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Sample records for allogeneic t-cell response

  1. Allogeneic T cell responses are regulated by a specific miRNA-mRNA network

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaping; Tawara, Isao; Zhao, Meng; Qin, Zhaohui S.; Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan; Tamaki, Hiroya; Nieves, Evelyn; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Reddy, Pavan

    2013-01-01

    Donor T cells that respond to host alloantigens following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) induce graft-versus-host (GVH) responses, but their molecular landscape is not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene (mRNA) expression and fine-tune the molecular responses of T cells. We stimulated naive T cells with either allogeneic or nonspecific stimuli and used argonaute cross-linked immunoprecipitation (CLIP) with subsequent ChIP microarray analyses to profile miR responses and their direct mRNA targets. We identified a unique expression pattern of miRs and mRNAs following the allostimulation of T cells and a high correlation between the expression of the identified miRs and a reduction of their mRNA targets. miRs and mRNAs that were predicted to be differentially regulated in allogeneic T cells compared with nonspecifically stimulated T cells were validated in vitro. These analyses identified wings apart-like homolog (Wapal) and synaptojanin 1 (Synj1) as potential regulators of allogeneic T cell responses. The expression of these molecular targets in vivo was confirmed in MHC-mismatched experimental BMT. Targeted silencing of either Wapal or Synj1 prevented the development of GVH response, confirming a role for these regulators in allogeneic T cell responses. Thus, this genome-wide analysis of miRNA-mRNA interactions identifies previously unrecognized molecular regulators of T cell responses. PMID:24216511

  2. Transplantation of Tail Skin to Study Allogeneic CD4 T Cell Responses in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Simona W.

    2014-01-01

    The study of T cell responses and their consequences during allo-antigen recognition requires a model that enables one to distinguish between donor and host T cells, to easily monitor the graft, and to adapt the system in order to answer different immunological questions. Medawar and colleagues established allogeneic tail-skin transplantation in mice in 1955. Since then, the skin transplantation model has been continuously modified and adapted to answer specific questions. The use of tail-skin renders this model easy to score for graft rejection, requires neither extensive preparation nor deep anesthesia, is applicable to animals of all genetic background, discourages ischemic necrosis, and permits chemical and biological intervention. In general, both CD4+ and CD8+ allogeneic T cells are responsible for the rejection of allografts since they recognize mismatched major histocompatibility antigens from different mouse strains. Several models have been described for activating allogeneic T cells in skin-transplanted mice. The identification of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in different mouse strains including C57BL/6 mice was an important step toward understanding and studying T cell-mediated alloresponses. In the tail-skin transplantation model described here, a three-point mutation (I-Abm12) in the antigen-presenting groove of the MHC-class II (I-Ab) molecule is sufficient to induce strong allogeneic CD4+ T cell activation in C57BL/6 mice. Skin grafts from I-Abm12 mice on C57BL/6 mice are rejected within 12-15 days, while syngeneic grafts are accepted for up to 100 days. The absence of T cells (CD3-/- and Rag2-/- mice) allows skin graft acceptance up to 100 days, which can be overcome by transferring 2 x 104 wild type or transgenic T cells. Adoptively transferred T cells proliferate and produce IFN-γ in I-Abm12-transplanted Rag2-/- mice. PMID:25147005

  3. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  4. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G; Davies, Jeffrey K

    2016-07-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  5. Induction of Cytomegalovirus-Specific T Cell Responses in Healthy Volunteers and Allogeneic Stem Cell Recipients Using Vaccination With Messenger RNA–Transfected Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H.; Smits, Evelien L.J.; Anguille, Sébastien; Van de Velde, Ann; Stein, Barbara; Braeckman, Tessa; Van Camp, Kirsten; Nijs, Griet; Ieven, Margareta; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi N.; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F.I.; Verpooten, Gert A.; Van Damme, Pierre; Cools, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Background Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Methods The present study explored the safety, feasibility, and immunogenicity of CMV pp65 messenger RNA–loaded autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) as a cellular vaccine for active immunization in healthy volunteers and allogeneic HSCT recipients. Four CMV-seronegative healthy volunteers and three allogeneic HSCT recipients were included in the study. Four clinical-grade autologous monocyte-derived DC vaccines were prepared after a single leukapheresis procedure and administered intradermally at a weekly interval. Results De novo induction of CMV-specific T-cell responses was detected in three of four healthy volunteers without serious adverse events. Of the HSCT recipients, none developed CMV disease and one of two patients displayed a remarkable threefold increase in CMV pp65-specific T cells on completion of the DC vaccination trial. Conclusion In conclusion, our DC vaccination strategy induced or expanded a CMV-specific cellular response in four of six efficacy-evaluable study subjects, providing a base for its further exploration in larger cohorts. PMID:25050468

  6. Monitoring of Human Cytomegalovirus and Virus-Specific T-Cell Response in Young Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe; Zelini, Paola; Chiesa, Antonella; Rognoni, Vanina; Mastronuzzi, Angela; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Zecca, Marco; Locatelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    In allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients, outcome of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection results from balance between viral load/replication and pathogen-specific T-cell response. Using a cut-off of 30,000 HCMV DNA copies/ml blood for pre-emptive therapy and cut-offs of 1 and 3 virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells/µl blood for T-cell protection, we conducted in 131 young patients a prospective 3-year study aimed at verifying whether achievement of such immunological cut-offs protects from HCMV disease. In the first three months after transplantation, 55/89 (62%) HCMV-seropositive patients had infection and 36/55 (65%) were treated pre-emptively, whereas only 7/42 (17%) HCMV-seronegative patients developed infection and 3/7 (43%) were treated. After 12 months, 76 HCMV-seropositive and 9 HCMV-seronegative patients (cumulative incidence: 90% and 21%, respectively) displayed protective HCMV-specific immunity. Eighty of these 85 (95%) patients showed spontaneous control of HCMV infection without additional treatment. Five patients after reaching protective T-cell levels needed pre-emptive therapy, because they developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). HSCT recipients reconstituting protective levels of HCMV-specific T-cells in the absence of GvHD are no longer at risk for HCMV disease, at least within 3 years after transplantation. The decision to treat HCMV infection in young HSCT recipients may be taken by combining virological and immunological findings. PMID:22848556

  7. Murine allogeneic CD19 CAR T cells harbor potent antileukemic activity but have the potential to mediate lethal GVHD.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Yang, Yinmeng; Qin, Haiying; Chien, Christopher D; Kochenderfer, James N; Fry, Terry J

    2016-03-10

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) persisting or relapsing following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a dismal prognosis. Success with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells offers an opportunity to treat these patients with leukemia-redirected donor-derived T cells, which may be more functional than T cells derived from patients with leukemia but have the potential to mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We, together with others, have previously demonstrated tumor-specific T-cell dysfunction in the allogeneic environment. Here, we studied CAR T-cell function following BMT using an immunocompetent murine model of minor mismatched allogeneic transplantation followed by donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells. Allogeneic donor-derived CD19-CAR T cells eliminated residual ALL with equal potency to those administered after syngeneic BMT. Surprisingly, allogeneic CAR T cells mediated lethal acute GVHD with early mortality, which is atypical for this minor mismatch model. We demonstrated that both allogeneic and syngeneic CAR T cells show initial expansion as effector T cells, with a higher peak but rapid deletion of allogeneic CAR T cells. Interestingly, CAR-mediated acute GVHD was only seen in the presence of leukemia, suggesting CAR-target interactions induced GVHD. Indeed, serum interleukin (IL)-6 was elevated only in the presence of both leukemia and CAR T cells, and IL-6 neutralization ameliorated the severity of GVHD in a delayed donor lymphocyte infusion model. Finally, allogeneic CD4(+) CAR T cells were responsible for GVHD, which correlated with their ability to produce IL-6 upon CAR stimulation. Altogether, we demonstrate that donor-derived allogeneic CAR T cells are active but have the capacity to drive GVHD. PMID:26660684

  8. Tumor immunotherapy across MHC barriers using allogeneic T-cell precursors

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Suh, David; Markley, John C; Smith, Odette M; King, Christopher; Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Jenq, Robert; Holland, Amanda M; Grubin, Jeremy; Cabrera-Perez, Javier; Brentjens, Renier J; Lu, Sydney X; Rizzuto, Gabrielle; Sant’Angelo, Derek B; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel; Heller, Glenn; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Lu, Chen; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2009-01-01

    We present a strategy for adoptive immunotherapy using T-lineage committed lymphoid precursor cells generated by Notch1-based culture. We found that allogeneic T-cell precursors can be transferred to irradiated individuals irrespective of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) disparities and give rise to host-MHC restricted and host-tolerant functional allogeneic T cells, improving survival in irradiated recipients as well as enhancing anti-tumor responses. T-cell precursors transduced to express a chimeric receptor targeting hCD19 resulted in significant additional anti-tumor activity, demonstrating the feasibility of genetic engineering of these cells. We conclude that ex vivo generated MHC-disparate T-cell precursors from any donor can be used universally for ‘off-the-shelf’ immunotherapy, and can be further enhanced by genetic engineering for targeted immunotherapy. PMID:18376399

  9. Regulatory T Cells in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that cellular adoptive immunotherapy is becoming an attractive though challenging approach in regulating tumor immunity and alloresponses in clinical transplantation. Naturally arising CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) have emerged as a key component in this regard. Over the last decade, a large body of evidence from preclinical models has demonstrated their crucial role in auto- and tumor immunity and has opened the door to their “first-in-man” clinical application. Initial studies in clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation are very encouraging and may pave the way for other applications. Further improvements in Treg ex vivo or in vivo expansion technologies will simplify their global clinical application. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of Treg biology and their potential for cell-based immunotherapy in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23737813

  10. High proportions of regulatory T cells in PBSC grafts predict improved survival after allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    PubMed Central

    Danby, R D; Zhang, W; Medd, P; Littlewood, T J; Peniket, A; Rocha, V; Roberts, D J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate immune responses and improve survival in murine transplant models. However, whether the Treg content of allogeneic cell grafts influences the outcome in human haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is not well established. In a prospective study of 94 adult allogeneic PBSC transplants (60% unrelated; 85% reduced intensity conditioning), the median Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127dim/−) dose transplanted was 4.7 × 106/kg, with Tregs accounting for a median of 2.96% of CD4+ T cells. Patients transplanted with grafts containing a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio above the median had a 3-year overall survival of 75%, compared with 49% in those receiving grafts with a Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio below the median (P=0.02), with a 3-year non-relapse mortality of 13% and 35%, respectively (P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, a high graft Treg/CD4+ T-cell ratio was an independent predictor of lower non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio (HR), 0.30; P=0.02), improved overall survival (HR, 0.45; P=0.03) and improved sustained neutrophil (HR, 0.52; P=0.002), platelet (HR, 0.51; P<0.001) and lymphocyte (HR, 0.54; P=0.009) recovery. These data support the hypothesis that the proportion of Tregs in allogeneic HSC grafts influences clinical outcome and suggest that Treg therapies could improve allogeneic HSC transplantation. PMID:26389831

  11. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  12. Allogeneic IgG combined with dendritic cell stimuli induces anti-tumor T cell immunity

    PubMed Central

    Carmi, Yaron; Spitzer, Matthew H.; Linde, Ian L.; Burt, Bryan M; Prestwood, Tyler R.; Perlman, Nikola; Davidson, Matthew G.; Kenkel, Justin A.; Segal, Ehud; Pusapati, Ganesh V.; Bhattacharya, Nupur; Engleman, Edgar G.

    2015-01-01

    While cancers grow in their hosts and evade host immunity through immunoediting and immunosuppression1–5, tumors are rarely transmissible between individuals. Much like transplanted allogeneic organs, allogeneic tumors are reliably rejected by host T cells, even when the tumor and host share the same major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the most potent determinants of transplant rejection6–10. How such tumor-eradicating immunity is initiated remains unknown, though elucidating this process could provide a roadmap for inducing similar responses against naturally arising tumors. We found that allogeneic tumor rejection is initiated by naturally occurring tumor-binding IgG antibodies, which enable dendritic cells (DC) to internalize tumor antigens and subsequently activate tumor-reactive T cells. We exploited this mechanism to successfully treat autologous and autochthonous tumors. Either systemic administration of DC loaded with allogeneic IgG (alloIgG)-coated tumor cells or intratumoral injection of alloIgG in combination with DC stimuli induced potent T cell mediated anti-tumor immune responses, resulting in tumor eradication in mouse models of melanoma, pancreas, lung and breast cancer. Moreover, this strategy led to eradication of distant tumors and metastases, as well as the injected primary tumors. To assess the clinical relevance of these findings, we studied antibodies and cells from patients with lung cancer. T cells from these patients responded vigorously to autologous tumor antigens after culture with alloIgG-loaded DC, recapitulating our findings in mice. These results reveal that tumor-binding alloIgG can induce powerful anti-tumor immunity that can be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25924063

  13. Origin and Biology of the Allogeneic Response

    PubMed Central

    Lakkis, Fadi G.; Lechler, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition by the immune system of nonself determinants on cells, tissues, or organs transplanted between genetically disparate members of the same species can lead to a potent allogeneic response that is responsible for rejection. We review here fundamental concepts that underlie the origins and biology of allorecognition in the mammalian immune system. We examine why and how T cells are alloreactive and discuss emerging evidence of allorecognition by innate immune cells. The nature of T cells (naïve vs. memory) and the alloantigen presentation pathways (direct, indirect, and semidirect) that initiate the allogeneic response are outlined. PMID:23906882

  14. Abundant cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactive clonotypes in the CD8(+) T cell receptor alpha repertoire following allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Link, C S; Eugster, A; Heidenreich, F; Rücker-Braun, E; Schmiedgen, M; Oelschlägel, U; Kühn, D; Dietz, S; Fuchs, Y; Dahl, A; Domingues, A M J; Klesse, C; Schmitz, M; Ehninger, G; Bornhäuser, M; Schetelig, J; Bonifacio, E

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is potentially curative, but associated with post-transplantation complications, including cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections. An effective immune response requires T cells recognizing CMV epitopes via their T cell receptors (TCRs). Little is known about the TCR repertoire, in particular the TCR-α repertoire and its clinical relevance in patients following stem cell transplantation. Using next-generation sequencing we examined the TCR-α repertoire of CD8(+) T cells and CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells in four patients. Additionally, we performed single-cell TCR-αβ sequencing of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells. The TCR-α composition of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 CMVpp65- and CMVIE -specific T cells was oligoclonal and defined by few dominant clonotypes. Frequencies of single clonotypes reached up to 11% of all CD8(+) T cells and half of the total CD8(+) T cell repertoire was dominated by few CMV-reactive clonotypes. Some TCR-α clonotypes were shared between patients. Gene expression of the circulating CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells was consistent with chronically activated effector memory T cells. The CD8(+) T cell response to CMV reactivation resulted in an expansion of a few TCR-α clonotypes to dominate the CD8(+) repertoires. These results warrant further larger studies to define the ability of oligoclonally expanded T cell clones to achieve an effective anti-viral T cell response in this setting. PMID:26800118

  15. Susceptibility of neonatal T cells and adult thymocytes to peripheral tolerance to allogeneic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    do Canto, Fábio B; Lima, Celso; Teixeira, Ivan A; Bellio, Maria; Nóbrega, Alberto; Fucs, Rita

    2008-01-01

    We studied the tolerization of neonatal thymocytes (NT), neonatal splenocytes (NS) and adult thymocytes (AT), transferred to syngeneic nude (nu/nu) hosts previously injected with semi-allogeneic splenocytes, without any supportive immunosuppressive treatment. This protocol allows the study of peripheral tolerance in the absence of the thymus. BALB/c neonatal T cells and ATs were able to expand in syngeneic BALB/c nu/nu mice and functionally reconstituted an allogeneic response, rejecting (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 splenocytes transferred 3–4 weeks after injection of BALB/c cells. However, if (BALB/c × B6.Ba) F1 cells were injected into BALB/c nude hosts 30 days before transfer of NT, NS or AT cells, the F1 population was preserved and specific tolerance to B6 allografts was established. Furthermore, transfer to lymphopenic F1 nu/nu showed that tolerance could be established only for neonatal populations, showing that unique properties of neonatal T cells allow their tolerization in both lymphopenic and non-lymphopenic conditions, in the absence of suppressive immunotherapy. These results bring empirical support to the possibility of T-cell engraftment in immunodeficient patients showing partial identity with donor major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes; the manipulation of immunological maturity of donor T cells may be the key for successful reconstitution of immunocompetence without induction of graft-versus-host disease. PMID:18462348

  16. Cytomegalovirus-infected human endothelial cells can stimulate allogeneic CD4+ memory T cells by releasing antigenic exosomes1

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jason D.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Pober, Jordan S.

    2008-01-01

    Human CMV infection is controlled by T cell-mediated immunity and in immunosuppressed transplant patients it is associated with acute allograft rejection as well as chronic allograft vasculopathy. CMV infects endothelial cells (EC) and it is thought that CMV-specific host immune responses to infected allograft EC contribute to rejection. In vitro, CD4+ T cells from CMV-positive donors (but not CMV-negative donors) are readily activated by CMV-infected allogeneic EC, although it is unclear how allogeneic CMV-infected EC activate self-class II MHC-restricted memory CD4+ T cells. In this study we confirm that purified CD4+ T cells from CMV+ donors are activated by allogeneic CMV-infected EC, but find that the response is dependent upon co-purified APC expressing class II MHC that are autologous to the T cells. The transfer of CMV antigens from infected EC to APC can be mediated by EC-derived exosome-like particles. These results provide a mechanism by which CMV can exacerbate allograft rejection, and suggest a novel function of EC-derived exosomes that could contribute in a more general manner to immune surveillance. PMID:19155503

  17. T cell responses to cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Klenerman, Paul; Oxenius, Annette

    2016-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) establishes a latent infection that generally remains asymptomatic in immune-competent hosts for decades but can cause serious illness in immune-compromised individuals. The long-term control of CMV requires considerable effort from the host immune system and has a lasting impact on the profile of the immune system. One hallmark of CMV infection is the maintenance of large populations of CMV-specific memory CD8(+) T cells - a phenomenon termed memory inflation - and emerging data suggest that memory inflation is associated with impaired immunity in the elderly. In this Review, we discuss the molecular triggers that promote memory inflation, the idea that memory inflation could be considered a natural pathway of T cell maturation that could be harnessed in vaccination, and the broader implications of CMV infection and the T cell responses it elicits. PMID:27108521

  18. T-cell Depleted Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplants As A Platform For Adoptive Therapy With Leukemia Selective Or Virus-Specific T-cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Richard J.; Koehne, Gunther; Hasan, Aisha N; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Prockop, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants adequately depleted of T-cells can reduce or prevent acute and chronic GVHD in both HLA matched and haplotype disparate hosts, without post-transplant prophylaxis with immunosuppressive drugs. Recent trials indicate that high doses of CD34+ progenitors from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood leukocytes isolated and T-cell depleted by immunoadsorption to paramagnetic beads, when administered after myeloablative conditioning with TBI and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone can secure consistent engraftment and abrogate GVHD in patients with acute leukemia without incurring an increased risk of a recurrent leukemia. Early clinical trials also indicate that high doses of in vitro generated leukemia reactive donor T-cells can be adoptively transferred and can induce remissions of leukemia relapse without GVHD. Similarly, virus-specific T-cells generated from the transplant donor or an HLA partially matched third party, have induced remissions of Rituxan-refractory EBV lymphomas and can clear CMV disease or viremia persisting despite antiviral therapy in a high proportion of cases. Analyses of treatment responses and failures illustrate both the advantages and limitations of donor or banked, third party derived T-cells, but underscore the potential of adoptive T-cell therapy in the absence of ongoing immunosuppression. PMID:26039207

  19. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  20. Activity of host-derived T cells which differentiate in nude mice grafted with co-isogenic or allogeneic thymuses.

    PubMed

    Kindred, B; Loor, F

    1974-05-01

    If nude mice are grafted with a neonatal thymus, host type precursor cells develop within the graft thymus and after about 6 wk the T-cell population of the thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes is of host type. However, immunological responsiveness produced in nude mice in this manner is incomplete: (a) the ability to react to T-cell mitogens in vitro is greater than in untreated nudes but lower than in normal mice; (b) the response to T-cell dependent antigens is less than normal; and (c) the rejection of skin grafts is slower than in normal animals. Whether host precursor cells which differentiate in an allogeneic thymus are able to reject skin grafts from thymus donor strain appears to depend on the strain combination used. PMID:4596513

  1. Dynamics of T cell responses after stroke.

    PubMed

    Gill, Dipender; Veltkamp, Roland

    2016-02-01

    T cells are integral to the pathophysiology of stroke. The initial inflammatory cascade leads to T cell migration, which results in deleterious and protective effects mediated through CD4(+), CD(8)+, γδ T cells and regulatory T cells, respectively. Cytokines are central to the T cell responses, with key roles established for TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-21 and IL-10. Through communication with the systemic immune system via neural and hormonal pathways, there is also transient immunosuppression after severe strokes. With time, the inflammatory process eventually transforms to one more conducive of repair and recovery, though some evidence also suggests ongoing chronic inflammation. The role of antigen-specific T cell responses requires further investigation. As our understanding develops, there is increasing scope to modulate the T cell response after stroke. PMID:26452204

  2. Phase I Trial of Adoptive Cell Transfer with Mixed-Profile Type-I/Type-II Allogeneic T Cells for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Nancy M.; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Fellowes, Vicki; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Hakim, Frances T.; Babb, Rebecca R.; Avila, Daniele; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Sportès, Claude; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Khuu, Hahn M.; Carpenter, Ashley E.; Krumlauf, Michael C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Gress, Ronald E.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) response to allogeneic lymphocytes requires donor T-cell engraftment and is limited by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In mice, Type-II-polarized T cells promote engraftment and modulate GVHD whereas Type-I-polarized T cells mediate more potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. This Phase-I translational study evaluated adoptive transfer of ex-vivo-costimulated Type-I/Type-II (T1/T2) donor T cells with T-cell-depleted (TCD) allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AlloSCT) for MBC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients had received anthracycline, taxane and antibody therapies, been treated for metastatic disease and an HLA-identical-sibling donor. Donor lymphocytes were costimulated ex vivo with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibody-coated magnetic beads in IL-2/IL-4-supplemented media. Patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, donor stem cells and T1/T2 cells, and monitoring for toxicity, engraftment, GVHD and tumor response; results were compared with historical controls, identically treated except for T1/T2-product infusions. RESULTS Mixed Type-I/Type-II CD4+-T cells predominated in T1/T2 products. Nine patients received T1/T2 cells at Dose-Level 1 (5×106 cells/kg). T-cell donor chimerism reached 100% by a median of 28 days. Seven (78%) developed acute GVHD. At Day +28, five patients had partial responses (56%) and none had MBC progression; thereafter, two patients had continued responses. Donor-T-cell engraftment and tumor responses appeared faster than in historical controls, but GVHD rates were similar and responders progressed early, often following treatment of acute GVHD. CONCLUSION Allogeneic T1/T2 cells were safely infused with TCD-AlloSCT, appeared to promote donor engraftment, and may have contributed to transient early tumor responses. PMID:21948234

  3. Donor CD4 T Cell Diversity Determines Virus Reactivation in Patients After HLA-Matched Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, J; Seitz, V; Balzer, H; Gary, R; Lenze, D; Moi, S; Pasemann, S; Seegebarth, A; Wurdack, M; Hennig, S; Gerbitz, A; Hummel, M

    2015-01-01

    Delayed reconstitution of the T cell compartment in recipients of allogeneic stem cell grafts is associated with an increase of reactivation of latent viruses. Thereby, the transplanted T cell repertoire appears to be one of the factors that affect T cell reconstitution. Therefore, we studied the T cell receptor beta (TCRβ) gene rearrangements of flow cytometry–sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the peripheral blood of 23 allogeneic donors before G-CSF administration and on the day of apheresis. For this purpose, TCRβ rearrangements were amplified by multiplex PCR followed by high-throughput amplicon sequencing. Overall, CD4+ T cells displayed a significantly higher TCRβ diversity compared to CD8+ T cells irrespective of G-CSF administration. In line, no significant impact of G-CSF treatment on the TCR Vβ repertoire usage was found. However, correlation of the donor T cell repertoire with clinical outcomes of the recipient revealed that a higher CD4+ TCRβ diversity after G-CSF treatment is associated with lower reactivation of cytomegalovirus and Epstein–Barr virus. By contrast, no protecting correlation was observed for CD8+ T cells. In essence, our deep TCRβ analysis identifies the importance of the CD4+ T cell compartment for the control of latent viruses after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25873100

  4. T cell responses in dengue viral infections.

    PubMed

    Malavige, Gathsaurie Neelika; Ogg, Graham S

    2013-12-01

    Dengue viral infections are the commonest mosquito borne viral infection in the world, affecting more than 100 countries and 390 million individuals annually. Currently, there are no effective antiviral drugs or an effective vaccine to prevent infection. A main hurdle in developing a safe and effective vaccine has been our poor understanding of the complex nature of the protective immune response in acute dengue infection and the presence of four dengue virus (DV) serotypes that are highly homologous. The role of DV specific T cells in the pathogenesis of severe clinical disease in not clear. It has been speculated that highly cross reactive T cells for the previous infecting heterologous DV serotype, which produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, contribute to disease pathogenesis. These cross reactive T cells are believed to be suboptimal in clearing the infection with the current DV-serotype. However, other studies have shown that cross-reactive DV-specific T cells are absent or present in very low frequency during acute infection, appearing only during the convalescent period in the majority of patients. Furthermore, significant apoptosis of T cells occurs in severe acute clinical disease. Overall therefore, it is unclear what role T cells play in contributing to disease pathogenesis during acute dengue infection. Existing data have been complicated by cross-reactivity in T cells assays. These findings can now be re-evaluated in the light of novel technologies to identify serotype-specific T cell responses. PMID:24220605

  5. [18F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-01-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75+-selected donor T cells (1.0–13 × 105)/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-(18F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([18F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [18F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [18F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  6. [(18)F]FHBG PET/CT Imaging of CD34-TK75 Transduced Donor T Cells in Relapsed Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Patients: Safety and Feasibility.

    PubMed

    Eissenberg, Linda G; Rettig, Michael P; Ritchey, Julie K; Prior, Julie L; Schwarz, Sally W; Frye, Jennifer; White, Brian S; Fulton, Robert S; Ghobadi, Armin; Cooper, Matthew L; Couriel, Daniel R; Seegulam, Muhammad Esa; Piwnica-Worms, David; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Cornetta, Kenneth; DiPersio, John F

    2015-06-01

    Described herein is a first-in-man attempt to both genetically modify T cells with an imagable suicide gene and track these transduced donor T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients using noninvasive positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) imaging. A suicide gene encoding a human CD34-Herpes Simplex Virus-1-thymidine kinase (CD34-TK75) fusion enabled enrichment of retrovirally transduced T cells (TdT), control of graft-versus-host disease and imaging of TdT migration and expansion in vivo in mice and man. Analysis confirmed that CD34-TK75-enriched TdT contained no replication competent γ-retrovirus, were sensitive to ganciclovir, and displayed characteristic retroviral insertion sites (by targeted sequencing). Affinity-purified CD34-TK75(+)-selected donor T cells (1.0-13 × 10(5))/kg were infused into eight patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Six patients also were administered 9-[4-((18)F)fluoro-3-hydroxymethyl-butyl]guanine ([(18)F]FHBG) to specifically track the genetically modified donor T cells by PET/CT at several time points after infusion. All patients were assessed for graft-versus-host disease, response to ganciclovir, circulating TdT cells (using both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and [(18)F]FHBG PET/CT imaging), TdT cell clonal expansion, and immune response to the TdT. This phase 1 trial demonstrated that genetically modified T cells and [(18)F]FHBG can be safely infused in patients with relapsed hematologic malignancies after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:25807290

  7. Programming of donor T cells using allogeneic δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells to reduce GVHD in mice.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Meng, Lijun; Mochizuki, Izumi; Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Liu, Yongnian; Purushe, Janaki; Fung, Henry; Zaidi, M Raza; Zhang, Yanyun; Reshef, Ran; Blazar, Bruce R; Yagita, Hideo; Mineishi, Shin; Zhang, Yi

    2016-06-23

    Alloreactive T cells play a critical role in eliminating hematopoietic malignant cells but are also the mediators of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major complication that subverts the success of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, induction of alloreactive T cells does not necessarily lead to GVHD. Here we report the development of a cellular programming approach to render alloreactive T cells incapable of causing severe GVHD in both major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-mismatched and MHC-identical but minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched mouse models. We established a novel platform that produced δ-like ligand 4-positive dendritic cells (Dll4(hi)DCs) from murine bone marrow using Flt3 ligand and Toll-like receptor agonists. Upon allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC stimulation, CD4(+) naïve T cells underwent effector differentiation and produced high levels of interferon γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-17 in vitro, depending on Dll4 activation of Notch signaling. Following transfer, allogeneic Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells were unable to mediate severe GVHD but preserved antileukemic activity, significantly improving the survival of leukemic mice undergoing allogeneic HSCT. This effect of Dll4(hi)DC-induced T cells was associated with their impaired expansion in GVHD target tissues. IFN-γ was important for Dll4(hi)DC programming to reduce GVHD toxicities of alloreactive T cells. Absence of T-cell IFN-γ led to improved survival and expansion of Dll4(hi)DC-induced CD4(+) T cells in transplant recipients and caused lethal GVHD. Our findings demonstrate that Dll4(hi)DC programming can overcome GVHD toxicity of donor T cells and produce leukemia-reactive T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:27143255

  8. Novel mode of action of the calcium antagonist mibefradil (Ro 40-5967): potent immunosuppression by inhibition of T-cell infiltration through allogeneic endothelium.

    PubMed Central

    Blaheta, R A; Hailer, N P; Brude, N; Wittig, B; Oppermann, E; Leckel, K; Harder, S; Scholz, M; Weber, S; Encke, A; Markus, B H

    1998-01-01

    Cyclosporin A reduces the mitotic activity of allosensitized lymphocytes, but fails to limit emigration of these cells into the donor organ. However, the modulation of both lymphocyte proliferation and infiltration are desirable characteristics of immunosuppressive therapy. The calcium-channel blocker, verapamil, has recently been shown to effectively prevent the transmigration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells through allogeneic endothelium. Mibefradil (Ro 40-5967) represents a new generation of calcium antagonists with high potency and long-term activity. To evaluate the immunosuppressive potential of this drug, the influence of mibefradil on lymphocyte adhesion to, horizontal locomotion along, and penetration through allogeneic endothelium (HUVEC) was performed. When lymphocytes were prestimulated for 24 hr with mibefradil, adhesion and penetration were dose-dependently reduced. The adhesion ID50 values were 3.4 microM (CD4+ T cells) versus 9.2 microM (CD8+ T cells) and 2.1 microM (CD4+ T cells) versus 3.9 microM (CD8+ T cells) with regard to penetration. Mibefradil also effectively blocked horizontal locomotion. Specific down-regulation of T-cell binding to the P-selection receptor (ID50: CD4+ T cells, 0.8 microM: CD8+ T cells, 1.2 microM) and to the intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) receptor (ID50: CD4+ T cells, 1.9 microM; CD8+ T cells, 1.5 microM) by mibefradil seems to be responsible for the decreased adhesion and penetration rates. Reduction of intracellular F-actin in T lymphocytes could diminish cell locomotion. In conclusion, the potent suppressive properties of mibefradil support its use as a co-medication in cyclosporin A-based immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:9741343

  9. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. III. Characterization of allogeneic bone marrow cell populations that increase allogeneic chimerism independently of graft-vs-host disease in mixed marrow recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Chester, C.H.; Sundt, T.M.; Romick, M.L.; Hoyles, K.A.; Sachs, D.H. )

    1989-12-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease vs failure of alloengraftment severely limit the success of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation as a therapeutic modality. We have recently used a murine bone marrow transplantation model involving reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with mixtures of allogeneic and syngeneic marrow to demonstrate that an allogeneic bone marrow subpopulation, removed by T cell depletion with rabbit anti-mouse brain serum and complement (RAMB/C), is capable of increasing levels of allogeneic chimerism. This effect was observed in an F1 into parent genetic combination lacking the potential for graft-vs-host disease, and radiation protection studies suggested that it was not due to depletion of stem cells by RAMB/C. We have now attempted to characterize the cell population responsible for increasing allogeneic chimerism in this model. The results indicate that neither mature T cells nor NK cells are responsible for this activity. However, an assay involving mixed marrow reconstitution in an Ly-5 congenic strain combination was found to be more sensitive to small degrees of stem cell depletion than radiation protection assays using three-fold titrations of bone marrow cells. Using this assay, we were able to detect some degree of stem cell depletion by treatment with RAMB/C, but not with anti-T cell mAb. Nevertheless, if the effects of alloresistance observed in this model are considered, the degree of stem cell depletion detected by such mixing studies in insufficient to account for the effects of RAMB/C depletion on levels of allogeneic chimerism, suggesting that another cell population with this property remains to be identified.

  10. Stereotaxic administrations of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells efficiently control the development of human glioblastoma brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jarry, Ulrich; Chauvin, Cynthia; Joalland, Noémie; Léger, Alexandra; Minault, Sandrine; Robard, Myriam; Bonneville, Marc; Oliver, Lisa; Vallette, François M; Vié, Henri; Pecqueur, Claire; Scotet, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) represents the most frequent and deadliest primary brain tumor. Aggressive treatment still fails to eliminate deep brain infiltrative and highly resistant tumor cells. Human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, the major peripheral blood γδ T cell subset, react against a wide array of tumor cells and represent attractive immune effector T cells for the design of antitumor therapies. This study aims at providing a preclinical rationale for immunotherapies in GBM based on stereotaxic administration of allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. The feasibility and the antitumor efficacy of stereotaxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cell injections have been investigated in orthotopic GBM mice model using selected heterogeneous and invasive primary human GBM cells. Allogeneic human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells survive and patrol for several days within the brain parenchyma following adoptive transfer and can successfully eliminate infiltrative GBM primary cells. These striking observations pave the way for optimized stereotaxic antitumor immunotherapies targeting human allogeneic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in GBM patients. PMID:27471644

  11. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  12. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  13. A stochastic T cell response criterion

    PubMed Central

    Currie, James; Castro, Mario; Lythe, Grant; Palmer, Ed; Molina-París, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The adaptive immune system relies on different cell types to provide fast and coordinated responses, characterized by recognition of pathogenic challenge, extensive cellular proliferation and differentiation, as well as death. T cells are a subset of the adaptive immune cellular pool that recognize immunogenic peptides expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells by means of specialized receptors on their membrane. T cell receptor binding to ligand determines T cell responses at different times and locations during the life of a T cell. Current experimental evidence provides support to the following: (i) sufficiently long receptor–ligand engagements are required to initiate the T cell signalling cascade that results in productive signal transduction and (ii) counting devices are at work in T cells to allow signal accumulation, decoding and translation into biological responses. In the light of these results, we explore, with mathematical models, the timescales associated with T cell responses. We consider two different criteria: a stochastic one (the mean time it takes to have had N receptor–ligand complexes bound for at least a dwell time, τ, each) and one based on equilibrium (the time to reach a threshold number N of receptor–ligand complexes). We have applied mathematical models to previous experiments in the context of thymic negative selection and to recent two-dimensional experiments. Our results indicate that the stochastic criterion provides support to the thymic affinity threshold hypothesis, whereas the equilibrium one does not, and agrees with the ligand hierarchy experimentally established for thymic negative selection. PMID:22745227

  14. Unbalanced recovery of regulatory and effector T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation contributes to chronic GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Alho, Ana C.; Kim, Haesook T.; Chammas, Marie J.; Reynolds, Carol G.; Matos, Tiago R.; Forcade, Edouard; Whangbo, Jennifer; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey S.; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H.; Alyea, Edwin P.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The development and maintenance of immune tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires the balanced reconstitution of donor-derived CD4 regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) as well as effector CD4 (conventional CD4 T cells [CD4Tcons]) and CD8 T cells. To characterize the complex mechanisms that lead to unbalanced recovery of these distinct T-cell populations, we studied 107 adult patients who received T-replete stem cell grafts after reduced-intensity conditioning. Immune reconstitution of CD4Treg, CD4Tcon, and CD8 T cells was monitored for a 2-year period. CD3 T-cell counts gradually recovered to normal levels during this period but CD8 T cells recovered more rapidly than either CD4Tregs or CD4Tcons. Reconstituting CD4Tregs and CD4Tcons were predominantly central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) cells and CD8 T cells were predominantly terminal EM cells. Thymic generation of naive CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells was maintained but thymic production of CD4Tregs was markedly decreased with little recovery during the 2-year study. T-cell proliferation was skewed in favor of CM and EM CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells, especially 6 to 12 months after HSCT. Intracellular expression of BCL2 was increased in CD4Tcon and CD8 T cells in the first 3 to 6 months after HSCT. Early recovery of naive and CM fractions within each T-cell population 3 months after transplant was also strongly correlated with the subsequent development of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). These dynamic imbalances favor the production, expansion, and persistence of effector T cells over CD4Tregs and were associated with the development of chronic GVHD. PMID:26670634

  15. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  16. Regulation of the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Romagnani, S

    2006-11-01

    The T cell branch of the immune system can respond to a virtually infinite variety of exogenous antigens, thus including the possibility of self-antigen recognition and dangerous autoimmune reactions. Therefore, regulatory mechanisms operate both during ontogeny within the thymus and after birth in the periphery. The control of self-reactive T cells occurs through a process of negative selection that results in apoptosis of T cells showing high affinity for self-peptides expressed at the thymic level by means of promiscuous gene expression. Self-reactive T cells escaped to negative selection are controlled in the periphery by other regulatory mechanisms, the most important being natural Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells. Regulation is also required to control excessive effector T cell responses against exogenous antigens, when they become dangerous for the body. Three types of effector T cells have been recognized: T helper 1 (Th1) cells, which are protective against intracellular bacteria; Th2 cells, which play some role in the protection against nematodes, but are responsible for allergic reactions; Th17 cells, which are probably effective in the protection against extracellular bacteria, but also play a role in the amplification of autoimmune disorders. Abnormal or excessive Th effector responses are regulated by different mechanisms. Redirection or immune deviation of Th1- or Th2-dominated responses is provided by cytokines [interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) vs. interleukin-4 (IL-4)] produced by the same cell types and by the CXCR3-binding chemokines CXCL4 and CXCL10. Moreover, both Th1 and Th2 responses can be suppressed by adaptive Treg cells through contact-dependent mechanisms and/or the production of IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Finally, TGF-beta1 can promote the development of both Th17 effector and adaptive Treg cells, while the contemporaneous production of IL-6 contributes to the development of Th17 cells, but inhibits Treg cells

  17. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  18. T-cell response to allergens.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Cevdet; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening IgE-dependent type 1 hypersensitivity reaction in which multiple organ systems are involved. The existence of allergen exposure and specific IgE are the major contributors to this systemic reaction. The decision of the immune system to respond to allergens is highly dependent on factors including the type and load of allergen, behavior and type of antigen-presenting cells, innate immune response stimulating substances in the same micromilieu, the tissue of exposure, interactions between T and B lymphocytes, costimulators, and genetic propensity known as atopy. Antigen-presenting cells introduce processed allergens to T-helper lymphocytes, where a decision of developing different types of T-cell immunity is given under the influence of several cytokines, chemokines, costimulatory signals and regulatory T cells. Among Th2-type cytokines, interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 are responsible for class switching in B cells, which results in production of allergen-specific IgE antibodies that bind to specific receptors on mast cells and basophils. After re-exposure to the sensitized allergen, this phase is followed by activation of IgE Fc receptors on mast cells and basophils resulting in biogenic mediator releases responsible for the symptoms and signs of anaphylaxis. Since the discovery of regulatory T cells, the concepts of immune regulation have substantially changed during the last decade. Peripheral T-cell tolerance is a key immunologic mechanism in healthy immune response to self antigens and non-infectious non-self antigens. Both naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells and inducible populations of allergen-specific, IL-10-secreting Treg type 1 cells inhibit allergen-specific effector cells and have been shown to play a central role in the maintenance of peripheral homeostasis and the establishment of controlled immune responses. On the other hand, Th17 cells are characterized by their IL-17 (or IL-17A), IL-17F, IL-6

  19. Dose-Dependent Changes in Influenza Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells Result in Increased Allogeneic T-Cell Proliferation at Low, but Not High, Doses of Virus

    PubMed Central

    Oh, SangKon; McCaffery, J. Michael; Eichelberger, Maryna C.

    2000-01-01

    During the acute phase of infection with influenza A virus, the degree of lymphopenia correlates with severity of disease. Factors that contribute to T-cell activation during influenza virus infection may contribute to this observation. Since the immune response is initiated when dendritic cells (DC) interact with T cells, we have established an in vitro system to examine the effects of influenza virus infection on DC function. Our results show that allogeneic T-cell proliferation was dependent on the dose of A/PR/8/34 used to infect DC, with enhanced responses at low, but not high, multiplicities of infection. The lack of enhancement at high virus doses was not primarily due to the increased rate of DC apoptosis, but required viral replication and neuraminidase (NA) activity. Clusters that formed between DC or between DC and T cells were also dependent on the viral dose. This change in cellular interaction may oppose T-cell proliferation in response to DC infected with high doses of PR8, since the increased contact between DC resulted in the exclusion of T cells. The enhanced alloreactive T-cell response was restored by neutralization of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). It is likely that NA present on viral particles released from DC infected with high doses of PR8 activates TGF-β1. Future studies will determine the mechanism by which TGF-β1 modifies the in vitro T-cell response and address the contribution of this cytokine to the lymphopenia observed in severe disease. PMID:10823850

  20. Functionally Active HIV-Specific T Cells that Target Gag and Nef Can Be Expanded from Virus-Naïve Donors and Target a Range of Viral Epitopes: Implications for a Cure Strategy after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Lam, Sharon; Cruz, Conrad Russell; Wright, Kaylor; Cochran, Christina; Ambinder, Richard F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can potentially cure human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) by eliminating infected recipient cells, particularly in the context of technologies that may confer HIV resistance to these stem cells. But, to date, the Berlin patient remains the only case of HIV cure despite multiple attempts to eradicate infection with HSCT. One approach to improve this is to administer virus-specific T cells, a strategy that has proven success in preventing other infections after transplantation. Although we have reported that broadly HIV-specific T cells can be expanded from HIV+ patients, allogeneic transplantations only contain virus-naïve T cells. Modifying this approach for the allogeneic setting requires a robust, reproducible platform that can expand HIV-specific cells from the naïve pool. Hence, we hypothesized that HIV-specific T cells could be primed ex vivo from seronegative individuals to effectively target HIV. Here, we show that ex vivo-primed and expanded HIV-specific T cells released IFNγ in response to HIV antigens and that these cells have enhanced ability to suppress replication in vitro. This is the first demonstration of ex vivo priming and expansion of functional, multi-HIV antigen-specific T cells from HIV-negative donors, which has implications for use of allogeneic HSCT as a functional HIV cure. PMID:26721209

  1. Engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow following administration of anti-T cell monoclonal antibodies and low-dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sharabi, Y.; Sachs, D.H.

    1989-02-01

    A nonlethal conditioning regimen involving administration of mAb in vivo, low-dose WBI and 700 rads of thymic irradiation, permits engraftment of T cell-depleted allogeneic BM. Engraftment of class I + II disparate allogeneic BM after conditioning with this regimen required depletion of both L3T4 and Lyt2 host T cell subsets in vivo. Treatment with a combination of specific mAbs to each subset (GK1.5 plus 2.43) was more effective than treatment with an anti-Thy1 mAb (30-H12). The low incidence of engraftment after 30-H12 treatment is probably due to reduced efficiency of 30-H12 in depletion of host alloreactive cell populations rather than an effect of this mAb on a particular population of donor cells that are important for engraftment.

  2. De novo alloreactive memory CD8+ T cells develop following allogeneic challenge when CNI immunosuppression is delayed.

    PubMed

    Hart-Matyas, M; Gareau, A J; Hirsch, G M; Lee, T D G

    2015-01-01

    Allospecific memory T cells are a recognized threat to the maintenance of solid-organ transplants. Limited information exists regarding the development of alloreactive memory T cells when post-transplant immunosuppression is present. The clinical practice of delaying calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) initiation post-transplant may permit the development of a de novo allospecific memory population. We investigated the development of de novo allospecific memory CD8+ T cells following the introduction of CNI immunosuppression in a murine model using allogeneic cell priming. Recipient mice alloprimed with splenocytes from fully mismatched donors received cyclosporine (CyA), initiated at 0, 2, 6, or 10days post-prime. Splenocytes from recipients were analyzed by flow cytometry or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for evidence of memory cell formation. Memory and effector CD8+ T cell development was prevented when CyA was initiated at 0day or 2days post-prime (p<0.001), but not 6days post-prime. Following a boost challenge, these memory CD8+ T cells were capable of producing a similarly sized population of secondary effectors as recipients not treated with CyA (p>0.05). Delaying CyA up to 6days or later post-prime permits the development of functional de novo allospecific memory CD8+ T cells. The development of this potentially detrimental T cell population in patients could be prevented by starting CNI immunosuppression early post-transplant. PMID:25315500

  3. Spinal fluid lymphocytes responsive to autologous and allogeneic cells in multiple sclerosis and control individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, G; Kotilinek, L; Schwartz, M; Sternad, M

    1984-01-01

    Spinal fluid lymphocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and controls were stimulated with either autologous non-T cells or with allogeneic non-T cells followed by stimulation with autologous non-T lymphocytes. Cells responding to these stimuli were cloned and their proliferative responses to autologous and allogeneic MS and normal non-T cells were measured. Large numbers of clones with specific patterns of reaction to both autologous and allogeneic cells were obtained from lymphocytes in MS cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), but only occasionally from cells in control CSF. Patterns of responses among clones from a particular CSF were similar and often identical, which suggested that cells in MS CSF were relatively restricted in their specificities. Surface antigen phenotyping of the clones showed them to be predominantly OKT4+, with 13% OKT8+ and 11% OKT4+8+. Peripheral T cells that were stimulated and cultured in parallel with CSF cells were different in that they usually did not give rise to as many clones nor were their patterns of response similar. Many CSF clones were heteroclitic, that is they responded to particular allogeneic cells but not autologous cells. Lymphocytes in MS CSF thus appear to represent a selected population of cells with a high frequency of responsiveness to autologous and allogeneic antigens. Such responses may be evidence for immune regulation within the central nervous system or could represent responses to altered-self antigens. PMID:6237121

  4. Facilitation of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation by a T cell-specific immunotoxin containing daunomycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, S.S.; Inazawa, M.; Sinha, N.; Sawada, S.; Vergidis, R.; Diener, E.

    1987-12-01

    Daunomycin coupled via an acid-sensitive spacer to monoclonal Thy-1.2-specific antibody was used to purge T lymphocytes from a 1:1 mixture of murine C57BL/6J bone marrow and spleen cells prior to engraftment in fully allogeneic, irradiated BALB/c recipients. Treatment of bone marrow with the immunotoxin at a concentration used for purging had no effect on the viability of committed hematopoietic progenitor or multipotent stem cells. All of the recipients of purged bone marrow were at least 80% chimeric for donor peripheral blood cells and none developed graft-versus-host disease. Out of 50 chimeras, 49 were still alive more than 200 days posttransplantation. The chimeras were shown to be tolerant to donor tissue as tested by mixed lymphocyte reactivity, cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and skin grafting. The same tests revealed full immunocompetence of chimeras to third-party alloantigens. In vivo IgM and IgG antibody responses to sheep red blood cells were similar in magnitude in allogeneically and syngeneically reconstituted mice.

  5. Prostaglandin E2 Production and T Cell Function in Mouse Adenovirus Type 1 Infection following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Mary K.; Procario, Megan C.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Weinberg, Jason B.

    2015-01-01

    Adenovirus infections are important complications of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). We demonstrate delayed clearance of mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1) from lungs of mice following allogeneic BMT. Virus-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production was greater in BMT mice than in untransplanted controls, but BMT using PGE2-deficient donors or recipients failed to improve viral clearance, and treatment of untransplanted mice with the PGE2 analog misoprostol did not affect virus clearance. Lymphocyte recruitment to the lungs was not significantly affected by BMT. Intracellular cytokine staining of lung lymphocytes demonstrated impaired production of INF-γ and granzyme B by cells from BMT mice, and production of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, and IL-17 following ex vivo stimulation was impaired in lymphocytes obtained from lungs of BMT mice. Viral clearance was not delayed in untransplanted INF-γ-deficient mice, suggesting that delayed viral clearance in BMT mice was not a direct consequence of impaired IFN-γ production. However, lung viral loads were higher in untransplanted CD8-deficient mice than in controls, suggesting that delayed MAV-1 clearance in BMT mice is due to defective CD8 T cell function. We did not detect significant induction of IFN-β expression in lungs of BMT mice or untransplanted controls, and viral clearance was not delayed in untransplanted type I IFN-unresponsive mice. We conclude that PGE2 overproduction in BMT mice is not directly responsible for delayed viral clearance. PGE2-independent effects on CD8 T cell function likely contribute to the inability of BMT mice to clear MAV-1 from the lungs. PMID:26407316

  6. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. PMID:27490939

  7. In Vivo Interleukin-13-Primed Macrophages Contribute to Reduced Alloantigen-Specific T Cell Activation and Prolong Immunological Survival of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Implants.

    PubMed

    Hoornaert, Chloé J; Luyckx, Evi; Reekmans, Kristien; Dhainaut, Maxime; Guglielmetti, Caroline; Le Blon, Debbie; Dooley, Dearbhaile; Fransen, Erik; Daans, Jasmijn; Verbeeck, Louca; Quarta, Alessandra; De Vocht, Nathalie; Lemmens, Evi; Goossens, Herman; Van der Linden, Annemie; Roobrouck, Valerie D; Verfaillie, Catherine; Hendrix, Sven; Moser, Muriel; Berneman, Zwi N; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into injured or diseased tissue-for the in situ delivery of a wide variety of MSC-secreted therapeutic proteins-is an emerging approach for the modulation of the clinical course of several diseases and traumata. From an emergency point-of-view, allogeneic MSCs have numerous advantages over patient-specific autologous MSCs since "off-the-shelf" cell preparations could be readily available for instant therapeutic intervention following acute injury. Although we confirmed the in vitro immunomodulatory capacity of allogeneic MSCs on antigen-presenting cells with standard coculture experiments, allogeneic MSC grafts were irrevocably rejected by the host's immune system upon either intramuscular or intracerebral transplantation. In an attempt to modulate MSC allograft rejection in vivo, we transduced MSCs with an interleukin-13 (IL13)-expressing lentiviral vector. Our data clearly indicate that prolonged survival of IL13-expressing allogeneic MSC grafts in muscle tissue coincided with the induction of an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype in vivo and a reduced number of alloantigen-reactive IFNγ- and/or IL2-producing CD8(+) T cells compared to nonmodified allografts. Similarly, intracerebral IL13-expressing MSC allografts also exhibited prolonged survival and induction of an alternatively activated macrophage phenotype, although a peripheral T cell component was absent. In summary, this study demonstrates that both innate and adaptive immune responses are effectively modulated in vivo by locally secreted IL13, ultimately resulting in prolonged MSC allograft survival in both muscle and brain tissue. Stem Cells 2016;34:1971-1984. PMID:26992046

  8. Polyfunctional T cells accumulate in large human cytomegalovirus-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Raskit; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Smith, Helen; Cheek, Elizabeth; Akbar, Arne; Kern, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Large cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses are observed in both young and, somewhat more often, old people. Frequent CMV reactivation is thought to exhaust these cells and render them dysfunctional so that larger numbers of them are needed to control CMV. Expansions of CMV-specific CD4 T cells are also seen but are less well studied. In this study, we examined the T-cell response to the dominant CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in healthy CMV-infected people across a wide age range (20 to 84 years) by using multicolor flow cytometry. CMV-specific T cells were characterized by the activation markers CD40 ligand (CD40L), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the memory markers CD27 and CD45RA. The proportions of effector memory T cells increased in large responses, as did the proportions of polyfunctional CD8 (IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+/-) TNF-α(+)) and CD4 (CD40L(+/-) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) TNF-α(+)) T-cell subsets, while the proportion of naïve T cells decreased. The bigger the CD4 or CD8 T-cell response to pp65, the larger was the proportion of T cells with an advanced memory phenotype in the entire (including non-CMV-specific) T-cell compartment. In addition, the number of activation markers per cell correlated with the degree of T-cell receptor downregulation, suggesting increased antigen sensitivity in polyfunctional cells. In summary, our findings show that polyfunctional CMV-specific T cells were not superseded by dysfunctional cells, even in very large responses. At the same time, however, the memory subset composition of the entire T-cell compartment correlated with the size of the T-cell response to CMV pp65, confirming a strong effect of CMV infection on the immune systems of some, but not all, infected people. PMID:22072753

  9. Chronic Tumor Necrosis Factor Alters T Cell Responses by Attenuating T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Andrew P.; Liblau, Roland S.; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Congia, Mauro; Laudanna, Carlo; Schreiber, Robert D.; Probert, Lesley; Kollias, George; McDevitt, Hugh O.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated injections of adult mice with recombinant murine TNF prolong the survival of NZB/W F1 mice, and suppress type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. To determine whether repeated TNF injections suppress T cell function in adult mice, we studied the responses of influenza hemagglutinin-specific T cells derived from T cell receptor (HNT-TCR) transgenic mice. Treatment of adult mice with murine TNF for 3 wk suppressed a broad range of T cell responses, including proliferation and cytokine production. Furthermore, T cell responses of HNT-TCR transgenic mice also expressing the human TNF-globin transgene were markedly reduced compared to HNT-TCR single transgenic littermates, indicating that sustained p55 TNF-R signaling is sufficient to suppress T cell function in vivo. Using a model of chronic TNF exposure in vitro, we demonstrate that (a) chronic TNF effects are dose and time dependent, (b) TNF suppresses the responses of both Th1 and Th2 T helper subsets, (c) the suppressive effects of endogenous TNF produced in T cell cultures could be reversed with neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to TNF, and (d) prolonged TNF exposure attenuates T cell receptor signaling. The finding that anti-TNF treatment in vivo enhances T cell proliferative responses and cytokine production provides evidence for a novel regulatory effect of TNF on T cells in healthy laboratory mice. These effects are more pronounced in chronic inflammatory disease. In addition, our data provide a mechanism through which prolonged TNF exposure suppresses disease in animal models of autoimmunity. PMID:9151895

  10. Regulatory T Cells in Radiotherapeutic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Schaue, Dörthe; Xie, Michael W.; Ratikan, Josephine A.; McBride, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling “danger.” The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift toward a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs), suppressor macrophages, and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the “brakes” on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer. PMID:22912933

  11. Favorable Outcomes in Patients with High Donor-Derived T Cell Count Following in vivo T Cell Depleted Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Chung, Harold M.; Roberts, Catherine; Manjili, Rose H.; Song, Shiyu; Williams, David C.; Edmiston, Wendy; Gatesman, Mandy L.; Edwards, Richard W.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Clark, William B.; Neale, Michael C.; McCarty, John M.; Manjili, Masoud H.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies were conditioned using a rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin based reduced intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Donor-derived CD3+ cell count (ddCD3), a product of CD3+ cell chimerism and absolute CD3+ cell count, when less than 110/μL, eight weeks post-transplant, predicted a high risk of sustained mixed chimerism and relapse. Alternatively, patients with a higher ddCD3 developed GVHD more frequently, and when partially chimeric, had higher rates of conversion to full donor chimerism upon withdrawal of immunosuppression. In conclusion, early data from a small cohort of patients indicates that ddCD3+ cell count at 8 weeks may be used to guide the decision-making process regarding withdrawal of immunosuppression and administration of donor lymphocyte infusion in partially T cell depleted reduced intensity regimens. PMID:22005648

  12. Selective Expansion of Allogeneic Regulatory T Cells by Hepatic Stellate Cells: Role of Endotoxin and Implications for Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Dangi, Anil; Sumpter, Tina L.; Kimura, Shoko; Stolz, Donna B.; Murase, Noriko; Raimondi, Giorgio; Vodovotz, Yoram; Huang, Chao; Thomson, Angus W.; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) may play an important role in hepatic immune regulation by producing numerous cytokines/chemokines, and expressing Ag-presenting and T cell co-regulatory molecules. Due to disruption of the endothelial barrier during cold-ischemic storage and reperfusion of liver grafts, HSCs can interact directly with cells of the immune system. Endotoxin (LPS), levels of which increase in liver diseases and transplantation, stimulates the synthesis of many mediators by HSCs. We hypothesized that LPS-stimulated HSCs might promote hepatic tolerogenicity by influencing naturally-occurring immunosuppressive CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Following their portal venous infusion, allogeneic CD4+ T cells, including Tregs, were found closely associated with HSCs, and this association increased in LPS-treated livers. In vitro, both unstimulated and LPS-stimulated HSCs up-regulated Fas (CD95) expression on conventional CD4+ T cells and induced their apoptosis in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner. By contrast, HSCs induced Treg proliferation, which required cell-cell contact, and was MHC class II-dependent. This effect was augmented when HSCs were pretreated with LPS. LPS increased the expression of MHC class II, CD80 and CD86, and stimulated the production of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and TNFα by HSCs. Interestingly, production of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα was strongly inhibited, but that of IL-10 enhanced, in LPS-pretreated HSC/Treg co-cultures. Adoptively transferred allogeneic HSCs migrated to the secondary lymphoid tissues and induced Treg expansion in lymph nodes. These data implicate endotoxins-stimulated HSCs as important immune regulators in liver transplantation by inducing selective expansion of tolerance-promoting Tregs, and reducing inflammation and allo-immunity. PMID:22427640

  13. The immunosuppressive compound 2-acetyl-4-tetrahydroxybutyl imidazole inhibits the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction by sequestration of a recirculating subpopulation of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bradbury, M G; Doherty, K V; Parish, C R; Lyons, A B

    1996-01-01

    2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) is an immunosuppressive component of caramel food colouring that causes lymphopenia in mice and rats by an unknown mechanism. In this study we investigated some of the affects of THI on the murine immune system. Initially we showed that splenic T lymphocytes from mice treated with 50 mg/l THI in their drinking water were unable to launch a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) against allogeneic stimulator cells, and had decreased and delayed interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. However, these T cells exhibited a normal proliferative response to concanavalin A (Con A), immobilized anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) and anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 mAb. Furthermore, the MLR response could be restored by the addition of IL-2 to the MLR culture. Homing studies using intravenous injection of fluorescence-labelled splenocytes showed that THI treatment decreased absolute numbers of labelled T and B lymphocytes in the blood and the spleen. Furthermore, these labelled cells reappeared in the blood and the spleen when mice were taken off THI, indicating that lymphocyte recirculation and splenic homing were modified reversibly by THI treatment. Cessation of THI treatment also resulted in a rapid reappearance of MLR responsiveness in the spleen, indicating that THI treatment does not functionally impair recirculating T cells. Collectively these data are compatible with the concept that a rapidly recirculating population of T cells, which produce IL-2 in an allogeneic MLR, are lost from the blood and spleen following THI treatment, and are sequestered in other, yet to be identified, tissues. PMID:8666439

  14. Antiviral Cd8+ T Cell Responses in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Janice M.; Altman, John D.; Lukacher, Aron E.

    2001-01-01

    Polyoma virus is a potent oncogenic pathogen when inoculated into newborn mice of particular H-2k strains. Using Dk tetramers containing the dominant antipolyoma CD8+ T cell epitope, middle T protein (MT)389–397, and intracellular interferon γ staining, we enumerated MT389-specific CD8+ T cells in infected neonates having opposite susceptibilities to polyoma virus–induced tumors. In resistant mice, MT389-specific CD8+ T cells dramatically expanded during acute infection in neonates to a frequency rivaling that in adults; furthermore, in both neonatal and adult mice, this antipolyoma CD8+ T cell response exhibited nearly identical T cell receptor (TCR) functional avidities and TCR functional fingerprints. Susceptible mice mounted an MT389-specific CD8+ T cell response of only fourfold lower magnitude than resistant mice; but, in clear contrast to resistant mice, these CD8+ T cells lacked ex vivo MT389-specific cytotoxic activity. However, MT389-specific CD8+ T cells in resistant and susceptible mice expressed similar TCR avidities, perforin levels, and surface type O-glycan levels indicative of mature CD8+ T cell effectors. Upon in vitro restimulation with infected antigen-presenting cells, CD8+ T cells from acutely infected susceptible neonates acquired strong MT389-specific cytotoxicity. These findings indicate that polyoma-specific CD8+ T cells are armed with, but restrained from deploying, their cytotoxic effector function in mice susceptible to polyoma virus tumorigenesis. PMID:11238590

  15. T cells raised against allogeneic HLA-A2/CD20 kill primary follicular lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Ingerid Weum; Kjellevoll, Synneva; Greve-Isdahl, Margrethe; Mensali, Nadia; Wälchli, Sébastien; Kumari, Shraddha; Loland, Beate Fossum; Egeland, Torstein; Kolstad, Arne; Olweus, Johanna

    2012-04-15

    T cells mediating a graft-versus-leukemia/lymphoma effects without causing graft-versus-host disease would greatly improve the safety and applicability of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We recently demonstrated that highly peptide- and HLA-specific T cells can readily be generated against allogeneic HLA-A*02:01 in complex with a peptide from the B cell-restricted protein CD20. Here, we show that such CD20-specific T cells can easily be induced from naïve precursors in cord blood, demonstrating that they do not represent cross-reactive memory cells. The cells displayed high avidity and mediated potent cytotoxic effects on cells from patients with the CD20(pos) B cell malignancies follicular lymphoma (FL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, the cytotoxicity was consistently lower for cells from two of the ALL patients. The ALL cells that were less efficiently killed did not display lower surface expression of CD20 or HLA-A*02:01, or mutations in the CD20 sequence. Peptide pulsing fully restored the levels of cytotoxicity, indicating that they are indeed susceptible to T cell-mediated killing. Adoptive transfer of CD20-specific T cells to an HLA-A*02:01(pos) patient requires an HLA-A*02:01(neg) , but otherwise HLA identical, donor. A search clarified that donors meeting these criteria can be readily identified even for patients with rare haplotypes. The results bear further promise for the clinical utility of CD20-specific T cells in B cell malignancies. PMID:21630262

  16. H-2 restriction as a consequence of intentional priming: T cells of fully allogeneic chimeric mice as well as of normal mice respond to foreign antigens in the context of H-2 determinants not encountered on thymic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stockinger, H; Pfizenmaier, K; Hardt, C; Rodt, H; Röllinghoff, M; Wagner, H

    1980-12-01

    Fully allogeneic chimeras were able to develop in vitro alloantigen-specific, as well as H-2-restricted, Sendai virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response. Depending on the immunization regimen used, Sendai virus-specific CTL responses were restricted to the H-2 antigens of either the stem cell donor or the thymus. Similarly, unprimed splenic T cells of normal mice were found to contain CTL-precursor cells that specifically reacted against Sendai virus or trinitrophenyl derivatives in the context of allogeneic major histocompatibility complex determinants that had not been encountered during their thymic differentiation. A frequency analysis of allogeneically versus syngeneically restricted virus-specific CTL precursors present in splenic T cells showed a ratio of about 1 to 6. These results provide evidence that H-2 restriction of trinitrophenyl- or Sendai virus-specific T cells is dictated by the complex type of the antigen-presenting cell and thus appears to be independent of the type of thymus in which the T cells have undergone maturation. PMID:6261255

  17. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid T cells differ in their response to alloantigens and recall antigens presented by dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, A J; Harding, B; Hughes, R A; Keat, A; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    Properties of T cells from inflammatory lesions were analysed by comparing the response of peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) T cells from 19 patients with a range of arthropathies to enriched allogeneic dendritic cells (DC) in a primary mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR). In 17 patients the proliferative response of SF T cells was significantly (P less than 0.05) less than that of PB lymphocytes. The reduced response of SF T cells was observed in all disease categories studied and could not be attributed to differences in cell number requirements or response kinetics. Addition of recombinant interleukin-2 enhanced the response of SF T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell mixing experiments suggested that active suppression was not the underlying mechanism of the poor MLR response of SF T cells. In contrast to the MLR response. SF T cells were able to mount vigorous proliferative responses to recall antigen presented by autologous antigen-presenting cells. The possibility is discussed that T cells compartmentalized at inflammatory lesions are a unique population with a diminished ability to interact with DC and respond to primary stimuli but an ability to respond to secondary antigenic challenge. PMID:1826648

  18. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  19. Graft-versus-lymphoma effect in refractory cutaneous T-cell lymphoma after reduced-intensity HLA-matched sibling allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Herbert, K E; Spencer, A; Grigg, A; Ryan, G; McCormack, C; Prince, H M

    2004-09-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are rare diseases that, in their advanced stages or in transformation, have a poor prognosis. Autologous stem cell transplantation (Au-SCT) after high-dose therapy has yielded disappointing results. Allogeneic transplantation (allo-SCT) provides the potential advantage of an immune-mediated graft-versus-lymphoma (GVL) effect. Reduced-intensity allo-SCT potentially offers a GVL effect, but with diminished toxicity related to the induction regimen; however, published experience with this approach in CTCL is limited. We report a series of three patients (age 35-49) with advanced, refractory (n=2) or transformed (n=1) CTCL who underwent reduced-intensity allo-SCT in the context of active disease. All three survived the peri-transplant period and, despite later having disease relapse, all exhibited evidence of a GVL effect. Relapses of the disease were in the context of immune suppression for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and when immune suppression was reduced, responses were regained. A comparison is made of these results to those in a review of the published literature to date. We conclude that while a GVL can be achieved for CTCL with reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation, the clinical benefits are short lived and novel approaches are required to obtain sustained remissions. PMID:15286686

  20. Longitudinal Requirement for CD4+ T Cell Help for Adenovirus Vector–Elicited CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Provine, Nicholas M.; Larocca, Rafael A.; Penaloza-MacMaster, Pablo; Borducchi, Erica N.; McNally, Anna; Parenteau, Lily R.; Kaufman, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of replication-incompetent recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors as candidate vaccine platforms, the mechanism by which these vectors elicit CD8+ T cell responses remains poorly understood. Our data demonstrate that induction and maintenance of CD8+ T cell responses by Ad vector immunization is longitudinally dependent on CD4+ T cell help for a prolonged period. Depletion of CD4+ T cells in wild type mice within the first 8 d following Ad immunization resulted in dramatically reduced induction of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, decreased T-bet and eomesodermin expression, impaired KLRG1+ effector differentiation, and atypical expression of the memory markers CD127, CD27, and CD62L. Moreover, these CD8+ T cells failed to protect against a lethal recombinant Listeria monocytogenes challenge. Depletion of CD4+ T cells between weeks 1 and 4 following immunization resulted in increased contraction of memory CD8+ T cells. These data demonstrate a prolonged temporal requirement for CD4+ T cell help for vaccine-elicited CD8+ T cell responses in mice. These findings have important implications in the design of vaccines aimed at eliciting CD8+ T cell responses and may provide insight into the impaired immunogenicity of vaccines in the context of AIDS and other CD4+ T cell immune deficiencies. PMID:24778441

  1. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

    PubMed

    Terra, Rafik; Wang, Xuehai; Hu, Yan; Charpentier, Tania; Lamarre, Alain; Zhong, Ming; Sun, Hui; Mao, Jianning; Qi, Shijie; Luo, Hongyu; Wu, Jiangping

    2013-01-01

    Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6) was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO) mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT) controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1) in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2) STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3) STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency. PMID:24391722

  2. To Investigate the Necessity of STRA6 Upregulation in T Cells during T Cell Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Tania; Lamarre, Alain; Zhong, Ming; Sun, Hui; Mao, Jianning; Qi, Shijie; Luo, Hongyu; Wu, Jiangping

    2013-01-01

    Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6) was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP) and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO) mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT) controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1) in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2) STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3) STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency. PMID:24391722

  3. Trafficking, persistence, and activation state of adoptively transferred allogeneic and autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques1

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Diane L.; Minang, Jacob T.; Trivett, Matt; Song, Kaimei; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; O'Connor, David; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Roederer, Mario; Ohlen, Claes

    2009-01-01

    Despite multiple lines of evidence suggesting their involvement, the precise role of CD8+ T-cells in controlling HIV replication remains unclear. To determine whether CD8+ T cells can limit retroviral replication in the absence of other immune responses, we transferred 1-13 × 109 allogeneic in vitro expanded SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones matched for the relevant restricting MHC-I allele into rhesus macaques near the time of intravenous (i.v.) SIV challenge. Additionally, in vitro expanded autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones were infused 4-9 months post-infection. Infused cells did not appreciably impact acute or chronic viral replication. The partially MHC-matched allogeneic cells were not detected in the blood or most tissues after 3 days but persisted longer in the lungs as assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Autologous cells transferred i.v. or intraperitoneally (i.p.) were found in BAL and blood samples for up to 8 weeks post-infusion. Interestingly, despite having a nominally activated phenotype (CD69+HLA-DR+), many of these cells persisted in the BAL without dividing. This suggests that expression of such markers by T cells at mucosal sites may not reflect recent activation, but may instead identify stable resident memory T cells. The lack of impact following transfer of such a large number of functional antigen-specific CD8+ T cells on SIV replication may reflect the magnitude of the immune response required to contain the virus. PMID:19949089

  4. Varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins B and E are major targets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells reconstituting during zoster after allogeneic transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kleemann, Patrick; Distler, Eva; Wagner, Eva M.; Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Aue, Steffi; Schnürer, Elke; Schild, Hansjörg; Theobald, Matthias; Plachter, Bodo; Tenzer, Stefan; Meyer, Ralf G.; Herr, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Background After allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation patients are at increased risk for herpes zoster as long as varicella-zoster virus specific T-cell reconstitution is impaired. This study aimed to identify immunodominant varicella-zoster virus antigens that drive recovery of virus-specific T cells after transplantation. Design and Methods Antigens were purified from a varicella-zoster virus infected cell lysate by high-performance liquid chromatography and were identified by quantitative mass spectrometric analysis. To approximate in vivo immunogenicity for memory T cells, antigen preparations were consistently screened with ex vivo PBMC of varicella-zoster virus immune healthy individuals in sensitive interferon-γ ELISpot assays. Candidate virus antigens identified by the approach were genetically expressed in PBMC using electroporation of in vitro transcribed RNA encoding full-length proteins and were then analyzed for recognition by CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells. Results Varicella-zoster virus encoded glycoproteins B and E, and immediate early protein 62 were identified in immunoreactive lysate material. Predominant CD4+ T-cell reactivity to these proteins was observed in healthy virus carriers. Furthermore, longitudinal screening in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation patients showed strong expansions of memory T cells recognizing glycoproteins B and E after onset of herpes zoster, while immediate early protein 62 reactivity remained moderate. Reactivity to viral glycoproteins boosted by acute zoster was mediated by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that glycoproteins B and E are major targets of varicella-zoster virus specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell reconstitution occurring during herpes zoster after allogeneic stem-cell transplantation. Varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins B and E might form the basis for novel non-hazardous zoster subunit vaccines suitable for immunocompromised transplant patients. PMID:22207687

  5. Regulation of antiviral T cell responses by type I interferons.

    PubMed

    Crouse, Josh; Kalinke, Ulrich; Oxenius, Annette

    2015-04-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are pro-inflammatory cytokines that are rapidly induced in different cell types during viral infections. The consequences of type I IFN signalling include direct antiviral activity, innate immune cell activation and regulation of adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we discuss recent conceptual advances in our understanding of indirect and direct regulation of T cell immunity by type I IFNs, which can either promote or inhibit T cell activation, proliferation, differentiation and survival. This regulation depends, to a large extent, on the timing of type I IFN exposure relative to T cell receptor signalling. Type I IFNs also provide activated T cells with resistance to natural killer cell-mediated elimination. PMID:25790790

  6. T cell responses in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2015-04-01

    According to the current view the histological features of psoriasis arise as a consequence of the interplay between T cells, dendritic cells and keratinocytes giving rise to a self-perpetuating loop that amplifies and sustains inflammation in lesional skin. In particular, myeloid dendritic cell secretion of IL-23 and IL-12 activates IL-17-producing T cells, Th22 and Th1 cells, leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF and IL-22. These cytokines mediate effects on keratinocytes thus establishing the inflammatory loop. Unlike psoriasis the immunopathogenic features of psoriatic arthritis are poorly characterized and there is a gap in the knowledge of the pathogenic link between inflammatory T cell responses arising in the skin and the development of joint inflammation. Here we review the knowledge accumulated over the years from the early evidence of autoreactive CD8 T cells that was studied mainly in the years 1990s and 2000s to the recent findings of the role of Th17, Tc17 cells and γδ T cells in psoriatic disease pathogenesis. The review will also focus on common and distinguishing features of T cell responses in psoriatic plaques and in synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis. The integration of this information could help to distinguish the role played by T cells in the initiation phase of the disease from the role of T cells as downstream effectors sustaining inflammation in psoriatic plaques and potentially leading to disease manifestation in distant joints. PMID:25445403

  7. Diversity of T-cell responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2013-04-01

    Using a dynamic model we study the adaptive immune response to a sequence of two infections. We incorporate lymphocyte diversity by modeling populations as continuous distributions in a multi-dimensional space. As expected, memory cells generated by the primary infection invoke a rapid response when the secondary infection is identical (homologous). When the secondary infection is different (heterologous), the memory cells have a positive effect or no effect at all depending on the similarity of the infections. This model displays ‘original antigenic sin’ where the average effector affinity for the heterologous infection is lower than it would be for a naive response, but in cases with original antigenic sin we see a reduction in pathogen density. We model pathology resulting from the immune system itself (immunopathology) but find that in cases of original antigenic sin, immunopathology is still reduced. Average effector affinity is not an accurate measure of the quality of an immune response. The effectivity, which is the total pathogen killing rate, provides a direct measure of quality. This quantity takes both affinity and magnitude into account.

  8. Mechanisms of Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases in Modulating T Cell Responses in Murine Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Michael; Lupp, Corinna; Stein, Pamela; Kreft, Andreas; Bopp, Tobias; Wehler, Thomas C.; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P.

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a key contributor to the morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Regulatory Foxp3+ CD4+ T cells (Treg) suppress conventional T cell activation and can control GvHD. In our previous work, we demonstrate that a basic mechanism of Treg mediated suppression occurs by the transfer of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to responder cells. Whether this mechanism is relevant for Treg mediated suppression of GvHD is currently unknown. To address this question, bone marrow and T cells from C57BL/6 mice were transferred into lethally irradiated BALB/c recipients, and the course of GvHD and survival were monitored. Transplanted recipients developed severe GvHD that was strongly ameliorated by the transfer of donor Treg cells. Towards the underlying mechanisms, in vitro studies revealed that Treg communicated with DCs via gap junctions, resulting in functional inactivation of DC by a metabolic pathway involving cAMP that is modulated by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram. PDE2 or PDE3 inhibitors as well as rolipram suppressed allogeneic T cell activation, indirectly by enhancing Treg mediated suppression of DC activation and directly by inhibiting responder T cell proliferation. In line with this, we observed a cooperative suppression of GvHD upon Treg transfer and additional rolipram treatment. In conclusion, we propose that an important pathway of Treg mediated control of GvHD is based on a cAMP dependent mechanism. These data provide the basis for future concepts to manipulate allogeneic T cell responses to prevent GvHD. PMID:23483980

  9. Mechanisms of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in modulating T cell responses in murine graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Lupp, Corinna; Stein, Pamela; Kreft, Andreas; Bopp, Tobias; Wehler, Thomas C; Schmitt, Edgar; Schild, Hansjörg; Radsak, Markus P

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a key contributor to the morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Regulatory Foxp3(+) CD4(+) T cells (Treg) suppress conventional T cell activation and can control GvHD. In our previous work, we demonstrate that a basic mechanism of Treg mediated suppression occurs by the transfer of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) to responder cells. Whether this mechanism is relevant for Treg mediated suppression of GvHD is currently unknown. To address this question, bone marrow and T cells from C57BL/6 mice were transferred into lethally irradiated BALB/c recipients, and the course of GvHD and survival were monitored. Transplanted recipients developed severe GvHD that was strongly ameliorated by the transfer of donor Treg cells. Towards the underlying mechanisms, in vitro studies revealed that Treg communicated with DCs via gap junctions, resulting in functional inactivation of DC by a metabolic pathway involving cAMP that is modulated by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 inhibitor rolipram. PDE2 or PDE3 inhibitors as well as rolipram suppressed allogeneic T cell activation, indirectly by enhancing Treg mediated suppression of DC activation and directly by inhibiting responder T cell proliferation. In line with this, we observed a cooperative suppression of GvHD upon Treg transfer and additional rolipram treatment. In conclusion, we propose that an important pathway of Treg mediated control of GvHD is based on a cAMP dependent mechanism. These data provide the basis for future concepts to manipulate allogeneic T cell responses to prevent GvHD. PMID:23483980

  10. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  11. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for peripheral T-cell NHL results in long-term disease control

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Jasmine; Palmer, Joycelynne M.; Delioukina, Maria; Thomas, Sandra; Tsai, Ni-Chun; Nademanee, Auayporn; Popplewell, Leslie; Gaal, Karl; Senitzer, David; Kogut, Neil; O'Donnell, Margaret; Forman, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The study analyzed outcomes of a consecutive case series of 37 patients with peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, from related and unrelated donors, using allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), between the years 2000 and 2007. All patients were pretreated; the majority had either relapsed or progressive disease (n=25, 68%), 13 had cutaneous histologies (CTCL), and all were ineligible for autologous transplant. Fully ablative conditioning regimens were used in 13 patients while 24 patients underwent reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). At five years the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) probabilities were 52.2% and 46.5%, respectively. At the time of analysis, 9 (24.3%) patients had either relapsed (n=6) or progressed (n=3) post allo-HCT. The cumulative incidences of relapse/progression and non-relapse mortality at 5 years were 24.3% and 28.9%. No statistically significant variables for survival or relapse were discovered by univariate Cox-regression analysis of disease and patient characteristics; differences between CTCL and other histologies were not significant. The median follow-up of 64.0 months (range: 16.4–100.4) indicates a mature data-set with probable cure in the survivors. The relapse/progression curves reached and maintained plateaus after 1 year post-transplant, demonstrating that long-term disease control is possible after allo-HCT in PTCL patients with advanced disease. PMID:21699453

  12. [Alleviation of palmoplantar pustulosis associated with adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hiroshi; Imaizumi, Kisako; Sakane, Emiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Ito, Kiminari; Kodaka, Taiichi; Matsumoto, Mayumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Takahashi, Takayuki

    2012-08-01

    A 68-year-old female with palmoplantar pustulosis was referred to our hospital in July, 2009 because of liver dysfunction, a positive test for HTLV-1, and circulating abnormal lymphocytes with irregularly shaped nuclei. A diagnosis of acute type adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) was made based on generalized lymph node swelling and high levels of serum LDH, in addition to the findings described above. The associated palmoplantar pustulosis responded to some extent to antibiotics, steroid ointment, and narrow band UBV light irradiation. For ATLL, she was serially treated with CHOP chemotherapy, an LSG 15 protocol, and CytaBOM protocol with consequent partial remission. These chemotherapies did not affect the palmoplantar pustulosis. For ATLL in partial remission, we performed allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (allo-PBSCT) from a related donor (HTLV-1-negative) with a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine, melphalan, and total body irradiation with 3 Gy in February, 2010. After the engraftment of donor hematopoietic cells, ATLL cells disappeared and the patient currently (as of April, 2012) remains in complete remission (CR). The residual palmoplantar pustulosis was further improved soon after allo-PBSCT and disappeared on Day 84 after transplantation. This refractory skin disease has also been in CR to date. PMID:22975820

  13. PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1hiTIM-3+ T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1hiTIM-3+ cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  14. PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells associate with and predict leukemia relapse in AML patients post allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Y; Zhang, J; Claxton, D F; Ehmann, W C; Rybka, W B; Zhu, L; Zeng, H; Schell, T D; Zheng, H

    2015-01-01

    Prognosis of leukemia relapse post allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) is poor and effective new treatments are urgently needed. T cells are pivotal in eradicating leukemia through a graft versus leukemia (GVL) effect and leukemia relapse is considered a failure of GVL. T-cell exhaustion is a state of T-cell dysfunction mediated by inhibitory molecules including programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and T-cell immunoglobulin domain and mucin domain 3 (TIM-3). To evaluate whether T-cell exhaustion and inhibitory pathways are involved in leukemia relapse post alloSCT, we performed phenotypic and functional studies on T cells from peripheral blood of acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving alloSCT. Here we report that PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells are strongly associated with leukemia relapse post transplantation. Consistent with exhaustion, PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) T cells are functionally deficient manifested by reduced production of interleukin 2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). In addition, these cells demonstrate a phenotype consistent with exhausted antigen-experienced T cells by losing TN and TEMRA subsets. Importantly, increase of PD-1(hi)TIM-3(+) cells occurs before clinical diagnosis of leukemia relapse, suggesting their predictive value. Results of our study provide an early diagnostic approach and a therapeutic target for leukemia relapse post transplantation. PMID:26230954

  15. Itk: The Rheostat of the T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Grasis, Juris A.; Tsoukas, Constantine D.

    2011-01-01

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Itk plays a key role in TCR-initiated signaling that directly and significantly affects the regulation of PLCγ1 and the consequent mobilization of Ca2+. Itk also participates in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization as well as cellular adhesion, which is necessary for a productive T cell response. The functional cellular outcome of these molecular regulations by Itk renders it an important mediator of T cell development and differentiation. This paper encompasses the structure of Itk, the signaling parameters leading to Itk activation, and Itk effects on molecular pathways resulting in functional cellular outcomes. The incorporation of these factors persuades one to believe that Itk serves as a modulator, or rheostat, critically fine-tuning the T cell response. PMID:21747996

  16. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  17. Exposure to inhaled isobutyl nitrite reduces T cell-dependent responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Soderberg, L.S.F.; Barnett, J.B. )

    1991-03-11

    Isobutyl nitrite is a drug of abuse popular among male homosexuals and among adolescents. In order to approximate the nitrite exposures of inhalant abusers, mice were treated with 900 ppm isobutyl nitrite in an inhalation chamber for 45 min per day for 14 days. At 72 hr after the last exposure, mice were assayed for immune competence. Under these conditions, mice gained only half the weight of mice exposed to air. The spleens of nitrite exposed mice weighed 15% less and had 24% fewer cells per spleen than controls. Adjusted for equal cell numbers, T cell mitogenic and allogeneic proliferative responses were significantly reduce by 33% and 47%, respectively. Unstimulated spleen cells had elevated levels of IL-2 transcription following exposure to isobutyl nitrite suggesting that nitrite inhalation caused a nonspecific induction of T cells. In contrast, B cell proliferative responses to LPS were unaltered. Exposure to the nitrite reduced the frequency of T-dependent antibody plaque-forming cells (PFC) by 63% and the total number of reduced by 60% after as few as five daily exposures to isobutyl nitrite. Therefore, the data suggest that habitual inhalation of isobutyl nitrite impairs immune competence and that toxicity appears to be directed toward T cell functions.

  18. KIR2DS1-dependent acquisition of CCR7 and migratory properties by human NK cells interacting with allogeneic HLA-C2+ DCs or T-cell blasts.

    PubMed

    Marcenaro, Emanuela; Pesce, Silvia; Sivori, Simona; Carlomagno, Simona; Moretta, Lorenzo; Moretta, Alessandro

    2013-04-25

    Natural killer (NK) cells may capture the CCR7 chemokine receptor from allogeneic CCR7(+) cells by trogocytosis and acquire migrating properties in response to lymph node chemokines. This event is negatively regulated by inhibitory killer Ig-like receptors (KIRs) and NKG2A. In this study, we analyzed the role of the HLA-C2-specific activating receptor KIR2DS1 in the process of CCR7 uptake by NK cells interacting with different allogeneic CCR7(+) cells. Co-incubation of KIR2DS1(+) fresh NK cells or NK-cell clones with HLA-C2(+) CCR7(+) lymphoblastoid cell lines resulted in increased CCR7 uptake. Remarkably, KIR2DS1 expression represented a major advantage for acquiring CCR7 from HLA-C2(+) allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) and T-cell blasts. These findings have important implications in haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in which donor-derived (alloreactive) KIR2DS1(+) NK cells, upon CCR7 acquisition, become capable of migrating toward lymph nodes, where they may kill patient DCs and T cells, preventing graft-versus-host and host-versus-graft reactions. PMID:23449637

  19. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  20. Enhancement of T cell responses as a result of synergy between lower doses of radiation and T cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Spary, Lisa K; Al-Taei, Saly; Salimu, Josephine; Cook, Alexander D; Ager, Ann; Watson, H Angharad; Clayton, Aled; Staffurth, John; Mason, Malcolm D; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2014-04-01

    As a side effect of cancer radiotherapy, immune cells receive varying doses of radiation. Whereas high doses of radiation (>10 Gy) can lead to lymphopenia, lower radiation doses (2-4 Gy) represent a valid treatment option in some hematological cancers, triggering clinically relevant immunological changes. Based on our earlier observations, we hypothesized that lower radiation doses have a direct positive effect on T cells. In this study, we show that 0.6-2.4 Gy radiation enhances proliferation and IFN-γ production of PBMC or purified T cells induced by stimulation via the TCR. Radiation with 1.2 Gy also lowered T cell activation threshold and broadened the Th1 cytokine profile. Although radiation alone did not activate T cells, when followed by TCR stimulation, ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation increased above that induced by stimulation alone. These changes were followed by an early increase in glucose uptake. Naive (CD45RA(+)) or memory (CD45RA(-)) T cell responses to stimulation were boosted at similar rates by radiation. Whereas increased Ag-specific cytotoxic activity of a CD8(+) T cell line manifested in a 4-h assay (10-20% increase), highly significant (5- to 10-fold) differences in cytokine production were detected in 6-d Ag-stimulation assays of PBMC, probably as a net outcome of death of nonstimulated and enhanced response of Ag-stimulated T cells. T cells from patients receiving pelvic radiation (2.2-2.75 Gy) also displayed increased cytokine production when stimulated in vitro. We report in this study enhanced T cell function induced by synergistic radiation treatment, with potential physiological significance in a wide range of T cell responses. PMID:24600032

  1. Stop and go traffic to tune T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Dustin, Michael L

    2004-09-01

    Adaptive immune responses are initiated by interactions of T cells with antigen-presenting cells, but the basic nature of these interactions during an immune response in vivo has been a matter of speculation. While some in vitro systems provide evidence for stable interactions, referred to as immunological synapses, compelling evidence supports T cell activation through serial transient interactions. Deep tissue intravital and organ culture microscopy studies suggest that both modes of interaction are employed, but new issues have emerged. This review will discuss in vitro results that framed the hypotheses that are currently being tested in vivo. I present a model in which TCR stop signals compete with chemokine-mediated go signals to adjust the duration of immunological synapse formation and tune the immune response between tolerance and full activation. PMID:15357942

  2. Complement-induced regulatory T cells suppress T-cell responses but allow for dendritic-cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Barchet, Winfried; Price, Jeffrey D.; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco; MacMillan, Sandra K.; Cobb, J. Perren; Thompson, Paul A.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and complement regulator CD46 on human CD4+ T lymphocytes induces Tr1-like regulatory T cells that suppress through IL-10 secretion bystander T-cell proliferation. Here we show that, despite their IL-10 production, CD46-induced T-regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not suppress the activation/maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). DC maturation by complement/CD46-induced Tregs is mediated through simultaneous secretion of GM-CSF and soluble CD40L, factors favoring DC differentiation and reversing inhibitory effects of IL-10. Thus, CD46-induced Tregs produce a distinct cytokine profile that inhibits T-cell responses but leaves DC activation unimpaired. Such “DC-sparing” Tregs could be desirable at host/environment interfaces such as the gastrointestinal tract where their specific cytokine profile provides a mechanism that ensures unresponsiveness to commensal bacteria while maintaining reactivity to invading pathogens. PMID:16239430

  3. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas: a study from the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    de Masson, Adèle; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Bouaziz, Jean-David; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Aubin, François; Garciaz, Sylvain; d'Incan, Michel; Dereure, Olivier; Dalle, Stéphane; Dompmartin, Anne; Suarez, Felipe; Battistella, Maxime; Vignon-Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Rivet, Jacqueline; Adamski, Henri; Brice, Pauline; François, Sylvie; Lissandre, Séverine; Turlure, Pascal; Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa; Brissot, Eolia; Dulery, Rémy; Servais, Sophie; Ravinet, Aurélie; Tabrizi, Reza; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Joly, Pascal; Socié, Gérard; Bagot, Martine

    2014-03-01

    The treatment of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas remains challenging. In particular, large-cell transformation of mycosis fungoides is associated with a median overall survival of two years for all stages taken together. Little is known regarding allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in this context. We performed a multicenter retrospective analysis of 37 cases of advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation, including 20 (54%) transformed mycosis fungoides. Twenty-four patients (65%) had stage IV disease (for mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome) or disseminated nodal or visceral involvement (for non-epidermotropic primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas). After a median follow up of 29 months, 19 patients experienced a relapse, leading to a 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 56% (95%CI: 0.38-0.74). Estimated 2-year overall survival was 57% (95%CI: 0.41-0.77) and progression-free survival 31% (95%CI: 0.19-0.53). Six of 19 patients with a post-transplant relapse achieved a subsequent complete remission after salvage therapy, with a median duration of 41 months. A weak residual tumor burden before transplantation was associated with increased progression-free survival (HR=0.3, 95%CI: 0.1-0.8; P=0.01). The use of antithymocyte globulin significantly reduced progression-free survival (HR=2.9, 95%CI: 1.3-6.2; P=0.01) but also transplant-related mortality (HR=10(-7), 95%CI: 4.10(-8)-2.10(-7); P<0.001) in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, the use of antithymocyte globulin was the only factor significantly associated with decreased progression-free survival (P=0.04). Allogeneic stem cell transplantation should be considered in advanced stage primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas, including transformed mycosis fungoides. PMID:24213148

  4. Mast Cells as Regulators of T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Bahri, Rajia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are recognized to participate in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Owing to their strategic location at the host-environment interface, they control tissue homeostasis and are key cells for starting early host defense against intruders. Upon degranulation induced, e.g., by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and allergen-mediated engagement of the high-affinity IgE receptor, complement or certain neuropeptide receptors, MCs release a wide variety of preformed and newly synthesized products including proteases, lipid mediators, and many cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests a regulatory role for MCs in inflammatory diseases via the regulation of T cell activities. Furthermore, rather than only serving as effector cells, MCs are now recognized to induce T cell activation, recruitment, proliferation, and cytokine secretion in an antigen-dependent manner and to impact on regulatory T cells. This review synthesizes recent developments in MC-T cell interactions, discusses their biological and clinical relevance, and explores recent controversies in this field of MC research. PMID:26300882

  5. Mast Cells as Regulators of T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Bahri, Rajia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are recognized to participate in the regulation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Owing to their strategic location at the host–environment interface, they control tissue homeostasis and are key cells for starting early host defense against intruders. Upon degranulation induced, e.g., by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and allergen-mediated engagement of the high-affinity IgE receptor, complement or certain neuropeptide receptors, MCs release a wide variety of preformed and newly synthesized products including proteases, lipid mediators, and many cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Interestingly, increasing evidence suggests a regulatory role for MCs in inflammatory diseases via the regulation of T cell activities. Furthermore, rather than only serving as effector cells, MCs are now recognized to induce T cell activation, recruitment, proliferation, and cytokine secretion in an antigen-dependent manner and to impact on regulatory T cells. This review synthesizes recent developments in MC–T cell interactions, discusses their biological and clinical relevance, and explores recent controversies in this field of MC research. PMID:26300882

  6. Intestinal T cell responses to cereal proteins in celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Kilmartin, C; Wieser, H; Abuzakouk, M; Kelly, J; Jackson, J; Feighery, C

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by sensitivity to wheat gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The etiological role of the other wheat-related cereals, barley, rye, and oats, is still debated. In order to investigate this issue further, in this study we examined the immune response of celiac mucosal T cell lines to fractions from all four cereals. Cell stimulation was assessed by measuring proliferation (employing (3)H-thymidine incorporation) or cytokine (IL-2, IFN-gamma) production. All five T cell lines demonstrated immunoreactivity to protein fractions from the four related cereals. In some cell lines, reactivity to wheat, barley, and rye was only evident when these cereal fractions had been pretreated with tissue transglutaminase. This study confirms the similar T cell antigenic reactivity of these four related cereals and has implications for their exclusion in the gluten-free diet. However, despite oats stimulation of T cell lines, this cereal does not activate a mucosal lesion in most celiac patients. PMID:16416236

  7. Keratinocyte growth factor enhances DNA plasmid tumor vaccine responses after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jenq, Robert R.; King, Christopher G.; Volk, Christine; Suh, David; Smith, Odette M.; Rao, Uttam K.; Yim, Nury L.; Holland, Amanda M.; Lu, Sydney X.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Diab, Adi; Alpdogan, Onder; Penack, Olaf; Na, Il-Kang; Kappel, Lucy W.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Houghton, Alan N.; Perales, Miguel-Angel

    2009-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), which is given exogenously to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) recipients, supports thymic epithelial cells and increases thymic output of naive T cells. Here, we demonstrate that this improved T-cell reconstitution leads to enhanced responses to DNA plasmid tumor vaccination. Tumor-bearing mice treated with KGF and DNA vaccination have improved long-term survival and decreased tumor burden after allo-BMT. When assayed before vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have increased numbers of peripheral T cells, including CD8+ T cells with vaccine-recognition potential. In response to vaccination, KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients, compared with control subjects, generate increased numbers of tumor-specific CD8+ cells, as well as increased numbers of CD8+ cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). We also found unanticipated benefits to antitumor immunity with the administration of KGF. KGF-treated allo-BMT recipients have an improved ratio of T effector cells to regulatory T cells, a larger fraction of effector cells that display a central memory phenotype, and effector cells that are derived from a broader T-cell–receptor repertoire. In conclusion, our data suggest that KGF can function as a potent vaccine adjuvant after allo-BMT through its effects on posttransplantation T-cell reconstitution. PMID:19011222

  8. Effect of selective T cell depletion of host and/or donor bone marrow on lymphopoietic repopulation, tolerance, and graft-vs-host disease in mixed allogeneic chimeras (B10 + B10. D2----B10)

    SciTech Connect

    Ildstad, S.T.; Wren, S.M.; Bluestone, J.A.; Barbieri, S.A.; Stephany, D.; Sachs, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of T cell-depleted syngeneic plus T cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow (B10 + B10.D2----B10) leads to the induction of mixed lymphopoietic chimerism, excellent survivals, specific in vivo transplantation tolerance to subsequent donor strain skin grafts, and specific in vitro unresponsiveness to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements as assessed by mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) proliferative and cell-mediated lympholysis (CML) cytotoxicity assays. When B10 recipient mice received mixed marrow inocula in which the syngeneic component had not been T cell depleted, whether or not the allogeneic donor marrow was treated, they repopulated exclusively with host-type cells, promptly rejected donor-type skin allografts, and were reactive in vitro to the allogeneic donor by CML and MLR assays. In contrast, T cell depletion of the syngeneic component of the mixed marrow inocula resulted in specific acceptance of allogeneic donor strain skin grafts. Such animals were specifically unreactive to allogeneic donor lymphoid elements in vitro by CML and MLR, but were reactive to third party. When both the syngeneic and allogeneic marrow were T cell depleted, variable percentages of host- and donor-type lymphoid elements were detected in the mixed reconstituted host. When only the syngeneic bone marrow was T cell depleted, animals repopulated exclusively with donor-type cells. Although these animals had detectable in vitro anti-host (B10) reactivity by CML and MLR and reconstituted as fully allogeneic chimeras, they exhibited excellent survival and had no in vivo evidence for graft-vs-host disease. Experiments in which untreated donor spleen cells were added to the inocula in this last group suggest that the presence of T cell-depleted syngeneic bone marrow cells diminishes graft-vs-host disease and the mortality from it.

  9. T Cells' Immunological Synapses Induce Polarization of Brain Astrocytes In Vivo and In Vitro: A Novel Astrocyte Response Mechanism to Cellular Injury

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Carlos; Sanderson, Nicholas S. R.; Barrett, Robert J.; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Kroeger, Kurt M.; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Astrocytes usually respond to trauma, stroke, or neurodegeneration by undergoing cellular hypertrophy, yet, their response to a specific immune attack by T cells is poorly understood. Effector T cells establish specific contacts with target cells, known as immunological synapses, during clearance of virally infected cells from the brain. Immunological synapses mediate intercellular communication between T cells and target cells, both in vitro and in vivo. How target virally infected astrocytes respond to the formation of immunological synapses established by effector T cells is unknown. Findings Herein we demonstrate that, as a consequence of T cell attack, infected astrocytes undergo dramatic morphological changes. From normally multipolar cells, they become unipolar, extending a major protrusion towards the immunological synapse formed by the effector T cells, and withdrawing most of their finer processes. Thus, target astrocytes become polarized towards the contacting T cells. The MTOC, the organizer of cell polarity, is localized to the base of the protrusion, and Golgi stacks are distributed throughout the protrusion, reaching distally towards the immunological synapse. Thus, rather than causing astrocyte hypertrophy, antiviral T cells cause a major structural reorganization of target virally infected astrocytes. Conclusions Astrocyte polarization, as opposed to hypertrophy, in response to T cell attack may be due to T cells providing a very focused attack, and thus, astrocytes responding in a polarized manner. A similar polarization of Golgi stacks towards contacting T cells was also detected using an in vitro allogeneic model. Thus, different T cells are able to induce polarization of target astrocytes. Polarization of target astrocytes in response to immunological synapses may play an important role in regulating the outcome of the response of astrocytes to attacking effector T cells, whether during antiviral (e.g. infected during HIV, HTLV-1

  10. TCRVγ9 γδ T Cell Response to IL-33: A CD4 T Cell-Dependent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Duault, Caroline; Franchini, Don Marc; Familliades, Julien; Cayrol, Corinne; Roga, Stéphane; Girard, Jean-Philippe; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Poupot, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The availability of specific stimuli to induce the anticancer cytotoxicity of human TCRVγ9-expressing T lymphocytes has allowed the development of γδ T cell-based cancer immunotherapies. However, the stringent dependence of such strategies on the inherently toxic IL-2 has raised safety concerns for patients, justifying a search for alternative methods for inducing γδ T cell stimulation. IL-33 is a γ-chain receptor-independent cytokine of the IL-1 superfamily that is expressed by endothelial cells from a tumor microenvironment and can sustain Th1 and Th2 immune responses. Therefore, we investigated its ability to support the stimulation of human TCRVγ9(+) γδ T cells. In this study, we report that IL-33 efficiently sustained the in vitro activation of Vγ9 T lymphocytes by synthetic phosphoantigens, zoledronate, and a BTN3A1 Ab in the absence of an exogenous supply of IL-2. IL-33 was as potent as IL-2 in allowing the proliferative amplification of Vγ9 T cells isolated from PBMC following activation by the synthetic phosphoantigen bromohydrin pyrophosphate. IL-33 also induced an identical maturation into TNF-α- and IFN-γ-producing Th1 effector memory cells, and IL-33-stimulated cells showed an equivalent cytotoxicity for various tumor cells in vitro. Finally, we found that the bioactivity of IL-33 on the Vγ9 T cell was indirectly mediated through contact with CD4 T cells and IL-2 production by CD4 T cells and Vγ9 T cells themselves. These data posit IL-33 as an alternative to IL-2 for Vγ9 T cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26608919

  11. T cells recognizing leukemic CD34+ progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of donor lymphocyte infusions for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Willem M.; Rijnbeek, Marion; van Bergen, Cornelis A. M.; Fibbe, Willem E.; Willemze, Roel; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik

    1998-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) is an effective treatment for relapsed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. To identify the effector and target cell populations responsible for the elimination of the leukemic cells in vivo we developed an assay to measure the frequency of T lymphocyte precursor cells capable of suppressing leukemic progenitor cells. Target cells in this assay were CML cells that were cultured in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and erythropoietin. [3H]thymidine incorporation at day 7 represented the proliferation of the progeny of the CD34+ CML progenitor cells, and not of the more mature CD34− CML cells. Effector cells were mononuclear cells, which were used in a limiting dilution analysis to measure the frequencies of CML progenitor cell-inhibitory lymphocyte precursors (PCILp) in peripheral blood of seven patients before and after DLI for relapsed CML. In the six patients who entered complete remission, a 5- to 100-fold increase of PCILp was found during the clinical response. In the patient with resistant relapse the frequency of PCILp was <10 per ml before and after DLI. Leukemia-reactive helper T lymphocyte precursor frequencies remained unchanged after DLI. A significant increase in cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursor frequency against more mature leukemic cells was found in only two responding patients. These results indicate that T cells specifically directed against CD34+ CML progenitor cells mediate the antileukemic effect of DLI. PMID:9707616

  12. Mechanistic Assessment of PD-1H Coinhibitory Receptor-Induced T-Cell Tolerance to Allogeneic Antigens1

    PubMed Central

    Flies, Dallas B.; Higuchi, Tomoe; Chen, Lieping

    2015-01-01

    PD-1H is a recently identified cell surface co-inhibitory molecule of the B7/CD28 immune modulatory gene family. We showed previously that single injection of a PD-1H agonistic monoclonal antibody (mAb) protected mice from graft versus host disease (GVHD). We report here two distinct mechanisms operate in PD-1H-induced T cell tolerance. First, signaling via PD-1H co-inhibitory receptor potently arrests allo-reactive donor T cells from activation and expansion in the initiation phase. Second, donor regulatory T cells are subsequently expanded to maintain long-term tolerance and GVHD suppression. Our study reveals the crucial function of PD-1H as a co-inhibitory receptor on allo-reactive T cells and its function in the regulation of T cell tolerance. Therefore, PD-1H may be a target for the modulation of allo-reactive T cells in GVHD and transplantation. PMID:25917101

  13. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals.

    PubMed

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  14. Dengue virus specific dual HLA binding T cell epitopes induce CD8+ T cell responses in seropositive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Comber, Joseph D; Karabudak, Aykan; Huang, Xiaofang; Piazza, Paolo A; Marques, Ernesto T A; Philip, Ramila

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus infects an estimated 300 million people each year and even more are at risk of becoming infected as the virus continues to spread into new areas. Despite the increase in viral prevalence, no anti-viral medications or vaccines are approved for treating or preventing infection. CD8+ T cell responses play a major role in viral clearance. Therefore, effective vaccines that induce a broad, multi-functional T cell response with substantial cross-reactivity between all virus serotypes can have major impacts on reducing infection rates and infection related complications. Here, we took an immunoproteomic approach to identify novel MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes presented by dengue virus infected cells, representing the natural and authentic targets of the T cell response. Using this approach we identified 4 novel MHC-I restricted epitopes: 2 with the binding motif for HLA-A24 molecules and 2 with both HLA-A2 and HLA-A24 binding motifs. These peptides were able to activate CD8+ T cell responses in both healthy, seronegative individuals and in seropositive individuals who have previously been infected with dengue virus. Importantly, the dual binding epitopes activated pre-existing T cell precursors in PBMCs obtained from both HLA-A2+ and HLA-A24+ seropositive individuals. Together, the data indicate that these epitopes are immunologically relevant T cell activating peptides presented on infected cells during a natural infection and therefore may serve as candidate antigens for the development of effective multi-serotype specific dengue virus vaccines. PMID:25668665

  15. Therapeutic blockade of LIGHT interaction with HVEM and LTβR attenuates in vivo cytotoxic allogeneic responses

    PubMed Central

    del Rio, Maria-Luisa; Fernandez-Renedo, Carlos; Scheu, Stefanie; Pfeffer, Klaus; Shintani, Yasushi; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Chaloin, Olivier; Schneider, Pascal; Rodriguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Background TNF/TNFR superfamily members conform a group of molecular interaction pathways of essential relevance during the process of T cell activation and differentiation towards effector cells and particularly for the maintenance phase of the immune response. Specific blockade of these interacting pathways, such as CD40/CD40L, contributes to modulate the deleterious outcome of allogeneic immune responses. We postulated that antagonizing the interaction of LIGHT expression on activated T cells with its receptors, HVEM and LTβR may decrease T cell-mediated allogeneic responses. Methods A flow cytometry competition assay was designed to identify anti-LIGHT monoclonal antibodies capable to prevent the interaction of mouse LIGHT with its receptors expressed on transfected cells. An antibody with the desired specificity was evaluated in a short-term in vivo allogeneic cytotoxic assay and tested for its ability to detect endogenous mouse LIGHT. Results We provide evidence for the first time that in mice, as previously described in humans, LIGHT protein is rapidly and transiently expressed after T cell activation, and this expression was stronger on CD8 T cells than on CD4 T cells. Two anti-LIGHT antibodies prevented interactions of mouse LIGHT with its two known receptors HVEM and LTβR. In vivo administration of anti-LIGHT antibody (clone 10F12) ameliorated host anti-donor short-term cytotoxic response in WT B6 mice, although to a lesser extent than that observed in LIGHT-deficient mice. Conclusions The therapeutic targeting of LIGHT may contribute to achieve a better control of cytotoxic responses refractory to current immunosuppressive drugs in transplantation. PMID:25226173

  16. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. I. Evidence for a donor cell population which increases allogeneic chimerism but which lacks the potential to produce GVHD

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-10-01

    The opposing problems of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and failure of alloengraftment present major obstacles to the application of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) across complete MHC barriers. The addition of syngeneic T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) to untreated fully allogeneic marrow inocula in lethally irradiated mice has been previously shown to provide protection from GVHD. We have used this model to study the effects of allogeneic T cells on levels of chimerism in recipients of mixed marrow inocula. The results indicate that T cells in allogeneic BM inocula eliminate both coadministered recipient-strain and radioresistant host hematopoietic elements to produce complete allogeneic chimerism without clinical GVHD. To determine the role of GVH reactivity in this phenomenon, we performed similar studies in an F1 into parent combination, in which the genetic potential for GVHD is lacking. The presence of T cells in F1 marrow inocula led to predominant repopulation with F1 lymphocytes in such chimeras, even when coadministered with TCD-recipient-strain BM. These results imply that the ability of allogeneic BM cells removed by T cell depletion to increase levels of allochimerism may be mediated by a population which is distinct from that which produces GVHD. These results may have implications for clinical BM transplantation.

  17. Durable responses to ibrutinib in patients with relapsed CLL after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Link, C S; Teipel, R; Heidenreich, F; Rücker-Braun, E; Schmiedgen, M; Reinhardt, J; Oelschlägel, U; von Bonin, M; Middeke, J M; Muetherig, A; Trautmann-Grill, K; Platzbecker, U; Bornhäuser, M; Schetelig, J

    2016-06-01

    Ibrutinib, a recently approved inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), has shown great efficacy in patients with high-risk CLL. Nevertheless, there are few data regarding its use in patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). We report clinical data from five CLL patients treated with ibrutinib for relapse after first or even second allogeneic transplantation. Additionally, we performed analyses on cytokine levels and direct measuring of CD4 Th1 and CD4 Th2 cells to evaluate possible clinically relevant immunomodulatory effects of ibrutinib. All patients achieved partial responses including one minimal residual disease (MRD)-negative remission. Within 1 year of follow-up, no relapse was observed. One patient died of severe pneumonia while on ibrutinib treatment. Beside this, no unexpected adverse events were observed. Flow cytometry and analyses of T cell-mediated cytokine levels (IL10 and TNFα) did not reveal substantial changes in T-cell distribution in favor of a CD4 Th1 T-cell shift in our patients. No acute exacerbation of GvHD was reported. In conclusion, these results support further evaluation of ibrutinib in CLL patients relapsing after alloSCT. PMID:26752141

  18. Hemolysin-producing Listeria monocytogenes affects the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-Chahine, C M; Del Giudice, G; Lambert, P H; Pechere, J C

    1992-01-01

    A murine experimental infection with a hemolysin-producing (Hly+) strain of Listeria monocytogenes and a non-hemolysin-producing (Hly-) mutant was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the role of hemolysin production in the immune response. No antilisterial antibodies were detectable following sublethal infection with Hly+ bacteria, but consistent antilisterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody production was observed following sublethal infection with the Hly- mutant. Hly+ but not Hly- L. monocytogenes induced transient inhibition of antibody response to Hly- bacteria and to unrelated T-cell-dependent (tetanus toxoid) and T-cell-independent (pneumococcal polysaccharide 3) antigens. Transient inhibition of the activation of an antigen-specific T-cell clone was also observed following Hly+ infection of antigen-presenting cells but not following Hly- infection. These results suggest that hemolysin production by L. monocytogenes is an important factor in modulating the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens in infected individuals. Images PMID:1548067

  19. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M.; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J.; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  20. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J; Simpson, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  1. IL-22 dampens the T cell response in experimental malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sellau, Julie; Alvarado, Catherine Fuentes; Hoenow, Stefan; Mackroth, Maria Sophie; Kleinschmidt, Dörte; Huber, Samuel; Jacobs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A tight regulation between the pro– and anti–inflammatory immune responses during plasmodial infection is of crucial importance, since a disruption leads to severe malaria pathology. IL-22 is a member of the IL-10 cytokine family, which is known to be highly important in immune regulation. We could detect high plasma levels of IL-22 in Plasmodium falciparum malaria as well as in Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA)-infected C57BL/6J mice. The deficiency of IL-22 in mice during PbA infection led to an earlier occurrence of cerebral malaria but is associated with a lower parasitemia compared to wt mice. Furthermore, at an early time point of infection T cells from PbA-infected Il22−/− mice showed an enhanced IFNγ but a diminished IL-17 production. Moreover, dendritic cells from Il22−/− mice expressed a higher amount of the costimulatory ligand CD86 upon infection. This finding can be corroborated in vitro since bone marrow-derived dendritic cells from Il22−/− mice are better inducers of an antigen-specific IFNγ response by CD8+ T cells. Even though there is no IL-22 receptor complex known on hematopoietic cells, our data suggest a link between IL-22 and the adaptive immune system which is currently not identified. PMID:27311945

  2. Selective T-cell Ablation with Bismuth-213 Labeled Anti-TCR Alpha Beta as Nonmyeloablative Conditionaing for Allogeneic Canine Marrow Transplantion

    SciTech Connect

    Bethge, W. A.; Wilbur, D. Scott; Storb, R.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Santos, E. B.; Brechbiel, M. W.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Sandmaier, B. M.

    2003-06-15

    Two major immunological barriers, the host versus graft (HVG) and the graft versus host (GVH) reaction, must be overcome for successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. T-cells are involved in these barriers in the major histocompatibility complex-identical settings. We hypothesized that selective ablation of T-cells using radioimmunotherapy, together with postgrafting immunosuppression, would ensure stable allogeneic engraftment. We developed a canine model of nonmyeloablative marrow transplantation in which host immune reactions are impaired by a single dose of 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), and where both GVH and residual HVG reactions are controlled by postgrafting immunosuppression with mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporine (CSP). We substituted the alpha-emitter bismuth-213 linked to a monoclonal antibody against TCR(alpha,beta)using the metal-binding chelate CHX-A”-DTPA, for 2 Gy TBI. Biodistribution studies using a gamma-emitting indium-111-labeled anti-TCR mAb showed uptake primarily in blood, marrow, lymph nodes, spleen and liver. In a dosimetry study, 4 dogs were treated with 0.13-0.46 mg/kg TCR mAb labeled with 3.7-5.6 mCi/kg (137-207 MBq/kg) Bi-213. The treatment was administered in 6 injections on days -3 and -2 followed by transplantion of dog leukocyte antigen-identical marrow on day 0 and postgrafting immunosuppression with MMF and CSP. Therapy was well tolerated except for elevations of transaminases, which were transient in all but one dog. No other organ toxicities or signs of graft-versus-host-disease were noted. The dogs had prompt allogeneic hematopoietic engraftment and achieved stable mixed donor-host hematopoietic chimerism with donor contributions ranging from 5-55 % with >30 weeks follow up.

  3. Direct stimulation of T cells by type I IFN enhances the CD8+ T cell response during cross-priming.

    PubMed

    Le Bon, Agnes; Durand, Vanessa; Kamphuis, Elisabeth; Thompson, Clare; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Rossmann, Cornelia; Kalinke, Ulrich; Tough, David F

    2006-04-15

    Type I IFN (IFN-alphabeta), which is produced rapidly in response to infection, plays a key role in innate immunity and also acts as a stimulus for the adaptive immune response. We have investigated how IFN-alphabeta induces cross-priming, comparing CD8+ T cell responses generated against soluble protein Ags in the presence or absence of IFN-alphabeta. Injection of IFN-alpha was found to prolong the proliferation and expansion of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, which was associated with marked up-regulation of IL-2 and IL-15 receptors on Ag-specific cells and expression of IL-15 in the draining lymph node. Surprisingly, neither IL-2 nor IL-15 was required for IFN-alpha-induced cross-priming. Conversely, expression of the IFN-alphabetaR by T cells was shown to be necessary for effective stimulation of the response by IFN-alpha. The finding that T cells represent direct targets of IFN-alphabeta-mediated stimulation reveals an additional mechanism by which the innate response to infection promotes adaptive immunity. PMID:16585561

  4. Regulation of the T Cell Response by CD39.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Maisa C; Robson, Simon; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-07-01

    The ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 (ENTPD1, or CD39) catalyzes the phosphohydrolysis of extracellular ATP (eATP) and ADP (eADP) released under conditions of inflammatory stress and cell injury. CD39 generates AMP, which is in turn used by the ecto-5'-nucleotidase CD73 to synthesize adenosine. These ectonucleotidases have a major impact on the dynamic equilibrium of proinflammatory eATP and ADP nucleotides versus immunosuppressive adenosine nucleosides. Indeed, CD39 plays a dominant role in the purinergic regulation of inflammation and the immune response because its expression is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. We review the specific role of CD39 in the kinetic regulation of cellular immune responses in the evolution of disease. We focus on the effects of CD39 on T cells and explore potential clinical applications in autoimmunity, chronic infections, and cancer. PMID:27236363

  5. Complex T-Cell Receptor Repertoire Dynamics Underlie the CD8+ T-Cell Response to HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Ana I.; Koning, Dan; Ladell, Kristin; McLaren, James E.; Grady, Bart P. X.; Schellens, Ingrid M. M.; van Ham, Petra; Nijhuis, Monique; Borghans, José A. M.; Keşmir, Can; Price, David A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although CD8+ T cells are important for the control of HIV-1 in vivo, the precise correlates of immune efficacy remain unclear. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of viral sequence variation and T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire composition across multiple epitope specificities in a group of antiretroviral treatment-naive individuals chronically infected with HIV-1. A negative correlation was detected between changes in antigen-specific TCR repertoire diversity and CD8+ T-cell response magnitude, reflecting clonotypic expansions and contractions related to alterations in cognate viral epitope sequences. These patterns were independent of the individual, as evidenced by discordant clonotype-specific transitions directed against different epitopes in single subjects. Moreover, long-term asymptomatic HIV-1 infection was characterized by evolution of the TCR repertoire in parallel with viral replication. Collectively, these data suggest a continuous bidirectional process of adaptation between HIV-1 and virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clonotypes orchestrated at the TCR-antigen interface. IMPORTANCE We describe a relation between viral epitope mutation, antigen-specific T-cell expansion, and the repertoire of responding clonotypes in chronic HIV-1 infection. This work provides insights into the process of coadaptation between the human immune system and a rapidly evolving lentivirus. PMID:25320304

  6. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  7. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  8. Impact of Pre-Transplant Anti-T Cell Globulin (ATG) on Immune Recovery after Myeloablative Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Sophie; Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine; Beguin, Yves; Seidel, Laurence; Gothot, André; Daulne, Coline; Willems, Evelyne; Delens, Loïc; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Hannon, Muriel; Baron, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant infusion of rabbit anti-T cell globulin (ATG) is increasingly used as prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). However, the precise impact of pre-transplant ATG on immune recovery after PBSCT is still poorly documented. Methods In the current study, we compared immune recovery after myeloablative PBSCT in 65 patients who either received (n = 37) or did not (n = 28) pre-transplant ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F). Detailed phenotypes of circulating T, B, natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry at serial time-points from day 40 to day 365 after transplantation. Thymic function was also assessed by sjTREC quantification. Serious infectious events were collected up to 2 years post-transplantation. Results Pre-transplant ATG-F had a prolonged (for at least up to 1-year) and selective negative impact on the T-cell pool, while it did not impair the recovery of B, NK nor iNKT cells. Among T cells, ATG-F selectively compromised the recovery of naïve CD4+, central memory CD4+ and naïve CD8+ cells, while it spared effector memory T and regulatory T cells. Levels of sjTRECs were similar in both cohorts at 1-year after PBSCT, suggesting that ATG-F unlikely impaired thymopoiesis at long-term after PBSCT. Finally, the incidence and rate of serious infections were similar in both groups, while ATG-F patients had a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Pre-transplant ATG-F induces long-lasting modulation of the circulating T-cell pool after myeloablative PBSCT, that may participate in preventing graft-versus-host disease without deeply compromising anti-pathogen defenses. PMID:26098781

  9. AGING INFLUENCES THE RESPONSE OF T CELLS TO STIMULATION BY THE ELLAGITANNIN, OENOTHEIN B

    PubMed Central

    Ramstead, Andrew G.; Schepetkin, Igor A.; Todd, Kimberly; Loeffelholz, James; Berardinelli, James G.; Quinn, Mark T.; Jutila, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Several plant extracts, including certain polyphenols, prime innate lymphocytes and enhance responses to secondary stimuli. Oenothein B, a polyphenol isolated from Epilobium angustifolium and other plant sources, enhances IFNγ production by both bovine and human NK cells and T cells, alone and in response to secondary stimulation by cytokines or tumor cells. Innate immune cell responsiveness is known to be affected by aging, but whether polyphenol responses by these cells are also impacted by aging is not known. Therefore, we examined oenothein B responsiveness in T cells from cord blood, young, and adult donors. We found that oenothein B stimulates bovine and human T cells from individuals over a broad range of ages, as measured by increased IL-2Rα and CD69 expression. However, clear differences in induction of cytokine production by T cells were seen. In T cells from human cord blood and bovine calves, oenothein B was unable to induce IFNγ production. However, oenothein B induced IFNγ production by T cells from adult humans and cattle. In addition, oenothein B induced GM-CSF production by human adult T cells, but not cord blood T cells. Within the responsive T cell population, we found that CD45RO+ memory T cells expressed more cytokines in response to oenothein B than CD45RO− T cells. In summary, our data suggest that the immunostimulation of T cells by oenothein B is influenced by age, particularly with respect to immune cytokine production. PMID:25887271

  10. Aging influences the response of T cells to stimulation by the ellagitannin, oenothein B.

    PubMed

    Ramstead, Andrew G; Schepetkin, Igor A; Todd, Kimberly; Loeffelholz, James; Berardinelli, James G; Quinn, Mark T; Jutila, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    Several plant extracts, including certain polyphenols, prime innate lymphocytes and enhance responses to secondary stimuli. Oenothein B, a polyphenol isolated from Epilobium angustifolium and other plant sources, enhances IFNγ production by both bovine and human NK cells and T cells, alone and in response to secondary stimulation by cytokines or tumor cells. Innate immune cell responsiveness is known to be affected by aging, but whether polyphenol responses by these cells are also impacted by aging is not known. Therefore, we examined oenothein B responsiveness in T cells from cord blood, young, and adult donors. We found that oenothein B stimulates bovine and human T cells from individuals over a broad range of ages, as measured by increased IL-2Rα and CD69 expression. However, clear differences in induction of cytokine production by T cells were seen. In T cells from human cord blood and bovine calves, oenothein B was unable to induce IFNγ production. However, oenothein B induced IFNγ production by T cells from adult humans and cattle. In addition, oenothein B induced GM-CSF production by human adult T cells, but not cord blood T cells. Within the responsive T cell population, we found that CD45RO+ memory T cells expressed more cytokines in response to oenothein B than CD45RO- T cells. In summary, our data suggest that the immunostimulation of T cells by oenothein B is influenced by age, particularly with respect to immune cytokine production. PMID:25887271

  11. T-cell function, T-cell phenotype and its role in responsiveness to recombinant human erythropoietin in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, M; Yassein, S; Darwish, K H

    2010-01-01

    Resistance to recombinant human erythropoietin (Epo) occurs in a small proportion of hemodialysis (HD) patients. In this study we investigated the relationship between T-cell phenotype (using flow cytometry), T-cell function (by measuring in vitro cytokine production) and responsiveness to Epo in HD patients and to compare the results with those from healthy controls. T-cell phenotypes were assessed and T-cell function was studied. The study included 24 chronic renal failure (CRF) patients on HD treated with rHuEPO as well as 14 normal control subjects. Dual-colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were used to compare the surface antigen expression on freshly isolated CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells from PBMC of the studied groups. Levels of a panel of selected cytokines (IL-4, IFN-gamma, slL-2R and IL-10) were determined in PBMC culture supernatants and in plasma samples (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-6, slL-2R) using (ELISA) kits. Patients were followed-up for 24 months and a survival study was carried out. T-cells from poor responders showed increased proportions of CD4+/CD28- cells and CD8+/CD28- cells compared with both good responders and controls. Compared with their CD28+ counterparts, CD4+/CD28- T-cells produced significantly more IFN-gamma, enabling them to function as pro-inflammatory cells. There was no difference in secretion of IFN-gamma, slL-2R or IL-4 in PBMC cultures obtained from HD patients and controls. However, Unstimulated PBMC from poor responders generated increased levels of IL-10 poor compared with both good responders and controls. Plasma slL-2R and IL-6 were significantly elevated in both good and poor responders compared with controls. Plasma levels of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were undetectable in both HD patients and controls. In the follow up period, more deaths were occurring among the poor responders than the good responders. Based on the finding of the this study we may suggest that, in the absence of any obvious cause, poor response to Epo

  12. Graft rejection by cytolytic T cells. Specificity of the effector mechanism in the rejection of allogeneic marrow

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, H.; Gress, R.E. )

    1990-02-01

    Cellular effector mechanisms of allograft rejection remain incompletely described. Characterizing the rejection of foreign-marrow allografts rather than solid-organ grafts has the advantage that the cellular composition of the marrow graft, as a single cell suspension, can be altered to include cellular components with differing antigen expression. Rejection of marrow grafts is sensitive to lethal doses of radiation in the mouse but resistant to sublethal levels of radiation. In an effort to identify cells mediating host resistance, lymphocytes were isolated and cloned from spleens of mice 7 days after sublethal TBI (650 cGy) and inoculation with allogeneic marrow. All clones isolated were cytolytic with specificity for MHC encoded gene products of the allogeneic marrow donor. When cloned cells were transferred in vivo into lethally irradiated (1025 cGy) recipients unable to reject allogeneic marrow, results utilizing splenic 125IUdR uptake indicated that these MHC-specific cytotoxic clones could suppress marrow proliferation. In order to characterize the effector mechanism and the ability of the clones to affect final engraftment, double donor chimeras were constructed so that 2 target cell populations differing at the MHC from each other and from the host were present in the same marrow allograft. Results directly demonstrated an ability of CTL of host MHC type to mediate graft rejection and characterized the effector mechanism as one with specificity for MHC gene products.

  13. Altered T cell responses in children with autism

    PubMed Central

    Ashwood, Paul; Krakowiak, Paula; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Hansen, Robin; Pessah, Isaac N.; Van de Water, Judy

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairment in social interactions, communication deficits, and restricted repetitive interests and behaviors. A potential etiologic role for immune dysfunction in ASD has been suggested. Dynamic adaptive cellular immune function was investigated in 66 children with a confirmed diagnosis of ASD and 73 confirmed typically developing (TD) controls 2–5 years-of-age. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with PHA and tetanus was used to compare group-associated cellular responses. The production of GM-CSF, TNFα, and IL-13 were significantly increased whereas IL-12p40 was decreased following PHA stimulation in ASD relative to TD controls. Induced cytokine production was associated with altered behaviors in ASD children such that increased pro-inflammatory or TH1 cytokines were associated with greater impairments in core features of ASD as well as aberrant behaviors. In contrast, production of GM-CSF and TH2 cytokines were associated with better cognitive and adaptive function. Following stimulation, the frequency of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing activation markers CD134 and CD25 but not CD69, HLA-DR or CD137 were significantly reduced in ASD, and suggests an altered activation profile for T cells in ASD. Overall these data indicate significantly altered adaptive cellular immune function in children with ASD that may reflect dysfunctional immune activation, along with evidence that these perturbations may be linked to disturbances in behavior and developmental functioning. Further longitudinal analyzes of cellular immunity profiles would delineate the relationship between immune dysfunction and the progression of behavioral and developmental changes throughout the course of this disorder. PMID:20833247

  14. L-Asparaginase II Produced by Salmonella Typhimurium Inhibits T Cell Responses and Mediates Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kullas, Amy L.; McClelland, Michael; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Tam, Jason W.; Torres, AnnMarie; Porwollik, Steffen; Mena, Patricio; McPhee, Joseph B.; Bogomolnaya, Lydia; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; van der Velden, Adrianus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium avoids clearance by the host immune system by suppressing T cell responses; however, the mechanisms that mediate this immunosuppression remain unknown. We show that S. Typhimurium inhibit T cell responses by producing L-Asparaginase II, which catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-asparagine to aspartic acid and ammonia. L-Asparaginase II is necessary and sufficient to suppress T cell blastogenesis, cytokine production, and proliferation and to downmodulate expression of the T cell receptor. Furthermore, S. Typhimurium-induced inhibition of T cells in vitro is prevented upon addition of L-asparagine. S. Typhimurium lacking the L-Asparaginase II gene (STM3106) are unable to inhibit T cell responses and exhibit attenuated virulence in vivo. L-Asparaginases are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia through mechanisms that likely involve amino acid starvation of leukemic cells, and these findings indicate that pathogens similarly use L-asparagine deprivation to limit T cell responses. PMID:23245323

  15. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24617310

  16. Impact of graft-versus-host disease on outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult T-cell leukemia: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Junya; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Utsunomiya, Atae; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Eto, Tetsuya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Kawano, Fumio; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Masuda, Masato; Nagafuji, Koji; Hara, Masamichi; Takanashi, Minoko; Kai, Shunro; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Kawase, Takakazu; Matsuo, Keitaro; Nagamura-Inoue, Tokiko; Kato, Shunichi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Morishima, Yasuo; Okamura, Jun; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Uchiyama, Takashi

    2012-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an effective treatment for adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), raising the question about the role of graft-versus-leukemia effect against ATL. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the effects of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) on overall survival, disease-associated mortality, and treatment-related mortality among 294 ATL patients who received allogeneic HCT and survived at least 30 days posttransplant with sustained engraftment. Multivariate analyses treating the occurrence of GVHD as a time-varying covariate demonstrated that the development of grade 1-2 acute GVHD was significantly associated with higher overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] for death, 0.65; P = .018) compared with the absence of acute GVHD. Occurrence of either grade 1-2 or grade 3-4 acute GVHD was associated with lower disease-associated mortality compared with the absence of acute GVHD, whereas grade 3-4 acute GVHD was associated with a higher risk for treatment-related mortality (HR, 3.50; P < .001). The development of extensive chronic GVHD was associated with higher treatment-related mortality (HR, 2.75; P = .006) compared with the absence of chronic GVHD. Collectively, these results indicate that the development of mild-to-moderate acute GVHD confers a lower risk of disease progression and a beneficial influence on survival of allografted patients with ATL. PMID:22234682

  17. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  18. Antitumor Responses of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Jennie B.; Benavides, Adriana D.; Das, Rupali; Bassiri, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are innate-like lymphocytes that were first described in the late 1980s. Since their initial description, numerous studies have collectively shed light on their development and effector function. These studies have highlighted the unique requirements for the activation of these lymphocytes and the functional responses that distinguish these cells from other effector lymphocyte populations such as conventional T cells and NK cells. This body of literature suggests that NKT cells play diverse nonredundant roles in a number of disease processes, including the initiation and propagation of airway hyperreactivity, protection against a variety of pathogens, development of autoimmunity, and mediation of allograft responses. In this review, however, we focus on the role of a specific lineage of NKT cells in antitumor immunity. Specifically, we describe the development of invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and the factors that are critical for their acquisition of effector function. Next, we delineate the mechanisms by which iNKT cells influence and modulate the activity of other immune cells to directly or indirectly affect tumor growth. Finally, we review the successes and failures of clinical trials employing iNKT cell-based immunotherapies and explore the future prospects for the use of such strategies. PMID:26543874

  19. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation with reduced conditioning intensity as a novel immunotherapy and antiviral therapy for adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Jun; Utsunomiya, Atae; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Uike, Naokuni; Sonoda, Shunro; Kannagi, Mari; Tomonaga, Masao; Harada, Mine; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Masuda, Masato; Kawano, Fumio; Yufu, Yuji; Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Saburi, Yoshio

    2005-05-15

    Sixteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) who were all over 50 years of age underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation with reduced-conditioning intensity (RIST) from HLA-matched sibling donors after a conditioning regimen consisting of fludarabine (180 mg/m2), busulfan (8 mg/kg), and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (5 mg/kg). The observed regimen-related toxicities and nonhematologic toxicities were all found to be acceptable. Disease relapse was the main cause of treatment failure. Three patients who had a relapse subsequently responded to a rapid discontinuation of the immunosuppressive agent and thereafter achieved another remission. After RIST, the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) proviral load became undetectable in 8 patients. RIST is thus considered to be a feasible treatment for ATL. Our data also suggest the presence of a possible graft-versus-ATL effect; an anti-HTLV-1 activity was also found to be associated with this procedure. PMID:15665110

  20. Prolonged Intake of Dietary Lipids Alters Membrane Structure and T Cell Responses in LDLr-/- Mice.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Abigail H; Tedla, Nicodemus; Hancock, Sarah E; Cornely, Rhea; Mitchell, Todd W; Yang, Zhengmin; Kockx, Maaike; Parton, Robert G; Rossy, Jérémie; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-05-15

    Although it is recognized that lipids and membrane organization in T cells affect signaling and T cell activation, to what extent dietary lipids alter T cell responsiveness in the absence of obesity and inflammation is not known. In this study, we fed low-density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice a Western high-fat diet for 1 or 9 wk and examined T cell responses in vivo along with T cell lipid composition, membrane order, and activation ex vivo. Our data showed that high levels of circulating lipids for a prolonged period elevated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation and resulted in an increased proportion of CD4(+) central-memory T cells within the draining lymph nodes following induction of contact hypersensitivity. In addition, the 9-wk Western high-fat diet elevated the total phospholipid content and monounsaturated fatty acid level, but decreased saturated phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin within the T cells. The altered lipid composition in the circulation, and of T cells, was also reflected by enhanced membrane order at the activation site of ex vivo activated T cells that corresponded to increased IL-2 mRNA levels. In conclusion, dietary lipids can modulate T cell lipid composition and responses in lipoprotein receptor knockout mice even in the absence of excess weight gain and a proinflammatory environment. PMID:27183636

  1. Dissociation of peripheral T cell responses from thymocyte negative selection by weak agonists supports a spare receptor model of T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Lisa K.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    We have focused on stability of the peptide-MHC complex as a determining factor of ligand potency for thymocytes and peripheral CD4+ T cell responses. MHC variant peptides that have low affinities and fast dissociation rates are different in that they stimulate proliferation and cytolysis of mature T cells (classifying the variant peptides as weak agonists) but do not induce thymocyte negative selection. The MHC variant weak agonists require significant receptor reserve, because decreasing the level of T cell receptor on mature T cells blocks the proliferative response. These results demonstrate that peripheral T cells are more sensitive to MHC variant ligands by virtue of increased T cell receptor expression; in addition, the data support a T cell model of the spare receptor theory. PMID:11904393

  2. Skewed T cell receptor repertoire of Vδ1+ γδ T lymphocytes after human allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the potential role for Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells in clonal restriction

    PubMed Central

    Fujishima, N; Hirokawa, M; Fujishima, M; Yamashita, J; Saitoh, H; Ichikawa, Y; Horiuchi, T; Kawabata, Y; Sawada, K-I

    2007-01-01

    The proliferation of Vδ1+ γδ T lymphocytes has been described in various infections including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and malaria. However, the antigen specificity and functions of the human Vδ1+ T cells remain obscure. We sought to explore the biological role for this T cell subset by investigating the reconstitution of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires of Vδ1+ γδ T lymphocytes after human allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We observed skewed TCR repertoires of the Vδ1+ T cells in 27 of 44 post-transplant patients. Only one patient developed EBV-associated post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in the present patient cohort. The -WGI- amino acid motif was observed in CDR3 of clonally expanded Vδ1+ T cells in half the patients. A skew was also detected in certain healthy donors, and the Vδ1+ T cell clone derived from the donor mature T cell pool persisted in the recipient's blood even 10 years after transplant. This T cell clone expanded in vitro against stimulation with autologous EBV–lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL), and the Vδ1+ T cell line expanded in vitro from the same patient showed cytotoxicity against autologous EBV–LCL. EBV-infected cells could also induce in vitro oligoclonal expansions of autologous Vδ1+ T cells from healthy EBV-seropositive individuals. These results suggest that human Vδ1+ T cells have a TCR repertoire against EBV-infected B cells and may play a role in protecting recipients of allogeneic HSCT from EBV-associated disease. PMID:17425654

  3. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell depletion improves the graft-versus-tumor effect of donor lymphocytes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maury, Sébastien; Lemoine, François M; Hicheri, Yosr; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Badoual, Cécile; Cheraï, Mustapha; Beaumont, Jean-Louis; Azar, Nabih; Dhedin, Nathalie; Sirvent, Anne; Buzyn, Agnès; Rubio, Marie-Thérèse; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Montagne, Olivier; Bories, Dominique; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Vernant, Jean-Paul; Cordonnier, Catherine; Klatzmann, David; Cohen, José L

    2010-07-21

    Donor T cells play a pivotal role in the graft-versus-tumor effect after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Regulatory T cells (T(reg)s) may reduce alloreactivity, the major component of the graft-versus-tumor effect. In the setting of donor lymphocyte infusion after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, we postulated that T(reg) depletion could improve alloreactivity and likewise the graft-versus-tumor effect of donor T cells. The safety and efficacy of T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion was studied in 17 adult patients with malignancy relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All but one had previously failed to respond to at least one standard donor lymphocyte infusion, and none had experienced graft-versus-host disease. Two of the 17 patients developed graft-versus-host disease after their first T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion and experienced a long-term remission of their malignancy. Four of the 15 patients who did not respond after a first T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion received a second T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion combined with lymphodepleting chemotherapy aimed to also eliminate recipient T(reg)s. All four developed acute-like graft-versus-host disease that was associated with a partial or complete and durable remission. In the whole cohort, graft-versus-host disease induction through T(reg) depletion was associated with improved survival. These results suggest that T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion is a safe, feasible approach that induces graft-versus-host or graft-versus-tumor effects in alloreactivity-resistant patients. In patients not responding to this approach, the combination of chemotherapy-induced lymphodepletion of the recipient synergizes with the effect of T(reg)-depleted donor lymphocyte infusion. These findings offer a rational therapeutic approach for cancer cellular immunotherapy. PMID:20650872

  4. Measurement of CD8 and CD4 T Cell Responses in Mouse Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Fett, Craig; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Study of the adaptive immune response to a viral challenge in an animal model often includes analysis of the T cell response. Here we discuss in detail the methods that are used to characterize the CD8 and CD4 T cell response following viral challenge in the lung.

  5. Profiles of activation, differentiation-markers, or β-integrins on T cells contribute to predict T cells' antileukemic responses after stimulation with leukemia-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Valentin; Schick, Julia; Ansprenger, Christian; Braeu, Marion; Kroell, Tanja; Kraemer, Doris; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Hausmann, Andreas; Buhmann, Raymund; Tischer, Johanna; Schmetzer, Helga

    2014-01-01

    and could serve to predict T cells' reactivity during stimulation. Refined analyses in the context of responses to immunotherapies are required. PMID:24911794

  6. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Eun; Walsh, Matthew C.; Hoehn, Kyle L.; James, David E.; Wherry, E. John; Choi, Yongwon

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2) regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO) by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses. PMID:26367121

  7. Impact of Pretransplantation (18)F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography on Survival Outcomes after T Cell-Depleted Allogeneic Transplantation for Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Reyal, Yasmin; Kayani, Irfan; Bloor, Adrian J C; Fox, Christopher P; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Sjursen, Ann-Marie; Fielding, Adele K; Ben Taylor, Marcus; Bishton, Mark J; Morris, Emma C; Thomson, Kirsty J; Russell, Nigel; Mackinnon, Stephen; Peggs, Karl S

    2016-07-01

    Pretransplant (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography status is an important prognostic factor for outcomes after autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), but its impact on outcomes after allogeneic SCT remains unclear. We retrospectively evaluated outcomes after T cell-depleted allogeneic SCT of 116 patients with nonprogressive HL according to pretransplant Deauville scores. Endpoints were overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), relapse rate (RR), and nonrelapse-related mortality (NRM). OS, PFS, and RR did not differ significantly between the Deauville 1 to 2 and Deauville 3 to 5 cohorts (OS: 77.5% versus 67.3%, P = .49; PFS: 59.4% versus 55.7%, P = .43; RR: 20.9% versus 22.6%, P = .28 at 4 years). Differences in PFS remained statistically nonsignificant when comparisons were made between Deauville 1 to 3 and Deauville 4 to 5 cohorts (60.9% versus 51.4%, P = .10), and RR remained very similar (21.5% versus 23.8%, P = .42). Multivariate analyses demonstrated trends toward significance for an effect of Deauville score on PFS (hazard ratio 1.82 for Deauville 4 to 5, P = .06) and for number of lines of prior therapy on OS (hazard ratio 2.34 for >5 lines, P = .10). The latter effect appeared to be driven by higher NRM rather than increased RR. Our findings suggest that Deauville score before allogeneic SCT in patients with nonprogressive HL has a relatively modest impact on survival outcomes in comparison with the impact in autologous SCT and that predictive values for the individual patient remain low, indicating that residual FDG-avid disease should not preclude allogeneic SCT. Furthermore, our findings bring into question the importance of attainment of metabolic complete response in this setting if it is at the expense of increasing NRM risk. PMID:27095691

  8. Transcriptomic analysis of mouse EL4 T cells upon T cell activation and in response to protein synthesis inhibition via cycloheximide treatment.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pek Siew; Hardy, Kristine; Peng, Kaiman; Shannon, Frances M

    2016-03-01

    T cell activation involves the recognition of a foreign antigen complexed to the major histocompatibility complex on the antigen presenting T cell to the T cell receptor. This leads to activation of signaling pathways, which ultimately leads to induction of key cytokine genes responsible for eradication of foreign antigens. We used the mouse EL4 T cell as a model system to study genes that are induced as a result of T cell activation using phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and calcium ionomycin (I) as stimuli. We were also interested to examine the importance of new protein synthesis in regulating the expression of genes involved in T cell activation. Thus we have pre-treated mouse EL4 T cells with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, and left the cells unstimulated or stimulated with PMA/I for 4 h. We performed microarray expression profiling of these cells to correlate the gene expression with chromatin state of T cells upon T cell activation [1]. Here, we detail further information and analysis of the microarray data, which shows that T cell activation leads to differential expression of genes and inducible genes can be further classified as primary and secondary response genes based on their protein synthesis dependency. The data is available in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE13278. PMID:26981393

  9. T cell responses against tumor associated antigens and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nagorsen, Dirk; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Letsch, Anne; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Rivoltini, Licia; Thiel, Eckhard; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2005-01-19

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous T cell responses against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are frequently detected in peripheral blood of tumor patients of various histiotypes. However, little is known about whether these circulating, spontaneously occurring, TAA-reactive T cells influence the clinical course of disease. METHODS: Fifty-four HLA-A2 positive colorectal cancer patients had been analyzed for the presence of T cell responses against epitopes derived from the TAA Ep-CAM, her-2/neu, and CEA either by ELISPOT assay or by intracellular cytokine staining. Then, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed comparing T-cell-responders and T-cell-non-responders. For comparison, a group of T-cell-non-responders was compiled stringently matched to T-cell-responders based on clinical criteria and also analyzed for survival. RESULTS: Sixteen out of 54 patients had a detectable T cell response against at least one of the three tested TAA. Two out of 21 patients (9.5%) with limited stage of disease (UICC I and II) and 14 out of 33 patients (42.4%) with advanced disease (UICC III and IV) were T cell response positive. Comparing all T-cell-responders (n = 16) and all T-cell-non-responders (n = 38), no survival difference was found. In an attempt to reduce the influence of confounding clinical factors, we then compared 16 responders and 16 non-responders in a matched group survival analysis; and again no survival difference was found (p = 0.7). CONCLUSION: In summary, we found no evidence that spontaneous peripheral T cell responses against HLA-A2-binding epitopes of CEA, her-2/neu and Ep-CAM are a strong prognostic factor for survival. PMID:15659244

  10. T cell responses against tumor associated antigens and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Nagorsen, Dirk; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Letsch, Anne; Germer, Christoph-Thomas; Buhr, Heinz-Johannes; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna; Rivoltini, Licia; Thiel, Eckhard; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous T cell responses against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are frequently detected in peripheral blood of tumor patients of various histiotypes. However, little is known about whether these circulating, spontaneously occurring, TAA-reactive T cells influence the clinical course of disease. Methods Fifty-four HLA-A2 positive colorectal cancer patients had been analyzed for the presence of T cell responses against epitopes derived from the TAA Ep-CAM, her-2/neu, and CEA either by ELISPOT assay or by intracellular cytokine staining. Then, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed comparing T-cell-responders and T-cell-non-responders. For comparison, a group of T-cell-non-responders was compiled stringently matched to T-cell-responders based on clinical criteria and also analyzed for survival. Results Sixteen out of 54 patients had a detectable T cell response against at least one of the three tested TAA. Two out of 21 patients (9.5%) with limited stage of disease (UICC I and II) and 14 out of 33 patients (42.4%) with advanced disease (UICC III and IV) were T cell response positive. Comparing all T-cell-responders (n = 16) and all T-cell-non-responders (n = 38), no survival difference was found. In an attempt to reduce the influence of confounding clinical factors, we then compared 16 responders and 16 non-responders in a matched group survival analysis; and again no survival difference was found (p = 0.7). Conclusion In summary, we found no evidence that spontaneous peripheral T cell responses against HLA-A2-binding epitopes of CEA, her-2/neu and Ep-CAM are a strong prognostic factor for survival. PMID:15659244

  11. CD4+ T Cell Priming as Biomarker to Study Immune Response to Preventive Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Medaglini, Donata

    2013-01-01

    T cell priming is a critical event in the initiation of the immune response to vaccination since it deeply influences both the magnitude and the quality of the immune response induced. CD4+ T cell priming, required for the induction of high-affinity antibodies and immune memory, represents a key target for improving and modulating vaccine immunogenicity. A major challenge in the study of in vivo T cell priming is due to the low frequency of antigen-specific T cells. This review discusses the current knowledge on antigen-specific CD4+ T cell priming in the context of vaccination, as well as the most advanced tools for the characterization of the in vivo T cell priming and the opportunities offered by the application of systems biology. PMID:24363656

  12. THE INITIAL PHASE OF AN IMMUNE RESPONSE FUNCTIONS TO ACTIVATE REGULATORY T CELLS

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, William E.; Dooms, Hans; Thorne, Steve H.; Kuswanto, Wilson F.; Simonds, Erin F.; Krutzik, Peter O.; Nolan, Garry P.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2009-01-01

    An early reaction of CD4+ T lymphocytes to antigen is the production of cytokines, notably IL-2. In order to detect cytokine dependent responses, naive antigen-specific T cells were stimulated in vivo and the presence of phosphorylated STAT5 molecules was used to identify the cell populations responding to IL-2. Within hours of T-cell priming, IL-2-dependent STAT5 phosphorylation occurred primarily in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. In contrast, the antigen-specific T cells received STAT5 signals only after repeated antigen exposure or memory differentiation. Regulatory T cells receiving IL-2 signals proliferated and developed enhanced suppressive activity. These results indicate that one of the earliest events in a T cell response is the activation of endogenous regulatory cells, potentially to prevent autoimmunity. PMID:19542444

  13. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  14. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  15. Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination Induces Divergent Proinflammatory or Regulatory T Cell Responses in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Prins, Corine; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; van Dissel, Jaap T.; Joosten, Simone A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the only currently available vaccine against tuberculosis, induces variable protection in adults. Immune correlates of protection are lacking, and analyses on cytokine-producing T cell subsets in protected versus unprotected cohorts have yielded inconsistent results. We studied the primary T cell response, both proinflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, induced by BCG vaccination in adults. Twelve healthy adult volunteers who were tuberculin skin test (TST) negative, QuantiFERON test (QFT) negative, and BCG naive were vaccinated with BCG and followed up prospectively. BCG vaccination induced an unexpectedly dichotomous immune response in this small, BCG-naive, young-adult cohort: BCG vaccination induced either gamma interferon-positive (IFN-γ+) interleukin 2-positive (IL-2+) tumor necrosis factor α-positive (TNF-α+) polyfunctional CD4+ T cells concurrent with CD4+ IL-17A+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells or, in contrast, virtually absent cytokine responses with induction of CD8+ regulatory T cells. Significant induction of polyfunctional CD4+ IFN-γ+ IL-2+ TNF-α+ T cells and IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was confined to individuals with strong immunization-induced local skin inflammation and increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Conversely, in individuals with mild inflammation, regulatory-like CD8+ T cells were uniquely induced. Thus, BCG vaccination either induced a broad proinflammatory T cell response with local inflammatory reactogenicity or, in contrast, a predominant CD8+ regulatory T cell response with mild local inflammation, poor cytokine induction, and absent polyfunctional CD4+ T cells. Further detailed fine mapping of the heterogeneous host response to BCG vaccination using classical and nonclassical immune markers will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms and determinants that underlie the induction of apparently opposite immune responses and how these

  16. CARMA1 is necessary for optimal T cell responses in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Roche, Marly I; Moon, James J; Ludwig, Thomas; Xavier, Ramnik J; Medoff, Benjamin D

    2011-12-15

    CARMA1 is a lymphocyte-specific scaffold protein necessary for T cell activation. Deletion of CARMA1 prevents the development of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma due to a defect in naive T cell activation. However, it is unknown if CARMA1 is important for effector and memory T cell responses after the initial establishment of inflammation, findings that would be more relevant to asthma therapies targeted to CARMA1. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the role of CARMA1 in T cells that have been previously activated. Using mice in which floxed CARMA1 exons can be selectively deleted in T cells by OX40-driven Cre recombinase (OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F)), we report that CD4(+) T cells from these mice have impaired T cell reactivation responses and NF-κB signaling in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo recall model of allergic airway inflammation that is dependent on memory T cell function, OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice have attenuated eosinophilic airway inflammation, T cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production. Using MHC class II tetramers, we demonstrate that the development and maintenance of Ag-specific memory T cells is not affected in OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells into wild-type mice induces markedly less airway inflammation in response to Ag challenge than transfer of wild-type Th2 cells. These data demonstrate a novel role for CARMA1 in effector and memory T cell responses and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting CARMA1 could help treat chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma. PMID:22075698

  17. Immune evasion of mantle cell lymphoma: expression of B7-H1 leads to inhibited T-cell response to and killing of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijuan; Qian, Jianfei; Lu, Yong; Li, Haiyan; Bao, Hanying; He, Donghua; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Yuhuan; He, Jin; Li, Yi; Neelapu, Sattva; Yang, Jing; Kwak, Larry W.; Yi, Qing; Cai, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials of immunotherapy in mantle cell lymphoma have not yet delivered desirable results, partly because of the inhibitory machinery of the tumor and its microenvironment. Here we investigated the role of B7-H1, a member of the B7 family of co-stimulatory/co-inhibitory ligands, in mantle cell lymphoma-mediated immunosuppression. Allogeneic CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were purified and co-cultured with irradiated mantle cell lymphoma cells. Mantle cell lymphoma-reactive T-cell lines from HLA-A*0201+ healthy blood donors were generated after in vitro restimulation, and were subjected to functional tests. We found that B7-H1 expressed on mantle cell lymphoma cells was able to inhibit T-cell proliferation induced by the tumor cells, impair the generation of antigen-specific T-cell responses, and render mantle cell lymphoma cells resistant to T-cell-mediated cytolysis. Blocking or knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells enhanced T-cell responses and restored tumor-cell sensitivity to T-cell-mediated killing in vitro and in vivo. Knocking down B7-H1 on mantle cell lymphoma cells primed more CD4+ or CD8+ memory effector T cells. Our study demonstrates for the first time that lymphoma cell-expressed B7-H1 may lead to the suppression of host anti-tumor immune responses in mantle cell lymphoma and targeting tumor cell B7-H1 may represent a novel approach to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:23508008

  18. Nab2 regulates secondary CD8+ T-cell responses through control of TRAIL expression

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Carmen; Arens, Ramon; Janssen, Edith M.; Fitzgerald, Patrick; Schumacher, Ton N.; Medema, Jan Paul; Green, Douglas R.; Schoenberger, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    CD4+ Th cells are pivotal for the generation and maintenance of CD8+ T-cell responses. “Helped” CD8+ T cells receive signals during priming that prevent the induction of the proapoptotic molecule TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) during reactivation, thereby enabling robust secondary expansion. Conversely, “helpless” CD8+ T cells primed in the absence of Th induce TRAIL expression after restimulation and undergo activation-induced cell death. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for the differential regulation of TRAIL in helped versus helpless CD8+ T cells by comparing their transcriptional profiles, and have identified a transcriptional corepressor, NGFI-A binding protein 2 (Nab2), that is selectively induced in helped CD8+ T cells. Enforced expression of Nab2 prevents TRAIL induction after restimulation of primary helpless CD8+ T cells, and expression of a dominant-negative form of Nab2 in helped CD8+ T cells impairs their secondary proliferative response that is reversible by TRAIL blockade. Finally, we observe that the CD8+ T-cell autocrine growth factor IL-2 coordinately increases Nab2 expression and decreases TRAIL expression. These findings identify Nab2 as a mediator of Th-dependent CD8+ T-cell memory responses through the regulation of TRAIL and the promotion of secondary expansion, and suggest a mechanism through which this operates. PMID:22128144

  19. Modulation of CNS autoimmune responses by CD8(+) T cells coincides with their oligoclonal expansion.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Henrike J; van den Brandt, Jens; Lingner, Thomas; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Weishaupt, Andreas; Reichardt, Holger M

    2016-01-15

    MS is a highly prevalent neuroinflammatory disease of presumed autoimmune origin. Clinical observations and animal studies suggest that CD8(+) T cells play an important role in MS but their exact mechanisms are ill defined. When we actively induced EAE in CD8 knock-out DA rats, or adoptively transferred encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells into CD8 knock-out DA rats, the disease course was indistinguishable from controls. Since our previous findings had revealed that the absence of CD8(+) T cells in Lewis rats ameliorated EAE, we compared antigen-induced T cell differentiation in both strains. Disease onset and the composition of the draining lymph nodes were similar but T cell activation in DA rats was much weaker. Moreover, oligoclonal expansion of CD8(+) T cells was exclusively observed in Lewis but not in DA rats. This suggests that myelin-specific CD8(+) T cells are involved in the differentiation of encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells in Lewis rats, whilst they do not impact CD4(+) T cell priming in DA rats. Hence, clonal expansion of CD8(+) T cells in secondary lymphoid organs appears to be linked to their ability to modulate CNS autoimmune responses. PMID:26711565

  20. MicroRNA-155 controls CD8+ T cell responses by regulating interferon signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gracias, Donald T.; Stelekati, Erietta; Hope, Jennifer L.; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Doering, Travis; Norton, Jillian; Mueller, Yvonne M.; Fraietta, Joseph A.; Wherry, E. John; Turner, Martin; Katsikis, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    We show that microRNA-155 (miR-155) is upregulated in primary effector and effector memory CD8+ T cells but is low in naive and central memory cells. Anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses and viral clearance were impaired in miR-155 deficient (miR-155-KO) mice, and this defect was intrinsic to CD8+ T cells as miR-155-KO CD8+ T cells mounted greatly reduced primary and memory responses. Conversely, miR-155 overexpression augmented anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. Gene expression profiling of miR-155-KO CD8+ T cells revealed increased type I interferon signaling and sensitivity. Inhibiting STAT1 or IRF7 increased miR-155-KO CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. We report a novel role for miR-155 in regulating IFN responsiveness and CD8+ T cell responses against pathogens in vivo. PMID:23603793

  1. Plasticity of γδ T Cells: Impact on the Anti-Tumor Response

    PubMed Central

    Lafont, Virginie; Sanchez, Françoise; Laprevotte, Emilie; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Gros, Laurent; Eliaou, Jean-François; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of γ and δ chains (γδ T cells) are of particular interest. γδ T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary, and prostate cancer) directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that γδ T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating γδ T cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating dendritic cell maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to γδ T cells and promote their differentiation into γδ T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of γδ T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying γδ T cell expansion, differentiation, and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25538706

  2. Enhanced local and systemic anti-melanoma CD8+ T cell responses after memory T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Amanda; Sen, Siddhartha; Tatar, Andrew J.; Mahvi, David A.; Meyers, Justin V.; Srinand, Prakrithi; Suresh, Marulasiddappa

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) melanoma immunotherapy typically employs acutely activated effector CD8+ T cells for their ability to rapidly recognize and clear antigen. We have previously observed that effector CD8+ T cells are highly susceptible to melanoma-induced suppression, whereas memory CD8+ T cells are not. Although memory T cells have been presumed to be potentially advantageous for ACT, the kinetics of local and systemic T cell responses after effector and memory ACT have not been compared. B16F10 melanoma cells stably transfected to express very low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) peptide GP33 (B16GP33) were inoculated into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. Equal numbers of bona fide naïve, effector, or memory phenotype GP33-specific CD8+ T cells were adoptively transferred into mice 1 day after B16GP33 inoculation. The efficacy of ACT immunotherapy was kinetically assessed using serial tumor measurements and flow cytometric analyses of local and systemic CD8+ T cell responses. Control of B16GP33 tumor growth, persistence of adoptively transferred CD8+ cells, intratumoral infiltration of CD8+ T cells, and systemic CD8+ T cell responsiveness to GP33 were strongest after ACT of memory CD8+ T cells. Following surgical tumor resection and melanoma tumor challenge, only mice receiving memory T cell-based ACT immunotherapy exhibited durable tumor-specific immunity. These findings demonstrate how the use of non-expanded memory CD8+ T cells may enhance ACT immunotherapeutic efficacy. PMID:27011014

  3. Enhanced local and systemic anti-melanoma CD8+ T cell responses after memory T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy in mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Amanda; Sen, Siddhartha; Tatar, Andrew J; Mahvi, David A; Meyers, Justin V; Srinand, Prakrithi; Suresh, Marulasiddappa; Cho, Clifford S

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) melanoma immunotherapy typically employs acutely activated effector CD8+ T cells for their ability to rapidly recognize and clear antigen. We have previously observed that effector CD8+ T cells are highly susceptible to melanoma-induced suppression, whereas memory CD8+ T cells are not. Although memory T cells have been presumed to be potentially advantageous for ACT, the kinetics of local and systemic T cell responses after effector and memory ACT have not been compared. B16F10 melanoma cells stably transfected to express very low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) peptide GP33 (B16GP33) were inoculated into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. Equal numbers of bona fide naïve, effector, or memory phenotype GP33-specific CD8+ T cells were adoptively transferred into mice 1 day after B16GP33 inoculation. The efficacy of ACT immunotherapy was kinetically assessed using serial tumor measurements and flow cytometric analyses of local and systemic CD8+ T cell responses. Control of B16GP33 tumor growth, persistence of adoptively transferred CD8+ cells, intratumoral infiltration of CD8+ T cells, and systemic CD8+ T cell responsiveness to GP33 were strongest after ACT of memory CD8+ T cells. Following surgical tumor resection and melanoma tumor challenge, only mice receiving memory T cell-based ACT immunotherapy exhibited durable tumor-specific immunity. These findings demonstrate how the use of non-expanded memory CD8+ T cells may enhance ACT immunotherapeutic efficacy. PMID:27011014

  4. Control of Immune Response to Allogeneic Embryonic Stem Cells by CD3 Antibody-Mediated Operational Tolerance Induction.

    PubMed

    Calderon, D; Prot, M; You, S; Marquet, C; Bellamy, V; Bruneval, P; Valette, F; de Almeida, P; Wu, J C; Pucéat, M; Menasché, P; Chatenoud, L

    2016-02-01

    Implantation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their differentiated derivatives into allogeneic hosts triggers an immune response that represents a hurdle to clinical application. We established in autoimmunity and in transplantation that CD3 antibody therapy induces a state of immune tolerance. Promising results have been obtained with CD3 antibodies in the clinic. In this study, we tested whether this strategy can prolong the survival of undifferentiated ESCs and their differentiated derivatives in histoincompatible hosts. Recipients of either mouse ESC-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) or cardiac progenitors received a single short tolerogenic regimen of CD3 antibody. In immunocompetent mice, allogeneic EBs and cardiac progenitors were rejected within 20-25 days. Recipients treated with CD3 antibody showed long-term survival of implanted cardiac progenitors or EBs. In due course, EBs became teratomas, the growth of which was self-limited. Regulatory CD4(+)FoxP3(+) T cells and signaling through the PD1/PDL1 pathway played key roles in the CD3 antibody therapeutic effect. Gene profiling emphasized the importance of TGF-β and the inhibitory T cell coreceptor Tim3 to the observed effect. These results demonstrate that CD3 antibody administered alone promotes prolonged survival of allogeneic ESC derivatives and thus could prove useful for enhancing cell engraftment in the absence of chronic immunosuppression. PMID:26492394

  5. Comparable incidence and severity of cytomegalovirus infections following T cell-depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation preceded by reduced intensity or myeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Kalpoe, J S; van der Heiden, P L J; Vaessen, N; Claas, E C J; Barge, R M; Kroes, A C M

    2007-07-01

    Reports on infectious complications following reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) are equivocal. This prospective follow-up study compared the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections following RIC with fludarabine, ATG and busulphan or conventional myeloablative conditioning (MAC). Forty-eight RIC and 59 MAC patients were enrolled. The occurrence and severity of CMV infections within 100 days following allo-SCT were assessed, using plasma CMV DNA load kinetics. CMV DNAemia was observed in 21 RIC (60%) and in 19 MAC (44%) patients at risk for CMV. The mean CMV DNAemia free survival time was comparable following RIC and MAC: 70 days (95% (confidence interval) CI: 59-80 days) and 77 days (95% CI: 68-86 days), respectively (P=0.24). Parameters indicative for the level of CMV reactivation, including the area under the curve of CMV DNA load over time as well as the onset, the peak values and duration of CMV infection episodes, the numbers and duration of CMV treatment episodes and recurrent infections, were not different in both groups. During follow-up, none of the patients developed CMV disease. RIC with fludarabine, ATG and busulphan demonstrated safety comparable to conventional MAC with regard to frequency and severity of CMV infections within 100 days following T cell-depleted allo-SCT. PMID:17530007

  6. Dissecting memory T cell responses to TB: concerns using adoptive transfer into immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay; Rich, Fenella J; Delahunt, Brett; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have used adoptive transfer of purified T cell subsets into immunodeficient mice to determine the subset of T cells responsible for mediating protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies suggested that CD62L(hi) memory CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice are key for protection against tuberculosis. Importantly, we observed that transfer of naïve CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-/- recipients protected against a mycobacterial challenge as well as transfer of BCG-experienced CD4(+) T cells. We found that transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or enriched CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice into Rag1-/- recipients induced severe colitis by 3 weeks post cell transfer, whereas transfer of CD62L(lo)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice did not. Naïve and CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells proliferated extensively upon transfer and developed an activated effector phenotype in the lung, even in the absence of infectious challenge. The induction of colitis and systemic cytokine response induced by the transfer and subsequent activation of CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice, into immunodeficient recipients, may heighten their ability to protect against mycobacterial challenge. This raises doubts about the validity of this model to study CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis. PMID:22738879

  7. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  8. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fogg, Mark; Murphy, John R.; Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall; Wang, Fred

    2013-07-05

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. - Highlights: • Viral proteins are tumor antigens in Epstein–Barr virus associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma. • CD8+ T cell responses against EBV proteins EBNA-1 and LMP2 are suppressed in NPC patients. • T regulatory cells are responsible for suppressing EBV immunity in NPC patients. • Depletion of Tregs with Ontak can rescue EBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in NPC patients. • This clinically approved drug may be effective for enhancing anti-tumor immunity in NPC patients.

  9. Cross-validation of IFN-γ Elispot assay for measuring alloreactive memory/effector T cell responses in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Bestard, O; Crespo, E; Stein, M; Lúcia, M; Roelen, D L; de Vaal, Y J; Hernandez-Fuentes, M P; Chatenoud, L; Wood, K J; Claas, F H; Cruzado, J M; Grinyó, J M; Volk, H D; Reinke, P

    2013-07-01

    Assessment of donor-specific alloreactive memory/effector T cell responses using an IFN-γ Elispot assay has been suggested to be a novel immune-monitoring tool for evaluating the cellular immune risk in renal transplantation. Here, we report the cross-validation data of the IFN-γ Elispot assay performed within different European laboratories taking part of the EU RISET consortium. For this purpose, development of a standard operating procedure (SOP), comparisons of lectures of IFN-γ plates assessing intra- and interlaboratory assay variability of allogeneic or peptide stimuli in both healthy and kidney transplant individuals have been the main objectives. We show that the use of a same SOP and count-settings of the Elispot bioreader allow low coefficient variation between laboratories. Frozen and shipped samples display slightly lower detectable IFN-γ frequencies than fresh samples. Importantly, a close correlation between different laboratories is obtained when measuring high frequencies of antigen-specific primed/memory T cell alloresponses. Interestingly, significant high donor-specific alloreactive T cell responses can be similarly detected among different laboratories in kidney transplant patients displaying histological patterns of acute T cell mediated rejection. In conclusion, assessment of circulating alloreactive memory/effector T cells using an INF-γ Elispot assay can be accurately achieved using the same SOP, Elispot bioreader and experienced technicians in kidney transplantation. PMID:23763435

  10. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2b) → B6D2F1 (H-2b/d), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2d) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  11. Differential Effect of MyD88 Signal in Donor T Cells on Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect and Graft-versus-Host Disease after Experimental Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Young; Ryu, Da-Bin; Lee, Sung-Eun; Park, Gyeongsin; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2015-11-01

    Despite the presence of toll like receptor (TLR) expression in conventional TCRαβ T cells, the direct role of TLR signaling via myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) within T lymphocytes on graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains unknown. In the allo-SCT model of C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) → B6D2F1 (H-2(b/d)), recipients received transplants of wild type (WT) T-cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) and splenic T cells from either WT or MyD88 deficient (MyD88KO) donors. Host-type (H-2(d)) P815 mastocytoma or L1210 leukemia cells were injected either subcutaneously or intravenously to generate a GVHD/GVL model. Allogeneic recipients of MyD88KO T cells demonstrated a greater tumor growth without attenuation of GVHD severity. Moreover, GVHD-induced GVL effect, caused by increasing the conditioning intensity was also not observed in the recipients of MyD88KO T cells. In vitro, the absence of MyD88 in T cells resulted in defective cytolytic activity to tumor targets with reduced ability to produce IFN-γ or granzyme B, which are known to critical for the GVL effect. However, donor T cell expansion with effector and memory T-cell differentiation were more enhanced in GVHD hosts of MyD88KO T cells. Recipients of MyD88KO T cells experienced greater expansion of Foxp3- and IL4-expressing T cells with reduced INF-γ producing T cells in the spleen and tumor-draining lymph nodes early after transplantation. Taken together, these results highlight a differential role for MyD88 deficiency on donor T-cells, with decreased GVL effect without attenuation of the GVHD severity after experimental allo-SCT. PMID:26552489

  12. Alloproliferative responses of purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells to endothelial cells in the absence of contaminating accessory cells.

    PubMed

    Page, C S; Holloway, N; Smith, H; Yacoub, M; Rose, M L

    1994-06-15

    Human capillary endothelial cells (EC), unlike rodent, constitutively express MHC class II antigens, raising the question of whether they can cause direct stimulation of resting T cells. Although previous reports have demonstrated an alloproliferative response between cultured human EC and resting T lymphocytes, they have not stringently proven the absence of contaminating leukocytes in both stimulator and responder populations. Here, we have quantitated the number of contaminating leukocytes in serially passaged human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and have examined the ability of HUVEC and an EC line (EAhy.926) to cause allostimulation of positively selected CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Contaminating CD45+ leukocytes were found in primary cultures at a mean level of 0.43 +/- 0.49%; by passages 3 and 4 there were less than 1/10,000 cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were purified by positive selection on antibody-coated Dynabeads and residual DR+ cells were removed by complement-dependent lysis. They were shown to be depleted of monocytes by their failure to proliferate in response to OKT3 and PHA. Nevertheless, the same cells gave an unequivocal response to cytokine-treated, serially passaged HUVEC or EAhy.926 cells. The response of CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells was dependent upon pretreatment of HUVEC or EAhy.926 with human rIFN-gamma. Neither CD4+ nor CD8+ T cells responded to MHC class II-bearing fibroblasts or epithelial cells. The CD8+ T cells that recognized EC did not respond to spleen cells in an MLR. The results confirm that EC, unlike other non-bone-marrow-derived cells, have the ability to provide all the signals necessary for direct stimulation of resting allogeneic T cells. PMID:7912014

  13. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8(+) T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C Y; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-03-31

    CD8(+) T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8(+) T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8(+) T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8(+) T cells were better than wild-type CD8(+) T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  14. Potentiating the antitumour response of CD8+ T cells by modulating cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Bai, Yibing; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuokai; Zheng, Xiaojun; Meng, Xiangbo; Li, Lunyi; Wang, Jing; Xu, Chenguang; Yan, Chengsong; Wang, Lijuan; Chang, Catharine C. Y.; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Zhang, Ti; Zhou, Penghui; Song, Bao-Liang; Liu, Wanli; Sun, Shao-cong; Liu, Xiaolong; Li, Bo-liang; Xu, Chenqi

    2016-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment1–4. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8+ T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme5, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8+ but not CD4+ T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8+ T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8+ T cells were better than wild-type CD8+ T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile6,7, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26982734

  15. SV40 large T antigen-specific human T cell memory responses.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sharon; Gibbs, Allen; Butchart, Eric; Mason, Malcolm D; Jasani, Bharat; Tabi, Zsuzsanna

    2008-08-01

    The continued presence of simian virus 40 (SV40), a monkey polyomavirus, in man is confirmed by the regular detection of SV40-specific antibodies in 5-10% of children who are unlikely to have received contaminated polio-vaccines. The aim of our experiments was to find cellular immunological evidence of SV40 infection in humans by testing memory T cell responses to SV40 large T antigen (Tag). As there is some indication that the virus may be present in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) cells, we analyzed T cell responses in MPM patients and in healthy donors. The frequencies of responding T cells to overlapping Tag peptides were tested by cytokine flow cytometry. CD8+ T cells from 4 of 32 MPM patients responded (above twofold of control) to SV40 Tag peptides, while no positive responses were detected in 12 healthy donors. Within SV40 Tag we identified three 15 amino acid-long immunogenic sequences and one 9 amino acid-long T cell epitope (p138) (138FPSELLSFL146), the latter including a HLA-B7-restriction motif. T cell responses to p138 were SV40-specific as T cells stimulated with p138 did not cross-react with the corresponding sequences of Tag of human polyomaviruses BKV and JCV. Similarly, the relevant BKV and JCV Tag peptides did not generate T cell responses against SV40 TAg p138. Peptide-stimulated T cells also killed SV40 Tag-transfected target cells. This article demonstrates the presence, and provides a detailed analysis, of SV40-specific T cell memory in man. PMID:18551603

  16. Enumeration of Cytotoxic CD8 T Cells Ex Vivo during the Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Dietmar M. W.; Sijts, Alice J. A. M.; Mosmann, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxicity is a key effector function of CD8 T cells. However, what proportion of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in vivo exert cytotoxic activity during a functional CD8 T-cell response to infection still remains unknown. We used the Lysispot assay to directly enumerate cytotoxic CD8 T cells from the spleen ex vivo during the immune response to infection with the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We demonstrate that not all antigen-responsive gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting T cells display cytotoxic activity. Most CD8 T cells detected at early time points of the response were cytotoxic. This percentage continuously declined during both the expansion and contraction phases to about 50% at the peak and to <10% of IFN-γ-producing cells in the memory phase. As described for clonal expansion, this elaboration of a program of differentiation after an initial stimulus was not affected by antigen or CD4 help but, like proliferation, could be influenced by later reinfection. These data indicate that cytotoxic effector function during the response to infection is regulated independently from IFN-γ secretion or expansion or contraction of the overall CD8 T-cell response. PMID:18678661

  17. Correlations in the T-cell response to altered peptide ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2004-10-01

    The vertebrate immune system is a wonder of modern evolution. Occasionally, however, correlations within the immune system lead to inappropriate recruitment of pre-existing T-cells against novel viral diseases. We present a random energy theory for the correlations in the naive and memory T-cell immune responses. The nonlinear susceptibility of the random energy model to structural changes captures the correlations in the immune response to mutated antigens. We show how the sequence-level diversity of the T-cell repertoire drives the dynamics of the immune response against mutated viral antigens.

  18. Dectin-1 in the control of Th2-type T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Upchurch, Katherine; Oh, SangKon; Joo, HyeMee

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that can induce and control host immune responses. DCs express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which can translate external and internal triggers into different types of T cell responses. The types of CD4+ T cell responses elicited by DCs (e.g., Th1, Th2, Th17, Th21, Th22 and regulatory T cells (Tregs)) are associated with either host immunity or inflammatory diseases, including allergic diseases and autoimmune diseases. In particular, the pathogenic functions of Th2-type T cells in allergic immune disorders have been well documented, although Th2-type T cell responses are crucial for immunity against certain parasite infections. Recent evidence also indicates that the inflammatory Th2 signatures in cancers, including breast and pancreatic cancers, are highly associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients. It is thus important to find cellular/molecular targets expressed in DCs that control such inflammatory Th2-type T cell responses. In a recent paper published in The Journal of Immunology, we demonstrated that Dectin-1 expressed on the two major human DC subsets, myeloid DCs (mDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs), has opposing roles in the control of Th2-type CD4+ T cell responses. Dectin-1 expressed on mDCs decreases Th2-type CD4+ T cell responses, while Dectin-1 expressed on pDCs favors Th2-type CD4+ T cell responses. This finding expands our understanding of the roles of DCs and Dectin-1 expressed on DCs in the pathogenesis of Th2-associated diseases and in host immunity to microbial infections and cancers. PMID:27088111

  19. Response of γδ T cells to plant-derived tannins

    PubMed Central

    Holderness, Jeff; Hedges, Jodi F.; Daughenbaugh, Katie; Kimmel, Emily; Graff, Jill; Freedman, Brett; Jutila, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Many pharmaceutical drugs are isolated from plants used in traditional medicines. Through screening plant extracts, both traditional medicines and compound libraries, new pharmaceutical drugs continue to be identified. Currently, two plant-derived agonists for γδ T cells are described. These plant-derived agonists impart innate effector functions upon distinct γδ T cell subsets. Plant tannins represent one class of γδ T cell agonist and preferentially activate the mucosal population. Mucosal γδ T cells function to modulate tissue immune responses and induce epithelium repair. Select tannins, isolated from apple peel, rapidly induce immune gene transcription in γδ T cells, leading to cytokine production and increased responsiveness to secondary signals. Activity of these tannin preparations tracks to the procyanidin fraction, with the procyanidin trimer (C1) having the most robust activity defined to date. The response to the procyanidins is evolutionarily conserved in that responses are seen with human, bovine, and murine γδ T cells. Procyanidin-induced responses described in this review likely account for the expansion of mucosal γδ T cells seen in mice and rats fed soluble extracts of tannins. Procyanidins may represent a novel approach for treatment of tissue damage, chronic infection, and autoimmune therpies. PMID:19166386

  20. LAG-3 Confers a Competitive Disadvantage upon Antiviral CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Cook, Kevin D; Whitmire, Jason K

    2016-07-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the benefits of systemic blockade of lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3) signals to improve immunity to tumors. Those studies are founded on the well-established inhibitory role of LAG-3 in regulating CD8(+) T cells during chronic virus infection and antitumor responses. However, the T cell response in LAG-3-deficient mice is similar in size and function to that in wild type animals, suggesting LAG-3 has nuanced immune-regulatory functions. We performed a series of adoptive transfer experiments in mice to better understand the T cell-intrinsic functions of LAG-3 in the regulation of CD8(+) T cell responses. Our results indicate that LAG-3 expression by CD8(+) T cells inhibits their competitive fitness and results in a slightly reduced rate of cell division in comparison with LAG-3-deficient cells. This cell-intrinsic effect of LAG-3 was consistent across both acute and chronic virus infections. These data show that LAG-3 directly modulates the size of the T cell response and support the use of LAG-3 blockade regimens to enhance CD8(+) T cell responses. PMID:27206765

  1. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M.; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR–pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR–pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models. PMID:24817867

  2. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Superoxide Provides a Third Signal for CD4 T Cell Effector Responses.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Tse, Hubert M

    2016-09-01

    Originally recognized for their direct induced toxicity as a component of the innate immune response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) can profoundly modulate T cell adaptive immune responses. Efficient T cell activation requires: signal 1, consisting of an antigenic peptide-MHC complex binding with the TCR; signal 2, the interaction of costimulatory molecules on T cells and APCs; and signal 3, the generation of innate immune-derived ROS and proinflammatory cytokines. This third signal, in particular, has proven essential in generating productive and long-lasting immune responses. Our laboratory previously demonstrated profound Ag-specific hyporesponsiveness in the absence of NADPH oxidase-derived superoxide. To further examine the consequences of ROS deficiency on Ag-specific T cell responses, our laboratory generated the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse, possessing superoxide-deficient T cells recognizing the nominal Ag OVA323-339 In this study, we demonstrate that OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells displayed a severe reduction in Th1 T cell responses, in addition to blunted IL-12R expression and severely attenuated proinflammatory chemokine ligands. Conversely, IFN-γ synthesis and IL-12R synthesis were rescued by the addition of exogenous superoxide via the paramagnetic superoxide donor potassium dioxide or superoxide-sufficient dendritic cells. Ultimately, these data highlight the importance of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS in providing a third signal for adaptive immune maturation by modulating the IL-12/IL-12R pathway and the novelty of the OT-II.Ncf1(m1J) mouse model to determine the role of redox-dependent signaling on effector responses. Thus, targeting ROS represents a promising therapeutic strategy in dampening Ag-specific T cell responses and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes. PMID:27474077

  3. Natural CD4+ T-Cell Responses against Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shamaila; Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Iversen, Trine Zeeberg; Donia, Marco; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Svane, Inge Marie; Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2012-01-01

    Background The enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) contributes to immune tolerance in a variety of settings. In cancer IDO is expressed within the tumor itself as well as in antigen-presenting cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes, where it endorses the establishment of peripheral immune tolerance to tumor antigens. Recently, we described cytotoxic CD8+ T-cell reactivity towards IDO-derived peptides. Methods and Findings In the present study, we show that CD4+ helper T cells additionally spontaneously recognize IDO. Hence, we scrutinized the vicinity of the previously described HLA-A*0201-restricted IDO-epitope for CD4+ T-cell epitopes. We demonstrated the presence of naturally occurring IDO-specific CD4+ T cells in cancer patients and to a lesser extent in healthy donors by cytokine release ELISPOT. IDO-reactive CD4+ T cells released IFN-γ, TNF-α, as well as IL-17. We confirm HLA class II-restriction by the addition of HLA class II specific blocking antibodies. In addition, we detected a trend between class I- and class II-restricted IDO responses and detected an association between IDO-specific CD4+ T cells and CD8+ CMV-responses. Finally, we could detect IL-10 releasing IDO-reactive CD4+ T cells. Conclusion IDO is spontaneously recognized by HLA class II-restricted, CD4+ T cells in cancer patients and in healthy individuals. IDO-specific T cells may participate in immune-regulatory networks where the activation of pro-inflammatory IDO-specific CD4+ responses may well overcome or delay the immune suppressive actions of the IDO-protein, which are otherwise a consequence of the early expression of IDO in maturing antigen presenting cells. In contrast, IDO-specific regulatory T cells may enhance IDO-mediated immune suppression. PMID:22539948

  4. CD4+ T cell-dependent and CD4+ T cell-independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kelly B; Szeto, Gregory L; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-20

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4(+) T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4(+) T cell-dependent and CD4(+) T cell-independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1(+) individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV(+) donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4(+) T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or lipopolysaccharide to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV(+) PBMCs were not reproduced upon depletion of CD4(+) T cells in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV(+) PBMCs maintained T cell-associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV(+) PBMCs showed impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the IFN-γ receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4(+) T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. PMID:26486173

  5. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-02-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA(-) CD62L(-)) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. T(reg) depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  6. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (Tregs) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA− CD62L−) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. Treg depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  7. CD4 T Cell Responses in Latent and Chronic Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Senta; Mandaric, Sanja; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-01-01

    The spectrum of tasks which is fulfilled by CD4 T cells in the setting of viral infections is large, ranging from support of CD8 T cells and humoral immunity to exertion of direct antiviral effector functions. While our knowledge about the differentiation pathways, plasticity, and memory of CD4 T cell responses upon acute infections or immunizations has significantly increased during the past years, much less is still known about CD4 T cell differentiation and their beneficial or pathological functions during persistent viral infections. In this review we summarize current knowledge about the differentiation, direct or indirect antiviral effector functions, and the regulation of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the setting of persistent latent or active chronic viral infections with a particular emphasis on herpes virus infections for the former and chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection for the latter. PMID:23717308

  8. T-cell response relative to genotype and ethnicity during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, David E; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Ikeda, Fusao; Stadanlick, Jason; Valiga, Mary; Shetty, Kirti; Reddy, K Rajender; Chang, Kyong-Mi

    2005-06-01

    Viral genotype and host ethnicity are important predictors of viral clearance during antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Based on the role of T cells in natural HCV clearance, we hypothesized that T cells may contribute to the genotypic and ethnic difference in treatment outcome. To test this hypothesis, T-cell response to HCV antigens (core, nonstructural NS3/4 and NS5) and control phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was monitored prospectively and was correlated with virological outcome in 41 patients chronically infected with HCV (27 genotype 1, 14 genotype 2 or 3; 19 black persons, 22 white persons) undergoing combined interferon alfa and ribavirin therapy. Interestingly, in patients with genotype 2 or 3 infection, enhanced virological response coincided with a greater T-cell response to HCV NS3/4 antigen at baseline (50% vs. 15%; P = .026) that augmented further during therapy (29% vs. 4%; P = .035) compared with genotype 1-infected patients. However, HCV-specific T-cell response remained weak in genotype 1-infected patients regardless of virological outcome or ethnicity. Furthermore, virological outcome was associated with a suppressed baseline proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin (P < .03) that increased during therapy (P < .003) independent of ethnicity or genotype. In conclusion, HCV-specific T-cell response was associated with HCV genotype but not with therapeutic clearance of HCV infection. The association between treatment outcome and phytohemagglutinin response suggests more global and antigen-nonspecific mechanisms for therapeutic HCV clearance. PMID:15915458

  9. T cell Bim levels reflect responses to anti–PD-1 cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Chen, Lingling; Cao, Siyu; Kottschade, Lisa A.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Block, Matthew S.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Park, Sean S.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Dong, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint therapy with PD-1 blockade has emerged as an effective therapy for many advanced cancers; however, only a small fraction of patients achieve durable responses. To date, there is no validated blood-based means of predicting the response to PD-1 blockade. We report that Bim is a downstream signaling molecule of the PD-1 pathway, and its detection in T cells is significantly associated with expression of PD-1 and effector T cell markers. High levels of Bim in circulating tumor-reactive (PD-1+CD11ahiCD8+) T cells were prognostic of poor survival in patients with metastatic melanoma who did not receive anti–PD-1 therapy and were also predictive of clinical benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma who were treated with anti–PD-1 therapy. Moreover, this circulating tumor-reactive T cell population significantly decreased after successful anti–PD-1 therapy. Our study supports a crucial role of Bim in both T cell activation and apoptosis as regulated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interactions in effector CD8+ T cells. Measurement of Bim levels in circulating T cells of patients with cancer may provide a less invasive strategy to predict and monitor responses to anti–PD-1 therapy, although future prospective analyses are needed to validate its utility. PMID:27182556

  10. Litomosoides sigmodontis induces TGF-β receptor responsive, IL-10-producing T cells that suppress bystander T-cell proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Wiebke; Schramm, Christoph; Breloer, Minka

    2015-09-01

    Helminth parasites suppress immune responses to prolong their survival within the mammalian host. Thereby not only helminth-specific but also nonhelminth-specific bystander immune responses are suppressed. Here, we use the murine model of Litomosoides sigmodontis infection to elucidate the underlying mechanisms leading to this bystander T-cell suppression. When OT-II T cells specific for the third-party antigen ovalbumin are transferred into helminth-infected mice, these cells respond to antigen-specific stimulation with reduced proliferation compared to activation within non-infected mice. Thus, the presence of parasitic worms in the thoracic cavity translates to suppression of T cells with a different specificity at a different site. By eliminating regulatory receptors, cytokines, and cell populations from this system, we provide evidence for a two-staged process. Parasite products first engage the TGF-β receptor on host-derived T cells that are central to suppression. In a second step, host-derived T cells produce IL-10 and subsequently suppress the adoptively transferred OT-II T cells. Terminal suppression was IL-10-dependant but independent of intrinsic TGF-β receptor- or PD-1-mediated signaling in the suppressed OT-II T cells. Blockade of the same key suppression mediators, i.e. TGF-β- and IL-10 receptor, also ameliorated the suppression of IgG response to bystander antigen vaccination in L. sigmodontis-infected mice. PMID:26138667

  11. Kinetics and Phenotype of Vaccine-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Responses to Toxoplasma gondii▿

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Kimberly A.; Wilson, Emma H.; Tait, Elia D.; Fox, Barbara A.; Roos, David S.; Bzik, David J.; Dzierszinski, Florence; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple studies have established that the ability of CD8+ T cells to act as cytolytic effectors and produce gamma interferon is important in mediating resistance to the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. To better understand the generation of the antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell responses induced by T. gondii, mice were immunized with replication-deficient parasites that express the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). Class I tetramers specific for SIINFEKL were used to track the OVA-specific endogenous CD8+ T cells. The peak CD8+ T-cell response was found at day 10 postimmunization, after which the frequency and numbers of antigen-specific cells declined. Unexpectedly, replication-deficient parasites were found to induce antigen-specific cells with faster kinetics than replicating parasites. The generation of optimal numbers of antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells was found to require CD4+ T-cell help. At 7 days following immunization, antigen-specific cells were found to be CD62Llow, KLRG1+, and CD127low, and they maintained this phenotype for more than 70 days. Antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells in immunized mice exhibited potent perforin-dependent OVA-specific cytolytic activity in vivo. Perforin-dependent cytolysis appeared to be the major cytolytic mechanism; however, a perforin-independent pathway that was not mediated via Fas-FasL was also detected. This study provides further insight into vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses that correlate with protective immunity to T. gondii and identifies a critical role for CD4+ T cells in the generation of protective CD8+ T-cell responses. PMID:19528214

  12. Kinetics and phenotype of vaccine-induced CD8+ T-cell responses to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Kimberly A; Wilson, Emma H; Tait, Elia D; Fox, Barbara A; Roos, David S; Bzik, David J; Dzierszinski, Florence; Hunter, Christopher A

    2009-09-01

    Multiple studies have established that the ability of CD8(+) T cells to act as cytolytic effectors and produce gamma interferon is important in mediating resistance to the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. To better understand the generation of the antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses induced by T. gondii, mice were immunized with replication-deficient parasites that express the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). Class I tetramers specific for SIINFEKL were used to track the OVA-specific endogenous CD8(+) T cells. The peak CD8(+) T-cell response was found at day 10 postimmunization, after which the frequency and numbers of antigen-specific cells declined. Unexpectedly, replication-deficient parasites were found to induce antigen-specific cells with faster kinetics than replicating parasites. The generation of optimal numbers of antigen-specific CD8(+) effector T cells was found to require CD4(+) T-cell help. At 7 days following immunization, antigen-specific cells were found to be CD62L(low), KLRG1(+), and CD127(low), and they maintained this phenotype for more than 70 days. Antigen-specific CD8(+) effector T cells in immunized mice exhibited potent perforin-dependent OVA-specific cytolytic activity in vivo. Perforin-dependent cytolysis appeared to be the major cytolytic mechanism; however, a perforin-independent pathway that was not mediated via Fas-FasL was also detected. This study provides further insight into vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses that correlate with protective immunity to T. gondii and identifies a critical role for CD4(+) T cells in the generation of protective CD8(+) T-cell responses. PMID:19528214

  13. Responses of intraepithelial lymphocytes to T-cell mitogens: a comparison between murine and porcine responses.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A D; Stokes, C R; Bourne, F J

    1986-01-01

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) were isolated from the small intestine of pigs. They showed a strong blastogenic response to the T-cell mitogens phytohaemagglutinin A (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM); in contrast, mouse IEL responded weakly to these mitogens. The response of pig IEL was age-dependent, reaching adult levels by 9 weeks of age. Early weaning of pigs delayed the onset of this response. The effects of inflammatory mediators on the response of mouse IEL were also examined. PMID:3488265

  14. Conditional deletion of SLP-76 in mature T cells abrogates peripheral immune responses1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Gregory F.; Corbo, Evann; Schmidt, Michelle; Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E.; Riese, Matthew J.; Jordan, Martha S.; Laufer, Terri M.; Brown, Eric J.; Maltzman, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The adaptor protein Src homology 2 domain-containing leukocyte-specific protein of 76 kDa (SLP-76) is central to the organization of intracellular signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR). Evaluation of its role in mature, primary T cells has been hampered by developmental defects that occur in the absence of wild-type SLP-76 protein in thymocytes. Following tamoxifen-regulated conditional deletion of SLP-76, mature, antigen-inexperienced T cells maintain normal TCR surface expression but fail to transduce TCR generated signals. Conditionally deficient T cells fail to proliferate in response to antigenic stimulation or a lymphopenic environment. Mice with induced deletion of SLP-76 are resistant to induction of the CD4+ T cell mediated autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of SLP-76-mediated signaling in initiating T cell-directed immune responses both in vitro and in vivo and highlight the ability to analyze signaling processes in mature T cells in the absence of developmental defects. PMID:21469089

  15. Epitope specific T-cell responses against influenza A in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Kim, Yohan; Tunheim, Gro; Cox, Rebecca J; Oftung, Fredrik; Peters, Bjoern; Mjaaland, Siri

    2016-02-01

    Pre-existing human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immunity may be a useful correlate of protection against severe influenza disease. Identification and evaluation of common epitopes recognized by T cells with broad cross-reactivity is therefore important to guide universal influenza vaccine development, and to monitor immunological preparedness against pandemics. We have retrieved an optimal combination of MHC class I and class II restricted epitopes from the Immune Epitope Database (www.iedb.org), by defining a fitness score function depending on prevalence, sequence conservancy and HLA super-type coverage. Optimized libraries of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell epitopes were selected from influenza antigens commonly present in seasonal and pandemic influenza strains from 1934 to 2009. These epitope pools were used to characterize human T-cell responses in healthy donors using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays. Upon stimulation, significant CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were induced, primarily recognizing epitopes from the conserved viral core proteins. Furthermore, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were phenotypically characterized regarding functionality, cytotoxic potential and memory phenotype using flow cytometry. Optimized sets of T-cell peptide epitopes may be a useful tool to monitor the efficacy of clinical trials, the immune status of a population to predict immunological preparedness against pandemics, as well as being candidates for universal influenza vaccines. PMID:26489873

  16. Highly-Immunogenic Virally-Vectored T-cell Vaccines Cannot Overcome Subversion of the T-cell Response by HCV during Chronic Infection.

    PubMed

    Swadling, Leo; Halliday, John; Kelly, Christabel; Brown, Anthony; Capone, Stefania; Ansari, M Azim; Bonsall, David; Richardson, Rachel; Hartnell, Felicity; Collier, Jane; Ammendola, Virginia; Del Sorbo, Mariarosaria; Von Delft, Annette; Traboni, Cinzia; Hill, Adrian V S; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Cortese, Riccardo; Klenerman, Paul; Folgori, Antonella; Barnes, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    An effective therapeutic vaccine for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, as an adjunct to newly developed directly-acting antivirals (DAA), or for the prevention of reinfection, would significantly reduce the global burden of disease associated with chronic HCV infection. A recombinant chimpanzee adenoviral (ChAd3) vector and a modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA), encoding the non-structural proteins of HCV (NSmut), used in a heterologous prime/boost regimen induced multi-specific, high-magnitude, durable HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses in healthy volunteers, and was more immunogenic than a heterologous Ad regimen. We now assess the immunogenicity of this vaccine regimen in HCV infected patients (including patients with a low viral load suppressed with interferon/ribavirin therapy), determine T-cell cross-reactivity to endogenous virus, and compare immunogenicity with that observed previously in both healthy volunteers and in HCV infected patients vaccinated with the heterologous Ad regimen. Vaccination of HCV infected patients with ChAd3-NSmut/MVA-NSmut was well tolerated. Vaccine-induced HCV-specific T-cell responses were detected in 8/12 patients; however, CD4+ T-cell responses were rarely detected, and the overall magnitude of HCV-specific T-cell responses was markedly reduced when compared to vaccinated healthy volunteers. Furthermore, HCV-specific cells had a distinct partially-functional phenotype (lower expression of activation markers, granzyme B, and TNFα production, weaker in vitro proliferation, and higher Tim3 expression, with comparable Tbet and Eomes expression) compared to healthy volunteers. Robust anti-vector T-cells and antibodies were induced, showing that there is no global defect in immunity. The level of viremia at the time of vaccination did not correlate with the magnitude of the vaccine-induced T-cell response. Full-length, next-generation sequencing of the circulating virus demonstrated that T-cells were

  17. The host response to allogeneic and xenogeneic biological scaffold materials.

    PubMed

    Keane, Timothy J; Badylak, Stephen F

    2015-05-01

    The clinical use of biological scaffold materials has become commonplace. Such scaffolds are composed of extracellular matrix (ECM), or components of ECM, derived from allogeneic or xenogeneic tissues. Such scaffold materials vary widely in their source tissue, processing methods and sterilization methods. The success or failure of an ECM scaffold for a given application is dependent on the host response following implantation; a response that is largely mediated by the innate immune system and which is influenced by a numerous factors, including the processing methods used in the preparation of biological scaffolds. The present paper reviews various aspects of the host response to biological scaffolds and factors that affect this response. In addition, some of the logistical, regulatory and reconstructive implications associated with the use of biological scaffolds are discussed. PMID:24668694

  18. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Osteoarthritic Synovium Are a Distinct Population Compared to Their Bone-Marrow Counterparts regarding Surface Marker Distribution and Immunomodulation of Allogeneic CD4+ T-Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Sebastien; Rimmele, Claudia; Bucur, Florin; Dreher, Thomas; Zeifang, Felix; Moradi, Babak; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The participation of an inflammatory joint milieu has been described in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play an important role in modulating inflammatory processes. Based on previous studies in an allogeneic T-cell coculture model, we aimed at further determining the role of synovial MSCs in OA pathogenesis. Methods. Bone-marrow (BM) and synovial membrane (SM) MSCs from hip joints of late stage OA patients and CD4+ T-cells from healthy donors were analysed regarding surface marker expression before and after coculture. Proliferation upon CD3/CD28 stimulation and cytokine analyses were compared between MSCs. Results. SM-MSCs differed from BM-MSCs in several surface markers and their osteogenic differentiation potential. Cocultures of both MSCs with CD4+ T-cells resulted in recruitment of CD45RA+ FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells. Upon stimulation, only SM-MSCs suppressed CD4+ T-cell proliferation, while both SM-MSCs and BM-MSCs modified cytokine profiles through suppressing IL-2 and TNF-α as well as increasing IL-6 secretion. Conclusions. Synovial MSCs from OA joints are a unique fraction that can be distinguished from their bone-marrow derived counterparts. Their unique ability to suppress CD3/CD28 induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation makes them a potential target for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27516777

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Osteoarthritic Synovium Are a Distinct Population Compared to Their Bone-Marrow Counterparts regarding Surface Marker Distribution and Immunomodulation of Allogeneic CD4+ T-Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Florin; Moradi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The participation of an inflammatory joint milieu has been described in osteoarthritis (OA) pathogenesis. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play an important role in modulating inflammatory processes. Based on previous studies in an allogeneic T-cell coculture model, we aimed at further determining the role of synovial MSCs in OA pathogenesis. Methods. Bone-marrow (BM) and synovial membrane (SM) MSCs from hip joints of late stage OA patients and CD4+ T-cells from healthy donors were analysed regarding surface marker expression before and after coculture. Proliferation upon CD3/CD28 stimulation and cytokine analyses were compared between MSCs. Results. SM-MSCs differed from BM-MSCs in several surface markers and their osteogenic differentiation potential. Cocultures of both MSCs with CD4+ T-cells resulted in recruitment of CD45RA+ FoxP3+ regulatory T-cells. Upon stimulation, only SM-MSCs suppressed CD4+ T-cell proliferation, while both SM-MSCs and BM-MSCs modified cytokine profiles through suppressing IL-2 and TNF-α as well as increasing IL-6 secretion. Conclusions. Synovial MSCs from OA joints are a unique fraction that can be distinguished from their bone-marrow derived counterparts. Their unique ability to suppress CD3/CD28 induced CD4+ T-cell proliferation makes them a potential target for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:27516777

  20. Functional Heterogeneity in CD4(+) T Cell Responses Against a Bacterial Pathogen.

    PubMed

    Milam, Ashley Viehmann; Allen, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how CD4(+) T cells function against a bacterial pathogen, we generated a Listeria monocytogenes-specific CD4(+) T cell model. In this system, two TCRtg mouse lines, LLO56 and LLO118, recognize the same immunodominant epitope (LLO190-205) of L. monocytogenes and have identical in vitro responses. However, in vivo LLO56 and LLO118 display vastly different responses during both primary and secondary infection. LLO118 dominates in the primary response and in providing CD8 T cell help. LLO56 predominates in the secondary response. We have also shown that both specific [T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated] and non-specific stimuli (bypassing the TCR) elicit distinct responses from the two transgenics, leading us to conclude that the strength of self-pMHC signaling during development tightly dictates the cell's future response in the periphery. Herein, we review our findings in this transfer system, focusing on the contribution of the immunomodulatory molecule CD5 and the importance of self-interaction in peripheral maintenance of the cell. We also discuss the manner in which individual TCR affinities to foreign and self-pMHC contribute to the outcome of an immune response; our assertion is that there exists a spectrum of possible T cell responses to recognition of cognate antigen during infection, adding immense diversity to the immune system's response to pathogens. PMID:26697015

  1. B cell priming for extrafollicular antibody responses requires Bcl-6 expression by T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sau K; Rigby, Robert J; Zotos, Dimitra; Tsai, Louis M; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Marshall, Jennifer L; Ramiscal, Roybel R; Chan, Tyani D; Gatto, Dominique; Brink, Robert; Yu, Di; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Tarlinton, David M; Cunningham, Adam F; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2011-07-01

    T follicular helper cells (Tfh cells) localize to follicles where they provide growth and selection signals to mutated germinal center (GC) B cells, thus promoting their differentiation into high affinity long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells. T-dependent B cell differentiation also occurs extrafollicularly, giving rise to unmutated plasma cells that are important for early protection against microbial infections. Bcl-6 expression in T cells has been shown to be essential for the formation of Tfh cells and GC B cells, but little is known about its requirement in physiological extrafollicular antibody responses. We use several mouse models in which extrafollicular plasma cells can be unequivocally distinguished from those of GC origin, combined with antigen-specific T and B cells, to show that the absence of T cell-expressed Bcl-6 significantly reduces T-dependent extrafollicular antibody responses. Bcl-6(+) T cells appear at the T-B border soon after T cell priming and before GC formation, and these cells express low amounts of PD-1. Their appearance precedes that of Bcl-6(+) PD-1(hi) T cells, which are found within the GC. IL-21 acts early to promote both follicular and extrafollicular antibody responses. In conclusion, Bcl-6(+) T cells are necessary at B cell priming to form extrafollicular antibody responses, and these pre-GC Tfh cells can be distinguished phenotypically from GC Tfh cells. PMID:21708925

  2. Rapamycin Impairs Antitumor CD8+ T-cell Responses and Vaccine-Induced Tumor Eradication.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Nada; Fayolle, Catherine; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Tang, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Leclerc, Claude

    2015-08-15

    The metabolic sensor mTOR broadly regulates cell growth and division in cancer cells, leading to a significant focus on studies of rapamycin and its analogues as candidate anticancer drugs. However, mTOR inhibitors have failed to produce useful clinical efficacy, potentially because mTOR is also critical in T cells implicated in immunosurveillance. Indeed, recent studies using rapamycin have demonstrated the important role of mTOR in differentiation and induction of the CD8+ memory in T-cell responses associated with antitumor properties. In this study, we demonstrate that rapamycin harms antitumor immune responses mediated by T cells in the setting of cancer vaccine therapy. Specifically, we analyzed how rapamycin affects the antitumor efficacy of a human papilloma virus E7 peptide vaccine (CyaA-E7) capable of eradicating tumors in the TC-1 mouse model of cervical cancer. In animals vaccinated with CyaA-E7, rapamycin administration completely abolished recruitment of CD8+ T cells into TC-1 tumors along with the ability of the vaccine to reduce infiltration of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Moreover, rapamycin completely abolished vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-cell responses and therapeutic activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate the powerful effects of mTOR inhibition in abolishing T-cell-mediated antitumor immune responses essential for the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines. PMID:26122844

  3. Regulatory T Cell Infusion Can Enhance Memory T Cell and Alloantibody Responses in Lymphodepleted Nonhuman Primate Heart Allograft Recipients.

    PubMed

    Ezzelarab, M B; Zhang, H; Guo, H; Lu, L; Zahorchak, A F; Wiseman, R W; Nalesnik, M A; Bhama, J K; Cooper, D K C; Thomson, A W

    2016-07-01

    The ability of regulatory T cells (Treg) to prolong allograft survival and promote transplant tolerance in lymphodepleted rodents is well established. Few studies, however, have addressed the therapeutic potential of adoptively transferred, CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(-) Foxp3(+) (Treg) in clinically relevant large animal models. We infused ex vivo-expanded, functionally stable, nonselected Treg (up to a maximum cumulative dose of 1.87 billion cells) into antithymocyte globulin-lymphodepleted, MHC-mismatched cynomolgus monkey heart graft recipients before homeostatic recovery of effector T cells. The monkeys also received tacrolimus, anti-interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibodies and tapered rapamycin maintenance therapy. Treg administration in single or multiple doses during the early postsurgical period (up to 1 month posttransplantation), when host T cells were profoundly depleted, resulted in inferior graft function compared with controls. This was accompanied by increased incidences of effector memory T cells, enhanced interferon-γ production by host CD8(+) T cells, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, and antidonor alloantibodies. The findings caution against infusion of Treg during the early posttransplantation period after lymphodepletion. Despite marked but transient increases in Treg relative to endogenous effector T cells and use of reputed "Treg-friendly" agents, the host environment/immune effector mechanisms instigated under these conditions can perturb rather than favor the potential therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred Treg. PMID:26700196

  4. Clonal analysis of the T-cell response to in vivo expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis protein Rv2034, using a CD154 expression based T-cell cloning method.

    PubMed

    Commandeur, Susanna; Coppola, Mariateresa; Dijkman, Karin; Friggen, Annemieke H; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; van den Eeden, Susan J F; Wilson, Louis; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J; Franken, Kees L M C; Geluk, Annemieke; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains a leading cause of death worldwide. A better understanding of the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are both important to TB protection, is essential to unravel the mechanisms of protection and to identify the key antigens seen by these T cells. We have recently identified a set of in vivo expressed Mtb genes (IVE-TB) which is expressed during in vivo pulmonary infection in mice, and shown that their encoded antigens are potently recognized by polyclonal T cells from tuberculin skin test-positive, in vitro ESAT-6/CFP10-responsive individuals. Here we have cloned T cells specific for one of these newly identified in vivo expressed Mtb (IVE-TB) antigens, Rv2034. T cells were enriched based on the expression of CD154 (CD40L), which represents a new method for selecting antigen-specific (low frequency) T cells independent of their specific function. An Rv2034-specific CD4+ T-cell clone expressed the Th1 markers T-bet, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and the cytotoxicity related markers granzyme B and CD107a as measured by flow cytometry. The clone specifically recognized Rv2034 protein, Rv2034 peptide p81-100 and Mtb lysate. Remarkably, while the recognition of the dominant p81-100 epitope was HLA-DR restricted, the T-cell clone also recognized a neighboring epitope (p88-107) in an HLA-DR- as well as HLA-DQ1-restricted fashion. Importantly, the T-cell clone was able to inhibit Mtb outgrowth from infected monocytes significantly. The characterization of the polyfunctional and Mtb inhibitory T-cell response to IVE-TB Rv2034 at the clonal level provides detailed further insights into the potential of IVE-TB antigens as new vaccine candidate antigens in TB. Our new approach allowed the identification of T-cell subsets that likely play a significant role in controlling Mtb infection, and can be applied to the analysis of T-cell responses in patient populations. PMID:24905579

  5. Clonal Analysis of the T-Cell Response to In Vivo Expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Rv2034, Using a CD154 Expression Based T-Cell Cloning Method

    PubMed Central

    Commandeur, Susanna; Coppola, Mariateresa; Dijkman, Karin; Friggen, Annemieke H.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; van den Eeden, Susan J. F.; Wilson, Louis; van der Ploeg-van Schip, Jolien J.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Geluk, Annemieke; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains a leading cause of death worldwide. A better understanding of the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, which are both important to TB protection, is essential to unravel the mechanisms of protection and to identify the key antigens seen by these T cells. We have recently identified a set of in vivo expressed Mtb genes (IVE-TB) which is expressed during in vivo pulmonary infection in mice, and shown that their encoded antigens are potently recognized by polyclonal T cells from tuberculin skin test-positive, in vitro ESAT-6/CFP10-responsive individuals. Here we have cloned T cells specific for one of these newly identified in vivo expressed Mtb (IVE-TB) antigens, Rv2034. T cells were enriched based on the expression of CD154 (CD40L), which represents a new method for selecting antigen-specific (low frequency) T cells independent of their specific function. An Rv2034-specific CD4+ T-cell clone expressed the Th1 markers T-bet, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2 and the cytotoxicity related markers granzyme B and CD107a as measured by flow cytometry. The clone specifically recognized Rv2034 protein, Rv2034 peptide p81–100 and Mtb lysate. Remarkably, while the recognition of the dominant p81–100 epitope was HLA-DR restricted, the T-cell clone also recognized a neighboring epitope (p88–107) in an HLA-DR- as well as HLA-DQ1-restricted fashion. Importantly, the T-cell clone was able to inhibit Mtb outgrowth from infected monocytes significantly. The characterization of the polyfunctional and Mtb inhibitory T-cell response to IVE-TB Rv2034 at the clonal level provides detailed further insights into the potential of IVE-TB antigens as new vaccine candidate antigens in TB. Our new approach allowed the identification of T-cell subsets that likely play a significant role in controlling Mtb infection, and can be applied to the analysis of T-cell responses in patient populations. PMID:24905579

  6. Naïve T Cell Homeostasis Regulated by Stress Responses and TCR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Daisuke; Atsumi, Toru; Stofkova, Andrea; Nishikawa, Naoki; Ohki, Takuto; Suzuki, Hironao; Katsunuma, Kokichi; Jiang, Jing-jing; Bando, Hidenori; Meng, Jie; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Ogura, Hideki; Hirano, Toshio; Arima, Yasunobu; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The survival of naïve T cells is believed to require signals from TCR–pMHC interactions and cytokines such as IL-7. In contrast, signals that negatively impact naïve T cell survival are less understood. We conducted a forward genetic screening of mice and found a mutant mouse line with reduced number of naïve T cells (T-Red mice). T-Red mice have a point mutation in the Kdelr1 gene, and their naïve T cells show enhanced integrated stress response (ISR), which eventually induces their apoptosis. Therefore, naïve T cells require a KDEL receptor-mediated mechanism that efficiently relieves cellular stress for their survival in vivo. Interestingly, naïve T cells expressing TCR with higher affinity/avidity to self-antigens survive in T-Red mice, suggesting the possible link between TCR-mediated survival and ISR-induced apoptosis. In this article, we discuss the regulation of naïve T cell homeostasis, keeping special attention on the ISR and TCR signal. PMID:26734005

  7. Primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV induced in vitro by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Macatonia, S E; Patterson, S; Knight, S C

    1991-01-01

    In earlier studies, primary proliferative and cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to influenza virus were produced in vitro by using mouse dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with virus or viral peptide as the stimulus for syngeneic T cells in 20-microliters hanging-drop cultures. We have now adapted this system for producing primary responses with cells from non-immune donors to produce primary proliferative and CTL responses to human immunodeficiency virus I (HIV) and to HIV peptides in vitro using cells from normal human peripheral blood. All donors in this study were laboratory personnel with no history of HIV infection. DC enriched from peripheral blood were exposed to HIV in vitro and small numbers were added to T lymphocytes in 20-microliters hanging drops. Proliferative responses to virus-infected DC were obtained after 3 days in culture. After 6 days, CTL were obtained that killed virus-infected autologous--but not allogeneic--phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blast cells. Proliferative and CTL responses were obtained using cells from 14 random donors expressing a spectrum of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) types but the CTL, once produced, showed killing restricted by the MHC class I type. Treatment of cultures with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to CD4-positive cells at the beginning of culture blocked the development of both proliferative and CTL responses, but treatment after 5 days had no effect on the CTL activity. Treatment with MCA to CD8-positive cells at the beginning of culture did not block proliferation significantly, but treatment either before or after the 5-day culture period blocked CTL responses. Collaboration between proliferating CD4-positive cells and CD8-positive cells may thus be required to produce CTL of the CD8 phenotype. DC exposed to HIV also produced CTL that killed autologous blast cells pulsed with gp120 envelope glycoprotein. However, DC infected with whole virus did not produce CTL that lysed target cells pulsed with a synthetic

  8. Invariant NKT cells regulate the CD8 T cell response during Theiler's virus infection.

    PubMed

    Mars, Lennart T; Mas, Magali; Beaudoin, Lucie; Bauer, Jan; Leite-de-Moraes, Maria; Lehuen, Agnès; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Liblau, Roland S

    2014-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are innate lymphocytes with a broad tissue distribution. Here we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the central nervous system (CNS) in the absence of inflammation. Their presence in the CNS dramatically augments following inoculation of C57Bl/6 mice with the neurotropic Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). At the peak of inflammation the cellular infiltrate comprises 45,000 iNKT cells for 1250 CD8 T cells specific for the immunodominant TMEV epitope. To study the interaction between these two T cell subsets, we infected both iNKT cell deficient Jα18(-/-) mice and iNKT cell enriched Vα14 transgenic mice with TMEV. The CD8 T cell response readily cleared TMEV infection in the iNKT cell deficient mice. However, in the iNKT cell enriched mice TMEV infection persisted and was associated with significant mortality. This was caused by the inhibition of the CD8 T cell response in the cervical lymph nodes and spleen after T cell priming. Taken together we demonstrate that iNKT cells reside in the CNS in the absence of inflammation and that their enrichment is associated with the inhibition of the anti-viral CD8 T cell response and an augmented mortality during acute encephalomyelitis. PMID:24498175

  9. The Use of Fluorescent Target Arrays for Assessment of T Cell Responses In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Quah, Benjamin J. C.; Wijesundara, Danushka K.; Ranasinghe, Charani; Parish, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to monitor T cell responses in vivo is important for the development of our understanding of the immune response and the design of immunotherapies. Here we describe the use of fluorescent target array (FTA) technology, which utilizes vital dyes such as carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE), violet laser excitable dyes (CellTrace Violet: CTV) and red laser excitable dyes (Cell Proliferation Dye eFluor 670: CPD) to combinatorially label mouse lymphocytes into >250 discernable fluorescent cell clusters. Cell clusters within these FTAs can be pulsed with major histocompatibility (MHC) class-I and MHC class-II binding peptides and thereby act as target cells for CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. These FTA cells remain viable and fully functional, and can therefore be administered into mice to allow assessment of CD8+ T cell-mediated killing of FTA target cells and CD4+ T cell-meditated help of FTA B cell target cells in real time in vivo by flow cytometry. Since >250 target cells can be assessed at once, the technique allows the monitoring of T cell responses against several antigen epitopes at several concentrations and in multiple replicates. As such, the technique can measure T cell responses at both a quantitative (e.g. the cumulative magnitude of the response) and a qualitative (e.g. functional avidity and epitope-cross reactivity of the response) level. Herein, we describe how these FTAs are constructed and give an example of how they can be applied to assess T cell responses induced by a recombinant pox virus vaccine. PMID:24998253

  10. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  11. Human T cell responses to Japanese encephalitis virus in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Lance; Bali, Tanushka; Buxton, Gemma; Chib, Savita; Chan, Sajesh; Soni, Mohammed; Hussain, Mohammed; Isenman, Heather; Fadnis, Prachi; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Satishkumar, Vishali; Lewthwaite, Penny; Kurioka, Ayako; Krishna, Srinivasa; Shankar, M Veera; Ahmed, Riyaz; Begum, Ashia; Ravi, Vasanthapuram; Desai, Anita; Yoksan, Sutee; Fernandez, Stefan; Willberg, Christian B; Kloverpris, Henrik N; Conlon, Christopher; Klenerman, Paul; Satchidanandam, Vijaya; Solomon, Tom

    2016-06-27

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus (JEV) is an important cause of encephalitis in children of South and Southeast Asia. However, the majority of individuals exposed to JEV only develop mild symptoms associated with long-lasting adaptive immunity. The related flavivirus dengue virus (DENV) cocirculates in many JEV-endemic areas, and clinical data suggest cross-protection between DENV and JEV. To address the role of T cell responses in protection against JEV, we conducted the first full-breadth analysis of the human memory T cell response using a synthetic peptide library. Ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) responses to JEV in healthy JEV-exposed donors were mostly CD8(+) and targeted nonstructural (NS) proteins, whereas IFN-γ responses in recovered JE patients were mostly CD4(+) and targeted structural proteins and the secreted protein NS1. Among patients, a high quality, polyfunctional CD4(+) T cell response was associated with complete recovery from JE. T cell responses from healthy donors showed a high degree of cross-reactivity to DENV that was less apparent in recovered JE patients despite equal exposure. These data reveal divergent functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses linked to different clinical outcomes of JEV infection, associated with distinct targeting and broad flavivirus cross-reactivity including epitopes from DENV, West Nile, and Zika virus. PMID:27242166

  12. Costimulation Endows Immunotherapeutic CD8 T Cells with IL-36 Responsiveness during Aerobic Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Tsurutani, Naomi; Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Ngoi, Soo Mun; Svedova, Julia; Menoret, Antoine; Treadway, Forrest B; Laubenbacher, Reinhard; Suárez-Ramírez, Jenny E; Cauley, Linda S; Adler, Adam J; Vella, Anthony T

    2016-01-01

    CD134- and CD137-primed CD8 T cells mount powerful effector responses upon recall, but even without recall these dual-costimulated T cells respond to signal 3 cytokines such as IL-12. We searched for alternative signal 3 receptor pathways and found the IL-1 family member IL-36R. Although IL-36 alone did not stimulate effector CD8 T cells, in combination with IL-12, or more surprisingly IL-2, it induced striking and rapid TCR-independent IFN-γ synthesis. To understand how signal 3 responses functioned in dual-costimulated T cells we showed that IL-2 induced IL-36R gene expression in a JAK/STAT-dependent manner. These data help delineate a sequential stimulation process where IL-2 conditioning must precede IL-36 for IFN-γ synthesis. Importantly, this responsive state was transient and functioned only in effector T cells capable of aerobic glycolysis. Specifically, as the effector T cells metabolized glucose and consumed O2, they also retained potential to respond through IL-36R. This suggests that T cells use innate receptor pathways such as the IL-36R/axis when programmed for aerobic glycolysis. To explore a function for IL-36R in vivo, we showed that dual costimulation therapy reduced B16 melanoma tumor growth while increasing IL-36R gene expression. In summary, cytokine therapy to eliminate tumors may target effector T cells, even outside of TCR specificity, as long as the effectors are in the correct metabolic state. PMID:26573834

  13. Oligoclonal CD4+ T Cells Promote Host Memory Immune Responses to Zwitterionic Polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Groneck, Laura; Schrama, David; Fabri, Mario; Stephen, Tom Li; Harms, Fabian; Meemboor, Sonja; Hafke, Helena; Bessler, Martina; Becker, Jürgen C.; Kalka-Moll, Wiltrud M.

    2009-01-01

    Zwitterionic polysaccharides of the normal flora bacteria represent a novel class of antigens in that they correct systemic CD4+ T-cell deficiencies and direct lymphoid organogenesis during colonization of the host. Presentation of these polysaccharides to CD4+ T cells depends on major histocompatibility complex class II- and DM-dependent retrograde transport from lysosomes to the cell surface. Yet the phenotype and clonality of the immune response to the polysaccharide in the mature host immune system have not been studied. Using the zwitterionic capsular polysaccharide Sp1 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a transient member of the bacterial flora, in an experimental mouse model of cellular immunity, we demonstrated the accumulation of TH1- and TH17-polarized CD4+ CD44high CD62low CD25− memory T cells. Subcutaneous immunization with Sp1 resulted in an increase of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), predominantly of the IgG1 subclass, and suggested the presence of a humoral memory response to the polysaccharide. CD4+ T cells stimulated with polysaccharide in vitro and in vivo showed a nonrestricted pattern for the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain variable region, as demonstrated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometry. Clonotype mapping of in vivo and in vitro polysaccharide-activated CD4+ T cells revealed clonotypic TCR transcripts. Taken together, the data show the induction of clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells by polysaccharides of commensal bacteria. Cellular and humoral memory host responses imply the ability of these polysaccharides to mediate the expansion of T cells via recognition within the CDR3 region of the TCR. PMID:19546196

  14. Immune Modulation of the T Cell Response in Asthma through Wnt10b.

    PubMed

    Trischler, Jordis; Shiomi, Takayuki; Turner, Damian L; Sklepkiewicz, Piotr L; Goldklang, Monica P; Tanaka, Kenji F; Xu, Ming; Farber, Donna L; D'Armiento, Jeanine M

    2016-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease, which is characterized by activation of CD4(+) T helper 2 cells orchestrating an allergic airway response. Whereas the role of Wnt family members in regulating T cell maintenance and maturation is established, their contribution to T cell activation in allergic asthma is not known. We hypothesized that Wnt10b plays a role in the modulation of the allergic airway response and affects T cell activation and polarization. Using an in vivo house dust mite asthma model, Wnt10b-deficient (Wnt10b(-/-)) mice were allergen-sensitized and inflammation, as well as T cell activation, was studied in vivo and in vitro. Wnt10b(-/-) mice exhibited an augmented inflammatory phenotype with an increase in eosinophils in the bronchoalveolar lavage and IL-4 and IL-13 in the lungs when compared with wild-type mice. In vitro studies confirmed an increased T helper type 2 polarization and increased T cell activation of Wnt10b(-/-) cells. Accordingly, the percentage of naive T cells was elevated by the addition of recombinant Wnt10b protein. Finally, Wnt10b(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in the percentage of effector T cells in the lungs after house dust mite sensitization, which indicated a heightened activation state, measured by an increased percentage of CD69(hi)CD11a(hi) cells. These findings suggest that Wnt10b plays an important role in regulating asthmatic airway inflammation through modification of the T cell response and is a prospective target in the disease process. PMID:26436894

  15. Lipoproteins are Major Targets of the Polyclonal Human T-cell Response to M. tuberculosis1

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Chetan; Turner, Marie T.; Lewinsohn, David M.; Moody, D. Branch; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in M. tuberculosis emphasize water soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC Class II. Much less is known about the role of antigens retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant antigens in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was similar among healthy controls, patients with latent tuberculosis, and patients with active tuberculosis. Individual responses to secreted antigens and cell wall extract were strongly correlated (r2=0.495, p=0.001), suggesting that T cells responding to cell wall and secreted antigens are present at similar frequency. Surprisingly, T cell stimulatory factors intrinsic to the cell wall partition into organic solvents; however, these responses are not explained by CD1-mediated presentation of lipids. Instead, we find that molecules soluble in organic solvents are dependent upon MHC Class II and recognized by IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T cells. We reasoned that MHC Class II dependent antigens extracting into lipid mixtures might be found among triacylated lipoproteins present in mycobacteria. We used M. tuberculosis lacking prolipoprotein signal peptidase A (lspA), an enzyme required for lipoprotein synthesis, to demonstrate loss of polyclonal T cell responses. Our results demonstrate the use of bacterial genetics to identify lipoproteins as an unexpected and immunodominant class of cell wall-associated antigens targeted by the polyclonal human T cell response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:23197260

  16. CD4+ T cell responses to self- and mutated p53 determinants during tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Fedoseyeva, E V; Boisgérault, F; Anosova, N G; Wollish, W S; Arlotta, P; Jensen, P E; Ono, S J; Benichou, G

    2000-06-01

    We analyzed CD4+ T helper responses to wild-type (wt) and mutated (mut) p53 protein in normal and tumor-bearing mice. In normal mice, we observed that although some self-p53 determinants induced negative selection of p53-reactive CD4+ T cells, other p53 determinants (cryptic) were immunogenic. Next, BALB/c mice were inoculated with J774 syngeneic tumor cell line expressing mut p53. BALB/c tumor-bearing mice mounted potent CD4+ T cell responses to two formerly cryptic peptides on self-p53. This response was characterized by massive production of IL-5, a Th2-type lymphokine. Interestingly, we found that T cell response was induced by different p53 peptides depending upon the stage of cancer. Mut p53 gene was shown to contain a single mutation resulting in the substitution of a tyrosine by a histidine at position 231 of the protein. Two peptides corresponding to wt and mutated sequences of this region were synthesized. Both peptides bound to the MHC class II-presenting molecule (Ed) with similar affinities. However, only mut p53.225-239 induced T cell responses in normal BALB/c mice, a result strongly suggesting that high-affinity wt p53.225-239 autoreactive T cells had been eliminated in these mice. Surprisingly, CD4+ T cell responses to both mut and wt p53.225-239 peptides were recorded in J774 tumor-bearing mice, a phenomenon attributed to the recruitment of low-avidity p53.225-239 self-reactive T cells. PMID:10820239

  17. Regional Variation in the Correlation of Antibody and T-Cell Responses to Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Diana L.; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H.; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z.; Bern, Caryn

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses. PMID:24710614

  18. A mathematical model for a T cell fate decision algorithm during immune response.

    PubMed

    Arias, Clemente F; Herrero, Miguel A; Acosta, Francisco J; Fernandez-Arias, Cristina

    2014-05-21

    We formulate and analyze an algorithm of cell fate decision that describes the way in which division vs. apoptosis choices are made by individual T cells during an infection. Such model involves a minimal number of known biochemical mechanisms: it basically relies on the interplay between cell division and cell death inhibitors on one hand, and membrane receptors on the other. In spite of its simplicity, the proposed decision algorithm is able to account for some significant facts in immune response. At the individual level, the existence of T cells that continue to replicate in the absence of antigen and the possible occurrence of T cell apoptosis in the presence of antigen are predicted by the model. Moreover, the latter is shown to yield an emergent collective behavior, the observed delay in clonal contraction with respect to the end of antigen stimulation, which is shown to arise just from individual T cell decisions made according to the proposed mechanism. PMID:24512913

  19. Gamma delta T cells recognize haptens and mount a hapten-specific response

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xun; Meyer, Christina; Wei, Yu-Ling; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize small organic molecules and chemical modifications of host molecules is an essential capability of the adaptive immune system, which until now was thought to be mediated mainly by B cell antigen receptors. Here we report that small molecules, such as cyanine 3 (Cy3), a synthetic fluorescent molecule, and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NP), one of the most noted haptens, are γδ T cell antigens, recognized directly by specific γδ TCRs. Immunization with Cy3 conjugates induces a rapid Cy3-specific γδ T cell IL-17 response. These results expand the role of small molecules and chemical modifications in immunity and underscore the role of γδ T cells as unique adaptive immune cells that couple B cell-like antigen recognition capability with T cell effector function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03609.001 PMID:25255099

  20. Overcoming Memory T cell Responses for Induction of Delayed Tolerance in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y.; Boskovic, S.; Aoyama, A.; Murakami, T.; Putheti, P.; Smith, R. N.; Ochiai, T.; Nadazdin, O.; Koyama, I.; Boenisch, O.; Najafian, N.; Bhasin, M.K.; Colvin, R. B.; Madsen, J. C.; Strom, T. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Benichou, G.; Cosimi, A. B.; Kawai, T.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of alloreactive memory T cells is a major barrier for induction of tolerance in primates. In theory, delaying conditioning for tolerance induction until after organ transplantation could further decrease the efficacy of the regimen, since pre-existing alloreactive memory T cells might be stimulated by the transplanted organ. Here, we show that such “delayed tolerance” can be induced in nonhuman primates through the mixed chimerism approach, if specific modifications to overcome/avoid donor-specific memory T cell responses are provided. These modifications include adequate depletion of CD8+ memory T cells and timing of donor bone marrow administration to minimize levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Using this modified approach, mixed chimerism was induced successfully in 11 of 13 recipients of previously placed renal allografts and long-term survival without immunosuppression could be achieved in at least 6 of these 11 animals. PMID:22053723

  1. A diametric role for OX40 in the response of effector/memory CD4+ T cells and regulatory T cells to alloantigen

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, Gillian; Wood, Kathryn J.; Fallah-Arani, Farnaz; Jones, Nick D.

    2013-01-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNFR superfamily that has potent costimulatory properties. Although the impact of blockade of the OX40-OX40L pathway has been well documented in models of autoimmune disease, its effect on the rejection of allografts is less well defined. Here we show that the alloantigen-mediated activation of naïve and memory CD4+ T cells results in the induction of OX40 expression and that blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions prevents skin allograft rejection mediated by either subset of T cells. Moreover, a blocking anti-OX40 was found to have no effect on the activation and proliferation of T cells, but rather effector T cells failed to accumulate in peripheral lymph nodes and subsequently migrate to skin allografts. This was found to be the result of an enhanced degree of cell death amongst proliferating effector cells. In clear contrast, blockade of OX40-OX40L interactions at the time of exposure to alloantigen enhanced the ability of regulatory T cells to suppress T cell responses to alloantigen by supporting rather than diminishing regulatory T cell survival. These data show that OX40-OX40L signalling contributes to the evolution of the adaptive immune response to an allograft via the differential control of alloreactive effector and regulatory T cell survival. Moreover, these data serve to further highlight OX40 and OX40L as therapeutic targets to assist the induction of tolerance to allografts and self-antigens. PMID:23817421

  2. Expanded breadth of the T-cell response to mosaic HIV-1 envelope DNA vaccination

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette; Fischer, William; Wallstrom, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    An effective AIDS vaccine must control highly diverse circulating strains of HIV-1. Among HIV -I gene products, the envelope (Env) protein contains variable as well as conserved regions. In this report, an informatic approach to the design of T-cell vaccines directed to HIV -I Env M group global sequences was tested. Synthetic Env antigens were designed to express mosaics that maximize the inclusion of common potential Tcell epitope (PTE) 9-mers and minimize the inclusion of rare epitopes likely to elicit strain-specific responses. DNA vaccines were evaluated using intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in inbred mice with a standardized panel of highly conserved 15-mer PTE peptides. I, 2 and 3 mosaic sets were developed that increased theoretical epitope coverage. The breadth and magnitude ofT-cell immunity stimulated by these vaccines were compared to natural strain Env's; additional comparisons were performed on mutant Env's, including gpl60 or gpl45 with or without V regions and gp41 deletions. Among them, the 2 or 3 mosaic Env sets elicited the optimal CD4 and CD8 responses. These responses were most evident in CD8 T cells; the 3 mosaic set elicited responses to an average of 8 peptide pools compared to 2 pools for a set of3 natural Env's. Synthetic mosaic HIV -I antigens can therefore induce T-cell responses with expanded breadth and may facilitate the development of effective T -cell-based HIV -1 vaccines.

  3. Therapeutic targeting of regulatory T cells enhances tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses in Epstein–Barr virus associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Fogg, Mark; Murphy, John R.; Lorch, Jochen; Posner, Marshall; Wang, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with multiple malignancies including nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In nasopharynx cancer, CD8+ T cells specific for EBV Nuclear Antigen-1 (EBNA-1) and Latent Membrane Protein 2 (LMP2) are important components of anti-tumor immunity since both are consistently expressed in NPC. We have previously shown that EBNA-1-specific CD8+ T cell responses were suppressed in NPC patients compared to healthy controls. We now find that CD8+ T cell responses specific for LMP2 are also abnormal in NPC patients, and both EBNA-1- and LMP2-specific responses are suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). EBNA-1 and LMP2-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as well as immune control of EBV-infected cells in vitro, could be restored by the depletion of Tregs and by use of a clinically approved drug targeting Tregs. Thus, in vivo modulation of Tregs may be an effective means of enhancing these anti-tumor immune responses in NPC patients. PMID:23601786

  4. Adoptive immunotherapy with unselected or EBV-specific T cells for biopsy-proven EBV+ lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Oflaz-Sozmen, Banu; Prockop, Susan E.; Kernan, Nancy A.; Abramson, Sara; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hedvat, Cyrus; Chou, Joanne F.; Heller, Glenn; Barker, Juliet N.; Boulad, Farid; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; George, Diane; Jakubowski, Ann; Koehne, Guenther; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Scaradavou, Andromachi; Small, Trudy N.; Khalaf, Ramzi; Young, James W.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated HLA-compatible donor leukocyte infusions (DLIs) and HLA-compatible or HLA-disparate EBV-specific T cells (EBV-CTLs) in 49 hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients with biopsy-proven EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). DLIs and EBV-CTLs each induced durable complete or partial remissions in 73% and 68% of treated patients including 74% and 72% of patients surviving ≥ 8 days after infusion, respectively. Reversible acute GVHD occurred in recipients of DLIs (17%) but not EBV-CTLs. The probability of complete response was significantly lower among patients with multiorgan involvement. In responders, DLIs and EBV-CTLs regularly induced exponential increases in EBV-specific CTL precursor (EBV-CTLp) frequencies within 7-14 days, with subsequent clearance of EBV viremia and resolution of disease. In nonresponders, EBV-CTLps did not increase and EBV viremia persisted. Treatment failures were correlated with impaired T-cell recognition of tumor targets. Either donor-derived EBV-CTLs that had been sensitized with autologous BLCLs transformed by EBV strain B95.8 could not lyse spontaneous donor-derived EBV-transformed BLCLs expanded from the patient's blood or biopsied tumor or they failed to lyse their targets because they were selectively restricted by HLA alleles not shared by the EBV-LPD. Therefore, either unselected DLIs or EBV-specific CTLs can eradicate both untreated and Rituxan-resistant lymphomatous EBV-LPD, with failures ascribable to impaired T-cell recognition of tumor-associated viral antigens or their presenting HLA alleles. PMID:22138512

  5. Enhanced natural killer-cell and T-cell responses to influenza A virus during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Alexander W.; Fukuyama, Julia; Aziz, Natali; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Davis, Mark M.; Holmes, Susan; Blish, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnant women experience increased morbidity and mortality after influenza infection, for reasons that are not understood. Although some data suggest that natural killer (NK)- and T-cell responses are suppressed during pregnancy, influenza-specific responses have not been previously evaluated. Thus, we analyzed the responses of women that were pregnant (n = 21) versus those that were not (n = 29) immediately before inactivated influenza vaccination (IIV), 7 d after vaccination, and 6 wk postpartum. Expression of CD107a (a marker of cytolysis) and production of IFN-γ and macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) 1β were assessed by flow cytometry. Pregnant women had a significantly increased percentage of NK cells producing a MIP-1β response to pH1N1 virus compared with nonpregnant women pre-IIV [median, 6.66 vs. 0.90% (P = 0.0149)] and 7 d post-IIV [median, 11.23 vs. 2.81% (P = 0.004)], indicating a heightened chemokine response in pregnant women that was further enhanced by the vaccination. Pregnant women also exhibited significantly increased T-cell production of MIP-1β and polyfunctionality in NK and T cells to pH1N1 virus pre- and post-IIV. NK- and T-cell polyfunctionality was also enhanced in pregnant women in response to the H3N2 viral strain. In contrast, pregnant women had significantly reduced NK- and T-cell responses to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin. This type of stimulation led to the conclusion that NK- and T-cell responses during pregnancy are suppressed, but clearly this conclusion is not correct relative to the more biologically relevant assays described here. Robust cellular immune responses to influenza during pregnancy could drive pulmonary inflammation, explaining increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:25246558

  6. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zipfel, P F; Irving, S G; Kelly, K; Siebenlist, U

    1989-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action. Images PMID:2498643

  7. Complexity of the primary genetic response to mitogenic activation of human T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zipfel, P.F.; Siebenlist, U. ); Irving, S.G.; Kelly, K. )

    1989-03-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of more than 60 novel cDNA clones that constitute part of the immediate genetic response to resting human peripheral blood T cells after mitogen activation. This primary response was highly complex, both in the absolute number of inducible genes and in the diversity of regulation. Although most of the genes expressed in activated T cells were shared with the activation response of normal human fibroblasts, a significant number were more restricted in tissue specificity and thus likely encode or effect the differentiated functions of activated T cells. The activatable genes could be further differentiated on the basis of kinetics of induction, response to cycloheximide, and sensitivity to the immunosuppressive drug cylcosporin A. It is of note that cyclosporin A inhibited the expression of more than 10 inducible genes, which suggests that this drug has a broad genetic mechanism of action.

  8. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H.; Ollert, Markus W.; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  9. CIP2A Promotes T-Cell Activation and Immune Response to Listeria monocytogenes Infection.

    PubMed

    Côme, Christophe; Cvrljevic, Anna; Khan, Mohd Moin; Treise, Irina; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Au-Yeung, Byron; Sittig, Eleonora; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Chen, Yiling; Oeder, Sebastian; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Horsch, Marion; Aittokallio, Tero; Busch, Dirk H; Ollert, Markus W; Neff, Frauke; Beckers, Johannes; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Fuchs, Helmut; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Chen, Zhi; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Westermarck, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    The oncoprotein Cancerous Inhibitor of Protein Phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is overexpressed in most malignancies and is an obvious candidate target protein for future cancer therapies. However, the physiological importance of CIP2A-mediated PP2A inhibition is largely unknown. As PP2A regulates immune responses, we investigated the role of CIP2A in normal immune system development and during immune response in vivo. We show that CIP2A-deficient mice (CIP2AHOZ) present a normal immune system development and function in unchallenged conditions. However when challenged with Listeria monocytogenes, CIP2AHOZ mice display an impaired adaptive immune response that is combined with decreased frequency of both CD4+ T-cells and CD8+ effector T-cells. Importantly, the cell autonomous effect of CIP2A deficiency for T-cell activation was confirmed. Induction of CIP2A expression during T-cell activation was dependent on Zap70 activity. Thus, we reveal CIP2A as a hitherto unrecognized mediator of T-cell activation during adaptive immune response. These results also reveal CIP2AHOZ as a possible novel mouse model for studying the role of PP2A activity in immune regulation. On the other hand, the results also indicate that CIP2A targeting cancer therapies would not cause serious immunological side-effects. PMID:27100879

  10. Pretransplant immediately early-1-specific T cell responses provide protection for CMV infection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bestard, O; Lucia, M; Crespo, E; Van Liempt, B; Palacio, D; Melilli, E; Torras, J; Llaudó, I; Cerezo, G; Taco, O; Gil-Vernet, S; Grinyó, J M; Cruzado, J M

    2013-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is still a major complication after kidney transplantation. Although cytotoxic CMV-specific T cells play a crucial role controlling CMV survival and replication, current pretransplant risk assessment for CMV infection is only based on donor/recipient (IgG)-serostatus. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of monitoring pre- and 6-month CMV-specific T cell responses against two dominant CMV antigens (IE-1 and pp65) and a CMV lysate, using an IFN-γ Elispot, for predicting the advent of CMV infection in two cohorts of 137 kidney transplant recipients either receiving routine prophylaxis (n = 39) or preemptive treatment (n = 98). Incidence of CMV antigenemia/disease within the prophylaxis and preemptive group was 28%/20% and 22%/12%, respectively. Patients developing CMV infection showed significantly lower anti-IE-1-specific T cell responses than those that did not in both groups (p < 0.05). In a ROC curve analysis, low pretransplant anti-IE-1-specific T cell responses predicted the risk of both primary and late-onset CMV infection with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC > 0.70). Furthermore, when using most sensitive and specific Elispot cut-off values, a higher than 80% and 90% sensitivity and negative predictive value was obtained, respectively. Monitoring IE-1-specific T cell responses before transplantation may be useful for predicting posttransplant risk of CMV infection, thus potentially guiding decision-making regarding CMV preventive treatment. PMID:23711167

  11. Role of acid sphingomyelinase bioactivity in human CD4+ T-cell activation and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Bai, A; Kokkotou, E; Zheng, Y; Robson, S C

    2015-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), a lipid hydrolase enzyme, has the potential to modulate various cellular activation responses via the generation of ceramide and by interaction with cellular receptors. We have hypothesized that ASM modulates CD4+ T-cell receptor activation and impacts immune responses. We first observed interactions of ASM with the intracellular domains of both CD3 and CD28. ASM further mediates T-cell proliferation after anti-CD3/CD28 antibody stimulation and alters CD4+ T-cell activation signals by generating ceramide. We noted that various pharmacological inhibitors of ASM or knockdown of ASM using small hairpin RNA inhibit CD3/CD28-mediated CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation. Furthermore, such blockade of ASM bioactivity by biochemical inhibitors and/or molecular-targeted knockdown of ASM broadly abrogate T-helper cell responses. In conclusion, we detail immune, pivotal roles of ASM in adaptive immune T-cell responses, and propose that these pathways might provide novel targets for the therapy of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26203857

  12. Memory T cell responses targeting the SARS coronavirus persist up to 11 years post-infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Chia, Adeline; Tan, Anthony T; Jadi, Ramesh S; Leong, Hoe Nam; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2016-04-12

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a highly contagious infectious disease which first emerged in late 2002, caused by a then novel human coronavirus, SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). The virus is believed to have originated from bats and transmitted to human through intermediate animals such as civet cats. The re-emergence of SARS-CoV remains a valid concern due to the continual persistence of zoonotic SARS-CoVs and SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs) in bat reservoirs. In this study, the screening for the presence of SARS-specific T cells in a cohort of three SARS-recovered individuals at 9 and 11 years post-infection was carried out, and all memory T cell responses detected target the SARS-CoV structural proteins. Two CD8(+) T cell responses targeting the SARS-CoV membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) proteins were characterized by determining their HLA restriction and minimal T cell epitope regions. Furthermore, these responses were found to persist up to 11 years post-infection. An absence of cross-reactivity of these CD8(+) T cell responses against the newly-emerged Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) was also demonstrated. The knowledge of the persistence of SARS-specific celullar immunity targeting the viral structural proteins in SARS-recovered individuals is important in the design and development of SARS vaccines, which are currently unavailable. PMID:26954467

  13. Resolution of Chlamydia trachomatis Infection Is Associated with a Distinct T Cell Response Profile.

    PubMed

    Picard, Michele D; Bodmer, Jean-Luc; Gierahn, Todd M; Lee, Alexander; Price, Jessica; Cohane, Kenya; Clemens, Veronica; DeVault, Victoria L; Gurok, Galina; Kohberger, Robert; Higgins, Darren E; Siber, George R; Flechtner, Jessica Baker; Geisler, William M

    2015-11-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the causative agent of the most frequently reported bacterial sexually transmitted infection, the total burden of which is underestimated due to the asymptomatic nature of the infection. Untreated C. trachomatis infections can cause significant morbidities, including pelvic inflammatory disease and tubal factor infertility (TFI). The human immune response against C. trachomatis, an obligate intracellular bacterium, is poorly characterized but is thought to rely on cell-mediated immunity, with CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells implicated in protection. In this report, we present immune profiling data of subjects enrolled in a multicenter study of C. trachomatis genital infection. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from subjects grouped into disease-specific cohorts were screened using a C. trachomatis proteomic library to identify the antigen specificities of recall T cell responses after natural exposure by measuring interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels. We identified specific T cell responses associated with the resolution of infection, including unique antigens identified in subjects who spontaneously cleared infection and different antigens associated with C. trachomatis-related sequelae, such as TFI. These data suggest that novel and unique C. trachomatis T cell antigens identified in individuals with effective immune responses can be considered as targets for vaccine development, and by excluding antigens associated with deleterious sequelae, immune-mediated pathologies may be circumvented. PMID:26446421

  14. The Control of the Specificity of CD4 T Cell Responses: Thresholds, Breakpoints, and Ceilings

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Andrea J.; Chaves, Francisco A.; Leddon, Scott A.; Tung, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over 25 years that CD4 T cell responses are restricted to a finite number of peptide epitopes within pathogens or protein vaccines. These selected peptide epitopes are termed “immunodominant.” Other peptides within the antigen that can bind to host MHC molecules and recruit CD4 T cells as single peptides are termed “cryptic” because they fail to induce responses when expressed in complex proteins or when in competition with other peptides during the immune response. In the last decade, our laboratory has evaluated the mechanisms that underlie the preferential specificity of CD4 T cells and have discovered that both intracellular events within antigen presenting cells, particular selective DM editing, and intercellular regulatory pathways, involving IFN-γ, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and regulatory T cells, play a role in selecting the final peptide specificity of CD4 T cells. In this review, we summarize our findings, discuss the implications of this work on responses to pathogens and vaccines and speculate on the logic of these regulatory events. PMID:24167504

  15. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Cioni, M; Leboeuf, C; Comoli, P; Ginevri, F; Hirsch, H H

    2016-04-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV-specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4(+) T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV-specific CD8(+) T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty-nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG-seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  16. Human cytomegalovirus elicits fetal γδ T cell responses in utero

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Margreet; Donner, Catherine; Liesnard, Corinne; Tackoen, Marie; Van Rysselberge, Michel; Twité, Nicolas; Goldman, Michel; Marchant, Arnaud; Willems, Fabienne

    2010-01-01

    The fetus and infant are highly susceptible to viral infections. Several viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (CMV), cause more severe disease in early life compared with later life. It is generally accepted that this is a result of the immaturity of the immune system. γδ T cells are unconventional T cells that can react rapidly upon activation and show major histocompatibility complex–unrestricted activity. We show that upon CMV infection in utero, fetal γδ T cells expand and become differentiated. The expansion was restricted to Vγ9-negative γδ T cells, irrespective of their Vδ chain expression. Differentiated γδ T cells expressed high levels of IFN-γ, transcription factors T-bet and eomes, natural killer receptors, and cytotoxic mediators. CMV infection induced a striking enrichment of a public Vγ8Vδ1-TCR, containing the germline-encoded complementary-determining-region-3 (CDR3) δ1–CALGELGDDKLIF/CDR3γ8–CATWDTTGWFKIF. Public Vγ8Vδ1-TCR–expressing cell clones produced IFN-γ upon coincubation with CMV-infected target cells in a TCR/CD3-dependent manner and showed antiviral activity. Differentiated γδ T cells and public Vγ8Vδ1-TCR were detected as early as after 21 wk of gestation. Our results indicate that functional fetal γδ T cell responses can be generated during development in utero and suggest that this T cell subset could participate in antiviral defense in early life. PMID:20368575

  17. Bystander T cells participate in specific response to cockroach antigen (CR) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Walters, C S; Tackey, R N; Reece, E; Paluvoi, S

    2003-02-01

    Allergic reactions due to whole body, body parts and fecal products of cockroach (CR) are characterized by inflammatory reaction that may lead to symptoms of rhinitis or asthma in atopic individuals. Although the majority of T cells at the site of CR hypersensitivity are not antigen specific, the cellular subset and cytokine receptors that participate and control the outcome of the reaction have not been fully studied. In this study, we have used fluorescent activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis to characterize the activation marker and cytokine profile of antigen specific and bystander T cells after in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood lymphocytes with whole body extract of CR antigen. There was significant enhancement of CD69 on blast and bystander T cells in all atopic subjects compared to non-atopics. Both antigen specific and bystander T cells showed increased expression of HLA-DR, CD25 and CD71 in 9 of 11 atopic patients compared to control. There was also an increase in CD45RA+ and a decrease in CD45RO+ cells following antigen stimulation. These results correlated with the increase in the early apoptotic cells observed in patients as measured by Annexin V stain. Our data revealed that there was no difference in the expression of CD95 in both stimulated and bystander T cells. However, there was enhancement of FasL by CR antigen, suggesting that the increased apoptosis that was observed was probably due to the Fas/FasL interaction. Positive intracellular IL2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma in T cells were observed in only the antigen specific blast cells in 83% of patients studied. These results suggest interplay of memory T cell response, apoptosis, and activated bystander T cells activities in maintaining cellular homeostasis during allergic reaction in cockroach sensitive atopic subjects. PMID:12722946

  18. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  19. T cell proliferative responses to molecular fractions of periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, L; Newman, H N; Marsh, P D

    1991-01-01

    Soluble antigenic preparations of Veillonella parvula and Bacteroides gingivalis were separated by SDS-PAGE and used after electroblotting and solubilization for in vitro lymphocyte stimulation in 13 patients with severe periodontitis and 12 controls. The cellular responses of controls and patients to V. parvula antigens were represented by four main proliferation-inducing fractions with 74-66, 52-46, 22-19 and 12 kD mol. wt. These fractions induced slightly enhanced DNA synthesis in lymphocytes from eight patients who failed to respond to whole antigenic extract. Lymphocyte samples from Veillonella whole extract unresponsive patients were also examined for in vitro proliferation by B. gingivalis fractions. Almost all stimulatory activities could be classified into five regions of 84-74, 35-31, 28-25, 17-15 and 12 kD. PMID:1988218

  20. Self-recognition specificity expressed by T cells from nude mice. Absence of detectable Ia-restricted T cells in nude mice that do exhibit self-K/D-restricted T cell responses

    SciTech Connect

    Kruisbeek, A.M.; Davis, M.L.; Matis, L.A.; Longo, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The presence in athymic nude mice of precursor T cells with self-recognition specificity for either H-2 K/D or H-2 I region determinants was investigated. Chimeras were constructed of lethally irradiated parental mice receiving a mixture of F1 nude mouse (6-8 wk old) spleen and bone marrow cells. The donor inoculum was deliberately not subjected to any T cell depletion procedure, so that any potential major histocompatibility complex-committed precursor T cells were allowed to differentiate and expand in the normal parental recipients. 3 mo after reconstitution, the chimeras were immunized with several protein antigens in complete Freund's adjuvant in the footpads and their purified draining lymph node T cells tested 10 d later for ability to recognize antigen on antigen-presenting cells of either parental haplotype. Also, their spleen and lymph node cells were tested for ability to generate a cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. It was demonstrated that T cell proliferative responses of these F1(nude)----parent chimeras were restricted solely to recognizing parental host I region determinants as self and expressed the Ir gene phenotype of the host. In contrast, CTL responses could be generated (in the presence of interleukin 2) to TNP-modified stimulator cells of either parental haplotype. Thus these results indicate that nude mice which do have CTL with self-specificity for K/D region determinants lack proliferating T cells with self-specificity for I region determinants. These results provide evidence for the concepts that development of the I region-restricted T cell repertoire is strictly an intrathymically determined event and that young nude mice lack the unique thymic elements responsible for edu

  1. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT responses correlate with protection. In other species, Tcm’s pose low activation threshold and a...

  2. Bovine central memory T cells are highly proliferative in response to bovine tuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both humans and cattle. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays are a correlate of protection. Recent...

  3. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14 days) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are used to access T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in both cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited long-term IFN-gamma ELISPOT response correlates with protection; how...

  4. Effector and memory T cell subsets in the response to bovine tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term (i.e., 14d) cultured IFN-gamma ELISPOT assays of PBMC are used as a correlate of T cell central memory (Tcm) responses in cattle and humans. With bovine tuberculosis, vaccine-elicited Tcm responses correlate with protection against experimental Mycobacterium bovis infection. The objective ...

  5. Memory and effector CD8 T-cell responses after nanoparticle vaccination of melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Speiser, Daniel E; Schwarz, Katrin; Baumgaertner, Petra; Manolova, Vania; Devevre, Estelle; Sterry, Wolfram; Walden, Peter; Zippelius, Alfred; Conzett, Katrin Baumann; Senti, Gabriela; Voelter, Verena; Cerottini, Jean-Philippe; Guggisberg, David; Willers, Jörg; Geldhof, Christine; Romero, Pedro; Kündig, Thomas; Knuth, Alexander; Dummer, Reinhard; Trefzer, Uwe; Bachmann, Martin F

    2010-10-01

    Induction of cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses is enhanced by the exclusive presentation of antigen through dendritic cells, and by innate stimuli, such as toll-like receptor ligands. On the basis of these 2 principles, we designed a vaccine against melanoma. Specifically, we linked the melanoma-specific Melan-A/Mart-1 peptide to virus-like nanoparticles loaded with A-type CpG, a ligand for toll-like receptor 9. Melan-A/Mart-1 peptide was cross-presented, as shown in vitro with human dendritic cells and in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. A phase I/II study in stage II-IV melanoma patients showed that the vaccine was well tolerated, and that 14/22 patients generated ex vivo detectable T-cell responses, with in part multifunctional T cells capable to degranulate and produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. No significant influence of the route of immunization (subcutaneous versus intradermal) nor dosing regimen (weekly versus daily clusters) could be observed. It is interesting to note that, relatively large fractions of responding specific T cells exhibited a central memory phenotype, more than what is achieved by other nonlive vaccines. We conclude that vaccination with CpG loaded virus-like nanoparticles is associated with a human CD8 T-cell response with properties of a potential long-term immune protection from the disease. PMID:20842051

  6. Effector, Memory, and Dysfunctional CD8+ T Cell Fates in the Antitumor Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive immune system plays a pivotal role in the host's ability to mount an effective, antigen-specific immune response against tumors. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) mediate tumor rejection through recognition of tumor antigens and direct killing of transformed cells. In growing tumors, TILs are often functionally impaired as a result of interaction with, or signals from, transformed cells and the tumor microenvironment. These interactions and signals can lead to transcriptional, functional, and phenotypic changes in TILs that diminish the host's ability to eradicate the tumor. In addition to effector and memory CD8+ T cells, populations described as exhausted, anergic, senescent, and regulatory CD8+ T cells have been observed in clinical and basic studies of antitumor immune responses. In the context of antitumor immunity, these CD8+ T cell subsets remain poorly characterized in terms of fate-specific biomarkers and transcription factor profiles. Here we discuss the current characterization of CD8+ T cell fates in antitumor immune responses and discuss recent insights into how signals in the tumor microenvironment influence TIL transcriptional networks to promote CD8+ T cell dysfunction. PMID:27314056

  7. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G.; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3+ T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8+ T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  8. Distribution of T Cells in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin and Responsiveness to Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Leal, Esther; Granja, Aitor G; Zarza, Carlos; Tafalla, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Although the skin constitutes the first line of defense against waterborne pathogens, there is a great lack of information regarding the skin associated lymphoid tissue (SALT) and whether immune components of the skin are homogeneously distributed through the surface of the fish is still unknown. In the current work, we have analyzed the transcription of several immune genes throughout different rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) skin areas. We found that immunoglobulin and chemokine gene transcription levels were higher in a skin area close to the gills. Furthermore, this skin area as well as other anterior sections also transcribed significantly higher levels of many different immune genes related to T cell immunity such as T cell receptor α (TCRα), TCRγ, CD3, CD4, CD8, perforin, GATA3, Tbet, FoxP3, interferon γ (IFNγ), CD40L and Eomes in comparison to posterior skin sections. In agreement with these results, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that anterior skin areas had a higher concentration of CD3(+) T cells and flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the percentage of CD8(+) T lymphocytes was also higher in anterior skin sections. These results demonstrate for the first time that T cells are not homogeneously distributed throughout the teleost skin. Additionally, we studied the transcriptional regulation of these and additional T cell markers in response to a bath infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). We found that VHSV regulated the transcription of several of these T cell markers in both the skin and the spleen; with some differences between anterior and posterior skin sections. Altogether, our results point to skin T cells as major players of teleost skin immunity in response to waterborne viral infections. PMID:26808410

  9. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Saghaug, Christina Skår; Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina; Hanevik, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4(+) T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4(+) effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4(+) EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4(+) EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  10. Multiplexed Nanoplasmonic Temporal Profiling of T-Cell Response under Immunomodulatory Agent Exposure

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs—agents regulating the immune response—are commonly used for treating immune system disorders and minimizing graft versus host disease in persons receiving organ transplants. At the cellular level, immunosuppressant drugs are used to inhibit pro-inflammatory or tissue-damaging responses of cells. However, few studies have so far precisely characterized the cellular-level effect of immunomodulatory treatment. The primary challenge arises due to the rapid and transient nature of T-cell immune responses to such treatment. T-cell responses involve a highly interactive network of different types of cytokines, which makes precise monitoring of drug-modulated T-cell response difficult. Here, we present a nanoplasmonic biosensing approach to quantitatively characterize cytokine secretion behaviors of T cells with a fine time-resolution (every 10 min) that are altered by an immunosuppressive drug used in the treatment of T-cell-mediated diseases. With a microfluidic platform integrating antibody-conjugated gold nanorod (AuNR) arrays, the technique enables simultaneous multi-time-point measurements of pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines secreted by T cells. The integrated nanoplasmonic biosensors achieve precise measurements with low operating sample volume (1 μL), short assay time (∼30 min), heightened sensitivity (∼20–30 pg/mL), and negligible sensor crosstalk. Data obtained from the multicytokine secretion profiles with high practicality resulting from all of these sensing capabilities provide a comprehensive picture of the time-varying cellular functional state during pharmacologic immunosuppression. The capability to monitor cellular functional response demonstrated in this study has great potential to ultimately permit personalized immunomodulatory treatment. PMID:27478873

  11. Human Memory CD4+ T Cell Immune Responses against Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Sørnes, Steinar; Peirasmaki, Dimitra; Svärd, Staffan; Langeland, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia may cause severe prolonged diarrheal disease or pass unnoticed as an asymptomatic infection. T cells seem to play an important role in the immune response to Giardia infection, and memory responses may last years. Recently, TH17 responses have been found in three animal studies of Giardia infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the human CD4+ T cell responses to Giardia. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from 21 returning travelers with recent or ongoing giardiasis and 12 low-risk healthy controls and stimulated in vitro with Giardia lamblia proteins. Production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), gamma interferon, interleukin-17A (IL-17A), IL-10, and IL-4 was measured in CD4+ effector memory (EM) T cells after 24 h by flow cytometry. After 6 days of culture, activation and proliferation were measured by flow cytometry, while an array of inflammatory cytokine levels in supernatants were measured with multiplex assays. We found the number of IL-17A-producing CD4+ EM T cells, as well as that of cells simultaneously producing both IL-17A and TNF-α, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals after 24 h of antigen stimulation. In supernatants of PBMCs stimulated with Giardia antigens for 6 days, we found inflammation-associated cytokines, including 1L-17A, as well as CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation, to be significantly elevated in the Giardia-exposed individuals. We conclude that symptomatic Giardia infection in humans induces a CD4+ EM T cell response of which IL-17A production seems to be an important component. PMID:26376930

  12. Early Gag Immunodominance of the HIV-Specific T-Cell Response during Acute/Early Infection Is Associated with Higher CD8+ T-Cell Antiviral Activity and Correlates with Preservation of the CD4+ T-Cell Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Ghiglione, Yanina; Falivene, Juliana; Socias, María Eugenia; Laufer, Natalia; Coloccini, Romina Soledad; Rodriguez, Ana María; Ruiz, María Julia; Pando, María Ángeles; Giavedoni, Luis David; Cahn, Pedro; Sued, Omar; Salomon, Horacio; Gherardi, María Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    The important role of the CD8+ T-cell response on HIV control is well established. Moreover, the acute phase of infection represents a proper scenario to delineate the antiviral cellular functions that best correlate with control. Here, multiple functional aspects (specificity, ex vivo viral inhibitory activity [VIA] and polyfunctionality) of the HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell subset arising early after infection, and their association with disease progression markers, were examined. Blood samples from 44 subjects recruited within 6 months from infection (primary HIV infection [PHI] group), 16 chronically infected subjects, 11 elite controllers (EC), and 10 healthy donors were obtained. Results indicated that, although Nef dominated the anti-HIV response during acute/early infection, a higher proportion of early anti-Gag T cells correlated with delayed progression. Polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T cells were detected at early time points but did not associate with virus control. Conversely, higher CD4+ T-cell set points were observed in PHI subjects with higher HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell VIA at baseline. Importantly, VIA levels correlated with the magnitude of the anti-Gag cellular response. The advantage of Gag-specific cells may result from their enhanced ability to mediate lysis of infected cells (evidenced by a higher capacity to degranulate and to mediate VIA) and to simultaneously produce IFN-γ. Finally, Gag immunodominance was associated with elevated plasma levels of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β). All together, this study underscores the importance of CD8+ T-cell specificity in the improved control of disease progression, which was related to the capacity of Gag-specific cells to mediate both lytic and nonlytic antiviral mechanisms at early time points postinfection. PMID:23616666

  13. Impact of ageing on the response and repertoire of influenza virus-specific CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ageing has been shown to reduce CD8 T cell repertoire diversity and immune responses against influenza virus infection in mice. In contrast, less is known about the impact of ageing on CD4 T cell repertoire diversity and immune response to influenza virus infection. Results The CD4 T cell response was followed after infection of young and aged C57BL/6 mice with influenza virus using a tetramer specific for an immunodominant MHC class II epitope of the influenza virus nucleoprotein. The appearance of virus-specific CD4 T cells in the lung airways of aged mice was delayed compared to young mice, but the overall peak number and cytokine secretion profile of responding CD4 T cells was not greatly perturbed. In addition, the T cell repertoire of responding cells, determined using T cell receptor Vβ analysis, failed to show the profound effect of age we previously described for CD8 T cells. The reduced impact of age on influenza-specific CD4 T cells was consistent with a reduced effect of age on the overall CD4 compared with the CD8 T cell repertoire in specific pathogen free mice. Aged mice that were thymectomized as young adults showed an enhanced loss of the epitope-specific CD4 T cell response after influenza virus infection compared with age-matched sham-thymectomized mice, suggesting that a reduced repertoire can contribute to impaired responsiveness. Conclusions The diversity of the CD4 T cell repertoire and response to influenza virus is not as profoundly impaired by ageing in C57BL/6 mice as previously shown for CD8 T cells. However, adult thymectomy enhanced the impact of ageing on the response. Understanding the impact of ageing on CD4 T cell responses to influenza virus infection is an important prerequisite for developing better vaccines for the elderly. PMID:24999367

  14. Early innate responses to pathogens: pattern recognition by unconventional human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; McLaren, James E; Price, David A; Eberl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Although typically viewed as a feature of innate immune responses, microbial pattern recognition is increasingly acknowledged as a function of particular cells nominally categorized within the adaptive immune system. Groundbreaking research over the past three years has shown how unconventional human T-cells carrying invariant or semi-invariant TCRs that are not restricted by classical MHC molecules sense microbial compounds via entirely novel antigen presenting pathways. This review will focus on the innate-like recognition of non-self metabolites by Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T-cells, with an emphasis on early immune responses in acute infection. PMID:26182978

  15. KAP1 Regulates Gene Networks Controlling T cell Development and Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Santoni de Sio, F.R.; Barde, I.; Offner, S.; Kapopoulou, A.; Genolet, R.; Corsinotti, A.; Bojkowska, K.; Thomas, J.H.; Luescher, I.; Pinschewer, D.; Harris, N.; Trono, D.

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of chromatin status at specific genomic loci controls lymphoid differentiation. Here, we investigated the role played in this process by KAP1, the universal cofactor of KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins (KRAB-ZFP), a tetrapod-restricted family of transcriptional repressors. T lymphoid KAP1 knockout mice displayed expansions of specific T cell populations, with impaired responses to stimulation and deregulation of genes involved in cell survival, cytoskeletal rearrangement, and immune signalling. Furthermore, chromatin studies demonstrate that KAP1 directly regulates the expression of a number of these genes, among which Foxo1 seemed of particular interest. Likely at least partly responsible for these effects, a small number of KRAB/ZFPs are selectively expressed in T cells. These results reveal the as-of-yet unsuspected importance of the KRAB/KAP1 epigenetic regulation system for T cell differentiation and function. PMID:22872677

  16. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  17. Otud7b facilitates T cell activation and inflammatory responses by regulating Zap70 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongbo; Wang, Hui; Xiao, Yichuan; Jin, Jin; Chang, Jae-Hoon; Zou, Qiang; Xie, Xiaoping; Cheng, Xuhong; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-03-01

    Signal transduction from the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for T cell-mediated immune responses and, when deregulated, also contributes to the development of autoimmunity. How TCR signaling is regulated is incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate a ubiquitin-dependent mechanism in which the deubiquitinase Otud7b has a crucial role in facilitating TCR signaling. Upon TCR ligation, Otud7b is rapidly recruited to the tyrosine kinase Zap70, a central mediator of TCR-proximal signaling. Otud7b deficiency attenuates the activation of Zap70 and its downstream pathways and impairs T cell activation and differentiation, rendering mice refractory to T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory responses. Otud7b facilitated Zap70 activation by deubiquitinating Zap70, thus preventing the association of Zap70 with the negative-regulatory phosphatases Sts1 and Sts2. These findings establish Otud7b as a positive regulator of TCR-proximal signaling and T cell activation, highlighting the importance of deubiquitination in regulating Zap70 function. PMID:26903241

  18. T-Cell Artificial Focal Triggering Tools: Linking Surface Interactions with Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Benoît; Pierobon, Paolo; Hivroz, Claire; Henry, Nelly

    2009-01-01

    T-cell activation is a key event in the immune system, involving the interaction of several receptor ligand pairs in a complex intercellular contact that forms between T-cell and antigen-presenting cells. Molecular components implicated in contact formation have been identified, but the mechanism of activation and the link between molecular interactions and cell response remain poorly understood due to the complexity and dynamics exhibited by whole cell-cell conjugates. Here we demonstrate that simplified model colloids grafted so as to target appropriate cell receptors can be efficiently used to explore the relationship of receptor engagement to the T-cell response. Using immortalized Jurkat T cells, we monitored both binding and activation events, as seen by changes in the intracellular calcium concentration. Our experimental strategy used flow cytometry analysis to follow the short time scale cell response in populations of thousands of cells. We targeted both T-cell receptor CD3 (TCR/CD3) and leukocyte-function-associated antigen (LFA-1) alone or in combination. We showed that specific engagement of TCR/CD3 with a single particle induced a transient calcium signal, confirming previous results and validating our approach. By decreasing anti-CD3 particle density, we showed that contact nucleation was the most crucial and determining step in the cell-particle interaction under dynamic conditions, due to shear stress produced by hydrodynamic flow. Introduction of LFA-1 adhesion molecule ligands at the surface of the particle overcame this limitation and elucidated the low TCR/CD3 ligand density regime. Despite their simplicity, model colloids induced relevant biological responses which consistently echoed whole cell behavior. We thus concluded that this biophysical approach provides useful tools for investigating initial events in T-cell activation, and should enable the design of intelligent artificial systems for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:19274104

  19. Cytotoxic T cell responses to human telomerase reverse transcriptase in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Nakamoto, Yasunari; Marukawa, Yohei; Arai, Kuniaki; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2006-06-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase, hTERT, has been identified as the catalytic enzyme required for telomere elongation. hTERT is expressed in most tumor cells but seldom expressed in most human adult cells. It has been reported that 80% to 90% of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) express hTERT, making the enzyme a potential target in immunotherapy for HCC. In the current study, we identified hTERT-derived, HLA-A*2402-restricted cytotoxic T cell (CTL) epitopes and analyzed hTERT-specific CTL responses in patients with HCC. Peptides containing the epitopes showed high affinity to bind HLA-A*2402 in a major histocompatibility complex binding assay and were able to induce hTERT-specific CTLs in both hTERT cDNA-immunized HLA-A*2402/Kb transgenic mice and patients with HCC. The CTLs were able to kill hepatoma cell lines depending on hTERT expression levels in an HLA-A*2402-restricted manner and induced irrespective of hepatitis viral infection. The number of single hTERT epitope-specific T cells detected by ELISPOT assay was 10 to 100 specific cells per 3 x 10(5) PBMCs, and positive T cell responses were observed in 6.9% to 12.5% of HCC patients. hTERT-specific T cell responses were observed even in the patients with early stages of HCC. The frequency of hTERT/tetramer+ CD8+ T cells in the tumor tissue of patients with HCC was quite high, and they were functional. In conclusion, these results suggest that hTERT is an attractive target for T-cell-based immunotherapy for HCC, and the identified hTERT epitopes may be valuable both for immunotherapy and for analyzing host immune responses to HCC. PMID:16729333

  20. The tortoise and the hare: slowly evolving T-cell responses take hastily evolving KIR

    PubMed Central

    van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits

    2010-01-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) locus comprises a variable and rapidly evolving set of genes encoding multiple inhibitory and activating receptors. The activating receptors recently evolved from the inhibitory receptors and both bind HLA class I and probably also class I-like structures induced by viral infection. Although generally considered natural killer (NK) cell receptors, KIR are also expressed by a large fraction of effector memory T cells, which slowly accumulate during human life. These effector memory cells are functionally similar to NK cells, as they are immediate effector cells that are cytotoxic and produce IFN-γ. However, different rules apply to NK and T cells with respect to KIR expression and function. For example, KIR tend to modulate signals driven by the T-cell receptor (TCR) rather than to act independently, and use different signal transduction pathways to modulate only a subset of effector functions. The most important difference may lie in the rules governing tolerance: while NK cells with activating KIR binding self-HLA are hyporesponsive, the same is unlikely to apply to T cells. We argue that the expression of activating KIR on virus-specific T cells carrying TCR that weakly cross-react with autoantigens can unleash the autoreactive potential of these cells. This may be the case in rheumatoid arthritis, where cytomegalovirus-specific KIR2DS2+ T cells might cause vasculitis. Thus, the rapid evolution of activating KIR may have allowed for efficient NK-cell control of viruses, but may also have increased the risk that slowly evolving T-cell responses to persistent pathogens derail into autoimmunity. PMID:20722764

  1. Discriminating Protective from Nonprotective Plasmodium-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Doll, Katherine L; Pewe, Lecia L; Kurup, Samarchith P; Harty, John T

    2016-05-15

    Despite decades of research, malaria remains a global health crisis. Current subunit vaccine approaches do not provide efficient long-term, sterilizing immunity against Plasmodium infections in humans. Conversely, whole parasite vaccinations with their larger array of target Ags have conferred long-lasting sterilizing protection to humans. Similar studies in rodent models of malaria reveal that CD8(+) T cells play a critical role in liver-stage immunity after whole parasite vaccination. However, it is unknown whether all CD8(+) T cell specificities elicited by whole parasite vaccination contribute to protection, an issue of great relevance for enhanced subunit vaccination. In this article, we show that robust CD8(+) T cell responses of similar phenotype are mounted after prime-boost immunization against Plasmodium berghei glideosome-associated protein 5041-48-, sporozoite-specific protein 20318-325-, thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) 130-138-, or circumsporozoite protein (CSP) 252-260-derived epitopes in mice, but only CSP252-260- and TRAP130-138-specific CD8(+) T cells provide sterilizing immunity and reduce liver parasite burden after sporozoite challenge. Further, CD8(+) T cells specific to sporozoite surface-expressed CSP and TRAP proteins, but not intracellular glideosome-associated protein 50 and sporozoite-specific protein 20, efficiently recognize sporozoite-infected hepatocytes in vitro. These results suggest that: 1) protection-relevant antigenic targets, regardless of their immunogenic potential, must be efficiently presented by infected hepatocytes for CD8(+) T cells to eliminate liver-stage Plasmodium infection; and 2) proteins expressed on the surface of sporozoites may be good target Ags for protective CD8(+) T cells. PMID:27084099

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Aging of the T-cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Moro-García, Marco Antonio; Alonso-Arias, Rebeca; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    T-lymphocytes play a central role in the effector and regulatory mechanisms of the adaptive immune response. Upon exiting the thymus they begin to undergo a series of phenotypic and functional changes that continue throughout the lifetime and being most pronounced in the elderly. The reason postulated for this is that the dynamic processes of repeated interaction with cognate antigens lead to multiple division cycles involving a high degree of cell differentiation, senescence, restriction of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, and cell cycle arrest. This cell cycle arrest is associated with the loss of telomere sequences from the ends of chromosomes. Telomere length is reduced at each cell cycle, and critically short telomeres recruit components of the DNA repair machinery and trigger replicative senescence or apoptosis. Repetitively stimulated T-cells become refractory to telomerase induction, suffer telomere erosion and enter replicative senescence. The latter is characterized by the accumulation of highly differentiated T-cells with new acquired functional capabilities, which can be caused by aberrant expression of genes normally suppressed by epigenetic mechanisms in CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells. Age-dependent demethylation and overexpression of genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation have been demonstrated in senescent subsets of T-lymphocytes. Thus, T-cells, principally CD4+CD28null T-cells, aberrantly express genes, including those of the KIR gene family and cytotoxic proteins such as perforin, and overexpress CD70, IFN-γ, LFA-1 and others. In summary, owing to a lifetime of exposure to and proliferation against a variety of pathogens, highly differentiated T-cells suffer molecular modifications that alter their cellular homeostasis mechanisms. PMID:23730199

  3. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  4. Dynamical System Modeling to Simulate Donor T Cell Response to Whole Exome Sequencing-Derived Recipient Peptides Demonstrates Different Alloreactivity Potential in HLA-Matched and -Mismatched Donor-Recipient Pairs.

    PubMed

    Abdul Razzaq, Badar; Scalora, Allison; Koparde, Vishal N; Meier, Jeremy; Mahmood, Musa; Salman, Salman; Jameson-Lee, Max; Serrano, Myrna G; Sheth, Nihar; Voelkner, Mark; Kobulnicky, David J; Roberts, Catherine H; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Manjili, Masoud H; Buck, Gregory A; Neale, Michael C; Toor, Amir A

    2016-05-01

    Immune reconstitution kinetics and subsequent clinical outcomes in HLA-matched recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) are variable and difficult to predict. Considering SCT as a dynamical system may allow sequence differences across the exomes of the transplant donors and recipients to be used to simulate an alloreactive T cell response, which may allow better clinical outcome prediction. To accomplish this, whole exome sequencing was performed on 34 HLA-matched SCT donor-recipient pairs (DRPs) and the nucleotide sequence differences translated to peptides. The binding affinity of the peptides to the relevant HLA in each DRP was determined. The resulting array of peptide-HLA binding affinity values in each patient was considered as an operator modifying a hypothetical T cell repertoire vector, in which each T cell clone proliferates in accordance with the logistic equation of growth. Using an iterating system of matrices, each simulated T cell clone's growth was calculated with the steady-state population being proportional to the magnitude of the binding affinity of the driving HLA-peptide complex. Incorporating competition between T cell clones responding to different HLA-peptide complexes reproduces a number of features of clinically observed T cell clonal repertoire in the simulated repertoire, including sigmoidal growth kinetics of individual T cell clones and overall repertoire, Power Law clonal frequency distribution, increase in repertoire complexity over time with increasing clonal diversity, and alteration of clonal dominance when a different antigen array is encountered, such as in SCT. The simulated, alloreactive T cell repertoire was markedly different in HLA-matched DRPs. The patterns were differentiated by rate of growth and steady-state magnitude of the simulated T cell repertoire and demonstrate a possible correlation with survival. In conclusion, exome wide sequence differences in DRPs may allow simulation of donor alloreactive T

  5. Continuum model of T-cell avidity: Understanding autoreactive and regulatory T-cell responses in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jaberi-Douraki, Majid; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Khadra, Anmar

    2015-10-21

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that results from the destruction of insulin-secreting pancreatic β cells, leading to abolition of insulin secretion and onset of diabetes. Cytotoxic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, activated by antigen presenting cells (APCs), are both implicated in disease onset and progression. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), on the other hand, play a leading role in regulating immunological tolerance and resistant homoeostasis in T1D by suppressing effector T cells (Teffs). Recent data indicates that after activation, conventional Teffs transiently produce interleukin IL-2, a cytokine that acts as a growth factor for both Teffs and Tregs. Tregs suppress Teffs through IL-2 deprivation, competition and Teff conversion into inducible Tregs (iTregs). To investigate the interactions of these components during T1D progression, a mathematical model of T-cell dynamics is developed as a predictor of β-cell loss, with the underlying hypothesis that avidity of Teffs and Tregs, i.e., the binding affinity of T-cell receptors to peptide-major histocompatibility complexes on host cells, is continuum. The model is used to infer a set of criteria that determines susceptibility to T1D in high risk subjects. Our findings show that diabetes onset is guided by the absence of Treg-to-Teff dominance at specific high avidities, rather than over the whole range of avidity, and that the lack of overall dominance of Teffs-to-Tregs over time is the underlying cause of the "honeymoon period", the remission phase observed in some T1D patients. The model also suggests that competition between Teffs and Tregs is more effective than Teff-induction into iTregs in suppressing Teffs, and that a prolonged full width at half maximum of IL-2 release is a necessary condition for curbing disease onset. Finally, the model provides a rationale for observing rapid and slow progressors of T1D based on modest heterogeneity in the kinetic parameters. PMID:26271890

  6. A Numerically Subdominant CD8 T Cell Response to Matrix Protein of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Controls Infection with Limited Immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Haddad, Elias K.; Marceau, Joshua; Morabito, Kaitlyn M.; Rao, Srinivas S.; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    CD8 T cells are involved in pathogen clearance and infection-induced pathology in respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Studying bulk responses masks the contribution of individual CD8 T cell subsets to protective immunity and immunopathology. In particular, the roles of subdominant responses that are potentially beneficial to the host are rarely appreciated when the focus is on magnitude instead of quality of response. Here, by evaluating CD8 T cell responses in CB6F1 hybrid mice, in which multiple epitopes are recognized, we found that a numerically subdominant CD8 T cell response against DbM187 epitope of the virus matrix protein expressed high avidity TCR and enhanced signaling pathways associated with CD8 T cell effector functions. Each DbM187 T effector cell lysed more infected targets on a per cell basis than the numerically dominant KdM282 T cells, and controlled virus replication more efficiently with less pulmonary inflammation and illness than the previously well-characterized KdM282 T cell response. Our data suggest that the clinical outcome of viral infections is determined by the integrated functional properties of a variety of responding CD8 T cells, and that the highest magnitude response may not necessarily be the best in terms of benefit to the host. Understanding how to induce highly efficient and functional T cells would inform strategies for designing vaccines intended to provide T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:26943673

  7. Elevated and cross-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells in bee and wasp venom allergic individuals.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Sumithra; Aslam, Aamir; Misbah, Siraj A; Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Moody, D Branch; Ogg, Graham

    2016-01-01

    The role of CD1a-reactive T cells in human allergic disease is unknown. We have previously shown that circulating CD1a-reactive T cells recognize neolipid antigens generated by bee and wasp venom phospholipase, and here tested the hypothesis that venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells associate with venom allergy. Circulating T cells from bee and wasp venom allergic individuals, before and during immunotherapy, were exposed to CD1a-transfected K562 cells in the presence of wasp or bee venom. T-cell response was evaluated based on IFNγ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 cytokine production. Venom allergic individuals showed significantly higher frequencies of IFN-γ, GM-CSF, and IL-13 producing CD1a-reactive T cells responsive to venom and venom-derived phospholipase than healthy individuals. Venom-responsive CD1a-reactive T cells were cross-responsive between wasp and bee suggesting shared pathways of allergenicity. Frequencies of CD1a-reactive T cells were initially induced during subcutaneous immunotherapy, peaking by weeks 5, but then reduced despite escalation of antigen dose. Our current understanding of venom allergy and immunotherapy is largely based on peptide and protein-specific T cell and antibody responses. Here, we show that lipid antigens and CD1a-reactive T cells associate with the allergic response. These data have implications for mechanisms of allergy and approaches to immunotherapy. PMID:26518614

  8. Gender-specific differences in PPARγ regulation of follicular helper T cell responses with estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong-Jai; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Lee, Jae-Ung; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.; Choi, Je-Min

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, has recently been connected with effector T cells, though its role is still not clear. Here, we investigated the roles of PPARγ in follicular helper T (TFH) cell responses regarding gender specificity. NP-OVA immunization in female but not male CD4-PPARγKO mice induced higher proportions of TFH cells and germinal center (GC) B cells following immunization than were seen in wild type mice. Treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone significantly reduced TFH cell responses in female mice while pioglitazone and estradiol (E2) co-treatment ameliorated TFH cells and GC responses in male mice. E2 treatment significantly enhanced PPARγ expression in male T cells, while T cell activation in the estrus but not in the diestrus stage of the menstrual cycle of females was inhibited by pioglitazone, suggesting that an estrogen-sufficient environment is important for PPARγ-mediated T cell regulation. These results demonstrate gender-based differences in sensitivities of PPARγ in TFH responses. These findings suggest that appropriate function of PPARγ is required in the regulation of female GC responses and that therapeutic strategies for autoimmune diseases using PPARγ agonists need to be tailored accordingly. PMID:27335315

  9. Ultrasensitivity in the Cofilin Signaling Module: A Mechanism for Tuning T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Munoz, Rocio; Castro-Sánchez, Patricia; Roda-Navarro, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasensitivity allows filtering weak activating signals and responding emphatically to small changes in stronger stimuli. In the presence of positive feedback loops, ultrasensitivity enables the existence of bistability, which convert graded stimuli into switch-like, sometimes irreversible, responses. In this perspective, we discuss mechanisms that can potentially generate a bistable response in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation monocycle that regulates the activity of cofilin in dynamic actin networks. We pay particular attention to the phosphatase Slingshot-1 (SSH-1), which is involved in a reciprocal regulation and a positive feedback loop for cofilin activation. Based on these signaling properties and experimental evidences, we propose that bistability in the cofilin signaling module might be instrumental in T cell responses to antigenic stimulation. Initially, a switch-like response in the amount of active cofilin as a function of SSH-1 activation might assist in controlling the naïve T cell specificity and sensitivity. Second, high concentrations of active cofilin might endow antigen-experienced T cells with faster and more efficient responses. We discuss the cofilin function in the context of T cell receptor triggering and spatial regulation of plasma membrane signaling molecules. PMID:26925064

  10. Ultrasensitivity in the Cofilin Signaling Module: A Mechanism for Tuning T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Munoz, Rocio; Castro-Sánchez, Patricia; Roda-Navarro, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasensitivity allows filtering weak activating signals and responding emphatically to small changes in stronger stimuli. In the presence of positive feedback loops, ultrasensitivity enables the existence of bistability, which convert graded stimuli into switch-like, sometimes irreversible, responses. In this perspective, we discuss mechanisms that can potentially generate a bistable response in the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation monocycle that regulates the activity of cofilin in dynamic actin networks. We pay particular attention to the phosphatase Slingshot-1 (SSH-1), which is involved in a reciprocal regulation and a positive feedback loop for cofilin activation. Based on these signaling properties and experimental evidences, we propose that bistability in the cofilin signaling module might be instrumental in T cell responses to antigenic stimulation. Initially, a switch-like response in the amount of active cofilin as a function of SSH-1 activation might assist in controlling the naïve T cell specificity and sensitivity. Second, high concentrations of active cofilin might endow antigen-experienced T cells with faster and more efficient responses. We discuss the cofilin function in the context of T cell receptor triggering and spatial regulation of plasma membrane signaling molecules. PMID:26925064