Science.gov

Sample records for alliance usa divers

  1. Sand Diver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    A few years ago, I was preparing to teach a summer enrichment program for middle school students at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. With swimming on the minds of most kids during the summer, I thought buoyancy would be a fun topic to discuss. An interesting way to introduce this concept is by discussing the beer-drinking balloonist who, in a lawn chair, floated to 11,000 feet above Los Angeles in 1997. However, I needed a hands-on project and was not about to go purchase some lawn chairs to duplicate this experiment. A simple submersible called the "Sand Diver" was designed and is now used as a hands-on activity for my introductory physics course.

  2. Angioma Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Shop to Support Us Our Videos Angioma Alliance Night at the Cincinnati Reds Cavernous Angioma and Children Dr. Issam Awad at the Angioma Alliance Family Conference info@AngiomaAlliance.org | © Angioma Alliance | Disclaimer | ...

  3. Divers Alert Network

    MedlinePlus

    Divers Alert Network is Your Dive Safety Association Divers Alert Network DAN is Divers Alert Network, the diving industry’s largest association ... Inc. All rights reserved. Site Map Advertise Privacy Policy Social Media Policy Logo Policy Terms & Conditions Contact Us ...

  4. [Oral problems in divers].

    PubMed

    Scheper, W A; Lobbezoo, F; Eijkman, M A J

    2005-05-01

    Divers can have several oral problems. Firstly, problems caused by pressure changes. These are barodontalgia and odontocrexis. Barodontalgia is toothache by barotrauma. Odontocrexis is restorations coming lose or breaking or tooth fractures by expansion of air beneath restorations. Other problems can occur by cements used to fix casted restorations, by inflammations in the orofacial region, and by not yet fully healed oral wounds. Secondly, there are problems related to the diver's mouthpiece. To keep the mouthpiece in place, the mandible has to be forced in a forward position. Holding this position often and for long periods of time, may develop or aggravate temporomandibular dysfunction. Insufficient fit of the mouthpiece may induce oral mucosal lesions. Therefore, it is recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces. It is also recommended to produce individual diver mouthpieces for complete dentures wearing divers and for divers with fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:15932043

  5. Research Diver Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Lee H.

    This publication provides a listing of the components of a specialized diver training program developed at the University of Michigan. Because of the demand for specialized diver training in the scientific community, a speciality diving course was developed to serve those in the various fields of marine and aquatic science and engineering. This…

  6. United Space Alliance waits to test its one-man submarine for SRB retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  7. United Space Alliance waits to test its one-man submarine for SRB retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The one-man submarine dubbed DeepWorker 2000 sits on the deck of Liberty Star, one of two KSC solid rocket booster recovery ships. Inside the sub is the pilot, Anker Rasmussen. The sub is being tested on its ability to duplicate the sometimes hazardous job United Space Alliance (USA) divers perform to recover the expended boosters in the ocean after a launch. The boosters splash down in an impact area about 140 miles east of Jacksonville and after recovery are towed back to KSC for refurbishment by the specially rigged recovery ships. DeepWorker 2000 was built by Nuytco Research Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia. It is 8.25 feet long, 5.75 feet high, and weighs 3,800 pounds. USA is a prime contractor to NASA for the Space Shuttle program.

  8. Oceanography for Divers: Waves, Tides, and Currents. Diver Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Lee H.

    To dive safely, it is suggested that the diver have a working knowledge of waves, tides, currents, and water quality. Lack of understanding and respect for ocean currents and surf can be of serious consequence to the diver. This paper on the diving environment is designed to provide the diver with a general understanding of the physical…

  9. Nutritional recommendations for divers.

    PubMed

    Benardot, Dan; Zimmermann, Wes; Cox, Gregory R; Marks, Saul

    2014-08-01

    Competitive diving involves grace, power, balance, and flexibility, which all require satisfying daily energy and nutrient needs. Divers are short, well-muscled, and lean, giving them a distinct biomechanical advantage. Although little diving-specific nutrition research on performance and health outcomes exists, there is concern that divers are excessively focused on body weight and composition, which may result in reduced dietary intake to achieve desired physique goals. This will result in low energy availability, which may have a negative impact on their power-to-weight ratio and health risks. Evidence is increasing that restrictive dietary practices leading to low energy availability also result in micronutrient deficiencies, premature fatigue, frequent injuries, and poor athletic performance. On the basis of daily training demands, estimated energy requirements for male and female divers are 3,500 kcal and 2,650 kcal, respectively. Divers should consume a diet that provides 3-8 g/kg/day of carbohydrate, with the higher values accommodating growth and development. Total daily protein intake (1.2-1.7 g/kg) should be spread evenly throughout the day in 20 to 30 g amounts and timed appropriately after training sessions. Divers should consume nutrient-dense foods and fluids and, with medical supervision, certain dietary supplements (i.e., calcium and iron) may be advisable. Although sweat loss during indoor training is relatively low, divers should follow appropriate fluid-intake strategies to accommodate anticipated sweat losses in hot and humid outdoor settings. A multidisciplinary sports medicine team should be integral to the daily training environment, and suitable foods and fluids should be made available during prolonged practices and competitions. PMID:24936780

  10. Headache in divers.

    PubMed

    Cheshire, W P; Ott, M C

    2001-03-01

    The increasing popularity of scuba diving has added a new category to the differential diagnosis of headache. Headache in divers, while uncommon and generally benign, can occasionally signify serious consequences of hyperbaric exposure such as arterial gas embolism, decompression sickness, and otic or paranasal sinus barotrauma. Inadequate ventilation of compressed gases can lead to carbon dioxide accumulation, cerebral vasodilatation, and headache. Other types of headache encountered in divers include exertional headache, cold stimulus headache, migraine, tension-type headache, acute traumatic headache, cervicogenic headache, carbon monoxide poisoning headache, and headache associated with envenomation. Correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment require a careful history and neurologic examination as well as an understanding of the unique physiologic stresses of the subaquatic environment. PMID:11264683

  11. Two-Liquid Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planinsic, G.; Kos, M.; Jerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    It is quite easy to make a version of the well known Cartesian diver experiment that uses two immiscible liquids. This allows students to test their knowledge of density and pressure in explaining the diver's behaviour. Construction details are presented here together with a mathematical model to explain the observations.

  12. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event. PMID:16251767

  13. Science Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Lorrie; Ribeiro, Mary

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Science Alliance project, a teacher-scientist collaboration where each teacher is given five non-consecutive days of professional development time to meet with a participating scientist, technician, engineer, mathematician, or environmentalist to develop a module of lesson plans that introduce the real world of industry into the…

  14. Pneumomediastinum in a snorkelling diver

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Johanne; Teatino, Raphael

    2012-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum is an uncommon disorder seen in shallow water divers. The authors present the case of a 25-year-old who sustained a pneumomediastinum while snorkelling; his presentation, investigation results, treatment and response. PMID:22605813

  15. Therapeutic alliance.

    PubMed

    Fox, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    I have been very fortunate in my journey of mental illness. I respond well to medication, but I don't think that is the complete answer to living successfully with serious, persistent mental illness. I believe a person's environment is also of utmost importance, enabling the person suffering with mental illness to continually grow in life. I found early in my struggle with mental illness a psychiatrist with whom I have always had a very good rapport. Until recently I didn't know that what I have with this psychiatrist is professionally known as a therapeutic alliance. Over the years, when I need someone to talk over anything that is troubling to me, I seek my psychiatrist. A therapeutic alliance is non-judgmental; it is nourishing; and finally it is a relationship of complete trust. Perhaps persons reading this article who have never experienced this alliance will seek it. I believe it can make an insecure person secure; a frightened person less frightened; and allow a person to continue the journey of mental health with a sense of belief in oneself. PMID:12433224

  16. Ear disorders in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M H

    2011-01-01

    History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called "diving medicine" was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas), and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers. PMID:23022815

  17. [Decompression of deep divers].

    PubMed

    Gardette, B

    1989-08-01

    For industrial saturation dives over 50 m, Heliox (He-O2) is now used routinely as respiratory gas mix. The decompression after such dives has been investigated thoroughly as well on the animal (minipig, monkeys) as on humans. Results show that for a given ascending speed, the number of bubbles detectable by the Doppler method in the bloodstream rises according to the maximal depth. The incidence of decompression accidents follows the same trend. This finding prompted us to adopt since 1979 slower decompression speeds. Moreover we modified the ascension profile, using henceforth a linear decompression in maintaining a constant speed for a given partial oxygen pressure. For our research program Hydra, we replaced in part Helium by Hydrogen in the respiratory gas mix. We were thus able to do the first hydrogen saturation decompression between 450 and 200 meters, during our Hydra V (1985) experiment. During our following diving research program Hydra VI (1986), 8 divers were decompressed under Hydreliox (H2-He-O2) mix from 500 to 300 m by eliminating hydrogen by chemical means. We used for this purpose a dehydrogenation apparatus developed by our engineering team. These decompressions took place without any difficulty and only a low number of bubbles detected. It is therefore possible to use decompression speeds for hydrogen and helium which are very similar. A confirmatory experiment on mice, where we exposed them to a 2000 m depth dive under Hydreliox (H2-He-O2), gave good results. This gives us the possibility, to perform gas exchange studies on small animals and to extrapolate the results to humans. PMID:2799362

  18. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.346 Diver's equipment. (a) Each diver... weight belt capable of quick release; (5) A knife; (6) Swim fins or shoes; (7) A diving wristwatch; and (8) A depth gage. (b) Each diver using a heavyweight diving outfit must— (1) Have a helmet...

  19. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.346 Diver's equipment. (a) Each diver... weight belt capable of quick release; (5) A knife; (6) Swim fins or shoes; (7) A diving wristwatch; and (8) A depth gage. (b) Each diver using a heavyweight diving outfit must— (1) Have a helmet...

  20. Oceanography for Divers: Hazardous Marine Life. Diver Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Lee H.

    Most people find that the life of the marine environment is beautiful and fascinating. Of the thousands of marine animals and plants, relatively few constitute a real hazard to the diver. Although some species are dangerous and may, in some instances, inflict serious wounds, with a few exceptions marine animals are not aggressive. Most…

  1. Diver First Class Reading Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, E. C., III; Berghage, T. E.

    The Nelson-Denny reading test was administered to thirty Navy first class diver candidates to evaluate the group's vocabulary, reading comprehension, reading rate and over-all reading ability. Reading rate and comprehension were at the twelfth grade level, while vocabulary ability was equal to the college freshman norm. (Author)

  2. iDiver: underwater text messaging and locating system for divers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanaswami, Ranga; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Rameez, R.; Stojanovic, Milica; Mehra, Raman K.

    2012-06-01

    Divers executing strategic underwater missions as well as recreational divers have a great need for communication. Divers can communicate between themselves as well as to a surface boat, to share information, perform cooperative maneuvers and call for help. In addition, it would be useful to know the location of all divers relative to the boat. Such capability will allow operators to guide divers in their maneuvers and provide immediate assistance during emergencies. We present the development of communication protocols for text messaging and the development of a relative diver locating system.

  3. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... using SCUBA must have— (1) Self-contained underwater breathing equipment including— (i) A primary breathing gas supply with a cylinder pressure gage readable by the diver during the dive; and (ii) A diver... provided with a helmet cushion and weighted shoes. (c) Each surface-supplied dive operation using...

  4. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... using SCUBA must have— (1) Self-contained underwater breathing equipment including— (i) A primary breathing gas supply with a cylinder pressure gage readable by the diver during the dive; and (ii) A diver... provided with a helmet cushion and weighted shoes. (c) Each surface-supplied dive operation using...

  5. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... using SCUBA must have— (1) Self-contained underwater breathing equipment including— (i) A primary breathing gas supply with a cylinder pressure gage readable by the diver during the dive; and (ii) A diver... provided with a helmet cushion and weighted shoes. (c) Each surface-supplied dive operation using...

  6. Alternobaric vertigo in professional divers.

    PubMed

    Molvaer, O I; Albrektsen, G

    1988-07-01

    The present investigation was part of a project performed to detect possible effects of diving on the cochleovestibular system. A group of 194 professional divers were interviewed, examined otologically, and their hearing was tested audiometrically. Caloric vestibular tests were performed in 48 subjects. The interview reviewed age, diving experience, previous ear disease or injury, head trauma, noise exposure during diving and during spare-time activities, eye color, tobacco habits, and the occurrence of vertigo during diving. Useful information regarding vertigo was obtained from 193. Of the 76 (39%) who had experienced vertigo, 64 (33%) were classified as alternobaric vertigo (AV), a type of vertigo caused by asymmetric middle ear pressure. A stepwise multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to detect variables contributing to the presence of AV. Variables having a statistically significant association with AV were previous barotrauma of the ear (P less than 0.05) and noise exposure during diving (less than 0.05). AV was most frequently encountered when diving during a common cold. In this sample of divers, AV did not lead to any serious or critical situations. PMID:3212844

  7. Functional response of sport divers to lobsters with application to fisheries management.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, David B; Parsons, Darren M; Kellison, G Todd; Plaia, Gayle R; Johnson, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    Fishery managers must understand the dynamics of fishers and their prey to successfully predict the outcome of management actions. We measured the impact of a two-day exclusively recreational fishery on Caribbean spiny lobster in the Florida Keys, USA, over large spatial scales (>100 km) and multiple years and used a theoretical, predator-prey functional response approach to identify whether or not sport diver catch rates were density-independent (type I) or density-dependent (type II or III functional response), and if catch rates were saturated (i.e., reached an asymptote) at relatively high lobster densities. We then describe how this predator-prey framework can be applied to fisheries management for spiny lobster and other species. In the lower Keys, divers exhibited a type-I functional response, whereby they removed a constant and relatively high proportion of lobsters (0.74-0.84) across all pre-fishing-season lobster densities. Diver fishing effort increased in a linear manner with lobster prey densities, as would be expected with a type-I functional response, and was an order of magnitude lower in the upper Keys than lower Keys. There were numerous instances in the upper Keys where the density of lobsters actually increased from before to after the fishing season, suggesting some type of "spill-in effect" from surrounding diver-disturbed areas. With the exception of isolated reefs in the upper Keys, the proportion of lobsters removed by divers was density independent (type-I functional response) and never reached saturation at natural lobster densities. Thus, recreational divers have a relatively simple predatory response to spiny lobster, whereby catch rates increase linearly with lobster density such that catch is a reliable indicator of abundance. Although diver predation is extremely high (approximately 80%), diver predation pressure is not expected to increase proportionally with a decline in lobster density (i.e., a depensatory response), which could

  8. Space Technology for Deepwater Divers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Can-Dive Services Ltd.'s Newtsuit offers several features that the Canadian company feels will attract divers and their employers. Although it is a hard shell armored suit, it is a relatively light 400 pounds made of aluminum. Future Newtsuits may be made of carbon fiber composite material that is lighter, yet stronger than steel. It has a constant pressure of one atmosphere meaning the pressure all the way down to the suits 1,000 feet limit will be the same as on the surface. Newtsuit, like a spacesuit, has a self contained backpack breathing system with a duration of 48 hours. It employs a series of patented low friction fluidic joints designed to make underwater motion easier and permit 75 percent; normal human mobility.

  9. Building Alliances Series: Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Public-private partnerships done right are a powerful tool for development, providing enduring solutions to some of the greatest challenges. To help familiarize readers with the art of alliance building, the Global Development Alliance (GDA) office has created a series of practical guides that highlight proven practices in partnerships,…

  10. Alliance through Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebalj, Darlene; Hudson, Susan; Ryan, Jan; Wight-Boycott, Juliet

    2007-01-01

    Following a landmark organisational change event within the University of Western Sydney, when the university ceased operating as a federation of four distinct, inter-related elements and merged to become a single entity, four foundation College Managers made a strategic decision to form an alliance. This alliance significantly enhanced the…

  11. Alliances in "The Hunger Games"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Painter, Judith

    2012-01-01

    This lesson plan is based on "The Hunger Games" by Suzanne Collins. Characters in "The Hunger Games" form alliances both inside and outside the arena. Katniss and Gale form alliances within District 12. Katniss, Peeta, and the other tributes form alliances for a variety of reasons during the Games. An alliance means that "someone's got your back"…

  12. The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of scuba divers pulmonary edema is described. When discovered in 1981, it was believed to be a cold-induced response in a submerged, otherwise healthy, scuba diver. The clinical features are described and discussed, as are the demographics. An alleged prevalence of 1.1% was complicated by problematic statistics and an apparent increase in reported cases. Recurrences both while diving and swimming or snorkeling were common. More recent case reports and surveys are described, identifying predisposing factors and associations, including cardiac pathology. Stress cardiomyopathies, reversible myocardial disorder or Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, may complicate the presentation, especially in older females. Relevant cardiac investigations and autopsy findings are reviewed. Disease severity and potential lethality of scuba divers pulmonary edema became more apparent early this century, and these influence our current recommendations to survivors. First aid and treatment are also discussed. PMID:27265985

  13. Scuba divers' pulmonary oedema. A review.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Carl

    2009-12-01

    The literature on scuba divers' pulmonary oedema (SDPE) is reviewed, especially in its relationship to other immersioninduced pulmonary oedemas. It is concluded that although the three forms induced by swimming, freediving and scuba diving have some features in common, there are significant differences in their demographics, causation and clinical management. The swimming-induced cases tend to be young and fit, but exposed to excessive exertion. The freedivers experience extreme breath-holding and barotraumatic influences. The scuba divers are an older group and may have preexisting or occult cardiovascular disease. Although the first-aid treatments may be similar, subsequent investigations and preventative measures will differ considerably. PMID:22752744

  14. Development of a new concept diver's watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, Takeo; Aizawa, Hitomi

    The 'Scuba Master' diver's watch represents a new concept. It was developed and announced in 1990. This watch automatically displays information necessary for safe scuba diving and records diving data. The watch was well accepted by divers all over the world. Safe diving techniques were investigated. This led to the need for developing a highly accurate, highly reliable depth measurement system. The functions and features of 'Scuba Masters' are described. The way to make the depth measurement system highly accurate and highly reliable is explained.

  15. The Cartesian Diver, Surface Tension and the Cheerios Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chi-Tung; Lee, Wen-Tang; Kao, Sung-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be used to measure the surface tension of a liquid to a certain extent. The surface tension measurement is related to the two critical pressures at which the diver is about to sink and about to emerge. After sinking because of increasing pressure, the diver is repulsed to the centre of the vessel. After the pressure is…

  16. A Lot of Good Physics in the Cartesian Diver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, Roberto; Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The Cartesian diver experiment certainly occupies a place of honour in old physics textbooks as a vivid demonstration of Archimedes' buoyancy. The original experiment, as described in old textbooks, shows Archimedes buoyancy qualitatively: when the increased weight of the diver is not counterbalanced by Archimedes' buoyancy, the diver sinks. When…

  17. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Alliance in the News

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is conducting cutting-edge research using nanotechnology to transform the diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Read news stories and announcements below about the Alliance's multidisciplinary work.

  18. Alliance-focused training.

    PubMed

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Muran, J Christopher; Safran, Jeremy D

    2015-06-01

    Alliance-focused training (AFT) aims to increase therapists' ability to recognize, tolerate, and negotiate alliance ruptures by increasing the therapeutic skills of self-awareness, affect regulation, and interpersonal sensitivity. In AFT, therapists are encouraged to draw on these skills when metacommunicating about ruptures with patients. In this article, we present the 3 main supervisory tasks of AFT: videotape analysis of rupture moments, awareness-oriented role-plays, and mindfulness training. We describe the theoretical and empirical support for each supervisory task, provide examples based on actual supervision sessions, and present feedback about the usefulness of the techniques from trainees in our program. We also note some of the challenges involved in conducting AFT and the importance of maintaining a strong supervisory alliance when using this training approach. PMID:25150677

  19. Do Springboard Divers Violate Angular Momentum Conservation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frohlich, Cliff

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several different methods that performers (divers and trampolinists) use to initate somersaults and twists and presents concrete examples of each method. Presents and evaluates quantitative calculations using information about the moments of inertia, mass, etc., of "typical" performers. (Author/GA)

  20. Teaching Science. Rising Raisins and Sinking Divers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Presents classroom science activities dealing with flotation, which may be presented at different levels of cognitive complexity. The activities involve observing various objects in carbonated soda and deal with concepts of weight, volume, and density. Describes a Cartesian Diver activity that allows further examination of the effects of…

  1. Cardiovascular regulation during apnea in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Dzamonja, Gordan; Tank, Jens; Palada, Ivan; Valic, Zoran; Bakovic, Darija; Obad, Ante; Ivancev, Vladimir; Breskovic, Toni; Diedrich, André; Joyner, Michael J; Luft, Friedrich C; Jordan, Jens; Dujic, Zeljko

    2009-04-01

    Involuntary apnea during sleep elicits sustained arterial hypertension through sympathetic activation; however, little is known about voluntary apnea, particularly in elite athletes. Their physiological adjustments are largely unknown. We measured blood pressure, heart rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and vascular resistance before and during maximal end-inspiratory breath holds in 20 elite divers and in 15 matched control subjects. At baseline, arterial pressure and heart rate were similar in both groups. Maximal apnea time was longer in divers (1.7+/-0.4 versus 3.9+/-1.1 minutes; P<0.0001), and it was accompanied by marked oxygen desaturation (97.6+/-0.7% versus 77.6+/-13.9%; P<0.0001). At the end of apnea, divers showed a >5-fold greater muscle sympathetic nerve activity increase (P<0.01) with a massively increased pressor response compared with control subjects (9+/-5 versus 32+/-15 mm Hg; P<0.001). Vascular resistance increased in both groups, but more so in divers (79+/-46% versus 140+/-82%; P<0.01). Heart rate did not change in either group. The rise in muscle sympathetic nerve activity correlated with oxygen desaturation (r(2)=0.26; P<0.01) and with the increase in mean arterial pressure (r(2)=0.40; P<0.0001). In elite divers, breath holds for several minutes result in an excessive chemoreflex activation of sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. Extensive sympathetically mediated peripheral vasoconstriction may help to maintain adequate oxygen supply to vital organs under asphyxic conditions that untrained subjects are not able to tolerate voluntarily. Our results are relevant to conditions featuring periodic apnea. PMID:19255361

  2. Women in the Farmers' Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, MaryJo

    The involvement of women in U.S. politics of the 1890s, specifically in the Populist Party and the National Farmers' Alliance, is discussed in this paper. Women comprised a large percentage of membership in many of the sub-alliances of the National Farmers' Alliance and a number were national leaders, including Mary Elizabeth Lease, Annie LePorte…

  3. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Family Caregiver Alliance. Blog What's New HOT Weather Tips We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and those ... conditions such as vascular disease or diabetes, the weather does not have to hit 100 degrees to ...

  4. Sustaining alliances for integrity.

    PubMed

    Werhane, P H

    2000-01-01

    Research in business ethics has shown that value-grounded organizations outperform their counterparts in business terms and that industries can successfully regulate themselves. The market in health care, systems theory, and stakeholder analysis are used to generate a set of five potential core values to sustain an Ethics Alliance of Oral Health Organizations. PMID:10941225

  5. Divers' lung function: small airways disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thorsen, E; Segadal, K; Kambestad, B; Gulsvik, A

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary function was measured in 152 professional saturation divers and in a matched control group of 106 subjects. Static lung volumes, dynamic lung volumes and flows, transfer factor for carbon monoxide (T1CO), transfer volume per unit alveolar volume (KCO), delta-N2, and closing volume (CV) were measured and compared with reference values from recent Scandinavian studies, British submariners, and the European Community for Coal and Steel (ECCS) recommended reference values. Diving exposure was assessed as years of diving experience, total number of days in saturation and depth, and as the product of days in saturation and mean depth. Divers had significantly lower values for forced expired volume in one second (FEV1), FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio, FEF25-75%, FEF75-85%, FEF50%, FEF75%, T1CO, and KCO compared with the controls and a significantly higher CV. There was a positive correlation between diving exposure and CV, whereas the other variables had negative correlations with diving exposure. Values for the control group were not different from the predictive values of Scandinavian reference studies or British submariners, although the ECCS standard predicted significantly lower values for the lung function variables both in divers and the control group. The pattern of the differences in lung function variables between the divers and controls is consistent with small airways dysfunction and with the transient changes in lung function found immediately after a single saturation dive. The association between reduced pulmonary function and previous diving exposure further indicates the presence of cumulative long term effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:2393630

  6. IR diver vision for turbidity mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, Jerry A.

    2010-04-01

    Commercial, forensic, and military divers often encounter turbid conditions which reduce visibility to zero. Under such conditions, work must be performed completely blind. The darkness resulting from high levels of turbidity is complete, and can be dangerous as well as disorienting. Such darkness can even occur near the surface on a bright and sunny day. Artificial underwater lighting is of no use in such situations, as it only makes matters worse (similar to the use of high beam headlights in dense fog). Certain wavelengths of infrared (IR) light have the ability to penetrate this underwater "fog," and thus form the basis of the current development. Turbidity results from clay, silt, finely divided organic and inorganic matter, soluble colored organic compounds, plankton and microscopic organisms suspended in water. The IR Diver Vision system described herein consists of a standard commercial diving mask of any of several configurations whereby an IR light source, IR video camera, video display, and power source may be integrated within or attached to the mask. The IR light source wavelength is compatible with the spectral bandwidth of the video camera. The camera field-of-view (FOV) is matched to the video display in order to provide a unity magnification and hence prevent diver ocular fatigue. The IR video camera, video display, power source and controls are compatible with extended use in a submarine environment. Some such masks will incorporate tilt/heading sensors and video indicators. 3-D Imaging, Inc. has developed prototypes and has patents pending on such devices.

  7. Diver monitoring by ultrasonic digital data telemetry.

    PubMed

    Woodward, B; Bateman, S C

    1994-07-01

    A through-water ultrasonic data telemetry system using burst-mode frequency shift keying (FSK) is described. The system can be adapted for the transmission of data from various sensors, but it has been designed principally for monitoring the respiratory rate, heart rate, temperature and depth of a free-swimming diver over a range of up to 300 metres. This application requires the transmission of low rate digital signals through water from a moving source to a receiver that is either stationary or moving. PMID:7952660

  8. Alliance for Computational Science Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Scheick, S. H.

    2003-04-26

    The mission of this alliance is to promote, encourage, and facilitate computational science activities at the member HBCUs and to use collaborative technologies among the alliance partners to create an environment in which students and researchers from a wide variety of applications areas can exchange ideas and share resources.

  9. Building Alliances Series: Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    Public-private partnerships done right are a powerful tool for development, providing enduring solutions to some of the greatest challenges. To help familiarize readers with the art of alliance building, the Global Development Alliance (GDA) office has created a series of practical guides that highlight proven practices in partnerships,…

  10. Space Alliance Technology Outreach Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Space Alliance Technology Outreach Program (SATOP), will provide technical assistance to small businesses through the contribution of time and expertise from Space Alliance Partners and support the development and expansion of technology business incubation programs in Florida and New York. A summary of these accomplishments are given.

  11. The possibility of passive acoustic monitoring of a Scuba Diver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Gorovoy, S. V.; Tagiltsev, A. A.; Kostiv, A. E.; Borodin, A. E.; Pochekutova, I. A.; Vasilistov, A. M.; Krupenkov, A. C.; Shiryaev, A. D.; Vlasov, D. I.

    2016-02-01

    The problem of controlling the state and location of scuba divers is of importance. This work consider the possibility to use for this purpose a low-frequency noise of a scuba diver. The noise of a scuba diver under a dry swimming suite near the trachea and in the water at a distance of 50 m was recorded.It wa shown that both sygnals are characterized by the presence of quasi-periodic components induced by the amplitude modulation of wide-band breathing noises by the brething rhythms of a scuba diver. The quasi-periodic componentss distinguished can be used to evaluate the physiological parameters of the state of a scuba diver and to establish his location.

  12. Strategic alliances and market risk.

    PubMed

    Havenaar, Matthias; Hiscocks, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Strategic alliances in product development and marketing are crucial to the biotechnology industry. Many alliances, however, are terminated before the drug reaches the market. In this article we make the case that strategic alliances can fail because of how they are negotiated. Alliance contracts are often inflexible and do not allow for changes in market conditions. We propose a model for contract valuation that can assist biotech and/or pharma deal makers in negotiating alliances that have a higher chance of survival in uncertain market conditions. The model makes use of variable royalties and milestone payments. Because licensing is key to the biotech and/or pharma business model this article will be of interest not only to professionals in licensing, but to all professionals active in the industry. PMID:22484547

  13. The Research Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Research Data Alliance (RDA) is an international organization created in 2012 to provide researchers with a forum for identifying and removing barriers to data sharing. Since then, RDA has gained over 3000 individual members, over three dozen organizational members, 47 Interest Groups, and 17 Working Groups, all focused on research data sharing. Interoperability is one instantiation of data sharing, but is not the only barrier to overcome. Technology limitations, discipline-specific cultures that do not support sharing, lack of best-practices, or lack of good definitions, are only three of a long list of situations preventing researchers from sharing their data. This presentation will cover how RDA has grown, some details on how the first eight solutions contribute to interoperability and sharing, and a sneak peek at what's in the pipeline.

  14. Brain Damage in Commercial Breath-Hold Divers

    PubMed Central

    Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Tamaki, Hideki; Lemaître, Frédéric; Okudera, Toshio; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Denoble, Petar J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute decompression illness (DCI) involving the brain (Cerebral DCI) is one of the most serious forms of diving-related injuries which may leave residual brain damage. Cerebral DCI occurs in compressed air and in breath-hold divers, likewise. We conducted this study to investigate whether long-term breath-hold divers who may be exposed to repeated symptomatic and asymptomatic brain injuries, show brain damage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Subjects and Methods Our study subjects were 12 commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) with long histories of diving work in a district of Japan. We obtained information on their diving practices and the presence or absence of medical problems, especially DCI events. All participants were examined with MRI to determine the prevalence of brain lesions. Results Out of 12 Ama divers (mean age: 54.9±5.1 years), four had histories of cerebral DCI events, and 11 divers demonstrated ischemic lesions of the brain on MRI studies. The lesions were situated in the cortical and/or subcortical area (9 cases), white matters (4 cases), the basal ganglia (4 cases), and the thalamus (1 case). Subdural fluid collections were seen in 2 cases. Conclusion These results suggest that commercial breath-hold divers are at a risk of clinical or subclinical brain injury which may affect the long-term neuropsychological health of divers. PMID:25115903

  15. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  16. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  17. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  18. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  19. 46 CFR 115.650 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater ROV. 115.650 Section 115.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete your underwater survey, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). (a) If you use divers...

  20. Glossopharyngeal insufflation induces cardioinhibitory syncope in apnea divers.

    PubMed

    Dzamonja, Gordan; Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Palada, Ivan; Valic, Zoran; Bakovic, Darija; Obad, Ante; Ivancev, Vladimir; Breskovic, Toni; Diedrich, André; Luft, Friedrich C; Dujic, Zeljko; Jordan, Jens

    2010-12-01

    Apnea divers increase intrathoracic pressure voluntarily by taking a deep breath followed by glossopharyngeal insufflation. Because apnea divers sometimes experience hypotension and syncope during the maneuver, they may serve as a model to study the mechanisms of syncope. We recorded changes in hemodynamics and sympathetic vasomotor tone with microneurography during breath holding with glossopharyngeal insufflation. Five men became hypotensive and fainted during breath holding with glossopharyngeal insufflation within the first minute. In four divers, heart rate dropped suddenly to a minimum of 38 ± 4 beats/min. Therefore, cardioinhibitory syncope was more common than low cardiac output syncope. PMID:20623312

  1. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  2. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  3. 56. LOOKING WEST AT CONCRETE TUNNEL DIVERING LOG POND OUTFLOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. LOOKING WEST AT CONCRETE TUNNEL DIVERING LOG POND OUTFLOW AWAY FROM SAWMILL SUPPORTS. PHOTOGRAPHER: UNKNOWN. DATE: 1954. COURTESY OF RALPH HULL. - Hull-Oakes Lumber Company, 23837 Dawson Road, Monroe, Benton County, OR

  4. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  5. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  6. 46 CFR 197.324 - Diver's safety harness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.324 Diver's safety harness. Each safety harness used in surface-supplied diving must have— (a) A positive buckling device; and (b) An...

  7. Otorhinolaryngologic disorders and diving accidents: an analysis of 306 divers.

    PubMed

    Klingmann, Christoph; Praetorius, Mark; Baumann, Ingo; Plinkert, Peter K

    2007-10-01

    Diving is a very popular leisure activity with an increasing number of participants. As more than 80% of the diving related problems involve the head and neck region, every otorhinolaryngologist should be familiar with diving medical standards. We here present an analysis of more than 300 patients we have treated in the past four years. Between January 2002 and October 2005, 306 patients presented in our department with otorhinological disorders after diving, or after diving accidents. We collected the following data: name, sex, age, date of treatment, date of accident, diagnosis, special aspects of the diagnosis, number of dives, diving certification, whether and which surgery had been performed, history of acute diving accidents or follow up treatment, assessment of fitness to dive and special remarks. The study setting was a retrospective cohort study. The distribution of the disorders was as follows: 24 divers (8%) with external ear disorders, 140 divers (46%) with middle ear disorders, 56 divers (18%) with inner ear disorders, 53 divers (17%) with disorders of the nose and sinuses, 24 divers (8%) with decompression illness (DCI) and 9 divers (3%) who complained of various symptoms. Only 18% of the divers presented with acute disorders. The most common disorder (24%) was Eustachian tube dysfunction. Female divers were significantly more often affected. Chronic sinusitis was found to be associated with a significantly higher number of performed dives. Conservative treatment failed in 30% of the patients but sinus surgery relieved symptoms in all patients of this group. The middle ear is the main problem area for divers. Middle ear ventilation problems due to Eustachian tube dysfunction can be treated conservatively with excellent results whereas pathology of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain often require surgery. More than four out of five patients visited our department to re-establish their fitness to dive. Although the treatment of acute diving

  8. A calculating alliance.

    PubMed

    Alanis, M; Sippel, S

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses the effects of the alliance between the Church and the Argentine state on women's reproductive rights. Several commentators have criticized how President Carlos Menem used the campaign against abortion for his own political interest. He issued a presidential decree on antiabortion campaign--the Day of the Unborn Child. This decree was announced on December 8, 1998, and the day of observance is March 25 of every coming year. Although the Argentine government does not have a law that explicitly regulates family planning method for the last two decades, many Argentines find the action of the president selfish. The initiation of this presidential decree was the culmination of Menem's manipulation of church and state to secure clerical support for his political regime. Even if statistics is providing him with data concerning the effects of unclear reproductive health laws, he and the church still has chosen not to focus on reproductive rights exclusively, but have concerned themselves primarily with other social and economic issues. While Menem uses the Vatican's pro-life rhetoric and his presidential power to protect fetal life, Argentines will have to contend with the existing Menem policies, which compromise the health of women and children. PMID:12178902

  9. Lung function over six years among professional divers

    PubMed Central

    Skogstad, M; Thorsen, E; Haldorsen, T; Kjuus, H

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To analyse longitudinal changes in pulmonary function in professional divers and their relation with cumulative diving exposure. Methods: The study included 87 men at the start of their education as professional divers. At follow up one, three, and six years later, 83, 81, and 77 divers were reexamined. The median number of compressed air dives in the 77 divers over the follow up period was 196 (range 37–2000). A group of non-smoking policemen (n = 64) were subjected to follow up examinations in parallel with the divers. Assessment of lung function included dynamic lung volumes, maximal expiratory flow rates, and transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TlCO). The individual rates of change of the lung function variables were calculated by fitting linear regression lines to the data, expressed as percent change per year. Results: The annual reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expired volume in one second (FEV1) were 0.91 (SD 1.22) and 0.84 (SD 1.28) per cent per year in divers, which were significantly higher than the reductions in the policemen of 0.24 (SD 1.04) and 0.16 (SD 1.07) per cent per year (p < 0.001). The annual reduction in the maximal expiratory flow rates at 25% and 75% of FVC expired (FEF25% and FEF75%) were related to the log10 transformed cumulative number of dives in a multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). The annual reductions in TlCO were 1.33 (SD 1.85) and 0.43 (SD 1.53) per cent per year in divers and policemen (p < 0.05). Conclusions: FVC, FEV1, maximal expiratory flow rates, and TlCO were significantly reduced in divers over the follow up period when compared with policemen. The contrasts within and between groups suggest that diving has contributed to the reduction in lung function. PMID:12205238

  10. Upper respiratory tract and aural flora of saturation divers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D M; Davis, P

    1978-01-01

    The conditions of helium saturation diving promote the proliferation of Gram-negative bacterial species in the external auditory meatus of divers. These changes in flora occurred in the absence of operational diving, that is, no contact with water. The colonising bacteria were autogenous in origin and cross-colonisation was observed between divers. On return to normal atmospheric conditions the aural flora became predominantly Gram-positive again within 48 hours. PMID:690235

  11. Increased carotid intima-media thickness in scuba divers

    PubMed Central

    Rezaali, Saeed; Shams-Hosseini, Narges Sadat

    2014-01-01

    Background Scuba divers work in high pressure conditions which may cause some changes in physiological status to adapt to this situation. In this study, the carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) was assessed in divers as a risk factor of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disorders. Methods This historical cohort study was performed on 16 male professional scuba divers as case group and 30 healthy people as controls with age range of 26-66 years. CIMT of both carotids of supine participants was measured by a 10 MHz linear ultrasonic probe quantitatively. Relationship between experience of diving and carotid IMT was evaluated. Results All the participants were males (mean age 42.9 ± 10.58. and for the control group was (47.05 ± 12.31 years). The mean right CIMT in divers and control group was 524.31 ± 149.40 and 443.66 ± 59.62 micrometer, respectively. Furthermore, the mean left CIMT in divers and control group was 624.57 ± 116.15 and 458.44 ± 49.56 micrometer, respectively. Conclusion The findings demonstrated that long-term occupational diving leads to increased intima-media thickness in scuba divers. PMID:24800047

  12. Understanding the underwater behaviour of scuba divers in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shan-Shan; Au, Alfred; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Diving-related activities may constitute a major threat to coral reefs. This study aimed to quantify the impact of diving in Hong Kong on hard corals and understand how socio-economic characteristics and experience level of divers influence diver-inflicted damage. We recorded and analysed the underwater behaviour of 81 recreational divers. On average, a diver was in contact with marine biota 14.7 times with about 40% of contacts involved corals and 38% were damaging contacts with corals or other biota in a single dive. The most harm-inflicting groups included inexperienced and camera-carrying divers. Although Hong Kong divers did not make many damaging contacts with corals, there is still an imminent need to determine the scale of damage from diving activities on the marine ecosystem given the rapid development of marine-based tourism and the limited coral-inhabited areas in Hong Kong where the marine environment is already under stress from anthropogenic activities. PMID:23471632

  13. Understanding the Underwater Behaviour of Scuba Divers in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shan-shan; Au, Alfred; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Diving-related activities may constitute a major threat to coral reefs. This study aimed to quantify the impact of diving in Hong Kong on hard corals and understand how socio-economic characteristics and experience level of divers influence diver-inflicted damage. We recorded and analysed the underwater behaviour of 81 recreational divers. On average, a diver was in contact with marine biota 14.7 times with about 40 % of contacts involved corals and 38 % were damaging contacts with corals or other biota in a single dive. The most harm-inflicting groups included inexperienced and camera-carrying divers. Although Hong Kong divers did not make many damaging contacts with corals, there is still an imminent need to determine the scale of damage from diving activities on the marine ecosystem given the rapid development of marine-based tourism and the limited coral-inhabited areas in Hong Kong where the marine environment is already under stress from anthropogenic activities.

  14. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  15. Decompression sickness in a vegetarian diver: are vegetarian divers at risk? A case report.

    PubMed

    van Hulst, Robert A; van der Kamp, Wim

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a diver who suffered decompression sickness (DCS), but who also was a strict vegetarian for more than 10 years. He presented with symptoms of tingling of both feet and left hand, weakness in both legs and sensory deficits for vibration and propriocepsis after two deep dives with decompression. The initial clinical features of this case were most consistent with DCS, possibly because of a vulnerable spinal cord due to cobalamin deficiency neuropathy. This case illustrates the similarities between DCS and a clinically defined vitamin B12 deficiency. The pathophysiology of vitamin B12 deficiency and common pathology and symptoms of DCS are reviewed. PMID:20568548

  16. Fracturing alliance improves profitability of Lost Hills field

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, M. ); Stewart, D. ); Gaona, M. )

    1994-11-21

    About 2 billion bbl of oil-in-place are present in the massive diatomite deposits of California's Lost Hills field, about 45 miles north-west of Bakersfield, Calif. Massive hydraulic fracturing treatments, 2,500-3,000 lb of proppant/net perforated ft, are an integral part of developing these reserves. An exclusive fracturing alliance initiated in 1990 between Chevron U.S.A. and Schlumberger Dowell has improved profitability of the Los Hills field. the paper describes the geology, the field before 1987, the 1987--90 period when hydraulic fracturing stimulation was found to be very costly, and after 1990 when the alliance was formed. The paper also describes the fracturing fluid, proppants, engineering evaluation, and execution of the job.

  17. Global Alliance for Tuberculosis Drug Development

    MedlinePlus

    ... to TB Medicines TB Alliance and the Medicines Patent Pool Sign Memorandum of Understanding to Improve Access ... Therapies April 20 TB Alliance and the Medicines Patent Pool Sign Memorandum of Understanding to Improve Access ...

  18. Your alliances are too stable.

    PubMed

    Ernst, David; Bamford, James

    2005-06-01

    A 2004 McKinsey survey of more than 30 companies reveals that at least 70% of them have major alliances that are underperforming and in need of restructuring. Moreover, JVs that broaden or otherwise adjust their scope have a 79% success rate, versus 33% for ventures that remain essentially unchanged. Yet most firms don't routinely evaluate the need to overhaul their alliances or intervene to correct performance problems. That means corporations are missing huge opportunities: By revamping just one large alliance, a company can generate 100 million dololars to 300 million dollars in extra income a year. Here's how to unlock more value from alliances: (1) Launch the process. Don't wait until your venture is in the middle of a crisis; regularly scan your major alliances to determine which need restructuring. Once you've targeted one, designate a restructuring team and find a senior sponsor to push the process along. Then delineate the scope of the team's work. (2) Diagnose performance. Evaluate the venture on the following performance dimensions: ownership and financials, strategy, operations, governance, and organization and talent. Identify the root causes of the venture's problems, not just the symptoms, and estimate how much each problem is costing the company. (3) Generate restructuring options. Based on the diagnosis, decide whether to fix, grow, or exit the alliance. Assuming the answer is fix or grow, determine whether fundamental or incremental changes are needed, using the five performance dimensions above as a framework. Then assemble three or four packages of restructuring options, test them with shareholders, and gain parents' approval. (4) Execute the changes. Embark on a widespread and consistent communication effort, building support among executives in the JV and the parent companies. So the process stays on track, assign accountability to certain groups or individuals. PMID:15938444

  19. The Relationship between Supervisee Stress, Coping Resources, the Working Alliance, and the Supervisory Working Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnilka, Philip B.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Dew, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the relationship of perceived stress, specific types of coping resources, the working alliance, and the supervisory working alliance among 232 counselor supervisees. The working alliance and the supervisory working alliance were negatively related to perceived stress and positively related to multiple coping resources. Two…

  20. The global alliance for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Groth, C G; Chapman, J R

    2006-03-01

    In 2002, The Transplantation Society proposed the creation of a Global Alliance for Transplantation, with the purpose of reducing the existing disparity regarding transplantation activities across the globe. This alliance should include major international scientific societies, international governmental organizations, and pharmaceutical companies. Consultations with each of these parties have taken place during the past 18 months and three Strategic Programs have been initiated: (1) the collection of information on transplantation; (2) the expansion of education in transplantation; and (3) the development of professional guidelines for organ donation and transplantation. PMID:16549119

  1. Decompression syndrome (Caisson disease) in an Indian diver

    PubMed Central

    Phatak, Uday A.; David, Eric J.; Kulkarni, Pravin M.

    2010-01-01

    Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson’s disease) is an acute neurological emergency in divers. It is caused due to release of nitrogen gas bubbles that impinge the blood vessels of the spinal cord and brain and result in severe neurodeficit. There are very few case reports in Indian literature. There are multiple factors in the pathogenesis of Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson’s disease) such as health problems in divers (respiratory problems or congenital heart diseases like atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus etc), speed of ascent from the depth and habits like smoking that render divers susceptible for such neurological emergency. Usually, immediate diagnosis of such a condition with MRI is not possible in hospitals in the Coastal border. Even though, MRI is performed, it has very low specificity and sensitivity. Facilities like hyperbaric oxygen treatment are virtually non-existent in these hospitals. Therefore, proper education of the divers and appropriate preventive measures in professional or recreational divers is recommended. PMID:21085532

  2. Diver visibility: Why one cannot see as far?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Weidemann, Alan D.

    2009-05-01

    Diver visibility has been one of the key research areas in underwater vision and imaging studies. Its applications also extend into imaging system performance evaluation and prediction, which is important in MIW and ASW operations. These applications are often associated with coastal ocean waters, and this is generally translated directly into turbidity of the water column. While mostly this is the case, exceptions can lead to erroneous predictions and potentially significant consequences. We examine issues associated with such situations, both by model as well as field data, in order to reach better estimates and to explore means to compensate for such effects, to enhance diver visibility. Visibility data collected by Navy divers from clean and relatively calm waters outside Pensacola, during Sept 2001 Gorging Littoral Ocean for Warfighters (GLOW) experiments suggested a closer examination is warranted, as observed diver visibility measured at different spatial frequencies contradicts conventional model predictions. Observation data from two different days, by different divers at different depths were used. The modulation transfer of high frequency components disappears at a level much higher than those predicted by the human vision sensitivity level. Such contradictions can be resolved, once the effect of the turbulence scattering is considered using a general imaging model.

  3. Predicting Spouses Perceptions of Their Parenting Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Farrah M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Gaertner, Lowell

    2004-01-01

    This study used marital and individual-level variables to predict spouses perceived parenting alliance. One hundred married couples completed measures of parenting alliance, marital consensus, marital power, and depression. Analyses revealed that marital consensus was a significant predictor of parenting alliance for both parents, and that…

  4. Academic Consortia as Strategic Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Charlotte

    1991-01-01

    The Association for Higher Education of North Texas is an alliance of 20 colleges and universities, 21 high-tech businesses, and civic interests in the Dallas-Fort Worth area that is modeling new ways for higher education institutions to respond to community needs. Other consortia are generally curriculum centered, service centered, or special…

  5. Electrical activity in dental amalgam of submerged divers during welding.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1987-10-01

    Divers performing underwater manual metal arc welding/cutting (UMMA) have complained about a metallic taste phenomenon. In several dives with voluntary leakage in their diving suits, potential alterations in dental amalgam were registered when they performed UMMA. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the test amalgam cylinders used and the diver's dental restorations. These values, along with the recorded potential values of the amalgam test cylinders and of the diver's dental restorations, enabled us to calculate the depolarizing current, using the law of Ohm. The current depolarizing the amalgam test cylinder did not differ significantly from the mean intermetallic currents between the dental restorations. The clinical effect of intraoral currents when performing UMMA welding should be regarded as small, whereas considerably higher currents should not be ruled out in an intense cutting situation. PMID:3478937

  6. Autonomic and cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex stress in apnoea divers.

    PubMed

    Steinback, Craig D; Breskovic, Toni; Banic, Ivana; Dujic, Zeljko; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2010-08-25

    Sleep apnoea, with repeated periods of hypoxia, results in cardiovascular morbidity and concomitant autonomic dysregulation. Trained apnoea divers also perform prolonged apnoeas accompanied by large lung volumes, large reductions in cardiac output and severe hypoxia and hypercapnia. We tested the hypothesis that apnoea training would be associated with decreased cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex gains and reduced respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography). Six trained divers and six controls were studied at rest and during asphyxic rebreathing. Despite an elevated resting heart rate (70+/-14 vs. 56+/-10 bpm; p=0.038), divers had a similar cardiovagal baroreflex gain (-1.22+/-0.47 beats/mmHg) as controls (-1.29+/-0.61; NS). Similarly, though MSNA burst frequency was slightly higher in divers at rest (16+/-4 bursts/min vs. 10+/-5 bursts/min, p=0.03) there was no difference in baseline burst incidence, sympathetic baroreflex gain (-3.8+/-2.1%/mmHg vs. -4.7+/-1.7%/mmHg) or respiratory modulation of MSNA between groups. Resting total peripheral resistance (11.9+/-2.6 vs. 12.3+/-2.2 mmHg/L/min) and pulse wave velocity (5.82+/-0.55 vs. 6.10+/-0.51 m/s) also were similar between divers and controls, respectively. Further, the sympathetic response to asphyxic rebreathing was not different between controls and divers (-1.70+/-1.07 vs. -1.74+/-0.84 a.u./% desaturation). Thus, these data suggest that, unlike patients with sleep apnoea, apnoea training in otherwise healthy individuals does not produce detectable autonomic dysregulation or maladaption. PMID:20627720

  7. Wheezing in a commercial diver due to disinfectant.

    PubMed

    Watt, S J

    1991-07-01

    A case is described of a saturation diver with no previous history of asthma who repeatedly developed work-related symptoms of asthma at pressure, which appear to be causally related to the use of dichlorophen as a disinfectant agent. Although challenge tests were negative, suggesting that dichlorophen may have been acting as an irritant rather than as a sensitizer, the symptoms were abolished by the use of an alternative disinfectant agent. The potential importance of this effect in a diver is discussed, and the case highlights the importance of the use of nontoxic agents in the diving environment. PMID:1887521

  8. On diver thermal status and susceptibility to decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Gerth, Wayne A

    2015-09-01

    In a recent Letter to the Editor, Clarke, et al, indicated that divers who deliberately chill themselves on a dive to reduce risk of decompression sickness (DCS) may be misinterpreting our 2007 Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) report. Indeed, we did not advocate that divers should risk hypothermia on bottom to reduce risk of DCS, nor do we dispute the authors' overall admonition to avoid diving cold unnecessarily. However, Clarke, et al, imply more generally that results of our study are not applicable to recreational or technical divers because the dives we tested were atypical of dives undertaken by such divers. We wish to clarify that our study does have implications for recreational and technical divers, implications that should not be ignored. The dives we tested were not intended to be typical of dives undertaken in any actual operational context. Instead, we chose to expose divers to temperatures at the extremes of their thermal tolerance in order to ensure that effects of diver thermal status on DCS susceptibility would be found if such effects existed. Our initial test dive profile provided appreciable time both on bottom and during decompression to allow any differential thermal effects during these two dive phases to manifest, while affording a baseline risk of DCS that could be altered by thermal effects without exposing subjects to inordinately high risks of DCS. Our results strongly indicate that the optimal diver thermal conditions for mitigation of DCS risk or minimization of decompression time entail remaining cool during gas uptake phases of a dive and warm during off-gassing phases. While the dose-response characteristics of our observed thermal effects are almost certainly non-linear in both exposure temperature and duration, it is only reasonable to presume that the effects vary monotonically with these factors. We have no reason to presume that such responses and effects under less extreme conditions would be in directions opposite to

  9. The Cartesian Diver as an Aid for Teaching Respiratory Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Greg K.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism by which air enters the mammalian lung is difficult for many students of physiology. In particular, some students have trouble seeing how pressure can be transmitted through a fluid such as the intrapleural fluid and how the magnitude of that pressure can change. A Cartesian diver, an old-time child's toy, may be used as a visual aid…

  10. Fatal dissecting aneurysm of the aorta in a diver.

    PubMed

    James, R; Hayman, J A

    1986-07-01

    A 20-yr-old trained sports diver developed severe chest pain shortly after decompressing from a 40 m repetitive freshwater sinkhole dive, and died 6 h later. An autopsy examination showed a dissecting aneurysm of the aorta with rupture into the left pleural cavity. The relationship between the fatal event and the diving is discussed. PMID:3785985

  11. New thoughts on the correction of presbyopia for divers.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Quentin M

    2008-06-01

    Some new ideas on the correction of presbyopia for divers, particularly those with demands for critical near vision underwater, are discussed. Progressive lenses cannot be satisfactorily bonded to a dive mask, so efforts to mimic the properties of progressive lenses using bifocal lenses are described. PMID:22692711

  12. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; van Wijk, A J; Klingler, M C; Ruiz Vicente, E; van Dijk, C J; Eijkman, M A J

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40.4 ± 11.9 years; 34.1% women) completed a specifically developed questionnaire, either online or on paper. Stepwise forward logistic regression analysis was performed to predict the presence of TMD pain, with several potential risk factors as predictors. Four hundred and eighty-five of the 536 respondents were free of any TMD pain before they started diving actively. In this sample, TMD pain was present in 214 persons (44.1%). Four predictors contributed significantly to the presence of TMD pain, viz., clenching (OR = 2.466), warm water (OR = 1.685), biting on the mouthpiece (OR = 1.598), and the quality rating of the mouthpiece (OR = 0.887, that is, a higher rating means a smaller odds of having TMD pain). TMD pain is a common complaint among scuba divers who were free of such complaints before they started diving actively. Clenching, biting on the mouthpiece, and a low rating of the mouthpiece are predictors for the presence of TMD pain in scuba divers, while diving in cold water serves as a protective factor for TMD pain. PMID:24766672

  13. Standards on medical fitness examinations for Navy divers.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The German Navy employs approximately 480 divers in their primary and secondary role. Before entering diving training, every diver has to pass an intensive physical examination programme at the German Naval Medical Institute (NMI) in Kiel-Kronshagen. Annual follow-ups ensure the currency of the medical findings. Criteria of medical fitness for diving reflect industrial medical standards for hyperbaric workers as well as the general medical guidelines for NATO divers. A diving examination consists of the individual medical history, a physical examination including the neurological status and the assessment of the cardiovascular fitness by ECG and bicycle ergometry. The respiratory system is screened by regular chest x-rays and spirometry or body plethysmography. Blood and urine samples are taken to look for abnormal haematological and metabolic conditions as well as disorders of the genito-urinary system. In order to determine visual fitness, diver's visual acuity, colour vision and stereopsis as well as eye fundi are examined by an eye specialist. Also the ENT examination involves a speciality consultant and consists of audiometry, inspection of the external ear and tympanic membrane and functional tests. To ensure a high standard of dental fitness, screening by a dental officer is part of the annual check-up. Every routine diving medical examination at the NMI includes a pressure test in the hyperbaric chamber. Divers who use nitrox or oxygen-rebreather devices have to pass successfully an oxygen tolerance test under hyperbaric conditions. The annual routine diving medical examination contributes to minimize the risk of accidents in military diving operations. PMID:14974787

  14. Physician equity alliances: attractive alternatives to PHOs.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D

    1997-04-01

    Physician equity alliances are becoming attractive alternatives to PHOs as integrative models for partnering with physicians, securing managed care contracts and increasing revenue. Unlike many PHOs, these alliances provide mechanisms for asset integration and long-term relationships along with utilization management, sophisticated information systems, access to capital and opportunities for physicians to integrate clinically. There are six major types of physician equity alliances: majority physician-owned, clinic without walls, health system joint venture, publicly held physician practice management company, specialty network, and venture capital. The type of alliance that a physician group practice ultimately develops depends on vision, values, method of capitalization, initial organizer of the alliance, level of involvement of physicians in business issues, corporate structure desired, and characteristics of the managed care market in which the alliance will operate. PMID:10166285

  15. Beef alliances: motivations, extent, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Ted C; Kovanda, Joseph

    2003-07-01

    With their growth, it is important to consider how alliances will impact the beef industry in the future. Alliances have the potential to make sweeping changes to cattle production, live and feeder cattle marketing, food safety protocols, use of government grades and standards, ownership structure, supply chain management, wholesale and retail product marketing, risk management, and many other industry activities. In an effort to address these issues, this article addresses the following questions: What is an alliance? What has motivated their proliferation? What have we learned from alliances? What aspects of alliances affect their likelihood of success or failure? What is the future of alliances? Are they a fad or a long-term evolving industry structural change? PMID:12951740

  16. Recreational scuba divers' aversion to low-frequency underwater sound.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, D M; Sims, J R; Curley, M D

    2001-01-01

    Increasing use of active low-frequency sonar by submarines and ships raises the risk of accidental exposure of recreational divers to low-frequency underwater sound (LFS). This study aimed to characterize the subjective responses of recreational scuba divers to LFS to ascertain the extent to which LFS may impact their enjoyment, comfort, or time spent underwater. Seventeen male and nine female recreational scuba divers participated. Diving was conducted in an acoustically transparent tank located within a larger anechoic pool. Subjects wore scuba gear and were positioned I m below the surface in a prone position. The sound transducer was located 4 m directly below the diver's head. Sound exposures consisted of three signal types (pure tone, 30 Hz hyperbolic sweep up, and 30 Hz hyperbolic sweep down) each presented at six center frequencies from 100 to 500 Hz and six sound pressure levels(SPL) ranging from 130 to 157 dB re 1 microPa. The duration of each sound exposure was 7 s. Subjects responded via an underwater console to rate aversion to LFS on a category-ratio scale, and to indicate the presence or absence of vibration of any body part. Aversion to LFS and the percent incidence of vibration increased as the SPL increased. The percent incidence of vibration decreased linearly with increasing frequency. At the highest SPL the probability that an aversion rating would exceed Very Severe (7 on the category-ratio scale) was predicted to be 19%. There was no significant difference in aversion among signal types. The 100 Hz frequency was the most aversive frequency (P < 0.05). A plot of aversion vs. frequency showed a U-shaped function with minimum aversion at 250 Hz. In conclusion, diver aversion to LFS is dependent upon SPL and center frequency. The highest aversion rating was given for 100 Hz, this frequency corresponded with the greatest probability of detecting vibration. Factors other than vibration seem to account for aversion to the highest frequencies. Our

  17. Injury survey in scuba divers of British Sub-Aqua Club: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok; Park, Jung-Min; Cho, Nam-Heung; Cha, Jun-Youl

    2015-12-01

    Scuba diving itself is generally known as a safe sports. However, various injury accidents can happen, and the incidences vary depending on divers' education grade levels about the risks. Therefore, the study set out to identify and analyze the causes and patterns of injuries depending on the divers' safety education grade levels through a questionnaire survey targeting ocean divers (n=12), sports divers (n=16), and dive leaders (n=15), all of whom belong to the British Sub-Aqua Club. After conducting a frequency analysis on the collected questionnaires, the conclusions are made as follows. First, in terms of diving depth, the most frequent diving depth was 15-20 m among ocean divers, 20-25 m among sports divers, and 15-20 m in case of dive leaders. Second, with regard to the causes of injuries, the most frequently answered causes are 'overtension' and 'low skill' among ocean divers; 'low skill' among sports divers; 'overaction' among dive leaders. Third, in terms of injury patterns, the most frequently answered injury patterns are 'ear' injuries among ocean divers; 'ankle' injuries among sports divers; 'ankle' and 'calf' injuries among dive leaders. Fourth, with regard to who performed first-aid when an injury accident happened, the most frequent answers are 'instructor' among ocean divers; 'instructor' and 'self' among sports divers; 'self' among dive leaders. We might suggest that more efforts need to be made to improve divers' low dependence on specialists for treatment and consultation so that we can prevent an injury from leading to the second injury accident. PMID:26730384

  18. Course Outline for a SCUBA Diving Speciality "UNDERWATER Survey DIVER"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitriou, K.

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline a course for the training of divers with a special interest in underwater surveying (e.g. surveyors, archaeologists, biologists, geologists, photographers/videographers). This outline presents: i) the Courses' Standards ii) the Learning Objectives for the related Knowledge Development, iii) the Skills that have to be conducted, iv) the Performance Requirements for the students and v) the Open Water Considerations for the Training Dives. It is expected that the resulting course outline will be used as a reference for the training of certified divers who want to become underwater surveyors, providing them basic knowledge and skills to survey adequate data for the detailed documentation of submerged features. Moreover the combination of knowledge (what) and the skills (how) that are presented during the proposed course attempt to define a protocol for the recording of underwater features in favor of mapping and 3D modeling.

  19. Examining the Prospective Scuba Diver: Which Exclusions are Proven?

    PubMed Central

    Beauprie, Ian

    1989-01-01

    Who can safely dive? All prospective divers in Canada must have a physician's approval to start training. Many review articles and typical check-list medical forms, however, imply exclusions that are not well proven. The author critically analyzes current diving and diving accident statistics and discusses the physiology of risk. He also discusses diving morbidity and mortality from pressure changes, illness caused by immersion only, hypothermia, and diving during pregnancy. PMID:21248872

  20. Cardiovascular changes during maximal breath-holding in elite divers.

    PubMed

    Guaraldi, Pietro; Serra, Maria; Barletta, Giorgio; Pierangeli, Giulia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Calandra-Buonaura, Giovanna; Cialoni, Danilo; Cortelli, Pietro

    2009-12-01

    During maximal breath-holding six healthy elite breath-hold divers, after an initial "easy-going" phase in which cardiovascular changes resembled the so-called "diving response", exhibited a sudden and severe rise in blood pressure during the "struggle" phase of the maneuver. These changes may represent the first tangible expression of a defense reaction, which overrides the classic diving reflex, aiming to reduce the hypoxic damage and to break the apnea before the loss of consciousness. PMID:19655193

  1. Distance Education Alliance Tackles FCS Teacher Shortage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Gay Nell

    2004-01-01

    To address teacher supply/demand/preparation issues, the Texas Education Agency funded a project that established a statewide inter-institutional system for providing Web-based distance education courses as preparation for FCS teacher certification. The Family and Consumer Sciences Distance Education Alliance (FCS Alliance) involves voluntary…

  2. Iowa Distance Education Alliance. Final Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Chris; Sweeney, Jan

    This document describes the accomplishments of the Iowa Distance Education Alliance (IDEA). The Iowa Distance Education Alliance (IDEA) is a partnership involving educational institutions across Iowa that received funding from the federal Star Schools Program to demonstrate the use of the Iowa Communication Network's (ICN) fiber optic technology…

  3. An evaluation of the redox state in professional scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Radojevic-Popovic, Radmila; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Sretenovic, Jasmina; Velicanin, Nevena; Bradic, Jovana; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Taking into consideration limited data regarding molecular interactions during and after diving, this investigation was intended to determine the oxidative status of divers before and after scuba diving by monitoring the oxidative status parameters. The prevalence study included a group of 32 male professional police scuba divers, 32 ± 5.1 years old. The examination took place twice: in a resting state before scuba diving and immediately after the dive (to 30 meters for 30 minutes). The oxidative status of the scuba divers was determined by measuring levels of the following oxidative stress markers: the index of lipid peroxidation (measured as TBARS), nitrites (NO2-), superoxide anion radical (O2*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT). Statistically significant increases in levels of NO2- and TBARS were observed after the dive, while there were no statistically relevant changes in levels of O2*-, H2O2, SOD and CAT. Our results have shown that a dive with these characteristics only slightly disturbs redox homeostasis, without serious intermolecular changes that can lead to prominent oxidative stress. PMID:26591980

  4. Cancer risks in naval divers with multiple exposures to carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Elihu D; Friedman, Lee S; Tamir, Yuval; Berman, Tamar; Levy, Or; Westin, Jerome B; Peretz, Tamar

    2003-01-01

    We investigated risks for cancer and the case for a cause-effect relationship in five successive cohorts of naval commando divers (n = 682) with prolonged underwater exposures (skin, gastrointestinal tract, and airways) to many toxic compounds in the Kishon River, Israel's most polluted waterway, from 1948 to 1995. Releases of industrial, ship, and agricultural effluents in the river increased substantially, fish yields decreased, and toxic damage to marine organisms increased. Among the divers (16,343 person-years follow-up from 18 years of age to year 2000), the observed/expected ratio for all tumors was 2.29 (p<0.01). Risks increased in cohorts first diving after 1960 compared to risks in earlier cohorts, notably for hematolymphopoietic, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, and skin cancer; induction periods were often brief. The findings suggest that the increases in risk for cancer and short induction periods resulted from direct contact with and absorption of multiple toxic compounds. Early toxic effects in marine life predicted later risks for cancer in divers. PMID:12676624

  5. Alliance, Technology, and Outcome in the Treatment of Anxious Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Brian C.; Choudhury, Muniya S.; Shortt, Alison L.; Pincus, Donna B.; Creed, Torrey A.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2004-01-01

    A strong therapeutic alliance is intuitively important in a cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxious youth where the child must confront feared stimuli in numerous exposure tasks. Research examining alliance-outcome relationships and the specific role of the alliance is currently limited. Is the alliance supportive in nature, does it enhance…

  6. Use of neural networks in telemedical monitoring of divers.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, R H; Woodward, B

    1997-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) has been developed to predict and classify the risk of medical disorders for certain dive profiles. The telemedical data applied to the ANN represent different physiological and physical parameters that are transmitted acoustically from a diver to a remote receiver. The telemetered data include dive time, maximum depth and decompression stop times and depths. Preliminary tests demonstrated the successful performance of the ANN where classical mathematical and statistical methods had failed due to the complex nature and variability of the parameters involved. PMID:9218391

  7. Space Suit Technologies Protect Deep-Sea Divers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Working on NASA missions allows engineers and scientists to hone their skills. Creating devices for the high-stress rigors of space travel pushes designers to their limits, and the results often far exceed the original concepts. The technologies developed for the extreme environment of space are often applicable here on Earth. Some of these NASA technologies, for example, have been applied to the breathing apparatuses worn by firefighters, the fire-resistant suits worn by racecar crews, and, most recently, the deep-sea gear worn by U.S. Navy divers.

  8. Claes Hellerström and Cartesian diver microrespirometry

    PubMed Central

    Welsh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cartesian diver microrespirometry was introduced by Claes Hellerström at the Department of Histology/Medical Cell Biology at Uppsala University, Sweden, to determine rates of oxygen consumption in islets of Langerhans. The theory behind this method is touched upon and the main findings described. Glucose-stimulated beta cell respiration significantly contributes to increased ATP generation, which is a prerequisite for stimulated insulin secretion and synthesis. This has had major implications for understanding the beta cell stimulus–secretion coupling. PMID:27181825

  9. The Alliance for Equity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merisotis, Jamie P.; Goulian, Katherine A.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter describes the organization, operations, and goals of the Alliance for Equity in Higher Education, a national coalition of associations and institutions founded to serve the emerging majority of racially diverse college students.

  10. Resistance Training for Rescue Divers in the Sport Scuba Diving Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mier, Constance M.; Kegeles, Sharon

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the need for certified rescue divers increases as the diving industry grows. Rescue divers must be physically prepared to perform several dives in one day and to carry equipment on and off the boat. Physical recovery is also important, as they must be alert at all times to potential emergency situations. This require high levels of…

  11. Cohort study of multiple brain lesions in sport divers: role of a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed Central

    Knauth, M.; Ries, S.; Pohimann, S.; Kerby, T.; Forsting, M.; Daffertshofer, M.; Hennerici, M.; Sartor, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of a patient foramen ovale in the pathogenesis of multiple brain lesions acquired by sport divers in the absence of reported decompression symptoms. DESIGN: Prospective double blind cohort study. SETTING: Diving clubs around Heidelberg and departments of neuroradiology and neurology. SUBJECTS: 87 sport divers with a minimum of 160 scuba dives (dives with self contained underwater breathing apparatus). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of multiple brain lesions visualised by cranial magnetic resonance imaging and presence and size of patent foramen ovale as documented by echocontrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. RESULTS: 25 subjects were found to have a right-to-left shunt, 13 with a patent foramen ovale of high haemodynamic relevance. A total of 41 brain lesions were detected in 11 divers. There were seven brain lesions in seven divers without a right-to-left shunt and 34 lesions in four divers with a right-to-left shunt. Multiple brain lesions occurred exclusively in three divers with a large patent foramen ovale (P = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Multiple brain lesions in sport divers were associated with presence of a large patent foramen ovale. This association suggests paradoxical gas embolism as the pathological mechanism. A patent foramen ovale of high haemodynamic relevance seems to be an important risk factor for developing multiple brain lesions in sport divers. PMID:9116544

  12. Medical and surgical treatment in divers with chronic rhinosinusitis and paranasal sinus barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Skevas, Theodoros; Baumann, Ingo; Bruckner, Thomas; Clifton, Nick; Plinkert, Peter K; Klingmann, Christoph

    2012-03-01

    Aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of medical and surgical treatment in divers with paranasal sinus barotrauma (PSB) secondary to chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). In this retrospective, cross-sectional, descriptive study 40 adult divers with CRS were included. Treatment of divers implied a 5-day course of a systemic steroid and a 6-week course of saline nasal irrigations and topical nasal steroid with mometasone in maximal dosage. If symptoms persisted, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was performed. Questionnaires included the Sinonasal Outcome Test-20 German Adapted Version (SNOT-20 GAV), dive-related questions (DRQ) and general questions. Questionnaires were completed retrospectively by recalling the symptoms before and after therapy. Forty of 82 divers completed the questionnaires. Mean follow-up was 42 months (range 13-95 months). There was a statistically significant improvement of the Total score (TS) and of every subscore, except the General Quality of Life score, in the SNOT-20 GAV as well as of the TS in the DRQ. Before treatment, divers who required surgery reported significantly more symptoms than divers who were treated conservatively. Post treatment there were no significant differences between the medical and surgical group. Overall, 35 divers could resume diving after therapy even though PSB still occurred but without complications. Divers with sinus problems can successfully be managed medically and if conservative treatment fails, FESS shows a statistically significant improvement of symptoms and no serious long-term hazards for diving. PMID:21901337

  13. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  14. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  15. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  16. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  17. 46 CFR 176.650 - Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underwater ROV. 176.650 Section 176.650 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... Examinations § 176.650 Alternative Hull Examination Program options: Divers or underwater ROV. To complete the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV)....

  18. Cohort Study of Multiple Brain Lesions in Sport Divers: Role of a Patent Foramen Ovale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauth, Michael; Ries, Stefan; Pohimann, Stefan; Kerby, Tina; Forstring, Michael; Daffertshofer, Michael; Hennerici,Michael; Sartor, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the role of a patent foramen ovale in the pathogenesis of multiple brain lesions acquired by sport divers in the absence of reported decompression symptoms. Design: Prospective double blind cohort study. . Setting Diving clubs around Heidelberg and departments of neuroradiology and neurology. Subjects: 87 sport divers with a minimum of 160 scuba dives (dives with self contained underwater breathing apparatus). Main outcome measures: Presence of multiple brain lesions visualised by cranial magnetic resonance imaging and presence and size of patent foramen ovale as documented by echocontrast transcranial Doppler ultrasonograhy. Results: 25 subjects were found to have a right-to-left shunt, 13 with a patent foramen ovale of high haemodynamic relevance. A total of 41 brain lesions were detected in 11 divers. There were seven brain lesions in seven divers without a right-to-left shunt and 34 lesions in four divers with a right-to-left shunt Multiple brain lesions occurred exclusively in three divers with a large patent foramen ovale (P=0.004). Conclusions: Multiple brain lesions in sport divers were associated with presence of a large patent foramen ovale. This association suggests paradoxical gas embolism as the pathological mechanism. A patent foramen ovale of high haemodynamic relevance seems to be an important risk factor for developing multiple brain lesions in sport divers.

  19. Southern Impact Testing Alliance (SITA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbs, Whitney; Roebuck, Brian; Zwiener, Mark; Wells, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to form this Alliance began in 2008 to showcase the impact testing capabilities within the southern United States. Impact testing customers can utilize SITA partner capabilities to provide supporting data during all program phases-materials/component/ flight hardware design, development, and qualification. This approach would allow programs to reduce risk by providing low cost testing during early development to flush out possible problems before moving on to larger scale1 higher cost testing. Various SITA partners would participate in impact testing depending on program phase-materials characterization, component/subsystem characterization, full-scale system testing for qualification. SITA partners would collaborate with the customer to develop an integrated test approach during early program phases. Modeling and analysis validation can start with small-scale testing to ensure a level of confidence for the next step large or full-scale conclusive test shots. Impact Testing Facility (ITF) was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960's and played a malor role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As a result of return to flight testing after the loss of STS-107 (Columbia) MSFC ITF realized the need to expand their capabilities beyond meteoroid and space debris impact testing. MSFC partnered with the Department of Defense and academic institutions as collaborative efforts to gain and share knowledge that would benefit the Space Agency as well as the DoD. MSFC ITF current capabilities include: Hypervelocity impact testing, ballistic impact testing, and environmental impact testing.

  20. Severe acute respiratory syndrome in a naval diver.

    PubMed

    Chim, Harvey; Soo, Kian Hing; Low, Edwin; Chan, Gregory

    2006-06-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly infectious, rapidly progressive, emerging disease. Early diagnosis and preventive measures are key for treatment and minimization of secondary spread. In the context of the armed forces, aggressive containment measures are essential to prevent an outbreak. In this study, we present the first reported case, to our knowledge, of SARS in a naval diver. The special physical requirements for divers and the potential complications associated with deep sea diving necessitate extensive investigation before certification of fitness for diving after SARS. In the early recovery period, potential problems during diving are caused by inadequate lung ventilation in relation to exercise level and increased breathing resistance attributable to weak respiratory muscles, with corresponding risk of hypoxia and hypercapnia, as well as decreased ability to respond to nonrespiratory problems during diving. Problems in the late recovery period include increased risk of diving complications (such as pulmonary barotrauma) resulting from fibrosis and scarring within the lung parenchyma, which are known complications of SARS. From our experience, we suggest that computed tomographic scans of the thorax, lung function tests, and careful follow-up monitoring should play a vital role in the assessment of patients during the convalescent period, before certification of fitness to dive. PMID:16808126

  1. Performing CPR on a commercial diver inside the diving bell

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Verma, Rohit; Ghosh, Dipak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    CPR in a diving bell is difficult. It is taught by diving companies and training institutes but has not been subjected to the tenets of evidence based medicine. The diving bell lacks space as well as a flat hard surface to lay the patient on and therefore conventional methods of administering CPR are not possible. The diver is hung from a pulley tied to the diver's harness, and the bell flooded with water to reduce pooling of blood. Airway is established using a cervical collar to hyperextend the neck and inserting an appropriate oropharyngeal airway. Cardiac compressions are administered by the bellman using his head or the knee while holding the patient with his arms from behind. The bell can be recovered to surface only when spontaneous breathing and circulation have started. Diving bell offers a unique environment for management of unconscious casualties. Even though the method is at variance with the conventional method of administering CPR, it is the only method possible inside the bell. It is important that the method be scrutinized and refined so as to be more effective and efficacious inside the bell. PMID:26957817

  2. Performing CPR on a commercial diver inside the diving bell.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Verma, Rohit; Ghosh, Dipak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    CPR in a diving bell is difficult. It is taught by diving companies and training institutes but has not been subjected to the tenets of evidence based medicine. The diving bell lacks space as well as a flat hard surface to lay the patient on and therefore conventional methods of administering CPR are not possible. The diver is hung from a pulley tied to the diver's harness, and the bell flooded with water to reduce pooling of blood. Airway is established using a cervical collar to hyperextend the neck and inserting an appropriate oropharyngeal airway. Cardiac compressions are administered by the bellman using his head or the knee while holding the patient with his arms from behind. The bell can be recovered to surface only when spontaneous breathing and circulation have started. Diving bell offers a unique environment for management of unconscious casualties. Even though the method is at variance with the conventional method of administering CPR, it is the only method possible inside the bell. It is important that the method be scrutinized and refined so as to be more effective and efficacious inside the bell. PMID:26957817

  3. Scaling of swim speed in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Sato, Katsufumi; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Mitani, Yoko; Amano, Masao; Aoki, Kagari; Narazaki, Tomoko; Iwata, Takashi; Minamikawa, Shingo; Miyazaki, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    1. Breath-hold divers are widely assumed to descend and ascend at the speed that minimizes energy expenditure per distance travelled (the cost of transport (COT)) to maximize foraging duration at depth. However, measuring COT with captive animals is difficult, and empirical support for this hypothesis is sparse. 2. We examined the scaling relationship of swim speed in free-ranging diving birds, mammals and turtles (37 species; mass range, 0·5-90,000 kg) with phylogenetically informed statistical methods and derived the theoretical prediction for the allometric exponent under the COT hypothesis by constructing a biomechanical model. 3. Swim speed significantly increased with mass, despite considerable variations around the scaling line. The allometric exponent (0·09) was statistically consistent with the theoretical prediction (0·05) of the COT hypothesis. 4. Our finding suggests a previously unrecognized advantage of size in divers: larger animals swim faster and thus could travel longer distance, search larger volume of water for prey and exploit a greater range of depths during a given dive duration. 5. Furthermore, as predicted from the model, endotherms (birds and mammals) swam faster than ectotherms (turtles) for their size, suggesting that metabolic power production limits swim speed. Among endotherms, birds swam faster than mammals, which cannot be explained by the model. Reynolds numbers of small birds (<2 kg) were close to the lower limit of turbulent flow (∼ 3 × 10(5) ), and they swam fast possibly to avoid the increased drag associated with flow transition. PMID:20946384

  4. Injury survey in scuba divers of British Sub-Aqua Club: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Gwang-Suk; Jee, Yong-Seok; Park, Jung-Min; Cho, Nam-Heung; Cha, Jun-Youl

    2015-01-01

    Scuba diving itself is generally known as a safe sports. However, various injury accidents can happen, and the incidences vary depending on divers’ education grade levels about the risks. Therefore, the study set out to identify and analyze the causes and patterns of injuries depending on the divers’ safety education grade levels through a questionnaire survey targeting ocean divers (n=12), sports divers (n=16), and dive leaders (n=15), all of whom belong to the British Sub-Aqua Club. After conducting a frequency analysis on the collected questionnaires, the conclusions are made as follows. First, in terms of diving depth, the most frequent diving depth was 15–20 m among ocean divers, 20–25 m among sports divers, and 15–20 m in case of dive leaders. Second, with regard to the causes of injuries, the most frequently answered causes are ‘overtension’ and ‘low skill’ among ocean divers; ‘low skill’ among sports divers; ‘overaction’ among dive leaders. Third, in terms of injury patterns, the most frequently answered injury patterns are ‘ear’ injuries among ocean divers; ‘ankle’ injuries among sports divers; ‘ankle’ and ‘calf’ injuries among dive leaders. Fourth, with regard to who performed first-aid when an injury accident happened, the most frequent answers are ‘instructor’ among ocean divers; ‘instructor’ and ‘self’ among sports divers; ‘self’ among dive leaders. We might suggest that more efforts need to be made to improve divers’ low dependence on specialists for treatment and consultation so that we can prevent an injury from leading to the second injury accident. PMID:26730384

  5. Strategic Alliance Poker: Demonstrating the Importance of Complementary Resources and Trust in Strategic Alliance Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reutzel, Christopher R.; Worthington, William J.; Collins, Jamie D.

    2012-01-01

    Strategic Alliance Poker (SAP) provides instructors with an opportunity to integrate the resource based view with their discussion of strategic alliances in undergraduate Strategic Management courses. Specifically, SAP provides Strategic Management instructors with an experiential exercise that can be used to illustrate the value creation…

  6. Entrepreneurial Alliances: A Study of Entrepreneurship and Strategic Alliances in the Charter School Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the practices, processes, and success rates of 15 entrepreneurial alliances in the Texas charter school industry. The research involved interdisciplinary industries (business and education) and focused on how a specific type of alliance structure utilized social innovation to exploit opportunity and impact change in the…

  7. An Attempt to Measure the Traffic Impact of Airline Alliances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iatrou, Kostas; Skourias, Nikolaos

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effects of airline alliances on the allied partners output by comparing the traffic change observed between the pre- and the post-alliance period. First, a simple methodology based on traffic passenger modelling is developed, and then an empirical analysis is conducted using time series from four global strategic alliances (Wings, Star Alliance, oneworld and SkyTeam) and 124 alliance routes. The analysis concludes that, all other things being equal, strategic alliances do lead to a 9.4%, on average, improvement in passenger volume.

  8. Recreational Diver Behavior and Contacts with Benthic Organisms in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Vinicius J.; Luiz, Osmar J.; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    In the last two decades, coral reefs have become popular among recreational divers, especially inside marine protected areas. However, the impact caused by divers on benthic organisms may be contributing to the degradation of coral reefs. We analyzed the behavior of 142 scuba divers in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil. We tested the effect of diver profile, reef type, use of additional equipment, timing, and group size on diver behavior and their contacts with benthic organisms. Eighty-eight percent of divers contacted benthic organism at least once, with an average of eight touches and one damage per dive. No significant differences in contacts were verified among gender, group size, or experience level. Artificial reef received a higher rate of contact than pinnacle and fringe reefs. Specialist photographers and sidemount users had the highest rates, while non-users of additional equipment and mini camera users had the lowest contact rates. The majority of contacts were incidental and the highest rates occurred in the beginning of a dive. Our findings highlight the need of management actions, such as the provision of pre-dive briefing including ecological aspects of corals and beginning dives over sand bottoms or places with low coral abundance. Gathering data on diver behavior provides managers with information that can be used for tourism management.

  9. Recreational Diver Behavior and Contacts with Benthic Organisms in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Giglio, Vinicius J; Luiz, Osmar J; Schiavetti, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    In the last two decades, coral reefs have become popular among recreational divers, especially inside marine protected areas. However, the impact caused by divers on benthic organisms may be contributing to the degradation of coral reefs. We analyzed the behavior of 142 scuba divers in the Abrolhos National Marine Park, Brazil. We tested the effect of diver profile, reef type, use of additional equipment, timing, and group size on diver behavior and their contacts with benthic organisms. Eighty-eight percent of divers contacted benthic organism at least once, with an average of eight touches and one damage per dive. No significant differences in contacts were verified among gender, group size, or experience level. Artificial reef received a higher rate of contact than pinnacle and fringe reefs. Specialist photographers and sidemount users had the highest rates, while non-users of additional equipment and mini camera users had the lowest contact rates. The majority of contacts were incidental and the highest rates occurred in the beginning of a dive. Our findings highlight the need of management actions, such as the provision of pre-dive briefing including ecological aspects of corals and beginning dives over sand bottoms or places with low coral abundance. Gathering data on diver behavior provides managers with information that can be used for tourism management. PMID:26614350

  10. Serum heat shock protein after simulated deep diving in Navy divers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui-Chieh; Chen, Yin-Shin; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Wan, Fan-Jong; Chang, Lu-Peng; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2009-10-31

    Deep sea diving might cause a tremendous physical or psychological stress to the divers. The present study aims to evaluate the stress response to a simulated wet dive in Navy divers. Nineteen Navy divers took part in this study when they were undergoing annual deep dive training. Ten divers were exposed to 190 feet of sea water (fsw) breathing compressed air on day 1 and to 250 fsw breathing helium-oxygen (Heliox) gas mixture on day 3. Another 9 divers were exposed to 220 fsw on day 1 and 285 fsw on day 3 breathing Heliox gas mixture. The bottom time ranged from 5 to 8 min, and then the standard U.S. Navy air and Heliox decompression tables were followed for surfacing. Predive levels of serum heat shock protein 72 (sHsp72) were 9.95 +/- 0.56 ng/ml, which were significantly higher than those in the control group (8.01 +/- 0.77 ng/ml). After simulating Heliox dive, the sHsp72 increased to 10.43 +/- 0.56 ng/ml, but this was not statistically significant. Our results demonstrated that the serum level of Hsp72 is higher in the Navy divers who underwent regular intensive exercise. However, it remains unknown whether this increase of stress protein is associated with the diving stress or exercise preconditioning in the Navy divers. PMID:20034233

  11. A survey of neurological decompression illness in commercial breath-hold divers (Ama) of Japan.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Hideki; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Ishitake, Tatsuya; Wong, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in the northern district of Yamaguchi, Japan to determine the relationship between neurological diving accidents and risk factors among commercial breath-hold divers (Ama). A questionnaire was distributed to 381 Ama divers who are members of the Ama diving union. We sought information on their dive practices (depth of single dive, single dive time, surface interval, length of dive shifts, lunch break) and the presence or absence of medical problems, such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmia, diabetic mellitus and other issues. Of the 381 Ama divers, 173 responded (45%): 29 were Funado (assisted-descent using weights) and 144 Cachido (unassisted) divers. Twelve had experienced strokelike symptoms during or after repetitive breath-hold diving; 11 were assisted and one unassisted (Funado vs. Cachido). Only two of 12 divers with neurological diving accidents had musculoskeletal symptoms. Neurological events were significantly correlated with dive depth, dive time, and surface interval; however, they were not related to medical history. Neurological diving accidents are more likely to happen among assisted Ama divers than unassisted ones. Repetitive breath-hold diving with a deep dive depth, long dive time, and short surface interval predisposes divers to decompression illness, which characteristically manifests as cerebral stroke. PMID:20737928

  12. Oral changes in divers working with electrical welding/cutting underwater.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T

    1987-01-01

    Divers performing electrical welding/cutting underwater often complain about a metallic taste in the mouth, strictly related to their work. In a nationwide clinical investigation, professional commercial divers were examined orally. The majority of the divers complained about a metallic taste. An increased surface deterioration of dental amalgam was detected in those divers who had performed electrical welding/cutting during the previous two years. In addition, after clinical and bacteriological examination, divers were found to belong to a caries risk group. In order to study the intraoral electrical activity, several actual dives were performed. When they were welding or cutting, the electrical activity registered intraorally in dental amalgam test samples was too low in magnitude to explain the metallic taste and the clinical appearance of the amalgam. The divers were dressed in a dry-suit and full-face mask. When leakage occurred or when a hot-water heated suit was used higher electrical activity was registered. This activity was still not of a magnitude, which could explain the symptoms theoretically, although a metallic taste and a subjective change in the divers dental amalgam were provoked. No increased levels of Hg and Cu could be detected in saliva, blood or urine. The flux density of the intraoral magnetic field created by a current of 650 ADC was calculated and measured to be 1.15 mT, which is approximately 25 times stronger than that of the earth. When exposing divers in-vivo to a field generated by a 200 ADC current, no symptoms other than magnetophosphenes were reported, such as metallic taste. The divers helmets offered almost no shielding effect towards the magnetic field. In-vitro exposure of dental amalgams to a magnetic field (1.15 mT; 50 Hz) increased the mobility of cupper and especially mercurity in the superficial layers of the amalgam after 24 h exposure, and gave rise to slight morphological changes within the amalgam. PMID:3469770

  13. Gastric barotrauma in a scuba diver: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Titu, Liviu V; Laden, Gerard; Purdy, Gerard M; Wedgwood, Kevin R

    2003-01-01

    Stomach rupture can occur as a consequence of the expansion of compressed air during rapid ascent after diving. We present the case of a middle-aged woman who suffered a gastric tear from surfacing too quickly after diving, and discuss the diagnosis and management of such patients by reviewing previously reported similar events. Gastric barotrauma should be suspected in divers who complain of abdominal pain, even in the absence of frank signs of peritoneal irritation. Although pneumoperitoneum is always present in these patients, it can also occur as a consequence of pulmonary barotrauma, making gastroscopy or radiological contrast studies, or both, essential for a definitive diagnosis. Surgical repair represents the treatment of choice for an active full-thickness tear and, if associated with arterial gas embolism or decompression sickness, should ideally be performed in a center where a category I (intensive care-capable) hyperbaric unit is available. PMID:12707828

  14. Implementing and maintaining an infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Britt M

    2010-01-01

    Infusion therapy models are ever changing and growing in modern health care. New technologies and problems arise daily as researchers and clinicians explore our world. As technologies advance, health care costs are also skyrocketing. The vast majority of hospitalized patients will receive some form of infusion therapy during their stay, and many will continue to receive therapy after they are discharged from the inpatient setting. Infusion alliances can aid cost containment by decreasing infusion-related complication rates, affect customer satisfaction, and promote interdisciplinary collaboration. This article discusses the potential benefits of an infusion alliance, details steps for using the performance improvement process when implementing and maintaining an alliance, and outlines the components of a successful business plan. PMID:20841983

  15. Perceptions amongst Tasmanian recreational scuba divers of the value of a diving medical.

    PubMed

    Baines, Carol

    2013-12-01

    An online survey was offered to recreational divers in Tasmania to ascertain if they have an understanding of how pressure affects their health and if they considered an annual dive medical necessary. A total of 98 recreational divers completed the survey, five of these had never had a dive medical while 74 felt that if they passed their dive medical they do not have any potential illness. Sixty five saw the dive medical as a comprehensive health check. This project provided an insight to Tasmanian recreational divers' understanding of and attitude towards the value of a dive medical. PMID:24510335

  16. Optimization of fin-swim training for SCUBA divers.

    PubMed

    Wylegala, J; Schafer-Owczarzak, M; Pendergast, D R

    2007-01-01

    Underwater swimming is a unique exercise and its fitness is not accomplished by other types of training. This study compared high intensity intermittent fin-swim training (HIIT) with moderate intensity continuous (MICT). Divers (n = 20; age = 23 +/- 4 yrs; weight = 82.57 +/- 10.38 kg; height = 180 +/- 6 cm) were assigned to MICT (65%-75% heart rate max (HRmax), for 45 min) or HIIT three 10 min swims/rest cycles (77%, 83%, and 92% HRmax, respectively) for 50 min. They trained using snorkel and fins at the surface paced by an underwater light system 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Swim tests were the energy cost of swimming, VO2max and timed endurance swim (at 70%/VO2max). The VO2 was a non-significantly reduced at any velocity with either HIIT or MICT. Maximal swim velocity increased after HIIT (10%) (p < or = 0.05) but not after MICT (p > 0.05). VO2max increased 18% after HIIT and 6% after MICT (p < or = 0.05). The endurance times increased 131% after HIIT and 78% after MICT (p < or = 0.05), and in spite of this post-swim lactate was not significantly different and averaged 4.69 +/- 1.10mM (p > 0.05). Although both training methods significantly improved fin swimming performance with similar time commitments, the HIIT improved VO2max and endurance more than MICT (p < or = 0.05). As no improvements in ventilation were observed, combining HIIT with respiratory muscle training could optimize diver swim fitness. PMID:18251440

  17. Financial analysis for the infusion alliance.

    PubMed

    Perucca, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    Providing high-quality, cost-efficient care is a major strategic initiative of every health care organization. Today's health care environment is transparent; very competitive; and focused upon providing exceptional service, safety, and quality. Establishing an infusion alliance facilitates the achievement of organizational strategic initiatives, that is, increases patient throughput, decreases length of stay, prevents the occurrence of infusion-related complications, enhances customer satisfaction, and provides greater cost-efficiency. This article will discuss how to develop a financial analysis that promotes value and enhances the financial outcomes of an infusion alliance. PMID:20841984

  18. Parameter estimation of the copernicus decompression model with venous gas emboli in human divers.

    PubMed

    Gutvik, Christian R; Dunford, Richard G; Dujic, Zeljko; Brubakk, Alf O

    2010-07-01

    Decompression Sickness (DCS) may occur when divers decompress from a hyperbaric environment. To prevent this, decompression procedures are used to get safely back to the surface. The models whose procedures are calculated from, are traditionally validated using clinical symptoms as an endpoint. However, DCS is an uncommon phenomenon and the wide variation in individual response to decompression stress is poorly understood. And generally, using clinical examination alone for validation is disadvantageous from a modeling perspective. Currently, the only objective and quantitative measure of decompression stress is Venous Gas Emboli (VGE), measured by either ultrasonic imaging or Doppler. VGE has been shown to be statistically correlated with DCS, and is now widely used in science to evaluate decompression stress from a dive. Until recently no mathematical model has existed to predict VGE from a dive, which motivated the development of the Copernicus model. The present article compiles a selection experimental dives and field data containing computer recorded depth profiles associated with ultrasound measurements of VGE. It describes a parameter estimation problem to fit the model with these data. A total of 185 square bounce dives from DCIEM, Canada, 188 recreational dives with a mix of single, repetitive and multi-day exposures from DAN USA and 84 experimentally designed decompression dives from Split Croatia were used, giving a total of 457 dives. Five selected parameters in the Copernicus bubble model were assigned for estimation and a non-linear optimization problem was formalized with a weighted least square cost function. A bias factor to the DCIEM chamber dives was also included. A Quasi-Newton algorithm (BFGS) from the TOMLAB numerical package solved the problem which was proved to be convex. With the parameter set presented in this article, Copernicus can be implemented in any programming language to estimate VGE from an air dive. PMID:20414813

  19. Contractor Alliances and the New World of Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, C.; Bound, H.

    A study investigated knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to operate in new working arrangements where people operate in alliance with others. Six strategic alliances were selected across three states and different industries. Participants in contractor alliances and stakeholders in the study were interviewed. Findings indicated that all…

  20. An Overview of Strategic Alliances between Universities and Corporations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmuti, Dean; Abebe, Michael; Nicolosi, Marco

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Strategic alliances generally represent inter-firm cooperative agreements aimed at achieving competitive advantage for the partners. In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in strategic alliances by multinational firms. This paper aims to explore the essence of these alliances and why they have become such a growing area of…

  1. Global University Alliances and the Creation of Collaborative Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunn, Andrew; Mintrom, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have seen the development of many global university alliances. Some alliances have taken a bilateral form, others are multilateral. In a period of increasing competition among universities, such alliances represent a curious form of cooperation. They have become more common just as global competition for academic talent has…

  2. Can Artificial Reef Wrecks Reduce Diver Impacts on Shipwrecks? The Management Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edney, Joanne; Spennemann, Dirk H. R.

    2015-08-01

    Managers have been advocating the use of artificial reef wrecks to diversify the experiences of recreational divers and thereby reduce the well-known impact on reefs. To examine whether artificial reef wrecks can serve as substitutes for historic shipwrecks this paper discusses the attitude of Australian divers to wreck diving in general and to artificial reef wrecks in particular. While the overwhelming majority of divers surveyed accepted the need for control, the experienced divers were less interested in artificial reef wrecks and less prepared to tolerate controls over their perceived freedom to dive wrecks. We present projections that show that this legacy issue will have largely resolved itself by 2025 due to attrition and natural ageing.

  3. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging of compressed air divers in diving accidents.

    PubMed

    Gao, G K; Wu, D; Yang, Y; Yu, T; Xue, J; Wang, X; Jiang, Y P

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of the cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of compressed air divers in diving accidents, we conducted an observational case series study. MRI of brain were examined and analysed on seven cases compressed air divers complicated with cerebral arterial gas embolism CAGE. There were some characteristics of cerebral injury: (1) Multiple lesions; (2) larger size; (3) Susceptible to parietal and frontal lobe; (4) Both cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter can be affected; (5) Cerebellum is also the target of air embolism. The MRI of brain is an sensitive method for detecting cerebral lesions in compressed air divers in diving accidents. The MRI should be finished on divers in diving accidents within 5 days. PMID:19341126

  4. Questions Students Ask: How Can a Downhill Skier Move Faster than a Sky Diver?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenti, Angelo, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of gravity, coefficient of friction, surface area, and Newton's second law to explain the physics involved in downhill skiers being able to move faster than sky divers in free fall. (JM)

  5. NATIONAL PLAN FOR THE SAFETY AND HEALTH OF DIVERS IN THEIR QUEST FOR SUBSEA ENERGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report contains recommendations for improving the health and safety of divers in fourteen biomedical topical chapters. They are: (1) exchange of inert gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide; (2) osteonecrosis; (3) compression and decompression protocols; (4) respiratory/pulmonary f...

  6. Earth System Science Education Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, R.; Schwerin, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) professional development program is providing in-depth geoscience content and teaching methods to pre- and in-service teachers. The program is building and expanding on NASA's successful ESSEA program that was funded from 2000-2005. Now sponsored by NSF, the network has expanded to nearly 40 institutions of higher learning committed to teacher Earth system science education. The program supports participating institutions with funding, training, and standards-aligned courses and resources for pre- and in-service teachers. As a result, teachers are prepared to teach Earth system science using inquiry-based classroom methods, geoscience data and tools. From 1999-2005, the NASA funded ESSEA Program delivered online Earth system science professional development for K-12 teachers through a network of 20 colleges and universities. The program was led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and based on a trio of 16-week online courses (for elementary, middle, and high school teachers) that had been developed and piloted by NASA's Classroom of the Future at Wheeling Jesuit University. The ESSEA program's mission was to: 1) support universities, colleges, and science education organizations delivering the K-12 online graduate courses; 2) strengthen teachers' understanding of Earth system science; 3) demonstrate the ability to deliver exceptional professional development to a national audience; and 4) create a solid infrastructure to sustain the program. As of spring 2006, the courses had been used by 40 faculty at 20 institutions educating over 1,700 K-12 teachers in Earth system science. Through NSF funding beginning in late 2006, IGES is enhancing and building on the ESSEA foundation by: 1. Introducing extensive use of data, models and existing Earth system educational materials to support the courses; 2. Implementing a rigorous evaluation program designed to demonstrate growth in teachers' Earth

  7. Earth System Science Education Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, R.; Schwerin, T.

    2006-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) professional development program is providing in- depth geoscience content and teaching methods to pre- and in-service teachers. The program is building and expanding on NASA's successful ESSEA program that was funded from 2000-2005. Beginning in 2006 NSF funding will enable ESSEA will expand to 40 institutions of higher learning that are committed to teacher education in Earth system science. The program will support participating institutions with funding, training, and standards-aligned courses and resources for pre- and in-service teachers. As a result, teachers will be prepared to teach Earth system science using inquiry-based classroom methods, geoscience data and tools. From 1999-2005, the NASA funded ESSEA Program delivered online Earth system science professional development for K-12 teachers through a network of 20 colleges and universities. The program was led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) and based on a trio of 16-week online courses (for elementary, middle, and high school teachers) that had been developed and piloted by NASA's Classroom of the Future at Wheeling Jesuit University. The ESSEA program's mission was to: 1) support universities, colleges, and science education organizations delivering the K-12 online graduate courses; 2) strengthen teachers' understanding of Earth system science; 3) demonstrate the ability to deliver exceptional professional development to a national audience; and 4) create a solid infrastructure to sustain the program. As of spring 2006, the courses had been used by 40 faculty at 20 institutions educating over 1,700 k-12 teachers in Earth system science. Although NASA funding ended in late 2005, the courses continue to be offered by 17 of the original 20 institutions. Through NSF funding beginning in late 2006, IGES will enhance and build upon the ESSEA foundation by: 1.Using the ESSEA courses as a model to introduce newly upgraded Earth

  8. The Carnegie Mellon/Sirsi Corporation Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Denise A.; Depellegrin, Tracey A.; Myers, Melanie D.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the relationship between Carnegie Mellon University libraries and Sirsi Corporation, their integrated library-management system vendor. Topics include Carnegie Mellon's expertise in library automation research and development; and three primary elements of the alliance: research, including user protocols, surveys, and focus groups;…

  9. Acronyms and Agencies. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents acronyms related to early intervention, education, special education, and other laws important to individuals with disabilities and their families. For related information, also read Acronyms and the Law. [For related report, "Acronyms and the Law. Alliance Action Information Sheets," see ED534052.

  10. Report on the Black Hills Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joe

    1979-01-01

    A rally to save the Black Hills from coal- and uranium-greedy energy companies was held on July 6 and over 2,000 joined in a 15-mile walk on July 7 in Rapid City, South Dakota. The Black Hills Alliance, an Indian coalition concerned about energy development proposals in the Great Plains, sponsored the gathering. (NQ)

  11. Robustness of airline alliance route networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordan, Oriol; Sallan, Jose M.; Simo, Pep; Gonzalez-Prieto, David

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the robustness of the three major airline alliances' (i.e., Star Alliance, oneworld and SkyTeam) route networks. Firstly, the normalization of a multi-scale measure of vulnerability is proposed in order to perform the analysis in networks with different sizes, i.e., number of nodes. An alternative node selection criterion is also proposed in order to study robustness and vulnerability of such complex networks, based on network efficiency. And lastly, a new procedure - the inverted adaptive strategy - is presented to sort the nodes in order to anticipate network breakdown. Finally, the robustness of the three alliance networks are analyzed with (1) a normalized multi-scale measure of vulnerability, (2) an adaptive strategy based on four different criteria and (3) an inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion. The results show that Star Alliance has the most resilient route network, followed by SkyTeam and then oneworld. It was also shown that the inverted adaptive strategy based on the efficiency criterion - inverted efficiency - shows a great success in quickly breaking networks similar to that found with betweenness criterion but with even better results.

  12. Developing Strategic Alliances in Management Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, E. Ann; Wright, Gill

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The notion of effective strategic alliances provides the basis on which this paper proposes a framework to manage the application and outcomes of management learning. The management of key partner collaboration emerges in this paper as a major success factor in determining effective management learning. A proactive structured approach to…

  13. School-College Faculty Collaboratives: Academic Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiani, Claire

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the Academic Alliances project and the collaboratives of faculty members who teach foreign languages and literature in universities, colleges, and schools in the United States which were a result of that project. Looks at what happens at meetings and how some groups are funded. Lists participating collaborative groups. (SED)

  14. Academic Alliances, You Can Do It Too.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinmiller, Robert C.; Steinmiller, Georgine G.

    Housed at Henderson State University, the Arkansas Network of Humanities Academic Alliances is a statewide network of school and college teachers in humanities disciplines who meet regularly to promote ongoing professional development and work toward common goals. The network seeks to strengthen humanities teaching at all educational levels,…

  15. Academic Alliances: School/College Faculty Collaboratives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Debra

    1985-01-01

    Reports on the activities and accomplishments of school and college faculty groups that are part of the national network of Academic Alliances. Includes information on the Rockefeller Fellowship Program, a listing of eight new member groups, information on four new statewide networks, and a synopsis of meetings and events of some groups. (SED)

  16. Facilitating Economic Development through Strategic Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noftsinger, John B., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how colleges and universities are becoming increasingly involved in economic development, with the formation of strategic alliances that have led to programs that benefit business and higher education. Discusses example programs from the Valley of Virginia Partnership for Education, and the outreach program of James Madison University.…

  17. Therapeutic alliance in a randomized clinical trial for bulimia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Accurso, Erin C.; Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ellen E.; Ciao, Anna; Cao, Li; Crosby, Ross D.; Smith, Tracey L.; Klein, Marjorie H.; Mitchell, James E.; Crow, Scott J.; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Peterson, Carol B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study examined the temporal relation between therapeutic alliance and outcome in two treatments for bulimia nervosa (BN). Method Eighty adults with BN symptoms were randomized to 21 sessions of integrative cognitive-affective therapy (ICAT) or enhanced cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-E). Bulimic symptoms (i.e., frequency of binge eating and purging) were assessed at each session and post-treatment. Therapeutic alliance (Working Alliance Inventory) was assessed at sessions 2, 8, 14, and post-treatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine differences in alliance growth by treatment and patient characteristics. Mixed-effects models examined the relation between alliance and symptom improvement. Results Overall, patients in both treatments reported strong therapeutic alliances. Regardless of treatment, greater therapeutic alliance between (but not within) subjects predicted greater reductions in bulimic behavior; reductions in bulimic behavior also predicted improved alliance. Patients with higher depression, anxiety, or emotion dysregulation had a stronger therapeutic alliance in CBT-E than ICAT, while those with more intimacy problems had greater improvement in therapeutic alliance in ICAT compared to CBT-E. Conclusions Therapeutic alliance has a unique impact on outcome, independent of the impact of symptom improvement on alliance. Within- and between-subject effects revealed that changes in alliance over time did not predict symptom improvement, but rather that individuals who had a stronger alliance overall had better bulimic symptom outcomes. These findings indicate that therapeutic alliance is an important predictor of outcome in the treatment of BN. PMID:25894667

  18. Diving pattern and work schedule of construction well divers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Huang, K L; Lee, H C; Huang, G B; Lin, T F; Niu, K C; Liou, S H; Lin, Y C

    1998-01-01

    Construction well divers in Taiwan reportedly suffer a high prevalence of dysbaric osteonecrosis. We studied five divers working at the same construction site. We recorded their diving methods, diving depths, bottom times, work patterns, water temperatures, and heart rates. We also monitored gas bubbles in the subclavian vein in selected dives. A crude but effective hot-water system protected divers against hypothermia and allowed them to work in 24 degrees-27 degrees C water. Divers worked approximately 6.6 h a day and progressed approximately 3.0 m a day while excavating an average of 148 buckets of sand and rock each weighing 49.5 kg. The divers sustained a heart rate increase of 49%. Sixty percent of their equivalent single dive bottom times exceeded the U.S. Navy's no-decompression limits. Two cases of venous bubbles were detected, and one of these divers showed symptoms of decompression sickness. The prolonged bottom time and lack of a decompression schedule probably contributed to a risk of decompression sickness and dysbaric osteonecrosis. PMID:9670435

  19. The Empirical Analysis of Impact of Alliances on Airline Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iatrou, Kostas; Alamdari, Fariba

    2003-01-01

    Airline alliances are dominating the current air transport industry with the largest carriers of the world belonging to one of the four alliance groupings - "Wings", Star Alliance, one world, SkyTeam - which represent 56% of world Revenue Passenger Kilometers. Although much research has been carried out to evaluate the impact of alliance membership on performance of airlines, it would be of interest to ascertain the degree of impact perceived by participating airlines in alliances. It is the purpose of this paper to gather the opinion of all the airlines, belonging to the four global alliance groupings on the impact alliances have had on their traffic and on their performance in general To achieve this, a comprehensive survey of the alliance management departments of airlines participating in the four global strategic alliances was carried out. With this framework the survey has examined which type of cooperation among carriers (FFP, Code Share, Strategic Alliance without antitrust immunity, Strategic Alliance with antitrust immunity) has produced the most positive impact on traffic and which type of route (short haul, long haul, hub-hub, hub-non hub, non hub-non hub) has been mostly affected. In addition, the respondent airlines quantified the effect alliances have had on specific areas of their operation, such as load factors, traffic, costs, revenue and fares. Their responses have been analysed under each global alliances grouping, under airline and under geographic region to establish which group, type of carrier and geographic region has benefited most. The results show that each of the four global alliances groupings has experienced different results according to the type of collaboration agreed amongst their member airlines.

  20. A wireless bio-sensing microfluidic chip based on resonating 'μ-divers'.

    PubMed

    Xue, Cong; Yang, Chen; Xu, Tiegang; Zhan, Jing; Li, Xinxin

    2015-05-21

    A magneto-elastic resonant 'micro-diver' system (MER-μDS) is proposed and developed for rapid liquid-phase detection of pathogens in a wireless way. The magneto-elastic micro-resonator (i.e., the μ-diver) is placed in the micro-chamber of the MER-μDS that is connected to the inlet/outlet for flow of the liquid analyte and a closed-loop micro-channel. After specific attachment of the analyte onto the μ-diver, the μ-diver is conveyed by the flow into the detection segment of the channel, around which a metal micro-coil is wound for both excitation resonance of the μ-diver and reading of its resonance frequency signal. After the pre-functionalized μ-diver captures the analyte and, then, is driven into the detection channel segment, the added mass induced resonant frequency shift can be wirelessly sensed by the coil. The micro-system features rapid and repeatable liquid-phase bio-sensing and the wireless signal readout scheme is favorable to real-time pathogen detection in liquid food, e.g., milk or juice, for food safety applications. An equivalent circuit model is established for design of the magneto-elastic μ-diver. After a bar-shaped μ-diver with length-extensional bulk-resonance mode is optimally designed and micro-fabricated, the MER-μDS is formed by micro-machining/assembling techniques. By placing a biotin-immobilized μ-diver into the wireless micro-sensing system, avidin-attached magnetic beads are detected to calibrate the mass sensitivity as 0.061 Hz pg(-1), which well confirms the modeling result. By using the antibody-immobilized μ-diver, PBS solution with an E. coli concentration of 10(2)-10(8) CFU mL(-1) is detected, resulting in a corresponding wireless f0-shift sensing signal of about 300-2300 Hz and a limit of detection of 10(2) CFU mL(-1). Food safety application potential of the MER-μDS technique is proven by detection of E. coli added to orange and apple juices (E. coli concentration: 10(4)-10(8) CFU mL(-1)). PMID:25891094

  1. Correlation between decompression sickness and circulating bubbles in 232 divers.

    PubMed

    Gardette, B

    1979-03-01

    Doppler monitoring examinations were carried out during 67 simulated helium-oxygen dives in the pressure chambers of the Centre d'Etudes Hyperbares (CEH) COMEX Marseille, and involved a total of 232 COMEX professional divers. Three to five detections were done in each 24-h period, each consisting of an observation at rest and an observation after deep knee bends. Recordings of the Doppler signals were subsequently analyzed by experienced listeners and graded according to the system described by Spencer and Johanson (1974). The two vestibular decompression accidents in this series were associated with bubble scores of grade 3 at rest; one occurred during the rapid initial phase of a bounce dive decompression and the other after return to the storage depth after an excursion dive. Twenty-five cases of muscular or joint pains were observed. A higher incidence of this type of problem was found with higher bubble grades in general, although it was not possible to predict pain. PMID:462655

  2. [Physiopathologic consequences of underwater diving and medical management of divers].

    PubMed

    Méliet, J L

    1996-05-01

    Underwater diving is a very closely medically managed activity. Performing it, the human organism is under the physical laws of pressure and following consequences. The expiratory flows are significatively reduced, enhancing the risk of alveolar hypoventilation at exertion, the central nervous system is the privileged target during inopportune tissue degassing related accidents (leaving 20% of sequellae), barotraumatic injuries threaten middle and inner ear or lung (pulmonary barotrauma is the most severe accident), the toxicity of gas under pressure (i.e. oxygen, nitrogen) exposes to specific risks of loss of consciousness. Lastly, the adaptative mechanisms to immersion can be overflown, leading to pulmonary oedema. Facing these constraints, the practitioner's role begins just before the diver's activity starts by looking for contraindications to diving. It continues during tuition time by teaching him the physiopathology of accidents, their prevention and first cares. Finally, in case of accident, a specialized medical team acts in diagnosis and treatment. From these points of view, diving medicine is a multispecialty medical matter. PMID:8963716

  3. Partial dereverberation used to characterize open circuit scuba diver signatures.

    PubMed

    Gemba, Kay L; Nosal, Eva-Marie; Reed, Todd R

    2014-08-01

    The use of passive acoustics to detect self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers is useful for nearshore and port security applications. While the performance of a detector can be optimized by understanding the signal's spectral characteristics, anechoic recording environments are generally not available or are cost prohibitive. A practical solution is to obtain the source spectra by equalizing the recording with the inverse of the channel's impulse response. This paper presents a dereverberation method for signal characterization that is subsequently applied to four recorded SCUBA configurations. The inverse impulse response is computed in the least-square sense, and partial dereverberation of SCUBA is performed over the 6-18 kHz band. Results indicate that early reflections and late reverberation added as much as 6.8 dB of energy. Mean unadjusted sound pressure levels computed over the 0.3-80 kHz band were 130 ± 5.9 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m. Bubble noise carries a significant amount of the total energy and masks the regulator signatures from 1.3 to 6 kHz, depending on the regulator configuration. While the dereverberation method is applied here to SCUBA signals, it is generally applicable to other sources if the impulse response of the recording environment can be obtained separately. PMID:25096097

  4. Decompression sickness in breath-hold divers: a review.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardette, Bernard; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-12-01

    Although it has been generally assumed that the risk of decompression sickness is virtually zero during a single breath-hold dive in humans, repeated dives may result in a cumulative increase in the tissue and blood nitrogen tension. Many species of marine mammals perform extensive foraging bouts with deep and long dives interspersed by a short surface interval, and some human divers regularly perform repeated dives to 30-40 m or a single dive to more than 200 m, all of which may result in nitrogen concentrations that elicit symptoms of decompression sickness. Neurological problems have been reported in humans after single or repeated dives and recent necropsy reports in stranded marine mammals were suggestive of decompression sickness-like symptoms. Modelling attempts have suggested that marine mammals may live permanently with elevated nitrogen concentrations and may be at risk when altering their dive behaviour. In humans, non-pathogenic bubbles have been recorded and symptoms of decompression sickness have been reported after repeated dives to modest depths. The mechanisms implicated in these accidents indicate that repeated breath-hold dives with short surface intervals are factors that predispose to decompression sickness. During deep diving, the effect of pulmonary shunts and/or lung collapse may play a major role in reducing the incidence of decompression sickness in humans and marine mammals. PMID:19967580

  5. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. PMID:23523829

  6. Creating a NASA-Wide Museum Alliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohus, Anita M.

    2006-01-01

    NASA's Museum Alliance is a nationwide network of informal educators at museums, science centers, and planetariums that present NASA information to their local audiences. Begun in 2002 as the Mars Museum Visualization Alliance with advisors from a dozen museums, the network has grown to over 300 people from 200 organizations, including a dozen or so international partners. The network has become a community of practice among these informal educators who work with students, educators, and the general public on a daily basis, presenting information and fielding questions about space exploration. Communications are primarily through an active listserve, regular telecons, and a pass word protected website. Professional development is delivered via telecons and downloadable presentations. Current content offerings include Mars exploration, Cassini, Stardust, Genesis, Deep Impact, Earth observations, STEREO, and missions to explore beyond our solar system.

  7. Strategic defense and the Western alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Lakoff, S.; Willoughby, R. )

    1987-01-01

    Strategic defense has again become a major item on the agenda of the Western Alliance. Revived by President Ronald Reagan in his Star Wars speech of March 1983, and implemented in his Strategic Defense Initiative, it has achieved renewed emphasis in military spending, in alliance research efforts, and in arms control negotiations. SDI is packaged in a way that makes it the largest single item in the Department of Defense's annual budget. It engages researchers in industrial and military laboratories on both sides of the Atlantic as well as in Japan and Israel. In the arms control negotiations now under way between the United States and the USSR, the conduct of this research and its implications for the strategic balance and the reduction of offensive weapons are critical considerations. The implications of this largely unexpected development are the subject of this book.

  8. The NPARC Alliance Verification and Validation Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Dudek, Julianne C.; Tatum, Kenneth E.

    2000-01-01

    The NPARC Alliance (National Project for Applications oriented Research in CFD) maintains a publicly-available, web-based verification and validation archive as part of the development and support of the WIND CFD code. The verification and validation methods used for the cases attempt to follow the policies and guidelines of the ASME and AIAA. The emphasis is on air-breathing propulsion flow fields with Mach numbers ranging from low-subsonic to hypersonic.

  9. International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Information Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, John Steven; Beebe, R.; Guinness, E.; Heather, D.; Huang, M.; Kasaba, Y.; Osuna, P.; Rye, E.; Savorskiy, V.

    2007-01-01

    This document is the third deliverable of the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Archive Data Standards Requirements Identification project. The goal of the project is to identify a subset of the standards currently in use by NASAs Planetary Data System (PDS) that are appropriate for internationalization. As shown in the highlighted sections of Figure 1, the focus of this project is the Information Model component of the Data Architecture Standards, namely the object models, a data dictionary, and a set of data formats.

  10. The Alliance Negotiation Scale: A psychometric investigation.

    PubMed

    Doran, Jennifer M; Safran, Jeremy D; Muran, J Christopher

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the utility and psychometric properties of a new measure of psychotherapy process, the Alliance Negotiation Scale (ANS; Doran, Safran, Waizmann, Bolger, & Muran, 2012). The ANS was designed to operationalize the theoretical construct of negotiation (Safran & Muran, 2000), and to extend our current understanding of the working alliance concept (Bordin, 1979). The ANS was also intended to improve upon existing measures such as the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI; Horvath & Greenberg, 1986, 1989) and its short form (WAI-S; Tracey & Kokotovic, 1989) by expanding the emphasis on negative therapy process. The present study investigates the psychometric validity of the ANS test scores and interpretation-including confirming its original factor structure and evaluating its internal consistency and construct validity. Construct validity was examined through the ANS' convergence and divergence with several existing scales that measure theoretically related constructs. The results bolster and extend previous findings about the psychometric integrity of the ANS, and begin to illuminate the relationship between negotiation and other important variables in psychotherapy research. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26460895

  11. The clinical partnership as strategic alliance.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Jeanne M; Donahue, Moreen; Bhalla, Bharat B

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a renewed partnership between a collegiate school of nursing and a community hospital. Universities and hospitals are searching for creative solutions to increase the number of registered nurses available to meet the demand for nursing care. An affiliation agreement had been in existence for many years, but health care system imperatives made it necessary to redesign the partnership between nursing education and nursing service. The model used to develop this new partnership is based on the work done in the field of management and is in the form of a strategic alliance. The success of a strategic alliance depends on two key factors: the relationship between partners and partnership performance. Identified outcomes show that this partnership is helping to meet the increasing demand for nursing care by building student capacity, satisfying mutual needs of faculty and clinical staff, and removing economic barriers. This article describes the development of the strategic alliance, its current status, and strategies for the future. PMID:15343495

  12. A comparison between boat-based and diver-based methods for quantifying coral bleaching

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, David G.; Ruzicka, Rob; Colella, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent increases in both the frequency and severity of coral bleaching events have spurred numerous surveys to quantify the immediate impacts and monitor the subsequent community response. Most of these efforts utilize conventional diver-based methods, which are inherently time-consuming, expensive, and limited in spatial scope unless they deploy large teams of scientifically-trained divers. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of the Along-Track Reef Imaging System (ATRIS), an automated image-acquisition technology, for assessing a moderate bleaching event that occurred in the summer of 2011 in the Florida Keys. More than 100,000 images were collected over 2.7 km of transects spanning four patch reefs in a 3-h period. In contrast, divers completed 18, 10-m long transects at nine patch reefs over a 5-day period. Corals were assigned to one of four categories: not bleached, pale, partially bleached, and bleached. The prevalence of bleaching estimated by ATRIS was comparable to the results obtained by divers, but only for corals > 41 cm in size. The coral size-threshold computed for ATRIS in this study was constrained by prevailing environmental conditions (turbidity and sea state) and, consequently, needs to be determined on a study-by-study basis. Both ATRIS and diver-based methods have innate strengths and weaknesses that must be weighed with respect to project goals.

  13. Funding conservation through use and potentials for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Emang, Diana; Lundhede, Thomas Hedemark; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2016-11-01

    The protected coral reefs off the coast of Malaysia receive numerous tourists, while also being as fishing grounds. These joint environmental pressures raise the need for additional costly conservation measures. It is natural to consider the potential for expanding the 'user pays' principle, already implemented in the form of various user fees. This study explores the potential for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan in Malaysia. The study applies a choice experiment to estimate scuba divers willingness to pay higher user fees for avoiding decreases of or getting improvements in environmental and recreational aspects of the diving experience. We investigate how sensitivity to fee size and hence willingness to pay vary with suitable selected characteristics of divers. We find potentials for a third degree price discrimination strategy exploiting higher willingness to pay among foreign divers (45%), male divers (16%) and people who has visited Sipadan several times (25%). Thus, revised pricing structures could significantly increase funds for the preservation of Sipadan. PMID:27521689

  14. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity and sympathetic nerve activity are normal in apnea divers during training season.

    PubMed

    Breskovic, Toni; Ivancev, Vladimir; Banic, Ivana; Jordan, Jens; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-04-19

    Apnea divers are exposed to repeated massive arterial oxygen desaturation, which could perturb chemoreflexes. An earlier study suggested that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of sympathetic vasomotor tone and ventilation may have recovered 4 or more weeks into the off season. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is present during the training season. We determined ventilation, heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac stroke volume, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during isocapnic hypoxia in 10 breath hold divers and 11 matched control subjects. The study was carried out at the end of the season of intense apnea trainings. Baseline MSNA frequency was 30+/-4bursts/min in control subjects and 25+/-4bursts/min in breath hold divers (P=0.053). During hypoxia burst frequency and total sympathetic activity increased similarly in both groups. Sympathetic activity normalized during the 30-minute recovery. Hypoxia-induced stimulation of minute ventilation was similar in both groups, although in divers it was maintained by higher tidal volumes and lower breathing frequency compared with control subjects. In both groups, hypoxia increased heart rate and cardiac output whereas total peripheral resistance decreased. Blood pressure remained unchanged. We conclude that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is paradoxically preserved in apnea divers, both, during the off and during the training season. The observation suggests that repeated arterial oxygen desaturation may not be sufficient explaining sympathetic reflex abnormalities similar to those in obstructive sleep apnea patients. PMID:19926535

  15. Divers' deaths in Split-Dalmatian County, Croatia (cases study, 1994-2004).

    PubMed

    Definis-Gojanović, Marija; Bresković, Toni; Sutlović, Davorka; Petri, Nadan

    2007-01-01

    The circumstances which lead to divers' death in Split-Dalmatian County in eleven-year period (1994-2004) were analyzed. The data were extracted from the files of autopsy reports of the Department of Forensic Medicine, Split University Hospital and School of Medicine, and the police reports of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Split-Dalmatian County. A total of 31 cases were found during the study period. The number of diving deaths didn't vary significantly through the years 1994-1999 but it increased after year 2000, mostly as a result of domestic and foreign tourists who practiced diving during their summer vacation. The average age of victims was 37.65 years. Of the 31 cases, 13 (41.9%) were apnoea (skin) divers and rest of them (18; 58.1%) were scuba divers. The leading activity of the apnoea divers was underwater fishing, while the majority of scuba divers were in recreational diving. The major cause of death was drowning. The circumstances which had led to the death remained unknown in most cases, mainly due to inexistence of proper criminal investigation. PMID:18350983

  16. Complement activation in divers after repeated air/heliox dives and its possible relevance to DCS.

    PubMed

    Hjelde, A; Bergh, K; Brubakk, A O; Iversen, O J

    1995-03-01

    Plasma levels of the anaphylatoxin C5a were measured in 19 divers performing repeated air dives. Blood samples were collected immediately before the first dive and 2 h after the first and the second or third dive. Serum obtained at the same times was subjected to complement activation in vitro by air bubbles. Six divers developed symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Most intravascular bubbles were observed in divers with the lowest plasma levels of C5a. Postdive plasma levels of C5a did not increase compared with predive levels, nor were postdive levels significantly different after two or three dives compared with the first dive. Repeated dives did not influence the amounts of C5a generated in vitro. Neither plasma levels of C5a nor C5a generated in vitro were significantly different in divers who experienced symptoms of DCS vs. divers without symptoms of DCS. We conclude that plasma level of C5a and measurement of C5a generation in vitro cannot be used to predict DCS. PMID:7775308

  17. Spleen and cardiovascular function during short apneas in divers.

    PubMed

    Palada, Ivan; Eterovic, Davor; Obad, Ante; Bakovic, Darija; Valic, Zoran; Ivancev, Vladimir; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2007-12-01

    We investigated the spleen volume changes as related to the cardiovascular responses during short-duration apneas at rest. We used dynamic ultrasound splenic imaging and noninvasive photoplethysmographic cardiovascular measurements before, during, and after 15-20 s apneas in seven trained divers. The role of baroreflex was studied by intravenous bolus of vasodilating drug trinitrosan during tidal breathing. The role of lung volume was studied by comparing the apneas at near-maximal lung volume with apneas after inhaling tidal volume, with and without cold forehead stimulation. In apneas at near maximal lung volume, a 20% reduction in splenic volume (P = 0.03) was observed as early as 3 s after the onset of breath holding. Around that time the heart rate increased, the mean arterial pressure abruptly decreased from 89.6 to 66.7 mmHg (P = 0.02), and cardiac output decreased, on account of reduction in stroke volume. Intravenous application of trinitrosan resulted in approximately 6-mmHg decrement in mean arterial pressure, while the splenic volume decreased for approximately 13%. In apneas at low lung volume, the early splenic contraction was also observed, 10% without and 12% with cold forehead stimulation, although the mean arterial pressure did not change or even increased, respectively. In conclusion, the spleen contraction is present at the beginning of apnea, accentuated by cold forehead stimulation. At large, but not small, lung volume, this initial contraction is probably facilitated by downloaded baroreflex in conditions of decreased blood pressure and cardiac output. PMID:17947504

  18. The aging diver: endothelial biochemistry and its potential implications for cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Berenji Ardestani, Simin; Buzzacott, Peter; Eftedal, Ingrid

    2015-12-01

    Divers are exposed to circulatory stress that directly affects the endothelial lining of blood vessels, and even asymptomatic dives are associated with inflammatory responses, microparticle release and endothelial dysfunction. As humans age, there is a relative increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease, attributed in part to declining endothelial function. Whether extensive diving in the older diver increases the risk of disease as a result of accumulated circulatory stress or provides protection through processes of acclimatization remains an open question. We provide a brief review of current knowledge about the separate effects of diving and aging on the vascular endothelium in humans and rodents, and discuss the available data on their combined effects. The aim is to elucidate possible outcomes of the interplay between exogenous and endogenous stress factors for endothelial function and to question potential implications for cardiovascular health in the aging diver. PMID:26687310

  19. Bilateral scaphoid stress fracture in a platform diver presenting with unilateral symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla; Mat Nor, Noreen Fazlina; Abdullah, Shalimar; Sapuan, Jamari

    2014-10-01

    Scaphoid stress fracture is rare and occurs mainly in gymnasts. The current literature has only two reported cases: unilateral scaphoid stress fracture in a platform diver and bilateral scaphoid stress fracture in a gymnast. We herein report bilateral stress fracture of the scaphoid in a platform diver who presented with only one symptomatic side. Our patient was a 16-year-old competitive platform diver with an 18-month history of pain in the right wrist. Radiography revealed fracture of the right scaphoid at the waist. As part of our preoperative plan of measuring the scaphoid length to determine the appropriate screw, radiography of the contralateral side was performed, revealing an unexpected fracture of the left scaphoid. Due to the frequency of stress fractures in competitive sports, especially gymnastics, we recommend that bilateral scaphoid radiography be performed for athletes presenting with a unilateral scaphoid fracture, to avoid missing a fracture in the contralateral side. PMID:25631904

  20. Hemoptysis provoked by voluntary diaphragmatic contractions in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Kiyan, E; Aktas, S; Toklu, A S

    2001-12-01

    Pulmonary barotrauma of descent (lung squeeze) has been described in breath-hold divers when the lung volume becomes smaller than the residual volume (RV), with the effect of increased ambient pressure. However, the ratio between the total lung capacity and the RV is not the only factor that plays a role in the lung squeeze. Blood shift into the thorax is another important factor. We report three cases of hemoptysis in breath-hold divers who dove for spear fishing in shallower depths than usual. All of the divers performed voluntary diaphragmatic contractions at the beginning of their ascent, while their mouths and noses were closed. We suggest that the negative intrathoracic pressure due to the forced attempt to breathe in with voluntary diaphragmatic contractions contributes to alveolar hemorrhage, since it may damage the pulmonary capillaries. PMID:11742946

  1. 46 CFR 71.50-27 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program options: Divers or underwater remotely operated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). 71.50-27 Section 71.50-27 Shipping COAST GUARD... (ROV). To conduct the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater ROV. (a.... (b) You may use an underwater ROV to conduct the underwater survey. The underwater ROV operating...

  2. 46 CFR 71.50-27 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program options: Divers or underwater remotely operated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). 71.50-27 Section 71.50-27 Shipping COAST GUARD... (ROV). To conduct the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater ROV. (a.... (b) You may use an underwater ROV to conduct the underwater survey. The underwater ROV operating...

  3. 46 CFR 71.50-27 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program options: Divers or underwater remotely operated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). 71.50-27 Section 71.50-27 Shipping COAST GUARD... (ROV). To conduct the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater ROV. (a.... (b) You may use an underwater ROV to conduct the underwater survey. The underwater ROV operating...

  4. 46 CFR 71.50-27 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program options: Divers or underwater remotely operated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). 71.50-27 Section 71.50-27 Shipping COAST GUARD... (ROV). To conduct the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater ROV. (a.... (b) You may use an underwater ROV to conduct the underwater survey. The underwater ROV operating...

  5. 46 CFR 71.50-27 - Alternative Hull Examination (AHE) program options: Divers or underwater remotely operated...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...: Divers or underwater remotely operated vehicle (ROV). 71.50-27 Section 71.50-27 Shipping COAST GUARD... (ROV). To conduct the underwater survey portion of the AHE, you may use divers or an underwater ROV. (a.... (b) You may use an underwater ROV to conduct the underwater survey. The underwater ROV operating...

  6. Recommendations for rescue of a submerged unresponsive compressed-gas diver.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, S J; Bennett, M H; Bird, N; Doolette, D J; Hobbs, G W; Kay, E; Moon, R E; Neuman, T S; Vann, R D; Walker, R; Wyatt, H A

    2012-01-01

    The Diving Committee of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society has reviewed available evidence in relation to the medical aspects of rescuing a submerged unresponsive compressed-gas diver. The rescue process has been subdivided into three phases, and relevant questions have been addressed as follows. Phase 1, preparation for ascent: If the regulator is out of the mouth, should it be replaced? If the diver is in the tonic or clonic phase of a seizure, should the ascent be delayed until the clonic phase has subsided? Are there any special considerations for rescuing rebreather divers? Phase 2, retrieval to the surface: What is a "safe" ascent rate? If the rescuer has a decompression obligation, should they take the victim to the surface? If the regulator is in the mouth and the victim is breathing, does this change the ascent procedures? If the regulator is in the mouth, the victim is breathing, and the victim has a decompression obligation, does this change the ascent procedures? Is it necessary to hold the victim's head in a particular position? Is it necessary to press on the victim's chest to ensure exhalation? Are there any special considerations for rescuing rebreather divers? Phase 3, procedure at the surface: Is it possible to make an assessment of breathing in the water? Can effective rescue breaths be delivered in the water? What is the likelihood of persistent circulation after respiratory arrest? Does the recent advocacy for "compression-only resuscitation" suggest that rescue breaths should not be administered to a non-breathing diver? What rules should guide the relative priority of in-water rescue breaths over accessing surface support where definitive CPR can be started? A "best practice" decision tree for submerged diver rescue has been proposed. PMID:23342767

  7. Barodontalgia and barotrauma in the human teeth: findings in navy divers, frogmen, and submariners of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Goethe, W H; Bäter, H; Laban, C

    1989-10-01

    From 2,580 submariners, divers, and frogmen, 13,618 individual findings were evaluated from a total of about 50,000 dental findings of the Nautical Medical Institute of the German Navy, Kiel, West Germany. Trend analysis and statistical significance tests showed that the teeth of navy divers and frogmen had deteriorated very much more within a period of 9 years after their first dental examination than those of submariners. This negative tendency was verified through additional direct comparison between 37 navy divers and 37 submariners whose dental states were observed during a period of 10 years. Here as well, navy divers had significantly worse teeth. The cause of this distinctive dental deterioration among navy divers is probably due to the additional barometric stress they were subjected to for many years during their diving career. Delayed damages as a result of barotrauma may be assumed, a logical suspicion which should be verified by further scientific research. PMID:2515472

  8. Counselor Technical Activity in Cases with Improving Working Alliances and Continuing-Poor Working Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Schmitz, Patrick J.

    1992-01-01

    Clients, 15 student volunteers paired with 15 counselors trainees for 4 sessions, rated strength of working alliance for each counseling session and scored counselor technical activity on various dimensions. Counselors were rated as relatively more challenging, thematically focused, and here-and-now oriented in improving dyads (eight dyads) than…

  9. North Carolina science and mathematics alliance

    SciTech Connect

    DuBay, D.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Alliance catalyzes building relationships among schools, parents, teachers, businesses, universities, and community colleges, government, and community leaders. A network of nine Regional Partnerships help communities build capacity to reform and support science and mathematics education, school by school. They assess needs, identify resources, and plan and coordinate activities using those resources to solve problems. Partnerships coordinate restructured systems of delivery of teacher education and student instruction in science and mathematics, such as site-based workshops for faculties; community-supported school improvement programs; professional development for school-based teams in leaderships and in science and mathematics content, and computer networking applications.

  10. The parental alliance following divorce: an overview.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, M F

    1998-01-01

    The empirical literature on the postdivorce parental alliance was reviewed with a focus on implications for clinical interventions by family therapists. Variables of cooperation and conflict between parents, individual parenting style, and personal adjustment were significantly interrelated and a range of co-parenting behaviors related to these variables was documented. A typology of divorcing families can be useful in predicting risks for child difficulties and in developing appropriate parenting plans. Clinical interventions need to be tailored to the unique characteristics and resources of a given family and can speak to multiple points of the family system. PMID:9474521

  11. Concept Mapping the Client's Perspective on Counseling Alliance Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Robinder P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify, categorize, and model clients' understanding of early counseling alliance formation factors. Forty participants who had received counseling services were interviewed and asked about what observable behaviors and verbalizations they thought had helped establish the alliance with their counselor.…

  12. Care and Control: Working Alliance among Adolescents in Authoritarian Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrinelli Orsi, Mylene; Lafortune, Denis; Brochu, Serge

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the literature published in the last 20 years on working alliance in adolescents involuntarily enrolled in intervention programs. Firstly, Bordin's adaptation of the concept of working alliance to adolescent populations is discussed. This is followed by an analysis of the main results of empirical studies on helping…

  13. Representations of Parent-Child Alliances in Children's Family Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Kim; Wallace, Tamar; Rudy, Duane

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between children's representations of parent-child alliances (PCA) and their peer relationship quality, using a new scale that was developed to rate representations of PCA in children's family drawings. The parent-child alliance pattern is characterized by a relationship between parent and…

  14. Strategic Alliances in Education: The Knowledge Engineering Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westera, Wim; van den Herik, Jaap; van de Vrie, Evert

    2004-01-01

    The field of higher education shows a jumble of alliances between fellow institutes. The alliances are strategic in kind and serve an economy-of-scales concept. A large scale is a prerequisite for allocating the budgets for new educational methods and technologies in order to keep the educational services up-to-date. All too often, however,…

  15. The Global Research Alliance on agricultural greenhouse gases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Global Research Alliance on Agricultural Greenhouse Gases was proposed by New Zealand at the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP) in Copenhagen in 2009 and developed in partnership with the United States. This alliance now includes 32 member count...

  16. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  17. The social side of hydropower: Forging a new alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Cernea, M.M.

    1997-03-01

    Social issues raised by hydropower development and approaches to addressing them are discussed. The primary social problem discussed is that of population relocation. Alliances between project developers and socioeconomics experts to address this and other issues are described. Such alliances can guide appropriate social actions in developing countries which lack formal policies and legislated frameworks for resettlement.

  18. Exploration of a Contextual Management Framework for Strategic Learning Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dealtry, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to take a further step forward in examining those important business factors that will shape the future of best practice in the quality management of internal and external strategic alliances. Design/methodology/approach: The article presents a speculative scenario on the future of strategic alliances in education,…

  19. Global alliances effect in coalition forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Galina; Galam, Serge

    2014-11-01

    Coalition forming is investigated among countries, which are coupled with short range interactions, under the influence of externally-set opposing global alliances. The model extends a recent Natural Model of coalition forming inspired from Statistical Physics, where instabilities are a consequence of decentralized maximization of the individual benefits of actors. In contrast to physics where spins can only evaluate the immediate cost/benefit of a flip of orientation, countries have a long horizon of rationality, which associates with the ability to envision a way up to a better configuration even at the cost of passing through intermediate loosing states. The stabilizing effect is produced through polarization by the global alliances of either a particular unique global interest factor or multiple simultaneous ones. This model provides a versatile theoretical tool for the analysis of real cases and design of novel strategies. Such analysis is provided for several real cases including the Eurozone. The results shed a new light on the understanding of the complex phenomena of planned stabilization in the coalition forming.

  20. Library Services Alliance of New Mexico. 1994 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The Library Services Alliance is a unique multi-type library consortium committed to resource sharing. As a voluntary association of university and governmental laboratory libraries supporting scientific research, the Alliance has become a leader in New Mexico in using cooperative ventures to cost-effectively expand resources supporting their scientific and technical communities. During 1994, the alliance continued to expand on their strategic planning foundation to enhance access to research information for the scientific and technical communities. Significant progress was made in facilitating easy access to the on-line catalogs of member libraries via connections through the Internet. Access to Alliance resources is now available via the World Wide Web and Gopher, as well as links to other databases and electronic information. This report highlights the accomplishments of the Alliance during calendar year 1994.

  1. Military Curricula for Vocational & Technical Education. Diver Second Class, 15-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This curriculum outline, student guide, and instructor guide for a secondary-postsecondary-level course in scuba diving (diver second class) is one of a number of military-developed curriculum packages selected for adaptation to vocational instruction and curriculum development in a civilian setting. Purpose stated for the 425-hour course is to…

  2. Dynamic Cerebral Autoregulation Is Acutely Impaired during Maximal Apnoea in Trained Divers

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Troy J.; Kavanagh, Justin J.; Breskovic, Toni; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine whether dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired during maximal voluntary apnoea in trained divers. Methods Mean arterial pressure (MAP), cerebral blood flow-velocity (CBFV) and end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2 (PETO2 and PETCO2) were measured in eleven trained, male apnoea divers (28±2 yr; 182±2 cm, 76±7 kg) during maximal “dry” breath holding. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was assessed by determining the strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV during maximal apnoea. Results The strength of phase synchronisation between MAP and CBFV increased from rest until the end of maximal voluntary apnoea (P<0.05), suggesting that dynamic cerebral autoregulation had weakened by the apnoea breakpoint. The magnitude of impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was strongly, and positively related to the rise in PETCO2 observed during maximal breath holding (R2 = 0.67, P<0.05). Interestingly, the impairment in dynamic cerebral autoregulation was not related to the fall in PETO2 induced by apnoea (R2 = 0.01, P = 0.75). Conclusions This study is the first to report that dynamic cerebral autoregulation is acutely impaired in trained divers performing maximal voluntary apnoea. Furthermore, our data suggest that the impaired autoregulatory response is related to the change in PETCO2, but not PETO2, during maximal apnoea in trained divers. PMID:24498340

  3. Magnetic field effects on dental amalgam in divers welding and cutting electrically underwater.

    PubMed

    Ortendahl, T W; Högstedt, P

    1988-11-01

    Divers have for some years been complaining about a metallic taste in the mouth while electrically welding and cutting underwater. This paper reports on results from an assessment of this problem. It was hypothesized that the magnetic fields arising from the welding or cutting current could correlate with the reported symptoms. The intraoral magnetic flux density was calculated to 1.15 mT, at 650 ADC, in a normal cutting situation. This was verified in vivo. This magnetic field was shown to contain an AC component that is a candidate for inducing secondary currents in the oral tissues and restorative materials. Five submerged divers exposed to a magnetic field of 0.35 mT did not report any metallic taste. Magnetophosphenes were reported by 1 diver. (Magnetophosphenes are luminous impressions due to excitement of the retina by a magnetic field in addition to or in place of impingement of light rays.) Only a slight shielding effect to magnetic fields was observed due to a copper-brass helmet. An in vitro model for exposure of dental amalgams to magnetic fields was designed. Recommendations for decreasing the magnetic field surrounding the diver in practical work is given. PMID:3227576

  4. Further Validation of the Learning Alliance Inventory: The Roles of Working Alliance, Rapport, and Immediacy in Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    This study further examined the reliability and validity of the Learning Alliance Inventory (LAI), a self-report measure designed to assess the working alliance between a student and a teacher. The LAI was found to have good internal consistency and test--retest reliability, and it demonstrated the predicted convergence with measures of immediacy…

  5. The Effects of Counselor Trainee Stress and Coping Resources on the Working Alliance and Supervisory Working Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gnilka, Philip B.

    2010-01-01

    Counselor trainees' stress and coping resources have the potential to influence the relationships formed with supervisors and clients. Two hundred thirty two (N = 232) Master-level counselor trainees completed surveys designed to measure perceived stress, coping resources, the working alliance, and the supervisory working alliance. Participants…

  6. Psychological and physical correlates of musculoskeletal symptoms in male professional divers and offshore workers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Underwater divers are more likely to complain of musculoskeletal symptoms than a control population. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine whether musculoskeletal symptoms reflected observable physical disorder, to ascertain the relationship between symptoms and measures of mood, memory and executive function and to assess any need for future screening. Methods A 10% random sample of responders to a prior postal health questionnaire was examined (151 divers, 120 non-diving offshore workers). Participants underwent physical examination and a neuropsychological test battery for memory and executive function. Participants also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for anxiety (HADSa) and depression (HADSd), and questionnaires for physical health-related quality of life (SF36 PCS), mental health-related quality of life (SF36 MCS), memory (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ), Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ)), executive function (dysexecutive syndrome questionnaire (DEX)), musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and general unrelated symptom reporting. Results Of participants with moderate/severe musculoskeletal symptoms, 52% had physical signs, and of participants with no symptoms, 73% had no physical signs. There was no difference in the prevalence of signs or symptoms between groups. Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with lower SF36 PCS for both groups. In divers, musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with higher general unrelated symptom reporting and poorer scoring for HADSa, PRMQ, CFQ and DEX with scores remaining within the normative range. A positive physical examination was associated with general unrelated symptom reporting in divers. There were no differences in neuropsychological test scores attributable to either group or musculoskeletal symptoms. Conclusions Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with physical signs, but this was not a strong effect. Reporting of musculoskeletal symptoms by

  7. The underestimated compression effect of neoprene wetsuit on divers hydromineral homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Castagna, O; Blatteau, J-E; Vallee, N; Schmid, B; Regnard, J

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed at demonstrating that the neoprene wetsuit provides not only thermal protection. Compression it exerts on the diver's shell significantly impacts hydromineral homeostasis by restraining the systemic vascular capacity and secondarily increasing urine output on dry land and during scuba diving. 8 healthy divers underwent five 2-h sessions: sitting out of water in trunks (control situation), sitting out of water wearing a wetsuit, and 3 wetsuit scuba-immersed sessions at 1, 6 and 12 msw depth, respectively. Urine volumes and blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht) and plasma sodium concentration were measured. Interface pressure between the garment and the skin was measured at 17 sites of the body shell, with a pressure transducer. Mean interface pressures between wetsuit and skin amounted to: 25.8±2.8 mm Hg. Whatever the depth, elastic recoil tension of wetsuit material was unchanged by immersion. Weight loss was respectively 2 and 3 times greater when wetsuit was worn out of water (430 g) and during immersion (710 g) than when divers did not wear any wetsuit out of water (235 g; p<0.05). Urine volume accounted for 85% of weight loss in either session. Weight loss and urine volume were similar whatever immersion depth. The decrease in plasma volume amounted to 8% of urine volume when divers did not wear any wetsuit out of water, and to 30% when wetsuit was worn out of water or during immersion. Diving wetsuit develops a pressure effect that alters diver's hydromineral homeostasis. During immersion, the wetsuit pressure merges into the larger main effect of hydrostatic pressure to reduce water content of body fluids, unrelated to immersion depth. PMID:23780899

  8. Improved pulmonary function in working divers breathing nitrox at shallow depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzpatrick, Daniel T.; Conkin, Johnny

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is limited data about the long-term pulmonary effects of nitrox use in divers at shallow depths. This study examined changes in pulmonary function in a cohort of working divers breathing a 46% oxygen enriched mixture while diving at depths less than 12 m. METHODS: A total of 43 working divers from the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL), NASA-Johnson Space Center completed a questionnaire providing information on diving history prior to NBL employment, diving history outside the NBL since employment, and smoking history. Cumulative dive hours were obtained from the NBL dive-time database. Medical records were reviewed to obtain the diver's height, weight, and pulmonary function measurements from initial pre-dive, first year and third year annual medical examinations. RESULTS: The initial forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) were greater than predicted, 104% and 102%, respectively. After 3 yr of diving at the NBL, both the FVC and FEV1 showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase of 6.3% and 5.5%, respectively. There were no significant changes in peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced mid-expiratory flow rate (FEF(25-75%)), and forced expiratory flow rates at 25%, 50%, and 75% of FVC expired (FEF25%, FEF50%, FEF75%). Cumulative NBL dive hours was the only contributing variable found to be significantly associated with both FVC and FEV1 at 1 and 3 yr. CONCLUSIONS: NBL divers initially belong to a select group with larger than predicted lung volumes. Regular diving with nitrox at shallow depths over a 3-yr period did not impair pulmonary function. Improvements in FVC and FEV1 were primarily due to a training effect.

  9. The therapeutic alliance in the treatment of personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Bender, Donna S

    2005-03-01

    Because personality disorders are associated with significant impairment in interpersonal relationships, special issues and problems arise in the formation of a therapeutic alliance in the treatment of patients with these disorders. In particular, patients with narcissistic, borderline, and paranoid personality traits are likely to have troubled interpersonal attitudes and behaviors that will complicate the patient's engagement with the therapist. While a strong positive therapeutic alliance is predictive of more successful treatment outcomes, strains and ruptures in the alliance may lead to premature termination of treatment. Therefore, clinicians need to consider the patient's characteristic way of relating in order to select appropriate interventions to effectively retain and involve the patient in treatment. Research has shown not only the importance of building an alliance but also that this alliance is vital in the earliest phase of treatment. The author first reviews several definitions of the therapeutic alliance with reference to how they apply to the treatment of patients with personality disorders. Issues relevant to forming a therapeutic alliance with patients with personality disorders are then discussed in terms of the three DSM-IV-TR personality disorder clusters. However, the author notes that these categories do not adequately capture the complexity of character pathology and that clinicians also need to consider which aspects of a patient's personality pathology are dominant at the moment in considering salient elements of the therapeutic alliance. In dealing with Cluster A personality disorders (schizotypal, schizoid, and paranoid personality disorders), what is most relevant for alliance building is the profound impairment in interpersonal relationships. The Cluster B "dramatic" personality disorders (antisocial, borderline, histrionic, and narcissistic) are all associated with pushing the limits. Consequently, clinicians need to exercise great

  10. Geoscience Alliance--A National Alliance for Broadening Participation of Native Americans in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalbotten, D. M.; Pellerin, H.; Greensky, L.; Burger, A.

    2009-12-01

    The continuing underrepresentation of Native Americans in the geosciences can only mean that native voices go unheard in setting research agendas and priorities. This is particularly significant where issues such as global climate change impact the land and livelihood of Native American communities. This talk will outline progress towards a Geoscience Alliance, with participation by faculty from tribal colleges, universities, and research centers; native elders and community members; students (K12, undergraduate, and graduate); formal and informal educators; and other interested individuals. Our focus will be on defining goals for this alliance, i.e., new research in Geoscience education, defining best practices, inclusion of Native voices in Geoscience research, the potential for new collaborations, and promotion of opportunities for Native students and communities.

  11. Strategic hospital alliances: impact on financial performance.

    PubMed

    Clement, J P; McCue, M J; Luke, R D; Bramble, J D; Rossiter, L F; Ozcan, Y A; Pai, C W

    1997-01-01

    Acute care hospitals have increasingly been forming local strategic hospital alliances (SHAs), which consume considerable resources in forming and may affect the competitiveness of provider markets. This research shows that SHAs and market factors, which have been perceived to be threats to hospitals, are related to hospitals' financial performance. Among the findings are that SHA members have higher net revenues but that they are not more effective at cost control. Nor do the higher net revenues result in higher cash flow. However, increasing SHA penetration in a market is related to lower net revenues per case. In addition, the penetration of private health maintenance organizations in markets is associated with lower revenues and expenses. PMID:9444827

  12. 77 FR 7572 - Alliance Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alliance Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on January 25, 2012, Alliance Pipeline L.P. filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission an application under... behalf of Alliance Pipeline Inc., Managing General Partner of Alliance Pipeline L.P., 800, 605--5 Ave....

  13. Patient-Rated Alliance as a Measure of Therapist Performance in Two Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Zac E.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Simon, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The ability to form a strong therapeutic alliance is considered a foundational skill across psychotherapies. Patient-rated measures of the alliance are now being used to make judgments about a therapist's tendency to build alliances with their patients. However, whether a patient-rated alliance measure provides a useful index of a…

  14. The Effects of Trust in Virtual Strategic-Alliance Performance Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston-Ortiz, Dina

    2010-01-01

    Outsourcing increases supported by technology have led to the formation of virtual strategic partnerships. Historically, 70% to 75% of alliance partnerships fail because members are often competitors outside the alliance network. To address alliance failure, a Delphi Study was conducted to identify the role of trust and alliance performance…

  15. Research on Efficiency of Knowledge Transfer in Technical Innovation Alliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang-sheng, Jiang

    The knowledge transfer efficiency (KTE) is closely relative to the success or failure of technology innovation in strategic alliances. This paper takes the KTE as the essential variable to establish the benefit function model of technology innovations to explore the KTE's influences on partners' innovative decisions under two different modes: independent innovations and alliance innovations. It is found that the higher the KTE, the greater the reducing extent of production costs is. The results could provide some theoretical supports for selections of the optimal competitive-ooperative relationship and managerial flexibility in technical innovation alliances.

  16. Science and Engineering Alliance: A new resource for the nation

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and four major Historically Black Colleges and Universities with strong research and development capabilities in science, engineering and computer technology have formed the Science and Engineering Alliance. Located in California, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, each brings to the Alliance a tradition of research and development and educational excellence. This unique consortium is now available to perform research development and training to meet the needs of the public and private sectors. The Alliance was formed to help assure an adequate supply of top-quality minority scientists in the next century, while simultaneously meeting the research and development needs of the public and private sectors.

  17. Size Matters: Spleen and Lung Volumes Predict Performance in Human Apneic Divers

    PubMed Central

    Schagatay, Erika; Richardson, Matt X.; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2012-01-01

    Humans share with seals the ability to contract the spleen and increase circulating hematocrit, which may improve apneic performance by enhancing gas storage. Seals have large spleens and while human spleen size is small in comparison, it shows great individual variation. Unlike many marine mammals, human divers rely to a great extent on lung oxygen stores, but the impact of lung volume on competitive apnea performance has never been determined. We studied if spleen- and lung size correlated with performance in elite apnea divers. Volunteers were 14 male apnea world championship participants, with a mean (SE) of 5.8 (1.2) years of previous apnea training. Spleen volume was calculated from spleen length, width, and thickness measured via ultrasound during rest, and vital capacity via spirometry. Accumulated competition scores from dives of maximal depth, time, and distance were compared to anthropometric measurements and training data. Mean (SE) diving performance was 75 (4) m for constant weight depth, 5 min 53 (39) s for static apnea and 139 (13) m for dynamic apnea distance. Subjects’ mean height was 184 (2) cm, weight 82 (3) kg, vital capacity (VC) 7.3 (0.3) L and spleen volume 336 (32) mL. Spleen volume did not correlate with subject height or weight, but was positively correlated with competition score (r = 0.57; P < 0.05). Total competition score was also positively correlated with VC (r = 0.54; P < 0.05). The three highest scoring divers had the greatest spleen volumes, averaging 538 (53) mL, while the three lowest-scoring divers had a volume of 270 (71) mL (P < 0.01). VC was also greater in the high-scorers, at 7.9 (0.36) L as compared to 6.7 (0.19) L in the low scorers (P < 0.01). Spleen volume was reduced to half after 2 min of apnea in the highest scoring divers, and the estimated resting apnea time gain from the difference between high and low scorers was 15 s for spleen volume and 60 s for VC

  18. The Influence of Therapist Variance on the Dependability of Therapists' Alliance Scores: A Brief Comment on "The Dependability of Alliance Assessments: The Alliance-Outcome Correlation Is Larger than You Think" (Crits-Christoph et al., 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Scott A.; Imel, Zac E.; Atkins, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Crits-Christoph, Connolly Gibbons, Hamilton, Ring-Kurtz, and Gallop (2011) used generalizability theory to critique the measurement of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy research, showing that the dependability of alliance scores may be quite low, which in turn can lead to attenuated alliance-outcome correlation estimates. Method…

  19. Networks of military alliances, wars, and international trade.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Matthew O; Nei, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    We investigate the role of networks of alliances in preventing (multilateral) interstate wars. We first show that, in the absence of international trade, no network of alliances is peaceful and stable. We then show that international trade induces peaceful and stable networks: Trade increases the density of alliances so that countries are less vulnerable to attack and also reduces countries' incentives to attack an ally. We present historical data on wars and trade showing that the dramatic drop in interstate wars since 1950 is paralleled by a densification and stabilization of trading relationships and alliances. Based on the model we also examine some specific relationships, finding that countries with high levels of trade with their allies are less likely to be involved in wars with any other countries (including allies and nonallies), and that an increase in trade between two countries correlates with a lower chance that they will go to war with each other. PMID:26668370

  20. New US philanthropy alliance picks physicist as boss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruesi, Liz

    2015-04-01

    Marc Kastner, a physicist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has become the first president of the Science Philanthropy Alliance (SPA) - a new group of six organizations aiming to increase private funding for fundamental research in the US.

  1. National Alliance of Clean Energy Incubator Activities - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Downing, P.E.

    2004-12-14

    Summary of activity related to development of the Alliance of Clean Energy Business Incubators and incubation services provided to the clean energy sector by the Advanced Technology Development Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  2. Networks of military alliances, wars, and international trade

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Matthew O.; Nei, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of networks of alliances in preventing (multilateral) interstate wars. We first show that, in the absence of international trade, no network of alliances is peaceful and stable. We then show that international trade induces peaceful and stable networks: Trade increases the density of alliances so that countries are less vulnerable to attack and also reduces countries’ incentives to attack an ally. We present historical data on wars and trade showing that the dramatic drop in interstate wars since 1950 is paralleled by a densification and stabilization of trading relationships and alliances. Based on the model we also examine some specific relationships, finding that countries with high levels of trade with their allies are less likely to be involved in wars with any other countries (including allies and nonallies), and that an increase in trade between two countries correlates with a lower chance that they will go to war with each other. PMID:26668370

  3. FROM ME TO US: THE CONSTRUCTION OF FAMILY ALLIANCE.

    PubMed

    Galdiolo, Sarah; Roskam, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal prospective and multi-informant study based on a three-wave research program (pregnancy, 12 months' postpartum, and 16 months' postpartum) aimed to determine the process of construction of family alliance, as assessed by the Lausanne Trilogue Play (Fivaz-Depeursinge & Corboz-Warnery, 1999). A model using parents' individual characteristics (i.e., personality traits and attachment orientations) as distal variables, coparenting as a mediator, child's temperament as a moderator, and family alliance as outcome was tested using structural equation modeling on 62 nonreferred families. Results showed that both parents' conscientiousness was positively and mothers' avoidant attachment and fathers' anxious attachment were negatively and indirectly (via coparenting) associated with the family alliance. The discussion underlines mothers' and fathers' different roles and the importance of coparenting as a core mechanism in the development of family alliance. PMID:26715070

  4. NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - Tutorials and Seminar Series

    Cancer.gov

    View details about tutorials and seminars hosted by Alliance members and members of the cancer research community. These events provide a forum for sharing innovative perspectives on research and development efforts in the field of nanotechnology and their application to cancer diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Also visit the Event Listing section to find scientific meetings and events where NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer leaders and members are participating.

  5. The relationship between diver experience levels and perceptions of attractiveness of artificial reefs - examination of a potential management tool.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E; Wheeler, Philip M; Johnson, Magnus L

    2013-01-01

    Artificial reefs are increasingly used worldwide as a method for managing recreational diving since they have the potential to satisfy both conservation goals and economic interests. In order to help maximize their utility, further information is needed to drive the design of stimulating resources for scuba divers. We used a questionnaire survey to explore divers' perceptions of artificial reefs in Barbados. In addition, we examined reef resource substitution behaviour among scuba divers. Divers expressed a clear preference for large shipwrecks or sunken vessels that provided a themed diving experience. Motives for diving on artificial reefs were varied, but were dominated by the chance of viewing concentrated marine life, increased photographic opportunities, and the guarantee of a 'good dive'. Satisfaction with artificial reef diving was high amongst novices and declined with increasing experience. Experienced divers had an overwhelming preference for natural reefs. As a management strategy, our results emphasize the capacity of well designed artificial reefs to contribute towards the management of coral reef diving sites and highlight a number of important areas for future research. Suggested work should validate the present findings in different marine tourism settings and ascertain support of artificial reefs in relationship to level of diver specialization. PMID:23894372

  6. Patent Foramen Ovale in Recreational and Professional Divers: An Important and Largely Unrecognized Problem.

    PubMed

    Honěk, Jakub; Šefc, Luděk; Honěk, Tomáš; Šrámek, Martin; Horváth, Martin; Veselka, Josef

    2015-08-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in divers that results from a paradoxical embolization of nitrogen bubbles. The number of scuba divers worldwide is estimated in the millions, and the prevalence of PFO is 25%-30% in adults. It is interesting that despite these numbers, many important issues regarding optimal screening, risk stratification, and management strategy still remain to be resolved. Recently published data suggest the possible effectiveness of both PFO closure and conservative diving measures in preventing arterial gas embolization. This review aims to introduce the basic principles of physiology and the pathophysiology of bubble formation and DCS, summarize the current literature on PFO and diving, and review the possibilities of diagnostic workup and management. PMID:26143138

  7. [Neurological decompression illness in a Japanese breath-held diver: a case report].

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Ryu; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Kitazono, Takanari

    2012-01-01

    We report a Japanese breath-hold diver (Ama) who presented neurological disorders after diving. He repeated diving into 25-30 meters depth in the sea for 6 hours. After diving, he felt dizziness and unsteady gait. Neurological examination showed left quadrant hemianopia, bilateral limb ataxia and ataxic gait. Head CT revealed gas bubbles in the left parietal lobe. In CT scan on 3 days after onset, gas bubbles disappeared and low density areas were observed in the bilateral parietal lobes. Brain imaging (DWI, T(2)WI and FLAIR) demonstrated high intensity in the parieto-occipital lobes. Neither pulmonary barotrauma nor intracardiac shunt was detected. He was diagnosed as having neurological decompression illness and therefore underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The pathogenesis of this case was considered to be microbubbles induced by decompression. The present case suggests that repetitive rapid surfacing from the deep sea causes neurological decompression illness even in the breath-hold diver. PMID:23064626

  8. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory.

    PubMed

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction) while also being open to others (participation). Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors) can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. We draw the conclusion that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications. PMID:25954215

  9. Alliance: a common factor of psychotherapy modeled by structural theory

    PubMed Central

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Haken, Hermann; Kyselo, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    There is broad consensus that the therapeutic alliance constitutes a core common factor for all modalities of psychotherapy. Meta-analyses corroborated that alliance, as it emerges from therapeutic process, is a significant predictor of therapy outcome. Psychotherapy process is traditionally described and explored using two categorically different approaches, the experiential (first-person) perspective and the behavioral (third-person) perspective. We propose to add to this duality a third, structural approach. Dynamical systems theory and synergetics on the one hand and enactivist theory on the other together can provide this structural approach, which contributes in specific ways to a clarification of the alliance factor. Systems theory offers concepts and tools for the modeling of the individual self and, building on this, of alliance processes. In the enactive perspective, the self is conceived as a socially enacted autonomous system that strives to maintain identity by observing a two-fold goal: to exist as an individual self in its own right (distinction) while also being open to others (participation). Using this conceptualization, we formalized the therapeutic alliance as a phase space whose potential minima (attractors) can be shifted by the therapist to approximate therapy goals. This mathematical formalization is derived from probability theory and synergetics. We draw the conclusion that structural theory provides powerful tools for the modeling of how therapeutic change is staged by the formation, utilization, and dissolution of the therapeutic alliance. In addition, we point out novel testable hypotheses and future applications. PMID:25954215

  10. Sink fast and swim harder! Round-trip cost-of-transport for buoyant divers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patrick J O; Biuw, Martin; Watanabe, Yuuki Y; Thompson, Dave; Fedak, Mike A

    2012-10-15

    Efficient locomotion between prey resources at depth and oxygen at the surface is crucial for breath-hold divers to maximize time spent in the foraging layer, and thereby net energy intake rates. The body density of divers, which changes with body condition, determines the apparent weight (buoyancy) of divers, which may affect round-trip cost-of-transport (COT) between the surface and depth. We evaluated alternative predictions from external-work and actuator-disc theory of how non-neutral buoyancy affects round-trip COT to depth, and the minimum COT speed for steady-state vertical transit. Not surprisingly, the models predict that one-way COT decreases (increases) when buoyancy aids (hinders) one-way transit. At extreme deviations from neutral buoyancy, gliding at terminal velocity is the minimum COT strategy in the direction aided by buoyancy. In the transit direction hindered by buoyancy, the external-work model predicted that minimum COT speeds would not change at greater deviations from neutral buoyancy, but minimum COT speeds were predicted to increase under the actuator disc model. As previously documented for grey seals, we found that vertical transit rates of 36 elephant seals increased in both directions as body density deviated from neutral buoyancy, indicating that actuator disc theory may more closely predict the power requirements of divers affected by gravity than an external work model. For both models, minor deviations from neutral buoyancy did not affect minimum COT speed or round-trip COT itself. However, at body-density extremes, both models predict that savings in the aided direction do not fully offset the increased COT imposed by the greater thrusting required in the hindered direction. PMID:23014571

  11. Acute and potentially persistent effects of scuba diving on the blood transcriptome of experienced divers.

    PubMed

    Eftedal, Ingrid; Ljubkovic, Marko; Flatberg, Arnar; Jørgensen, Arve; Brubakk, Alf O; Dujic, Zeljko

    2013-10-16

    During scuba diving, the circulatory system is stressed by an elevated partial pressure of oxygen while the diver is submerged and by decompression-induced gas bubbles on ascent to the surface. This diving-induced stress may trigger decompression illness, but the majority of dives are asymptomatic. In this study we have mapped divers' blood transcriptomes with the aim of identifying genes, biological pathways, and cell types perturbed by the physiological stress in asymptomatic scuba diving. Ten experienced divers abstained from diving for >2 wk before performing a 3-day series of daily dives to 18 m depth for 47 min while breathing compressed air. Blood for microarray analysis was collected before and immediately after the first and last dives, and 10 matched nondivers provided controls for predive stationary transcriptomes. MetaCore GeneGo analysis of the predive samples identified stationary upregulation of genes associated with apoptosis, inflammation, and innate immune responses in the divers, most significantly involving genes in the TNFR1 pathway of caspase-dependent apoptosis, HSP60/HSP70 signaling via TLR4, and NF-κB-mediated transcription. Diving caused pronounced shifts in transcription patterns characteristic of specific leukocytes, with downregulation of genes expressed by CD8+ T lymphocytes and NK cells and upregulation of genes expressed by neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages. Antioxidant genes were upregulated. Similar transient responses were observed after the first and last dive. The results indicate that sublethal oxidative stress elicits the myeloid innate immune system in scuba diving and that extensive diving may cause persistent change in pathways controlling apoptosis, inflammation, and innate immune responses. PMID:23964024

  12. Reversible myocardial dysfunction and clinical outcome in scuba divers with immersion pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Louge, Pierre; Henckes, Anne; Demaistre, Sebastien; Heno, Phillipe; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2013-06-01

    Immersion pulmonary edema in scuba divers is a rare disorder that tends to recur and can be potentially fatal, even in the absence of underlying cardiac disease. Anecdotal cases of reversible myocardial dysfunction have been described in this setting, but little is known of its pathogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to determine the clinical outcomes and the determinants associated with this condition. The data from 54 consecutive divers admitted for acute immersion pulmonary edema during a 5.5-year period were retrospectively studied. A diagnosis of myocardial dysfunction was established by the presence of elevated cardiac troponin T levels, coupled with electrocardiographic changes and/or wall motion abnormalities on the echocardiogram. The demographic, clinical, biologic, and diving characteristics were tested as potential predictors of this disorder. All the patients had complete resolution of symptoms within 72 hours, but 3 required intensive ventilation or hemodynamic support at admission. Reversible myocardial dysfunction was observed in 28% and was associated more with age >50 years (odds ratio [OR] 5.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.5 to 21, p = 0.013), hypertension (OR 8.2, 95% CI 2.1 to 32, p = 0.002), diabetes (OR 22.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 458; p = 0.002), and release of natriuretic peptides (OR 9.1, 95% CI 2.4 to 35, p = 0.001). Follow-up investigations at 1 month were obtained for 49 patients and revealed a significant number of patients with occult hypertension. In conclusion, reversible myocardial dysfunction is not uncommon in divers with immersion pulmonary edema. The short-term overall prognosis is not adversely altered, but severe heart failure with a fatal outcome is unpredictable. Close monitoring of older divers with latent cardiovascular risk factors is warranted. PMID:23497776

  13. STS-55 MS2 Precourt is assisted by divers during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-55 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and clamshell helmet, is pulled through the water by two SCUBA-equipped divers during launch emergency egress (bailout) training at JSC. The Weightless Environment Training Facility's (WETF's) 25-foot deep pool served as the ocean as Precourt and other crewmembers familiarized themselves with water survival procedures.

  14. Navy hearing conservation program: hearing threshold comparisons to Navy SEALS and divers.

    PubMed

    Bohnker, B; Rovig, G; Page, J; Philippi, A; Butler, F; Sack, D

    2003-01-01

    The study examined hearing threshold for Navy special operations personnel (SEALS (Sea-Air-Land): N = 212; divers: N = 165). Hearing threshold values were obtained and age adjusted using Mantel Haenzel Weighted odds ratio (MHOR) to compare with information in the Navy Hearing Conservation Database. For any threshold above 20 dB in the 500 through 3000 Hz range, the SEALS were significantly less at risk (MHOR = 0.54, p = 0.022) in the right ear, while the divers were significantly less at risk in the left ear (MHOR = 0.61, p = 0.047). For hearing thresholds at 4000 Hz above 40 dB, SEALS were significantly more at risk in both left ear (MHOR = 2.03, p = 0.0043) and right ear (MHOR = 2.58, p = 0.000089), while divers were not different. Risk assessment based on these findings must consider the multiple exposure hazards and critical mission profiles for the Navy special operations personnel. Requirements for mission accomplishment in hazardous environments may deem these risks acceptable. PMID:12964859

  15. Noise exposure of commercial divers in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Nedwell, J R; Mason, T I; Collett, A G; Gardiner, R W K

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that exposure to high noise levels can adversely affect human hearing. Legislation exists in Europe to control or restrict the level of noise to which employees may be exposed during the course of their work. While the noise levels to which a worker may be exposed is well defined in air, human sensitivity to noise is different in high-pressure and mixed-gas conditions. Relatively little research exists to define human hearing in these circumstances, and few measurements exist of the levels of noise to which divers working in these conditions are exposed. A study using specially designed equipment has been undertaken in Norwegian waters to sample the noise levels present during typical saturation dives undertaken by commercial divers working in the Norwegian oil and gas industry. The divers were working in heliox at depths of 30 msw and 120 msw. It found noise levels were generally dominated by self-noise: flow noise while breathing and communications. The noise levels, both when corrected for the difference in hearing sensitivity under pressure in mixed gas and uncorrected, would exceed legislated limits for noise exposure in a working day without the use of noisy tools. PMID:26094290

  16. In situ applications of a new diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler.

    PubMed

    Weber, Miriam; Faerber, Paul; Meyer, Volker; Lott, Christian; Eickert, Gabriele; Fabricius, Katharina E; De Beer, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    Microsensors are powerful tools for microenvironment studies, however their use has often been restricted to laboratory applications due to the lack of adequate equipment for in situ deployments. Here we report on new features, construction details, and examples of applications of an improved diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler for underwater field operation to a water depth of 25 m. The new motorized profiler has a final precision of 5 microm, and can accommodate amperometric Clark-type microsensors for oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, potentiometric microsensors (e.g., for pH, Ca2+), and fiber-optic irradiance microsensors. The profiler is interfaced by a logger with a signal display, and has pushbuttons for underwater operation. The system can be pre-programmed to autonomous operation or interactively operated by divers. Internal batteries supply power for up to 24 h of measurements and 36 h of data storage (max. 64 million data points). Two flexible stands were developed for deployment on uneven or fragile surfaces, such as coral reefs. Three experimental pilot studies are presented, where (1) the oxygen distribution in a sand ripple was 3-D-mapped, (2) the microenvironment of sediment accumulated on a stony coral was studied, and (3) oxygen dynamics during an experimental sedimentation were investigated. This system allows SCUBA divers to perform a wide array of in situ measurements, with deployment precision and duration similar to those possible in the laboratory. PMID:17937304

  17. Cardio-ventilatory responses to poikilocapnic hypoxia and hypercapnia in trained breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Costalat, Guillaume; Pichon, Aurélien; Coquart, Jeremy; Bauer, Fabrice; Lemaître, Frédéric

    2014-02-01

    Trained breath-hold divers (BHDs) are exposed to repeated bouts of intermittent hypoxia and hypercapnia during prolonged breath-holding. It has thus been hypothesized that their specific training may develop enhanced chemo-responsiveness to hypoxia associated with reduced ventilatory response to hypercapnia. Hypercapnic ventilatory responses (HCVR) and hypoxic ventilatory responses at rest (HVRr) and exercise (HVRe) were assessed in BHDs (n=7) and a control group of non-divers (NDs=7). Cardiac output (CO), stroke volume (SV) and heart rate (HR) were also recorded. BHDs presented carbon dioxide sensitivity similar to that of NDs (2.85±1.41 vs. 1.85±0.93Lmin(-1)mmHg(-1), p>0.05, respectively). However, both HVRr (+68%) and HVRe (+31%) were increased in BHDs. CO and HR reached lower values in BHDs than NDs during the hypoxic exercise test. These results suggest that the exposure to repeated bouts of hypoxia/hypercapnia frequently experienced by trained breath-hold divers only enhances their chemo-responsiveness to poikilocapnic hypoxia, without altering HCVR. PMID:24341998

  18. Dyspnea in divers at 49.5 ATA: mechanical, not chemical in origin.

    PubMed

    Spaur, W H; Raymond, L W; Knott, M M; Crothers, J C; Braithwaite, W R; Thalmann, E D; Uddin, D F

    1977-06-01

    Pulmonary function was studied in six divers living in a hyperbaric chamber at a pressure nearly fifty times normal (49.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), equivalent to 488 m or 1600 ft seawater (fsw)). As expected, ventilatory function was reduced. At 49.5 ATA, maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) was 45% less than the control value. Instantaneous rates of gas flow during forced expiration were similarly reduced, especially those flow rates measured high in the lung volume. These reductions occurred despite an apparent increase in functional residual capacity (FRC) and the use of transpulmonary pressures considerably greater than those exerted during the same maneuvers at normal (sea-level) pressure. During underwater work at 49.5 ATA, the divers rapidly became exhausted at moderate levels of oxygen consumption (1.9 liters/min), showing severe dyspnea and impending syncope. These symptoms were not due to retention of carbon dioxide, nor to hemodynamic or metabolic causes. Thus, dense gas breathing, like asthma, exemplifies a state in which severe dyspnea may occur with normal or low arterial carbon dioxide and normal oxygen transport. The physiological adjustments the divers employed were similar to those seen in acute asthma, imposing an elastic load in addition to the flow-resistive work of breathing a gas mixture eight times as dense as air. Although men can do moderate work under conditions similar to those of this experiment, they will have only a limited physiological reserve available to meet the possibilities of emergencies or respiratory infections. PMID:878071

  19. Electrocardiographic aspects of deep dives in elite breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, F; Lafay, V; Taylor, M; Costalat, G; Gardette, B

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac diving response, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and the prevalence, time of onset, and possible associations of cardiac arrhythmias were examined during deep breath-hold (BH) dives. Nine elite BH divers (33.2 +/- 3.6 years; mean +/- SD) performed one constant-weight dive of at least 75% of their best personal performance (70 +/- 7 meters for 141 +/- 22 seconds) wearing a 12-lead ECG Holter monitor. Diving parameters (depth and time), oxygen saturation (SaO2), blood lactate concentration and ventilatory parameters were also recorded. Bradycardia during these dives was pronounced (52.2 +/- 12.2%), with heart rates dropping to 46 +/- 10 beats/minute. The diving reflex was strong, overriding the stimulus of muscular exercise during the ascent phase of the dive for all divers. Classical arrhythmias occurred, mainly after surfacing, and some conduction alterations were detected at the bottom of the dives. The BH divers did not show any right shift of the QRS electrical axis during their dives. PMID:23682546

  20. Proposal on limits for chemical exposure in saturation divers' working atmosphere: the case of benzene.

    PubMed

    Djurhuus, Rune; Nossum, Vibeke; Øvrebø, Steinar; Skaug, Vidar

    2012-03-01

    Saturation diving is performed under extreme environmental conditions. The divers are confined to a limited space for several weeks under high environmental pressure and elevated oxygen partial pressure. At present, divers are protected against chemical exposure by standard exposure limits only adjusted for the increased exposure length, i.e. from 8 to 24 hours a day and from 5 to 7 days a week. The objective of the present study was to indicate a procedure for derivation of occupational exposure limits for saturation diving, termed hyperbaric exposure limits (HEL). Using benzene as an example, a procedure is described that includes identification of the latest key documents, extensive literature search with defined exclusion criteria for the literature retrieved. Hematotoxicity and leukemia were defined as the critical effects, and exposure limits based upon concentration and cumulative exposure data and corresponding risks of leukemia were calculated. Possible interactions of high pressure, elevated pO₂, and continuous exposure have been assessed, and incorporated in a final suggestion of a HEL for benzene. The procedure should be applicable for other relevant chemicals in the divers' breathing atmosphere. It is emphasized that the lack of interactions from pressure and oxygen indicated for benzene may be completely different for other chemicals. PMID:22304480

  1. What Do Chinese and Foreign Universities Value about Their Strategic Alliances? Exploring a Dimension of Higher Education Alliances in a Cross Cultural Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mike

    2003-01-01

    There are now over 5,000 alliances between Chinese and foreign universities but there is little research on how managers from the two sides value the various aspects of their educational alliances. This research finds that both sides valued a range of alliance levels, types, activities, sizes and structures but there were significant differences.…

  2. Alliance for Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research & Education

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Hilary

    2013-09-01

    The Sequestration Training, Outreach, Research and Education (STORE) Alliance at The University of Texas at Austin completed its activity under Department of Energy Funding (DE- FE0002254) on September 1, 2013. The program began as a partnership between the Institute for Geophysics, the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Department at UT. The initial vision of the program was to promote better understanding of CO2 utilization and storage science and engineering technology through programs and opportunities centered on training, outreach, research and technology transfer, and education. With over 8,000 hrs of formal training and education (and almost 4,500 of those hours awarded as continuing education credits) to almost 1,100 people, STORE programs and activities have provided benefits to the Carbon Storage Program of the Department of Energy by helping to build a skilled workforce for the future CCS and larger energy industry, and fostering scientific public literacy needed to continue the U.S. leadership position in climate change mitigation and energy technologies and application. Now in sustaining mode, the program is housed at the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and benefits from partnerships with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center, TOPCORP and other programs at the university receiving industry funding.

  3. Japanese contributions to International Planetary Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yukio; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Hirata, Naru; Shinohara, Iku

    2012-07-01

    In this presentation, we will introduce Japanese contributions to the data archives for international collaborations. In Japan, the importance of planetary data archive was not recognized enough until early in 2000's. While NASA and ESA started their collaborations to their archives: PDS and PSA, and tried to make the new standard, JAXA was looking for the way of contributions because Japan did not have own data and archiving policy. The activities of NASA and ESA extended to the international collaborations, and International Planetary Data Alliance was established. JAXA had an opportunity to join the IPDA as an agency member. One of the contributions, the IPDA chairman was undertaken by Japanese member. The projects in IPDA were managed and were proceeded successfully during the term. For the technical part, JAXA is making several pilot systems to share planetary data. Planetary Data Access Protocol, PDAP, developed by IPDA, is implemented in JAXA's system, and provides a search system for Hayabusa and Kaguya (SELENE) data. Not only for Japanese data, but also Apollo's seismic data archives are prepared for scientific communities. The seismic data on the moon has not been measured for a long time, and Apollo's data are still precious and should be archived together with much information. The contributions to planetary data archives has just started and continues as a member of IPDA.

  4. Alliances for Undergraduate Research in the Geosciences Through Collaborative Recruitment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R.; Eriksson, S.; Haacker-Santos, R.; Calhoun, A.

    2006-12-01

    Undergraduate research is a key strategy for encouraging students to pursue graduate school and careers in science end engineering. In the geosciences, where participation by members of underrepresented groups is among the lowest of any science field, these programs must continue and strengthen their efforts to engage students from historically underrepresented groups. A significant limitation on our ability to engage students from historically underrepresented groups comes from the expense, in terms of time and resources, of promoting these career options to talented undergraduates considering a host of STEM careers. Another hurdle is our ability to match students with research projects tailored to their interests. Further complicating this is the challenge of matching students who have culturally motivated geographic constraints—for example, Native students who seek to serve their local community—to relevant opportunities. As a result, we believe that a number of highly qualified students never fully consider careers in the geosciences. To address these obstacles, we propose an alliance of undergraduate research programs in the geosciences. In this model, all members of the alliance would share recruiting, and students would submit a single application forwarded to all alliance members. The Alliance could offer applicants multiple research opportunities, from across the alliance, tailored to fit the applicant's needs and interests. This strategy has proven very effective in other fields; for example, the Leadership Alliance allows 32 member institutions to offer internships and fellowships through one central application process. SOARS and RESESS, programs in atmospheric science and geophysics, respectively, have done this co-recruiting for two years. There are many benefits to this type of alliance. First, it would allow programs to leverage and coordinate their recruiting investments. From our experience with SOARS and RESESS, much of the effort in

  5. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral "Lesions" and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    PubMed

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p < 0.05) and Symbol-Digit-Substitution (SDS; p < 0.01). Compared to subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents, divers scored similar on DSB and SDS tests, but significantly better on the Simple Reaction Time (REA) and Hand-Eye Coordination (EYE) tests. There was no correlation between PFO, number of UBO's and any of the neuro-psychometric tests. We conclude that for

  6. Strategic Classification and Examination of the Development of Current Airline Alliance Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhi H.; Evans, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Previous research argues that despite the fact that strategic alliances have become an important feature of the world airline industry, little rigorous analysis has been done on the effects of these alliances. This is partially because there is a lack of precise definitions to specify different types of airline alliances in the literature. This research identifies several categories of airline alliances through a strategic classification of the current alliance activities involving the major airlines for the period 1989 to 1999. The classification enables this research to examine how strategic alliance activities are evolving, particularly to compare how airlines in North America, the European Union and the Asia Pacific region have committed to different alliances. Findings show that there is a significant difference between the number and scope of alliances adopted in the three aviation markets. These findings facilitate research to further analyse the impact of market liberalization on various formations of strategic airline alliances.

  7. Within treatment therapeutic alliance ratings profiles predict posttreatment frequency of alcohol use

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Mark A.; Connors, Gerard J.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Dearing, Ronda L.

    2016-01-01

    While past research has demonstrated a positive relationship between the therapeutic alliance (TA) and improved drinking outcomes, specific aspects of the alliance have received less attention. In this study, we examined the association between alliance characteristics during treatment and 4-month follow-up drinking reports. 65 treatment-seeking alcohol dependent clients who participated in 12 weeks of individual outpatient treatment provided weekly TA ratings during treatment and reported on pre-treatment, during treatment, and post-treatment alcohol use. Latent profile analysis was conducted to discern distinct profiles of client and therapist ratings of therapeutic alliance with similar alliance characteristics. TA profiles were based on clients’ and therapists’ mean alliance rating, minimum alliance rating, maximum alliance rating, the range of alliance ratings, and the difference in session number between maximum and minimum alliance ratings. 1- through 4- class models were fit to the data. Model fit was judged by comparative fit indices, substantive interpretability, and parsimony. Wald tests of mean equality determined whether classes differed on follow-up percentage of days abstinent (PDA) at 4 months posttreatment. 3-profile solutions provided the best fit for both client and therapist ratings of the therapeutic alliance. Client alliance rating profiles predicted drinking in the follow-up period, but therapist rating profiles did not. These results suggest that distinct profiles of the therapeutic alliance can be identified and that client alliance rating profiles are associated with frequency of alcohol use following outpatient treatment. PMID:26999350

  8. Child, caregiver, and therapist perspectives on therapeutic alliance in usual care child psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Accurso, Erin C.; Garland, Ann F.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the temporal stability and cross-informant agreement on multiple perspectives of child and caregiver alliance with therapists in usual care psychotherapy. Baseline predictors of alliance were also examined. Children with disruptive behavior problems (n=209) and their caregivers were followed for up to 16 months after initiating psychotherapy at a community-based clinic. Alliance was rated by children, caregivers, and therapists every four months for as long as families participated in treatment. Repeated-measures analyses using linear mixed models with random intercepts were conducted to determine whether child and caregiver alliance differed across time, as well to examine factors associated with each perspective on alliance. Intraclass correlations (ICCs) between child, caregiver, and therapist reports of alliance were also examined. Alliance was rated relatively high overall across perspectives. Clients (children and caregivers) tended to report the strongest and most stable alliance, while therapists reported the weakest alliance and perceived deteriorations in child alliance over time. Inter-informant agreement was variable for child and caregiver alliance; agreement was moderate between clients and therapists. Several predictors of alliance emerged, including child gender, anxiety diagnosis, caregiver race/ethnicity, and therapist experience. This study provides methodological information about reports of therapeutic alliance across time and informants that can inform current efforts to understand the alliance-outcome association. PMID:25314097

  9. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    King, Jessica M.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D

  10. Phenotypes and Virulence among Staphylococcus aureus USA100, USA200, USA300, USA400, and USA600 Clonal Lineages.

    PubMed

    King, Jessica M; Kulhankova, Katarina; Stach, Christopher S; Vu, Bao G; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus diseases affect ~500,000 individuals per year in the United States. Worldwide, the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages cause many of the life-threatening S. aureus infections, such as bacteremia, infective endocarditis, pneumonia, toxic shock syndrome, and surgical site infections. However, the virulence mechanisms associated with these clonal lineages, in particular the USA100 and USA600 isolates, have been severely understudied. We investigated the virulence of these strains, in addition to strains in the USA200, USA300, and USA400 types, in well-established in vitro assays and in vivo in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. We show in the infective endocarditis and sepsis model that strains in the USA100 and USA600 lineages cause high lethality and are proficient in causing native valve infective endocarditis. Strains with high cytolytic activity or producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) or staphylococcal enterotoxin C (SEC) caused lethal sepsis, even with low cytolytic activity. Strains in the USA100, USA200, USA400, and USA600 lineages consistently contained genes that encode for the enterotoxin gene cluster proteins, SEC, or TSST-1 and were proficient at causing infective endocarditis, while the USA300 strains lacked these toxins and were deficient in promoting vegetation growth. The USA100, USA200, and USA400 strains in our collection formed strong biofilms in vitro, whereas the USA200 and USA600 strains exhibited increased blood survival. Hence, infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis are multifactorial and not intrinsic to any one individual clonal group, further highlighting the importance of expanding our knowledge of S. aureus pathogenesis to clonal lineages causative of invasive disease. IMPORTANCE S. aureus is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in the developed world, affecting ~40,000 individuals each year in the United States, and the second leading cause of bacteremia (D. R

  11. Strategic alliances for the future of the gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Catell, R.B.

    1993-12-31

    The natural gas industry is in a position to benefit significantly from the inherent environmental advantages of natural gas and access to a large reserves base. Concurrently, the domestic natural gas industry will be undergoing extensive regulatory and structural changes in the coming years as a result of the implementation of FERC Order 636. The competition between fuels is intensifying, and the number of new market players and consumer demands are rising. As all sectors of the industry are facing new risk resulting from changes in access to storage, balancing, excess capacity, capacity release programs, and from the entry of gas marketers and aggregators, companies must increasingly rely on strategic alliances to remain competitive and stable. Strategic alliances are cooperative relationships between gas companies, pipelines, end-users, producers, marketers, as well as government bodies and labor unions. The principal goals of strategic alliances are to reduce risks, leverage resources and competitiveness, achieve long-term objectives, and build flexibility. Brooklyn Union has been involved in strategic alliances in the areas of (1) exploration, production, and supply; (2) transportation and storage; (3) marketing and market development; (4) regulatory and legislative activities; and (5) environmental activities. These alliances have allowed Brooklyn Union to diversify its gas supply, cooperatively support new pipelines, introduce new products and services, retain customers, generate new business, and assist in the enactment of reasonable Federal and State regulations and energy policies. Brooklyn Union recognizes that in the future the natural gas industry must continue to form strategic alliances to better serve the customer. Through strategic alliances the industry can increase the value and importance of natural gas as America`s premier energy source.

  12. Prevention of Injury and Violence in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Haegerich, Tamara M; Dahlberg, Linda L; Simon, Thomas R; Baldwin, Grant T; Sleet, David A; Greenspan, Arlene I

    2015-01-01

    In the first three decades of life, more individuals in the USA die from injuries and violence than from any other cause. Millions more people survive and are left with physical, emotional, and financial problems. Injuries and violence are not accidents; they are preventable. Prevention has a strong scientific foundation, yet efforts are not fully implemented or integrated into clinical and community settings. In this Series paper, we review the burden of injuries and violence in the USA, note effective interventions, and discuss methods to bring interventions into practice. Alliances between the public health community and medical care organisations, health-care providers, states, and communities can reduce injuries and violence. We encourage partnerships between medical and public health communities to consistently frame injuries and violence as preventable, identify evidence-based interventions, provide scientific information to decision makers, and strengthen the capacity of an integrated health system to prevent injuries and violence. PMID:24996591

  13. The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Thomas; Gopala Krishna, Barla; Crichton, Daniel J.

    2016-07-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is a close association of partners with the aim of improving the quality of planetary science data and services to the end users of space based instrumentation. The specific mission of the IPDA is to facilitate global access to, and exchange of, high quality scientific data products managed across international boundaries. Ensuring proper capture, accessibility and availability of the data is the task of the individual member space agencies. The IPDA is focused on developing an international standard that allows discovery, query, access, and usage of such data across international planetary data archive systems. While trends in other areas of space science are concentrating on the sharing of science data from diverse standards and collection methods, the IPDA concentrates on promoting governing data standards that drive common methods for collecting and describing planetary science data across the international community. This approach better supports the long term goal of easing data sharing across system and agency boundaries. An initial starting point for developing such a standard will be internationalization of NASA's Planetary Data System's (PDS) PDS4 standard. The IPDA was formed in 2006 with the purpose of adopting standards and developing collaborations across agencies to ensure data is captured in common formats. It has grown to a dozen member agencies represented by a number of different groups through the IPDA Steering Committee. Member agencies include: Armenian Astronomical Society, China National Space Agency (CNSA), European Space Agency (ESA), German Aerospace Center (DLR), Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO), Italian Space Agency (ASI), Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), National Air and Space Administration (NASA), National Centre for Space Studies (CNES), Space Research Institute (IKI), UAE Space Agency, and UK Space Agency. The IPDA Steering Committee oversees the execution of

  14. Final report : PATTON Alliance gazetteer evaluation project.

    SciTech Connect

    Bleakly, Denise Rae

    2007-08-01

    In 2005 the National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC) proposed that the PATTON Alliance provide assistance in evaluating and obtaining the Integrated Gazetteer Database (IGDB), developed for the Naval Space Warfare Command Research group (SPAWAR) under Advance Research and Development Activity (ARDA) funds by MITRE Inc., fielded to the text-based search tool GeoLocator, currently in use by NGIC. We met with the developers of GeoLocator and identified their requirements for a better gazetteer. We then validated those requirements by reviewing the technical literature, meeting with other members of the intelligence community (IC), and talking with both the United States Geologic Survey (USGS) and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency (NGA), the authoritative sources for official geographic name information. We thus identified 12 high-level requirements from users and the broader intelligence community. The IGDB satisfies many of these requirements. We identified gaps and proposed ways of closing these gaps. Three important needs have not been addressed but are critical future needs for the broader intelligence community. These needs include standardization of gazetteer data, a web feature service for gazetteer information that is maintained by NGA and USGS but accessible to users, and a common forum that brings together IC stakeholders and federal agency representatives to provide input to these activities over the next several years. Establishing a robust gazetteer web feature service that is available to all IC users may go a long way toward resolving the gazetteer needs within the IC. Without a common forum to provide input and feedback, community adoption may take significantly longer than anticipated with resulting risks to the war fighter.

  15. The Role of Therapeutic Alliance in Mindfulness Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Simon B.; Davis, James M.; Hoyt, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mindfulness-based interventions have enjoyed a marked increase in support within biomedical and psychological research and practice in the past two decades. Despite the widespread application of these treatments for a range of psychological and medical conditions, there remains a lack of consensus regarding mechanisms through which these interventions effect change. One plausible yet underexplored mechanism is the therapeutic alliance between participants and mindfulness instructors. Methods In this report, data are presented on therapeutic alliance from the mindfulness arm (n = 37) of a randomized controlled trial of a mindfulness-based smoking cessation treatment. Results Results suggest that client-reported therapeutic alliance measured mid-treatment did not significantly predict primary smoking outcomes. Alliance did predict improvement in post-treatment scores on several outcome variables linked to mindfulness practice, including emotion regulation (β =−.24, p = .042), mindfulness (β = .33, p = .007), negative affect (β = −.33, p = .040), as well as treatment compliance (β = .39, p = .011). Conclusion Implications of these relationships and the possible role of therapeutic alliance in mindfulness treatments are explored. PMID:23775222

  16. Environmental planning for oil and gas projects in alliance organizations

    SciTech Connect

    Hanley, P.T.; Campbell, G.R.B.; Wuestenfield, K.S.

    1996-12-31

    Oil companies are increasingly adopting the {open_quotes}alliance{close_quotes} organization to develop innovative engineering solutions to make projects economic in an industry characterized by global opportunities and competition for investment dollars. This structure involves strategic contractual relationships between companies and contractors. On Alaska`s North Slope, BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. has formed alliances to engineer and develop its Badami and Northstar oil fields. These fields are small in comparison to Prudhoe Bay and Endicott and their economics cannot support high capital and operating costs. Costs, reserves, and permits are the three major building blocks of a successful oil development project. The alliance structure presents some special challenges and opportunities in successfully designing an environmentally sensitive project rd obtaining permits. On the Badami project, permitting has required that alliance members, the regulators, and BPXA environmental personnel develop a mutual understanding and reaction of engineering and environmental constraints and opportunities. Part of the communications challenge has resulted from the differing mandates and boundaries of the alliance and the external requirements of environmental laws and regulations. The lessons learned on Badami have been adopted in environmental planning and permitting the Northstar project.

  17. Therapeutic alliance and binge-eating outcomes in a group therapy context.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Compare, Angelo; Zarbo, Cristina; Brugnera, Agostino

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic alliance in individual and group psychotherapy is associated with treatment outcomes for a variety of disorders. However, debate persists about the centrality of the alliance in determining positive outcomes. We examined the alliance-outcome relationship across 20 sessions of emotionally focused group therapy (EFGT) for binge-eating disorder (BED). We hypothesized that (1) previous session alliance increase will predict lower subsequent session binge eating level while controlling for previous session binge eating level; and (2) previous session binge eating decline will predict higher subsequent session alliance level while controlling previous session alliance level. Participants were 118 individuals with BED who received 20 sessions of EFGT in 8 groups. Levels of binge eating and therapeutic alliance to the therapist were measured weekly. Linear growth in alliance during group therapy was associated with reduced binge eating at 6 months' posttreatment. We also found that the group's and the individual's alliance scores and binge-eating episodes were significantly associated across treatment, suggesting a mutual influence of the group's and individual's experience of the alliance with the therapist. Regarding the first hypothesis, previous session alliance increase was significantly associated with lower subsequent session binge eating. Regarding the second hypothesis, previous session binge-eating decline was not significantly related to higher subsequent session alliance. The findings provide evidence in a group therapy context for a model in which alliance change influences subsequent symptom levels, but not the other way around. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27182894

  18. Use of Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) to detect sub-clinical inner ear damage in divers of the Indian Navy

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Dilip; Khan, Shazia

    2014-01-01

    Background Professional Divers are at a high risk of Sensorineural Hearing Impairment. Divers may sustain sub-clinical hearing loss that is not identified on pure tone audiometry (PTA). Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) reflect the functional status of the Outer Hair Cells. OAE testing constitutes the only non-invasive means of objective cochlear investigation and may be a more sensitive measure than PTA in identifying sub-clinical hearing loss. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed to determine utility of Otoacoustic Emissions testing in detecting sub-clinical Inner Ear damage in divers of Indian Navy. Transient Evoked Otoacoustic Emissions (TEOAE) levels were measured in 50 audiologically asymptomatic ship divers of Indian Navy and compared with control group comprising of 50 normal hearing individuals. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between the study and control group. Also no correlation was observed between diving years and TEOAE levels. There was no correlation greater than −0.49 between diving years and TEOAE SNR. Conclusions We concluded that TEOAE levels are not a sensitive tool in identifying ships divers without any history of noise exposure at risk for developing hearing loss. PMID:25382908

  19. The Relationship between Diver Experience Levels and Perceptions of Attractiveness of Artificial Reefs - Examination of a Potential Management Tool

    PubMed Central

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E.; Wheeler, Philip M.; Johnson, Magnus L.

    2013-01-01

    Artificial reefs are increasingly used worldwide as a method for managing recreational diving since they have the potential to satisfy both conservation goals and economic interests. In order to help maximize their utility, further information is needed to drive the design of stimulating resources for scuba divers. We used a questionnaire survey to explore divers’ perceptions of artificial reefs in Barbados. In addition, we examined reef resource substitution behaviour among scuba divers. Divers expressed a clear preference for large shipwrecks or sunken vessels that provided a themed diving experience. Motives for diving on artificial reefs were varied, but were dominated by the chance of viewing concentrated marine life, increased photographic opportunities, and the guarantee of a ‘good dive’. Satisfaction with artificial reef diving was high amongst novices and declined with increasing experience. Experienced divers had an overwhelming preference for natural reefs. As a management strategy, our results emphasize the capacity of well designed artificial reefs to contribute towards the management of coral reef diving sites and highlight a number of important areas for future research. Suggested work should validate the present findings in different marine tourism settings and ascertain support of artificial reefs in relationship to level of diver specialization. PMID:23894372

  20. Sesquiterpenoids Isolated from Two Species of the Asteriscus Alliance.

    PubMed

    Triana, Jorge; Eiroa, José Luis; Morales, Manuel; Perez, Francisco J; Brouard, Ignacio; Quintana, José; Ruiz-Estévez, Mercedes; Estévez, Francisco; León, Francisco

    2016-05-27

    Investigation of the aerial parts of two Spanish members of the Asteriscus alliance, Asteriscus graveolens subsp. stenophyllus and Asteriscus schultzii, afforded four new sesquiterpene lactones containing a humulene skeleton (1-4) and one new sesquiterpene lactone of the asteriscanolide type (5). Their chemical structures were determined on the basis of the HRMS and from 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies. Both species showed different profiles of sesquiterpenoid constituents. A. schultzii did not show humulene or asteriscane sesquiterpenes, suggesting a resemblance to the genus Pallenis, another member of the Asteriscus alliance. A literature review on chemical isolates from the Asteriscus alliance supported the placement of A. schultzii in the genus Pallenis. The isolated components (1-5) were assessed for cytotoxicity against the HL-60 and MOLT-3 leukemia cell lines, with compound 1 showing activity in both biological assays (IC50 value range 4.1-5.4 μM). PMID:27145162

  1. The CIO and the medical informaticist: alliance for progress.

    PubMed Central

    Spackman, K. A.; Elert, J. D.; Beck, J. R.

    1993-01-01

    To achieve the full potential of information technology, health care institutions must overcome organizational and political barriers that often overshadow scientific and technical barriers. The time has come for an alliance between the Chief Information Officer (CIO) and medical informatics specialists, or informaticists. Organizations that successfully accomplish this alliance will position themselves to take advantage of the enormous potential of information technology to manage today's cost-quality pressures. This article first reviews some of the recent developments in the way health care organizations manage information technology. It then describes the traditional, perhaps the natural state of affairs, in which there may be tension and conflict between medical informaticists and line managers of information systems (IS). Finally, the article makes a case for closer collaboration and cooperation between these groups, and provides a case study that illustrates one example of such an alliance. PMID:8130528

  2. Results and current status of the NPARC alliance validation effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towne, Charles E.; Jones, Ralph R.

    1996-01-01

    The NPARC Alliance is a partnership between the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and the USAF Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) dedicated to the establishment of a national CFD capability, centered on the NPARC Navier-Stokes computer program. The three main tasks of the Alliance are user support, code development, and validation. The present paper is a status report on the validation effort. It describes the validation approach being taken by the Alliance. Representative results are presented for laminar and turbulent flat plate boundary layers, a supersonic axisymmetric jet, and a glancing shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction. Cases scheduled to be run in the future are also listed. The archive of validation cases is described, including information on how to access it via the Internet.

  3. A Socio-technical Approach for Transient SME Alliances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezgui, Yacine

    The paper discusses technical requirements to promote the adoption of alliance modes of operation by SMEs in the construction sector. These requirements have provided a basis for specifying a set of functionality to support the collaboration and cooperation needs of SMEs. While service-oriented architectures and semantic web services provide the middleware technology to implement the identified functionality, a number of key technical limitations have been identified, including lack of support for the dynamic and non-functional characteristics of SME alliances distributed business processes, lack of execution monitoring functionality to manage running business processes, and lack of support for semantic reasoning to enable SME business process service composition. The paper examines these issues and provides key directions for supporting SME alliances effectively.

  4. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer... this publication. Proposed Collection: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology...

  5. Two levels of alliance formation among male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.).

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R C; Smolker, R A; Richards, A F

    1992-01-01

    In Shark Bay, Western Australia, male bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.) cooperate in pairs and triplets to sequester and control the movements of females. We refer to this behavior as "herding" and to the male pairs and triplets as alliances. During a 25-month study (1987-1989) on the social relationships of males, we documented herding in 10 alliances. Males preferentially herded nonpregnant females likely to be in estrus. Alliance members associated with one another consistently when not herding females. Each alliance associated preferentially with one or two other alliances. Occasionally, two alliances combined and took females from another alliance or defended females against such efforts. This study documents multiple-level male alliances within a social group outside of humans. PMID:11607275

  6. Barodontalgias, dental and orofacial barotraumas: a survey in Swiss divers and caisson workers.

    PubMed

    Zanotta, Cristina; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Nussberger, Peter; Waltimo, Tuomas; Filippi, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Changing ambient pressure can lead to medical conditions in body cavities filled with air. Intraoral pain elicited by changes in pressure is referred to as barodontalgia. Dental barotraumas are defined as pressure-induced damages of teeth and restorations. The pathophysiologic background so far is not completely clear. The present study deals with dental and orofacial symptoms which can occur as a result of pressure variations. With the aid of cantonal administrations, diving associations, and tunnel construction firms, 520 pressure-exposed individuals (499 scuba/ professional divers, 21 caisson workers operating at excess pressure) were questioned regarding dental problems. A personal interview was conducted with affected individuals. Problems in the dental area were experienced by 15% of all respondents. Toothaches were suffered by 10.2% of the participants. Tooth injuries occurred in 6.3% of all interviewees (26 fractured amalgam restorations, 4 crown fractures, 3 losses of tooth fragments). A proportion of 11.3% among the respondents complained about temporomandibular joint problems or mucosal irritations (for example aphthae) related to the mouthpieces. Barotraumas outside the dental area were incurred by 31.9% of the divers. Of these, 69.9% concerned the ears and 65.6% occurred during the descent. Based on the results obtained from the survey and taking into account the current literature, recommendations for the prevention of barotraumas in divers and caisson workers were prepared. Diagnostic exclusion of dental pathologies and avoidance of retentive reconstruction materials are important factors for the prevention of barodontalgias and dental barotraumas. PMID:24853026

  7. Understanding the working alliance with clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Oyer, Laura; O'Halloran, Mary Sean; Christoe-Frazier, Liesel

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic working alliance is a vital ingredient of psychotherapy, specifically for clients diagnosed with anorexia nervosa, as progress is often slow and treatment difficult. This qualitative phenomenological study investigated the experiences of eight clients with anorexia nervosa and seven therapists who work with this population, regarding which therapist factors aided in and challenged the working alliance formation in individual psychotherapy. Data was gathered through semi-structured interviews. Some helpful therapist factors included collaboration, appropriate self-disclosure, providing a warm and safe environment, and willingness to be contacted outside of a session. Unhelpful factors included lack of attunement and objectivity and failure to individualize treatment. PMID:25879137

  8. Annual report 1994 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA) was formed in 1990. The goal of the SEA is to foster and encourage collaborative research among the Alliance members. Collaborative research enhances the production of well-qualified scientists and engineers graduating from the SEA member institutions. These students will become contributing participants in the United States technical workforce now and into the next century. The SEA consist of four historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and a national laboratory. The SEA is a non-profit consortium. The SEA collaborates on research projects with government agencies, national laboratories, private foundations, industry, and other universities in a broad range of scientific and technical areas.

  9. Research on suppliers selection for e-commerce alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Chunhua; Sun, Bin; Liu, Dongsheng

    2009-07-01

    First, the characteristics of suppliers in the e-Commerce alliances of certain industries will be analyzed in this paper and the initial model to select suppliers is built. Then, the history performances of providers in the initial model and the ability to cooperate with others are recorded and analyzed. Based on the analysis above and considering the restriction of supply, the number of re-sellers and the price of products, an improved model to select suppliers in the e-Commerce alliance of certain industries called "the mix-integers model" is built. Finally, a mathematical example is used to describe how the mix-integers model to work.

  10. Brain magnetic resonance imaging, aerobic power, and metabolic parameters among 30 asymptomatic scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Dupas, B; Potiron, M; Louvet, S; Geraut, C

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of cerebral lesions in asymptomatic scuba divers and explain the causes of them: potential risk factors associating cardiovascular risk factors, low aerobic capacity, or characteristics of diving (maximum depth, ascent rate). Experienced scuba divers, over 40 years of age, without any decompression sickness (DCS) history were included. We studied 30 scuba divers (instructors) without any clinical symptoms. For all of them, we carried out a clinical examination with fatty body mass determination and we questioned them about their diving habits. A brain Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), an assessment of maximal oxygen uptake, glycemia, triglyceridemia, and cholesterolemia were systematically carried out. Cerebral spots of high intensity were found at 33 % in the scuba diving group and 30 % in the control group. In the diving group, abnormalities were related to unsafe scuba-diving or metabolic abnormalities. In our study, we did not find a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system, and the age, depth of the dives, number of dives, and ergometric performances (maximal oxygen uptake, V.O (2max), serum level of blood lactate). Nevertheless, we found a significant relationship between the lesions of the central nervous system and ascent rate faster than 10 meters per minute (r = 0.57; p = 0.003) or presence of high level of cholesterolemia (r = 0.6; p = 0.001). We found concordant results using the Cochran's Test: meaningful link between the number of brain lesions and the speed of decompression (Uexp = 14 < Utable = 43; alpha = 0.05, p < 0.01). We concluded that hyperintensities can be explained by preformed nitrogen gas microbubbles and particularly in presence of cholesterol, when the ascent rate is up to 10 meters per minute. So, it was remarkable to note that asymptomatic patients practicing scuba diving either professionally or recreationally, presented lesions of the central nervous

  11. Fasting improves static apnea performance in elite divers without enhanced risk of syncope.

    PubMed

    Schagatay, Erika; Lodin-Sundström, Angelica

    2014-01-01

    In competitive apnea divers, the nutritional demands may be essentially different from those of, for example, endurance athletes, where energy resources need to be maximised for successful performance. In competitive apnea, the goal is instead to limit metabolism, as the length of the sustainable apneic period will depend to a great extent on minimising oxygen consumption. Many but not all elite divers fast before performing static apnea in competition. This may increase oxygen consumption as mainly lipid stores are metabolised but could also have beneficial effects on apneic duration. Our aim was to determine the effect of over-night fasting on apnea performance. Six female and seven male divers performed a series of three apneas after eating and fasting, respectively. The series consisted of two 2-min apneas spaced by 3 min rest and, after 5 min rest, one maximal effort apnea. Apneas were performed at supine rest and preceded by normal respiration and maximal inspiration. Mean (± SD) time since eating was 13 h (± 2 h 43 min) for the fasting and 1 h 34 min (± 33 min) for the eating condition (P < 0.001). Mean blood glucose was 5.1 (± 0.4) mmol/L after fasting and 5.9 (± 0.7) mmol/L after eating (P<0.01). Lung volumes were similar in both conditions (NS). For the 2-min apneas, nadir SaO2 during fasting was 95 (± 1)% and 92 (± 2)% (P < 0.001) on eating and ETCO2 was lower in the fasting condition (P < 0.01) while heart rate (HR) during apnea was 74 (± 10) bpm for fasting and 80 (± 10) bpm for eating conditions (P < 0.01). Maximal apnea durations were 4 min 41 s (± 43 s) during fasting and 3 min 51 s (± 37 s) after eating (P < 0.001), and time without respiratory contractions was 31 s (25%) longer after fasting (P < 0.01). At maximal apnea termination, SaO2 and ETCO2 were similar in both conditions (NS) and apneic HR was 63 (± 9) bpm for fasting and 70 (± 10) bpm for eating (P < 0.01). The 22% longer apnea duration after fasting with analogous end apnea

  12. Precision, accuracy, and application of diver-towed underwater GPS receivers.

    PubMed

    Schories, Dirk; Niedzwiedz, Gerd

    2012-04-01

    Diver-towed global positioning systems (GPS) handhelds have been used for a few years in underwater monitoring studies. We modeled the accuracy of this method using the software KABKURR originally developed by the University of Rostock for fishing and marine engineering. Additionally, three field experiments were conducted to estimate the precision of the method and apply it in the field: (1) an experiment of underwater transects from 5 to 35 m in the Southern Chile fjord region, (2) a transect from 5 to 30 m under extreme climatic conditions in the Antarctic, and (3) an underwater tracking experiment at Lake Ranco, Southern Chile. The coiled cable length in relation to water depth is the main error source besides the signal quality of the GPS under calm weather conditions. The forces used in the model resulted in a displacement of 2.3 m in a depth of 5 m, 3.2 m at a 10-m depth, 4.6 m in a 20-m depth, 5.5 m at a 30-m depth, and 6.8 m in a 40-m depth, when only an additional 0.5 m cable extension was used compared to the water depth. The GPS buoy requires good buoyancy in order to keep its position at the water surface when the diver is trying to minimize any additional cable extension error. The diver has to apply a tensile force for shortening the cable length at the lower cable end. Repeated diving along transect lines from 5 to 35 m resulted only in small deviations independent of water depth indicating the precision of the method for monitoring studies. Routing of given reference points with a Garmin 76CSx handheld placed in an underwater housing resulted in mean deviances less than 6 m at a water depth of 10 m. Thus, we can confirm that diver-towed GPS handhelds give promising results when used for underwater research in shallow water and open a wide field of applicability, but no submeter accuracy is possible due to the different error sources. PMID:21614620

  13. Examining Supervisor and Supervisee Agreement on Alliance: Is Shame a Factor?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Cynthia; Savard, Reginald; Lecomte, Conrad

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the agreement of 31 supervisee-supervisor pairs on perceived strength of working alliance throughout 5 supervision sessions and on whether the alliance differed significantly in relation to supervisee shame-proneness. The Supervisory Working Alliance Inventory (Trainee and Supervisor versions) was used to measure the working…

  14. Patient's and Therapist's Views of Early Alliance Building in Dynamic Psychotherapy: Patterns and Relation to Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Ueli; de Roten, Yves; Beretta, Veronique; Michel, Luc; Despland, Jean-Nicolas

    2008-01-01

    Patients and therapists have somewhat divergent perspectives of alliance. Usually in psychotherapy research, the focus is on the patient's view of alliance, predicting parts of outcome. This study questions this hypothesis by applying the shape-of-change procedure to patient's and therapist's view of alliance-building processes in dynamic…

  15. An Exploration of the Working Alliance in Mental Health Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kondrat, David C.; Early, Theresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The working alliance between clients and helpers has been identified as a common factor of treatment effectiveness, yet very little research has explored variables associated with working alliance between mental health case managers and their consumers. This study explored the potential covariates of working alliance within community mental health…

  16. Strategic Alliances between Chinese and Foreign Universities: Was a Staggered Form of Entry Used?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Explored whether foreign universities moved through levels of alliance with China as a form of staggered market entry. Found almost no movement between levels of alliance, and that high levels of commitment were required at all levels to make an alliance successful. This indicates that foreign universities should be careful to establish alliances…

  17. Early Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, Aaron; Dauber, Sarah; Stambaugh, Leyla Faw; Cecero, John J.; Liddle, Howard A.

    2006-01-01

    The impact of early therapeutic alliance was examined in 100 clients receiving either individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or family therapy for adolescent substance abuse. Observational ratings of adolescent alliance in CBT and adolescent and parent alliance in family therapy were used to predict treatment retention (in CBT only) and…

  18. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing ('clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23 to 37 mm Hg (30 ± 7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54 ± 24% versus 34 ± 26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6 ± 28% and 83.4 ± 38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  19. Metabolomic approach with LC-MS reveals significant effect of pressure on diver's plasma.

    PubMed

    Ciborowski, Michal; Javier Rupérez, F; Martínez-Alcázar, Ma Paz; Angulo, Santiago; Radziwon, Piotr; Olszanski, Romuald; Kloczko, Janusz; Barbas, Coral

    2010-08-01

    Professional and recreational diving are growing activities in modern life. Diving has been associated with increased prevalence of stroke, hypertension, asthma, diabetes, or bone necrosis. We evaluated the effect of increased pressure equivalent to diving at 30 and 60 m for 30 min in two groups of divers using an untargeted approach with LC-MS fingerprinting of plasma. We found over 100 metabolites to be altered in plasma post exposure and after the corresponding decompression procedures. Among them, a group of lysophosphatidylcholines and lysophosphatidylethanolamines were increased, including lysoplasmalogen, a thrombosis promoter, together with changes in metabolic rate-associated molecules such as acylcarnitines and hemolysis-related compounds. Moreover, three metabolites that could be associated to bone degradation show different intensities between experimental groups. Ultimately, this nontargeted, short-term study opens the possibility of discovering markers of long-term effect of pressure that could be employed in routine health control of divers and could facilitate the development of safer decompression procedures. PMID:20504017

  20. Death of a scuba diver caused by vomiting and panic: a case report.

    PubMed

    Petri, Nadan M; Stipancevic, Hrvoje; Sutlovic, Davorka; Gojanovic, Marija Definis

    2011-06-01

    Scuba diving fatalities are rare and sometimes extremely difficult to explain. A thorough forensic investigation, conducted by a qualified team, helps avoid possible later questions and doubts, family concerns and judicial matters, since a significant body of evidence is lost after the body of the victim is buried or the equipment is reused. We report about a death of a scuba diver who was drowned while diving to the depth of 30 meters. Before being assisted to the surface, the diver panicked and removed the regulator from his mouth. The technical expertise of the scuba gear and the chemical analysis of the air from the high-pressure cylinder revealed no irregularities. Homicide, suicide, nitrogen narcosis, oxygen toxicity, and regulator malfunction were ruled out as possible causes of death. The most probable cause that triggered the event was vomiting into the regulator, as confirmed nearly 4 years later by the toxicological analysis of the traces of matter found in the dry chamber of the breathing regulator. Such an analysis should be considered when investigating suspicious diving related deaths and could be undertaken even after a significant time delay if the equipment is kept properly stored. PMID:20190635

  1. Barotraumatic orbital emphysema of rhinogenic origin in a breath-hold diver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, A; Delehaye, E; Cau, M; Cosso, L

    2008-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a well-recognized complication of fractures involving the orbit. Commonly, it occurs when high pressure develops in nasal cavity as during nose blowing, coughing or Valsalva's maneuver and usually occurs in the subcutaneous tissues. We report the case of a young breath-hold diver who developed spontaneous, non compressive orbital emphysema during underwater fishing, with a maximal depth of 25-30 meters in the Sardinian sea. He was otherwise healthy, without previous cranio-facial trauma and nasosinusal diseases or surgery were not present in the history. When he was referred to our attention the patient presented right eyelid ptosis but diplopia and vision impairment were absent. Computer tomography scans showed subcutaneous air in the right upper eyelid and around the eyeball, particularly near the orbit's roof but optic nerve area, intraconal, was free of air. A dehiscence in lamina papyracea was evident. In our opinion, this has been the point of air entry into the orbit. A supportive therapy was advised and two weeks later the emphysema was recovered completely and the subject was symptoms free. The literature has been revised and to our knowledge no previous cases of barotraumatic orbital emphysema, in a breath-hold diver, are referred. PMID:18619111

  2. Calibration of a bubble evolution model to observed bubble incidence in divers.

    PubMed

    Gault, K A; Tikuisis, P; Nishi, R Y

    1995-09-01

    The method of maximum likelihood was used to calibrate a probabilistic bubble evolution model against data of bubbles detected in divers. These data were obtained from a diverse set of 2,064 chamber man-dives involving air and heliox with and without oxygen decompression. Bubbles were measured with Doppler ultrasound and graded according to the Kisman-Masurel code from which a single maximum bubble grade (BG) per diver was compared to the maximum bubble radius (Rmax) predicted by the model. This comparison was accomplished using multinomial statistics by relating BG to Rmax through a series of probability functions. The model predicted the formation of the bubble according to the critical radius concept and its evolution was predicted by assuming a linear rate of inert gas exchange across the bubble boundary. Gas exchange between the model compartment and blood was assumed to be perfusion-limited. The most successful calibration of the model was found using a trinomial grouping of BG according to no bubbles, low, and high bubble activity, and by assuming a single tissue compartment. Parameter estimations converge to a tissue volume of 0.00036 cm3, a surface tension of 5.0 dyne.cm-1, respective time constants of 27.9 and 9.3 min for nitrogen and helium, and respective Ostwald tissue solubilities of 0.0438 and 0.0096. Although not part of the calibration algorithm, the predicted evolution of bubble size compares reasonably well with the temporal recordings of BGs. PMID:7580766

  3. Modified ventilatory response characteristics to exercise in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Kai; Metzger, Jule; Scholz, Tobias; Tetzlaff, Kay; Sorichter, Stephan; Walterspacher, Stephan

    2014-09-01

    Specific adjustments to repeated extreme apnea are not fully known and understood. While a blunted ventilatory chemosensitivity to CO2 is described for elite breath-hold divers (BHDs) at rest, it is unclear whether specific adaptations affect their response to dynamic exercise. Eight elite BHDs with a previously validated decrease in CO2 chemosensitivity, 8 scuba divers (SCDs), and 8 matched control subjects were included in a study where markers of ventilatory response, Fowler's dead space, partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2), and blood lactate concentrations during cycle exercise were measured. Maximal power output did not differ between the groups, but lactate threshold (θL) appeared at a significantly lowered respiratory compensation point (RCP) and at a higher VO2 for the BHDs. End-tidal (petCO2) and estimated arterial pCO2 (paCO2) were significantly higher in BHDs at θL, the RCP, and maximum exhaustion. BHDs showed a significantly (P < .01) slower breathing pattern in relation to a given tidal volume at a specific work rate. In summary, BHDs presented signs of a metabolic shift from aerobic to anaerobic energy supply, decreased chemosensitivity during exercise, and a distinct ventilatory-response pattern during cycle exercise that differs from SCDs and controls. PMID:24231513

  4. Respiratory effects of a single dive to 50 meters in sport divers with asymptomatic respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Staschen, C M; Struck, N; Mutzbauer, T S

    2001-02-01

    Increasing popularity of sports diving makes it likely that subjects with allergic respiratory diseases will be involved in diving with self contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba). The present study evaluated the effects of a single scuba-dive on pulmonary function in subjects with respiratory atopy. Specific airways conductance (sGaw), residual volume (RV), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), mid expiratory flow at 50% of FVC (MEF50), and transfer factor for carbon monoxide (TLCO) were measured in 9 sport divers with a history of hay fever and 9 matched healthy sport divers (control) before, 3 hours and 24 hours after a wet hyperbaric chamber dive to a depth of 50 m. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) was assessed by methacholine challenge 4 weeks after the dive. Atopic subjects and controls did not differ with respect to anthropometric data, diving experience, and predive lung function. A 3% reduction in FVC was found 24h after the dive (p < 0.05) in both groups, whereas sGaw decreased by 15% 24 h after the dive (p < 0.05) in the subjects with respiratory atopy only. Postdive changes in RV, FEV1, MEF50, and TLCO did not reach level of statistical significance. AHR was obtained in 8/9 subjects with respiratory atopy. We conclude that subjects with atopic sensitization and asymptomatic AHR may be more susceptible to effects of diving on pulmonary function. PMID:11281622

  5. Cardiovascular changes during underwater static and dynamic breath-hold dives in trained divers.

    PubMed

    Breskovic, Toni; Uglesic, Lovro; Zubin, Petra; Kuch, Benjamin; Kraljevic, Jasenka; Zanchi, Jaksa; Ljubkovic, Marko; Sieber, Arne; Dujic, Zeljko

    2011-09-01

    Limited information exists concerning arterial blood pressure (BP) changes in underwater breath-hold diving. Simulated chamber dives to 50 m of freshwater (mfw) reported very high levels of invasive BP in two divers during static apnea (SA), whereas a recent study using a noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer reported unchanged or mildly increased values at 10 m SA dive. In this study we investigated underwater BP changes during not only SA but, for the first time, dynamic apnea (DA) and shortened (SHT) DA in 16 trained breath-hold divers. Measurements included BP (subaquatic sphygmomanometer), ECG, and pulse oxymetry (arterial oxygen saturation, SpO₂, and heart rate). BP was measured during dry conditions, at surface fully immersed (SA), and at 2 mfw (DA and SHT DA), whereas ECG and pulse oxymetry were measured continuously. We have found significantly higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) values in SA (∼40%) vs. SHT DA (∼30%). Postapneic recovery of BP was slightly slower after SHT DA. Significantly higher BP gain (mmHg/duration of apnea in s) was found in SHT DA vs. SA. Furthermore, DA attempts resulted in faster desaturation vs. SA. In conclusion, we have found moderate increases in BP during SA, DA, and SHT DA. These cardiovascular changes during immersed SA and DA are in agreement with those reported for dry SA and DA. PMID:21719730

  6. Standardized ROV and diver interfaces will bring surge in subsea capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, B.F.

    1989-05-01

    Standardization and new developments in subsea interfaces, or profiles, for remotely operated vehicles (ROV's) or divers promise a new generation of subsea capabilities. Progress in subsea systems comes from the development of several individual components. ROV/diver interface profiles are a critical component in this chain of developments. ROV's are also of particular importance because these unmanned submarines provide low-cost flexibility in deep water applications. The development of standardized profiles, which means basic size and shapes, for intervention will affect subsea completion and drilling systems, emergency safety valves (ESV), and any other subsea installation. As an example of their importance, standardized profiles could help keep some offshore fires from becoming full-fledged disasters, such as the one at the Piper-Alpha platform in the North Sea. Pipeline riser valves in such cases could be closed by ROV's to prevent the pipelines from feeding the fire. Standardized profiles to accomplish this and other subsea tasks are available in the public domain for immediate application.

  7. Creative Alliances with the Business Community: Pima Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Thomas E.

    Pima Community College (PCC) in Tucson is involved in a number of creative alliances with the Arizona business community, including the Arizona Consortium for Education and Training and the Arizona State Environmental Technical Training Center (ASETT). Through the Consortium, PCC, in conjunction with Arizona four-year colleges, provides specific…

  8. Enacting Feminist Alliance Principles in a Doctoral Writing Support Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swadener, Beth Blue; Peters, Lacey; Eversman, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a multivocal narrative approach to analyze the dynamics, accomplishments, and challenges of an interdisciplinary doctoral support group consisting primarily of female members. The authors raise issues of power, alliance, troubling expert-novice models of mentoring, and the role of social justice pedagogy in the group.

  9. Acronyms and the Law. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents acronyms related to early intervention, education, special education, and other laws important to individuals with disabilities and their families. For related information, also read Acronyms and Agencies. [For related report, "Acronyms and Agencies. Alliance Action Information Sheets," see ED534053.

  10. Iowa Distance Education Alliance. Final Evaluation Report. Abbreviated Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Chris; And Others

    This report describes 2-year outcomes of the Iowa Distance Education Alliance (IDEA), a partnership involving educational institutions across Iowa that received funding from the federal Star Schools Program to demonstrate the use of the Iowa Communication Network's (ICN's) fiber-optic technology for K-12 instruction. First-year project activities…

  11. Eagle and the Condor: Indigenous Alliances for Youth Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wihak, Christine; Hately, Lynne; Allicock, Sydney; Lickers, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This narrative describes the growth of an alliance between two indigenous organizations in North and South America, illustrating how a shared indigenous vision of cultural survival and connection to the land led to the creation of an ongoing collaboration for indigenous youth leadership development, which has extended to encompass collaboration…

  12. Supporting Early Childhood Environmental Education through the Natural Start Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Christy; Braus, Judy

    2013-01-01

    The Natural Start Alliance is a new initiative of the North American Association for Environmental Education. Natural Start was created to support and expand early childhood environmental education (ECEE) by creating a network of organizations, educators, parents, and others who care about using environmental education to support young children's…

  13. Combining regional expertise to form a bereavement support alliance.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, Judy B; Kobler, Kathie; Roose, Rosmarie E; Meyer, Charlotte; Schmitz, Nancy; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Providing compassionate bereavement care for families experiencing perinatal loss is a standard of care in most healthcare organizations. In this article, we describe the development of The Alliance of Perinatal Bereavement Support Facilitators, begun over 25 years ago in Chicago by staff who identified the need to reach out to colleagues at other area institutions for advice and support in this work. This collaboration created a regional support network that has resulted in a long-lasting, active, sustainable organization of excellence focused on enhancing practice, education, and perinatal bereavement care. Alliance activities center around four main areas: education, networking/support, policy, and recognizing outstanding service to families. By continuing to draw upon the collective talent, wisdom, and expertise of its members, The Alliance still serves grieving families and provides mentoring for future interdisciplinary team members engaged in this work. The path taken to build this organization can be used by professionals in other specialties who are looking to create their own alliance infrastructure based on mutual benefit and interest. PMID:24759313

  14. The MATRIX: Multicultural Alliance for Technology, Research, and Information Exchange

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Raymond E.

    2006-01-01

    Community colleges, although being a potential source of future scientists and engineers, there are certain faults in the reform approach of these colleges that need to be addressed. The Multicultural Alliance for Technology, Research, and Information Exchange (MATRIX) model is presented to energize community colleges to create a science research…

  15. The Importance of Empathy in the Therapeutic Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feller, Candi P.; Cottone, R. Rocco

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation of the construct of empathy, the authors report that the literature reflects strong evidence that empathy is an essential component of the therapeutic alliance across theories and that empathy is necessary in the counseling process. The concept of empathy continues to be a central component of new forms of counseling and…

  16. Applying Lessons from Industry to Intra-Campus Alliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Walter L.

    To break out of the mold of the modern college compartmentalized setting, alliances can and must be formed between different disciplines on campus. Knowledge the students gain from the differing perspectives will enhance their ability to communicate; oral and written communication; and effective listening have been identified as factors that help…

  17. Alliance between tobacco and alcohol industries to shape public policy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Aims The tobacco and alcohol industries share common policy goals when facing regulation, opposing policies such as tax increases and advertising restrictions. The collaboration between these two industries in the tobacco policy arena is unknown. This study explored if tobacco and alcohol companies built alliances to influence tobacco legislation, and if so, how those alliances worked. Methods Analysis of previously secret tobacco industry documents. Findings In the early 1980s, tobacco companies started efforts to build coalitions with alcohol and other industries to oppose cigarette excise taxes, clean indoor air policies, and tobacco advertising and promotion constraints. Alcohol companies were often identified as a key partner and source of financial support for the coalitions. These coalitions had variable success interfering with tobacco control policymaking. Conclusions The combined resources of tobacco and alcohol companies may have affected tobacco control legislation. These alliances helped to create the perception that there is a broader base of opposition to tobacco control. Advocates should be aware of the covert alliances between tobacco, alcohol, and other industries and expose them to correct this misperception. PMID:23587076

  18. The STARS Alliance: Viable Strategies for Broadening Participation in Computing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlberg, Teresa; Barnes, Tiffany; Buch, Kim; Rorrer, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    The Students and Technology in Academia, Research, and Service (STARS) Alliance is a nationally-connected system of regional partnerships among higher education, K-12 schools, industry and the community with a mission to broaden the participation of women, under-represented minorities and persons with disabilities in computing (BPC). Each regional…

  19. Queering School Communities: Ethical Curiosity and Gay-Straight Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Cris

    2004-01-01

    This essay analyzes the growth of associational identity and ethical community encouraged by Gay-Straight Alliances, using queer theory to analyze their ideas and practices. Following an analysis of the Equal Access Act, which has provided space and time to extracurricular public school groups, the author turns to accounts of students involved in…

  20. A Medical School--Elementary School Science Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Leslie M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Houston Elementary Science Alliance. This program uses medical school resources and personnel to provide elementary school science teachers with scientific information and hands-on activities that stress the doing of science and develops teachers to serve as a resource for their colleagues. (MDH)

  1. Academic Alliances: A New Approach to School/College Collaboration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiani, Claire L.; Burnett, David G.

    1986-01-01

    Academic alliances between secondary school teachers and postsecondary faculty are discussed. Teachers and faculty who teach the same subject in the same geographical area voluntarily meet regularly to examine the quality of teaching and learning in their discipline at the local level. School and college faculty together develop some common ground…

  2. Alliances in the Dutch BeweegKuur Lifestyle Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    den Hartog, Franciska; Wagemakers, Annemarie; Vaandrager, Lenneke; van Dijk, Marieke; Koelen, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: BeweegKuur (Exercise Therapy) is a Dutch lifestyle programme in which participants are referred by a general practitioner (GP) to a lifestyle advisor. To support participants, regional and local alliances are established. The present study explored the successes and challenges associated with collaboration processes in local BeweegKuur…

  3. Corporate Developments and Strategic Alliances in E-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Thomas; Hermens, Antoine

    2001-01-01

    Describes the emergence of corporate universities and strategic alliances among universities, electronic learning companies, and technology companies that are providing online delivery of interactive education and training. Outlines characteristics of comprehensive electronic learning and cautions against the use of new technologies to deliver…

  4. Cooperation and Alliances: Higher Education and the Use of Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotolo, Lawrence G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia Tidewater Consortium for Higher Education, a consortium of 15 colleges and universities located in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia, which has operated its own cable television channel for the past 21 years. The channel serves the educational needs of the community and allows strategic alliances with other agencies. (EV)

  5. Advisory Working Alliance, Perceived English Proficiency, and Acculturative Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Meifen; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Du, Yi; Lin, Shu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the moderators of (a) general or cross-cultural advisory working alliances and (b) perceived English proficiency on the association between acculturative stress and psychological distress. A total of 143 East Asian international students completed an online survey. Results from a hierarchical regression…

  6. Alliance for Workforce Skills. Final Report. Summative Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capital Community-Technical Coll., Hartford, CT.

    The Alliance for Workforce Skills (AWS), a public/private partnership, provided adult basic skills training to employed and unemployed men and women in the Greater Hartford area. Many goals were not met, due in large part to the massive downturn in the Hartford economy. Only one of the four sponsoring corporations was still an active AWS partner…

  7. Striving for Empathy: Affinities, Alliances and Peer Sexuality Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Jessica; Copp, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Peer sexuality educators' accounts of their work reveal two approaches to empathy with their students: affinity and alliance. "Affinity-based empathy" rests on the idea that the more commonalities sexuality educators and students share (or perceive they share), the more they will be able to empathise with one another, while…

  8. Building Alliances: Photojournalism Educators and Members of NPPA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Keith

    Alliances between members of the visual communication division of the Association for Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) and the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) can be strengthened without sacrificing the basic liberal arts principles promoted by R. O. Blanchard and W. G. Christ in their book "Media Education and the Liberal…

  9. The Development of a Measure of the Parenting Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abidin, Richard R.; Brunner, John F.

    The Parenting Alliance Inventory (PAI) was administered to 186 mothers and 75 fathers with a wide range of socioeconomic backgrounds who had at least one child between 2 and 6 years of age. Subjects were recruited from child care facilities, pediatric practices, and public recreational facilities in central Virginia. Extrafamilial child caregivers…

  10. The National Special Education Alliance: One Year Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The National Special Education Alliance (a national network of local computer resource centers associated with Apple Computer, Inc.) consists, one year after formation, of 24 non-profit support centers staffed largely by volunteers. The NSEA now reaches more than 1000 disabled computer users each month and more growth in the future is expected.…

  11. Alliance Building in the Information and Online Database Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Johanna Olson

    2001-01-01

    Presents an analysis of information industry alliance formation using environmental scanning methods. Highlights include why libraries and academic institutions should be interested; a literature review; historical context; industry and market structures; commercial and academic models; trends; and implications for information providers,…

  12. The Resolution of Ruptures in the Therapeutic Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Jeremy D.; Muran, J. Christopher

    1996-01-01

    A rupture in the therapeutic alliance is a deterioration in the quality of the relationship between patient and therapist; it is an interpersonal marker that indicates an opportunity for exploring and understanding the processes that maintain a maladaptive interpersonal schema. Outlines features of a research program on ruptures in the therapeutic…

  13. Social Scientists Can Benefit from Alliance for Excellence Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senese, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    Contends that the "Alliance for Excellence: Librarians Respond to a Nation at Risk" report contains information which can be useful for improving social studies instruction. Denotes special attention to the need for quality elementary and secondary school library services and suggests social studies teachers can recommend current materials to the…

  14. 78 FR 9003 - Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979), (3) Will... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 39 RIN 2120-AA64 Airworthiness Directives; Engine Alliance Turbofan Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  15. National--Alliance for Arts Education; JDR 3rd Fund

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Forbes W.; Bloom, Kathryn

    1978-01-01

    The Alliance for Arts Education is an educational project embracing organizations and individuals at the national, state, and local levels with a mutual commitment to the arts as an integral part of the educational process. The JDR 3rd Fund provides consultant and technical services and, through coordination of the League of Cities for the Arts in…

  16. Nonlinear analysis of the cooperation of strategic alliances through stochastic catastrophe theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Hu, Bin; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2014-04-01

    The excitation intervention of strategic alliance may change with the changes in the parameters of circumstance (e.g., external alliance tasks). As a result, the stable cooperation between members may suffer a complete unplanned betrayal at last. However, current perspectives on strategic alliances cannot adequately explain this transition mechanism. This study is a first attempt to analyze this nonlinear phenomenon through stochastic catastrophe theory (SCT). A stochastic dynamics model is constructed based on the cooperation of strategic alliance from the perspective of evolutionary game theory. SCT explains the discontinuous changes caused by the changes in environmental parameters. Theoretically, we identify conditions where catastrophe can occur in the cooperation of alliance members.

  17. Schools without Fear. Proceedings of the Annual International Alliance for Invitational Education Conference (14th). International Alliance for Invitational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Adrianna Hayes, Ed.

    Papers presented at the fourteenth Annual Conference of the Alliance for Invitational Education are (1) "Caring, Sharing, Daring: Three Tests to Help Develop More Inviting Policies, Programmes, and Procedures" (M. Ayers); (2) "Project: Gentlemen on the Move - Combating the Poor Academic and Social Performance of African American Male Youth" (D. F.…

  18. An Empirical Investigation of Defense Interpretation Depth, Defensive Functioning, and Alliance Strength in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, Jonathan; Bhatia, Maneet; De Roten, Yves; Despland, Jean-Nicolas; Drapeau, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between depth of defense interpretations by therapists, and patient defensive functioning, on the therapeutic alliance in a sample of 36 patients undergoing short-term dynamic psychotherapy. Defense interpretation depth was defined as the degree to which therapist interpretations contained information regarding the motivation for patient defenses and historical origins of the defensive processes (Greensen, 1967). Mean depth of interpretation was compared between sessions that were identified beforehand as either high-alliance or low-alliance sessions using the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAq-II: Luborsky et al., 1996). Results indicated that defensive functioning was correlated to defense interpretation depth in low-alliance sessions. Moreover, mean depth of interpretation was also higher in low-alliance sessions, pointing to the possible "destabilizing" effects that these interpretations may have on both defensive functioning and the therapeutic alliance. These results are discussed within the context of previous studies of therapeutic technique in dynamic psychotherapy. PMID:26241796

  19. How Do Airlines Perceive That Strategic Alliances Affect Their Individual Branding?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalligiannis, Konstantinos; Iatrou, Kostas; Mason, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Much research has been carried out to evaluate the impact of strategic alliance membership on the performance of airlines. However it would be of interest to identify how airlines perceive this impact in terms of branding by each of the three global alliance groupings. It is the purpose of this paper to gather the opinion of airlines, belonging to the three strategic alliance groups, on the impact that the strategic alliance brands have had on their individual brands and how do they perceive that this impact will change in the future. To achieve this, a comprehensive survey of the alliance management and marketing departments of airlines participating in the three global strategic alliances was required. The results from this survey give an indication whether the strategic airline alliances, which are often referred to as marketing agreements, enhance, damage or have no impact on the individual airline brands.

  20. Acute otitis externa in divers working in the North Sea: a microbiological survey of seven saturation dives.

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Saturation diving is an important and widely used technique in the Offshore Oil Industry. During 1974-5 two saturation dives in the North Sea were terminated because of outbreaks of incapacitating otitis externa, and others were disrupted. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was consistently isolated from the ears of affected divers. Because complex work schedules were threatened seven subsequent dives were subjected to microbiological monitoring and control. Colonization of ear canal with P. aeruginosa or with other gram-negative bacilli occurred in 39 (67%) of the 58 divers studied, usually within 7 days of starting the dive. Data obtained by serotyping this isolations of P. aeruginosa suggested that a single infected diver may be the source of organisms which rapidly spread to his colleagues and throughout the living chambers, that the living chambers may constitute a reservoir of infection during and between dives, and that certain serotypes of P. aeruginosa are more likely than others to colonize the ear canal in the conditions of a saturation dive. The control measures used during the dives were only partially effective, but none of the divers suffered severe pain and all the dives were an operational success. PMID:405421

  1. [Diving fitness for scuba divers--what the primary care physician should know].

    PubMed

    Muth, C M; Kemmer, A; Tetzlaff, K

    2005-07-01

    The diving fitness medical examination serves to show and reveal medical conditions that are a contraindication for diving or to evaluate the risk of preexisting conditions. For this reason, it should never have the character of a certification given as a matter of courtesy. Fitness to dive is given if the candidate is healthy and when there are no pathological findings. Even with deviations from the norm, diving is still possible, but with restrictions. Important organ systems for the diving fitness examination are the cardiovascular system, the respiratory organs and the ears. In addition, adequate eyesight is important. The German Society of Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine (GTOUM) has drawn up recommendations on the examination of scuba divers to assist the physician (www.gtuem.org). PMID:16041935

  2. SCUBA divers as oceanographic samplers: The potential of dive computers to augment aquatic temperature monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wright, Serena; Hull, Tom; Sivyer, David B; Pearce, David; Pinnegar, John K; Sayer, Martin D J; Mogg, Andrew O M; Azzopardi, Elaine; Gontarek, Steve; Hyder, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring temperature of aquatic waters is of great importance, with modelled, satellite and in-situ data providing invaluable insights into long-term environmental change. However, there is often a lack of depth-resolved temperature measurements. Recreational dive computers routinely record temperature and depth, so could provide an alternate and highly novel source of oceanographic information to fill this data gap. In this study, a citizen science approach was used to obtain over 7,000 scuba diver temperature profiles. The accuracy, offset and lag of temperature records was assessed by comparing dive computers with scientific conductivity-temperature-depth instruments and existing surface temperature data. Our results show that, with processing, dive computers can provide a useful and novel tool with which to augment existing monitoring systems all over the globe, but especially in under-sampled or highly changeable coastal environments. PMID:27445104

  3. Safety divers prepare HST mockup in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Safety divers in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) prepare a mockup of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for one of 32 separate training sessions conducted by four of the STS-61 crew members in June. The three-week process allowed mission trainers to refine the timelines for the five separate spacewalks scheduled to be conducted on the actual mission scheduled for December 1993. The HST is separated into two pieces since the water tank depth cannot support the entire structure in one piece. The full length payload bay mockup shows the Solar Array Carrier in the foreground and the various containers that will house replacement hardware that will be carried on the mission.

  4. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele presenting with acute visual loss in a scuba diver.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, Lizette; Foster, Tecah

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male scuba diver presented with an acute history of painful unilateral visual loss after scuba diving. He had right-sided retrobulbar pain and headache. He was known to have sinusitis and had transient visual loss in two previous episodes after scuba diving. His visual acuity was hand motions and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. There was no proptosis. He had a right relative afferent pupillary defect. Colour vision was normal in the left eye and absent in the right eye. Fundal examination revealed healthy discs and macula bilaterally. He was assessed as a right optic neuropathy, possibly secondary to compression. An MRI of the brain revealed a large sphenoidal mucocele extending into the right optic foramen. He was treated with oral steroids, antibiotics and nasal decongestants. He underwent endoscopic intranasal sphenoidectomy and marsupialisation with return of his visual acuity to 20/25 in that eye. PMID:23964041

  5. A rare case of a scuba diver's death due to propeller injuries of a desalination pump.

    PubMed

    Perilli, G; Di Battista, B; Montana, A; Pavia, J; Cauchi, S; Zerafa, N M; Pomara, C

    2015-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, as well as pleasure boat cruising are becoming increasingly popular hobbies. As a result, the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. Injuries by propellers, amputation, death by drowning, and bleeding are rare reported events in forensic literature. The most common circumstances surrounding boat-propeller-related injuries are concerned with getting into or out of the boat, personal watercraft use or water skiing, and falling or being thrown from the boat. A case of a scuba diver's death that occurred during an illegal scuba fishing trip around a desalination plant is presented. A complete autopsy and histological study of all organs and surfaces of dismembered cadaveric sections, performed in order to determine the phases of death, are reported. An underwater scene investigation was conducted by an engineering team studying the mouth of the pump and the dynamic characteristic of rotating propeller blades. PMID:25882144

  6. Sphenoidal sinus mucocele presenting with acute visual loss in a scuba diver

    PubMed Central

    Mowatt, Lizette; Foster, Tecah

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old male scuba diver presented with an acute history of painful unilateral visual loss after scuba diving. He had right-sided retrobulbar pain and headache. He was known to have sinusitis and had transient visual loss in two previous episodes after scuba diving. His visual acuity was hand motions and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. There was no proptosis. He had a right relative afferent pupillary defect. Colour vision was normal in the left eye and absent in the right eye. Fundal examination revealed healthy discs and macula bilaterally. He was assessed as a right optic neuropathy, possibly secondary to compression. An MRI of the brain revealed a large sphenoidal mucocele extending into the right optic foramen. He was treated with oral steroids, antibiotics and nasal decongestants. He underwent endoscopic intranasal sphenoidectomy and marsupialisation with return of his visual acuity to 20/25 in that eye. PMID:23964041

  7. SCUBA divers as oceanographic samplers: The potential of dive computers to augment aquatic temperature monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Serena; Hull, Tom; Sivyer, David B.; Pearce, David; Pinnegar, John K.; Sayer, Martin D. J.; Mogg, Andrew O. M.; Azzopardi, Elaine; Gontarek, Steve; Hyder, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring temperature of aquatic waters is of great importance, with modelled, satellite and in-situ data providing invaluable insights into long-term environmental change. However, there is often a lack of depth-resolved temperature measurements. Recreational dive computers routinely record temperature and depth, so could provide an alternate and highly novel source of oceanographic information to fill this data gap. In this study, a citizen science approach was used to obtain over 7,000 scuba diver temperature profiles. The accuracy, offset and lag of temperature records was assessed by comparing dive computers with scientific conductivity-temperature-depth instruments and existing surface temperature data. Our results show that, with processing, dive computers can provide a useful and novel tool with which to augment existing monitoring systems all over the globe, but especially in under-sampled or highly changeable coastal environments. PMID:27445104

  8. Dynamic diaphragmatic MRI during apnea struggle phase in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Batinic, Tonci; Mihanovic, Frane; Breskovic, Toni; Zubin-Maslov, Petra; Lojpur, Mihajlo; Mijacika, Tanja; Dujic, Zeljko

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide insight in diaphragmatic involuntary breathing movements (IBM) during struggle phase of apnea at total lung capacity (TLC) and functional residual capacity (FRC) using magnetic resonance imaging along with measurements of hemodynamics and arterial oxygenation. The study was performed in eight elite breath-hold divers. There was a similar increase in diaphragmatic cranio-caudal excursions towards the end of TLC and FRC apnea. The greatest diaphragmatic excursion in both apneas and during tidal breathing was in the middle and posterior part of the diaphragm. Diaphragm thickness in elite BHD was within the reference range of normal values suggesting no diaphragmatic hypertrophy in this population. We found that the range of diaphragmatic excursions increases toward the end of apneas. Additionally, our data suggest that the diaphragm participates in IBM occurrence and that various segments of the diaphragm behave nonhomogenously both in tidal breathing and IBMs. PMID:26644078

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Breath-Hold Divers with Cerebral Decompression Sickness

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Ryu; Kamouchi, Masahiro; Arakawa, Shuji; Furuta, Yoshihiko; Kanazawa, Yuka; Kitazono, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of cerebral decompression sickness (DCS) is still unclear. We report 2 cases of breath-hold divers with cerebral DCS in whom magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated distinctive characteristics. One case presented right hemiparesthesia, diplopia, and gait disturbance after breath-hold diving into the sea at a depth of 20 m. Brain MRI with fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequence revealed multiple hyperintense lesions in the right frontal lobe, bilateral thalamus, pons, and right cerebellar hemisphere. The second case presented visual and gait disturbance after repetitive breath-hold diving into the sea. FLAIR imaging showed hyperintense areas in the bilateral occipito-parietal lobes. In both cases, diffusion-weighted imaging and apparent diffusion coefficient mapping revealed hyperintense areas in the lesions identified by FLAIR. Moreover, follow-up MRI showed attenuation of the FLAIR signal abnormalities. These findings are suggestive of transient hyperpermeability in the microvasculature as a possible cause of cerebral DCS. PMID:24575029

  10. Preconditioning methods and mechanisms for preventing the risk of decompression sickness in scuba divers: a review.

    PubMed

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2010-07-01

    Scuba divers are at risk of decompression sickness due to the excessive formation of gas bubbles in blood and tissues following ascent, with potentially subsequent neurological injuries. Since nonprovocative dive profiles are no guarantor of protection against this disease, novel means are required for its prevention including predive procedures that could induce more resistance to decompression stress. In this article, we review the recent studies describing the promising preconditioning methods that might operate on the attenuation of bubble formation believed to reduce the occurrence of decompression sickness. The main practical applications are simple and feasible predive measures such as endurance exercise in a warm environment, oral hydration, and normobaric oxygen breathing. Rheological changes affecting tissue perfusion, endothelial adaptation with nitric oxide pathway, up-regulation of cytoprotective proteins, and reduction of preexisting gas nuclei from which bubbles grow could be involved in this protective effect. PMID:20623437

  11. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli outpatient urinary isolates: final results from the North American Urinary Tract Infection Collaborative Alliance (NAUTICA).

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Hisanaga, Tamiko L; Laing, Nancy M; DeCorby, Melanie R; Nichol, Kim A; Weshnoweski, Barb; Johnson, Jack; Noreddin, Ayman; Low, Don E; Karlowsky, James A; Hoban, Daryl J

    2006-06-01

    The North American Urinary Tract Infection Collaborative Alliance (NAUTICA) study determined the antibiotic susceptibility to commonly used agents for urinary tract infections of outpatient Escherichia coli urinary isolates obtained from various geographic regions in the USA and Canada. NAUTICA involved 40 medical centres (30 from the USA and 10 from Canada). From April 2003 to June 2004 inclusive, each centre submitted up to 50 consecutive outpatient midstream urine isolates. All isolates were identified to species level by each laboratory's existing protocol. Susceptibility testing was determined using the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) microdilution method. Ampicillin (resistant>or=32 microg/mL), sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SMX/TMP) (resistant>or=4 microg/mL), nitrofurantoin (resistant>or=128 microg/mL), ciprofloxacin (resistant>or=4 microg/mL) and levofloxacin (resistant>or=8 microg/mL) resistance breakpoints used were those published by the CLSI. Of the 1142 E. coli collected, 75.5% (862) were collected from the USA and 280 (24.5%) were from Canada. Patient demographics revealed a mean age of 48.1 years (range, 2 months to 99 years), with female patients representing 79.4% of patients and males representing 20.6%. Overall, resistance to ampicillin was 37.7%, followed by SMX/TMP (21.3%), nitrofurantoin (1.1%), ciprofloxacin (5.5%) and levofloxacin (5.1%). Resistance rates for all antimicrobials were higher in US medical centres compared with Canadian centres (P<0.05). Fluoroquinolone resistance was highest in patients>or=65 years of age (P<0.05). Resistance rates demonstrated considerable geographic variability both in the USA and Canada. This study reports higher rates of antibiotic resistance in US versus Canadian outpatient urinary isolates of E. coli and demonstrates the continuing evolution of resistance to antimicrobial agents. PMID:16713191

  12. Release of erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase after breath holding in competing free divers.

    PubMed

    Kjeld, T; Jattu, T; Nielsen, H B; Goetze, J P; Secher, N H; Olsen, N V

    2015-06-01

    Free diving is associated with extreme hypoxia. This study evaluated the combined effect of maximal static breath holding and underwater swimming on plasma biomarkers of tissue hypoxemia: erythropoietin, neuron-specific enolase and S100B, C-reactive protein, pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, and troponin T. Venous blood samples were obtained from 17 competing free divers before and 3 h after sessions of static apnea and underwater swimming. The heart was evaluated by echocardiography. Static apnea for 293 ± 78 s (mean ± SD) and subsequent 88 ± 21 m underwater swimming increased plasma erythropoietin from 10.6 ± 3.4 to 12.4 ± 4.1 mIU/L (P = 0.013) and neuron-specific enolase from 14.5 ± 5.3 to 24.6 ± 6.4 ng/mL (P = 0.017); C-reactive protein decreased from 0.84 ± 1.0 to 0.71 ± 0.67 mmol/L (P = 0.013). In contrast, plasma concentrations of S100B (P = 0.394), pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (P = 0.549), and troponin T (P = 0.125) remained unchanged and, as assessed by echocardiography, the heart was not affected. In competitive free divers, bouts of static and dynamic apnea increase plasma erythropoietin and neuron-specific enolase, suggesting that renal and neural tissue, rather than the heart, is affected by the hypoxia developed during apnea and underwater swimming. PMID:25142912

  13. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization. PMID:24400144

  14. Nutritional considerations during prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperbaric, hyperoxic environment: recommendations for saturation divers.

    PubMed

    Deb, S K; Swinton, P A; Dolan, E

    2016-01-01

    Saturation diving is an occupation that involves prolonged exposure to a confined, hyperoxic, hyperbaric environment. The unique and extreme environment is thought to result in disruption to physiological and metabolic homeostasis, which may impact human health and performance. Appropriate nutritional intake has the potential to alleviate and/or support many of these physiological and metabolic concerns, whilst enhancing health and performance in saturation divers. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to identify the physiological and practical challenges of saturation diving and consequently provide evidence-based nutritional recommendations for saturation divers to promote health and performance within this challenging environment. Saturation diving has a high-energy demand, with an energy intake of between 44 and 52 kcal/kg body mass per day recommended, dependent on intensity and duration of underwater activity. The macronutrient composition of dietary intake is in accordance with the current Institute of Medicine guidelines at 45-65 % and 20-35 % of total energy intake for carbohydrate and fat intake, respectively. A minimum daily protein intake of 1.3 g/kg body mass is recommended to facilitate body composition maintenance. Macronutrient intake between individuals should, however, be dictated by personal preference to support the attainment of an energy balance. A varied diet high in fruit and vegetables is highly recommended for the provision of sufficient micronutrients to support physiological processes, such as vitamin B12 and folate intake to facilitate red blood cell production. Antioxidants, such as vitamin C and E, are also recommended to reduce oxidised molecules, e.g. free radicals, whilst selenium and zinc intake may be beneficial to reinforce endogenous antioxidant reserves. In addition, tailored hydration and carbohydrate fueling strategies for underwater work are also advised. PMID:26744625

  15. Underwater study of arterial blood pressure in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Arne; L'abbate, Antonio; Passera, Mirko; Garbella, Erika; Benassi, Antonio; Bedini, Remo

    2009-11-01

    Knowledge regarding arterial blood pressure (ABP) values during breath-hold diving is scanty. It derives from a few reports of measurements performed at the water's surface, showing slight or no increase in ABP, and from a single study of two simulated deep breath-hold dives in a hyperbaric chamber. Simulated dives showed an increase in ABP to values considered life threatening by standard clinical criteria. For the first time, using a novel noninvasive subaquatic sphygmomanometer, we successfully measured ABP in 10 healthy elite breath-hold divers at a depth of 10 m of freshwater (mfw). ABP was measured in dry conditions, at the surface (head-out immersion), and twice at a depth of 10 mfw. Underwater measurements of ABP were obtained in all subjects. Each measurement lasted 50-60 s and was accomplished without any complications or diver discomfort. In the 10 subjects as a whole, mean ABP values were 124/93 mmHg at the surface and 123/94 mmHg at a depth of 10 mfw. No significant statistical differences were found when blood pressure measurements at the water surface were compared with breath-hold diving conditions at a depth of 10 mfw. No systolic blood pressure values >140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure values >115 mmHg were recorded. In conclusion, direct measurements of ABP during apnea diving showed no or only mild increases in ABP. However, our results cannot be extended over environmental conditions different from those of the present study. PMID:19696356

  16. Remote Sensing and Earth System Dynamics: The Helmholtz Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajnsek, I.; Eineder, M.; Walter, T. R.; Friedrich, A. M.; Bieber, P.; Huth, A.; Papathanassiou, K.; Montzka, C.; Wollschläger, U.; Thies, B.; Humbert, A.; Braun, M.; Krieger, G.; Moreira, A.

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of the five year funded German Helmholtz Alliance "Remote Sensing and Earth System Dynamics" is the development and evaluation of novel bio/geo-physical information products derived from data acquired by a new generation of remote sensing satellites; and their integration in Earth system models for improving understanding and modelling the ability of global environmental processes and ecosystem change. The Alliance is organized in 4 research topics, each one dedicated to a specific Earth sphere with a specific scientific goal: Biosphere: Global forest structure and biomass dynamics are evaluated for forest and biodiversity monitoring and the quantification of the global carbon cycle; Geosphere: The ability to measure topographic variations with millimeter accuracy is explored for improving the understanding of earthquake and volcano activities; Hydrosphere: The quantification of soil moisture and its variations at high spatial resolution is assessed with respect to hydrological models and the global water cycle; Cryosphere: The estimation of melting processes in snow, ice and permafrost regions is addressed in terms of global climate change. The Alliance has been founded in June 2012 and comprises around 120 scientists with a financial support for 50 PhDs and Postdocs having different backgrounds and nationalities. 18 national research centers and universities are participating which represent a unique opportunity to exploit and widen the expertise of all participating centers and to maximize their role and contribution in the international environmental change science. In this talk the objectives of the Alliance and research highlights will be presented which were obtained in the first 2.5 years of its research activities.

  17. The alliance for computing at the extreme scale.

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, James Alfred; Dosanjh, Sudip Singh; Doerfler, Douglas W.; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Vigil, Manuel; Koch, Ken; Morrison, John

    2010-05-01

    Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories have formed a new high performance computing center, the Alliance for Computing at the Extreme Scale (ACES). The two labs will jointly architect, develop, procure and operate capability systems for DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing Program. This presentation will discuss a petascale production capability system, Cielo, that will be deployed in late 2010, and a new partnership with Cray on advanced interconnect technologies.

  18. Global Equity Gauge Alliance: reflections on early experiences.

    PubMed

    McCoy, David; Bambas, Lexi; Acurio, David; Baya, Banza; Bhuiya, Abbas; Chowdhury, A Mushtaque R; Grisurapong, Siriwan; Liu, Yuanli; Ngom, Pierre; Ngulube, Thabale J; Ntuli, Antoinette; Sanders, David; Vega, Jeanette; Shukla, Abhay; Braveman, Paula A

    2003-09-01

    The paper traces the evolution and working of the Global Equity Gauge Alliance (GEGA) and its efforts to promote health equity. GEGA places health equity squarely within a larger framework of social justice, linking findings on socioeconomic and health inequalities with differentials in power, wealth, and prestige in society. The Alliance's 11 country-level partners, called Equity Gauges, share a common action-based vision and framework called the Equity Gauge Strategy. An Equity Gauge seeks to reduce health inequities through three broad spheres of action, referred to as the 'pillars' of the Equity Gauge Strategy, which define a set of interconnected and overlapping actions. Measuring and tracking the inequalities and interpreting their ethical import are pursued through the Assessment and Monitoring pillar. This information provides an evidence base that can be used in strategic ways for influencing policy-makers through actions in the Advocacy pillar and for supporting grassroots groups and civil society through actions in the Community Empowerment pillar. The paper provides examples of strategies for promoting pro-equity policy and social change and reviews experiences and lessons, both in terms of technical success of interventions and in relation to the conceptual development and refinement of the Equity Gauge Strategy and overall direction of the Alliance. To become most effective in furthering health equity at both national and global levels, the Alliance must now reach out to and involve a wider range of organizations, groups, and actors at both national and international levels. Sustainability of this promising experiment depends, in part, on adequate resources but also on the ability to attract and develop talented leadership. PMID:14717573

  19. American lifelines alliance efforts to improve electric power transmission reliability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishenko, S.P.; Savage, W.U.; Honegger, D.G.; McLane, T.R.

    2002-01-01

    A study was performed on American Lifelines Alliance (ALA) efforts to improve electric power transmission reliability. ALA is a public-private partnership project, with the goal of reducing risks to lifelines from natural hazards and human threat events. The mechanism used by ALA for developing national guidelines for lifeline systems is dependent upon using existing Standards Developing Organizations (SDO) accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) as means to achieve national consensus.

  20. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Fink, Mary M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents and overview of the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL). It covers the University of Nebraska's areas of research, and its outreach to students at Native American schools as part of AERIAL. The report contains three papers: "Airborne Remote Sensing (ARS) for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Application" (White Paper), "Validated Numerical Models for the Convective Extinction of Fuel Droplets (CEFD)", and "The Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS): Research Collaborations with the NASA Langley Research Center".

  1. ALLIANCE: An architecture for fault tolerant multi-robot cooperation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, L.E.

    1995-02-01

    ALLIANCE is a software architecture that facilitates the fault tolerant cooperative control of teams of heterogeneous mobile robots performing missions composed of loosely coupled, largely independent subtasks. ALLIANCE allows teams of robots, each of which possesses a variety of high-level functions that it can perform during a mission, to individually select appropriate actions throughout the mission based on the requirements of the mission, the activities of other robots, the current environmental conditions, and the robot`s own internal states. ALLIANCE is a fully distributed, behavior-based architecture that incorporates the use of mathematically modeled motivations (such as impatience and acquiescence) within each robot to achieve adaptive action selection. Since cooperative robotic teams usually work in dynamic and unpredictable environments, this software architecture allows the robot team members to respond robustly, reliably, flexibly, and coherently to unexpected environmental changes and modifications in the robot team that may occur due to mechanical failure, the learning of new skills, or the addition or removal of robots from the team by human intervention. The feasibility of this architecture is demonstrated in an implementation on a team of mobile robots performing a laboratory version of hazardous waste cleanup.

  2. Negotiating therapeutic alliances with a family at impasse.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Myrna L; Lee, Hsin-Hua; Shaffer, Katharine S; Cabrera, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    To bridge the science-practice gap, the APA Presidential Task Force endorsed the publication of evidence-based case studies, but to date, there have been few such investigations of conjoint family therapy. To fill this gap, we studied a successful case of treatment-as-usual in a community agency. Owing to the complexity of the working alliance in conjoint therapy, we examined how an experienced family therapist managed to develop and sustain multiple alliances over time with an estranged couple in crisis. The outcome data showed clinically meaningful changes as well as high satisfaction levels and notable declines in the target complaint discomfort levels of all family members. Alliance indicators showed that the therapist worked diligently over time to connect emotionally with each family member and to foster and maintain safety. Session impact scores showed consistently deep sessions but more variability in smoothness. By working toward the only shared treatment goal-to repair each parent's individual relationship with their very angry daughter-the therapist was able to reduce the effect of the marital estrangement on the child. At the end of the 10 contracted family sessions, the parents agreed to begin working on their relationship in couples therapy, which led shortly thereafter to a reconciliation. PMID:24059731

  3. Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories through alliances or consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Winchell, B.M.

    1994-12-01

    To better facilitate working with industry, groups of industrial participants, and partners in alliances or consortia, Sandia National Laboratories presents information helpful to those outside groups as to the forms of arrangements that may be used to better facilitate partnering relationships between Sandia National Laboratories and consortia or alliances of outside parties. It is expected that these alliances and consortia will include both large and small for-profit industrial concerns, as well as not-for-profit entities such as universities, institutes, other research facilities, and other nonprofit institutions or consortia containing institutions. The intent of this report is to provide such outside groups with information that will facilitate rapid interactions with Sandia National Laboratories through some of these forms of business which will be discussed in this report. These are not the only approaches to facilitating business interactions with Sandia National Laboratories and it is not intended that this report be legal advice or required approaches to doing business with Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this report is merely to suggest ways in which Sandia National Laboratories can work with outside parties in the most expeditious manner.

  4. Partnering with Sandia National Laboratories through alliances or consortia

    SciTech Connect

    Winchell, B.M.

    1994-04-01

    To better facilitate working with industry, groups of industrial participants, and partners in alliances or consortia, Sandia National laboratories presents information helpful to those outside groups as to the forms of arrangements that may be used to better facilitate partnering relationships between Sandia National Laboratories and consortia or alliances of outside parties. It is expected that these alliances and consortia will include both large and small for-profit industrial concerns, as well as not-for-profit entities such as universities, institutes, other research facilities, and other nonprofit institutions or consortia containing institutions. The intent of this report is to provide such outside groups with information that will facilitate rapid interactions with Sandia National Laboratories through some of these forms of business which will be discussed in this report. These are not the only approaches to facilitating business interactions with Sandia National Laboratories and it is not intended that this report be legal advice or required approaches to doing business with Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this report is merely to suggest ways in which Sandia National Laboratories can work with outside parties in the most expeditious manner.

  5. Seapower in the nuclear age: NATO as a maritime alliance

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolsky, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study examines the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, (NATO), from the perspective of its collective maritime forces; how those forces were organized, what task they were given, and how they related to the broader strategic and political doctrines of the Alliance. Drawing upon much heretofore classified material, the study begins with a history and analysis of the cold water at sea. It then examines the impact of the growth in Soviet maritime capabilities and the adoption by NATO of a strategy of flexible response upon the allied posture at sea. A single chapter is devoted to the reinforcement sealift problem. The concluding chapter discusses NATO and the war at sea in the early 1980s. The study comes to the following basic conclusions: (1) the collective maritime forces of the Alliance, both nuclear and conventional, have had as their tasks the traditional task all maritime forces have had in the past - to exploit the strategic value of the seas for the purposes of conveyance and projection and to deny these usages to the enemy; (2) NATO's maritime posture has been consistent with the overall strategies of the Alliance (3) the strategy of flexible response only increased NATO's need to exploit that strategic value of the seas, but did so at a time when the Soviets were becoming increasingly able to deny NATO effective use of the sea to support its position on the European continent.

  6. Establishing strategic alliance among hospitals through SAIS: a case study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hung, Won-Fu; Hwang, Hsin-Ginn; Liao, Chechen

    2005-01-01

    Due to a reformed healthcare insurance system and a gradually decreasing public affairs' budget by the government year by year, Central Taiwan Office (CTO), the Department of Health (DOH) in Taiwan, initiated a strategic alliance project of the hospitals subordinated to the DOH in November, 2001. This project was a five-year plan with an attempt to expand and develop three more strategic alliances covering the northern, southern and eastern regions of Taiwan respectively. Through a cooperative system, such an alliance allows the following: resource sharing, technique collaboration, marketing affiliations and so on. In order to decrease operation management costs and improve the quality of service at hospitals, the strategic alliance practice is supported by IS. We call this alignment the IS-enabled strategic alliance. All the IS-enabled functions are supported by the Strategic Alliance Information System (SAIS). In this article, the SAIS developed by the CTO of the DOH is introduced. PMID:18048210

  7. An International Framework for Data Sharing: Moving Forward with the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health.

    PubMed

    Rahimzadeh, Vasiliki; Dyke, Stephanie O M; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2016-06-01

    The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health is marshaling expertise in biomedical research and data sharing policy to propel bench-to-bedside translation of genomics in parallel with many of the BioSHaRE-EU initiatives described at length in this Issue. Worldwide representation of institutions, funders, researchers, and patient advocacy groups at the Global Alliance is testament to a shared ideal that sees maximizing the public good as a chief priority of genomic innovation in health. The Global Alliance has made a critical stride in this regard with the development of its Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-related Data.(1) This article first discusses the human rights pillars that underlie the Framework and mission of the Global Alliance. Second, it outlines the Global Alliance's use of data governance policies through a number of demonstration projects. Finally, the authors describe how the Global Alliance envisions international data sharing moving forward in the postgenomic era. PMID:27082668

  8. A new level of complexity in the male alliance networks of Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops sp.).

    PubMed

    Connor, Richard C; Watson-Capps, Jana J; Sherwin, William B; Krützen, Michael

    2011-08-23

    Male bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia form two levels of alliances; two to three males cooperate to herd individual females and teams of greater than three males compete with other groups for females. Previous observation suggested two alliance tactics: small four to six member teams of relatives that formed stable pairs or trios and unrelated males in a large 14-member second-order alliance that had labile trio formation. Here, we present evidence for a third level of alliance formation, a continuum of second-order alliance sizes and no relationship between first-order alliance stability and second-order alliance size. These findings challenge the 'two alliance tactics' hypothesis and add to the evidence that Shark Bay male bottlenose dolphins engage in alliance formation that likely places considerable demands on their social cognition. PMID:21047850

  9. Therapeutic alliance, expressed emotion, and treatment outcome for anorexia nervosa in a family-based partial hospitalization program.

    PubMed

    Rienecke, Renee D; Richmond, Rebekah; Lebow, Jocelyn

    2016-08-01

    Adolescent therapeutic alliance has been found to be associated with improvements in eating disorder cognitions and with early weight gain. The current study assessed patient and parent therapeutic alliance, correlates of parent alliance, and relationship between alliance and treatment outcome. Fifty-six patients with anorexia nervosa completed measures of therapeutic alliance and eating disorder symptoms. Patients' parents completed measures of therapeutic alliance, expressed emotion, and psychopathology. Patients' alliance predicted cognitive and behavioral symptomatology at end of treatment (β=-0.39, p=0.001), though it was not related to changes in weight (β=0.12, p=0.377). Maternal hostility was associated with lower maternal alliance (r=-0.34, p=0.05). Findings suggest that maternal hostility should be addressed in treatment, and that patient alliance may be important in achieving psychological recovery from disordered eating. PMID:27289048

  10. 77 FR 73637 - Alliance Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alliance Pipeline L.P.; Notice of Application Take notice that on November 26, 2012, Alliance Pipeline L.P. (Alliance), 800, 605-5 Ave. SW., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 3H5... Pipeline L.P., 800, 605-5 Ave. SW., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 3H5, by telephone at (403) 517-6354 or...

  11. The USA PATRIOT Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minow, Mary; Coyle, Karen; Kaufman, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Explains the USA PATRIOT (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism) Act, passed after the September 11 terrorist attacks, and its implications for libraries and patron records. Considers past dealings with the FBI; court orders; search warrants; wiretaps; and subpoenas. Includes:…

  12. CHILD HEALTH USA 2002

    EPA Science Inventory

    Child Health USA 2002, the thirteenth annual report on the health status and service needs of America's children is presented by the Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). To assess the bureau's progress toward achieving its vision...

  13. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.0W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  14. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This view of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a detailed look at the national seashore recreation area with its many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago.

  15. The Effect of R&D Alliances on the Speed of Innovation: Evidence from Chinese SMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Minghong; Yin, Xinke

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the R&D alliances' effect on technological innovation. There are many factors that have effect on technological innovation, but few empirical literatures have studied R&D alliances. After reviewing related literature, we propose some hypotheses and test them with a sample of 504 small and medium enterprises that have carried out R&D activities and joined in R&D alliances. The results indicate that, for small and medium enterprises, participating in R&D alliances is good for technological innovation. Moreover, capital investment and human resource has positive impacts on innovation, but which industry that enterprises belong to has no effect.

  16. How central is the alliance in psychotherapy? A multilevel longitudinal meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, Christoph; Del Re, A C; Wampold, Bruce E; Symonds, Dianne; Horvath, Adam O

    2012-01-01

    Prior meta-analyses have found a moderate but robust relationship between alliance and outcome across a broad spectrum of treatments, presenting concerns, contexts, and measurements. However, there continues to be a lively debate about the therapeutic role of the alliance, particularly in treatments that are tested using randomized clinical trial (RCT) designs. The purpose of this present study was to examine whether research design, type of treatment, or author's allegiance variables, alone or in combination, moderate the relationship between alliance and outcome. Multilevel longitudinal analysis was used to investigate the following moderators of the alliance-outcome correlation: (a) research design (RCT or other), (b) use of disorder-specific manuals, (c) specificity of outcomes, (d) cognitive and/or behavioral therapy (CBT) or other types of treatments, (e) researcher allegiance, and (f) time of alliance assessment. RCT, disorder-specific manual use, specificity of primary and secondary outcomes, and CBT did not moderate the alliance-outcome correlation. Early alliance-outcome correlations were slightly higher in studies conducted by investigators with specific interest in alliance than were those in studies conducted by researchers without such an allegiance. Over the course of therapy, these initial differences disappeared. Apart from this trend, none of the variables previously proposed as potential moderators or mediators of the alliance-outcome relation, alone or in combination, were found to have a mediating impact. PMID:21988681

  17. Governance processes and change within organizational participants of multi-sectoral community health care alliances: the mediating role of vision, mission, strategy agreement and perceived alliance value.

    PubMed

    Hearld, Larry R; Alexander, Jeffrey A

    2014-03-01

    Multi-sectoral community health care alliances are organizations that bring together individuals and organizations from different industry sectors to work collaboratively on improving the health and health care in local communities. Long-term success and sustainability of alliances are dependent on their ability to galvanize participants to take action within their 'home' organizations and institutionalize the vision, goals, and programs within participating organizations and the broader community. The purpose of this study was to investigate two mechanisms by which alliance leadership and management processes may promote such changes within organizations participating in alliances. The findings of the study suggest that, despite modest levels of change undertaken by participating organizations, more positive perceptions of alliance leadership, decision making, and conflict management were associated with a greater likelihood of participating organizations making changes as a result of their participation in the alliance, in part by promoting greater vision, mission, and strategy agreement and higher levels of perceived value. Leadership processes had a stronger relationship with change within participating organizations than decision-making style and conflict management processes. Open-ended responses by participants indicated that participating organizations most often incorporated new measures or goals into their existing portfolio of strategic plans and activities in response to alliance participation. PMID:24415003

  18. Circulating bubbles and breath-hold underwater fishing divers: a two-dimensional echocardiography and continuous wave Doppler study.

    PubMed

    Boussuges, A; Abdellaoui, S; Gardette, B; Sainty, J M

    1997-01-01

    Since the 1960s, decompression illness after breath-hold diving has been widely debated. The aim of this study was to detect circulating bubbles after breath-hold diving in underwater fishing divers. We used continuous Doppler (DUG, COMEX Pro) and transthoracic two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (Kontron Sigma 1). This study was conducted during a training course organized by the French Federation of Subaquatic Sports at Minorca (Balearic Islands). Ten breath-hold divers performed repeated breath-hold dives for periods ranging from 2 to 6 h [mean maximum depth 35 meters of seawater (msw)]. A dive computer (Maestro Pro Beuchat, analyst PC interface) was used to record diving patterns. No circulating bubbles were detected in the right heart cavities (2D echocardiography) or in the pulmonary artery (continuous Doppler). However, this study had some limits: only 10 subjects were studied and the earliest detection was 3 min after immersion, further studies will thus be required. PMID:9444062

  19. [Decompression sickness in divers treated at the Israel Naval Medical Institute between the years 1992 to 1997].

    PubMed

    Gil, A; Shupak, A; Lavon, H; Adir, Y

    2000-05-01

    Clinical characteristics of 125 divers treated for decompression sickness (DCS) in the hyperbaric multiplace chambers of this Institute during 1992-1997 were analyzed retrospectively. In 62 (51%) the diagnosis was DCS Type I (joint pain or skin involvement) and in 60 (49%) DCS Type II (neurological, inner ear or pulmonary disease). Risk factors for the evolution of DCS were depth and duration of the dives involving accidents, violation of recommendations of the decompression tables, and repeated dives. Results were available for 112 of the 125 patients. 54 of them (48%) recovered completely, and another 54 recovered partially; 4 did not respond to treatment. Inner ear DCS was less responsive to hyperbaric oxygen treatment (p = 0.0001). There was significant improvement of neurological function in those with severe neurological injury (p = 0.0001). Rapid diagnosis and transportation of divers with DCS to a hyperbaric chamber is of crucial importance. PMID:10883229

  20. Patent foramen ovale in scuba divers. A report of two cases and a brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chessa, Massimo; Clai, Francesco; Vigna, Carlo; Butera, Gianfranco; Negura, Diana Gabriela; Giamberti, Alessandro; Bossone, Edoardo; Carminati, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Scuba diving (diving with a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) has become a popular sport. Decompression illness may be due to the formation of gas bubbles in various body tissues at an increased ambient pressure. The gas can pass from the systemic venous circulation into the arterial circulation as a result of either pulmonary barotrauma or intravascular shunting. Gas emboli may be the cause of an increased prevalence of brain lesions in sport divers. The management of scuba divers (professionals and amateurs) with a patent foramen ovale is not clear. We present the cases of 2 subjects with decompression illness and a patent foramen ovale and briefly review the literature on this combination. PMID:15773277

  1. Regional and total body active heating and cooling of a resting diver in water of varied temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardy, Erik; Mollendorf, Joseph; Pendergast, David

    2008-02-01

    Passive insulations alone are not sufficient for maintaining underwater divers in thermal balance or comfort. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the active heating and cooling requirements to keep a diver at rest in thermal balance and comfort in water temperatures between 10 and 40 °C. A diver wearing a prototype tubesuit and a wetsuit (3 or 6.5 mm foam neoprene) was fully submersed (0.6 m) in water at a specified temperature (10, 20, 30 and 40 °C). During immersion, the tubesuit was perfused with 30 °C water at a flow rate of 0.5 L min-1 to six individual body regions. An attempt was made to keep skin temperatures below 42 °C in hot water (>30 °C) and elevated but below 32 °C in cold water (<20 °C). A skin temperature of 32 °C is the threshold for maximal body thermal resistance due to vasoconstriction. Skin temperatures and core temperature were monitored during immersion to ensure they remained within set thermal limits. In addition skin heat flux, oxygen consumption and the thermal exchange of the tubesuit were measured. In both wetsuit thicknesses there was a linear correlation between the thermal exchange of the tubesuit and ambient water temperature. In the 6.5 mm wetsuit -214 W to 242 W of heating (-) and cooling (+) was necessary in 10 °C to 40 °C water, respectively. In the 3 mm wetsuit -462 to 342 W was necessary in 10 °C to 40 °C water, respectively. It was therefore concluded that a diver at rest can be kept in thermal balance in 10-40 °C water with active heating and cooling.

  2. Effect of in-water recompression with oxygen to 6 msw versus normobaric oxygen breathing on bubble formation in divers.

    PubMed

    Blatteau, Jean-Eric; Pontier, Jean-Michel

    2009-07-01

    It is generally accepted that the incidence of decompression sickness (DCS) from hyperbaric exposures is low when few or no bubbles are present in the circulation. To date, no data are available on the influence of in-water oxygen breathing on bubble formation following a provocative dive in man. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of post-dive hyperbaric versus normobaric oxygen breathing (NOB) on venous circulating bubbles. Nineteen divers carried out open-sea field air dives at 30 msw depth for 30 min followed by a 9 min stop at 3 msw. Each diver performed three dives: one control dive, and two dives followed by 30 min of hyperbaric oxygen breathing (HOB) or NOB; both HOB and NOB started 10 min after surfacing. For HOB, divers were recompressed in-water to 6 msw at rest, whereas NOB was performed in a dry room in supine position. Decompression bubbles were examined by a precordial pulsed Doppler. Bubble count was significantly lower for post-dive NOB than for control dives. HOB dramatically suppressed circulating bubble formation with a bubble count significantly lower than for NOB or controls. In-water recompression with oxygen to 6 msw is more effective in removing gas bubbles than NOB. This treatment could be used in situations of "interrupted" or "omitted" decompression, where a diver returns to the water in order to complete decompression prior to the onset of symptoms. Further investigations are needed before to recommend this protocol as an emergency treatment for DCS. PMID:19424716

  3. Sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to glossopharyngeal insufflation in trained apnea divers.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Dzamonja, Gordan; Breskovic, Toni; Steinback, Craig D; Diedrich, André; Tank, Jens; Jordan, Jens; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-12-01

    Glossopharyngeal insufflation (lung packing) is a common maneuver among experienced apnea divers by which additional air is pumped into the lungs. It has been shown that packing may compromise cardiovascular homeostasis. We tested the hypothesis that the packing-mediated increase in intrathoracic pressure enhances the baroreflex-mediated increase in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in response to an exaggerated drop in cardiac output (CO). We compared changes in hemodynamics and MSNA (peroneal microneurography) during maximal breath-holds without and with prior moderate packing (0.79 ± 0.40 liters) in 14 trained divers (12 men, 2 women, 26.7 ± 4.5 yr, body mass index 24.8 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)). Packing did not change apnea time (3.8 ± 1.0 vs. 3.8 ± 1.2 min), hemoglobin oxygen desaturation (-17.6 ± 12.3 vs. -18.7 ± 12.8%), or the reduction in CO (1 min: -3.65 ± 1.83 vs. -3.39 ± 1.96 l/min; end of apnea: -2.44 ± 1.33 vs. -2.16 ± 1.44 l/min). On the other hand, packing dampened the early, i.e., 1-min increase in mean arterial pressure (MAP, 1 min: 9.2 ± 8.3 vs. 2.4 ± 11.0 mmHg, P < 0.01) and in total peripheral resistance (relative TPR, 1 min: 2.1 ± 0.5 vs. 1.9 ± 0.5, P < 0.05) but it augmented the concomitant rise in MSNA (1 min: 28.0 ± 11.7 vs. 39.4 ± 12.7 bursts/min, P < 0.001; 32.8 ± 16.4 vs. 43.9 ± 14.8 bursts/100 heart beats, P < 0.01; 3.3 ± 2.1 vs. 4.8 ± 3.2 au/min, P < 0.05). We conclude that the early sympathoactivation 1 min into apnea after moderate packing is due to mechanisms other than excessive reduction in CO. We speculate that lower MAP despite increased MSNA after packing might be explained by vasodilator substances released by the lungs. This idea should be addressed in future studies. PMID:20864558

  4. Central nervous system oxygen toxicity in closed circuit scuba divers II.

    PubMed

    Butler, F K; Thalmann, E D

    1986-06-01

    Central nervous system oxygen toxicity is currently the limiting factor in underwater swimming/diving operations using closed-circuit oxygen equipment. A dive series was conducted at the Navy Experimental Diving Unit in Panama City, FL, to determine whether these limits can be safely extended and also to evaluate the feasibility of making excursions to increased depth after a previous transit at a shallower depth for various lengths of time. A total of 465 man-dives were conducted on 14 different experimental profiles. In all, 33 episodes of oxygen toxicity were encountered, including 2 convulsions. Symptoms were classified as probable, definite, or convulsion. Findings were as follows: symptom classification is a useful tool in evaluating symptoms of oxygen toxicity; safe exposure limits should generally be adjusted only as a result of definite symptoms or convulsions; the following single-depth dive limits are proposed: 20 fsw (6.1 msw)--240 min, 25 fsw (7.6 msw)--240 min, 30 fsw (9.1 msw)--80 min, 35 fsw (10.7 msw)--25 min, 40 fsw (12.2 msw)--15 min, 50 fsw (15.2 msw)--10 min; a pre-exposure of up to 4 h at 20 fsw causes only a slight increase in the probability of an oxygen toxicity symptom on subsequent downward excursions; a pre-exposure depth of 25 fsw will have a more adverse effect on subsequent excursions than will 20 fsw; a return to 20 fsw for periods of 95-110 min seems to provide an adequate recovery period from an earlier excursion and enables a second excursion to be taken without additional hazard; nausea was the most commonly noted symptom of oxygen toxicity, followed by muscle twitching and dizziness; dives on which oxygen toxicity episodes were noted had a more rapid rate of core temperature cooling than dives without toxicity episodes; several divers who had passed the U.S. Navy Oxygen Tolerance Test were observed to be reproducibly more susceptible to oxygen toxicity than the other experimental divers. PMID:3727183

  5. Differential antioxidant protection in tissues from marine mammals with distinct diving capacities. Shallow/short vs. deep/long divers.

    PubMed

    Cantú-Medellín, Nadiezhda; Byrd, Barbie; Hohn, Aleta; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2011-04-01

    The diving response in marine mammals results in bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction, with blood flow redistributing preferentially to nervous and cardiac tissues. Therefore, some tissues are rendered ischemic during a dive; with the first breath after a dive, blood flow to all tissues is reestablished. In terrestrial mammals, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production increases in response to ischemia/reperfusion and oxidative damage can occur. The capacity of marine mammals to tolerate repeated ischemia/reperfusion cycles associated with diving appears to be due to an enhanced antioxidant system. However, it is not known if diving depth and/or duration elicit differences in tissue capacity to produce ROS and antioxidant defenses in marine mammals. The objective of this study was to analyze ROS production, antioxidant defenses and oxidative damage in marine mammal species that perform shallow/short vs. deep/long dives. We measured production of superoxide radical (O(2)(•-)), oxidative damage to lipids and proteins, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and glutathione levels in tissues from shallow/short divers (Tursiops truncatus) and deep/long divers (Kogia spp.). We found that differences between the diving capacity of dolphins and Kogia spp. are reflected in O(2)(•-) production and antioxidant levels. These differences suggest that shallow/short and deep/long divers have distinct mechanisms to successfully maintain redox balance. PMID:21147244

  6. Alliance for Earth Sciences, Engineering and Development in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, E. J.; Adewumi, M.

    2004-12-01

    Penn State University, with a significant number of African University partners (University of Ibadan, University of Lagos, University of Cape Town, University of Witwatersrand, and Agustino Neto University) as well as HBCUs (Howard University and the Mississippi Consortium for International Development - a consortium of four HBCUs in Mississippi), has established the Alliance for Earth Sciences, Engineering and Development in Africa (AESEDA). AESEDA is designed to enable the integration of science, engineering, and social sciences in order to develop human resources, promote economic vitality and enable environmental stewardship in Africa. The Alliance has a coherent and significant multidisciplinary focus, namely African georesources. Education is a central focus, with research collaboration as one element of the vehicle for education. AESEDA is focused on building an environment of intellectual discourse and pooled intellectual capital and developing innovative and enabling educational programs and enhancing existing ones. AESEDA also has unique capabilities to create role models for under-represented groups to significantly enable the utilization of human potential. The efforts of the Alliance center around specific activities in support of its objectives: (1) Focused research collaboration among partner institutions, (2) Development of an international community of scholars, and (3) Joint development of courses and programs and instructional innovation. Penn State has a unique ability to contribute to the success of this program. The College of Earth and Mineral Sciences contains strong programs in the areas of focus. More than 25 faculty in the College have active research and educational efforts in Africa. Hence, the Alliance has natural and vigorous support within the College. The College is also providing strong institutional support for AESEDA, by establishing a Director and support staff and creating permanent funds for a unique set of new faculty hires

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2002-08-20

    This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  8. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral “Lesions” and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p < 0.05) and Symbol-Digit-Substitution (SDS; p < 0.01). Compared to subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents, divers scored similar on DSB and SDS tests, but significantly better on the Simple Reaction Time (REA) and Hand-Eye Coordination (EYE) tests. There was no correlation between PFO, number of UBO's and any of the neuro-psychometric tests. We conclude that for

  9. Cerebral arterial gas embolism in a professional diver with a persistent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Colin M; Sayer, Martin Dj

    2015-06-01

    A 33-year-old, male professional scallop diver diving on the Outer Hebrides in Scotland rapidly developed symptoms of cerebral arterial gas embolism following a provocative dive with possibly a fast ascent. During transfer by helicopter to the mainland for treatment, his symptoms improved on surface oxygen. He was recompressed on a Royal Navy Treatment Table 62 (RN TT62) with complete resolution. Just over six weeks later, again diving on the Outer Hebrides and after adopting more conservative diving practices, he developed symptoms and signs of vestibular decompression sickness after a problem-free dive, with dizziness, poor co-ordination and gait, nausea and vomiting, and rotational vertigo. He was again transported to the mainland for recompression treatment. He received an extended RN TT62 and required five further Comex 12 (223 kPa) hyperbaric oxygen treatments over the following three days before he was symptom free. A 4 mm persistent foramen ovale (PFO) was subsequently diagnosed and he underwent successful closure of the defect with Amplatzer device and returned to commercial diving a year later. PMID:26165536

  10. Diving bradycardia of elderly Korean women divers, haenyeo, in cold seawater: a field report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo-Young; Lee, Hyo-Hyun; Kim, Siyeon; Jang, Young-Joon; Baek, Yoon-Jeong; Kang, Kwon-Yong

    2016-03-28

    The purpose of the present field study was to explore diving patterns and heart rate of elderly Korean women divers (haenyeo) while breath-hold diving in cold seawater. We hypothesized that the decreasing rate in heart rate of elderly haenyeos during breath-hold diving was greater and total diving time was shorter than those of young haenyeos from previous studies. Nine haenyeos participated in a field study [68 ± 10 yr in age, ranged from 56 to 83 yr] at a seawater temperature of 10 to 13 °C. Average total diving time including surface swimming time between dives was 253 ± 73 min (155-341 min). Total frequency of dives was 97 ± 28 times and they dived 23 ± 8 times per hour. All haenyeos showed diving bradycardia with a decreased rate of 20 ± 8% at the bottom time (101 ± 20 bpm) when compared to surface swimming time (125 ± 16 bpm) in the sea. Older haenyeos among the nine elderly haenyeos had shorter diving time, less diving frequencies, and lower heart rate at work (p<0.05). These reductions imply that haenyeos voluntarily adjust their workload along with advancing age and diminished cardiovascular functions. PMID:26632118

  11. Abdominal compartment syndrome caused by tension pneumoperitoneum in a scuba diver

    PubMed Central

    Bunni, J; Bryson, PJ; Higgs, SM

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome is a surgical emergency caused by a raised intra-abdominal pressure, which may lead to respiratory, cardiovascular and renal compromise. It is most commonly seen in post-operative and trauma patients and it has a variety of causes. Tension pneumoperitoneum (TP) is a rare cause of abdominal compartment syndrome most often seen after gastrointestinal endoscopy with perforation. We present the case of a fit 52-year-old experienced female diver who developed TP and shock following a routine training dive to 27m. Following accidental inhalation of water, she had an unstaged ascent and, on reaching the surface, developed severe acute abdominal pain and distension. She was brought to our emergency department by air ambulance for assessment. Clinical and radiological examination revealed a shocked patient with dramatic free intra-abdominal gas and signs of abdominal compartment syndrome, which was treated with needle decompression. Symptoms and signs resolved quickly with no need for further surgical intervention. TP is a surgical emergency where surgery can be avoided with prompt diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23131212

  12. Cold injury to a diver's hand after a 90-min dive in 6 degrees C water.

    PubMed

    Laden, Gerard D M; Purdy, Gerard; O'Rielly, Gerard

    2007-05-01

    We present here a case of non-freezing cold injury (NFCI) in a sport scuba diver. There are similarities between the presenting symptoms of NFCI and decompression sickness, e.g., pain and/or altered sensation in an extremity, often reported as numbness. In both conditions patients have been known to describe their lower limbs or feet as feeling woolly. Both conditions are the result of environmental exposure. Additionally, there are no good (high sensitivity and specificity) diagnostic tests for either condition. Diagnosis is made based on patient history, clinical presentation, and examination. NFCI is most frequently seen in military personnel, explorers, and the homeless. When affecting the feet of soldiers it is often referred to as "trench foot." Historically, NFCI has been and continues to be of critical importance in infantry warfare in cold and wet environments. A high priority should be given to prevention of NFCI during military operational planning. With the advent of so-called "technical diving" characterized by going deeper for longer (often in cold water) and adventure tourism, this extremely painful condition is likely to increase in prevalence. NFCI is treated symptomatically. PMID:17539448

  13. Heart rate and blood pressure time courses during prolonged dry apnoea in breath-hold divers.

    PubMed

    Perini, Renza; Tironi, Adelaide; Gheza, Alberto; Butti, Ferdinando; Moia, Christian; Ferretti, Guido

    2008-09-01

    To define the dynamics of cardiovascular adjustments to apnoea, beat-to-beat heart rate (HR) and blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) were recorded during prolonged breath-holding in air in 20 divers. Apnoea had a mean duration of 210 +/- 70 s. In all subjects, HR attained a value 14 beats min(-1) lower than control within the initial 30 s (phase I). HR did not change for the following 2-2.5 min (phase II). Then, nine subjects interrupted the apnoea (group A), whereas 11 subjects (group B) could prolong the breath-holding for about 100 s, during which HR continuously decreased (phase III). In both groups, mean blood pressure was 8 mmHg above control at the end of phase I; it then further increased by additional 12 mmHg at the end of the apnoea. In both groups, SaO(2) did not change in the initial 100-140 s of apnoea; then, it decreased to 95% at the end of phase II. In group B, SaO(2) further diminished to 84% at the end of phase III. A typical pattern of cardiovascular readjustments was identified during dry apnoea. This pattern was not compatible with a role for baroreflexes in phase I and phase II. Further readjustment in group B may imply a role for both baroreflexes and chemoreflexes. Hypothesis has been made that the end of phase II corresponds to physiological breakpoint. PMID:18496707

  14. Diving bradycardia of elderly Korean women divers, haenyeo, in cold seawater: a field report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, Joo-Young; LEE, Hyo-Hyun; KIM, Siyeon; JANG, Young-Joon; BAEK, Yoon-Jeong; KANG, Kwon-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present field study was to explore diving patterns and heart rate of elderly Korean women divers (haenyeo) while breath-hold diving in cold seawater. We hypothesized that the decreasing rate in heart rate of elderly haenyeos during breath-hold diving was greater and total diving time was shorter than those of young haenyeos from previous studies. Nine haenyeos participated in a field study [68 ± 10 yr in age, ranged from 56 to 83 yr] at a seawater temperature of 10 to 13 °C. Average total diving time including surface swimming time between dives was 253 ± 73 min (155–341 min). Total frequency of dives was 97 ± 28 times and they dived 23 ± 8 times per hour. All haenyeos showed diving bradycardia with a decreased rate of 20 ± 8% at the bottom time (101 ± 20 bpm) when compared to surface swimming time (125 ± 16 bpm) in the sea. Older haenyeos among the nine elderly haenyeos had shorter diving time, less diving frequencies, and lower heart rate at work (p<0.05). These reductions imply that haenyeos voluntarily adjust their workload along with advancing age and diminished cardiovascular functions. PMID:26632118

  15. The Impact of Belonging to a High School Gay/Straight Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Camille

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative investigation studies the impact of belonging to a high school Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA or Alliance) on the lives of seven students. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted over a two-year time period. The author used voices of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and straight students to relate the experiences unique to each…

  16. The Impact of Belonging to a High School Gay/Straight Alliance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Camille

    This qualitative investigation studies the impact of belonging to a high school Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA or Alliance) on the lives of seven students in a Salt Lake City (Utah) high school. Individual and focus group interviews were conducted over a 2-year period. The researcher/author used voices of gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, and straight students…

  17. Alliance and Outcome in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirk, Stephen R.; Gudmundsen, Gretchen; Kaplinski, Heather Crisp; McMakin, Dana L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined predictive relations between therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes in manual-guided, cognitive-behavioral therapy for adolescent depression. Fifty-four adolescents met criteria for a depressive disorder and were treated in school-based clinics. Alliance was measured after the third session from both therapist and…

  18. Therapeutic Alliance in Telephone-Administered Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applebaum, Allison J.; DuHamel, Katherine N.; Winkel, Gary; Rini, Christine; Greene, Paul B.; Mosher, Catherine E.; Redd, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A strong therapeutic alliance has been found to predict psychotherapeutic treatment success across a variety of therapeutic modalities and patient populations. However, only a few studies have examined therapeutic alliance as a predictor of psychotherapy outcome among cancer survivors, and none have examined this relation in…

  19. Therapeutic alliance in Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for bulimia nervosa: probably necessary but definitely insufficient.

    PubMed

    Raykos, Bronwyn C; McEvoy, Peter M; Erceg-Hurn, David; Byrne, Susan M; Fursland, Anthea; Nathan, Paula

    2014-06-01

    The present paper assessed therapeutic alliance over the course of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT-E) in a community-based sample of 112 patients with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa (BN) or atypical BN. Temporal assessment of alliance was conducted at three time points (the start, middle and end of treatment) and the relationship between alliance and treatment retention and outcome was explored. Results indicated that the alliance between patient and therapist was strong at all stages of CBT-E, and even improved in the early stages of treatment when behaviour change was initiated (weekly in-session weighing, establishing regular eating, and ceasing binge-eating and compensatory behaviours). The present study found no evidence that alliance was related to treatment retention or outcomes, or that symptom severity or problematic interpersonal styles interacted with alliance to influence outcomes. Alliance was also unrelated to baseline emotional or interpersonal difficulties. The study provides no evidence that alliance has clinical utility for the prediction of treatment retention or outcome in CBT-E for BN, even for individuals with severe symptoms or problematic interpersonal styles. Early symptom change was the best predictor of outcome in CBT-E. Further research is needed to determine whether these results are generalizable to patients with anorexia nervosa. PMID:24841726

  20. PERSONALITY TRAITS AND THE WORKING ALLIANCE IN PSYCHOTHERAPY TRAINEES: AN ORGANIZING ROLE FORTHE FIVE FACTOR MODEL?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Benjamin P; Talbot, Nancy; Tatman, Anthony W; Brition, Peter C

    2009-05-01

    Ackerman and Hilsenroth (2001, 2003) suggested that therapist personality may be meaningfully associated with the psychotherapy working alliance. We extended this line of research by examining the association between Five Factor Model (Costa & McCrae, 1997b) personality traits Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness to Experience, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness, and ratings of the working alliance made by clients and psychotherapy trainees. Higher trainee Neuroticism was associated with better client ratings of the alliance, but with worse trainee ratings of the alliance. Higher trainee Openness was associated with lower client ratings of the alliance, and higher trainee Agreeableness with lower trainee ratings of the alliance. Because levels of Neuroticism were low and levels of Openness high among therapist trainees, the results suggest that average rather than low Neuroticism, and average rather than high Openness facilitate better client perceptions of the alliance. Implications are discussed in terms of monitoring and training therapists who evidence these dispositions, in order to assist them in developing maximally effective alliances with clients. PMID:24163497

  1. The reciprocal relationship between alliance and symptom improvement across treatment of childhood anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Marker, Craig D.; Comer, Jonathan S.; Abramova, Viktoriya; Kendall, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined changes in the therapeutic alliance and in self-reported anxiety over the course of 16 weeks of manual-based family treatment for child anxiety disorders. Method 86 children (51.3% female; aged 7.15 to 14.44; 86.2% Caucasian, 14.8% minority) with a principal diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and/or social phobia, and their parents, received family treatment for anxiety disorders in youth. Child, therapist, and parent ratings of therapeutic alliance and child ratings of state anxiety were measured each session. Latent difference score growth modeling investigated the interacting relationship. Results Therapeutic alliance change, as rated by the mother and by the therapist, was a significant predictor (medium effect) of latter change in child anxiety (with greater therapeutic alliance leading to later reduction in anxiety). However, changes in child-reported anxiety also predicted latter change in father- and therapist-reported alliance (small-to-medium effect). Prospective relationships between child-reported therapeutic alliance and child-reported symptom improvement were not significant. Conclusions Results provide partial support for a reciprocal model in which therapeutic alliance improves outcome, and anxiety reduction improves therapeutic alliance. PMID:23009693

  2. FLORIDA GULF ALLIANCE COORDINATION: A PUBLIC AWARENESS AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT PROGRAM MX964795

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will assist the Gulf of Mexico Alliance by providing financial assistance to engage a Florida Gulf Alliance Coordinator and an assistant to partner with the media on a Gulf-wide public awareness campaign. Also, the coordinator and assistant will support Florida relat...

  3. Working Alliance, Attachment Memories, and Social Competencies of Women in Brief Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallinckrodt, Brent; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Female clients (n=76) at 4 university and community agencies completed surveys containing questionnaires concerning parental bonding, self-efficacy, adult attachment, and working alliance. Results indicated that parental bonds, especially with fathers, were significantly associated with social competencies, although working alliance was negatively…

  4. The Client's Perspective on Forming a Counselling Alliance and Implications for Research on Counsellor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Robinder P.; Davis, Michael D.; Arvay, Marla J.

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the client's perspective on what helps form and strengthen the counselling alliance and aims to provide a preliminary catalogue of concrete client-identified alliance-building factors. Nine participants (four males, five females) currently or previously in counselling were interviewed using the Critical Incident…

  5. 75 FR 11228 - Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Manufacturers Alliance Insurance Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ..., at 74 FR 31536. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Surety Bond Branch at (202) 874-6850. SUPPLEMENTARY... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable On Federal Bonds: Manufacturers Alliance Insurance Company....C. 9305 to the following company: Manufacturers Alliance Insurance Company (NAIC 36897)....

  6. Management of Cultural Differences under Various Forms of China-UK Higher Education Strategic Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaoqing; Roberts, Joanne; Yan, Yanni; Tan, Hui

    2016-01-01

    International strategic alliances are notorious for their high failure rate. Increased inter-partner conflict resulting from ineffective cross-cultural management is perceived to be one of the key reasons for unsatisfactory alliance performance. Driven by globalization, universities are extending into foreign markets through the establishment of…

  7. The Identification of Funding Options, Problems and Issues Associated with Sino-Foreign University Alliances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Many Chinese universities (there are over 1,080) have various forms of alliances with foreign universities to undertake the development and delivery of courses in China, participate in exchange activities, collaborate in research projects and engage in consulting programs. It is now quite common for these alliances to offer complete undergraduate…

  8. Measuring Therapeutic Alliance with Children in Residential Treatment and Therapeutic Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roest, Jesse; van der Helm, Peer; Strijbosch, Eefje; van Brandenburg, Mariëtte; Stams, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the construct validity and reliability of a therapeutic alliance measure (Children's Alliance Questionnaire [CAQ]) for children with psychosocial and/or behavioral problems, receiving therapeutic residential care or day care in the Netherlands. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis of a one-factor model ''therapeutic…

  9. The Contribution of the Counselor-Client Working Alliance to Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elad-Strenger, Julia; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of Israeli counselors' and clients' ratings of their working alliance on clients' career exploration (CE), using a sample of 94 three-session career counseling processes. Results reveal that both clients' and counselors' working alliance ratings increased over time; yet, clients' ratings remained…

  10. 76 FR 56749 - Northern Laramie Range Alliance; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Laramie Range Alliance; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on July 12, 2011, Northern Laramie Range Alliance filed a Petition for Declaratory...Support@ferc.gov , or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Comment Date: 5...

  11. The therapeutic alliance in a naturalistic psychiatric setting: Temporal relations with depressive symptom change

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Christian A.; Beard, Courtney; Auerbach, Randy P.; Menninger, Eliza; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2014-01-01

    Objective Numerous studies have reported associations between the therapeutic alliance and depressive symptom improvement in outpatient samples. However, little is known regarding the temporal relationship between the alliance and symptom change among relatively severely depressed patients receiving treatment in naturalistic, psychiatric hospital settings. Method Adult patients with major depression (n = 103) receiving combined cognitive behavioral therapy and pharmacological treatment at a psychiatric hospital completed repeated assessments of the therapeutic alliance and depressive symptoms, as well as a pretreatment assessment of their expectation of symptom improvement. Results Results indicated that the alliance and treatment outcome expectancies significantly predicted subsequent depressive symptom change. However, in a model in which prior symptom change and treatment outcome expectancies were statistically controlled, the alliance-outcome association was rendered nonsignificant. The alliance was significantly associated with prior symptom improvement. Conclusions Findings highlight the importance of controlling for plausible third variable and temporal confounds to minimize biased estimates of alliance-outcome associations in future studies. Overall, results were more consistent with the alliance being a consequence, rather than a cause, of symptom change. Finally, findings contribute to a growing body of evidence supporting the role of treatment outcome expectancies in predicting symptom improvement, even within our relatively severely depressed sample. PMID:25156322

  12. Alliances That Work. A Report from a Conference (Louisville, Kentucky, May 23, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Technology Strategies, Inc., Carrboro, NC.

    This monograph summarizes presentations and discussions that took place at a symposium organized in conjunction with the spring meeting of the Trans-Atlantic Technology and Training Alliance (TA3). TA3 is an international alliance dedicated to sharing practices that prepare workers for technical careers, providing opportunities for faculty…

  13. Relation of Patient Pretreatment Characteristics to the Therapeutic Alliance in Diverse Psychotherapies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Louise; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Investigated prediction of therapeutic alliance from patient pretreatment characteristics among 60 elderly depressed outpatients treated in behavioral, cognitive, and brief dynamic psychotherapy. Found that higher degree of patient defensiveness was related to lower patient contribution to alliance as reflected in patient commitment and working…

  14. How To Make International Strategic Alliances Work: One More Business Lesson from the Japanese.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    International strategic alliances are established by two or more companies as synergistic relationships to achieve a common goal where both parties benefit. The evolving global market has focused renewed interest on these alliances as an important tool in penetrating new markets. No country has achieved as much success as Japan in forging such…

  15. Reciprocal Influence of Alliance to the Group and Outcome in Day Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tasca, Giorgio A.; Lampard, Amy M.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the alliance-outcome relationship is still emerging. This study examined the reciprocal influence of change in alliance to the group and change in urge to restrict in eating-disordered individuals attending a group-based day treatment. Participants (N = 238) were a transdiagnostic or mixed diagnostic sample of eating-disordered…

  16. The Therapy Alliance: A Moderator in Therapy Outcome for Families Dealing with Child Abuse and Neglect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lee N.; Ketring, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The role of the therapy alliance in therapy outcome for families dealing with child abuse and neglect was examined using the family as the unit of analysis. The alliance was tested as a moderator in relationship to posttreatment levels of symptom distress and physical violence. Results show that the bonds, goals, and tasks subscale scores are…

  17. The University Student Perspective on Factors that Hinder the Counseling Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, Robinder P.; Cook, Megan C.; Domene, Jose F.

    2012-01-01

    These two studies investigated the university student clients' perspective on factors that hinder the counseling alliance. In Study 1, twelve university students identified alliance-hindering factors while watching a videotape of their third or fourth counseling session. In total, 74 factors (in the form of participant statements) were elicited…

  18. Treatment Preferences Affect the Therapeutic Alliance: Implications for Randomized Controlled Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iacoviello, Brian M.; McCarthy, Kevin Scott; Barrett, Marna S.; Rynn, Moira; Gallop, Robert; Barber, Jacques P.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of treatment preferences on the development of the therapeutic alliance was investigated. Seventy-five patients were followed while participating in a randomized controlled trial comparing supportive-expressive psychotherapy with sertraline or pill placebo in the treatment of major depressive disorder. Therapeutic alliance was…

  19. Professional Development and the Teaching Schools Experiment in England: Leadership Challenges in an Alliance's First Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from the first year of a longitudinal, mixed-methods case study of a large teaching school alliance in England. This national initiative is intended to drive improvement at system level by grouping schools around formally designated teaching schools. These "alliances" work collaboratively to share learning,…

  20. Fracturing alliance allows economical production of massive diatomite oil reserves: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Klins, M.A.; Stewart, D.W.; Pferdehirt, D.J.; Stewart, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    As North American oilfield operations mature, there is a perceptible loosening of the autocratic ties between oil companies and contractors. They are being replaced by alliances or partnerships designed to minimize cost while improving profitability of the companies involved. This paper evaluates a mature alliance, its implementation, structure, and results.

  1. Alliances and Arguments: A Case Study of a Child with Persisting Speech Difficulties in Peer Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tempest, Alison; Wells, Bill

    2012-01-01

    The ability to argue and to create alliances with peers are important social competencies for all children, including those who have speech, language and communication needs. In this study, we investigated the management of arguments and alliances by a group of 5-year-old male friends, one of whom has a persisting speech difficulty (PSD). Twelve…

  2. Correlates of Therapeutic Alliance and Treatment Outcomes among Israeli Female Methadone Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiff, Miriam; Levit, Shabtay

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study examines potential predictors (e.g., attachment style, frequency of therapeutic treatment sessions) of client-rated therapeutic alliance between the social worker and client. The relationship between therapeutic alliance and client's psychological outcomes (hope and posttraumatic stress symptoms [PTS's]) was also assessed.…

  3. Pretreatment Social Relations, Therapeutic Alliance, and Improvements in Parenting Practices in Parent Management Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazdin, Alan E.; Whitley, Moira K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the parent-therapist alliance in parent management training for children (N = 218; 53 girls and 165 boys, ages 2-14) referred clinically for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior. The interrelations of pretreatment parent social relationships, the parent-therapist alliance over the course of treatment, and…

  4. Initiative to establish Research Data Alliance moves forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    With the amount of scientific data being gathered growing exponentially—due to the increasing number of sensor networks, scientific instruments, computer models, and other tools—there are enormous scientific opportunities but also significant challenges, including how to effectively share research data within and across scientific communities. A 29 August symposium on global scientific data infrastructures, sponsored by the National Academy of Sciences' Board on Research Data and Information (BRDI), addressed this issue while focusing on a new initiative to establish a Research Data Alliance (RDA). The alliance already has received about $3 million in funding from two U.S. agencies—the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology—the Australian government, and the European Union to move forward with funding a handful of nongovernmental structures (NGS) to work on the initiative, according to Alan Blatecky, director of the NSF's Office of Cyberinfrastructure. The initiative—which he said would include a council, plenary, secretariat, NGSs, and working groups—is on a fast track, with the first NGS meeting planned for 2-3 October in Washington, D. C., and the first meeting of the RDA scheduled for March 2013 in Europe.

  5. National Alliance for Radiation Readiness: Leveraging Partnerships to Increase Preparedness.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, James S; Allen, Meredith

    2016-02-01

    The National Alliance for Radiation Readiness (NARR) is an alliance of 16 national member organizations that have banded together to serve as the collective "voice of health" in radiological preparedness through: • participation in national dialogues on radiological emergency issues; • provision of thoughtful feedback on documents, policies, and guidelines; and • convening of partners to raise awareness of and resolve radiological emergency issues. NARR benefits from the intersection and interaction of public health, radiation control, healthcare, and emergency management professionals--all with an interest in bolstering the nation's preparedness for a radiological or nuclear incident. NARR is able to provide a unique perspective on radiological and nuclear preparedness by creating multi-disciplinary workgroups to develop guidance, recommendations, and provide subject matter feedback. NARR aims to build response and recovery capacity and capabilities by supporting the sharing of resources and tools, including technical methods and information through the development of an online clearinghouse. NARR also aims to identify and disseminate best practices, as well as define and educate on the roles and responsibilities of local, state, and federal government and the numerous agencies involved with the response to a radiological emergency. PMID:26717184

  6. Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Annual report FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Goland, A.N.; Kaplan, E.

    1993-11-01

    Funding was provided to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fourth quarter of FY93 to establish a regional alliance as defined by Dr. Clyde Frank during his visit to BNL on March 7, 1993. In collaboration with the Long Island Research Institute (LIRI), BNL developed a business plan for the Northeast Waste Management Alliance (NEWMA). Concurrently, informal discussions were initiated with representatives of the waste management industry, and meetings were held with local and state regulatory and governmental personnel to obtain their enthusiasm and involvement. A subcontract to LIRI was written to enable it to formalize interactions with companies offering new waste management technologies selected for their dual value to the DOE and local governments in the Northeast. LIRI was founded to develop and coordinate economic growth via introduction of new technologies. As a not-for-profit institution it is in an ideal position to manage the development of NEWMA through ready access to venture capital and strong interactions with the business community, universities, and BNL. Another subcontract was written with a professor at SUNY/Stony Brook to perform an evaluation of new pyrolitic processes, some of which may be appropriate for development by NEWMA. Independent endorsement of the business plan recently by another organization, GETF, with broad knowledge of DOE/EM-50 objectives, provides a further incentive for moving rapidly to implement the NEWMA strategy. This report describes progress made during the last quarter of FY93.

  7. Pricing Mechanism Design for Centralized Pollutant Treatment with SME Alliances.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Tao, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we assume that a professional pollutant treatment enterprise treats all of the pollutants emitted by multiple small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In order to determine the treatment price, SMEs can bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, or through forming alliances. We propose a bargaining game model of centralized pollutant treatment to study how the pollutant treatment price is determined through negotiation. Then, we consider that there is a moral hazard from SMEs in centralized pollutant treatment; in other words, they may break their agreement concerning their quantities of production and pollutant emissions with the pollutant treatment enterprise. We study how the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent this by pricing mechanism design. It is found that the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent SMEs' moral hazard through tiered pricing. If the marginal treatment cost of the pollutant treatment enterprise is a constant, SMEs could bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, otherwise, they should form a grand alliance to bargain with it as a whole. PMID:27338440

  8. Pricing Mechanism Design for Centralized Pollutant Treatment with SME Alliances

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuyu; Huang, Bo; Tao, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we assume that a professional pollutant treatment enterprise treats all of the pollutants emitted by multiple small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). In order to determine the treatment price, SMEs can bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, or through forming alliances. We propose a bargaining game model of centralized pollutant treatment to study how the pollutant treatment price is determined through negotiation. Then, we consider that there is a moral hazard from SMEs in centralized pollutant treatment; in other words, they may break their agreement concerning their quantities of production and pollutant emissions with the pollutant treatment enterprise. We study how the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent this by pricing mechanism design. It is found that the pollutant treatment enterprise can prevent SMEs’ moral hazard through tiered pricing. If the marginal treatment cost of the pollutant treatment enterprise is a constant, SMEs could bargain with the pollutant treatment enterprise individually, otherwise, they should form a grand alliance to bargain with it as a whole. PMID:27338440

  9. A survey of diving behaviour and accidental water ingestion among Dutch occupational and sport divers to assess the risk of infection with waterborne pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Schijven, Jack; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2006-05-01

    Divers may run a higher risk of infection with waterborne pathogens than bathers because of more frequent and intense contact with water that may not comply with microbiologic water quality standards for bathing water. In this study we aimed to estimate the volume of water swallowed during diving as a key factor for infection risk assessment associated with diving. Using questionnaires, occupational and sport divers in the Netherlands were asked about number of dives, volume of swallowed water, and health complaints (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and ear, skin, eye, and respiratory complaints). Occupational divers, on average, swallowed 9.8 mL marine water and 5.7 mL fresh surface water per dive. Sport divers swallowed, on average, 9.0 mL marine water; 13 mL fresh recreational water; 3.2 mL river, canal, or city canal water; and 20 mL water in circulation pools. Divers swallowed less water when wearing a full face mask instead of an ordinary diving mask and even less when wearing a diving helmet. A full face mask or a diving helmet is recommended when diving in fecally contaminated water. From the volumes of swallowed water and concentrations of pathogens in fecally contaminated water, we estimated the infection risks per dive and per year to be as high as a few to up to tens of percents. This may explain why only 20% of the divers reported having none of the inquired health complaints within a period of 1 year. It is highly recommended that divers be informed about fecal contamination of the diving water. PMID:16675425

  10. Reentrant phase transitions and defensive alliances in social dilemmas with informed strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-05-01

    Knowing the strategy of an opponent in a competitive environment conveys obvious evolutionary advantages. But this information is costly, and the benefit of being informed may not necessarily offset the additional cost. Here we introduce social dilemmas with informed strategies, and we show that this gives rise to two cyclically dominant triplets that form defensive alliances. The stability of these two alliances is determined by the rotation velocity of the strategies within each triplet. A weaker strategy in a faster rotating triplet can thus overcome an individually stronger competitor. Fascinating spatial patterns favor the dominance of a single defensive alliance, but enable also the stable coexistence of both defensive alliances in very narrow regions of the parameter space. A continuous reentrant phase transition reveals before unseen complexity behind the stability of strategic alliances in evolutionary social dilemmas.

  11. Building alliances for improving newborn health in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Miller-Petrie, Molly K; Mazia, Goldy; Serpa, Magdalena; Pooley, Bertha; Marshall, Margaret; Meléndez, Carlos; Vicuña, Marisol

    2014-07-01

    The regional Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) Neonatal Alliance and national neonatal alliances in Bolivia, El Salvador, and Peru were studied through in-depth interviews and a review of publications. Findings were analyzed to distill successful strategies, structures, and tools for improving neonatal health by working through alliances that can be replicated at the regional or national level. The studies found the following factors were the most critical for successful outcomes from alliance work: inclusion of the Ministry of Health as a leader or primary stakeholder; a committed, diverse, technically expert, and horizontal membership; the presence of champions for neonatal health at the national level; development of a shared work plan based on feasible objectives; the use of shared financing mechanisms; the use of informal and dynamic organizational structures; and a commitment to scientific evidence-based programming. The relationship between the regional and national alliances was found to be mutually beneficial. PMID:25211677

  12. School Climate, Individual Support, or Both? Gay-Straight Alliances and the Mental Health of Sexual Minority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walls, N. Eugene; Wisneski, Hope; Kane, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of 284 sexual minority youth and young adults, this paper examines the relationships between mental health variables, the absence or presence of a gay-straight alliance, and membership status in a gay-straight alliance. The results suggest that the presence of a gay-straight alliance in a school or college, rather than actual…

  13. The Association Between Patient Characteristics and the Therapeutic Alliance in Cognitive-Behavioral and Interpersonal Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantino, Michael J.; Arnow, Bruce A.; Blasey, Christine; Agras, W. Stewart

    2005-01-01

    The therapeutic alliance is an established predictor of psychotherapy outcome. However, alliance research in the treatment of eating disorders has been scant, with even less attention paid to correlates of alliance development. The goal of this study was to examine the relation between specific patient characteristics and the development of the…

  14. The relationship between alliance and client involvement in CBT for child anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Bryce D; Islam, Nadia Y; Chiu, Angela W; Smith, Meghan M; Chu, Brian C; Wood, Jeffrey J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of the relationship between the alliance and client involvement in child psychotherapy. To address this gap, we examined the relationship between these therapy processes over the course of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for child anxiety disorders. The sample was 31 child participants (M age = 9.58 years, SD = 2.17, range = 6-13 years, 67.7% boys; 67.7% Caucasian, 6.5% Latino, 3.2% Asian/Pacific Islander, and 22.6% mixed/other) diagnosed with a primary anxiety disorder. The participants received a manual-based individual CBT program for child anxiety or a manual-based family CBT program for child anxiety. Ratings of alliance and client involvement were collected on early (Session 2) and late (Session 8) treatment phases. Two independent coding teams rated alliance and client involvement. Change in alliance positively predicted late client involvement after controlling for initial levels of client involvement. In addition, change in client involvement positively predicted late alliance after controlling for initial levels of the alliance. The findings were robust after controlling for potentially confounding variables. In CBT for child anxiety disorders, change in the alliance appears to predict client involvement; however, client involvement also appears to predict the quality of the alliance. Our findings suggest that the nature of the relationship between alliance and client involvement may be more complex than previously hypothesized. In clinical practice, tracking alliance and level of client involvement could help optimize the impact and delivery of CBT for child anxiety. PMID:24245994

  15. The Role of Setting Versus Treatment Type in Alliance within Youth Therapy

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Bryce D.; Jensen-Doss, Amanda; Tully, Carrie B.; Southam-Gerow, Michael A.; Weisz, John R.; Kendall, Philip C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Does the strength of the youth-therapist alliance differ across treatment settings or treatment type? We examined these questions in the context of youth therapy Method 89 youths (M age = 10.56, SD = 1.99; 63.70% Caucasian; 52.80% male) diagnosed with an anxiety disorder received (a) manual-based individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) in a research setting, (b) manual-based ICBT in practice settings, or (c) non-manualized usual care (UC) in practice settings. Coders, using the Therapy Process Observational Coding System–Alliance scale, rated 865 sessions. Youth completed the Therapeutic Alliance Scale for Children at posttreatment. Results Youth who received ICBT in a research setting had significantly higher observer-rated alliance than youth who received either therapy delivered in practice settings. In practice settings, youth who received ICBT had significantly stronger observer-rated alliance early in treatment than youth in UC, but this difference was not observed at the end of treatment. Similarly, youth-report alliance at post-treatment was significantly higher in ICBT in the research setting, and there was no difference between ICBT and UC delivered in practice settings. Alliance differences largely held when controlling for youth characteristics; however, differences early in treatment between the ICBT groups were no longer statistically significant when controlling for anxiety severity or primary anxiety diagnosis. Conclusions Our findings suggest that (a) the alliance may be stronger in research settings, and (b) treatment manuals do not undermine alliance. Future research is required to help pinpoint whether other youth, therapist, or setting factors contribute to the lower alliance seen in practice settings. PMID:26881448

  16. Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA (42.0N, 70.5W) is a national seashore recreation area with many fine resorts and summer estate homes. Geologically, the cape is a deposit of earth and stone called a terminal moraine, left by the great Pleistocene glaciers of about 20,000 years ago. The through canal at the base of the cape is a manmade feature for waterborne traffic and is part of the Intercoastal Canal network. The cape actually begins south of the canal.

  17. The effects of seasonal training on heart rate and oxygen saturation during face-immersion apnea in elite breath-hold diver: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kapus, Jernej; Usaj, Anton; Jeranko, Samo; Daić, Jure

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to monitor a diver's ability to perform maximal face-immersion apnea throughout the competitive season. A male, world-class apnea diver was followed for 1 year (from March 2012 to March 2013). During this period he was tested six times. Each test session involved the measurements of the pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength. In addition, the ability to perform maximal face-immersion apnea was also explored. The results of face-immersion apnea durations showed a continuous improvement throughout the preparation period 1 with the peak in the main competition period and a decline during the competition period 2 and the transition period. It seemed that the training periodization was successful by producing the diver's peak performance level at the main diving competition i.e. the 2012 AIDA Freediving World Championships. In conclusion, the study shows that changes in training interventions due to seasonal training periodization could be accompanied by changes in a diver's ability to perform the maximal face-immersion apnea. However, further research is needed to establish the influences of individual components of apnea training on a diver's performance. PMID:26887906

  18. The effectiveness of a health-surveillance program for caisson saturation divers in a tunnel-boring machine: a microbiological survey.

    PubMed

    Van Rees Vellinga, T P; Sterk, W; Van Dijk, F J H

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this field study is to report and evaluate the implementation of a health surveillance program we developed to monitor the microbiological load for saturation divers, including preventive and therapeutic interventions. We extended the DMAC protocol for Saturation Diving Chamber Hygiene and added some components: ear inspections, swabs and environmental swabs every third day. The implementation was evaluated by analyzing the results of the activities. In a pre-saturation dive check we examined a total of 17 divers. Here we present the data from all seven saturation phases, collected over a period of 1.5 years. In every saturation phase we have found pathogenic bacteria or fungi in divers and in the environment, but more in some periods than in others. We did not observe any serious infection that required a diver to abort his stay in the living chamber. This health surveillance program has demonstrated the potential value of an early warning system to prevent problems. The bacterial load found in divers and in the environment was clearly visible. Prevention could be improved by more consistent implementation of the protocol. Fortunately, the infections had no serious consequences for the health of the workers or for the continuation of the work process. PMID:21226394

  19. Pre-dive normobaric oxygen reduces bubble formation in scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Olivier; Gempp, Emmanuel; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2009-05-01

    Oxygen pre-breathing is routinely employed as a protective measure to reduce the incidence of altitude decompression sickness in aviators and astronauts, but the effectiveness of normobaric oxygen before hyperbaric exposure has not been well explored. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of 30-min normobaric oxygen (O(2)) breathing before diving upon bubble formation in recreational divers. Twenty-one subjects (13 men and 8 women, mean age (SD) 33 +/- 8 years) performed random repetitive open-sea dives (surface interval of 100 min) to 30 msw for 30 min with a 6-min stop at 3 msw under four experimental protocols: "air-air" (control), "O(2)-O(2)", "O(2)-air" and "air-O(2)" where "O(2)" corresponds to a dive with oxygen pre-breathing and "air" a dive without oxygen administration. Post-dive venous gas emboli were examined by means of a precordial Doppler ultrasound. The results showed decreased bubble scores in all dives where preoxygenation had taken place (p < 0.01). Oxygen pre-breathing before each dive ("O(2)-O(2)" condition) resulted in the highest reduction in bubble scores measured after the second dive compared to the control condition (-66%, p < 0.05). The "O(2)-air" and "air-O(2) "conditions produced fewer circulating bubbles after the second dive than "air-air" condition (-47.3% and -52.2%, respectively, p < 0.05) but less bubbles were detected in "air-O(2) "condition compared to "O(2)-air" (p < 0.05). Our findings provide evidence that normobaric oxygen pre-breathing decreases venous gas emboli formation with a prolonged protective effect over time. This procedure could therefore be beneficial for multi-day repetitive diving. PMID:19219451

  20. Adolescent and parent alliances with therapists in Brief Strategic Family Therapy with drug-using Hispanic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Michael S; Mayorga, Carla C; Mitrani, Victoria B; Szapocznik, José; Turner, Charles W; Alexander, James F

    2008-07-01

    This study examined the relationship between alliance and retention in family therapy. Alliance was examined at the individual (parent, adolescent) and family level (within-family differences) for families that either dropped out or completed family therapy. Participants were 31 Hispanic adolescents and their family members who received brief strategic family therapy for the treatment of adolescent drug use. Videotapes of first sessions were rated to identify parent and adolescent alliances with the therapist. Results demonstrated that Completer cases had significantly higher levels of alliance across all family members than Dropout cases, and Dropout cases had significantly higher unbalanced alliances than Completer cases. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:18717922

  1. Understanding and Measuring Coach–Teacher Alliance: A Glimpse Inside the ‘Black Box’

    PubMed Central

    Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2016-01-01

    Coaching models are increasingly used in schools to enhance fidelity and effectiveness of evidence-based interventions; yet, little is known about the relationship between the coach and teacher (i.e., coach–teacher alliance), which may indirectly enhance teacher and student outcomes through improved implementation quality. There is also limited research on measures of coach–teacher alliance, further hindering the field from understanding the active components for successful coaching. The current study examined the factor structure and psychometric characteristics of a measure of coach–teacher alliance as reported by both teachers and coaches and explored the extent to which teachers and coaches reliably rate their alliance. Data come from a sample of 147 teachers who received implementation support from one of four coaches; both the teacher and the coach completed an alliance questionnaire. Separate confirmatory factor analyses for each informant revealed four factors (relationship, process, investment, and perceived benefits) as well as an additional coach-rated factor (perceived teacher barriers). A series of analyses, including cross-rater correlations, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Kuder-Richardson reliability estimates suggested that teachers and coaches provide reliable, though not redundant, information about the alliance. Implications for future research and the utilization of the parallel coach–teacher alliance measures to increase the effectiveness of coaching are discussed. PMID:26872479

  2. Relationship Between Patient SWAP-200 Personality Characteristics and Therapist-Rated Therapeutic Alliance Early in Treatment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott W; Levy, Saryn R; Hilsenroth, Mark J; Fiori, Katherine; Bornstein, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we assess the extent to which patient personality features and prototypes are associated with early treatment therapist-rated alliance. The study sample consisted of 94 patients receiving psychodynamic psychotherapy at an outpatient clinic. Clinicians completed the Working Alliance Inventory (J Couns Psychol 36:223-233; Psychother Res 9:405-423) to assess their views of early alliance and the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure 200 (SWAP-200; Assessment 5:333-353, Am J Psychiatry 161:1350-1365, 1743-1754; Am J Psychiatry 156:258-272, 273-285) to assess patient personality. The SWAP-200 Narcissistic Clinical Prototype, Dysphoric Q-Factor, and Dysphoric/High-Functioning Neurotic Q-Subfactor significantly correlated with early therapist-rated alliance. Correlations that trended toward significance were also found. Also identified were specific SWAP-200 items that were found to relate to high early therapist-rated alliance scores. These results demonstrate some relationship, albeit small, between patient personality characteristics and therapists' views of the alliance that may serve to further a conceptual understanding of the alliance, specific personality syndromes, and the associated impact on the therapeutic interaction. PMID:27176789

  3. The parent-child-therapist alliance: A case study using a strategic approach.

    PubMed

    Naidu, Thirusha; Behari, Sheethal

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we present a single case study of a clinical approach that addresses the needs of parents and their children in psychotherapy. The approach begins by addressing the child's and parent's concerns separately at first by establishing strong therapeutic alliances with each, and then proceeds to address the concerns of the parent-child dyad. The basic premise is that the therapeutic alliance is the central element to successful outcomes in psychotherapy. The nature of alliance-building and its associated methods and techniques have been extensively considered for adult therapy. However, there is considerably less written on the therapeutic alliance with children and adolescents in the context of family interventions. We briefly examine some theoretical dimensions and applications of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy with children/adolescents and their parents. A three-phase alliance-building psychotherapy strategy, founded on the idea that each therapeutic relationship warrants an effective working alliance, is proposed. The case of a single mother and her adolescent daughter is employed to illustrate the strategy. PMID:25859699

  4. Dynamic Relationships of Therapist Alliance and Group Cohesion in Transdiagnostic Group CBT for Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Norton, Peter J.; Kazantzis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the temporal variability of the alliance-symptom change and cohesion-symptom change relationships over the course of group therapy. These questions were examined in a sample of 373 clients receiving a transdiagnostic cognitive behavior therapy (tCBT), which culled the principle research-supported mechanisms of change for anxiety disorders. Method We examined relationships between the client versions of the Working Alliance Inventory and Group Cohesion Scale in predicting subsequent symptom change, as assessed by the state scale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results Alliance and cohesion were significant predictors of next session anxiety scores. The alliance was consistently associated with anxiety symptoms (rs = −.152 to −.198, ps < .05), but cohesion only showed significant relationships with anxiety symptoms at sessions 8 and 10 (Session 8, r = −.233, p = .020, and 10, r = −.236, p = .027). Alliance-anxiety relations remained constant, whereas cohesion-anxiety relations substantially increased from earlier to later sessions. Discussion Differences that were obtained in the relation of alliance and cohesion with anxiety symptoms suggests that these processes have different roles within group tCBT. If replicated, the present findings would suggest that the dynamic relationships between alliance and cohesion and symptoms within group CBT for anxiety disorders have been an important omission in process-outcome studies. PMID:26689305

  5. Understanding and Measuring Coach-Teacher Alliance: A Glimpse Inside the 'Black Box'.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stacy R; Pas, Elise T; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2016-05-01

    Coaching models are increasingly used in schools to enhance fidelity and effectiveness of evidence-based interventions; yet, little is known about the relationship between the coach and teacher (i.e., coach-teacher alliance), which may indirectly enhance teacher and student outcomes through improved implementation quality. There is also limited research on measures of coach-teacher alliance, further hindering the field from understanding the active components for successful coaching. The current study examined the factor structure and psychometric characteristics of a measure of coach-teacher alliance as reported by both teachers and coaches and explored the extent to which teachers and coaches reliably rate their alliance. Data come from a sample of 147 teachers who received implementation support from one of four coaches; both the teacher and the coach completed an alliance questionnaire. Separate confirmatory factor analyses for each informant revealed four factors (relationship, process, investment, and perceived benefits) as well as an additional coach-rated factor (perceived teacher barriers). A series of analyses, including cross-rater correlations, intraclass correlation coefficients, and Kuder-Richardson reliability estimates suggested that teachers and coaches provide reliable, though not redundant, information about the alliance. Implications for future research and the utilization of the parallel coach-teacher alliance measures to increase the effectiveness of coaching are discussed. PMID:26872479

  6. Ambivalence and alliance ruptures in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Jennifer A; Button, Melissa L; Westra, Henny A

    2014-01-01

    Client ambivalence about change (or motivation) is regarded as central to outcomes in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). However, little research has been conducted to examine the impact of client ambivalence about change on therapy process variables such as the therapeutic alliance. Given the demonstrated limitations of self-report measures of key constructs such as ambivalence and motivation, the present study instead employed a newly adapted observational measure of client ambivalence. Client statements regarding change (change talk (CT) and counter-change talk (CCT)) were coded in early (session 1 or 2) therapy sessions of CBT for generalized anxiety disorder. The frequency of CT and CCT was then compared between clients who later experienced an alliance rupture with their therapist, and clients who did not. The results showed that clients in dyads who later experienced an alliance rupture expressed significantly more CCT at the outset of therapy than clients who did not later experience an alliance rupture. However, CT utterances did not significantly differ between alliance rupture and no-rupture groups. CCT may strain the alliance because clients expressing higher levels of CCT early in therapy may be less receptive to therapist direction in CBT. Consequently, it is recommended that clients and therapists work together to carefully address these key moments in therapy so as to prevent alliance rupture and preserve client engagement in therapy. PMID:24655131

  7. Assessing Organizational Change in Multisector Community Health Alliances

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jeffrey A; Hearld, Larry R; Shi, Yunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this article was to identify some common organizational features of multisector health care alliances (MHCAs) and the analytic challenges presented by those characteristics in assessing organizational change. Data Sources Two rounds of an Internet-based survey of participants in 14 MHCAs. Study Design We highlight three analytic challenges that can arise when quantitatively studying the organizational characteristics of MHCAs—assessing change in MHCA organization, assessment of construct reliability, and aggregation of individual responses to reflect organizational characteristics. We illustrate these issues using a leadership effectiveness scale (12 items) validated in previous research and data from 14 MHCAs participating in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Aligning Forces for Quality (AF4Q) program. Findings High levels of instability and turnover in MHCA membership create challenges in using survey data to study changes in key organizational characteristics of MHCAs. We offer several recommendations to diagnose the source and extent of these problems. PMID:25102763

  8. Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc., Annual Report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA) is a not-for-profit corporation formed by four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and a leading national laboratory. The four HBCU Institutions are: Alabama A and M University, Jackson State University, Prairie View A and M University, and Southern University and A and M College. The national laboratory is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This was a year of continued focusing for SEA. Guided by the belief that involving faculty and students in high-quality research, coupled with implementing action plans to enhance the research infrastructure of the universities will lead to the production of well-qualified African-American scientists and engineers, SEA research agenda became one of the primary focus. The Research Design Teams represents SEA's vanguard activity, and their work this past year reflected the commitment to producing technical talent of the highest quality.

  9. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance 2nd Annual Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2001-03-30

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are pleased to provide the proceedings of the second annual Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Workshop held on March 29-30, 2001 in Arlington. The package includes the presentations made during the workshop, a list of participants, and the results of the breakout sessions. Those sessions covered stack materials and processes, power electronics, balance of plant and thermal integration, fuel processing technologies, and stack and system performance modeling. The breakout sessions have been reported as accurately as possible; however, due to the recording and transcription process errors may have occurred. If you note any significant omissions or wish to provide additional information, we welcome your comments and hope that all stakeholder groups will use the enclosed information in their planning endeavors.

  10. ChemTechLinks: Alliances for Chemical Technician Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nameroff, Tamara

    2003-09-01

    ChemTechLinks (CTL) is a project of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Educational and International Activities Division and funded by the National Science Foundation to support and advance chemistry-based technician education. The project aims to help improve technician education programs, foster academic-industry alliances, provide professional development opportunities for faculty, and increase student recruitment into chemical technology. The CTL Web site serves as an information clearinghouse and link to other ACS resources and programs, including a Web-based, Voluntary Industry Standards (VIS) database, the Chemistry Technician Program Approval Service, the College Chemistry Consultants Service, summer workshops for high school teachers and two-year college faculty that emphasize a technology-oriented curriculum, scholarships for two-year college faculty to attend ACS Short Courses, a self-study instructional guide for faculty to use in preparing for classroom instruction, and information and free recruitment materials about career opportunities in chemistry technology.

  11. The Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Box, Richard C.; Fink, Mary; Gogos, George; Lehrer, Henry R.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Nickerson, Jocelyn S.; Tarry, Scott E.; Vlasek, Karisa D.; O'Neil, Patrick D.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Nebraska Space Grant Consortium (NSGC) & EPSCoR programs at the University of Nebraska at Omaha are involved in a variety of innovative research activities. Such research is supported through the Aeronautics Education, Research, and Industry Alliance (AERIAL) and collaborative seed funds. AERIAL is a comprehensive, multi-faceted, five year NASA EPSCoR initiative that contributes substantially to the strategic research and technology priorities of NASA while intensifying Nebraska s rapidly growing aeronautics research and development endeavors. AERIAL includes three major collaborative research teams (CRTs) whose nexus is a common focus in aeronautics research. Each CRT - Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS), Airborne Remote Sensing for Agricultural Research and Commercialization Applications (ARS), and Numerical Simulation of the Combustion of Fuel Droplets: Finite Rate Kinetics and Flame Zone Grid Adaptation (CEFD) -has a distinct research agenda. This program provides the template for funding of new and innovative research that emphasizes aerospace technology.

  12. Dynamic Alliance of Agriculture Productslogistics Based on Swarm Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xinsheng; Cui, Yan; Ying, Jilai; Wei, Jianguang

    Along with the growing up of the Chinese generalized agriculture, the agriculture products logistics demands are increasing quickly in quality and quantity. Oppositely, the service of agriculture products logistics is slowly. It is very essential to study the logistics service mode suited to the tendency of the agriculture products logistics demand. The paper analyzes the common characteristic between the agriculture products logistics individual and the intelligence individual. Then, by the swarm intelligence, thedynamic alliance of agriculture products logistics is presented, the construction algorithm and the application method are given too. The paper provides a better operable development mode for the agriculture products logistics in China, which has directive meaning to improve the logistics efficiency for the socialistic new economy development and the New County Construction.

  13. NASA's Contributions to the Gulf of Mexico Alliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glorioso, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the contribution that NASA has made and the plans for future missions that will assist the mission of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA). Specific reference to the work of the Stennis Space Center is reviewed. Some of the projects are: Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST), Regional Sediment Management, Coral Reef Early Warning System, Harmful Algal Bloom, Hypoxia, Land-Use and Land-Cover (LULC) Change from 1974-2008 around Mobile Bay, AL, Satellite Estimation of Suspended Particulate Loads in and around Mobile Bay, AL, Estimating Relative Nutrient Contributions of Agriculture and Forests Using MODIS Time Series, Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion, Standardized Remote Sensing PRoduct for Water Clarity estimation within Gulf of Mexico Coastal Waters.

  14. The Relationship of Decongestant Use and Risk of Decompression Sickness; A Case-Control Study of Hawaiian Scuba Divers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to cold, dehydration, and aging are known to contribute to the development of decompression sickness (DCS) in divers. Hypertension and nicotine usage have also been suggested as risk factors. Vasoconstriction is an underlying mechanism associated with all of these risk factors. Vasoconstriction increases the degree of bubble formation which is believed to be the cause of DCS. Formed bubbles interfere with the production of nitric oxide which modulates vascular tone resulting in vasoconstriction. Divers commonly use sympathomimetic decongestants which induce vasoconstriction to prevent barotrauma of the ears and sinuses while diving and thus theoretically may contribute to the risk for developing DCS. The purpose of this case-control study was to explore the association between decongestant usage and development of DCS in 400 divers treated/evaluated at the University of Hawai‘i, John A. Burns School of Medicine between 1983 and 2010. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were employed to evaluate differences between cases and controls. In addition to the variable of interest, other co-variables known to have significant influence in the development of DCS were appropriately controlled for during the analyses. In this study population, dehydration (OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 7.4), repetitive diving (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.4), and violation of dive profiles (OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 3.1, 7.9) contributed independently and significantly to the development of DCS. The co-variables of cold, gender, obesity, and rapid ascents were not significant contributors to developing DCS in this study. There was a small but statistically insignificant risk associated with decongestant use (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.8–2.6; P = .22). The inherent limitations associated with records-based studies may have underestimated this risk. It is important therefore that future research be undertaken to help clarify this concern. PMID:24567870

  15. The relationship of decongestant use and risk of decompression sickness; a case-control study of Hawaiian scuba divers.

    PubMed

    Smerz, Richard W

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to cold, dehydration, and aging are known to contribute to the development of decompression sickness (DCS) in divers. Hypertension and nicotine usage have also been suggested as risk factors. Vasoconstriction is an underlying mechanism associated with all of these risk factors. Vasoconstriction increases the degree of bubble formation which is believed to be the cause of DCS. Formed bubbles interfere with the production of nitric oxide which modulates vascular tone resulting in vasoconstriction. Divers commonly use sympathomimetic decongestants which induce vasoconstriction to prevent barotrauma of the ears and sinuses while diving and thus theoretically may contribute to the risk for developing DCS. The purpose of this case-control study was to explore the association between decongestant usage and development of DCS in 400 divers treated/evaluated at the University of Hawai'i, John A. Burns School of Medicine between 1983 and 2010. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were employed to evaluate differences between cases and controls. In addition to the variable of interest, other co-variables known to have significant influence in the development of DCS were appropriately controlled for during the analyses. In this study population, dehydration (OR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 7.4), repetitive diving (OR = 2.8; 95% CI: 1.8, 4.4), and violation of dive profiles (OR = 4.9; 95% CI: 3.1, 7.9) contributed independently and significantly to the development of DCS. The co-variables of cold, gender, obesity, and rapid ascents were not significant contributors to developing DCS in this study. There was a small but statistically insignificant risk associated with decongestant use (OR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.8-2.6; P = .22). The inherent limitations associated with records-based studies may have underestimated this risk. It is important therefore that future research be undertaken to help clarify this concern. PMID:24567870

  16. Trajectory and predictors of alliance in cognitive behavioral therapy for youth anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chu, Brian C; Skriner, Laura C; Zandberg, Laurie J

    2014-01-01

    Multilevel growth analysis was used to establish the shape of change (mean growth trajectory) for youth- and therapist-rated alliance in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxious youth and to identify between-youth predictors of alliance trajectory. Youth (N = 69; ages 7-17; 52.2% female) and their parents participated in an empirically supported CBT protocol. Therapists rated alliance each session and youth every four sessions. Data were fit to four growth models: linear, quadratic, a dual slope, and a novel "alliance rupture" model. Two-level models were estimated to examine the effect of youth age, sex, pretreatment symptom severity, diagnostic comorbidity, early treatment factors (use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors), and coping styles (engagement, disengagement, and involuntary coping). A dual slope model fit therapist data best, whereas youth data did not evidence systematic growth. Two-level growth models identified that pretreatment anxiety severity predicted higher initial alliance levels. Depressive symptoms predicted less linear growth and engagement coping predicted greater growth during exposure sessions. No variables predicted preexposure growth. In the therapist model, 22% of initial alliance, 50% of preexposure growth, and 75% of postexposure growth were accounted for by between youth variables (mood disorder, anxiety and depression symptoms, engagement and involuntary coping). Therapist-reported alliance ratings may grow over the course of manual-based CBT, even during exposure-focused sessions. Pretreatment youth factors and coping style may influence the absolute value and linear trajectory of alliance during CBT. Findings about alliance-influencing factors can help set expectations for, and enhance training in, empirically supported treatments. PMID:23581531

  17. Constituents of political cognition: Race, party politics, and the alliance detection system.

    PubMed

    Pietraszewski, David; Curry, Oliver Scott; Petersen, Michael Bang; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2015-07-01

    Research suggests that the mind contains a set of adaptations for detecting alliances: an alliance detection system, which monitors for, encodes, and stores alliance information and then modifies the activation of stored alliance categories according to how likely they will predict behavior within a particular social interaction. Previous studies have established the activation of this system when exposed to explicit competition or cooperation between individuals. In the current studies we examine if shared political opinions produce these same effects. In particular, (1) if participants will spontaneously categorize individuals according to the parties they support, even when explicit cooperation and antagonism are absent, and (2) if party support is sufficiently powerful to decrease participants' categorization by an orthogonal but typically-diagnostic alliance cue (in this case the target's race). Evidence was found for both: Participants spontaneously and implicitly kept track of who supported which party, and when party cross-cut race-such that the race of targets was not predictive of party support-categorization by race was dramatically reduced. To verify that these results reflected the operation of a cognitive system for modifying the activation of alliance categories, and not just socially-relevant categories in general, an identical set of studies was also conducted with in which party was either crossed with sex or age (neither of which is predicted to be primarily an alliance category). As predicted, categorization by party occurred to the same degree, and there was no reduction in either categorization by sex or by age. All effects were replicated across two sets of between-subjects conditions. These studies provide the first direct empirical evidence that party politics engages the mind's systems for detecting alliances and establish two important social categorization phenomena: (1) that categorization by age is, like sex, not affected by alliance

  18. Contribution of Patient Defense Mechanisms and Therapist Interventions to the Development of Early Therapeutic Alliance in a Brief Psychodynamic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Despland, Jean-Nicolas; de Roten, Yves; Despars, Josée; Stigler, Michael; Perry, J. Christopher

    2001-01-01

    This preliminary study examined how patients' defense mechanisms and psychotherapists' techniques influence early alliance formation. The authors assessed the relationships among defense mechanisms, therapist interventions, and the development of alliance in a sample of 12 patients undergoing Brief Psychodynamic Investigation (4 sessions). Alliance development occurred rapidly and was clearly established by the third session. Neither defensive functioning nor supportive or exploratory interventions alone differentiated early alliance development. However, the degree of adjustment of therapists' interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning discriminated a low alliance from both improving and high alliances. The adjustment of therapeutic interventions to patients' level of defensive functioning is a promising predictor of alliance development and should be examined further, alongside other predictors of outcome. PMID:11402078

  19. Should computed chest tomography be recommended in the medical certification of professional divers? A report of three cases with pulmonary air cysts.

    PubMed

    Toklu, A S; Kiyan, E; Aktas, S; Cimsit, M

    2003-08-01

    Pulmonary barotrauma (PBT) is a recognised risk of compressed gas diving. Any reason that causes air trapping in the lung during ascent may cause PBT by increasing intrapulmonary pressure. Chest x ray examination is mandatory for medical certification of the professional divers in many countries, but pulmonary air trapping lesions such as an air cyst in the lungs cannot always be detected by plain chest x ray examination. Computed tomography (CT) is a reliable, but expensive measure for detecting pulmonary abnormalities in divers. Three cases with pulmonary air cysts are reported in which air cysts were invisible on the x ray pictures, but well defined by CT. It is impractical and not cost effective to perform CT for medical certification of all divers, but it can be an option to recommend CT once during the initial examination of the candidates for professional diving, especially if there is a history of predisposing factors, such as smoking or pulmonary infections. PMID:12883024

  20. Using underwater cameras to assess the effects of snorkeler and SCUBA diver presence on coral reef fish abundance, family richness, and species composition.

    PubMed

    Dearden, P; Theberge, M; Yasué, M

    2010-04-01

    The results of underwater visual fish censuses (UVC) could be affected by fish changing their behavior in response to the snorkeler or diver conducting the survey. We used an underwater video camera to assess how fish abundance, family richness, and community composition were affected by the presence of snorkelers (n = 12) and self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers (n = 6) on a coral reef in Thailand. The total number of families, abundance of some fish families, and overall species composition showed significant differences before and during snorkeling disturbances. We did not detect significant and consistent changes to these parameters in the presence of a SCUBA diver; however, this could be a result of lower statistical power. We suggest that the use of a stationary video camera may help cross-check data that is collected through UVC to assess the true family composition and document the presence of rare and easily disturbed species. PMID:19353295

  1. Making the Alliance and Taking the Transference in Work With Suicidal Patients

    PubMed Central

    Plakun, Eric M.

    2001-01-01

    This article focuses on two components of psychodynamic psychotherapy with suicidal patients. First, the value and importance of establishing and maintaining a clearly defined therapeutic alliance is noted and explored. A carefully negotiated alliance can become an edge or boundary across which the survival of the therapy, as well as the patient, can be negotiated. Attention to the vicissitudes of the alliance is hypothesized to be the central initial therapeutic action with suicidal patients. Second, the author explores the importance of “taking” rather than “refusing” the transferences offered by the suicidal patient, particularly negative and erotic transferences. Case examples are offered as illustrations. PMID:11696654

  2. Uneasy alliances: managed care plans formed by safety-net providers.

    PubMed

    Sparer, M S; Brown, L D

    2000-01-01

    Health care providers that have traditionally served the poor are forming their own managed care plans, often in alliance with local safety-net peers. These alliances make it easier to raise needed capital, increase the pool of likely enrollees, and enable plans to benefit from efficiencies of scale. At the same time, however, the alliances often are undermined by conflicts of interest among the different sponsors and between the sponsors and the plan. This paper suggests that these plans are most likely to do well when the state makes special efforts to help and when plans have the leadership and financial reserves to take advantage of their supportive state policies. PMID:10916958

  3. The Construction of Shapley Value in Cooperative Game and its Application on Enterprise Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaofeng, Xu; Aiqing, Ruan

    On the base of the nature of Shapely Value, the construction of Shapely Value in cooperative game is analyzed in this paper, and it is concluded that Shapely Value is made up of two parts, one part depends on individual itself, and the other part depends on the state of individual in alliance. Then the construction of Shapely Value is used to discuss the enterprise alliance and the rent of enterprise alliance is put forward, finally some interesting conclusions are presented in the paper.

  4. Alliances becoming more critical. Interview by Donald E.L. Johnson.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D P

    1992-07-01

    Too many hospitals underutilize the services of their alliances, primarily because of lack of commitment from the CEO and a failure to involve physicians in management, administration and planning, according to David P. Hunter, chief executive officer of The Hunter Group, in an interview with Donald E.L. Johnson, editor and publisher of Health Care Strategic Management. Increasingly, alliances will offer new kinds of information and data services. They may even take on medical training and educational functions to improve their members' competitive edge. In any event, Hunter says, alliances must do more to involve physicians in hospitalwide cost, quality and performance issues. PMID:10120287

  5. Predictors of child-therapist alliance in cognitive-behavioral treatment of children referred for oppositional and antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Kazdin, Alan E; Durbin, Kelly A

    2012-06-01

    We examined the therapeutic alliance in evidence-based treatment for children (N=97, 24 girls and 73 boys, ages 6-13 years) referred clinically for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior. We predicted that the quality of the child-therapist alliance would be related to therapeutic improvements in the children at the end of treatment and that the alliance would be predicted by alliance-relevant child characteristics (intellectual and social competencies) assessed before treatment. Multiple perspectives were obtained to evaluate child characteristics before treatment, alliance during the course of treatment, and therapeutic change at the end of treatment. The main findings were as follows: (1) the child-therapist alliance was related to therapeutic change at the end of treatment. The better the quality of the therapeutic alliance during treatment, the greater the therapeutic change among the children; (2) intellectual and social competencies of the child before treatment predicted the quality of the therapeutic alliance. Children higher in intellectual and social competencies formed a better child-therapist alliance; and (3) intellectual and social competencies did not account for or explain the connection of alliance and therapeutic change. The findings could not easily be attributed to the influence of other domains (socioeconomic disadvantage, parent psychopathology and stress, and severity and scope of child dysfunction) that plausibly might contribute to alliance and therapeutic change or to rater effects (common rater variance) among predictors and outcome criteria. We propose that the next steps for child-alliance research is to better describe factors that contribute to alliance and to explain precisely what mechanisms might be involved that connect alliance during treatment with changes in individual functioning. PMID:22642524

  6. Congruence of group therapist and group member alliance judgments in emotionally focused group therapy for binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Compare, Angelo; Tasca, Giorgio A; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Kivlighan, Dennis M

    2016-06-01

    We used West and Kenny's (2011) Truth-and-Bias (T&B) model to examine how accurately group therapists' judge their group members' alliances, and the effects of therapist-patient congruence in alliance ratings on patient outcomes. Were considered: (a) directional bias - therapists' tendency to over- or underrate their clients' alliances, (b) truth strength - clients' alliance ratings, and (c) bias strength - therapists' tendency to conflate their alliance ratings for a specific group member with the average alliance ratings for the other members of the group. There were 118 obese adult patients with binge-eating disorder that were treated by 8 therapists with Emotionally Focused Group Therapy. Outcomes were operationalized as pre- to postchanges in: health-related quality of life, binge eating, and psychological distress. Patients' and therapists' working alliance were assessed after the 2nd, 10th, and last (20th) group therapy sessions. (a) There was no significant congruence between group therapists' and members' ratings of alliance; (b) therapists' ratings of an individual group member's alliance were significantly related to therapists' ratings of the other group members' alliance in early sessions but unrelated in later sessions; and (c) the relationship between therapists' alliance ratings and bias strength was weaker when patient binge eating outcomes improved. Group therapists adopted a "better safe than sorry" strategy by underestimating the strength of their group members' alliances. Therapists had a tendency to judge each group member's individual alliance based on the aggregated alliance of the other group members. Improvement in patient binge eating outcomes was related to therapists overcoming this tendency. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26914591

  7. Depletion of deep marine food patches forces divers to give up early.

    PubMed

    Thums, Michele; Bradshaw, Corey J A; Sumner, Michael D; Horsburgh, Judy M; Hindell, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Many optimal foraging models for diving animals examine strategies that maximize time spent in the foraging zone, assuming that prey acquisition increases linearly with search time. Other models have considered the effect of patch quality and predict a net energetic benefit if dives where no prey is encountered early in the dive are abandoned. For deep divers, however, the energetic benefit of giving up is reduced owing to the elevated energy costs associated with descending to physiologically hostile depths, so patch residence time should be invariant. Others consider an asymptotic gain function where the decision to leave a patch is driven by patch-depletion effects - the marginal value theorem. As predator behaviour is increasingly being used as an index of marine resource density and distribution, it is important to understand the nature of this gain function. We investigated the dive behaviour of the world's deepest-diving seal, the southern elephant seal Mirounga leonina, in response to patch quality. Testing these models has largely been limited to controlled experiments on captive animals. By integrating in situ measurements of the seal's relative lipid content obtained from drift rate data (a measure of foraging success) with area-restricted search behaviour identified from first-passage time analysis, we identified regions of high- and low-quality patches. Dive durations and bottom times were not invariant and did not increase in regions of high quality; rather, both were longer when patches were of relatively low quality. This is consistent with the predictions of the marginal value theorem and provides support for a nonlinear relationship between search time and prey acquisition. We also found higher descent and ascent rates in high-quality patches suggesting that seals minimized travel time to the foraging patch when quality was high; however, this was not achieved by increasing speed or dive angle. Relative body lipid content was an important

  8. Engaging the broader community in biodiversity research: the concept of the COMBER pilot project for divers in ViBRANT

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitidis, Christos; Faulwetter, Sarah; Chatzigeorgiou, Georgios; Penev, Lyubomir; Bánki, Olaf; Dailianis, Thanos; Pafilis, Evangelos; Kouratoras, Michail; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Fanini, Lucia; Vasileiadou, Aikaterini; Pavloudi, Christina; Vavilis, Panagiotis; Koulouri, Panayota; Dounas, Costas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper discusses the design and implementation of a citizen science pilot project, COMBER (Citizens’ Network for the Observation of Marine BiodivERsity, http://www.comber.hcmr.gr), which has been initiated under the ViBRANT EU e-infrastructure. It is designed and implemented for divers and snorkelers who are interested in participating in marine biodiversity citizen science projects. It shows the necessity of engaging the broader community in the marine biodiversity monitoring and research projects, networks and initiatives. It analyses the stakeholders, the industry and the relevant markets involved in diving activities and their potential to sustain these activities. The principles, including data policy and rewards for the participating divers through their own data, upon which this project is based are thoroughly discussed. The results of the users analysis and lessons learned so far are presented. Future plans include promotion, links with citizen science web developments, data publishing tools, and development of new scientific hypotheses to be tested by the data collected so far. PMID:22207815

  9. Engaging the broader community in biodiversity research: the concept of the COMBER pilot project for divers in ViBRANT.

    PubMed

    Arvanitidis, Christos; Faulwetter, Sarah; Chatzigeorgiou, Georgios; Penev, Lyubomir; Bánki, Olaf; Dailianis, Thanos; Pafilis, Evangelos; Kouratoras, Michail; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Fanini, Lucia; Vasileiadou, Aikaterini; Pavloudi, Christina; Vavilis, Panagiotis; Koulouri, Panayota; Dounas, Costas

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and implementation of a citizen science pilot project, COMBER (Citizens' Network for the Observation of Marine BiodivERsity, http://www.comber.hcmr.gr), which has been initiated under the ViBRANT EU e-infrastructure. It is designed and implemented for divers and snorkelers who are interested in participating in marine biodiversity citizen science projects. It shows the necessity of engaging the broader community in the marine biodiversity monitoring and research projects, networks and initiatives. It analyses the stakeholders, the industry and the relevant markets involved in diving activities and their potential to sustain these activities. The principles, including data policy and rewards for the participating divers through their own data, upon which this project is based are thoroughly discussed. The results of the users analysis and lessons learned so far are presented. Future plans include promotion, links with citizen science web developments, data publishing tools, and development of new scientific hypotheses to be tested by the data collected so far. PMID:22207815

  10. Cerebral arterial gas embolism with delayed treatment and a fatal outcome in a 14-year-old diver.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, John; Fock, Andrew; Arulanandam, Shalini

    2011-03-01

    In today's recreational diving climate, diving fitness examinations are not mandatory, and even divers who go for these examinations may not have routine chest X-rays (CXR) done in the absence of respiratory symptoms or a past history of respiratory problems. We present a case of an ultimately fatal cerebral arterial gas embolism in a 14-year-old boy with an undiagnosed lung cyst, the contribution of which to his death is uncertain. Various factors such as lack of oxygen first aid at the remote dive site; poor communication; lack of diving medicine expertise, poor oxygen administration and management in a local hospital and long delay to recompression therapy contributed to the poor outcome. It is imperative that dive operators and physicians working in close proximity to popular dive sites be educated on how to recognise and treat diving emergencies and be well-acquainted, as should divers, with the contact numbers of diving medical hotlines that offer timely and appropriate advice in case of emergency. PMID:21560983

  11. National Alliance for Clean Energy Incubators New Mexico Clean Energy Incubator

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Suzanne S.

    2004-12-15

    The National Alliance for Clean Energy Incubators was established by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop an emerging network of business incubators for entrepreneurs specializing in clean energy enterprises. The Alliance provides a broad range of business services to entrepreneurs in specific geographic locales across the U.S. and in diverse clean energy technology areas such as fuel cells, alternative fuels, power generation, and renewables, to name a few. Technology Ventures Corporation (TVC) participates in the Alliance from its corporate offices in Albuquerque, NM, and from its sites in Northern and Southern New Mexico, California, and Nevada. TVC reports on the results of its attempts to accelerate the growth and success of clean energy and energy efficiency companies through its array of business support services. During the period from September 2002 through September 2004, TVC describes contributions to the Alliance including the development of 28 clients and facilitating capital raises exceeding $35M.

  12. Examining the Relationship between Choice, Therapeutic Alliance and Outcomes in Mental Health Services

    PubMed Central

    Stanhope, Victoria; Barrenger, Stacey L.; Salzer, Mark S.; Marcus, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-determination within mental health services is increasingly recognized as an ethical imperative, but we still know little about the impact of choice on outcomes among people with severe mental illnesses. This study examines whether choice predicts outcomes and whether this relationship is mediated by therapeutic alliance. Method: The study sample of 396 participants completed a survey measuring choice, therapeutic alliance, recovery, quality of life and functioning. Multivariate analyses examined choice as a predictor of outcomes, and Sobel tests assessed alliance as a mediator. Results: Choice variables predicted recovery, quality of life and perceived outcomes. Sobel tests indicated that the relationship between choice and outcome variables was mediated by therapeutic alliance. Implications: The study demonstrates that providing more choice and opportunities for collaboration within services does improve consumer outcomes. The results also show that collaboration is dependent on the quality of the relationship between the provider and consumer. PMID:25562652

  13. Therapeutic Alliance and Retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy: A Mixed-Methods Study.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Alyson H; Friedlander, Myrna L

    2015-10-01

    We explored how the therapeutic alliance contributed to retention in Brief Strategic Family Therapy by analyzing videotapes of eight-first sessions in which four therapists worked with one family that stayed in treatment and one family that dropped out. Although behavioral exchange patterns between clients and therapists did not differ by retention status, positive therapist alliance-related behavior followed negative client alliance behavior somewhat more frequently in the retained cases. In the qualitative aspect of the study, four family therapy experts each viewed two randomly assigned sessions and commented on their quality without knowing the families' retention status. A qualitative analysis of the audiotaped commentaries revealed 18 alliance-related themes that were more characteristic of either the retained or the nonretained cases. PMID:25640754

  14. Strategic alliance: adapting to the business environment in long-term care.

    PubMed

    Mara, Cynthia Massie; Ziegenfuss, James T

    2002-01-01

    This article is addressed to long-term-care administrators and planners as well as purchasers of long-term care. Believing the current and future business environment will force continued adaptation in long-term-care organizations, the authors utilize nine categories to map pressures for change: cultural, technological, educational, political, legal, natural resource, demographic, sociologic, and economic. Long-term-care organizations, especially those that are not-for-profit, are becoming members of alliances as one way of addressing these pressures. This article describes and presents a case example of a composite alliance to demonstrate the advantages of membership in a strategic alliance. We also present examples of ways in which alliance members use strategic partnerships to improve their ability to manage these forces. PMID:12847938

  15. Mechanics, Problems and Contributions of Tertiary Strategic Alliance: The Case of 22 Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffu, Kojo; Mamman, Aminu

    1999-01-01

    A study of international strategic alliances involving 22 Australian universities indicates that a majority of universities have frameworks for internationalization initiatives, with top institutional management instrumental in initiating joint ventures with overseas institutions despite limited resources. Australian universities believe they…

  16. COORDINATING AND DEVELOPING A PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGN FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO ALLIANCE MX964756

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will develop and implement a comprehensive, 36-month public awareness campaign to promote stewardship messages associated with the other four Alliance priority issues and community hurricane preparedness.

  17. Awards Breakfast for Inventions and Contributions Board (ICB), Glenn Alliance for Technology Exchang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Awards Breakfast for Inventions and Contributions Board (ICB), Glenn Alliance for Technology Exchange (GATE), Technology Transfer and Partnership Office (TTP), and Research & Development (R&D) 100 Award Winners

  18. Active Learning Classrooms and Educational Alliances: Changing Relationships to Improve Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baepler, Paul; Walker, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter explores the "educational alliance" among students and between students and instructors. We contend that this is a framework that can help us understand how active learning classrooms facilitate positive educational outcomes.

  19. The Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance: Building a Network for Effective Collaboration and Impact (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowcroft, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mission of the Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance (The Alliance), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is to advance exemplary climate change education through research and innovative partnerships. Through six unique regional projects, The Alliance is reaching wide and diverse audiences across the U.S., while linking groups and institutions that might not otherwise be connected by a common focus on climate change education. The goals for The Alliance include building collaborations between projects and institutions, sharing effective practices, and leveraging resources to create a community in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. To foster these goals, NSF has funded a central hub, the Alliance Office. Currently, the Alliance Office is building the infrastructure necessary to support activities and communication between the projects. Successful networks need objectives for their interactions and a common vision held by the partners. In the first national meeting of The Alliance members, held in June 2013, the foundation was laid to begin this work. The Alliance now has a common mission and vision to guide the next four years of activities. An initial 'mapping' of the network has identified the scope and diversity of the network, how members are connected, current boundaries of the network, network strengths and weaknesses, and network needs. This information will serve as a baseline as the network develops. The Alliance has also identified the need for key 'working groups' which provide an opportunity for members to work across the projects on common goals. As The Alliance evolves, building blocks identified by the field of network science will be used to forge a strong and successful collaborative enterprise. Infrastructure is being established to support widespread engagement; social ties are being fostered through face-to-face meetings and monthly teleconferences; time is provided to build and share knowledge; the

  20. Therapist and client perspectives on the alliance in the treatment of traumatized adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ormhaug, Silje M.; Shirk, Stephen R.; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Objective Client ratings of the therapeutic alliance are an important predictor of outcome in the treatment of traumatized adolescents and adults, but less is known about the therapists’ perspective. The aim of this study was to investigate how therapists’ ratings relate to the adolescents’ perspective, how individual therapist and adolescent ratings relate to change in symptoms and treatment satisfaction, and whether discrepant alliance perspectives impact treatment outcome. Method The sample consisted of 156 youth (mean age 15.1, range 10–18), randomized to trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy or treatment as usual, and alliance ratings from 62 therapists. Alliance was measured midtreatment with the Therapeutic Alliance Scale for Children, and the factor structure of the two scales was analyzed with exploratory factor analyses. A change in posttraumatic symptoms was assessed with the Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) and the Clinicial-Administered PTSD Scale for Children and Adolescents (CAPS-CA). Results Therapist and client perspectives on the alliance were significantly, but moderately, associated (intraclass correlations [ICC]=0.54, p<0.001). Both scales predicted adolescent treatment satisfaction but only the client scale was significantly related to change in symptoms. Factor analyses revealed differences in factor structure with therapist ratings organized around bond and task dimensions and adolescent ratings organized by item valence. Higher therapist ratings compared to adolescent ratings predicted higher residual PTS symptoms. Discussion Although adolescent and therapist alliance ratings are moderately associated, results suggest that the ratings are differentially associated with outcomes. These findings, along with results indicating important differences in factor structure, imply that adolescent and therapist ratings are not interchangeable. Future studies should investigate how therapists can improve their judgments of adolescents

  1. Alliances With the Potential to Transform Geoscience Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, E. J.

    2005-12-01

    Geoscience problems and disciplines are inherently global, and today's opportunities for students to join the workforce also increasingly involve every country and every place on the planet. We have reached the point where the need to create global educational experiences and to make global connections are more important than ever. First, there is enormous benefit to all students if they can contribute within the context of an increasingly globalized world. Second, our primary objective as educators is to build human capacity. The reach and impact of any university is severely limited if our efforts to build this capacity is limited to students within our own classroom. The Alliances that have the potential to transform Geoscience education then have two pathways. The first is to internationalize the curriculum and to provide international educational and research opportunities. This includes: (1) establishing formal undergraduate exchange opportunities specially for the Geosciences, (2) providing opportunities within our course frameworks to enable students to gain international competences, (3) promoting international field experiences and research projects, (4) developing collaborative educational projects with international partners, and (5) creating institutional structures that are charged with promoting, proposing, reviewing, monitoring and assessing international opportunities. The second is to recognize that developing strong educational programs across the world will have a greater impact on education and research, and hence the global workforce, then for select countries to educate small populations of international students. The Alliance for Earth Science, Engineering and Development in Africa (AESEDA), created at Penn State in 2003, is establishing the partnerships with universities in Africa and with HCBUs within the U.S. that both internationalize the education of Penn State students and enable capacity building within the participating universities

  2. A study of the differential effects of Tomm's questioning styles on therapeutic alliance.

    PubMed

    Ryan, D; Carr, A

    2001-01-01

    To replicate and extend Dozier's (1992) test of Tomm's hypothesis about the differential effects of questioning styles on therapeutic alliance, an analogue study was conducted. Twenty-eight family triads, each including a son and his parents, viewed four videotaped, simulated family therapy scenarios in which Tomm's four questioning styles were separately portrayed. Participants were asked to identify with the client whose role corresponded to theirs (that is, father, mother, or son) and, on the basis of this, to rate the client's alliance with the therapist. They were also asked to rate the overall alliance between the family and the therapist. Finally, having viewed all four scenarios, they were invited to rate comparatively the quality of the therapeutic alliance across the four questioning styles. Compared with strategic and lineal questioning styles, circular and reflexive questions led to higher ratings of therapeutic alliance on all three measures. The results of this study support Tomm's hypothesis that questioning styles based on circular assumptions lead to a better therapeutic alliance at an individual and systemic level than do questions based on lineal assumptions. PMID:11288371

  3. Dengue in Florida (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Florida (USA), particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases), and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes. PMID:26462955

  4. Youth Empowerment and High School Gay-Straight Alliances

    PubMed Central

    Muraco, Anna; Subramaniam, Aarti; Laub, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    In the field of positive youth development programs, “empowerment” is used interchangeably with youth activism, leadership, civic participation and self-efficacy. However, few studies have captured what empowerment means to young people in diverse contexts. This article explores how youth define and experience empowerment in youth-led organizations characterized by social justice goals: high school Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs). Through focus group interviews, fifteen youth leaders of GSAs from different regions of California explain what they think empowerment means and how they became empowered through their involvement with the GSA. Youth describe three inter-related dimensions of empowerment: personal empowerment, relational empowerment, and strategic empowerment through having and using knowledge. When these three dimensions are experienced in combination, GSA leaders have the potential for individual and collective empowerment as agents of social change at school. By understanding these youth's perspectives on the meanings of empowerment, this article clarifies the conceptual arena for future studies of socially marginalized youth and of positive youth development. PMID:19636734

  5. Annual report 1991 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-21

    Nineteen ninety-one was a busy and productive year for the Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA). This report covers the major programs and activities of the SEA during the fiscal year 1991 (the year ending September 30, 1991), which was the first year of operation. Where warranted, the report highlights some of the events from the last quarter of the calendar year. The SEA is a non-profit consortium of four Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The SEA members are Alabama A&M University (Normal, Alabama); Jackson State University (Jackson, Mississippi); Prairie View A&M University (Prairie View, Texas); and Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, Louisiana). The SEA`s mission is to help increase the number of well-qualified minority scientists for the next century and beyond, and to provide input into the research and development needs of the nation. The SEA collaborates on research projects with government agencies, national laboratories, private foundations, industry and other universities in a broad range of technical areas.

  6. Unique Partnerships: The Earth System Science Education Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerin, T. G.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) professional development program is a unique partnership involving over 19 colleges, universities, and other science organizations across the country, offering a trio of online, ESS graduate-level courses for K-12 teachers. Among the cadre of ESSEA organizations are three (3) Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU's) and one primarily Hispanic serving university; many ESSEA universities serve rural and disadvantaged communities. The inquiry-based courses are providing teachers with the content knowledge and tools they need to incorporate Earth system science into their curricula. Over 1000 teachers have completed at least one of the semester-long, graduate level courses. Additionally, teachers implementing ESS in their classrooms have commented that the cross-disciplinary nature of the courses positively impacts student learning across the board, not just in science. The primary goal of ESSEA team members is to reach K-12 students by instructing in-service teachers who will teach them. However, many ESSEA universities open their courses to undergraduate pre-service teachers as well as non-science majors, improving not only our students' scientific literacy, but also that of our citizenry.

  7. ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program Verification and Validation Whitepaper

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R; Graziani, F; Trucano, T

    2006-03-31

    The purpose of this whitepaper is to provide a framework for understanding the role that verification and validation (V&V) are expected to play in successful ASC Predictive Science Academic Alliance (PSAA) Centers and projects. V&V have been emphasized in the recent specification of the PSAA (NNSA, 2006): (1) The resulting simulation models lend themselves to practical verification and validation methodologies and strategies that should include the integrated use of experimental and/or observational data as a key part of model and sub-model validation, as well as demonstrations of numerical convergence and accuracy for code verification. (2) Verification, validation and prediction methodologies and results must be much more strongly emphasized as research topics and demonstrated via the proposed simulations. (3) It is mandatory that proposals address the following two topics: (a) Predictability in science & engineering; and (b) Verification & validation strategies for large-scale simulations, including quantification of uncertainty and numerical convergence. We especially call attention to the explicit coupling of computational predictability and V&V in the third bullet above. In this whitepaper we emphasize this coupling, and provide concentrated guidance for addressing item 2. The whitepaper has two main components. First, we provide a brief and high-level tutorial on V&V that emphasizes critical elements of the program. Second, we state a set of V&V-related requirements that successful PSAA proposals must address.

  8. Annual report 1993 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    By combining their resources and with support from the US Department of Energy (DOE), Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA) has worked for the past three years to increase the participation of African-Americans in science, engineering, and related fields. At the core of the SEA is a combined population of over 33,000 African-American students, and a combined Historically Black Colleges and Universities research faculty and staff of nearly 400 individuals that specialize in several major areas of science and engineering. SEA views its approach as a constructive, long-term solution to increasing the nation`s technical manpower talent pool. For the faculty and students, SEA develops new collaborative research opportunities, creates new summer research internships and coop programs, strengthens existing programs, provides students participation in technical conferences, workshops, and seminars, and grants scholarships and incentive awards to future scientists and engineers. SEA relies on the collective talents of its members to build partnerships with the Federal government and private industry that help create opportunities for African-American science and engineering students, and promote activities that advance this mission. As the number of science and engineering students graduating from SEA institutions continues to rise, SEA is pleased to report that the program is making a difference.

  9. Rethinking schools of public health: a strategic alliance model.

    PubMed

    Moloughney, Brent W; Skinner, Harvey A

    2006-01-01

    Canada is in the midst of rejuvenation of public health organizations, mandates and infrastructure. Major planning exercises are underway regarding public health human resources, where academic institutions have a key role to play. To what extent could schools of public health be part of the solution? Many universities across Canada are considering or in the process of implementing MPH programs (some 17 programs planned and/or underway) and possible schools of public health. However, concerns are raised about critical mass, quality and standards. We encourage innovation and debate about ways to enhance collaborative and structural arrangements for education programs. A school of public health model might emerge from this, but so too might other models. Also, novel types of organizational structure need consideration. One example is a "strategic alliance" model that is broad-based, integrative and adaptive--building on the interdisciplinary focus needed for addressing public health concerns in the 21st century. From our perspective, the central question is: what (new) types of organizational structures and, equally important, collaborative networks will enable Canada to strengthen its public health workforce so that it may better address local and global challenges to public health? PMID:16827419

  10. Santa Fe Alliance for Science: The First Eight Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenstein, Robert A.

    2013-04-01

    The Santa Fe Alliance for Science (SFAFS) was founded in May, 2005. SFAFS exists to provide assistance in K-14 math and science education in the greater Santa Fe area. It does this via extensive programs (1) in math and science tutoring at Santa Fe High School, Santa Fe Community College and to a lesser degree at other schools, (2) science fair advising and judging, (3) its ``Santa Fe Science Cafe for Young Thinkers'' series, (4) a program of professional enrichment for K-12 math and science teachers, and (5) a fledging math intervention program in middle school math. Well over 150 STEM professionals, working mostly as volunteers, have contributed since our beginning. Participation by students, parents and teachers has increased dramatically over the years, leading to much more positive views of math and science, especially among elementary school students and teachers. Support from the community and from local school districts has been very strong. I will present a brief status report on SFAFS activities, discuss some of the lessons learned along the way and describe briefly some ideas for the future. More information can be found at the SFAFS website, www.sfafs.org.

  11. Annual report 1992 - Science and Engineering Alliance, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    Twenty years of attention has resulted in little change in the minorities in science pipeline problem. What happened? The answers to this question are many. They are synergistically linked around some complex issues. The Science and Engineering Alliance (SEA) institutions have long focused on the need for more minorities in science and engineering. In fact, the creation of SEA is a demonstration of how the member institutions continue exploring new and innovative ways of addressing the pipeline problem. Combining their resources and appointing a fulltime director to oversee this longterm effort shows commitment. This annual report reviews SEA activities that occurred in 1992 to address the minorities in science problem. The commitment to this challenging problem is evident in the many programs and creative efforts described in this report. Because SEA believes commitment begins with accountability, this report contains facts and figures that demonstrate actual accomplishments by SEA during fiscal year 1992 (the year ending September 30, 1992). Where warranted, the report highlights events from the last quarter of the calendar year.

  12. Earth Science Big Data Activities at Research Data Alliance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Baumann, Peter; Evans, Ben; Riedel, Morris

    2016-04-01

    In this presentation we introduce Earth science related activities of the Big Data Interest Group (BDIG) in Research Data Alliance (RDA). "RDA is an international organization focused on the development of infrastructure and community activities that reduce barriers to data sharing and exchange, and the acceleration of data driven innovation worldwide." The participation of researchers in RDA is voluntary. As the name implies, an Interest Group is a collection of participants sharing the same interest. The BDIG seeks to address community needs on all things having to do with Big Data. The ultimate goal of RDA Big Data Interest Group is to produce a set of recommendation documents to advise diverse research communities with respect to: • How to select an appropriate Big Data solution for a particular science application to realize optimal value? and • What are the best practices in dealing with various data and computing issues associated with such a solution? The primary means to reaching such recommendations is through the establishment and work of Working Groups, each of which focuses on a specific issue. Although BDIG is not specific to Earth science, its recent activities revolve mostly around it. We introduce some of these activities that are designed to advance our knowledge and to characterize Big Data in Earth science.

  13. Alterations in Body Fluid Balance During Fin Swimming in 29 °C Water in a Population of Special Forces Divers.

    PubMed

    Castagna, O; Desruelle, A V; Blatteau, J E; Schmid, B; Dumoulin, G; Regnard, J

    2015-12-01

    Highly trained "combat swimmers" encounter physiological difficulties when performing missions in warm water. The aim of this study was to assess the respective roles of immersion and physical activity in perturbing fluid balance of military divers on duty in warm water. 12 trained divers performed 2 dives each (2 h, 3 m depth) in fresh water at 29 °C. Divers either remained Static or swam continuously (Fin) during the dive. In the Fin condition, oxygen consumption and heart rate were 2-fold greater than during the Static dive. Core and skin temperatures were also higher (Fin: 38.5±0.4 °C and 36.2±0.3 °C and Static: 37.2±0.3 °C and 34.3±0.3 °C; respectively p=0.0002 and p=0.0003). During the Fin dive, the average mass loss was 989 g (39% urine loss, 41% sweating and 20% insensible water loss and blood sampling); Static divers lost 720 g (84% urine loss, 2% sweating and 14% insensible water loss and blood sampling) (p=0.003). In the Fin condition, a greater decrease in total body mass and greater sweating occurred, without effects on circulating renin and aldosterone concentrations; diuresis was reduced, and plasma volume decreased more than in the Static condition. PMID:26422054

  14. Fast Surfers, Broad Scanners and Deep Divers as Users of Information Technology-Relating Information Preferences to Personality Traits and Study Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinstrom, Jannica

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the influence of personality traits and approaches to studying on students' information-seeking behavior, with a specific focus on use of information technology. Three information-seeking patterns emerged from analyses of 305 college students: "Fast Surfers,""Broad Scanners," and "Deep Divers." Findings point to the importance of…

  15. Antibiotic resistance in outpatient urinary isolates: final results from the North American Urinary Tract Infection Collaborative Alliance (NAUTICA).

    PubMed

    Zhanel, George G; Hisanaga, Tamiko L; Laing, Nancy M; DeCorby, Melanie R; Nichol, Kim A; Palatnik, Lorraine P; Johnson, Jack; Noreddin, Ayman; Harding, Godfrey K M; Nicolle, Lindsay E; Hoban, Daryl J

    2005-11-01

    The goal of the North American Urinary Tract Infection Collaborative Alliance (NAUTICA) study was to determine antibiotic susceptibility to commonly used agents for urinary tract infections against outpatient urinary isolates obtained in various geographic regions in the USA and Canada. Forty-one medical centres (30 from the USA and 11 from Canada) participated, with each centre submitting up to 50 consecutive outpatient midstream urine isolates. Isolates were identified to species level by the standard protocol of each laboratory. Susceptibility testing was determined using the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) microdilution method. Resistance breakpoints used were those published by the NCCLS, including: ampicillin (resistant > or = 32 microg/mL), sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SMX/TMP) (resistant > or = 4 microg/mL), nitrofurantoin (resistant > or = 128 microg/mL), ciprofloxacin (resistant > or = 4 microg/mL) and levofloxacin (resistant > or = 8 microg/mL). Of the 1990 isolates collected, 75.1% (1494) were collected from the USA and 24.9% (496) were collected from Canada. The mean age of the patients was 48.3 years (range 1 month to 99 years), and 79.5% and 20.5% of isolates were obtained from women and men, respectively. The most common organisms were Escherichia coli (57.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (12.4%), Enterococcus spp. (6.6%), Proteus mirabilis (5.4%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.9%), Citrobacter spp. (2.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (2.2%), Enterobacter cloacae (1.9%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (1.3%), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (1.2%), Klebsiella spp. (1.2%), Enterobacter aerogenes (1.1%) and Streptococcus agalactiae (1.0%). Among all 1990 isolates, 45.9% were resistant to ampicillin, 20.4% to SMX/TMP, 14.3% to nitrofurantoin, 9.7% to ciprofloxacin and 8.1% to levofloxacin. Fluoroquinolone resistance was highest in patients > or = 65 years of age. For the 1142 E. coli isolates, resistance rates were: ampicillin 37.7%, SMX

  16. FrogwatchUSA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Droege, S.

    2002-01-01

    full text: Frogs and toads are perhaps the most approachable and available of all our wildlife. In many, if not most places, they are abundant. In wetter parts of the East, almost anyone outside on a warm rainy night in spring will hear their dream-like calls, bellows, trills and snores. Even in the deserts of the Southwest, a nocturnal trip after a summer monsoon will yield toads moving across the roads toward a cacophonous orgy of mating and calling in the roadside ditches and desert pools. Birds share with frogs and toads this same sense of presence in our daily lives. But the difference is that birds are like the attractive neighbor who just never gives you the time of day, while frogs are more like the troglodyte who appears regularly to chat, philosophize, and have a beer. Uninvited, frogs appear in our water gardens, toads are on our stoops in the morning, we catch them when we are kids, raise their babies in the aquarium, and feel sorry when we find we have run them over with the lawnmower. When concerns about declining populations of amphibians reached the mass media, the Secretaries' office became involved. In addition to using traditional research mechanisms to investigate the problem, the Secretary also wanted to involve the public directly. The combination of high public appeal and the relative ease with which frog calls can be learned made a large-scale monitoring program for frogs and toads possible. What emerged was a program called Frogwatch USA, modeled after a successful Canadian program with a similar name. A web site was created (www.frogwatch.org) that presented potential frogwatchers with directions and a way to register their site online as well as enter their data. Observers chose where to count frogs depending on what they felt was important. For some it was their backyard, others chose vulnerable wetlands in their neighborhoods, or spots on local refuges and parks. Initially funded at $8,000 a year and then after two years increased to

  17. Impact of HMO market structure on physician-hospital strategic alliances.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, L R; Bazzoli, G J; Dynan, L; Wholey, D R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of HMO market structure on the formation of physician-hospital strategic alliances from 1993 through 1995. The two trends, managed care and physician-hospital integration have been prominent in reshaping insurance and provider markets over the past decade. STUDY DESIGN: Pooled cross-sectional data from the InterStudy HMO Census and the Annual Survey conducted by the American Hospital Association (AHA) between 1993 and the end of 1995 to examine the effects of HMO penetration and HMO numbers in a market on the formation of hospital-sponsored alliances with physicians. Because prior research has found nonlinear effects of HMOs on a variety of dependent variables, we operationalized HMO market structure two ways: using a Taylor series expansion and cross-classifying quartile distributions of HMO penetration and numbers into 16 dummy indicators. Alliance formation was operationalized using the presence of any alliance model (IPA, PHO, MSO, and foundation) and the sum of the four models present in the hospital. Because managed care and physician-hospital integration are endogenous (e.g., some hospitals also sponsor HMOs), we used an instrumental variables approach to model the determinants of HMO penetration and HMO numbers. These instruments were then used with other predictors of alliance formation: physician supply characteristics, the extent of hospital competition, hospital-level descriptors, population size and demographic characteristics, and indicators for each year. All equations were estimated at the MSA level using mixed linear models and first-difference models. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Contrary to conventional wisdom, alliance formation is shaped by the number of HMOs in the market rather than by HMO penetration. This confirms a growing perception that hospital-sponsored alliances with physicians are contracting vehicles for managed care: the greater the number of HMOs to contract with, the greater the development of alliances

  18. Do reef fish habituate to diver presence? Evidence from two reef sites with contrasting historical levels of SCUBA intensity in the Bay Islands, Honduras.

    PubMed

    Titus, Benjamin M; Daly, Marymegan; Exton, Dan A

    2015-01-01

    Contact between humans and the marine environment is increasing, but the capacity of communities to adapt to human presence remains largely unknown. The popularization of SCUBA diving has added a new dimension to human impacts in aquatic systems and, although individual-level impacts have been identified, cumulative effects on ecosystem function and community-wide responses are unclear. In principle, habituation may mitigate the consequences of human presence on the biology of an individual and allow the quick resumption of its ecological roles, but this has not been documented in aquatic systems. Here, we investigate the short-term impact of human presence and the long-term habituation potential of reef-fish communities to recreational SCUBA divers by studying symbiotic cleaning interactions on coral reefs with differing levels of historical contact with divers. We show that incidences of human contact result in a smaller decline in ecosystem function and more rapid resumption of baseline services on a reef in Utila, Honduras that has heavy historical levels of SCUBA diver presence, compared to an un-dived reef site in the Cayos Cochinos Marine Protected Area (CCMPA). Nonetheless, despite the generally smaller change in ecosystem function and decades of regular contact with divers, cleaning behavior is suppressed by >50% at Utila when divers are present. We hypothesize that community-wide habituation of reef fish is not fully achievable and may be biologically restricted to only partial habituation. Differential responses to human presence impacts the interpretation and execution of behavioral research where SCUBA is the predominant means of data collection, and provides an important rationale for future research investigating the interplay between human presence, ecosystem function, and community structure on coral reefs. PMID:25807543

  19. Do Reef Fish Habituate to Diver Presence? Evidence from Two Reef Sites with Contrasting Historical Levels of SCUBA Intensity in the Bay Islands, Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Benjamin M.; Daly, Marymegan; Exton, Dan A.

    2015-01-01

    Contact between humans and the marine environment is increasing, but the capacity of communities to adapt to human presence remains largely unknown. The popularization of SCUBA diving has added a new dimension to human impacts in aquatic systems and, although individual-level impacts have been identified, cumulative effects on ecosystem function and community-wide responses are unclear. In principle, habituation may mitigate the consequences of human presence on the biology of an individual and allow the quick resumption of its ecological roles, but this has not been documented in aquatic systems. Here, we investigate the short-term impact of human presence and the long-term habituation potential of reef-fish communities to recreational SCUBA divers by studying symbiotic cleaning interactions on coral reefs with differing levels of historical contact with divers. We show that incidences of human contact result in a smaller decline in ecosystem function and more rapid resumption of baseline services on a reef in Utila, Honduras that has heavy historical levels of SCUBA diver presence, compared to an un-dived reef site in the Cayos Cochinos Marine Protected Area (CCMPA). Nonetheless, despite the generally smaller change in ecosystem function and decades of regular contact with divers, cleaning behavior is suppressed by >50% at Utila when divers are present. We hypothesize that community-wide habituation of reef fish is not fully achievable and may be biologically restricted to only partial habituation. Differential responses to human presence impacts the interpretation and execution of behavioral research where SCUBA is the predominant means of data collection, and provides an important rationale for future research investigating the interplay between human presence, ecosystem function, and community structure on coral reefs. PMID:25807543

  20. Therapist and Patient Perceptions of Alliance and Progress In Psychological Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Kashy, Deborah A.; Rubin, Stephen; Hernandez, Enrique; Bergman, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal was to understand both therapist and patient perspectives on alliance and session progress for women in treatment for gynecological cancer. We used a longitudinal version of the one-with-many design to partition variation in alliance and progress ratings into therapist, patient/dyad, and time-specific components. We also evaluated therapist and patient characteristics that predict alliance and session progress. Methods Two hundred and three women and their therapists completed measures of alliance and session progress across a 6-session course of treatment. Participants also completed pre-intervention measures of self-esteem, depression, cancer-specific distress, emotional expressivity, and use of protective buffering. Results Patients reported higher alliance and greater progress than therapists. When therapists reported particularly strong alliance with particular patients, those patients concurred. More experienced therapists reported higher alliances and more progress but their patients did not agree. Patients who began treatment in more difficult psychosocial circumstances tended to have less positive session outcomes on average but evidenced more improvement across therapy sessions. Conclusions Patients rated their alliance and progress more positively than their therapists, although there was substantial relative agreement between therapists and patients. Alliance and progress improved over time, particularly among patients who evidenced higher levels of distress and poorer physical functioning. More experienced therapists were more confident in their abilities but their patients did not share this perception. PMID:22746145

  1. Helping Alliance, Retention, and Treatment Outcomes: A Secondary Analysis From the NIDA Clinical Trials Network Women and Trauma Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Miele, Gloria M.; Hien, Denise A.; Campbell, Aimee N. C.; Hu, Mei-Chen; Caldeira, Nathilee; Jiang, Huiping; Litt, Lisa; Killeen, Therese; Hatch-Maillette, Mary; Najavits, Lisa; Brown, Chanda; Robinson, James A.; Brigham, Gregory S.; Nunes, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the association between the therapeutic alliance and treatment outcomes among 223 women with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders who participated in a multisite clinical trial of group treatments for trauma and addictions in the United States throughout 2004 and 2005. General linear models indicated that women who received Seeking Safety, a cognitive-behavioral treatment, had significantly higher alliance ratings than those in Women's Health Education, a control group. Alliance was related to significant decreases in PTSD symptoms and higher attendance in both interventions. Alliance was not related to substance use outcomes. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:22475068

  2. Interpersonal predictors of early therapeutic alliance in a transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral treatment for adolescents with anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura; Henderson, Heather A; Ehrenreich-May, Jill

    2012-06-01

    The importance of therapeutic alliance in predicting treatment success is well established, but less is known about client characteristics that predict alliance. This study examined alliance predictors in adolescents with anxiety and/or depressive disorders (n=31) who received a transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral treatment, the Unified Protocol for the Treatment of Emotional Disorders in Youth (Ehrenreich, Buzzella, Trosper, Bennett, & Barlow, 2008) in the context of a larger randomized controlled trial. Alliance was assessed at session three by therapists, clients, and independent observers. Results indicated that alliance ratings across the three informant perspectives were significantly associated with one another, but that pretreatment interpersonal variables (e.g., social support, attachment security, and social functioning in current family and peer relationships) were differentially associated with varying informant perspectives. Adolescent and observer ratings of alliance were both predicted by adolescent self-reports on measures reflecting how they perceive their interpersonal relationships. In addition, adolescent-reported symptom severity at pretreatment predicted observer ratings of alliance such that adolescents who indicated greater anxiety and depressive symptoms were rated as having stronger early alliances by independent observers. Therapists perceived having weaker early alliances with adolescents evidencing clinically significant depression at intake as compared with adolescents diagnosed with anxiety disorders alone. Future research is needed to examine whether identification of relevant interpersonal factors at intake can help improve initial therapeutic engagement and resulting outcomes for the psychosocial treatment of adolescents with anxiety and depressive disorders. PMID:22642525

  3. 3-D eye movement measurements on four Comex's divers using video CCD cameras, during high pressure diving.

    PubMed

    Guillemant, P; Ulmer, E; Freyss, G

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the vulnerability of the vestibular system regarding barotraumatism (1) and deep diving may induce immediate neurological changes (2). These extreme conditions (high pressure, limited examination time, restricted space, hydrogen-oxygen mixture, communication difficulties etc.) require adapted technology and associated fast experimental procedure. We were able to solve these problems by developing a new system of 3-D ocular movements on line analysis by means of a video camera. This analyser uses image processing and forms recognition software which allows non-invasive video frequency calculation of eye movements including torsional component. As this system is immediately ready for use, we were able to realize the subsequent examinations in a maximum time of 8 min for each diver: oculomotor tests including saccadic, slow and optokinetic traditional automatic measurements; vestibular tests regarding spontaneous and positional nystagmus, and reactional nystagmus to the pendular test. For pendular induced nystagmus we used appropriate head positions to stimulate separately the lateral and the posterior semicircular canal, and we measured the gain by operating successively in visible light and complete darkness. Recordings were done during a simulated onshore dive to an ambient pressure corresponding to a depth of 350 m. The above examinations were completed on the first and last days by caloric tests with the same video system analyser. The results of the investigations demonstrated perfect tolerance of the oculomotor and vestibular systems of these 4 divers thus fulfilling the preventive conditions defined by Comex Co. We were able to overcome the limitations due to low cost PC computer operation and cameras (necessity of adaptation to pressure, focus difficulties and direct light exposure eye reflexions). We still have on line accurate measurements even on the torsional component of the eye movement. Due to this technological efficiency

  4. Ocean Literacy Alliance-Hawaii (OLA-HI) Resource Guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, B. C.; Rivera, M.; Hicks Johnson, T.; Baumgartner, E.; Davidson, K.

    2008-05-01

    The Ocean Literacy Alliance-Hawaii (OLA-HI) was founded in 2007 to establish a framework for collaboration in ocean science education in Hawaii. OLA-HI is supported by the federal Interagency Working Group-Ocean Education (IWG-OE) and funded through NSF and NOAA. Hawaii support is provided through the organizations listed above in the authors' block. Our inaugural workshop was attended by 55 key stakeholders, including scientists, educators, legislators, and representatives of federal, state, and private organizations and projects in Hawaii. Participants reviewed ongoing efforts, strengthened existing collaborations, and developed strategies to build new partnerships. Evaluations showed high satisfaction with the workshop, with 100% of respondents ranking the overall quality as `good' or `excellent'. Expected outcomes include a calendar of events, a website (www.soest.hawaii.edu/OLAHawaii), a list serve, and a resource guide for ocean science education in Hawaii. These products are all designed to facilitate online and offline networking and collaboration among Hawaii's ocean science educators. The OLA-HI resource guide covers a gamut of marine resources and opportunities, including K-12 curriculum, community outreach programs, museum exhibits and lecture series, internships and scholarships, undergraduate and graduate degree programs, and teacher professional development workshops. This guide is designed to share existing activities and products, minimize duplication of efforts, and help provide gap analysis to steer the direction of future ocean science projects and programs in Hawaii. We ultimately plan on using the resource guide to develop pathways to guide Hawaii's students toward ocean-related careers. We are especially interested in developing pathways for under-represented students in the sciences, particularly Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, and will focus on this topic at a future OLA-HI workshop.

  5. The Iowa Chemistry Education Alliance, ICEA: Process and product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Kathleen Annette

    2005-12-01

    The Iowa Chemistry Education Alliance, ICEA, supported by Department of Education Star Schools funding (R203F5000198), was both a Process and a Product. The Process included: (a) Design and support of high school teacher training sessions that incorporated distance learning techniques, cooperative learning and guided inquiry strategies, and a constructivist, student-centered classroom focus; (b) Design and incorporation of eight supplemental learning modules, corresponding assessment rubrics, and supporting videotapes into the existing Iowa high school chemistry curriculum; (c) Adaptation of the learning modules throughout the course of the academic year while the units were being integrated into the existing curriculum; (d) Modification and final editing of the curriculum modules and videotapes. The Product consisted of eight supplemental ICEA learning modules with corresponding assessment rubrics, and three supporting videotapes. To integrate ICEA materials into the existing curriculum, students at high schools around the state of Iowa conducted cooperative, guided-inquiry laboratory exercises. Via electronic mail and Iowa's two-way interactive audio-video system, the Iowa Communications Network (ICN), they discussed strategies for experimentation and shared results obtained. Invited guest experts also visited student groups via the ICN. Teachers conducted regular biannual on-site face-to-face planning meetings. These were augmented and supported by weekly or biweekly "staff" meetings conducted via the ICN. From the original three hundred students in four central Iowa high schools (rural, urban, and suburban), by its third and fourth year, the Project evolved to include over 1500 students in twenty-five high schools statewide.

  6. Muddy Waters: Earth System Science Education Alliance Wetlands Degradation Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C.; Jordan, S.; Kaufman, C.

    2008-12-01

    The College of Charleston, Charleston, SC recently obtained funding from the South Carolina Space Grant Consortium to develop a geoscience-based education module for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). The Muddy Waters Education Module will prepare students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), in addition to pre-service educators, in using remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor our changing wetland and delta environments. The curriculum will provide opportunities for students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences founded in sound educational pedagogy. The ESSEA curriculum exists within a national network of universities, colleges, and science education organizations dedicated to improving Earth science education, thereby increasing exposure to a significant environmental issue - wetland and delta degradation - and providing a means of sustainability for the future. This session will provide information on the new module highlighting the crisis of wetland and delta degradation occurring on a global scale, specifically focusing on the Ganges Delta, the Yellow River Delta, the Everglades and all of the associated and surrounding wetlands. In addition, we will discuss the Merritt Island National Refuge and the wetlands surrounding Cape Canaveral, as a pristine environment that has been protected due to its proximity to the space shuttle launches. This Muddy Waters Education Module will raise awareness of processes that are currently underway with global climatic change and anthropogenic effects and the interconnectedness of the various spheres (atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere) in wetland environments. The Muddy Waters Curriculum will be designed to meet National Education Standards in science, geography, math, etc. The module will engage students in authentic research and will engage and inspire students in environmental

  7. International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) Technical Experts Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuna, P.; Salgado, J.

    2012-09-01

    created in 2005 as an effort to make the different agencies dealing with planetary data come to homogeneous and interoperable approaches for the handling of their data. The IPDA's main emphasis is to ease discovery, access and use of planetary data by world-wide scientists regardless of which agency is collecting and distributing the data. Ensuring proper capture, accessibility and availability of the data is the task of the individual space agencies. The IPDA is focusing on developing an international standard which allows the following capabilities: query, access and usage of data across international planetary data archive systems. While, trends in other areas of space science are concentrating on the sharing of science data from diverse standards and collection methods, the IPDA shall concentrate on promoting standards which drive common methods for collecting and describing planetary science data across the international community. Such an approach will better support the long term goal of easing data sharing across system and agency boundaries. The IPDA web pages can be found at the following link: http://planetarydata.org/ The IPDA Technical Experts Group (IPDA TEG) was created to ensure correct integration of the different standards created within the alliance. The Technical Experts Group of the IPDA provides oversight on system and software standards and architectures under development by the IPDA. It is responsible for coordination of technical projects and ensuring that the projects are compatible with the IPDA system architecture and requirements. The IPDA TEG is empowered by the Steering Committee to design and develop technical standards that meet the IPDA requirements and fit within the IPDA system architecture. The TEG is responsible to review and approve standards when they are ready for submission to the Steering Committee. This paper will summarise the activities of the IPDA TEG during its conception with particular emphasis in the recent

  8. Male reproductive success increases with alliance size in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus).

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Joanna; Corrigan, Shannon; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Möller, Luciana M

    2012-03-01

    1. Determining the extent of variation in male mating strategies and reproductive success is necessary to understand the fitness benefits of social and cooperative behaviour. 2. This study assesses the reproductive success of male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in a small embayment population where different behavioural strategies of males have previously been identified. Parentage for 44 sampled calves was examined using 23 microsatellite loci and one mitochondrial DNA marker. Our candidate parent pool of 70 males and 64 females contained individuals sampled from both the embayment and adjacent coastal populations. 3. A moderate level of polygyny was detected in our sample. We assigned paternity of 23 calves to 12 males at the strict 95% confidence level and an additional nine calves to two males at the 80% confidence level. The majority (92%) of successful males were identified as residents to the embayment, and 46% of offspring were located within the same social group or community as their father. 4. Our results suggest that the size of alliances was the best predictor of reproductive success for males in this population, while the strength of association among allied males, alliance stability and male ranging patterns had little influence. In line with predictions for male alliances formed between unrelated individuals, we found that reproductive skew within alliances was not large. 5. Together, our genetic and behavioural analyses demonstrate that alliance formation between male dolphins is a successful strategy to enhance reproductive output. PMID:21981240

  9. Impact of exchanges and client-therapist alliance in online-text psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, D'Arcy J; Stiles, William B; Bailer, A John; Hughes, Michael R

    2013-05-01

    The impact of exchanges and client-therapist alliance of online therapy text exchanges were compared to previously published results in face-to-face therapy, and the moderating effects of four participant factors found significant in previously published face-to-face studies were investigated using statistical mixed-effect modeling analytic techniques. Therapists (N=30) and clients (N=30) engaged in online therapy were recruited from private practitioner sites, e-clinics, online counseling centers, and mental-health-related discussion boards. In a naturalistic design, they each visited an online site weekly and completed the standard impact and alliance questionnaires for at least 6 weeks. Results indicated that the impact of exchanges and client-therapist alliance in text therapy was similar to, but in some respects more positive than, previous evaluations of face-to-face therapy. The significance of participant factors previously found to influence impact and alliance in face-to-face therapy (client symptom severity, social support, therapist theoretical orientation, and therapist experience) was not replicated, except that therapists with the more symptomatic clients rated their text exchanges as less smooth and comfortable. Although its small size and naturalistic design impose limitations on sensitivity and generalizability, this study provides some insights into treatment impact and the alliance in online therapy. PMID:23530546

  10. The building and sustaining of a health care partnership: the Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance.

    PubMed

    Chatman, Vera Stevens; Buford, Juanita F; Plant, Brynne

    2003-11-01

    The ability of academic health centers (AHCs) to maintain their financial viability and mission in the face of revolutionary changes was broadly discussed during the last decade. Among the suggestions for protecting the future of AHCs was to form strategic alliances to further the missions of education, research, and service. Although the evidence indicates that 55% of strategic alliances fall apart after three years, the Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance is now beginning its fifth year, and it appears to be growing stronger. This article presents a brief overview of the evolving historical relationship between Meharry Medical College and Vanderbilt University Medical Center-two institutions that share the same fundamental missions but have very different traditions, cultures, resources, and emphases for medical training-and their relationship with Metropolitan General Hospital at Meharry, a public hospital. The characteristics that have distinguished this strategic alliance are its organizational structure, clearly articulated and measurable objectives, an independent central office, and a shared responsibility for the management and provision of clinical services at Nashville General Hospital. The belief that the Meharry-Vanderbilt Alliance is the "right thing to do" has provided a foundation for cooperation at all levels of both AHCs. PMID:14604868

  11. Impact of Exchanges and Client–Therapist Alliance in Online-Text Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, William B.; Bailer, A. John; Hughes, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The impact of exchanges and client–therapist alliance of online therapy text exchanges were compared to previously published results in face-to-face therapy, and the moderating effects of four participant factors found significant in previously published face-to-face studies were investigated using statistical mixed-effect modeling analytic techniques. Therapists (N=30) and clients (N=30) engaged in online therapy were recruited from private practitioner sites, e-clinics, online counseling centers, and mental-health-related discussion boards. In a naturalistic design, they each visited an online site weekly and completed the standard impact and alliance questionnaires for at least 6 weeks. Results indicated that the impact of exchanges and client–therapist alliance in text therapy was similar to, but in some respects more positive than, previous evaluations of face-to-face therapy. The significance of participant factors previously found to influence impact and alliance in face-to-face therapy (client symptom severity, social support, therapist theoretical orientation, and therapist experience) was not replicated, except that therapists with the more symptomatic clients rated their text exchanges as less smooth and comfortable. Although its small size and naturalistic design impose limitations on sensitivity and generalizability, this study provides some insights into treatment impact and the alliance in online therapy. PMID:23530546

  12. Proceedings: EPRI's Agricultural and Food Technology Alliances: Memphis, Tennessee, May 12-14, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This document is a compilation of field trip overviews, presentations and committee reports from the EPRI Agricultural Technology Alliance (ATA) and Food Technology Alliance (FTA) Joint Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee, May 12-14, 1998. Presentation titles include: Agricultural Research Programs in Tennessee; Tennessee's Food and Agricultural Research Programs; The TVA -- Formation and Evolution, Deregulation/Restructuring the Electric Utility Industry -- Status and Update; Water and Wastewater Program Interactions with the Food and Agricultural Technology Alliances; Aquaculture -- Its Importance to Food and Agriculture; The Poultry Industry -- The Original Agriculture and Food Integrator; Update on Electronic Pasteurization; and California's Electric Industry Restructuring New Options for Agricultural Customers. The document also includes steering committee actions of both the ATA and the FTA, a registration list, steering committee operating procedures and member services for the ATA and the FTA, project summaries, and minutes from the ozone workshop that took place prior to the meeting.

  13. Evaluation of an academic service partnership using a strategic alliance framework.

    PubMed

    Murray, Teri A; James, Dorothy C

    2012-01-01

    Strategic alliances involve the sharing of resources to achieve mutually relevant benefits and they are flexible ways to access resources outside of one's own institution. The recent landmark report from the Institute of Medicine, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, called for academic and health care organizations to strategically align around the future registered nurse workforce to improve the quality and safety of patient care. The dedicated education unit (DEU) is one practical way for 2 entities to align so that students can learn to administer safe, quality care. Because DEUs have great potential, it is critical to evaluate the alignment between the academic and service partner for appropriate fit, mutual benefit, and long-term success. In this article, we analyze the effectiveness of the Saint Louis University School of Nursing (SLUSON) and Mercy Hospital, St. Louis (MHSL) DEU project, an alliance between a medical center and school of nursing, using the Single Alliance Key Success Model. PMID:22177471

  14. Treatment Engagement: Building Therapeutic Alliance in Home-Based Treatment with Adolescents and their Families

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Sanna J.; Bender, Kimberly; Lantry, Janet; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Client engagement is an essential yet challenging ingredient in effective therapy. Engaged clients are more likely to bond with therapists and counselors, endorse treatment goals, participate to a greater degree, remain in treatment longer, and report higher levels of satisfaction. This study explored the process of engaging high-risk youth and their parents in a unique home-based family therapy intervention. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 families who completed family therapy sessions that included a core component aimed at increasing treatment engagement. Parents’ and youths’ perceptions of engagement suggest the importance of developing therapeutic alliance with therapists, who facilitated building a shared alliance among family members. Implications for improving client engagement are discussed within the context of alliance building with the therapist and among family members. PMID:20556209

  15. The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA): Overview of the Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, A.; Gopala Krishna, B.; Crichton, D. J.; Beebe, R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Arviset, C.; Di Capria, M. T.; Mickaelian, A. M.; IPDA

    2016-06-01

    An overview of activities of the IPDA is presented in the frame of the recently growing number of successful space experiments dedicated to planetary observation, with a significantly growing number of people involved in such activity and with significantly growing numbers of web services willing to share data and services in our research domain, but also, in close by domains such as astronomy, heliophysics and atmospheric sciences for the Earth. An overview of a number of space agencies and organizations is given. In total, IPDA consists of 13 national organizations: NASA (USA), CNES (France), ESA (Europe), STFC (UK), JAXA (Japan), ASI (Italy), ISRO (India), DLR (Germany), RKA (Russia), RCSA (China), FMI (Finland), ArSA (Armenia) and United Arab Emirates. Some projects of 2015 in frame of the IPDA activities are described.

  16. Interpersonal problems as predictors of therapeutic alliance and symptom improvement in cognitive therapy for depression

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Fritz; Jarrett, Robin B.; Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Barrett, Marna S.; Clark, Lee Anna; Thase, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Background The degree to which interpersonal problems of depressed patients improve over the course of cognitive therapy (CT) and relate to the quality of the therapeutic alliance and to symptom improvement, remain unclear. Methods We analyzed data of adult outpatients (N = 523) with major depressive disorder participating in a clinical trial to determine the factor structure of the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Circumplex (IIP-C) and to relate the observed factor scores to the quality of the therapeutic alliance and symptom improvement over the course of CT. Patients received 16–20 sessions protocol (50–60 minutes each) of individual CT according to the treatment manual by Beck et al. (1979). Results We found a three-factor structure (interpersonal distress, agency, and communion) of interpersonal problems. Interpersonal distress decreased (d = .90), but interpersonal style did not change substantively during CT (communion d = .03; agency d = .14). High initial agency scores related negatively to the therapeutic alliance (β = −.12), whereas high initial communion scores related positively to the therapeutic alliance (β = .15). Elevated pre-treatment interpersonal distress scores were related to both weaker therapeutic alliances (β = .13) and higher symptom levels throughout treatment (β = .10). Limitations All patients in this study had recurrent MDD and it is therefore uncertain whether the results would generalize to patients with other psychiatric disorders. Conclusions This study supports the use of the IIP-C as a comprehensive measure of patients' interpersonal style and interpersonal distress. The IIP-C measured before CT showed some predictive validity with respect to therapeutic alliance measured at the midpoint and therapy outcome. The clinical importance of these findings is discussed. PMID:22306232

  17. Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) IPY Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, L. S.; Myers, R. J.; Schwerin, T.

    2008-12-01

    The Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) is a National Science Foundation-supported program implemented by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) to improve the quality of geoscience instruction for pre-service, middle, and high school teachers. ESSEA increases teachers' access to quality materials, standards-based instructional methods and content knowledge. With additional support from NASA, the ESSEA program is being enhanced to reflect emphasis on the International Polar Year. From 1999-2005 the ESSEA program was based on a trio of online courses (for elementary, middle, and high school teachers), the courses have been used by 40 faculty at 20 institutions educating over 1,700 teachers in Earth system science. Program evaluation of original course participants indicated that the courses had significant impact on teachers Earth system content knowledge and beliefs about teaching and learning. Seventeen of the original participating institutions have continued to use the courses and many have developed new programs that incorporate the courses in Earth science education opportunities for teachers. Today the ESSEA program lists nearly 40 colleges and universities as participants. With NASA support, the K-4 course and modules have been revised to include topics and resources focusing on the International Polar Year. Additional modules examining the changes in black carbon, ice sheets and permafrost have been added for middle and high school levels. The new modules incorporate geoscience data and analysis tools into classroom instruction. By exploring IPY related topics and data, participating teachers and their students will develop new understandings about the interactions and dependencies of the Earth spheres and our polar regions. Changes in climate, air, water, and land quality and animal and plant populations make the news everyday. The ESSEA IPY modules will help teachers inform rather than frighten their students as they learn

  18. Overview of the Earth System Science Education Alliance Online Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, J. A.

    2001-12-01

    Science education reform has skyrocketed over the last decade in large part thanks to technology-and one technology in particular, the Internet. The World Wide Web has opened up dynamic new online communities of learners. It has allowed educators from around the world to share thoughts about Earth system science and reexamine the way science is taught. A positive offshoot of this reform effort is the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). This partnership among universities, colleges, and science education organizations is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the Center for Educational TechnologiesTM at Wheeling Jesuit University. ESSEA's mission is to improve Earth system science education. ESSEA has developed three Earth system science courses for K-12 teachers. These online courses guide teachers into collaborative, student-centered science education experiences. Not only do these courses support teachers' professional development, they also help teachers implement Earth systems science content and age-appropriate pedagogical methods into their classrooms. The ESSEA courses are open to elementary, middle school, and high school teachers. Each course lasts one semester. The courses begin with three weeks of introductory content. Then teachers develop content and pedagogical and technological knowledge in four three-week learning cycles. The elementary school course focuses on basic Earth system interactions between land, life, air, and water. In week A of each learning cycle, teachers do earth system activities with their students. In week B teachers investigate aspects of the Earth system -- for instance, the reason rocks change to soil, the relationship between rock weathering and soil nutrients, and the consequent development of biomes. In week C teachers develop classroom activities and share them online with other course participants. The middle school course stresses the effects of real-world events -- volcanic eruptions

  19. Overview of the Earth System Science Education Alliance Online Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botti, J.; Myers, R.

    2002-12-01

    Science education reform has skyrocketed over the last decade in large part thanks to technology-and one technology in particular, the Internet. The World Wide Web has opened up dynamic new online communities of learners. It has allowed educators from around the world to share thoughts about Earth system science and reexamine the way science is taught. A positive offshoot of this reform effort is the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). This partnership among universities, colleges, and science education organizations is led by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies and the Center for Educational Technologiestm at Wheeling Jesuit University. ESSEA's mission is to improve Earth system science education. ESSEA has developed three Earth system science courses for K-12 teachers. These online courses guide teachers into collaborative, student-centered science education experiences. Not only do these courses support teachers' professional development, they also help teachers implement Earth systems science content and age-appropriate pedagogical methods into their classrooms. The ESSEA courses are open to elementary, middle school, and high school teachers. Each course lasts one semester. The courses begin with three weeks of introductory content. Then teachers develop content and pedagogical and technological knowledge in four three-week learning cycles. The elementary school course focuses on basic Earth system interactions between land, life, air, and water. In week A of each learning cycle, teachers do earth system activities with their students. In week B teachers investigate aspects of the Earth system-for instance, the reason rocks change to soil, the relationship between rock weathering and soil nutrients, and the consequent development of biomes. In week C teachers develop classroom activities and share them online with other course participants. The middle school course stresses the effects of real-world events-volcanic eruptions

  20. Patient-Oncologist Alliance, Psychosocial Well-Being, and Treatment Adherence Among Young Adults With Advanced Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Trevino, Kelly M.; Fasciano, Karen; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop a strong alliance with their health care providers have been shown to have higher levels of psychosocial well-being and rates of treatment adherence. Young adults with cancer have lower levels of psychosocial well-being and treatment adherence relative to patients with cancer in other age groups. This study sought to evaluate the relationships between the patient-oncologist alliance, psychosocial well-being, and treatment adherence in young adults with advanced cancer. Patients and Methods Ninety-five young adults (age 20 to 40 years) with advanced cancer were administered measures of alliance, psychosocial well-being, willingness to adhere to treatment, and treatment adherence. Relationships between alliance and psychosocial well-being were examined bivariately. Multiple linear regression models examined the relationship between alliance and adherence, controlling for confounding influences (eg, psychosocial well-being). Results Alliance was significantly (P ≤ .01) and positively associated with greater perceived social support and less severe illness-related grief. After controlling for significant confounding influences (ie, metastases, appraised support, and grief), alliance remained significantly (P ≤ .01) associated with greater willingness to adhere to treatment and greater adherence to oral medication. Conclusion By developing a strong alliance, oncologists may enhance psychosocial well-being and increase treatment adherence in young adult patients with advanced cancer. PMID:23530105