) recording...

  9. The Development of Teachers' Responses to Challenging Situations during Interaction Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talvio, Markus; Lonka, Kirsti; Komulainen, Erkki; Kuusela, Marjo; Lintunen, Taru

    2015-01-01

    The qualitative changes in teachers' responses in challenging situations were analysed during a four-day Teacher Effectiveness Training (TET) course, which aimed at improving teachers' interpersonal dynamics with pupils, parents and colleagues. The participants were 21 teachers from one elementary and 23 teachers from one secondary…

  10. A Strategic Response to MOOCs: How One European University Is Approaching the Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mark; Costello, Eamon; Donlon, Enda; Giolla-Mhichil, Mairead Nic

    2015-01-01

    This paper briefly outlines some of the macro level claims, counter-claims, and unresolved debates surrounding the rapid growth of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) in Higher Education. It then reports insights, experiences, and perceptions of those charged with developing a strategic institutional response to the challenges and opportunities…

  11. Anxiety sensitivity and trait anxiety are associated with response to 7.5% carbon dioxide challenge

    PubMed Central

    Fluharty, Meg E; Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R

    2016-01-01

    The 7.5% carbon dioxide (CO2) inhalation model is used to provoke acute anxiety, for example to investigate the effects of anxiety on cognitive processes, or the efficacy of novel anxiolytic agents. However, little is known about the relationship of baseline anxiety sensitivity or trait anxiety (i.e., anxiety proneness), with an individual’s response to the 7.5% CO2 challenge. We examined data from a number of 7.5% CO2 challenge studies to determine whether anxiety proneness was related to subjective or physiological response. Our findings indicate anxiety proneness is associated with greater subjective and physiological responses. However, anxiety-prone individuals also have a greater subjective response to the placebo (medical air) condition. This suggests that anxiety-prone individuals not only respond more strongly to the 7.5% CO2 challenge, but also to medical air. Implications for the design and conduct of 7.5% CO2 challenge studies are discussed. PMID:26561530

  12. Profile of the bovine acute-phase response following an intravenous bolus-dose lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to further define the acute-phase response to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in beef steers. In Exp. 1, 9 crossbred beef steers (449 ± 12 kg BW) were used in a completely random design to determine the effects of 0.5, 1.0, or 2.0 micrograms of LPS/kilogram of bod...

  13. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... academic standards. 200.1 Section 200.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC... Assessments § 200.1 State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards. (a)...

  14. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... academic standards. 200.1 Section 200.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC... Assessments § 200.1 State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards. (a)...

  15. Systemic sensitization with the protein allergen ovalbumin augments local sensitization in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jane; Manicone, Anne M; McGuire, John K; Wang, Ying; Parks, William C

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of atopic dermatitis based on epicutaneous sensitization have shed light on the role of epicutaneous allergen entry in the development of respiratory and gastrointestinal allergy. However, the contribution of non-cutaneous modes of sensitization to skin diseases has not been evaluated. We assessed if systemic ovalbumin administration, in conjunction with local sensitization, could prime for a robust inflammatory response. Furthermore, we attempted to elucidate important aspects of disease pathogenesis previously unaddressed in mouse models. Mice that underwent intraperitoneal ovalbumin sensitization prior to epicutaneous challenge demonstrated an acute (Th2-polarized) atopic dermatitis-like phenotype upon local challenge. The inflammatory response was strikingly more robust than in mice that underwent epicutaneous sensitization alone. The lesional infiltrate contained a dendritic cell population that corresponded phenotypically with inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells of significance in human disease. Finally, in accordance with observations in human atopic dermatitis, there was an increase in cluster of differentiation (CD) 103 (αE subunit)-expressing CD4+ T lymphocytes. However, the absence of CD103 on approximately 50% of infiltrating cells argues against a primary role for the αEβ7 integrin in tissue homing. In conclusion, we present a mouse model of atopic dermatitis that reveals novel insights into the pathogenesis of this complex disease. PMID:24672255

  16. Household mold and dust allergens: Exposure, sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity

    SciTech Connect

    Gent, Janneane F.; Kezik, Julie M.; Hill, Melissa E.; Tsai, Eling; Li, De-Wei; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2012-10-15

    Background: Few studies address concurrent exposures to common household allergens, specific allergen sensitization and childhood asthma morbidity. Objective: To identify levels of allergen exposures that trigger asthma exacerbations in sensitized individuals. Methods: We sampled homes for common indoor allergens (fungi, dust mites (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1) and cockroach (Bla g 1)) for levels associated with respiratory responses among school-aged children with asthma (N=1233) in a month-long study. Blood samples for allergy testing and samples of airborne fungi and settled dust were collected at enrollment. Symptoms and medication use were recorded on calendars. Combined effects of specific allergen sensitization and level of exposure on wheeze, persistent cough, rescue medication use and a 5-level asthma severity score were examined using ordered logistic regression. Results: Children sensitized and exposed to any Penicillium experienced increased risk of wheeze (odds ratio [OR] 2.12 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12, 4.04), persistent cough (OR 2.01 95% CI 1.05, 3.85) and higher asthma severity score (OR 1.99 95% CI 1.06, 3.72) compared to those not sensitized or sensitized but unexposed. Children sensitized and exposed to pet allergen were at significantly increased risk of wheeze (by 39% and 53% for Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g and Can f 1>1.2 {mu}g/g, respectively). Increased rescue medication use was significantly associated with sensitization and exposure to Der p 1>0.10 {mu}g/g (by 47%) and Fel d 1>0.12 {mu}g/g (by 32%). Conclusion: Asthmatic children sensitized and exposed to low levels of common household allergens Penicillium, Der p 1, Fel d 1 and Can f 1 are at significant risk for increased morbidity. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Few studies address concurrent allergen exposures, sensitization and asthma morbidity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Children with asthma were tested for sensitivity to common indoor allergens

  17. Cytokine responses in birds challenged with the human food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni implies a Th17 response

    PubMed Central

    Reid, William D. K.; Close, Andrew J.; Humphrey, Suzanne; Chaloner, Gemma; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Rothwell, Lisa; Kaiser, Pete; Williams, Nicola J.; Humphrey, Tom J.; Wigley, Paul; Rushton, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    Development of process orientated understanding of cytokine interactions within the gastrointestinal tract during an immune response to pathogens requires experimentation and statistical modelling. The immune response against pathogen challenge depends on the specific threat to the host. Here, we show that broiler chickens mount a breed-dependent immune response to Campylobacter jejuni infection in the caeca by analysing experimental data using frequentist and Bayesian structural equation models (SEM). SEM provides a framework by which cytokine interdependencies, based on prior knowledge, can be tested. In both breeds important cytokines including pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β, , IL-4, IL-17A, interferon (IFN)-γ and anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β4 were expressed post-challenge. The SEM revealed a putative regulatory pathway illustrating a T helper (Th)17 response and regulation of IL-10, which is breed-dependent. The prominence of the Th17 pathway indicates the cytokine response aims to limit the invasion or colonization of an extracellular bacterial pathogen but the time-dependent nature of the response differs between breeds. PMID:27069644

  18. Characterizing individual differences in animal responses to a nutritional challenge: Toward improved robustness measures.

    PubMed

    Friggens, N C; Duvaux-Ponter, C; Etienne, M P; Mary-Huard, T; Schmidely, P

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to explore the variation between individuals in the response to and recovery from a nutritional challenge, the repeatability of responses between lactation stages, and the use of shape-clustering methods to classify similar individuals. Sixteen dairy goats were exposed to a 2-d nutritional challenge (underfeeding) at 2 different stages of lactation. Each challenge consisted of a 7-d control period with standard total mixed ration (TMR), 2d of straw-only feeding, and a 10-d recovery period on the TMR. All feeds were offered ad libitum, as was water. The first challenge was in late lactation on primiparous goats (mean days in milk=249), and the second challenge was carried out on the same goats early in the following lactation (mean days in milk=28). The main energetic response traits dry matter intake (DMI), milk yield, body weight, milk fat and protein contents, and plasma glucose, fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), urea, and insulin, were measured daily throughout. A clustering procedure linked to a piecewise mixed model was used to characterize different types of response. As expected, straw feeding caused a large decline in DMI and milk yield, and substantial increases in milk fat and milk protein composition, relative to the prechallenge period on the control TMR. For both DMI and milk yield, the slope of the response, and hence the size of the drop, was strongly related to the prechallenge values, indicating that these 2 measures were tightly constrained by the challenge. Regression slopes between lactation stages for responses to the same nutritional challenge were significant for DMI, milk protein content, plasma BHB and urea, and body weight, indicating that within-animal responses in late and early lactation were repeatable. The clustering procedure generally performed well, classifying both scaling differences and differences in shape. The extent of reranking of cluster designations between late lactation and the

  19. Characterization of Allergens Prepared from Smooth and Rough Strains of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, L. M.; Diaz, R.; Taylor, A. G.

    1973-01-01

    Protein allergens were prepared from Br. melitensis smooth strain Rev. 1 and rough strain B115 using a cold saline method of extraction. Guineapig skin tests showed the two preparations to be of similar potency and specificity. Gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 showed that the skin test reactive fractions of each preparation were composed of a mixture of proteins with molecular weights in the range of 12,000 to 50,000. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis indicated that the preparations consisted of at least 12 similar, if not identical, protein constituents. At least 20 protein bands were revealed with polyacrylamide gel isoelectric focusing, which appeared to be almost identical in the two preparations. Smooth lipopolysaccharide antigen, tested in normal and infected guineapigs, was of a lower potency than protein allergens and the eyrthematous response occurred earlier, resembling an antibody mediated reaction rather than delayed hypersensitivity. The allergen prepared from the rough strain contained no detectable smooth lipopolysaccharide antigen and therefore did not stimulate a secondary rise in antibody to smooth cells in sensitized animals. As the presence of smooth lipopolysaccharide antigen in an allergen appears to be unnecessary for provoking delayed hypersensitivity responses, and undesirable because it may stimulate the production of antibodies which interfere with diagnosis, it is preferable to prepare allergens from rough strains of brucella. ImagesFigs. 1-2,4-5Fig. 7 PMID:4758380

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of the Major Allergen Amb a 11 from Short Ragweed Pollen.

    PubMed

    Groeme, Rachel; Airouche, Sabi; Kopečný, David; Jaekel, Judith; Savko, Martin; Berjont, Nathalie; Bussieres, Laetitia; Le Mignon, Maxime; Jagic, Franck; Zieglmayer, Petra; Baron-Bodo, Véronique; Bordas-Le Floch, Véronique; Mascarell, Laurent; Briozzo, Pierre; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-06-17

    Allergy to the short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen is a major health problem. The ragweed allergen repertoire has been recently expanded with the identification of Amb a 11, a new major allergen belonging to the cysteine protease family. To better characterize Amb a 11, a recombinant proform of the molecule with a preserved active site was produced in Escherichia coli, refolded, and processed in vitro into a mature enzyme. The enzymatic activity is revealed by maturation following an autocatalytic processing resulting in the cleavage of both N- and C-terminal propeptides. The 2.05-Å resolution crystal structure of pro-Amb a 11 shows an overall typical C1A cysteine protease fold with a network of molecular interactions between the N-terminal propeptide and the catalytic triad of the enzyme. The allergenicity of Amb a 11 was confirmed in a murine sensitization model, resulting in airway inflammation, production of serum IgEs, and induction of Th2 immune responses. Of note, inflammatory responses were higher with the mature form, demonstrating that the cysteine protease activity critically contributes to the allergenicity of the molecule. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that Amb a 11 is a bona fide cysteine protease exhibiting a strong allergenicity. As such, it should be considered as an important molecule for diagnosis and immunotherapy of ragweed pollen allergy. PMID:27129273

  1. Testing small molecule analogues of the Acanthocheilonema viteae immunomodulator ES-62 against clinically relevant allergens.

    PubMed

    Janicova, L; Rzepecka, J; Rodgers, D T; Doonan, J; Bell, K S; Lumb, F E; Suckling, C J; Harnett, M M; Harnett, W

    2016-06-01

    ES-62 is a glycoprotein secreted by the filarial nematode Acanthocheilonema viteae that protects against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway hyper-responsiveness in mice by virtue of covalently attached anti-inflammatory phosphorylcholine (PC) residues. We have recently generated a library of small molecule analogues (SMAs) of ES-62 based around its active PC moiety as a starting point in novel drug development for asthma and identified two compounds - termed 11a and 12b - that mirror ES-62's protective effects. In this study, we have moved away from OVA, a model allergen, to test the SMAs against two clinically relevant allergens - house dust mite (HDM) and cockroach allergen (CR) extract. We show that both SMAs offer some protection against development of lung allergic responses to CR, in particular reducing eosinophil infiltration, whereas only SMA 12b is effective in protecting against eosinophil-dependent HDM-induced allergy. These data therefore suggest that helminth molecule-induced protection against model allergens may not necessarily translate to clinically relevant allergens. Nevertheless, in this study, we have managed to demonstrate that it is possible to produce synthetic drug-like molecules based on a parasitic worm product that show therapeutic potential with respect to asthma resulting from known triggers in humans. PMID:27059010

  2. Preventive capacity of allergen immunotherapy on the natural history of allergy.

    PubMed

    Incorvaia, C

    2013-06-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the practice of administering gradually increasing doses of the specific causative allergen to reduce the clinical reactivity of allergic subjects. A bulk of literature demonstrates that AIT is an effective and safe treatment to reduce allergic symptoms and the use of drugs. The preventive capacity of AIT is less investigated. The studies thus far available showed that this treatment, in both forms of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is able to prevent the development of asthma in patients with allergic rhinitis and the occurrence of new sensitizations in patients monosensitized. Such outcomes demonstrate the ability of AIT to change the natural history of respiratory allergy. Of particular importance, SCIT with Hymenoptera venom has an invaluable role in preventing potentially fatal anaphylactic reactions to the culprit sting in venom-allergic patients. Ongoing studies are aimed at evaluating the possible capacity of AIT in primary prevention of allergy. All these capabilities are related to the mechanisms of action of AIT. In fact, both SCIT and SLIT are able to modify the allergen presentation by dendritic cells that in turn modify the phenotype of allergen-specific T cells, switching from the Th2-type response, typical of allergic inflammation, to a Th1-type response. An important role is played by allergen-specific T regulatory (Treg) cells, which produce suppressive cytokines such as IL-10 and TGF-beta. PMID:24396984

  3. Responses to Environmental & Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth (RESCUE) foresight initiative - towards a European response to grand challenges in sustainability research and learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, B.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    The "Responses to Environmental and Societal Challenges for our Unstable Earth" (RESCUE; www.esf.org/rescue) foresight initiative - a joint COST-ESF "Frontiers of Science" initiative - aimed to help Europe address the societal and scientific challenges related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues. In RESCUE, the focus of attention was on people and the goal was to stimulate an integrated, innovative response from natural, social and human sciences. The RESCUE foresight initiative began in September 2009 and has recently been completed. RESCUE had the following key objectives: 1. To propose a strategic process for natural, social and human sciences to improve their ability and capacity to work together to address global environmental change through interdisciplinary synergy and to respond effectively to societal and policy-relevant needs; 2. To articulate new scientific issues related to global environmental change and the related resilience issues, especially those of transdisciplinary nature and of major relevance to society; 3. To explore new approaches towards truly integrated, interdisciplinary science, and to facilitate the 'revolution' in education and capacity building it requires. The work of RESCUE focused on the following themes: · Contributions from social sciences and humanities in developing responses to challenges of the Anthropocene; · Collaboration between the natural, social and human sciences in global environmental change and resilience studies; · Requirements for research methodologies and data; · Education and capacity building - towards a 'revolution'; · The interface between science and policy, communication and outreach. The RESCUE recommendations include the following issues to be addressed by science-funders, science policy-makers, researchers, practitioners, educators and a range of other societal actors: · develop an institutional framework for an open knowledge society, · re-organise research so

  4. Effect of oleic acid on the allergenic properties of peanut and cashew allergens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oleic acid is the major fatty acid in peanuts and cashews. There is limited information about its effect on peanut and cashew allergens during heating. The objective was to determine if heat treatment with oleic acid changes the allergenic properties of these nut proteins. Peanut and cashew protein...

  5. The Role of Allergen Exposure and Avoidance in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Sachin N.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Allergy testing and avoidance of allergens plays an important role in asthma control. Increased allergen exposure, in genetically susceptible individuals, can lead to allergic sensitization. Continued allergen exposure can increase the risk of asthma and other allergic diseases. In a patient with persistent asthma, identification of indoor and outdoor allergens and subsequent avoidance can improve symptoms. Often times, a patient will have multiple allergies and the avoidance plan should target all positive allergens. Several studies have shown that successful allergen remediation includes a comprehensive approach including education, cleaning, physical barriers and maintaining these practices. PMID:20568555

  6. Chemical changes in rubber allergens during vulcanization.

    PubMed

    Bergendorff, Ola; Persson, Christina; Lüdtke, Anna; Hansson, Christer

    2007-09-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis to rubber is caused by residues of chemicals used in manufacturing a rubber product. Several different additives are used to achieve a final product of the desired characteristics. Accelerators such as thiurams, dithiocarbamates, and mercaptobenzothiazoles are often among the additives responsible for allergic reactions recognized by dermatologists. The chemistry of the vulcanization process is complicated; as it occurs at an elevated temperature with a mixture of reactive chemicals, the compositions of the initial and final products differ. This paper investigates the changes in composition of common allergens during vulcanization, doing so by chemically analysing various rubber formulations at different stages of the process. Major changes were found in which added chemicals were consumed and new ones produced. An important observation is that thiuram disulfides rarely appear in the final rubber although they may have been used as additives. Instead, thiurams are often converted to dithiocarbamates or to products formed by addition to mercaptobenzothiazole structures, if these have been used together with thiurams as accelerators. PMID:17680862

  7. Immunological responses to vaccination following experimental Lawsonia intracellularis virulent challenge in pigs.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, M G; Collins, A M; Donahoo, M; Emery, D

    2013-05-31

    Although a live attenuated vaccine has been used extensively to provide immunity against porcine proliferative enteropathy (PE) caused by Lawsonia intracellularis, the nature of the protective response is an area of considerable interest for the control of PE. Two trials investigated immune responses in pigs after oral and intramuscular (IM) vaccination followed by virulent L. intracellularis challenge. After an oral vaccination with 10(5.9) TCID50 organisms, significantly increased serum and mucosal secretions of IgM, IgG and higher mucosal TNF-α and TGF-β1 were detected by day 17, together with a trend towards higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-6. Pigs vaccinated IM produced elevated serum antibody titres but mucosal immune responses were not detected. After challenge with virulent L. intracellularis, non-vaccinated control pigs had higher PE lesion scores and excreted significantly higher numbers of L. intracellularis in faeces than the vaccinated pigs. Reduced intestinal pathology and faecal L. intracellularis shedding were evident in the vaccinated groups. The results indicated that protection was associated with mucosal cytokine and specific IgG and IgA responses after vaccination and that systemic antibody responses were boosted following challenge. However in the search for an immune correlate with protection, a causal association was not evident from a kinetic analysis of immune parameters in serum, ileal pathology and faecal shedding. PMID:23478250

  8. Intranasal immunization with a dominant T-cell epitope peptide of a major allergen of olive pollen prevents mice from sensitization to the whole allergen.

    PubMed

    Marazuela, Eva G; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Fernández-García, Héctor; García, M Soledad; Villalba, Mayte; Batanero, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Mucosal tolerance induction with vaccines based on peptides representing T-cell epitopes of allergens is a promising way for treating allergic diseases. Ole e 1 is the main allergen of olive pollen, which is an important cause of allergy in Mediterranean countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of the peptide T109-K130 containing a dominant T-cell epitope of Ole e 1, to modulate the allergen-specific immune response in a prophylactic mouse model. Mice were intranasally treated with the peptide 1 week prior to sensitization with Ole e 1. Blood, lungs and spleens were collected and analysed for immune response. Intranasal pretreatment of mice with the peptide led to suppress serum specific IgE, IgG1 and IgG2a antibody levels, and markedly reduced proliferative T-cell response and Th2-cytokine production, but increased IFN-gamma secretion in spleen cell cultures. Increased mRNA IL-10 levels were observed in lungs from pretreated mice. Pathologic alterations of the lung associated with airway inflammation (peribronchial/perivascular infiltrates, eosinophilia and mucus production) were significantly suppressed after pretreatment. Similar results were obtained when mice were sensitized 10 weeks after treatment. Our results demonstrate that intranasal administration of a single T-cell peptide protects mice against subsequent sensitization to the allergen, possibly via IFN-gamma and IL-10. This study emphasizes the usefulness of nasal peptide T-based vaccines against allergy. PMID:17662454

  9. Time course proteomic profiling of cellular responses to immunological challenge in the sea urchin, Heliocidaris erythrogramma.

    PubMed

    Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haynes, Paul A; Raftos, David A; Nair, Sham V

    2012-06-01

    Genome sequences and high diversity cDNA arrays have provided a detailed molecular understanding of immune responses in a number of invertebrates, including sea urchins. However, complementary analyses have not been undertaken at the level of proteins. Here, we use shotgun proteomics to describe changes in the abundance of proteins from coelomocytes of sea urchins after immunological challenge and wounding. The relative abundance of 345 reproducibly identified proteins were measured 6, 24 and 48 h after injection. Significant changes in the relative abundance of 188 proteins were detected. These included pathogen-binding proteins, such as the complement component C3 and scavenger receptor cysteine rich proteins, as well as proteins responsible for cytoskeletal remodeling, endocytosis and intracellular signaling. An initial systemic reaction to wounding was followed by a more specific response to immunological challenge involving proteins such as apolipophorin, dual oxidase, fibrocystin L, aminopeptidase N and α-2-macroglobulin. PMID:22446733

  10. Thioredoxin from the Indianmeal Moth Plodia interpunctella: Cloning and Test of the Allergenic Potential in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hemmer, Wolfgang; Mahler, Vera; Panzani, Raphael C.; Jarisch, Reinhart; Wiedermann, Ursula; Duchêne, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objective The Indianmeal moth Plodia interpunctella is a highly prevalent food pest in human dwellings, and has been shown to contain a number of allergens. So far, only one of these, the arginine kinase (Plo i 1) has been identified. Objective The aim of this study was to identify further allergens and characterise these in comparison to Plo i 1. Method A cDNA library from whole adult P. interpunctella was screened with the serum of a patient with indoor allergy and IgE to moths, and thioredoxin was identified as an IgE-binding protein. Recombinant thioredoxin was generated in E. coli, and tested together with Plo i 1 and whole moth extracts in IgE immunoblots against a large panel of indoor allergic patients' sera. BALB/c mice were immunised with recombinant thioredoxin and Plo i 1, and antibody production, mediator release from RBL cells, T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were measured. Result For the first time a thioredoxin from an animal species was identified as allergen. About 8% of the sera from patients with IgE against moth extracts reacted with recombinant P. interpunctella thioredoxin, compared to 25% reacting with recombinant Plo i 1. In immunised BALB/c mice, the recombinant allergens both induced classical Th2-biased immune responses such as induction IgE and IgG1 antibodies, upregulation of IL-5 and IL-4 and basophil degranulation. Conclusion Thioredoxin from moths like Plo i 1 acts like a classical Type I allergen as do the thioredoxins from wheat or corn. This clearly supports the pan-allergen nature of thioredoxin. The designation Plo i 2 is suggested for the new P. interpunctella allergen. PMID:22844539

  11. Is high pressure treatment able to modify the allergenicity of the largemouth bass allergens?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chu-Yi; Tao, Sha; Liu, Rong; Chen, Fu-Sheng; Xue, Wen-Tong

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of high pressure treatment on the structural changes and allergenicity of largemouth bass. We treated the allergens at 100, 200, 300 and 400 MPa for 15 min and at 300 MPa for 5, 10, 15, 20 and 30 min at 20 °C. The treated samples from largemouth bass were tested for their IgE-binding properties by combining Sodium dodecyl sulfate-Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Circular dichroism analysis was performed to characterize the structural change. In summary, we can determine that the greatest structure changes were found for samples treated by 400 MPa for 15 min. High pressure treatment did change the structure, subunit composition and molecular weight of largemouth bass allergens, but it did not change the allergenicity of the allergens.

  12. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: T-regulatory cells and more.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2006-05-01

    Activation-induced cell death, anergy, or immune response modulation by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. Genetic predisposition and environmental instructions tune thresholds for the activation of T cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident tissue cells in allergic diseases. Skewing allergen-specific effector T cells to a Treg-cell phenotype seems to be crucial in maintaining a healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-specific immunotherapy. The Treg-cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T-cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of T-helper 1- and T-helper 2-type cytokines. Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, including cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and cell surface molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1, and histamine receptor 2. The increased levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production while simultaneously increasing the production of noninflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms on T cells, regulation of antibody isotypes, and suppression of effector cells. The application of current knowledge of Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches to the prevention and cure of allergic disease. PMID:16701141

  13. Differential Immune Responses of Red Deer (Cervus elaphus) following Experimental Challenge with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Mark; O'Brien, Rory; Mackintosh, Colin; Griffin, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Immune responses of red deer (Cervus elaphus) that presented with different levels of paucibacillary pathology were profiled to detail immune changes during the progression of Johne's disease. Immune responses were monitored using an immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISA, and flow cytometry. Animals in the study were divided into outcome groups postmortem according to disease severity. All animals mounted IgG1 antibody and IFN-γ responses to both the vaccination and experimental challenges. The Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IgG1 antibody responses in the challenged group showed marked differences between infected and severely diseased animals. Slightly higher IFN-γ responses were seen in infected animals compared with severely diseased animals. No significant changes were seen in the phenotype of lymphocyte populations investigated. Vaccination with killed M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in mineral oil adjuvant reduced the level of severe disease; however, it obscured immunological differences between the infected and severely diseased groups. This suggests protection is not exclusively mediated via the presence of a type 1 response and, furthermore, the presence of a type 2 response is compatible with protection. These profiles provide information on the different immune processes in Johne's disease progression. PMID:18400974

  14. Prenatal fluoxetine exposure affects cytokine and behavioral response to an immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Avitsur, Ronit; Levy, Sigal; Grinshpahet, Rachel; Goren, Naama; Hirsh, Ofer; Zalko, Assaf

    2015-07-15

    Fluoxetine (FLX), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) is a commonly prescribed antidepressant drug in pregnant women. FLX readily crosses the placenta, consequently altering serotonergic neurotransmission in the fetus and causing physiological and behavioral disturbances in the newborn. Studies have shown that serotonin plays a role in modulating immune signaling. Thus, the goal of this study was to assess the effects of prenatal exposure to FLX on the response to an immune challenge in offspring mice. Male and female mice were prenatally exposed to FLX and later injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) at different stages of development. Results indicated that prenatal FLX modulated aspects of the response to the endotoxin challenge. Prenatal FLX diminished the secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 in adult male and female mice. Prenatal exposure to FLX further suppressed TNFα and augmented IL-1β secretion in adult males. Early effects of LPS (within 24h of administration) on body weight and food consumption were diminished by prenatal exposure to FLX in adult mice. Delayed effects of LPS (within 60h of administration) were modulated by prenatal FLX in young animals. These results provide an indication that prenatal modulations of the serotonergic system had lasting implications for host response to an immune challenge. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the effects of prenatal environment on the development of physiological systems that are important to coping with infectious challenges, and assist in understanding the limitations and precautions that should be taken in the use of SSRIs during pregnancy. PMID:26025058

  15. Role in Allergic Diseases of Immunological Cross-Reactivity between Allergens and Homologues of Parasite Proteins.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Helton da Costa; Nutman, Thomas B

    2016-01-01

    Implied under the rubric of the hygiene hypothesis is that helminth infection can protect against allergic disease. It is well known that helminths induce processes associated with type 2 immune responses, but they also induce important regulatory responses that can modulate these type 2-associated responses-modulation that influences responses to bystander antigens including allergens. Indeed, most epidemiological studies demonstrate a beneficial effect of helminth infection on atopy, but there are also convincing data to demonstrate that helminth infection can precipitate or worsen allergic inflammation/disease. Reasons for these disparate findings are much debated, but there is a school of thought that suggests that helminth-triggered type 2-associated responses, including IgE to cross-reactive aeroallergens, can offset the regulatory effects imposed by the same organisms. The cross-reactivity among helminths and allergenic tropomyosins dominated the antigen/allergen cross-reactivity field, but recent data suggest that cross-reactivity is much more common than previously appreciated. It has been demonstrated that a high degree of molecular similarity exists between allergens and helminth proteins. Thus, an understanding of the mechanisms underlying the response induced by helminth infection and their impact on the induction of allergic disease in the host are critical for designing therapies using iatrogenic infections or parasite products to treat inflammatory diseases and for developing vaccines against helminth parasites. PMID:27480900

  16. Large-scale investigation of the parameters in response to Eimeria maxima challenge in broilers.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, E; Bed'Hom, B; Juin, H; Hawken, R; Abrahamsen, M S; Elsen, J M; Servin, B; Pinard-van der Laan, M H; Demeure, O

    2015-04-01

    Coccidiosis, a parasitic disease of the intestinal tract caused by members of the genera Eimeria and Isospora, is one of the most common and costly diseases in chicken. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of the challenge and level of variability of measured parameters in chickens during the challenge with Eimeria maxima. Furthermore, this study aimed to investigate which parameters are the most relevant indicators of the health status. Finally, the study also aimed to estimate accuracy of prediction for traits that cannot be measured on large scale (such as intestinal lesion score and fecal oocyst count) using parameters that can easily be measured on all animals. The study was performed in 2 parts: a pilot challenge on 240 animals followed by a large-scale challenge on 2,024 animals. In both experiments, animals were challenged with 50,000 Eimeria maxima oocysts at 16 d of age. In the pilot challenge, all animals were measured for BW gain, plasma coloration, hematocrit, and rectal temperature and, in addition, a subset of 48 animals was measured for oocyst count and the intestinal lesion score. All animals from the second challenge were measured for BW gain, plasma coloration, and hematocrit whereas a subset of 184 animals was measured for intestinal lesion score, fecal oocyst count, blood parameters, and plasma protein content and composition. Most of the parameters measured were significantly affected by the challenge. Lesion scores for duodenum and jejunum (P < 0.001), oocyst count (P < 0.05), plasma coloration for the optical density values between 450 and 490 nm (P < 0.001), albumin (P < 0.001), α1-globulin (P < 0.01), α2-globulin (P < 0.001), α3-globulin (P < 0.01), and β2-globulin (P < 0.001) were the most strongly affected parameters and expressed the greatest levels of variation. Plasma protein profiles proved to be a new, reliable parameter for measuring response to Eimeria maxima. Prediction of intestinal lesion score and fecal oocyst

  17. Inter- and intrasubject variability of the inflammatory response to segmental endotoxin challenge in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Holz, O; Tan, L; Schaumann, F; Müller, M; Scholl, D; Hidi, R; McLeod, A; Krug, N; Hohlfeld, J M

    2015-12-01

    Segmental endotoxin challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can be used as a pharmacodynamic model to safely induce a transient airway inflammation in the peripheral lung of healthy subjects and to test the anti-inflammatory efficacy of investigational new drugs. In contrast to whole lung LPS challenge only a fraction of the dose is required that can be precisely administered to a specific lung region and a vehicle challenged segment as an intra-subject control can be included. The aim of this study was to assess the intra- and inter-individual variability of the response to segmental LPS challenge for the appropriate design and power calculation of future clinical trials. Two cohorts with 10 subjects each underwent two segmental LPS challenges within five weeks. The inflammatory response was evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid at 6 (cohort 1) and 24 h (cohort 2) both in the LPS and in a vehicle challenged segment, as well as in plasma for up to 26 h post LPS challenge. While the cytokine response was more pronounced at 6 h, the influx of neutrophils and monocytes dominated at 24 h; e.g. neutrophils increased from a median (inter-quartile range, IQR) of 0.14 (0.16) and 0.09 (0.08)x10(4) cells/mL BAL fluid at baseline to 10.2 (17.1) and 19.3 (15.9)x10(4) cells/mL 24 h after the two separate challenges. The within-subject variability was higher than the between-subject variability for most of the markers. However, sample size estimations based on the variability of outcome variables found lower or equal numbers with cross-over designs compared to parallel group designs for cellular markers at 24 h and cytokine variables at 6 h. The segmental LPS challenge model was safe. Future study designs have to balance between burden to the study subjects (4 versus 2 bronchoscopies), variability (within-versus between-subject), and the desired outcome variable (cells versus chemo/cytokine). PMID:26545873

  18. Allergens of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, Greg S; Huang, Shih-Wen; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2005-01-01

    Background Beauveria bassiana is an important entomopathogenic fungus currently under development as a bio-control agent for a variety of insect pests. Although reported to be non-toxic to vertebrates, the potential allergenicity of Beauveria species has not been widely studied. Methods IgE-reactivity studies were performed using sera from patients displaying mould hypersensitivity by immunoblot and immunoblot inhibition. Skin reactivity to B. bassiana extracts was measured using intradermal skin testing. Results Immunoblots of fungal extracts with pooled as well as individual sera showed a distribution of IgE reactive proteins present in B. bassiana crude extracts. Proteinase K digestion of extracts resulted in loss of IgE reactive epitopes, whereas EndoH and PNGaseF (glycosidase) treatments resulted in minor changes in IgE reactive banding patterns as determined by Western blots. Immunoblot inhibitions experiments showed complete loss of IgE-binding using self protein, and partial inhibition using extracts from common allergenic fungi including; Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium herbarum, Candida albicans, Epicoccum purpurascens, and Penicillium notatum. Several proteins including a strongly reactive band with an approximate molecular mass of 35 kDa was uninhibited by any of the tested extracts, and may represent B. bassiana specific allergens. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the in vitro results, demonstrating allergenic reactions in a number of individuals, including those who have had occupational exposure to B. bassiana. Conclusions Beauveria bassiana possesses numerous IgE reactive proteins, some of which are cross-reactive among allergens from other fungi. A strongly reactive potential B. bassiana specific allergen (35 kDa) was identified. Intradermal skin testing confirmed the allergenic potential of B. bassiana. PMID:15644142

  19. [Allergen management in the food industry].

    PubMed

    Röder, Martin; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    Due to the lack of causative immunotherapies, individuals with food allergies have to rely on correct labelling for even minute amounts of allergenic constituents. It is not relevant to the allergic whether the source of the culprit food is an ingredient or an allergen that entered the food unintentionally, as is the case with so-called cross-contacts or hidden allergens.Efficient allergen management is the manufacturer's prerequisite for coping with allergenic foods in the food production environment and handling them in a way that avoids cross-contact. If it is technically not feasible to eliminate cross-contacts entirely, it must be ensured that these cross-contacts do not enter the final product without being detected.This article discusses measures that should be considered in allergen management. Examples include recording all relevant allergens in the production facility, staff sensitization and training, and taking into account all areas of production from incoming raw materials to outgoing goods.For the evaluation of unavoidable cross-contacts, it is possible today to draw on data from clinical trials for many of the substances that are subject to labelling. This data can be used to assess the risk of the final product.However, the data from threshold studies is not legally binding, so it is left to the manufacturer to assess the level up to which the food is safe for the allergic. In particular the non-harmonized approach of the EU member countries' food safety authorities currently represents a major obstacle, as this can lead to food recalls even though existing levels were evaluated as being safe according to the risk assessments performed. PMID:27299344

  20. Expression, purification, and characterization of almond (Prunus dulcis) allergen Pru du 4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochemical characterizations of food allergens are required for understanding the allergenicity of food allergens. Such studies require a relatively large amount of highly purified allergens. Profilins from numerous species are known to be allergens, including food allergens, such as almond (Prunus...

  1. Cortisol Response to Challenge Involving Low Controllability: The Role of Control Beliefs and Age

    PubMed Central

    Agrigoroaei, Stefan; Polito, Michael; Lee, Angela; Kranz-Graham, Eileen; Seeman, Teresa; Lachman, Margie E.

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol responses are typically more pronounced under low controllability conditions, yet little is known about the role of individual differences. This study examined whether cortisol response to a situation with low controllability differs as a function of preexisting control beliefs and age. We manipulated level of controllability using a driving simulator. Control beliefs were assessed prior to the lab session. Salivary cortisol was measured before and after the driving simulation. Participants were 152 adults aged 22-84 from a Boston area sample. In comparison to the normal controllability condition, those in the low controllability condition reported less perceived control over driving, supporting the effectiveness of the manipulation. In the low controllability condition those with higher control beliefs showed a greater cortisol response than those with low control beliefs. Older adults showed a greater cortisol response than younger adults during the challenge. Implications of acute cortisol responses for performance outcomes are discussed. PMID:23348557

  2. Comparisons of Allergenic and Metazoan Parasite Proteins: Allergy the Price of Immunity.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Nidhi; Farnell, Edward J; Fitzsimmons, Colin M; Ryan, Stephanie; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Maizels, Rick M; Dunne, David W; Thornton, Janet M; Furnham, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    Allergic reactions can be considered as maladaptive IgE immune responses towards environmental antigens. Intriguingly, these mechanisms are observed to be very similar to those implicated in the acquisition of an important degree of immunity against metazoan parasites (helminths and arthropods) in mammalian hosts. Based on the hypothesis that IgE-mediated immune responses evolved in mammals to provide extra protection against metazoan parasites rather than to cause allergy, we predict that the environmental allergens will share key properties with the metazoan parasite antigens that are specifically targeted by IgE in infected human populations. We seek to test this prediction by examining if significant similarity exists between molecular features of allergens and helminth proteins that induce an IgE response in the human host. By employing various computational approaches, 2712 unique protein molecules that are known IgE antigens were searched against a dataset of proteins from helminths and parasitic arthropods, resulting in a comprehensive list of 2445 parasite proteins that show significant similarity through sequence and structure with allergenic proteins. Nearly half of these parasite proteins from 31 species fall within the 10 most abundant allergenic protein domain families (EF-hand, Tropomyosin, CAP, Profilin, Lipocalin, Trypsin-like serine protease, Cupin, BetV1, Expansin and Prolamin). We identified epitopic-like regions in 206 parasite proteins and present the first example of a plant protein (BetV1) that is the commonest allergen in pollen in a worm, and confirming it as the target of IgE in schistosomiasis infected humans. The identification of significant similarity, inclusive of the epitopic regions, between allergens and helminth proteins against which IgE is an observed marker of protective immunity explains the 'off-target' effects of the IgE-mediated immune system in allergy. All these findings can impact the discovery and design of molecules

  3. Item response theory and the measurement of psychiatric constructs: some empirical and conceptual issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Reise, S P; Rodriguez, A

    2016-07-01

    Item response theory (IRT) measurement models are now commonly used in educational, psychological, and health-outcomes measurement, but their impact in the evaluation of measures of psychiatric constructs remains limited. Herein we present two, somewhat contradictory, theses. The first is that, when skillfully applied, IRT has much to offer psychiatric measurement in terms of scale development, psychometric analysis, and scoring. The second argument, however, is that psychiatric measurement presents some unique challenges to the application of IRT - challenges that may not be easily addressed by application of conventional IRT models and methods. These challenges include, but are not limited to, the modeling of conceptually narrow constructs and their associated limited item pools, and unipolar constructs where the expected latent trait distribution is highly skewed. PMID:27056796

  4. Allergen-induced traffic of bone marrow eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to airways.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna-Karin; Sergejeva, Svetlana; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Lee, James J; Lötvall, Jan

    2004-11-01

    We evaluated whether bone marrow (BM) inflammatory cells have capacity to traffic into the airways following allergen exposure in a mouse model of allergen-induced airway inflammation. We also evaluated the effect of IL-5 overexpression on (i) the production of eosinophils in BM, (ii) the accumulation of eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes in blood and airways and (iii) the changes in CD34+ cell numbers in BM, blood and airways. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label cells produced during the exposure period. Furthermore, CD3 splenocytes were adoptively transferred to investigate the BM inflammatory response. Allergen exposure induced traffic of BM eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes to the airways and increased the number of BrdU+ eosinophils, neutrophils, lymphocytes and CD34+ cells in BALf. IL-5 overexpression enhanced the eosinophilopoiesis and increased the presence of BrdU+ eosinophils and CD34+ cells in airways and enhanced the number of CD34+ cells in BM and blood after allergen exposure. Adoptive transfer of CD3 lymphocytes overexpressing IL-5 caused increased BM eosinophilia. In conclusion, allergen exposure induces traffic of not only newly produced eosinophils but also newly produced neutrophils and lymphocytes into the airways. PMID:15384047

  5. [Mesenchymal stem cells influence on leukocytes allergen-specific reactions in case of atopic hypersencitivity].

    PubMed

    Aisenstadt, A A; Supilnikova, O V; Bagaeva, V V; Smoljaninov, A B; Samoylovich, M P; Klimovich, V B

    2015-01-01

    Buffy coat samples containing lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes, were obtained from the peripheral blood of 16 donors who had clinical manifestations of atopic hypersensitivity in their medical background. After ex vivo incubation with donor-specific allergens, the percentage of B- and T-lymphocytes and natural killers (NK) remained unchanged. Buffy coat incubation with allergens induced production of IgE and IL-4 in all studied samples. In 13 out of 16 cases the reaction to contact with an allergen was also evident in the increasing of T-activated lymphocytes (CD3+, HLA-DR+) subpopulation. Co-cultivation with MSC from bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord resulted in blocking of allergen-induced IgE and IL4 secretion and HLA-DR+ T-lymphocytes subpopulation increase. There were no significant differences in the effect of MSCs, isolated from three different sources, on allergen-specific responses of leukocytes. Co-culturing of leukocytes with MSCs from all three sources led to an increase in the content of regulatory T-lymphocytes by an average of 30%. Thus, the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs in vitro results in blocking of the effector part of allergic reactions. PMID:26021169

  6. 78 FR 66011 - Allergenic Products Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ..., perennial rye, Timothy, and Kentucky bluegrass mixed pollens allergen extract tablet for sublingual use... recommendations on the safety and efficacy of Grastek, a Timothy grass pollen allergen extract tablet...

  7. Pollensomes as Natural Vehicles for Pollen Allergens.

    PubMed

    Prado, Noela; De Linares, Concepción; Sanz, María L; Gamboa, Pedro; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Batanero, Eva

    2015-07-15

    Olive (Olea europaea) pollen constitutes one of the most important allergen sources in the Mediterranean countries and some areas of the United States, South Africa, and Australia. Recently, we provided evidence that olive pollen releases nanovesicles of respirable size, named generically pollensomes, during in vitro germination. Olive pollensomes contain allergens, such as Ole e 1, Ole e 11, and Ole e 12, suggesting a possible role in allergy. The aim of this study was to assess the contribution of pollensomes to the allergic reaction. We show that pollensomes exhibit allergenic activity in terms of patients' IgE-binding capacity, human basophil activation, and positive skin reaction in sensitized patients. Furthermore, allergen-containing pollensomes have been isolated from three clinically relevant nonphylogenetically related species: birch (Betula verrucosa), pine (Pinus sylvestris), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne). Most interesting, pollensomes were isolated from aerobiological samples collected with an eight-stage cascade impactor collector, indicating that pollensomes secretion is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Our findings indicate that pollensomes may represent widespread vehicles for pollen allergens, with potential implications in the allergic reaction. PMID:26041541

  8. Combined action of vasoactive amines and bradykinin mediates allergen-evoked thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lavich, Tatiana R; Cordeiro, Renato S B; Calixto, João B; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Martins, Marco A

    2003-02-21

    The ability of allergens to induce hyperalgesia in immunoglobulin E (IgE)-sensitized rats was investigated. The left hind paws of Wistar rats were sensitized with intraplantar injections of IgE anti-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin monoclonal antibody, and challenged with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin 24 h later. Allergen challenge yielded rapid thermal hyperalgesia and oedema formation in the ipsilateral paws, both reaching a plateau from 15 min to 3 h, and both diminishing thereafter. Allergen-evoked hyperalgesia was inhibited by intraperitoneal treatment with meclizine or methysergide, histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonists. There was also sensitivity to local treatment with either bradykinin B(1) or B(2) receptor antagonists, des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin or D-arginyl-[Hyp3, Thi5, D-Tic7, Oic8]-bradykinin (Hoe 140). Anaphylactic hyperalgesia was mimicked by the combined administration of histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine and bradykinin at doses which were ineffective when injected alone. This synergistic effect was abolished by treatment with either meclizine, methysergide, Hoe 140 or des-Arg(9)-[Leu(8)]-bradykinin. Our findings show that local thermal hyperalgesia is a feature of allergen-evoked inflammation, and that a synergistic interaction among bradykinin, 5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine plays a critical role in this phenomenon. PMID:12591112

  9. Novel liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for sensitive determination of the mustard allergen Sin a 1 in food.

    PubMed

    Posada-Ayala, Maria; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S; Maes, Xavier; Muñoz-Garcia, Esther; Villalba, Mayte; Rodríguez, Rosalía; Perez-Gordo, Marina; Vivanco, Fernando; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier

    2015-09-15

    Mustard is a condiment added to a variety of foodstuffs and a frequent cause of food allergy. A new strategy for the detection of mustard allergen in food products is presented. The methodology is based on liquid chromatography analysis coupled to mass spectrometry. Mustard allergen Sin a 1 was purified from yellow mustard seeds. Sin a 1 was detected with a total of five peptides showing a linear response (lowest LOD was 5ng). Sin a 1 was detected in mustard sauces and salty biscuit (19±3mg/kg) where mustard content is not specified. Sin a 1, used as an internal standard, allowed quantification of this mustard allergen in foods. A novel LC/MS/MS SRM-based method has been developed to detect and quantify the presence of mustard. This method could help to detect mustard allergen Sin a 1 in processed foods and protect mustard-allergic consumers. PMID:25863610

  10. Responsiveness to cocaine challenge in adult rats following prenatal exposure to cocaine.

    PubMed

    Heyser, C J; Rajachandran, L; Spear, N E; Spear, L P

    1994-09-01

    Adult rats that were gestationally exposed to cocaine and control offspring were examined for their sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine. Offspring were derived from Sprague-Dawley dams that had received subcutaneous injections of 40 mg/kg per 3 cc cocaine hydrochloride daily on gestational days 8-20, pair-fed dams that were injected with saline, and nontreated control dams. In order to investigate the sensitivity to challenge doses of cocaine, offspring were assessed in adulthood for locomotor activity, cocaine drug discrimination, and the time course of cocaine in brain tissue following acute cocaine challenge. Adult offspring prenatally exposed to cocaine were observed to exhibit a reduced sensitivity to the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine as evidenced by a significant shift to the right in the dose-response curve of cocaine discrimination. No prenatal treatment effects were observed in terms of the temporal patterns of cocaine discrimination or with regard to brain levels of cocaine. In addition, baseline locomotor activity and locomotor responses to challenge doses of cocaine were comparable across the prenatal treatment groups. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure reduced sensitivity of offspring to the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine without altering either the distribution of cocaine to the brain or the sensitivity of the offspring to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. PMID:7862930

  11. EFFECTS OF AEROBIC CONDITIONING ON CARDIOVASCULAR SYMPATHETIC RESPONSE TO AND RECOVERY FROM CHALLENGE

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, M; Alex, C; Shapiro, PA; McKinley, PS; Brondolo, EN; Myers, MM; Choi, CJ; Lopez-Pintado, S; Sloan, RP

    2013-01-01

    Objective Exercise has widely-documented cardioprotective effects but the mechanisms behind these effects are still poorly understood. Here, we test the hypothesis that aerobic training lowers cardiovascular sympathetic responses to and speeds recovery from challenge. Methods We conducted a randomized controlled trial contrasting aerobic versus strength training on indices of cardiac (pre-ejection period, PEP) and vascular (low-frequency blood pressure variability, LF-BPV) sympathetic responses to and recovery from psychological and orthostatic challenge in 149 young, healthy and sedentary adults. Results Aerobic and strength training did not alter PEP or LF-BPV reactivity to or recovery from challenge. Conclusions These findings, from a large randomized controlled trial using an intent-to-treat design, show that moderate aerobic exercise training has no effect on PEP and LF BPV reactivity to or recovery from psychological or orthostatic challenge. In healthy young adults, the cardioprotective effects of exercise training are unlikely to be mediated by changes in sympathetic activity. PMID:23889039

  12. Morphine has latent deleterious effects on the ventilatory responses to a hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge.

    PubMed

    May, Walter J; Henderson, Fraser; Gruber, Ryan B; Discala, Joseph F; Young, Alex P; Bates, James N; Palmer, Lisa A; Lewis, Stephen J

    2013-08-28

    This study explored the concept that morphine has latent deleterious actions on the ventilatory control systems that respond to a hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge. In this study, we examined the ventilatory responses elicited by hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge in conscious rats at a time when the effects of morphine (10 mg/kg) on arterial blood-gas chemistry and minute ventilation had subsided. Morphine induced pronounced changes in arterial blood-gas chemistry (e.g., an increase in pCO2, decreases in pO2 and sO2) and decreases in minute ventilation. Despite the complete resolution of the morphine-induced changes in arterial blood-gas chemistry and minute ventilation and almost complete resolution of the effects on peak inspiratory flow and peak expiratory flow, subsequent exposure to hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge elicited markedly blunted increases in minute ventilation and in peak inspiratory and expiratory flows. These findings demonstrate that (1) the changes in arterial blood-gas chemistry elicited by morphine parallel changes in minute ventilation rather than PIF and PEF, and (2) morphine has latent untoward effects on the ventilatory responses to hypoxic-hypercapnic challenge. These novel findings raise the possibility that patients deemed to have recovered from the acute ventilatory depressant effects of morphine may still be susceptible to the latent effects of this opioid analgesic. The mechanisms underlying these latent effects remain to be elucidated. PMID:25045592

  13. A Review of the Biocompatibility of Implantable Devices: Current Challenges to Overcome Foreign Body Response

    PubMed Central

    Onuki, Yoshinori; Bhardwaj, Upkar; Papadimitrakopoulos, Fotios; Burgess, Diane J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, a variety of devices (drug-eluting stents, artificial organs, biosensors, catheters, scaffolds for tissue engineering, heart valves, etc.) have been developed for implantation into patients. However, when such devices are implanted into the body, the body can react to these in a number of different ways. These reactions can result in an unexpected risk for patients. Therefore, it is important to assess and optimize the biocompatibility of implantable devices. To date, numerous strategies have been investigated to overcome body reactions induced by the implantation of devices. This review focuses on the foreign body response and the approaches that have been taken to overcome this. The biological response following device implantation and the methods for biocompatibility evaluation are summarized. Then the risks of implantable devices and the challenges to overcome these problems are introduced. Specifically, the challenges used to overcome the functional loss of glucose sensors, restenosis after stent implantation, and calcification induced by implantable devices are discussed. PMID:19885290

  14. Purification, crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of peanut major allergen Ara h 3

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Tengchuan; Howard, Andrew; Zhang, Yu-Zhu

    2007-10-01

    The crystallization of peanut allergen Ara h 3 is reported. The peanut is a significant food source, but is responsible for many cases of anaphylaxis. The peanut 11S legumin-like seed storage protein Ara h 3 is one of the best characterized allergens. In this study, Ara h 3 was extracted from peanut kernels and purified by sequential anion-exchange, hydrophobic interaction and gel-filtration chromatography to very high purity to facilitate crystallization and structural studies. Well diffracting single crystals were obtained by the vapor-diffusion method. A molecular-replacement structural solution has been obtained and refinement of the structure is currently under way.

  15. Molecular Determinants for Antibody Binding on Group 1 House Dust Mite Allergens

    SciTech Connect

    Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Pomés, Anna; Glesner, Jill; Vailes, Lisa D.; Osinski, Tomasz; Porebski, Przemyslaw J.; Majorek, Karolina A.; Heymann, Peter W.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.E.; Minor, Wladek; Chapman, Martin D.

    2012-07-11

    House dust mites produce potent allergens, Der p 1 and Der f 1, that cause allergic sensitization and asthma. Der p 1 and Der f 1 are cysteine proteases that elicit IgE responses in 80% of mite-allergic subjects and have proinflammatory properties. Their antigenic structure is unknown. Here, we present crystal structures of natural Der p 1 and Der f 1 in complex with a monoclonal antibody, 4C1, which binds to a unique cross-reactive epitope on both allergens associated with IgE recognition. The 4C1 epitope is formed by almost identical amino acid sequences and contact residues. Mutations of the contact residues abrogate mAb 4C1 binding and reduce IgE antibody binding. These surface-exposed residues are molecular targets that can be exploited for development of recombinant allergen vaccines.

  16. Evaluation of the Allergenicity Potential of TcPR-10 Protein from Theobroma cacao

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Thyago Hermylly Santana; Pirovani, Carlos Priminho; Micheli, Fabienne; Noronha, Fátima Soares Motta; Alves, Andréa Catão; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; da Silva Gesteira, Abelmon

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis related protein PR10 (TcPR-10), obtained from the Theobroma cacao-Moniliophthora perniciosa interaction library, presents antifungal activity against M. perniciosa and acts in vitro as a ribonuclease. However, despite its biotechnological potential, the TcPR-10 has the P-loop motif similar to those of some allergenic proteins such as Bet v 1 (Betula verrucosa) and Pru av 1 (Prunus avium). The insertion of mutations in this motif can produce proteins with reduced allergenic power. The objective of the present work was to evaluate the allergenic potential of the wild type and mutant recombinant TcPR-10 using bioinformatics tools and immunological assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Mutant substitutions (T10P, I30V, H45S) were inserted in the TcPR-10 gene by site-directed mutagenesis, cloned into pET28a and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) cells. Changes in molecular surface caused by the mutant substitutions was evaluated by comparative protein modeling using the three-dimensional structure of the major cherry allergen, Pru av 1 as a template. The immunological assays were carried out in 8–12 week old female BALB/c mice. The mice were sensitized with the proteins (wild type and mutants) via subcutaneous and challenged intranasal for induction of allergic airway inflammation. Conclusions/Significance We showed that the wild TcPR-10 protein has allergenic potential, whereas the insertion of mutations produced proteins with reduced capacity of IgE production and cellular infiltration in the lungs. On the other hand, in vitro assays show that the TcPR-10 mutants still present antifungal and ribonuclease activity against M. perniciosa RNA. In conclusion, the mutant proteins present less allergenic potential than the wild TcPR-10, without the loss of interesting biotechnological properties. PMID:22768037

  17. Indoor determinants of dustborne allergens in Mexican homes

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Sever, Michelle L.; Sly, Peter D.; London, Stephanie J.; Escamilla-Nuñez, María Consuelo; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens represents a significant risk factor for allergies and asthma in several parts of the world. In Mexico, few studies have evaluated indoor allergens, including cat, dog, and mouse allergens and the factors that predict their presence. This study evaluates the main environmental and household predictors of high prenatal allergen levels and multiple allergen exposures in a birth cohort from Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a birth cohort study of 1094 infants recruited during pregnancy and followed until delivery. We collected dust samples in a subset of 264 homes and assessed environmental factors. Der p 1, Der f 1, dust mite group 2, Fel d 1, Can f 1, Rat n 1, Mus m 1, and Bla g 2 concentrations in dust samples were measured using immunoassays. To define detectable allergen levels, the lowest limits of detection for each allergen were taken as cutoff points. Overall allergen exposure was considered high when four or more allergens exceeded detectable levels in the same household. Logistic regression was used for predictive models. Eighty-five percent of homes had at least one allergen in dust over the detection limit, 52.1% had high exposure (four or more allergens above detectable limits), and 11.7% of homes had detectable levels for more than eight allergens. Der p 1, Der p 2, Mus m 1, and Fel d 1 were the most frequent allergens detected. Each allergen had both common and distinct predictors. The main predictors of a high multiple allergen index were the size of the home, pesticide use, mother's age, mother as homemaker, and season. Increased indoor environmental allergen exposure is mainly related to sociodemographic factors and household cleaning. PMID:25715241

  18. Indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers.

    PubMed

    Tranter, Daniel C; Wobbema, Amanda Teresa; Norlien, Kathleen; Dorschner, Dale F

    2009-09-01

    Elevated concentrations of allergens in the indoor environment may cause allergic sensitization and symptoms. Occupant exposure to indoor allergens in educational facilities should and can be controlled. This study (1) assessed the presence of indoor allergens in Minnesota schools and child care centers, (2) characterized the distribution of allergens in different materials, and (3) evaluated the effect of building and maintenance interventions on allergen concentrations. Settled dust samples were collected from carpet, vinyl tile floors, and upholstered furniture in six schools and seven child care centers before and after interventions. Interventions included changes to cleaning, ventilation, entry mats, furnishings, flooring, and classroom items. The amount of total dust, culturable fungi, and indoor allergens--cockroach, dust mite, cat, and dog--were quantified in the dust samples. Cockroach and dust mite allergens were generally low and below the detection limit, but one dust mite allergen was detected in some areas. Cat and dog allergens were frequently detected at elevated levels, with half the samples above the provisional sensitization risk thresholds and a few samples above the symptom thresholds. Allergen concentrations were highest in upholstered furniture, followed by carpeting and then vinyl floor tile. Cat and dog allergens were lower after the interventions. Cat and dog allergens, but not dust mite and cockroach allergens, seem to be ubiquitous in child care and elementary schools of the U.S. Midwest. These allergens may contribute to sensitization in atopic individuals and occasionally cause symptoms in sensitized allergic individuals. Fleecy materials that are not adequately cleaned, such as upholstered furniture, appear to be the most significant allergen reservoirs. Modest environmental interventions can be implemented by building staff, which should result in lower allergen concentrations. PMID:19585331

  19. Indoor determinants of dustborne allergens in Mexican homes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Cadena, Leticia; Zeldin, Darryl C; Barraza-Villarreal, Albino; Sever, Michelle L; Sly, Peter D; London, Stephanie J; Escamilla-Nuñez, María Consuelo; Romieu, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens represents a significant risk factor for allergies and asthma in several parts of the world. In Mexico, few studies have evaluated indoor allergens, including cat, dog, and mouse allergens and the factors that predict their presence. This study evaluates the main environmental and household predictors of high prenatal allergen levels and multiple allergen exposures in a birth cohort from Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was conducted as part of a birth cohort study of 1094 infants recruited during pregnancy and followed until delivery. We collected dust samples in a subset of 264 homes and assessed environmental factors. Der p 1, Der f 1, dust mite group 2, Fel d 1, Can f 1, Rat n 1, Mus m 1, and Bla g 2 concentrations in dust samples were measured using immunoassays. To define detectable allergen levels, the lowest limits of detection for each allergen were taken as cutoff points. Overall allergen exposure was considered high when four or more allergens exceeded detectable levels in the same household. Logistic regression was used for predictive models. Eighty-five percent of homes had at least one allergen in dust over the detection limit, 52.1% had high exposure (four or more allergens above detectable limits), and 11.7% of homes had detectable levels for more than eight allergens. Der p 1, Der p 2, Mus m 1, and Fel d 1 were the most frequent allergens detected. Each allergen had both common and distinct predictors. The main predictors of a high multiple allergen index were the size of the home, pesticide use, mother's age, mother as homemaker, and season. Increased indoor environmental allergen exposure is mainly related to sociodemographic factors and household cleaning. PMID:25715241

  20. Hormonal response of male green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis) to GnRH challenge.

    PubMed

    Husak, Jerry F; Irschick, Duncan J; Henningsen, Justin P; Kirkbride, Kimberly S; Lailvaux, Simon P; Moore, Ignacio T

    2009-02-01

    Circulating plasma levels of testosterone often differ among social classes of sexually mature males within a population, but the general physiological mechanisms underlying such differences remain unclear. Within sexually mature male green anole lizards (Anolis carolinensis), smaller "lightweight" males have on average relatively smaller heads, lower bite-forces, and lower testosterone levels compared with larger "heavyweight" males. We conducted gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) challenges on lightweight and heavyweight males to determine if lightweight males were capable of producing comparable levels of circulating testosterone to heavyweight males but are socially or physiologically suppressed from doing so. We challenged lightweight and heavyweight males with chicken I and II GnRH and measured their resulting levels of testosterone and corticosterone. Neither lightweights nor heavyweights increased circulating testosterone levels after GnRH challenge, suggesting they are already at maximal production levels, consistent with the Challenge Hypothesis. Instead, testosterone levels tended to decrease and corticosterone levels increased, most likely owing to the stress response associated with handling. Our results are dramatically different from GnRH challenges conducted in bird species, suggesting that more field studies are needed in reptilian systems. PMID:19012286