Science.gov

Sample records for alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

  1. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura? Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare blood ... kee-ay). Petechiae may look like a rash. Purpura and Petechiae The photograph shows purpura (bruises) and ...

  2. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000552.htm Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a blood disorder that causes blood ...

  3. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... thrombocytopenic purpura; Bleeding disorder - ITP; Autoimmune - ITP; Low platelet count - ITP ... when certain immune system cells produce antibodies against platelets. Platelets help your blood clot by clumping together ...

  4. What Causes Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura? A lack of activity in the ADAMTS13 enzyme ( ... This leads to hemolytic anemia . Inherited Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura In inherited TTP, the ADAMTS13 gene is faulty. ...

  5. Genotype and Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Congenital Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Familial Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, Congenital; Upshaw-Schulman Syndrome

  6. Genetics Home Reference: thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare disorder that causes blood clots ( ...

  7. Histoplasmosis and Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Hood, A. B.; Inglis, F. G.; Lowenstein, L.; Dossetor, J. B.; MacLean, L. D.

    1965-01-01

    Two patients with disseminated histoplasmosis are reported. One patient presented with severe thrombocytopenic purpura and splenomegaly. Histoplasmin skin test, blood and bone marrow cultures and smears, sputum cultures, and chest radiographs were negative for Histoplasma capsulatum. She died on the sixth hospital day from a massive intracerebral hemorrhage. Cardiorespiratory function was maintained until one kidney was removed for homotransplantation. The second patient, with chronic glomerulonephritis and uremia, received the renal homograft from the first patient. Initial signs of homograft rejection developed five days postoperatively. Diffuse thrombocytopenic purpura occurred shortly thereafter. Spores of Histoplasma capsulatum were observed in blood smears, in leukocyte concentrates, and in five-day leukocyte cultures from the blood obtained prior to death. Disseminated histoplasmosis was found in both patients at autopsy. The severe platelet deficit in both cases suggests that systemic histoplasmosis should be considered as a cause of thrombocytopenic purpura. To our knowledge, this is the first reported instance of direct transmission of Histoplasma capsulatum, and must be considered a hazard in homotransplantation. In vitro leukocyte cultures as a method for early diagnosis of certain disseminated fungous infections needs further investigation. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:5317993

  8. Living with Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people fully recover from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). However, relapses (flareups) can occur in many people who have acquired and inherited TTP. If you've had TTP, call your doctor ...

  9. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura preceding systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Simeon-Aznar, C P; Cuenca-Luque, R; Fonollosa-Pla, V; Bosch-Gil, J A

    1992-01-01

    The case of a patient admitted with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura nine years after developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is reported. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with SLE has been described on other occasions, but in most patients the diagnosis of SLE precedes that of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. The unusual sequence and the chronological separation of the two diseases is emphasised. PMID:1575591

  10. How Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnosis thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) based on your medical history, a physical exam, and test results. If TTP is suspected or diagnosed, a hematologist will be ...

  11. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with terminal pancytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S. C.; Adam, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    A 27 year old housewife developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura during the twelfth week of pregnancy. She had partial response to initial plasma infusion and subsequent plasmapheresis. However, her clinical course was complicated by the development of severe pancytopenia the consequence of a hypocellular marrow. She succumbed to septicaemic shock one month after diagnosis. The development of hypocellular marrow in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura has not been reported before. PMID:2267212

  12. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, D A; Faix, J D; Coblyn, J; Fraser, P; Smith, B; Weinblatt, M E

    1986-01-01

    We report two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus who subsequently developed thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. In each case the coexistence of these two conditions was confirmed by pathological findings. Both patients responded to treatment, but one eventually died. A review of the literature suggests a possible relationship between the two disorders. Images PMID:3707220

  13. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with statin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sundram, F; Roberts, P; Kennedy, B; Pavord, S

    2004-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare condition but associated with 90% mortality if left untreated. The diagnosis is usually made when there is thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, although the full pentad also includes fever, renal impairment, and neurological dysfunction. A variety of underlying causes have been implicated in acquired TTP including bacterial and viral infections, bone marrow and organ transplantation, pregnancy, immune disorders, and certain drugs. To date there is just one case report of TTP associated with statin treatment. The clinical course of a patient who presented with TTP after being started on simvastatin, a HMG-CoA inhibitor, is described. PMID:15356359

  14. Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in hemophilia A.

    PubMed Central

    Reen, B. S.; Card, R. T.; McSheffrey, J. B.; Skinnider, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura resistant to steroid therapy occurred in a 30-year-old patient with severe hemophilia A. This association has recently been reported in other patients, and a possible relation to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been suggested. Although this patient had been treated with factor VIII concentrate for 4 years, the proportions of helper and suppressor T cells were normal, and there was no evidence of AIDS. An uncomplicated splenectomy gave excellent results. All patients with hemophilia should have their platelet counts monitored closely and should report any unusual pattern of bleeding. PMID:6686949

  15. [Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a newborn].

    PubMed

    Sudour, H; Rouabah, M; Mansuy, L; Bordigoni, P; Hascoet, J-M

    2007-01-01

    A newborn presented with haemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, hyperbilirubinemia and renal failure as early as the first hours of life. An early plasmatherapy was undertaken, followed by good outcome. The specific von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS 13) was found at less than 5%. This is the specific biologic diagnostic element of congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or Upshaw-Schulman syndrome. This disease of constitutional thrombotic microangiopathy was well identified and understood only few years ago. It's a rare disease which early diagnosis and treatment are crucial in order to preserve functional and vital capacities of the patient. PMID:17137768

  16. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting. PMID:26819784

  17. Plasma exchange in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Toffelmire, E B; Clark, W F; Cordy, P E; Linton, A L; Lohmann, R C

    1984-01-01

    Three patients were recently treated for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). One presented with toxic shock syndrome; TTP developed but promptly responded to a regimen of antiplatelet agents, steroids and plasma exchange. In another the manifestations of TTP developed after presentation with hypertension and abdominal pain. This patient responded to a similar regimen but required extended treatment before remission could be maintained with medications alone. In the third patient the full TTP syndrome appeared after several days of plasma exchange treatment for hemolyticuremic syndrome. He did not respond. It is suggested that TTP may present in many forms initially, that microangiopathic hemolysis may be a late manifestation and that the optimal therapy is not known. PMID:6541965

  18. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in southeastern New England.

    PubMed

    Crowley, J P; Zaroulis, C G; O'Shea, P A; Clark, D D

    1983-05-01

    Eight patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) originating within a 25-mile radius had their conditions diagnosed in a three-year period at a community teaching hospital in southeastern New England. In the preceding ten years, only one case of TTP had occurred in the same hospital. A niece-uncle relationship was present in two patients, and lymphocyte typing showed that they both shared an HLA haplotype. In the remaining patients, no social, familial, or environmental connection was established. Three patients died, all of whom were female. Six patients received exchange plasmapheresis with excellent responses in five. Autopsies in the three fatal cases showed widespread organ involvement with TTP but did not disclose evidence of any common underlying disease. This unusual occurrence should alert physicians to the possibility of localized outbreaks of TTP and the necessity of considering this diagnosis in all patients with unexplained thrombocytopenia. PMID:6383244

  19. Recombinant thrombomodulin for secondary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kensuke; Inokuchi, Ryota; Hiruma, Takahiro; Ohshima, Kazuma; Sonoo, Tomohiro; Tokunaga, Kurato; Doi, Kent; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-06-01

    In the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), reductions in the enzyme activity of ADAMTS13, which cuts ultralarge von Willebrand multimers, generates shear stress on the microvascular endothelium, leading to platelet aggregation and the formation of a thrombus. ADAMTS13 activity is markedly decreased in typical TTP, but is only mildly reduced in secondary TTP, which concomitantly develops with primary disease. The latter develops with septic disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and often causes organ failure. Recombinant thrombomodulin (rTM) is a drug that is used to treat DIC and may also remit TTP because it improves vascular endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, we herein investigated the efficacy of rTM in patients treated for the pathology of secondary TTP. Patients who were admitted to the Emergency and Critical Care Center of our hospital and met the following conditions were extracted and retrospectively analyzed: hemolytic anemia accompanied by fragmented red blood cells (Hb < 12 g/dL or lower); thrombocytopenia (<100 × 10/μL); and ADAMTS13 activity <50%. Sixteen patients were included and accompanied by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) stage 2 or more severe nephropathy and DIC. Eleven and 5 patients treated with and without rTM (the rTM and non-rTM treatment groups, respectively) were compared, and no significant difference was noted in their basic characteristics, such as background disease and severity. No significant difference was observed in survival rates; however, the platelet count, which is an important outcome of treatments for TTP, significantly increased in the rTM treatment group: 3.3 ± 2.6→11.3 ± 14.6 versus 3.5 ± 3.7→5.7 ± 3.9 (×1000/μL) (P = 0.034). Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura originally requires invasive treatments and its prognosis is not favorable. Blood thrombomodulin levels also markedly increase due to vascular endothelial dysfunction

  20. Bone marrow examination before steroids in thrombocytopenic purpura or arthritis.

    PubMed

    Reid, M M

    1992-12-01

    Corticosteroids were used to treat two children with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and one with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis without examination of the bone marrow. Of the two with presumed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, one had Fanconi's anaemia and the other may have had aplastic anaemia. The third child had acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. The diagnosis of Fanconi's anaemia was delayed. A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma was caused in the second case. In the third, delayed diagnosis and, perhaps, compromised outlook resulted. These three cases re-emphasize the well aired caveats about the diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and provide further support for the arguments of those who believe that if corticosteroids are to be used to treat such children, their bone marrow should be examined first. PMID:1290852

  1. SYSTEMIC INFECTIONS MIMICKING THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Kristina K.; Terrell, Deirdra R.; Vesely, Sara K.; George, James N.

    2012-01-01

    The absence of specific diagnostic criteria, the urgency to begin plasma exchange treatment, and the risk for complications from plasma exchange make the initial evaluation of patients with suspected thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) difficult. Systemic infections may mimic the presenting clinical features of TTP. In the Oklahoma TTP-HUS (hemolytic-uremic syndrome) Registry, 1989–2010, 415 consecutive patients have been clinically diagnosed with their first episode of TTP; in 31 (7%) the presenting clinical features were subsequently attributed to a systemic infection. All 31 patients had diagnostic criteria for TTP; 16 (52%) had the complete “pentad” of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neurologic abnormalities, renal failure and fever. Four (16%) of 25 patients who had ADAMTS13 measurements had <10% activity; three patients had a demonstrable ADAMTS13 inhibitor. Compared to 62 patients with severe ADAMTS13 deficiency (<10%) who had no recognized alternative disorders, patients with systemic infections had more frequent fever, coma, renal failure, and the complete “pentad” of clinical features. Seventeen different infectious etiologies were documented. A systematic literature review identified 67 additional patients with a diagnosis of TTP or HUS and also a systemic infection. Among all 98 patients, infections with 41 different bacteria, viruses, and fungi were documented, suggesting that many different systemic infections may mimic the presenting clinical features of TTP. Initial plasma exchange treatment is appropriate in critically ill patients with diagnostic features of TTP, even if a systemic infection is suspected. Continuing evaluation to document a systemic infection is essential to determine the appropriateness of continued plasma exchange. PMID:21850657

  2. Interrelation between Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, M N; Al-Rukhaimi, M N; Railey, M J; Raizada, S N; Fernandes, H N; Marashi, M M

    1994-01-01

    Features suggestive of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) are known to occur in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We report a patient who had TTP which resolved with plasma exchange and immunosuppression, but presented three years later with features of SLE. The diagnosis satisfied all the required criteria in both instances. The interrelationship between the two conditions is discussed. PMID:18583760

  3. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with pregnancy in two sisters.

    PubMed Central

    Alqadah, F.; Zebeib, M. A.; Awidi, A. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two sisters suffered from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura late in their first pregnancies. HLA typing of the patients and their immediate family members demonstrated no obvious relationship. Hereditary aspects, association with pregnancy, prognosis and management of pregnant women with TTP are discussed. PMID:8497440

  4. Thrombocytopenic Purpura Associated with Dietary Supplements Containing Citrus Flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Alaa; Bourneau-Martin, Delphine; Dopter, Aymeric; Lainé-Cessac, Pascale; Belizna, Cristina; Urbanski, Geoffrey; Lavigne, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of thrombocytopenic purpura associated with the intake of two dietary supplements containing mainly citrus flavonoids. This is the first case to be notified to the French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (ANSES). It addresses the importance of an accurate medication history interview for each patient. PMID:26242500

  5. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: MR demonstration of reversible brain abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    D'Aprile, P.; Carella, A.; Pagliarulo, R. ); Farchi, G. )

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura evaluated by MR, Multiple hyperintense foci on the TS-weighted images, observed principally in the brain stem and in the region of the basal nuclei, and neurologic signs disappeared after 15 days of therapy. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. [Laparoscopic splenectomy in immune thrombocytopenic purpura in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Danishyan, K I; Soboleva, O A; Galstyan, G M; Zvereva, A V; Sorkina, O M

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes 4 cases of laparoscopic splenectomy in pregnant women with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. No complications of surgery were noted in all the patients. The postoperative period was marked by sustained clinical and hematological remission that made it possible to discontinue prednisolone therapy and to ensure an uncomplicated course of pregnancy and labor. PMID:27459624

  7. Prostacyclin and thromboxane A2 in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, S H; Wainscoat, J S; Zeitlin, H; Bolton, F G; Leaver, H A; Seawright, A; Preece, J M

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to find whether a deficiency in prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2; PGI2) is implicated in the pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Plasma samples from two patients with the disease before treatment and from 22 healthy controls were therefore assayed for concentrations of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2, the stable metabolites of PGI2 and thromboxane A2, respectively. Neither of the patients responded to treatment, which in one case included an infusion of PGI2. Both patients had normal concentrations of 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha and thromboxane B2, thus implying that circulating amounts of PGI2 and thromboxane A2 were also normal. These findings suggest that 6-oxo-PGF1 alpha may be detectable in normal amounts in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and that the condition need not be associated with a high concentration of thromboxane A2. PMID:6797537

  8. Chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. A 3-year study.

    PubMed

    Fotos, P G; Graham, W L; Bowers, D C; Perfetto, S P

    1983-06-01

    Idiopathic (autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ATP) is accepted to be a disorder resulting from accelerated platelet destruction attributed to an autoimmune process. The patient whose case is presented in this article was first seen by a dentist. The oral findings have been documented as the case was followed for 3 years through acute exacerbations, pregnancy, and delivery of an infant with thrombocytopenia. The patient was managed with intermittent steroid therapy and splenectomy. PMID:6576288

  9. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: The role of ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Heesun J; Allen, Charles; Lichtin, Alan E

    2016-08-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon, life-threatening disease requiring prompt diagnosis and initiation of therapeutic plasma exchange to improve patient survival. However, diagnosis is often difficult because of atypical presentations and signs and symptoms that resemble other conditions. Measurements of ADAMTS13 activity, ADAMTS13 inhibitor, and ADAMTS13 autoantibody are useful for diagnosing TTP, guiding therapy, and predicting relapse. PMID:27505881

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura presenting with pathologic fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Kuku, Irfan; Kaya, Emin; Unlu, Serkan; Ertem, Kadir; Nizam, Ilknur

    2014-08-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is an acute syndrome with abnormalities in multiple organ systems, which becomes manifest with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. The hereditary or acquired deficiency of ADAMTS-13 activity leads to an excess of high molecular weight von Willebrand factor multimers in plasma, leading to platelet aggregation and diffuse intravascular thrombus formation, resulting in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Thrombotic lesions occurring in TTP leads to ischemia and convulsion. Depending on the properties of the bony tissue, fractures are divided into three groups as traumatic, pathological, and stress fractures. A pathologic fracture is a broken bone caused by disease leading to weakness of the bone. This process is most commonly due to osteoporosis, but may also be due to other pathologies such as cancer, infections, inherited bone disorders, or a bone cyst. We herein report a case with a pathologic fracture due to convulsion secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic pupura. Thrombotic lesions occurring in TTP may lead to ischemia and convulsion, as in our patient and pathological fractures presented in our case report may occur as a result of severe muscle contractions associated with convulsive activity. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic pupura is a disease that involves many organ systems and thus may have a very wide spectrum of clinical presentations. PMID:25113918

  11. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and mumps.

    PubMed

    Kurekci, A Emin; Atay, A Avni; Demirkaya, Erkan; Sarici, S Umit; Ozcan, Okan

    2006-03-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood is characterized by a typical history of acute development of purpura and bruising in an otherwise healthy child. In children it usually follows a viral infection (eg, mumps, rubella) or immunization. We report for the first time a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura due to mumps during the maintenance phase of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. PMID:16679943

  12. Intrahepatic splenosis after splenectomy performed for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Toktaş, Osman; Yavuz, Alpaslan; İliklerden, Ümit; Yılmaz, Deniz; Bayram, İrfan

    2015-01-01

    The term splenosis describes autotransplantation or implantation of ectopic splenic tissue within the abdominal cavity or in any other unusual body compartment. In addition to the diagnostic dilemma it causes, splenosis may also lead to persistence or recurrence of hematologic dysfunctions by its preserved immune activity especially in cases of splenectomy due to hematologic indications. Herein, we present a 40-year-old female who had splenectomy for idiopatic thrombocytopenic purpura, and was identified to have splenic tissue within left lobe of the liver during further assessment of ongoing thrombocytopenia. PMID:26668536

  13. [An unusual coincidence of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Zamir, D; Polychuck, I; Reitblat, T; Leibovitz, I; Lugassy, G

    2002-08-01

    A 52 year old man was admitted for hospitalization due to dizziness and weakness that appeared in the previous 2 weeks. Anemia and thrombocytopenia, as well as elevated levels of lactic dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis and schistocytes on blood smear, all suggested thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, B12 deficiency was also diagnosed. The diagnosis of pernicious anemia was reassured by both fundic biopsy and the existence of antiparietal cells antibodies and anti-intrinsic cells antibodies. A few courses of plasmapheresis along with parenteral B12 stabilized his physical condition and he was released with no need for further treatment, and only required ambulatory follow-up. PMID:12222131

  14. Accessory spleen compromising response to splenectomy for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Ambriz, P.; Munoz, R.; Quintanar, E.; Sigler, L.; Aviles, A.; Pizzuto, J.

    1985-06-01

    Accessory spleens were sought in 28 patients who had undergone splenectomy for chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), using a variety of techniques. Abdominal scintigraphy with autologous erythrocytes labeled with Tc-99m and opsonized with anit-D IgG (radioimmune method) proved to be most useful, clearly demonstrating one or more accessory spleens in 12 cases (43%). Computed tomography (CT) was also helpful. Four out of five patients demonstrated an increased platelet count following surgery, the effectiveness of which was illustrated by the radioimmune scan. Patients who have had splenectomy for chronic ITP should be scanned using radioimmune techniques and CT to determine whether an accessory spleen is present.

  15. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasma exchange or exchange transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, K. V.; Fishleder, A.; Lucas, F. V.; Goormastic, M.; Bukowski, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Of 40 patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, 17 were treated with plasma exchange, 15 with exchange transfusions, and 6 with both types of therapy. One patient died before being treated and another patient was seen but not treated. Plasma exchange was performed daily for a mean of seven exchanges per patient. The replacement fluid during plasma exchange was fresh frozen plasma in all cases. The complete response rates for each type of treatment were as follows: 88% for plasma exchange (15 patients), 47% for exchange transfusions (7 patients), and 67% for exchange transfusions and plasma exchange (4 patients). Clinical and laboratory factors were examined for any statistically significant association with therapy response. Treatment with plasma exchange was statistically the initial factor most strongly associated with prognosis. Paresis, paresthesias, seizures, mental status change, and coma showed no association with response to treatment. Some of the laboratory factors that did not show significant association with treatment response were the initial creatinine, hemoglobin, platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin. This study supports the hypothesis that plasma exchange has significantly improved the prognosis of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. These patients should be treated aggressively regardless of the severity of their symptoms. PMID:1877181

  16. Two Mechanistic Pathways for Thienopyridine-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Kim, Benjamin; Zakarija, Anaadriana; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Pandey, Dilip K.; Buffie, Charlie G.; McKoy, June M.; Tevar, Amul D.; Cursio, John F.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Kwaan, Hau C.; De Masi, Davide; Sarode, Ravindra; Raife, Thomas J.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Davidson, Charles; Sadler, J. Evan; Ortel, Thomas L.; Zheng, X. Long; Kato, Seiji; Matsumoto, Masanori; Uemura, Masahito; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Objectives We sought to describe clinical and laboratory findings for a large cohort of patients with thienopyridine-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Background The thienopyridine derivatives, ticlopidine and clopidogrel, are the 2 most common drugs associated with TTP in databases maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods Clinical reports of TTP associated with clopidogrel and ticlopidine were identified from medical records, published case reports, and FDA case reports (n = 128). Duration of thienopyridine exposure, clinical and laboratory findings, and survival were recorded. ADAMTS13 activity (n = 39) and inhibitor (n = 30) were measured for a subset of individuals. Results Compared with clopidogrel-associated TTP cases (n = 35), ticlopidine-associated TTP cases (n = 93) were more likely to have received more than 2 weeks of drug (90% vs. 26%), to be severely thrombocytopenic (84% vs. 60%), and to have normal renal function (72% vs. 45%) (p < 0.01 for each). Compared with TTP patients with ADAMTS13 activity >15% (n = 13), TTP patients with severely deficient ADAMTS13 activity (n = 26) were more likely to have received ticlopidine (92.3% vs. 46.2%, p < 0.003). Among patients who developed TTP >2 weeks after thienopyridine, therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) increased likelihood of survival (84% vs. 38%, p < 0.05). Among patients who developed TTP within 2 weeks of starting thienopyridines, survival was 77% with TPE and 78% without. Conclusions Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare complication of thienopyridine treatment. This drug toxicity appears to occur by 2 different mechanistic pathways, characterized primarily by time of onset before versus after 2 weeks of thienopyridine administration. If TTP occurs after 2 weeks of ticlopidine or clopidogrel therapy, therapeutic plasma exchange must be promptly instituted to enhance likelihood of survival. PMID:17868804

  17. Harmful and beneficial antibodies in immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Imbach, P A

    1994-01-01

    Two facts support the definition of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) as an immune disorder. First, antibodies against platelets, which often appear after a viral infection, provoke the increased elimination of these cells. Viral disease may change the complex immune response of the host at different levels. In chronic ITP, the consequences of the dysregulated immune system are autoantibodies, primarily against platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. Second, pooled immunoglobulins from healthy blood donors may influence the imbalanced immune response in ITP. The initial study dose of 5 x 0.4 g of intact 7S IgG/kg body weight can now be reduced to 2 x 0.4 g/kg body weight in the majority of patients. The possible mechanisms of action of intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) are reviewed and updated in this article. The combination of effects on the humoral and cellular immune responses using IVIG in concert with cytokines may open up new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:8033430

  18. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and splenectomy: a current appraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Rutkow, I M

    1978-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a disease process characterized by microangiopathic anemia, fever, neurologic manifestations, renal abnormalities, and thrombocytopenia. These clinical findings are caused by vascular occlusions of the microcirculation. At present the utilization of splenectomy, in the treatment of this illness, remains a highly controversial subject. However, review of the literature reveals that 70% of the long term survivors of TTP had undergone splenectomy. This report presents five patients with TTP, four of whom had been splenectomized. Long term survival (greater than one year) was achieved in three individuals. It is recommended that splenectomy be considered as part of the initial management of all patients with TTP, in addition to high dose corticosteroids and antiplatelet drugs. PMID:568920

  19. Initial management of adults with idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    George, J N

    2002-03-01

    Since idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults is usually a chronic condition with few spontaneous remissions, the goal of treatment is not cure, but to maintain a hemostatically safe platelet level. The indication for treatment should be based not merely on platelet counts, but also clinical indices of bleeding. Although most patients show good initial response to prednisone, the side effects of steroids limit this treatment. Currently, long-term management usually involves splenectomy. Since splenectomy has surgical risks and may also predispose the patient to sepsis, a clinical trial using anti-D (WinRho-SDR) has been performed to determine whether this treatment can safely delay or avoid the need for surgery. The use of WinRho may also reveal the occurrence of spontaneous remissions, a previously unrecognized subgroup of adults with chronic ITP. PMID:11913992

  20. Postinfluenza Vaccination Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Three Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Joji; Manabe, Masahiro; Ido, Kentaro; Ichihara, Hiroyoshi; Aoyama, Yasutaka; Ohta, Tadanobu; Furukawa, Yoshio; Mugitani, Atsuko

    2016-01-01

    The etiologies of secondary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) include infection, autoimmune disease, and immunodeficiency. We report the cases of three elderly patients who developed ITP after receiving influenza vaccinations. The platelet count of an 81-year-old woman fell to 27,000/μL after she received an influenza vaccination. A 75-year-old woman developed thrombocytopenia (5,000 platelets/μL) after receiving an influenza vaccination. An 87-year-old woman whose laboratory test values included a platelet count of 2,000/μL experienced genital bleeding after receiving an influenza vaccination. After Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication or corticosteroid treatment, all of the patients' platelet counts increased. Influenza vaccination is an underlying etiology of ITP in elderly patients. HP eradication or corticosteroid treatment is effective for these patients. Clinicians should be aware of the association between ITP and influenza vaccinations. PMID:26998369

  1. ADAMTS13 and von Willebrand Factor in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X. Long

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was a mystery for over half a century until the discovery of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 is primarily synthesized in the liver, and its main function is to cleave von Willebrand factor (VWF) anchored on the endothelial surface, in circulation, and at the sites of vascular injury. Deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<10%) resulting from mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene or autoantibodies against ADAMTS13 causes hereditary or acquired (idiopathic) TTP. ADAMTS13 activity is usually normal or modestly reduced (>20%) in other forms of thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation, infection, and disseminated malignancy or in hemolytic uremic syndrome. Plasma infusion or exchange remains the initial treatment of choice to date, but novel therapeutics such as recombinant ADAMTS13 and gene therapy are under development. Moreover, ADAMTS13 deficiency has been shown to be a risk factor for the development of myocardial infarction, stroke, cerebral malaria, and preeclampsia. PMID:25587650

  2. [Bronchiolitis obliterans with organizing pneumonia associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Presas, J L; Piriz, J; Serra, S L; Paz, E D; Allievi, A; Kartin, D; Olmedo, G

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a 35 year-old woman with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who, under treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, developed bilateral interstitial pulmonary disease. Previously she had been splenectomized and treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporin. During the clinical course, the patient developed alterations of the hepatogram and presented a positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. The lung biopsy showed the histologic pattern of obliterative bronchiolitis, interstitial inflammatory infiltration and intraalveolar pneumonia (BOOP). We could not find in the literature a previous report in which ITP was associated with BOOP. Of interest was the spontaneous remission of the pulmonary disease after suppression of cyclosporin and positive serology for Epstein-Barr virus. PMID:9674210

  3. Treatment of severe, refractory and rapidly evolving thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Acedillo, Rey R; Govind, Mayur; Kashgary, Abdullah; Clark, William F

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented to hospital with gross haematuria and evidence of severe, refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Initial treatment with high-volume plasma exchange therapy and early administration of rituximab failed to achieve a sustained clinical response. His clinical course was complicated by left hemianopsia and despite an urgent splenectomy he developed a large right-sided stroke with malignant cerebral oedema that required an emergent decompressive craniotomy. He also had numerous infectious complications as a consequence of an aggressive immunosuppressive strategy. While the patient did not respond to cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, N-acetylcysteine, and one course of bortezomib, he eventually responded to a second course of bortezomib. One year later, the patient remains in remission and maintains excellent cognitive function. However, he has not completely recovered from his stroke and continues to participate in rehabilitation for his residual physical deficits. PMID:27284100

  4. Laparoscopic splenectomy for the treatment of refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Akira; Sasaki, Akira; Nitta, Hiroyuki; Obuchi, Toru; Baba, Shigeaki; Wakabayashi, Go

    2013-12-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a serious hematologic disorder with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. We report here on the surgical and homological outcomes of laparoscopic splenectomy (LS) in a patient with refractory TTP. A 69-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of purpura in the lower extremities. In addition to the marked thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia and progressive mental disorder were noted. The ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) activity was undetectable and ADAMTS13 inhibitor was extremely increased. The diagnosis of TTP was made based on the clinical features and laboratory abnormalities. She received steroid-pulse therapy for 3 days, low-dose methylprednisolone continuous infusion and plasma exchange (PE) daily for 14 days. However, the patient was found to be refractory TTP to PE. The LS was performed at 15 days after diagnosis. The ADAMTS13 inhibitor was not detected after LS, and in addition, the platelet count had increased to over 100,000/mm(3) on postoperative day 17. The patient remains in remission 24 months after surgery. The results of our case demonstrate that LS is a safe and reasonable treatment option for patients with TTP refractory to PE. PMID:26182130

  5. Treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: focus on eltrombopag

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Lawrence

    2009-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a relatively common autoimmune disorder in which antibodies are produced to circulating platelets. Symptoms can be mild, but for most patients the risk of severe bleeding is unacceptable and treatment is required. Glucocorticoids followed by splenectomy had been the mainstays of therapy. High dose intravenous immunoglobulin and anti-RhD therapy are available for patients with severe illness, but produce only temporary benefit. Rituximab may provide more durable responses, danazol may be underutilized, and immunosuppressants and cytotoxic agents are less often required. Recently the pathophysiology of ITP has been more clearly elucidated, particularly the importance of decreased production of platelets in most patients and the very blunted rise that occurs in serum thrombopoietin (TPO). The isolation of TPO and better understanding of its role in thrombopoiesis has led to the development of new highly effective treatments. TPO analogs had some successes in treating highly refractory ITP patients but were taken out of development due to TPO-antibody induction. Two second-generation TPO-mimetics, romiplostim and the orally available eltrombopag, have recently been licensed in some territories for the treatment of ITP. Approval of eltrombopag was based on results from Phase II and III placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term extension study. About 80% of patients achieve significant increases in platelet count (11% of placebo patients), with reduced bleeding and reduced use of concomitant medications; responses are often durable with no tachyphylaxis. The side effects of eltrombopag are generally mild and not worse than placebo, although there are concerns about hepatic dysfunction, and the potentials for thromboses, marrow reticulin fibrosis, rebound thrombocytopenia and cataracts. This is an important new option for highly refractory patients, and its niche in earlier treatment (and for other thrombocytopenic

  6. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. II. Principles of therapy and guidelines for management.

    PubMed

    Sills, R H

    1984-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a life-threatening disorder which requires immediate therapy. Unfortunately, there are no widely accepted therapeutic recommendations for this rare disorder. The literature contains large numbers of uncontrolled and often uncomparable studies of a variety of therapies used in differing combinations. This article attempts to rationalize the therapy of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura based on our current understanding of its pathophysiology. The rationale of each therapeutic modality, including plasma therapy, corticosteroids, vincristine, antiplatelet agents, and splenectomy, is discussed. This is followed by an overview of the clinical results reported in the literature for these individual treatments. Finally, overall therapeutic guidelines for the therapy of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura are presented. It is hoped that these guidelines will clarify the treatment of this disorder until more definitive therapeutic studies are available. PMID:6398631

  7. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: survival by "giving a dam".

    PubMed Central

    Moake, Joel L.

    2004-01-01

    A teenager died suddenly in 1923 of systemic microvascular thrombosis. Dr. Eli Moschcowitz attributed the "hitherto undescribed disease" (now "thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura," or "TTP") to "some powerful poison" with "both agglutinative and hemolytic properties." In 1982, TTP was found to be a defect in the "processing" of unusually large (UL) von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers. By 1998, the cause of TTP was known to be either familial absence or acquired inhibition (by autoantibody) of plasma VWF-cleaving metalloprotease. This enzyme, the 13th member of a disintegrin and metalloprotease family with thrombospondin domains (ADAMTS-13), circulates in normal plasma waiting to cleave the long strings of ULVWF multimers emerging from stimulated endothelial cells. Uncleaved ULVWF multimers in TTP induce platelet adhesion and aggregation in the rapidly flowing blood of microvessels. Episodes of TTP are treated by "giving A DAM" (TS-13, that is) contained in normal plasma, either by infusion alone or in combination with plasmapheresis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:17060968

  8. Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes among Women with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Wyszynski, Diego F.; Carman, Wendy J.; Cantor, Alan B.; Graham, John M.; Kunz, Liza H.; Slavotinek, Anne M.; Kirby, Russell S.; Seeger, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To examine pregnancy and birth outcomes among women with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or chronic ITP (cITP) diagnosed before or during pregnancy. Methods. A linkage of mothers and babies within a large US health insurance database that combines enrollment data, pharmacy claims, and medical claims was carried out to identify pregnancies in women with ITP or cITP. Outcomes included preterm birth, elective and spontaneous loss, and major congenital anomalies. Results. Results suggest that women diagnosed with ITP or cITP prior to their estimated date of conception may be at higher risk for stillbirth, fetal loss, and premature delivery. Among 446 pregnancies in women with ITP, 346 resulted in live births. Women with cITP experienced more adverse outcomes than those with a pregnancy-related diagnosis of ITP. Although 7.8% of all live births had major congenital anomalies, the majority were isolated heart defects. Among deliveries in women with cITP, 15.2% of live births were preterm. Conclusions. The results of this study provide further evidence that cause and duration of maternal ITP are important determinants of the outcomes of pregnancy. PMID:27092275

  9. Treatment options for chronic idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    George, J N

    2000-01-01

    The goal of treatment for idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is to prevent serious bleeding. Traditionally, corticosteroids have been used as first-line therapy followed by splenectomy. Experience with splenectomy over 60 years shows that approximately two thirds of patients achieve normal platelet counts during the initial observation, but that thrombocytopenia often recurs with longer follow-up. We know that long-term use of corticosteroids can lead to significant morbidities; there is no consensus regarding the appropriate timing or indications for splenectomy. To address the Issue of appropriate use of splenectomy, we designed a multicenter clinical trial that will randomize patients to either standard care, involving prednisone followed by splenectomy, or to a novel regimen of limited prednisone treatment followed by WinRho SDF (Nabi, Boca Raton, FL) (anti-D) therapy to maintain the platelet count in a safe range for 1 year. Anti-D can be administered easily in an outpatient setting with few side effects and can provide predictable, transient increases in platelet count. The hypothesis is that prolonged maintenance therapy with a nontoxic regimen may increase the percentage of patients who will experience a spontaneous remission from thrombocytopenia, thereby avoiding an invasive and permanent surgical procedure, splenectomy, and its potentially life-threatening sequelae. PMID:10676922

  10. Bortezomib in the treatment of refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Patriquin, Christopher J; Thomas, Mari R; Dutt, Tina; McGuckin, Siobhan; Blombery, Piers A; Cranfield, Tanya; Westwood, John P; Scully, Marie

    2016-06-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening condition caused by autoantibody-mediated inhibition of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type-1 motif, 13). Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) improves survival, but disease may be refractory despite therapy. Management and treatment response of refractory TTP is variable, with rituximab and other immunosuppression often being used. Case reports have suggested a benefit of the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, possibly due to elimination of the autoreactive plasma cells producing anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies. We evaluated the effect of bortezomib in a series of primary refractory TTP patients unresponsive to intensive therapy. Bortezomib-treated patients were identified from consecutive cases managed at two UK referral centres. Demographic and clinical data were extracted from hospital records. ADAMTS13 activity was measured using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer VWF73 assay, and anti-ADAMTS13 IgG using enzyme-linked immunosorbent asssay. We identified six bortezomib-treated patients out of 51 consecutive cases of acute, acquired TTP. All patients received TPE, methylprednisolone and rituximab. Five of the six achieved complete remission with bortezomib, and one died of cardiac arrest due to underlying disease. No treatment-related adverse events were observed. Mean follow-up time after hospital discharge was 17 months (range: 3-33). Bortezomib appears effective in the treatment of a subgroup of cases with severe, refractory TTP. Prospective trials are required to further investigate this effect. PMID:27009919

  11. Current insights into thrombotic microangiopathies: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    von Auer, Charis; von Krogh, Anne-Sophie; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Lämmle, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The complex relation between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and pregnancy is concisely reviewed. Pregnancy is a very strong trigger for acute disease manifestation in patients with hereditary TTP caused by double heterozygous or homozygous mutations of ADAMTS13 (ADisintegrin And Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin type 1 domains, no. 13). In several affected women disease onset during their first pregnancy leads to the diagnosis of hereditary TTP. Without plasma treatment mother and especially fetus are at high risk of dying. The relapse risk during a next pregnancy is almost 100% but regular plasma transfusion starting in early pregnancy will prevent acute TTP flare-up and may result in successful pregnancy outcome. Pregnancy may also constitute a mild risk factor for the onset of acute acquired TTP caused by autoantibody-mediated severe ADAMTS13 deficiency. Women having survived acute acquired TTP may not be at very high risk of TTP relapse during an ensuing next pregnancy but seem to have an elevated risk of preeclampsia. Monitoring of ADAMTS13 activity and inhibitor titre during pregnancy may help to guide management and to avoid disease recurrence. Finally, TTP needs to be distinguished from the much more frequent hypertensive pregnancy complications, preeclampsia and especially HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome. PMID:25903530

  12. Lupus-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like microangiopathy.

    PubMed

    Blum, Daniel; Blake, Geoffrey

    2015-11-01

    Recently reported cases of lupus complicated by a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like syndrome suggest a survival benefit to early treatment with plasma exchange. The following is a report of the eighth such case in the last ten years. A 44-year-old lady known for lupus presented with the nephrotic syndrome and a renal biopsy was consistent with class 4G lupus nephritis. She was given high-dose steroids and cytotoxic therapy, but her induction therapy was complicated by the classic pentad of TTP. She was subsequently treated with another course of high-dose steroids, a different cytotoxic agent, and plasma exchange, with clinical resolution shortly thereafter. Similar to seven recently reported cases of microangiopathy in lupus, this lady's TTP-like syndrome improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange, despite not having a severely deficient ADAMTS13. This has implications on both current clinical practice and on the pathogenesis of TTP-like syndromes in lupus. PMID:26558190

  13. Successful management of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Uğur Bilgin, Aynur; Karaselek, Mehmet Ali; Camlı, Kazım

    2014-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an uncommon, severe, potentially life-threatening disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, altered mental status, fever, and renal abnormalities. It can be seen at any age or sex but affects women of childbearing age more commonly. Pregnancy is known as one of the most common precipitating events for the onset of TTP and occurs mostly in the late third trimester or during the puerperium. Because of relatively low prevalence of pregnancy-related TTP, here we report the clinical characteristics and successful outcomes of 7 women with pregnancy-related TTP. Median age of patients was 25 (19-32). While 4 out of 7 women were primiparous, others were multiparous. Total plasma exchange (TPE) procedure was started within 24h after admission to our hospital. All patients got into complete remission without any maternal mortality. Fetal mortality was found to be 28%. Pregnancy-related TTP is still associated with high maternal and fetal mortality rates. However, the prognosis of TTP has improved dramatically with early diagnosis and plasma- based therapies. PMID:24667160

  14. Lupus-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Daniel; Blake, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    Recently reported cases of lupus complicated by a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP)-like syndrome suggest a survival benefit to early treatment with plasma exchange. The following is a report of the eighth such case in the last ten years. A 44-year-old lady known for lupus presented with the nephrotic syndrome and a renal biopsy was consistent with class 4G lupus nephritis. She was given high-dose steroids and cytotoxic therapy, but her induction therapy was complicated by the classic pentad of TTP. She was subsequently treated with another course of high-dose steroids, a different cytotoxic agent, and plasma exchange, with clinical resolution shortly thereafter. Similar to seven recently reported cases of microangiopathy in lupus, this lady’s TTP-like syndrome improved dramatically after initiation of plasma exchange, despite not having a severely deficient ADAMTS13. This has implications on both current clinical practice and on the pathogenesis of TTP-like syndromes in lupus. PMID:26558190

  15. Platelet antibody in prolonged remission of childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, R.; Kinney, T.R.; Rosse, W.

    1985-11-01

    Evaluations were performed in 20 patients with childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who remained in remission longer than 12 months. The mean duration of follow-up from diagnosis was 39 months (range 17 to 87 months). Eleven patients (four girls) in group 1 had an acute course of ITP, defined as platelet count greater than 150 X 10(9)/L within 6 months of diagnosis. Nine patients (five girls) in group 2 had a chronic course, defined as platelet count less than 150 X 10(9)/L for greater than or equal to 1 year or requiring splenectomy in an attempt to control hemorrhagic symptoms. Platelet count and serum (indirect) platelet-associated IgG (PAIgG) levels were normal in all 20 patients at follow-up. Both direct and indirect PAIgG levels were measured using a SVI-monoclonal anti-IgG antiglobulin assay. All had normal direct PAIgG levels, except for one patient in group 1 who had a borderline elevated value of 1209 molecules per platelet. These data suggest that the prevalence of elevated platelet antibodies is low during sustained remission without medication in patients with a history of childhood ITP. These data may be relevant for pregnant women with a history of childhood ITP, with regard to the risk of delivering an infant with thrombocytopenia secondary to transplacental passage of maternal platelet antibody.

  16. Platelet antibody in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombocytopenias

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiura, K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    Platelet-associated immunoglobulin was measured by the use of fluorescent anti-1gG antibody. The method is simple, rapid, and sensitive and provides a precise quantitive assay of bound (direct) and free (indirect) 1gG with platelet specificity. We have evaluated this test in 30 normal volunteers and in 50 patients with immune and nonimmune, treated and untreated thrombocytopenias. All patients with immune thrombocytopenias (acute and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus) having platelet counts < 100,000/..mu..l had elevated levels of platelet-bound 1gG and 86% had also positive results in the indirect assay. All patients with nonimmunological thrombocytopenias showed normal results in the direct and indirect assay of platelet-associated immunoglobulin. In patients studied repeatedly during the course of their illness, an inverse relation was found between platelet count and level of platelet-bound 1gG. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus presented clear exceptions to this rule. Investigations of the absorbability of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies showed that this assay can readily differentiate between these two antibody species and can also identify specificities of alloantibodies.

  17. Association of HLA-DRw2 with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Fotino, M; Gibofsky, A; Winchester, R J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 38 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) were tested for HLA-A, -B, and -C alloantigens. Isolated B lymphocytes from 20 of these patients were tested for HLA-DRw (Ia) alloantigens. The profile of HLA alloantigens in the patients with AITP was significantly different from that of a matched control population. The most significant finding was the presence of the HLA-DRw2 alloantigen in 75% of patients as compared with 23% in the control population, P less than 0.001, relative risk 10.0 (A relative risk of 1 would indicate no association between the presence of the antigen and the disease.) The co-occurrence of either A3 and B7 (known to be in linkage disequilibrium with DRw2) or A26 and Bw38 was significantly increased as compared with the control population (P less than 0.001). Of the patients positive for DRw2, 47% had the association A26 and Bw38 as compared with the control population association incidence of 21% (P less than 0.1). Thus, in the patient population, A26-Bw38 appears to be a haplotype that is in linkage disequilibrium with DRw2 (as presumably is the case with A3-B7). These data indicate that a predisposition to AITP is inherited with a DRw2 gene of the major histocompatibility system. PMID:571874

  18. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Oregel, Karlos Z; Ramdial, Jeremy; Glück, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A 21-year-old male presented to the emergency department after a 5-day history of recurrent vomiting and decreased urine output. History revealed ingestion of ibuprofen. During the diagnostic workup, the following was identified: white blood cell count 13.4 (×10(3)/mcL), hemoglobin 11.9 (×10(6)/mcL) with an MCV of 73 fL, hematocrit 34% and platelets were 31,000/mcL, sodium of 130 mmol/L, potassium of 5.1 mmol/L, chloride of 83 mmol/L, bicarbonate of 21 mmol/L, blood urea nitrogen of 184 mg/dL and creatinine of 19.1 mg/dL. He was later diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) based on the fact that he presented with most components of the TTP pentad (except for fever), which included altered mental status, acute kidney injury, thrombocytopenia, and evidence of red cell fragmentation and his ADAMTS13 level was found to be less than 10% prior to therapy. The patient then received plasma exchange, oral corticosteroids, and hemodialysis, which led to a full recovery of platelet count and renal function. PMID:25512716

  19. Rapid encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Golla, Sunitha; Horkan, Clare; Dogaru, Grigore; Teske, Thomas E; Christopher, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rho (D) immune globulin intravenous (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment is infrequently noted. A single case of irreversible encephalopathy following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a second case of encephalopathy following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:18957844

  20. A Case Associated with Comorbidities Among Cerebral Infarction, Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, and Triple X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hanjun; Hwang, Sang Sun; Uh, Young; Kim, Juwon; Yoon, Kap Jun; Lee, Ji-Yong

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old female presented to the emergency room due to the chief complaint of left-sided weakness. By imaging study, she was diagnosed with cerebral infarction. Thrombolytic and antiplatelet agents were not considered due to the “golden hour” for treatment having passed and a low platelet count. The peripheral blood smear, bone marrow biopsy, and aspirate findings were consistent with immune thrombocytopenic purpura. The chromosome analysis revealed the 47,XXX karyotype. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report associated with the comorbidities of cerebral infarction, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and triple X syndrome. PMID:25035678

  1. Serum prostacyclin binding defects in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K K; Hall, E R; Rossi, E C; Papp, A C

    1985-01-01

    To understand the pathophysiologic significance of abnormal serum prostacyclin (PGI2) binding activities in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), we evaluated the PGI2 binding characteristics in three chronic TTP sera and 19 normal sera. PGI2 binding by serum was rapid and reversible. The binding activity in TTP sera (22.1 +/- SD, 4.4%) was significantly lower than that of normal sera (42.2 +/- 6.2%). Moreover, the antiaggregating activity and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6KPGF1 alpha) content in the gel filtrates representing the binding peak was proportionally lower in a TTP serum than normal serum. Although normal and TTP sera bound [14C]arachidonate with similar activity, and neither bound [3H]6KPGF1 alpha, there was a difference in prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) binding. Binding of [3H]PGE1 was subnormal in two TTP sera (W.J. and T.G.) and normal in the third (H.S.). Normal serum corrected the binding defects of TTP serum. Interestingly, the mixture of two TTP sera (W.J. and H.S.) mutually corrected their PGI2 binding defects. In addition, although in vivo plasma transfusions improved the PGI2 binding activity of W.J. and H.S., there existed a striking difference in the nature of their response. These observations indicate that there is at least two types of PGI2 binding defects in TTP. Our data indicate that TTP is associated with diminished serum binding of PGI2. This defect may reduce the availability of PGI2 to damaged vascular sites and decrease an important modulator of platelet thrombus formation at times of severe vascular insult. Images PMID:3880771

  2. Risk Factors for Autoimmune Diseases Development After Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Roriz, Mélanie; Landais, Mickael; Desprez, Jonathan; Barbet, Christelle; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Wynckel, Alain; Baudel, Jean-Luc; Provôt, François; Pène, Frédéric; Mira, Jean-Paul; Presne, Claire; Poullin, Pascale; Delmas, Yahsou; Kanouni, Tarik; Seguin, Amélie; Mousson, Christiane; Servais, Aude; Bordessoule, Dominique; Perez, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Veyradier, Agnès; Halimi, Jean-Michel; Hamidou, Mohamed; Coppo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) can be associated with other autoimmune disorders, but their prevalence following autoimmune TTP remains unknown. To assess the prevalence of autoimmune disorders associated with TTP and to determine risk factors for and the time course of the development of an autoimmune disorder after a TTP episode, we performed a cross sectional study. Two-hundred sixty-one cases of autoimmune TTP were included in the French Reference Center registry between October, 2000 and May, 2009. Clinical and laboratory data available at time of TTP diagnosis were recovered. Each center was contacted to collect the more recent data and diagnosis criteria for autoimmunity. Fifty-six patients presented an autoimmune disorder in association with TTP, 9 years before TTP (median; min: 2 yr, max: 32 yr) (26 cases), at the time of TTP diagnosis (17 cases) or during follow-up (17 cases), up to 12 years after TTP diagnosis (mean, 22 mo). The most frequent autoimmune disorder reported was systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (26 cases) and Sjögren syndrome (8 cases). The presence of additional autoimmune disorders had no impact on outcomes of an acute TTP or the occurrence of relapse. Two factors evaluated at TTP diagnosis were significantly associated with the development of an autoimmune disorder during follow-up: the presence of antidouble stranded (ds)DNA antibodies (hazard ratio (HR): 4.98; 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.64–15.14]) and anti-SSA antibodies (HR: 9.98; 95% CI [3.59–27.76]). A follow-up across many years is necessary after an acute TTP, especially when anti-SSA or anti-dsDNA antibodies are present on TTP diagnosis, to detect autoimmune disorders early before immunologic events spread to prevent disabling complications. PMID:26496263

  3. Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Noonavath, Ravinder Naik; Lakshmi, Chandrasekharan Padma; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Kate, Vikram

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effect of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication on platelet counts in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (cITP). METHODS: A total of 36 cITP patients were included in the study. The diagnosis of H. pylori was done by rapid urease test and Giemsa staining of the gastric biopsy specimen. All H. pylori positive patients received standard triple therapy for 14 d and were subjected for repeat endoscopy at 6 wk. Patients who continued to be positive for H. pylori on second endoscopy received second line salvage therapy. All the patients were assessed for platelet response at 6 wk, 3rd and 6th months. RESULTS: Of the 36 patients, 17 were positive for H. pylori infection and eradication was achieved in 16 patients. The mean baseline platelet count in the eradicated patients was 88615.38 ± 30117.93/mm3 and platelet count after eradication at 6 wk, 3 mo and 6 mo was 143230.77 ± 52437.51/mm3 (P = 0.003), 152562.50 ± 52892.3/mm3 (P = 0.0001), 150187.50 ± 41796.68/mm3 (P = 0.0001) respectively and in the negative patients, the mean baseline count was 71000.00 ± 33216.46/mm3 and at 6 wk, 3rd and 6th month follow up was 137631.58 ± 74364.13/mm3 (P = 0.001), 125578.95 ± 71472.1/mm3 (P = 0.005), 77210.53 ± 56892.28/mm3 (P = 0.684) respectively. CONCLUSION: Eradication of H. pylori leads to increase in platelet counts in patients with cITP and can be recommended as a complementary treatment with conventional therapy. PMID:24944483

  4. Platelet-associated complement C3 in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1982-05-01

    Platelet-associated C3 (PA-C3) was measured with a quantitative immunofluorescence assay. With this assay, PA-C3 levels were determined for 78 normal volunteers, 30 patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), and 20 patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias. Platelet-associatd IgG (PA-lgG) levels were also measured with our standard quantitative immunofluorescence assay. All patients with nonimmune thrombocytopenias and ITP in remission had normal PA-C3 levels. Twenty-four patients with active ITP wre classified into 3 groups: 9 (38%) with increased PA-IgG and normal PA-C3 levels, 10 (42%) with elevated PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels, and 5 (20%) with increased PA-C3 values only. A direct correlation was found between PA-C3 and PA-IgG levels. PA-IgG levels were higher in the group of patients with elevated PA-C3 levels than in those with normal values. Platelet survival studies showed reduced survival times of 1.5-2.5 days for the 5 patients with elevated PA-C3 levels only. Elevated PA-C3 levels returned to normal in 7 ITP patients whose platelet counts increased in response to corticosteriod therapy or to splenectomy. Therefore, PA-C3 and PA-IgG assays can be used to identify patients with ITP, to follow their response to therapy, and to classify them into immunologic subgroups similar to red cell classifiation by Coombs' testing in immune hemolytic anemia.

  5. Complement and cytokine response in acute Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, John-Paul; Langley, Kathryn; Heelas, Edward; Machin, Samuel J; Scully, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Complement dysregulation is key in the pathogenesis of atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (aHUS), but no clear role for complement has been identified in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). We aimed to assess complement activation and cytokine response in acute antibody-mediated TTP. Complement C3a and C5a and cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor, interferon-γ and IL-17a) were measured in 20 acute TTP patients and 49 remission cases. Anti-ADAMTS13 immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtypes were measured in acute patients in order to study the association with complement activation. In acute TTP, median C3a and C5a were significantly elevated compared to remission, C3a 63·9 ng/ml vs. 38·2 ng/ml (P < 0·001) and C5a 16·4 ng/ml vs. 9·29 ng/ml (P < 0·001), respectively. Median IL-6 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the acute vs. remission groups, IL-6: 8 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P = 0·003), IL-10: 6 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P < 0·001). C3a levels correlated with both anti-ADAMTS13 IgG (rs = 0·604, P = 0·017) and IL-10 (rs = 0·692, P = 0·006). No anti-ADAMTS13 IgG subtype was associated with higher complement activation, but patients with the highest C3a levels had 3 or 4 IgG subtypes present. These results suggest complement anaphylatoxin levels are higher in acute TTP cases than in remission, and the complement response seen acutely may relate to anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibody and IL-10 levels. PMID:24372446

  6. Low serum levels of interleukin-6 in children with post-infective acute thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Munda, S E; Sciotto, A; Schilirò, G

    1995-08-01

    Interleukin-6 plays an important role in host defense mechanisms and it appears to be a major mediator of the acute-phase response. IL-6 is also an important thrombocytopoietic factor. High serum levels of IL-6 are present in reactive thrombocytosis. The number and function of circulating platelets are the major factors that affect megakaryocytopoiesis by thrombopoietin. High levels of thrombopoietin have been observed in patients with thrombocytopenic purpura. To evaluate a possible thrombopoietin-like function of IL-6, we measured IL-6 levels in the serum of patients affected by post-infective acute thrombocytopenic purpura using a sensitive ELISSA assay. As controls, we studied normal subjects and patients with reactive thrombocytosis. No significant difference was observed between thrombocytopenic patients and normal controls. High IL-6 levels were present in patients with reactive thrombocytosis. In conclusion, we had not observed high levels of IL-6 in acute thrombocytopenic purpura and, very probably, IL-6 is not involved in the regulation of platelet mass for the hemostatic function. The thrombocytopoietic activity of IL-6 is another acute-phase response and it is consistent with the other functions of this cytokine. This suggests an active participation of platelets in host defense mechanisms. PMID:7628586

  7. [A case of renal cell carcinoma associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Atsushi; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Ohno, Rena; Yoshida, Soichiro; Ishii, Nobuyuki; Terao, Toshiya; Watanabe, Toru; Yamada, Takumi

    2005-06-01

    A 29-year-old woman was referred to another hospital with complaints of bruising and ecchymosis and thrombocytopenia (12,000/microl) was pointed out. After some examinations, the patient was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and was started on steroid therapy. Then the patient consulted our hospital and computerized tomography revealed a left renal tumor 4 cm in diameter. Under the diagnosis of left renal neoplasm we performed left nephrectomy and splenectomy with preoperative high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin treatment. Pathological examination revealed clear cell carcinoma. After the operation, the platelet count increased gradually. We should consider bleeding tendency by thrombocytopenia and side effect of long-term steroid treatment when we perform operations on patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:16050475

  8. A case of refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasmapheresis and rituximab.

    PubMed

    Kirui, Nicholas; Sokwala, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

     Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder with no prevalence or incidence studies in sub-Saharan Africa. Acquired TTP has several causes, all of which lead to decreased activity of von Willebrand factor cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) due to autoantibodies that are directed towards ADAMTS13. We report a case of a 46-year-old man who presented with most of the classic clinical manifestations of TTP. PMID:27384362

  9. Plasma infusions in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura complicating systemic lupus erythematosus—a successful outcome

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, R.; Markel, A.; Carter, A.; Brook, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    A severe form of acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) developed in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Infusions of large amounts of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) were added to steroid therapy and resulted in a rapid improvement and remission. Further episodes of thrombocytopenia and abdominal pains during a two-year follow-up were successfully treated with plasma alone and this indicates the important role of FFP infusions in the recovery of this patient. PMID:6890673

  10. Rapid irreversible encephalopathy associated with anti-D immune globulin treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Kenneth; Horkan, Clare; Barb, Ilie T; Arbelaez, Christian; Hodgdon, Travis A; Yodice, Paul C

    2004-11-01

    Intravenous Rho (D) immune globulin (IV RhIG, WinRho SDF) has been shown to be a safe treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Common side effects of IV RhIG include mild hemolysis, febrile reaction, and headache. Significant hemolysis with renal impairment following IV RhIG has been reported. We report a case of irreversible encephalopathy 48 hr following an infusion of IV RhIG for treatment of ITP. PMID:15495245

  11. Presumptive thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura following a hump-nosed viper (Hypnale hypnale) bite: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hump-nosed viper bites are frequent in southern India and Sri Lanka. However, the published literature on this snakebite is limited and its venom composition is not well characterized. In this case, we report a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like syndrome following envenoming which, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported in the literature before. A 55-year-old woman from southern Sri Lanka presented to the local hospital 12 hours after a hump-nosed viper (Hypnale hypnale) bite. Five days later, she developed a syndrome that was characteristic of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with fever, thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolysis, renal impairment and neurological dysfunction in the form of confusion and coma. Her clinical syndrome and relevant laboratory parameters improved after she was treated with therapeutic plasma exchange. We compared our observations on this patient with the current literature and concluded that thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a theoretically plausible yet unreported manifestation of hump-nosed viper bite up to this moment. This study also provides an important message for clinicians to look out for this complication in hump-nosed viper bites since timely treatment can be lifesaving. PMID:24987409

  12. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura presenting as acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouabbi, Jason Aboudi; Zein, Rami; Kafri, Zyad; Al-Katib, Ayad; Hadid, Tarik

    2016-08-01

    In patients presenting with thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction, prompt initiation of plasma exchange takes precedence over other invasive diagnostic procedures for coronary artery disease. Such procedures should be delayed until clinical condition and laboratory parameters have been stabilized. PMID:27525072

  13. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Culquichicón-Sánchez, Carlos; Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m(2) (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×10(9) platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient's glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin. PMID:27026836

  14. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Gastritis by H. pylori Associated With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Ricardo; Flores-Guevara, Igor; Espinoza Morales, Frank; Mejia, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    We present the 15th case reported worldwide and 3rd case reported in Latin America of immune thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Scopus, MEDLINE, and SciELO. An 11-year-old male patient of mixed ethnicity with immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Type 1 diabetes mellitus, and gastritis due to H. pylori presented to the emergency room with petechiae, ecchymosis, and gingival and conjunctival bleeding that had been worsening for the past three months. The patient had a body mass index of 18.85 kg/m2 (P75). A biochemical analysis showed 1×109 platelets/L, increased prothrombin time, increased partial thromboplastin time, and an HbA1C of 7.84% on admission. He was prescribed a single dose of intravenous methylprednisolone 750 mg in 100 mL of NaCl and daily oral 50 mg prednisolone, with intravenous 250 mg tranexamic acid every eight hours. The patient’s glycemic control was continued with the administration of insulin glargine (30 units every 24 hours) and prandial insulin glulisine (five to eight units per meal). Before admission, the patient was on a prescribed treatment of sitagliptin 50 mg and metformin 850 mg, but this was suspended in the emergency room. For the eradication of H. pylori he was prescribed amoxicillin 500 mg every eight hours, oral clarithromycin 335 mg every 12 hours, and IV omeprazole 40 mg. After 15 days, he showed disease resolution and he was discharged to his home with orders to follow-up with pediatrics, hematology, and endocrinology services. The first-line treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients with active bleeding and a platelet count < 30,000 platelets/μl is the administration of corticosteroids and inmunoglobulin. PMID:27026836

  15. Focal ulcerative ileocolitis with terminal thrombocytopenic purpura in juvenile cotton top tamarins (Saguinus oedipus).

    PubMed

    Snook, S S; Canfield, D R; Sehgal, P K; King, N W

    1989-03-01

    A newly recognized syndrome characterized by an acute focal ulcerative ileocolitis, anemia and thrombocytopenic purpura in five juvenile cotton-top tamarins is described. The presentation and morphology of this syndrome is distinct from any other reported gastrointestinal disease reported in tamarins. Traditional etiologies such as viruses, ingested toxins, Campylobacter, Salmonella and Yersinia and Clostridium difficile are not considered likely etiologic agents. Nontraditional etiologies such as anaerobes or pathologic strains of Escherichia coli are now being considered. This syndrome is of potential significance to ongoing research into the etiology of idiopathic tamarin colitis. PMID:2496272

  16. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura in ulcerative colitis: a case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Subhash; Finn, Sarah; Obah, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 extraintestinal manifestations are reported in ulcerative colitis (UC). A commonly reported hematological manifestation is autoimmune hemolytic anemia. On rare occasions, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been reported with UC. The presence of thrombocytopenia can complicate the clinical scenario as the number of bloody bowel movements is an important indicator of disease activity in UC. A proposed theory for this association is antigenic mimicry between a platelet surface antigen and bacterial glycoprotein. We are reporting a case of UC and associated ITP managed successfully with anti-TNF therapy. We also performed a systemic review of case reports and a case series reporting this association. PMID:24765254

  17. Intravenous anti-D immunoglobulin in the treatment of resistant immune thrombocytopenic purpura in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sieunarine, K; Shapiro, S; Al Obaidi, M J; Girling, J

    2007-04-01

    A 35-week pregnant 38-year-old woman presented with isolated thrombocytopenia (platelet count 4 x 10(9)/l). Investigations confirmed immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and she received treatment with prednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulins with no increment in the platelet count. At 37 and 38 weeks of the pregnancy, she received two doses of WinRho (anti-D immunoglobulin) at 50 microg/kg. Five days later, with a platelet count of 46 x 10(9)/l, she had an uncomplicated normal vaginal delivery. WinRho is a useful adjunct to other first-line treatment modalities for immune thrombocytopenia in pregnancy. PMID:17309547

  18. Alternatives to splenectomy in the management of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood.

    PubMed

    Russell, E C; Maurer, H M

    1984-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in childhood exerts influence on the medical, social, and psychologic life of the child. Chronic platelet destruction takes place in the spleen and splenectomy results in complete and permanent recovery of normal platelet counts in most patients. Splenectomy is not without risks, however, and alternative methods of management have been sought. Chronic corticosteroid administration, immunosuppressive agents, infusions of fresh-frozen plasma, plasmapheresis, and high-dose intravenous gammaglobulin administration have all met with variable degrees of success. At the present time, there appears to be no completely satisfactory alternative to splenectomy in the management of the child with chronic ITP. PMID:6205604

  19. Coombs Positive Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Male Pediatric Patient: An Urgent Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Zenno, Anna; Richardson, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a thrombotic microangiopathy often caused by deficiency of von Willebrand (vW) factor cleaving protease, ADAMTS-13, leading to large vW multimers and intravascular platelet aggregation. Hemolysis in TTP is mechanical and nonimmune mediated, thus Coombs testing is usually negative. We report a case of an adolescent with thrombocytopenia and Coombs positive anemia, diagnosed with Evans syndrome, but ultimately found to have TTP. TTP should be considered in children with thrombocytopenia and Coombs positive anemia who are refractory to steroids or develop signs of microangiopathy.  Recognition of this presentation can lead to life-saving treatment with plasma exchange. PMID:27195703

  20. [Protocol for the study and treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). ITP-2010].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, E; Fernández-Delgado, R; Sastre, A; Toll, T; Llort, A; Molina, J; Astigarraga, I; Dasí, M A; Cervera, A

    2011-06-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), formerly known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is a disease in which clinical and therapeutic management has always been controversial. The ITP working group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology has updated its guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of ITP in children based on current guidelines, literature review, clinical trials and member consensus. The primary objective was to lessen clinical variability in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in order to obtain best clinical results with minimal adverse events and good quality of life. PMID:21439923

  1. Clopidogrel-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura following Endovascular Treatment of Spontaneous Carotid Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Rubano, Jerry A.; Chen, Kwan; Sullivan, Brianne; Vosswinkel, James A.; Jawa, Randeep S.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening multisystem disease secondary to platelet aggregation. We present a patient who developed profound thrombocytopenia and anemia 8 days following initiation of therapy with clopidogrel after stent placement for carotid artery dissection. She did not have a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin domain 13 (ADAMTS 13) deficiency. Management included steroids and therapeutic plasma exchange. Clopidogrel has rarely been associated with TTP. Unlike other causes of acquired TTP, the diagnosis of early clopidogrel-associated TTP is largely clinical given the infrequent reduction in ADAMTS 13 activity. PMID:26623244

  2. Stroke due to typical thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated successfully with intravenous thrombolysis and therapeutic plasma exchange

    PubMed Central

    Boattini, Matteo; Procaccianti, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a 39-year-old man with expressive aphasia due to occlusion of the temporal stem of the left middle cerebral artery. Laboratory tests showed microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. A thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was diagnosed, and thrombolytic therapy (TT) with alteplase followed by therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) were performed with complete resolution of symptoms. The gold standard TTP treatment is TPE, and its delay can be lethal. The use of TT in TTP is controversial and has potential risks. This case shows a successful TT in a patient with typical TTP presenting as a stroke due to a large cerebral artery occlusion. PMID:23362068

  3. Surgical treatment of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: results in 107 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Cola, B.; Tonielli, E.; Sacco, S.; Brulatti, M.; Franchini, A.

    1986-07-01

    Between 1972 and 1985, 107 patients with chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura underwent splenectomy. Platelet life span and sites of sequestration were studied with labelled platelets and external scanning. Medical treatment was always of scarce and transient effectiveness and had considerable side effects. Splenectomy had minimal complications and mortality and caused no hazard of overwhelming sepsis in adults. The results of splenectomy were very satisfying, especially when platelet sequestration was mainly splenic (remission in about 90% of patients). Surgical treatment is at present the most effective in patients with chronic ITP.

  4. Controversies in the diagnosis and management of childhood acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Segel, George B; Feig, Stephen A

    2009-09-01

    Acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) occurs most commonly in young children who present with severe isolated thrombocytopenia and purpura. A marrow examination is not required unless glucocorticoids are used, lest treatment mask incipient acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but controversy exists here. The recommendations for evaluation and management remain controversial, since prospective controlled trials have not been done. There is some consensus based on experience and empiric data. Almost all children with acute ITP will recover completely without therapy. Although the various treatments may increase the platelet count, they do not influence the outcome of the illness, may increase cost, and cause significant side effects. Therefore, careful observation may be the best management option for the patient with ITP, in the absence of severe bleeding. The data available relevant to these issues are discussed. PMID:19165890

  5. The spleen and splenectomy in immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    2000-01-01

    The benefits of surgical splenectomy in patients with immune (Idiopathic) thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) probably reflect the combined effects of eliminating a source of antiplatelet antibody synthesis as well as the primary site of platelet destruction. The recent availability of intravenous Rho(D) Immune globulin (WinRho SDF; Nabi, Boca Raton, FL) presents an opportunity to extend the duration of nonsurgical (spleen-sparing) management of chronic ITP by inducing reversible Fc blockade. While new methods for laparoscopic splenectomy may offer improved surgical outcomes and reduced costs for ITP patients in the near-term, the long-term consequences of splenectomy remain to be determined. Partial splenectomy has been shown to be effective in the management of anemia in hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis, while preserving vital splenic phagocytic and immune functions. The concept that cell destruction occurs in reticuloendothelial cells has been updated with recognition that the mononuclear phagocyte is neither a reticular nor an endothelial cell. Immune phagocytosis is now understood to be mediated by macrophage IgG Fc and complement receptors. A key factor for devising a strategy for selecting medical or surgical splenectomy, or postponing splenectomy, is an assessment of the relative importance of splenic immune versus phagocytic function in the pathogenesis of ITP. PMID:10676918

  6. Multiple domains of ADAMTS13 are targeted by autoantibodies against ADAMTS13 in patients with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, X. Long; Wu, Haifeng M.; Shang, Dezhi; Falls, Erica; Skipwith, Christopher G.; Cataland, Spero R.; Bennett, Charles L.; Kwaan, Hau C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Type G immunoglobulins against ADAMTS13 are the primary cause of acquired (idiopathic) thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, the domains of ADAMTS13 which the type G anti-ADAMT13 immunoglobulins target have not been investigated in a large cohort of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Design and Methods Sixty-seven patients with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura were prospectively collected from three major U.S. centers. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay determined plasma concentrations of anti-ADAMTS13 type G immunoglobulins, whereas immunoprecipitation plus western blotting determined the binding domains of these type G immunoglobulins. Results Plasma anti-ADAMTS13 type G immunoglobulins from 67 patients all bound full-length ADAMTS13 and a variant truncated after the eighth TSP1 repeat (delCUB). Approximately 97% (65/67) of patients harbored type G immunoglobulins targeted against a variant truncated after the spacer domain (MDTCS). However, only 12% of patients’ samples reacted with a variant lacking the Cys-rich and spacer domains (MDT). In addition, approximately 37%, 31%, and 46% of patients’ type G immunoglobulins interacted with the ADAMTS13 fragment containing TSP1 2-8 repeats (T2-8), CUB domains, and TSP1 5-8 repeats plus CUB domains (T5-8CUB), respectively. The presence of type G immunoglobulins targeted against the T2-8 and/or CUB domains was inversely correlated with the patients’ platelet counts on admission. Conclusions This multicenter study further demonstrated that the multiple domains of ADAMTS13, particularly the Cys-rich and spacer domains, are frequently targeted by anti-ADAMTS13 type G immunoglobulins in patients with acquired (idiopathic) thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Our data shed more light on the pathogenesis of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and provide further rationales for adjunctive immunotherapy. PMID:20378566

  7. Role of plasmapheresis in thrombocytopenic purpura associated with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Patel, T C; Moore, S B; Pineda, A A; Witzig, T E

    1996-06-01

    A 67-year-old man with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia had a relapse of chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), which had been refractory to corticosteroids, splenectomy, vinca alkaloids, and high-dose intravenous gamma-globulin therapy. A biclonal gammopathy (IgM kappa and IgG lambda) was detected in his serum and was likely responsible for his refractory thrombocytopenia. He was treated with chlorambucil and prednisone. Plasmapheresis was effective in temporarily maintaining platelet counts and in decreasing morbidity until immunosuppression was completely effective against the production of the monoclonal protein. The previously reported experiences with use of plasmapheresis in patients with chronic ITP are discussed. Plasmapheresis may be of value in the treatment of selected patients with severe ITP and monoclonal gammopathy. PMID:8642891

  8. The role of splenectomy in multimodality treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, P A; Rayner, A A; Linker, C A; Schuman, M A; Liu, E T; Hohn, D C

    1985-01-01

    Current treatment modalities for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) include plasmapheresis (PP), splenectomy, steroids, dextran, other antiplatelet agents, and vinca alkaloids. Prior to the development of PP and use of multimodality treatment for TTP, mortality rates exceeded 50%. This report reviews 11 patients treated for TTP, demonstrates the successful use of splenectomy as salvage therapy, and defines our indications for splenectomy in the treatment of this disorder. Ten of 11 patients were initially treated with PP; three responded completely and one died of fulminant disease. Six patients had a transient partial response to plasmapheresis and were subsequently treated with splenectomy, steroids, and dextran-70. Initial plasmapheresis resulted in improvement in laboratory values and clinical status in those patients requiring splenectomy. Durable remission (6-48 months) was achieved in 91% of patients with minimal morbidity. PMID:2412500

  9. Ciprofloxacin-Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Case of Successful Treatment and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan Talib; Diaz-Fuentes, Gilda; Jadhav, Preeti; Khaja, Misbahuddin

    2015-01-01

    A 49-year-old African American woman was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, lethargy, and confusion. She was receiving ciprofloxacin for a urinary-tract infection prior to admission. Laboratory examination revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and serum creatinine. Peripheral smear showed numerous schistocytes, and the patient was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Ciprofloxacin was identified as the offending agent. The patient received treatment with steroids and plasmapheresis, which led to rapid clinical recovery. This is the first case to our knowledge of successfully treated ciprofloxacin-induced TTP; previously reported cases had fulminant outcomes. Quinolones are an important part of the antibiotic armamentarium, and this case can raise awareness of the association between quinolones and TTP. A high index of suspicion for detection and early and aggressive management are vitally important for a successful outcome. PMID:26587293

  10. [A Case of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura during Adjuvant Chemotherapy for Colon Cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahara, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Shinichi; Ogasawara, Takeshi; Shida, Takashi; Nomura, Satoru; Sato, Yoshiharu; Takahashi, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    A 76-year-old man underwent surgery for sigmoid colon cancer. The pathological finding was stage Ⅱ with a high-risk of recurrence (SI [bladder], l y0, v2, pN0, H0, P0, M0). He was treated with TS-1 as adjuvant chemotherapy. After the 1 course of chemotherapy, his platelet count was 4,000/mL. The high index of platelet associated IgG (PA-IgG) and bone marrow examination suggested that thrombocytopenia was caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The platelet count improved by prednisolone administration and Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment. After 6 months with no administration of adjuvant chemotherapy, the colon cancer recurred locally, and we performed a Hartmann's operation. PMID:26805292

  11. Refractory chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Horino, Satoshi; Rikiishi, Takeshi; Niizuma, Hidetaka; Abe, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Yuko; Onuma, Masaei; Hoshi, Yoshiyuki; Sasahara, Yoji; Yoshinari, Miyako; Kazama, Takuro; Hayashi, Yutaka; Kumaki, Satoru; Tsuchiya, Shigeru

    2009-11-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been associated with several hematologic malignancies such as Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but it is rare in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here, we report a 7-year-old girl with chronic ITP during early intensive phase of chemotherapy for ALL. She underwent splenectomy because thrombocytopenia had persisted even after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), steroids, vincristine, rituximab, and anti-D antibody. After splenectomy, her platelet count had recovered, and maintenance therapy could be resumed with a support of IVIG. To our knowledge, this is the first child case of chronic ITP during chemotherapy for ALL and splenectomy was effective in this patient. PMID:19816666

  12. Using decision analysis techniques to deal with "unanswerable" questions in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Robert

    2003-12-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common disorder with rare adverse outcomes. This makes it a particularly difficult area in which to undertake conventional studies. An alternative method for solving clinical questions is decision analysis, which is in essence a computer-assisted synthesis of the literature. Using the example of a newly diagnosed ITP patient, the author attempts to answer the question of whether a bone marrow aspirate (BMA) is required prior to starting steroids. Using decision analysis methodology, the author determines that BMA is not essential prior to starting steroids. More importantly, three variables critical to the decision-making process are determined: the risk of death from the BMA procedure, the altered chance of survival for a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) inappropriately given steroids, and how sensitive the complete blood count is at determining the risk of ALL. This scenario demonstrates the value of decision analysis and lays the groundwork for future endeavors. PMID:14668643

  13. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura induced by intestinal tuberculosis in a liver transplant recipient

    PubMed Central

    Lugao, Renata dos Santos; Motta, Marina Pamponet; de Azevedo, Matheus Freitas Cardoso; de Lima, Roque Gabriel Rezende; Abrantes, Flávia de Azevedo; Abdala, Edson; Carrilho, Flair José; Mazo, Daniel Ferraz de Campos

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical manifestations are associated directly or indirectly with tuberculosis. Among them, haematological abnormalities can be found in both the pulmonary and extrapulmonary forms of the disease. We report a case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with intestinal tuberculosis in a liver transplant recipient. The initial management of thrombocytopenia, with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin, was not successful, and the lack of tuberculosis symptoms hampered a proper diagnostic evaluation. After the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis and the initiation of specific treatment, a progressive increase in the platelet count was observed. The mechanism of ITP associated with tuberculosis has not yet been well elucidated, but this condition should be considered in cases of ITP that are unresponsive to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin, especially in immunocompromised patients and those from endemic areas. PMID:25009408

  14. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M.; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  15. Nocardia transvalensis Disseminated Infection in an Immunocompromised Patient with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    García-Méndez, Jorge; Carrillo-Casas, Erika M; Rangel-Cordero, Andrea; Leyva-Leyva, Margarita; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Arenas, Roberto; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia transvalensis complex includes a wide range of microorganisms with specific antimicrobial resistance patterns. N. transvalensis is an unusual Nocardia species. However, it must be differentiated due to its natural resistance to aminoglycosides while other Nocardia species are susceptible. The present report describes a Nocardia species involved in an uncommon clinical case of a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and pulmonary nocardiosis. Microbiological and molecular techniques based on the sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene allowed diagnosis of Nocardia transvalensis sensu stricto. The successful treatment was based on trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and other drugs. We conclude that molecular identification of Nocardia species is a valuable technique to guide good treatment and prognosis and recommend its use for daily bases diagnosis. PMID:27313917

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura as an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus with acquired ADAMTS 13 antibody.

    PubMed

    Changcharoen, Bhisit; Bolger, Dennis Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient presenting with headache, fatigue, ecchymoses and recent, excessive vaginal bleeding. Prompt review of the peripheral blood smear showed evidence of microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange and corticosteroids were started urgently. The patient responded favourably to the treatment. Subsequently, positive serological markers returned and were compatible with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs, member 13 (ADAMTS 13) activity was remarkably low with a positive inhibitory ADAMTS 13 antibody. Mycophenolate and hydroxychloroquine were started along with a prolonged course and taper of corticosteroids. These medications have been maintained with an excellent response in 14 months of follow-up. PMID:25701834

  17. Subcutaneous anti-D treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Kjaersgaard, Mimi; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Hasle, Henrik

    2009-12-15

    We investigated the effect of subcutaneous anti-D IgG as platelet enhancing therapy in children with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Twenty-three children were treated with subcutaneous anti-D 50 microg/kg. The median platelet count increased from 7 x 10(9) to 31 x 10(9)/L on day 3 (P < 0.01). The median decline in hemoglobin was 1.3 g/dl. Two children experienced minor fever and chills within 24 hr of treatment. Pain at the injection site was common but self-limiting with no effect on activity level. These results suggest subcutaneous anti-D IgG 50 microg/kg as an effective and well-tolerated treatment option in childhood ITP. PMID:19722275

  18. Successful use of rituximab in refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in a patient with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, M; Al-Rasheed, M; Al-Muhani, A

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a common autoimmune disease in patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We describe a 36-year-old woman with CVID. The clinical course of her disease was complicated by bronchiectasis, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and portal vein thrombosis. She developed recurrent attacks of ITP refractory to high doses of corticosteroid, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and splenectomy. She received a total of 5 doses of rituximab (375 mg/m2) and achieved an immediate and persistent response. Therapy was well tolerated. Her platelet count remained above 370,000/microL for 8 months of follow-up, despite repeated infections. During this period the patient remained off corticosteroids and on continuous IVIG replacement therapy. PMID:20635793

  19. Peliosis hepatis presenting with massive hepatomegaly in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun Bean; Kim, Do Kyung; Byun, Sun Jeong; Park, Ji Hye; Choi, Jin Young; Park, Young Nyun; Kim, Do Young

    2015-12-01

    Peliosis hepatis is a rare condition that can cause hepatic hemorrhage, rupture, and ultimately liver failure. Several authors have reported that peliosis hepatis develops in association with chronic wasting disease or prolonged use of anabolic steroids or oral contraceptives. In this report we describe a case in which discontinuation of steroid therapy improved the condition of a patient with peliosis hepatis. Our patient was a 64-year-old woman with a history of long-term steroid treatment for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura . Her symptoms included abdominal pain and weight loss; the only finding of a physical examination was hepatomegaly. We performed computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the liver and a liver biopsy. Based on these findings plus clinical observations, she was diagnosed with peliosis hepatis and her steroid treatment was terminated. The patient recovered completely 3 months after steroid discontinuation, and remained stable over the following 6 months. PMID:26770928

  20. Clopidogrel-induced refractory thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura successfully treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Khodor, Sara; Castro, Miguel; McNamara, Colin; Chaulagain, Chakra P

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a multisystem disorder characterized by microvascular aggregation of platelets and fibrin strands causing thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and organ dysfunction. TTP can develop as a result of a deficiency in ADAMTS13 enzyme activity due to either a genetic defect or, more commonly, the development of anti-ADAMTS13 autoantibodies. TTP can also be associated with pregnancy, organ transplant, lupus, infections, and drugs. Here, we present a case of TTP that developed shortly after the start of clopidogrel treatment for acute ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction, and describe the clinical presentation, refractory course of the disease, and successful induction of remission through the use of rituximab in a setting of pre-existing autoimmune diseases. PMID:26684918

  1. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura induced by intestinal tuberculosis in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Lugao, Renata dos Santos; Motta, Marina Pamponet; de Azevedo, Matheus Freitas Cardoso; de Lima, Roque Gabriel Rezende; Abrantes, Flávia de Azevedo; Abdala, Edson; Carrilho, Flair José; Mazo, Daniel Ferraz de Campos

    2014-07-01

    A variety of clinical manifestations are associated directly or indirectly with tuberculosis. Among them, haematological abnormalities can be found in both the pulmonary and extrapulmonary forms of the disease. We report a case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with intestinal tuberculosis in a liver transplant recipient. The initial management of thrombocytopenia, with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin, was not successful, and the lack of tuberculosis symptoms hampered a proper diagnostic evaluation. After the diagnosis of intestinal tuberculosis and the initiation of specific treatment, a progressive increase in the platelet count was observed. The mechanism of ITP associated with tuberculosis has not yet been well elucidated, but this condition should be considered in cases of ITP that are unresponsive to steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin, especially in immunocompromised patients and those from endemic areas. PMID:25009408

  2. Cytokine-induced killer cell therapy-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: rare but noteworthy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yong; Gao, Quanli; Lin, Jizhen; Zhang, Qinxian; Xu, Benling; Song, Yongping

    2016-09-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a diminished platelet count, an autoimmune condition with antibodies against platelets and an increased tendency to bleed. The association between ITP and solid tumors is uncommon. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cell therapy is a well tolerated and promising cancer treatment with minimal toxicity. For the first time, CIK cell therapy was reported to be followed by ITP. The mechanism through which CIK induces ITP remains unclear. Imbalanced ratio of Th cells, decreased numbers or impaired function of Treg cells and excessive secretion of cytokines inducing abnormal activation of B cells may be among the possible reasons. Therefore, a better understanding of this rare condition will require further investigation of these cases. PMID:27485074

  3. Novel platelet-agglutinating protein from a thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, F A; Lian, E C

    1985-01-01

    A novel platelet-agglutinating protein (PAP) was purified approximately 2,000-fold from the plasma of a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephacel and concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatographies. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with and without reduction, this preparation revealed a major protein band with a molecular weight of 37,000, and a minor band with a molecular weight of 32,000-34,000. After elution from the gel, only the 37,000-mol wt protein corresponding to the major band induced the platelet agglutination. When four normal plasmas and the recovery plasma from the same TTP patient were subjected to the similar purification steps, the 37,000-mol wt major band was absent. The 125I-PAP bound to the platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. The platelet agglutination induced by PAP was not inhibited by hirudin, heparin in the presence of antithrombin III, phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, apyrase, aspirin, or prostaglandin I2. However, it was inhibited by IgG from normal adults and from the same TTP patient after recovery. The anti-37,000-mol wt PAP antiserum prepared in the rabbit formed a single precipitin line against the highly purified PAP. Using this antiserum in the Western immunoblotting, the 37,000-mol wt protein band was found in the three TTP plasmas, of which the platelet-agglutinating activity was inhibited by the anti-37,000-mol wt PAP IgG. The 37,000-mol wt immunoprecipitin band was absent in the plasmas obtained from another two TTP patients, two normal subjects, two patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and two patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation. These results suggest that the 37,000-mol wt PAP is present only in certain cases of TTP, and is likely to be responsible for the formation of platelet thrombi in the microcirculation. Images PMID:3932464

  4. Hemorrhagic Stroke in an Adolescent Female with HIV-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Rakhmanina, Natella; Wong, Edward CC; Davis, Jeremiah C; Ray, Patricio E

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection can trigger acute episodes of Idiopathic Thrombocytoponic Purpura (ITP), and Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP), particularly in populations with advanced disease and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). These diseases should be distinguished because they respond to different treatments. Previous studies done in adults with HIV-TTP have recommended the prompt initiation or re-initiation of ART in parallel with plasma exchange therapy to improve the clinical outcome of these patients. Here, we describe a case of HIV-TTP resulting in an acute hemorrhagic stroke in a 16 year old female with perinatally acquired HIV infection and non-adherence to ART, who presented with severe thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and a past medical history of HIV-ITP. Both differential diagnosis and treatments for HIV-ITP and HIV-TTP were considered simultaneously. A decrease in plasma ADAMTS13 activity (<5%) without detectable inhibitory antibodies confirmed the diagnosis of HIV-TTP. Re-initiation of ART and plasma exchange resulted in a marked decrease in the HIV-RNA viral load, recovery of the platelet count, and complete recovery was achieved with sustained virologic suppression. PMID:25429351

  5. Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Hemoglobin H Disease Early Misdiagnosed as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Series of Unfortunate Events

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Stamatia; Pasakiotou, Marily; Arapoglou, Stergios; Gigi, Eleni; Vetsiou, Evaggelia; Vlachaki, Efthymia

    2015-01-01

    We herein would like to report an interesting case of a patient who presented with anemia and thrombocytopenia combined with high serum Lactic Dehydrogenase where Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura was originally considered. As indicated a central venous catheter was inserted in his subclavian vein which led to mediastinal hematoma and finally intubation and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) hospitalization. After further examination patient was finally diagnosed with B12 deficiency in a setting of H hemoglobinopathy. There have been previous reports where pernicious anemia was originally diagnosed and treated as Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura but there has been none to our knowledge that was implicated with hemothorax and ICU hospitalization or correlated with thalassemia and we discuss the significance of accurate diagnosis in order to avoid adverse reactions and therapy implications. PMID:26609455

  6. Excessive naked megakaryocyte nuclei in myelodysplastic syndrome mimicking idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a complicated pre- and post-transplantation course.

    PubMed

    Olcay, Lale; Tuncer, A Murat; Okur, Hamza; Erdemli, Esra; Uysal, Zumrut; Cetin, Mualla; Duru, Feride; Cetinkaya, Duygu Uckan

    2009-09-01

    A boy 3 years 7 months old with thrombocytopenia and history of intracranial hemorrhage who underwent bone marrow transplantation is presented. He was refractory to steroids, immunoglobulin G, vincristine, azathioprine, cyclosporine A, interleukin-11, chemotherapy, and splenectomy. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was excluded by light /electron microscopic and flow cytometric findings; the diagnosis of refractory cytopenia, a subgroup of pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, was made. Naked megakaryocyte nuclei were 55.38 +/- 28.2% vs. 31.67 +/- 23.22% of all megakaryocytes in the patient and the control group of 9 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, respectively (p = .016). The posttransplatation course was complicated by delayed platelet engraftment, bronchiolitis obliterans associated with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved completely. PMID:19657988

  7. Elevated common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen expression in pediatric immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Cornelius, A S; Campbell, D; Schwartz, E; Poncz, M

    1991-01-01

    Bone marrow examination is often performed in thrombocytopenic children to distinguish immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) from acute leukemia. We describe a patient with thrombocytopenia and 50% common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) positivity in his marrow who was subsequently shown to have ITP. CALLA (CD10) is a surface antigen found in early B-lymphocytes and is elevated in most cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This case prompted us to prospectively study the frequency of immature lymphocyte populations in children with ITP. Fourteen patients with acute ITP and five with other conditions were studied. The two groups were comparable with respect to age: ITP mean, 4.3 (range 0.3-15.5) years; control mean, 5.8 (0.6-13.8) years. The ITP group had a significantly higher percentage of CD10 positive bone marrow lymphocytes (p = 0.007). Five of the 10 patients younger than 4 years of age in the ITP group had CD10 levels of greater than 30%, which is in the leukemic range, whereas none of the control patients had a CD10 levels of greater than 17% (p = 0.003). There was good correlation between CD10 positivity and B4 positivity indicating that both of these markers arise from the same population of immature B-lymphocytes. None of the ITP patients who were older than 4 years had a CD10 level of greater than 30%. We conclude that it is common to have an increase in the proportion of immature lymphocytes in the marrow of young children with ITP. The cause of this increase in CD10 positive cells is unknown.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1827572

  8. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  9. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with vaccinations: a review of reported cases.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Ceccarelli, Fulvia; Nesher, Gideon; Borella, Elisabetta; Odeh, Qasim; Conti, Fabrizio; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Valesini, Guido

    2014-12-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune condition characterized by low platelet count with mucocutaneous and other bleedings. Clinical manifestations may range from spontaneous formation of purpura and petechiae, especially on the extremities, to epistaxis, bleeding at the gums or menorrhagia, any of which occur usually if the platelet count is below 20,000 per μl. A very low count may result in the spontaneous formation of hematomas in the mouth or on other mucous membranes. Fatal complications, including subarachnoid or intracerebral, lower gastrointestinal or other internal bleeding can arise due to an extremely low count. Vaccines may induce ITP by several mechanisms. Vaccine-associated autoimmunity may stem not only from the antigen-mediated responses but also from other constituents of the vaccine, such as yeast proteins, adjuvants, and preservatives diluents. The most likely is through virally induced molecular mimicry. The binding of pathogenic autoantibodies to platelet and megakaryocytes may cause thrombocytopenia by different mechanisms, such as opsonization, direct activation of complement, or apoptotic pathways. The autoantibodies hypothesis is not sufficient to explain all ITP cases: In the anti-platelet antibody-negative cases, a complementary mechanism based on T cell immune-mediated mechanism has been suggested. In particular, T cell subsets seem dysregulated with an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as IFN-γ and TNF, and chemokines, as CXCL10. Vaccines are one of the most striking discoveries in human history that changed dramatically life expectancy. Nonetheless, the occurrence of adverse events and autoimmune phenomena has been described following vaccination, and ITP may represent one of this. PMID:25427992

  10. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed Central

    Maghbool, Maryam; Maghbool, Masood; Shahriari, Mehdi; Karimi, Mehran

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10–15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years). A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150×109/L) or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150×109/L). We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients. PMID:21589818

  11. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population. PMID:27383202

  12. Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Black People: Impact of Ethnicity on Survival and Genetic Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Suella; Jamme, Mathieu; Deligny, Christophe; Busson, Marc; Loiseau, Pascale; Azoulay, Elie; Galicier, Lionel; Pène, Frédéric; Provôt, François; Dossier, Antoine; Saheb, Samir; Veyradier, Agnès; Coppo, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Black people are at increased risk of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Whether clinical presentation of TTP in Black patients has specific features is unknown. We assessed here differences in TTP presentation and outcome between Black and White patients. Clinical presentation was comparable between both ethnic groups. However, prognosis differed with a lower death rate in Black patients than in White patients (2.7% versus 11.6%, respectively, P = .04). Ethnicity, increasing age and neurologic involvement were retained as risk factors for death in a multivariable model (P < .05 all). Sixty-day overall survival estimated by the Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with the Log-Rank test confirmed that Black patients had a better survival than White patients (P = .03). Salvage therapies were similarly performed between both groups, suggesting that disease severity was comparable. The comparison of HLA-DRB1*11, -DRB1*04 and -DQB1*03 allele frequencies between Black patients and healthy Black individuals revealed no significant difference. However, the protective allele against TTP, HLA-DRB1*04, was dramatically decreased in Black individuals in comparison with White individuals. Black people with TTP may have a better survival than White patients despite a comparable disease severity. A low natural frequency of HLA-DRB1*04 in Black ethnicity may account for the greater risk of TTP in this population. PMID:27383202

  13. [Determination of activated platelets: evaluation of methodology and application for patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Oshida, M; Kiyokawa, T; Aochi, H; Honda, S; Tomiyama, Y; Kurata, Y

    2001-12-01

    Platelet activation causes a change in surface expression of several endogenous proteins, such as CD62P, CD63 and CD40L. Therefore, it is possible to analyze the functional in vivo status of the circulating platelet population directly by flow cytometry. In this study we developed the method to be suitable for use in clinical studies. We used EDTA-2K as anticoagulant since the sample anticoagulated with EDTA-2K, sodium citrate or ACD-A showed no difference in the data of activated platelets. We determined whether fixation of sample is necessary. The samples stained before or without fixation showed abnormally high level of activated platelets, indicating that fixation is necessary before staining. It is controversial whether activated platelets circulate in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura(ITP). We measured activated platelets in patients with ITP using our optimised method. The percentages of CD62P, CD63 and CD40L positive platelets were significantly high in patients with ITP and 24%, 55% and 36% (respectively) of ITP patients showed elevated level of activated platelets. These data indicate that activated platelets circulate in ITP patients. PMID:11797399

  14. Splenectomy for primary and recurrent immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Current criteria for patient selection and results.

    PubMed Central

    Akwari, O E; Itani, K M; Coleman, R E; Rosse, W F

    1987-01-01

    Of 565 patients with thrombocytopenia admitted to Duke University Hospital between 1975 and 1985, 100 had splenectomy. Ninety-eight patients had failed chronic immunosuppressive therapy and three patients had acute intracranial bleeding or total absence of platelets in the peripheral blood smear, and had urgent splenectomy. At primary splenectomy, accessory spleens were identified and resected in 18% of patients. There was no operative mortality. Fifty-eight patients had an excellent response to splenectomy and their steroids were tapered off within 3 weeks. Thirteen patients had a poor response to primary splenectomy of whom eight remitted spontaneously and five required accessory splenectomy resulting in complete remission in three patients. Twenty-nine patients were considered nonresponders, 25 of whom had radionuclide scanning for accessory spleens. Seven of these patients had accessory spleens identified but only four consented to accessory splenectomy. In three of the four patients, a complete remission was achieved. Neither platelet antibody titers nor measurements of platelet survival or turnover predicted platelet response to splenectomy. However, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in older patients was significantly less likely to respond to splenectomy. These data support continuing use of splenectomy in selected patients with ITP and an aggressive search for accessory spleens in patients who relapse since they are easily localized at operation by hand-held isotope detector probe. Images Fig. 6. PMID:3662662

  15. Atypical presentations of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: a diagnostic role for ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Yosef; Rottenstreich, Amihai; Rund, Deborah; Hochberg-Klein, Sarit

    2016-08-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an acute, life threatening disease. Only a minority of patients expresses the complete clinical presentation and unusual manifestations can occur. Demonstration of low activity levels of ADAMTS13 (<5 %) is highly specific for the diagnosis of TTP. This study reports a series of five cases of TTP presenting with a thrombotic event and no hematological findings. Detailed chart reviews on these patients were conducted. We identified two patients whose first attack of TTP presented as a thrombotic episode without microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, only to be diagnosed as TTP days later, after the appearance of hematological signs. We also describe three cases of classical TTP relapsing atypically as cerebrovascular accidents without hematological signs. Low levels of ADAMTS13 activity were detected and facilitated the diagnosis. The neurological manifestations disappeared concurrent with normalization of ADAMTS13 activity level after plasma exchange. This study underscores the importance of having a high clinical suspicion of TTP in cases of thrombosis even without hematological abnormalities in patients with previous attacks of TTP. In this clinical scenario, measurement of ADAMTS13 activity is important for diagnosis and early administration of treatment. PMID:26867546

  16. Does Helicobacter pylori play a role in the pathogenesis of childhood chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Maghbool, Maryam; Maghbool, Masood; Shahriari, Mehdi; Karimi, Mehran

    2009-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an acute self-limited bleeding disorder that can progress to chronic form in 10-15% of the cases. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a possible cause of chronic ITP. We studied 30 children with resistant chronic ITP for H. pylori infection based on the detection of H. pylori fecal antigen. This retrospective study was based on data obtained from medical records of 30 children aged between five and 17 years (median age at ITP diagnosis was ten years). A specially-designed data sheet was used to record information on age, sex, duration of disease, family history of bleeding disorders, previous treatments and median platelet count. In patients with H. pylori infection, antimicrobial treatment consisted of amoxicillin, metronidazol and omeprazol. Response was assessed every month for one year and defined as complete (platelet count >150×10(9)/L) or partial (platelet count between 50 and 150×10(9)/L). We detected H. pylori infection in 5 patients. In 4 of them increased platelet count was seen during one year of follow-up and in one patient the platelet count was acceptable during six months. Although the pathological mechanism of H. pylori-induced thrombocytopenia was unclear in our patient sample, the assessment of H. pylori infection and use of eradication therapy should be attempted in chronic and resistant ITP patients. PMID:21589818

  17. [Antiphospholipid syndrome with autoimmune hemolytic anemia which mimics thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Naoki; Taniguchi, Yasuhiro; Hidaka, Tomonori; Katayose, Keiko; Kameda, Takuro; Side, Kotaro; Shimoda, Haruko; Nagata, Kenji; Kubuki, Yoko; Matsunaga, Takuya; Shimoda, Kazuya

    2010-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for lethargy, fever, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and consciousness disturbance. Direct Coombs test was positive, and anti-cardiolipin beta2-glycoprotein I antibody was detected. She was diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome complicated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). She demonstrated variable consciousness disturbance, inability to distinguish right from left, dysgraphia and dyscalculia. Multiple cerebral infarctions, especially dominant cerebral hemisphere infarctions, were observed on magnetic resonance imaging. A ventilation-perfusion scan demonstrated the presence of a ventilation-perfusion mismatch in both lung fields, and multiple veinous embolisms in the right femoral, bilateral the great saphenous and popliteal veins. Therefore, pulmonary embolism and thrombophlebitis were diagnosed. Based on these findings, it was necessary to distinguish this diagnosis from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). As ADAMTS-13 activity was within the normal range, TTP was denied. Thereafter, the patient was treated with 1 mg/kg of prednisolone for AIHA, 3 mg of warfarin, and 3500 units of low-molecular-weight heparin for thrombosis, and her condition improved. PMID:20467225

  18. [Sudden death associated with myocardial damage caused by microthrombi in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kiyoko; Hattori, Yukinori; Shimada, Koki; Araki, Yoko; Adachi, Tatsuya; Tsushita, Keitaro

    2015-11-01

    We describe a 35-year-old woman with Down's syndrome who was admitted to a clinic with anorexia and vomiting. Since laboratory findings showed anemia (Hb 7.4 g/dl) and thrombocytopenia (0.5 × 10⁴/μl), she was transferred to our hospital for treatment. Further laboratory examinations revealed schistocytes, LDH elevation, and a negative Coombs' test. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected. Plasma exchange (PEX) and prednisolone administration were thus immediately initiated. Prior to these treatments, ADAMTS13 activity was less than 5% and inhibitors were detected at a level of 0.8 Bethesda U/ml. Although her platelet count had risen to 13.0 × 10⁴/μl by day 6 (post 4 sessions of PEX), it had decreased to 1.8 × 10⁴/μl on day 7. Despite ongoing PEX, thrombocytopenia persisted. On day 21, she suddenly died. Autopsy findings revealed no evidence of myocardial necrosis or coronary artery thrombosis. Extensive microthrombi were, however, detected in precapillary arterioles, capillaries, and post-capillary venules of the heart. Therefore, this patient's sudden death was clinically suspected to have been caused by cardiomyopathy, which had produced cardiogenic shock. PMID:26666721

  19. Life-Threatening Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Idhiopatic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Successful Selective Splenic Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Matteo; Massaro, Fulvio; Annechini, Giorgia; Baldacci, Erminia; D’Elia, Gianna Maria; Rosati, Riccardo; Trisolini, Silvia Maria; Volpicelli, Paola; Foà, Robin; Capria, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE) is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy. PMID:27158433

  20. Genetic variations in complement factors in patients with congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xinping; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna A; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Eura, Yuka; Hirai, Hidenori; Honda, Shigenori; Kokame, Koichi; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; von Krogh, Anne-Sophie; Yoshida, Yoko; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Lämmle, Bernhard; Miyata, Toshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    The congenital form of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is caused by genetic mutations in ADAMTS13. Some, but not all, congenital TTP patients manifest renal insufficiency in addition to microangiopathic hemolysis and thrombocytopenia. We included 32 congenital TTP patients in the present study, which was designed to assess whether congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency have predisposing mutations in complement regulatory genes, as found in many patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). In 13 patients with severe renal insufficiency, six candidate complement or complement regulatory genes were sequenced and 11 missense mutations were identified. One of these missense mutations, C3:p.K155Q mutation, is a rare mutation located in the macroglobulin-like 2 domain of C3, where other mutations predisposing for aHUS cluster. Several of the common missense mutations identified in our study have been reported to increase disease-risk for aHUS, but were not more common in patients with as compared to those without renal insufficiency. Taken together, our results show that the majority of the congenital TTP patients with renal insufficiency studied do not carry rare genetic mutations in complement or complement regulatory genes. PMID:26830967

  1. Acquired Idiopathic ADAMTS13 Activity Deficient Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Population from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Masanori; Bennett, Charles L.; Isonishi, Ayami; Qureshi, Zaina; Hori, Yuji; Hayakawa, Masaki; Yoshida, Yoko; Yagi, Hideo; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a type of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Studies report that the majority of TTP patients present with a deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity. In a database of TMA patients in Japan identified between 1998 and 2008, 186 patients with first onset of acquired idiopathic (ai) ADAMTS13-deficient TTP (ADAMTS13 activity <5%) were diagnosed. The median age of onset of TTP in this group of patients was 54 years, 54.8% were female, 75.8% had renal involvement, 79.0% had neurologic symptoms, and 97.8% had detectable inhibitors to ADAMTS13 activity. Younger patients were less likely to present with renal or neurologic dysfunction (p<0.01), while older patients were more likely to die during the TTP hospitalization (p<0.05). Findings from this cohort in Japan differ from those reported previously from the United States, Europe, and Korea with respect to age at onset (two decades younger in the other cohort) and gender composition (60% to 100% female in the other cohort). We conclude that in one of the largest cohorts of ai-TTP with severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 activity reported to date, demographic characteristics differ in Japanese patients relative to those reported from a large Caucasian registry from Western societies. Additional studies exploring these findings are needed. PMID:22427934

  2. Immunologic effects of anti-D (WinRho-SD) in children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, S A; Malinoski, F J; Ware, R E

    1998-02-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is an effective treatment for immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) that induces transient blockade of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) with additional effects including alteration of T lymphocyte subsets and suppression of in vitro T lymphocyte proliferation. As anti-D also is an effective treatment for ITP, we investigated its in vitro and in vivo immunologic effects. The in vitro effects of various agents used in ITP therapy were compared using T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Anti-D caused significantly less inhibition than IVIG or dexamethasone, but non-specific protein was as suppressive as IVIG. Six children with chronic ITP were studied following anti-D administration. Patients received a single dose of anti-D (WinRho-SD, 50 microg/kg i.v. over 5 min) and were studied on day 0, day 7, and 1 month later. Anti-D did not affect T lymphocyte subsets including the T cell receptor variable beta repertoire, in vitro T lymphocyte proliferation to mitogens, recall antigens, or interleukin-2, in vitro IgG synthesis induced by pokeweed mitogen, or T lymphocyte cytokine mRNA levels. We conclude that anti-D has no demonstrable in vitro or in vivo effects on lymphocyte enumeration or function, and therefore likely is effective in the treatment of ITP primarily through RES blockade. PMID:9462545

  3. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy. PMID:26740871

  4. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a 13C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H. pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×103 million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  5. Refractory Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Cytomegalovirus Infection: A Call for a Change in the Current Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Shimanovsky, Alexei; Patel, Devbala; Wasser, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a decreased platelet count caused by excess destruction of platelets and inadequate platelet production. In many cases, the etiology is not known, but the viral illness is thought to play a role in the development of some cases of ITP. The current (2011) American Society of Hematology ITP guidelines recommend initial diagnostic studies to include testing for HIV and Hepatitis C. The guidelines suggest that initial treatment consist of observation, therapy with corticosteroids, IVIG or anti D. Most cases respond to the standard therapy such that the steroids may be tapered and the platelet counts remain at a hemostatically safe level. Some patients with ITP are dependent on long-term steroid maintenance, and the thrombocytopenia persists with the tapering of the steroids. Recent case reports demonstrate that ITP related to cytomegalovirus (CMV) can persist in spite of standard therapy and that antiviral therapy may be indicated. Herein we report a case of a 26-year-old female with persistent ITP that resolved after the delivery of a CMV-infected infant and placenta. Furthermore, we review the current literature on CMV-associated ITP and propose that the current ITP guidelines be amended to include assessment for CMV, even in the absence of signs and symptoms, as part of the work-up for severe and refractory ITP, especially prior to undergoing an invasive procedure such as splenectomy. PMID:26740871

  6. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy on Platelet Counts in Patients With Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohamadreza

    2016-01-01

    This study was a before and after clinical evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication on platelet counts in a group of 23 patients with chronic Idiopathic (Autoimmune) thrombocytopenic purpura (CITP). H. pylori infection was identified in patients by a (13)C-urea breath test and confirmed by an H. pylori stool antigen test. Eradication was conducted in patients testing positive. Infected (n = 10) and uninfected (n = 13) patient groups did not differ with respect to age, gender, history of previous splenectomy, treatment with anti-D, current treatment with corticosteroids, or initial platelet counts. H pylori eradication was successful in eight infected CITP patients, with two patients not responsive to treatment. Compared to the uninfected group, patients in the infected group who responded to eradication therapy had significantly increased platelet counts after six months (56.2 ± 22.2 vs. 233 ± 85.6 ×10(3) million cells/L; P < 0.01), whereas platelet counts in the non-responding patients and uninfected group did not differ after this period of time. H. pylori eradication promotes significant platelet count improvement in patients with CITP. Thus, all patients with CITP should be tested and treated for H. pylori infections. PMID:26925898

  7. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Patil, Pradnya D; Riley, Elizabeth C; Mitchell, Charlene K

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  8. Presence of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in the patients with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramyar, Asghar; Aghamohammadi, Asghar; Moazzami, Kasra; Rezaei, Nima; Yeganeh, Mehdi; Cheraghi, Taher; Pouladi, Nima; Heydari, Golnaz; Abolhassani, Hassan; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Parvaneh, Nima; Moin, Mostafa

    2008-09-01

    Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and an increased susceptibility to recurrent infections as well as autoimmunity and malignancies. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) are two autoimmune disorders which may be seen in association with CVID. Among 85 CVID patients, seven cases had ITP and/or AIHA (8%). Four of these patients had one or more episodes of ITP, one patient had AIHA, and two patients had both ITP and AIHA (Evans syndrome). Almost, all patients experienced chronic and recurrent infections mostly in respiratory and gastrointestinal systems during the course of the disease. Among the seven patients, five presented their underlying disease with recurrent respiratory and/or gastrointestinal tract infections, while in two remaining patients, CVID was presented with ITP. Three patients died until now; two because of hepatic failure and one due to pulmonary hemorrhage. As CVID is prone to autoimmune disorders, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of adult-onset ITP and possibly in children. Chronic and recurrent ITP, especially in the presence of propensity to respiratory and gastrointestinal infections mandate the evaluation for an underlying immune dysregulation such as CVID. PMID:18780952

  9. Vaccine administration and the development of immune thrombocytopenic purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Cecinati, Valerio; Principi, Nicola; Brescia, Letizia; Giordano, Paola; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-05-01

    The most important reasons cited by the opponents of vaccines are concerns about vaccine safety. Unlike issues such as autism for which no indisputable documentation of direct relationship with vaccine use is available, immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an adverse event that can really follow vaccine administration, and may limit vaccine use because little is known about which vaccines it may follow, its real incidence and severity, the risk of chronic disease, or the possibility of recurrences after new doses of the same vaccine. The main aim of this review is to clarify the real importance of thrombocytopenia as an adverse event and discuss how it may interfere with recommended vaccination schedules. The available data clearly indicate that ITP is very rare and the only vaccine for which there is a demonstrated cause-effect relationship is the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine that can occur in 1 to 3 children every 100,000 vaccine doses. However, also in this case, the incidence of ITP is significantly lower than that observed during the natural diseases that the vaccine prevents. Consequently, ITP cannot be considered a problem limiting vaccine use except in the case of children suffering from chronic ITP who have to receive MMR vaccine. In these subjects, the risk-benefit ratio of the vaccine should be weighed against the risk of measles in the community. PMID:23324619

  10. When the picture is fragmented: Vitamin B12 deficiency masquerading as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Patil, Pradnya D.; Riley, Elizabeth C.; Mitchell, Charlene K.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has high mortality and necessitates prompt recognition of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and initiation of plasmapheresis. We present a challenging diagnostic workup and management of a 42-year-old man who presented with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes on peripheral smear, all pointing to MAHA. Plasmapheresis and steroid therapy were promptly initiated, but hemolysis continued. Further workup showed megaloblastic anemia, severe Vitamin B12 deficiency, high iron saturation, and absent reticulocytosis, none of which could be explained by TTP. Severe Vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to hemolytic anemia from the destruction of red cells in the marrow that have failed the process of maturation. However, this should not cause thrombotic microangiopathy. Previous reports of B12 deficiency presenting with MAHA and a TTP-like manifestation have identified acute hyperhomocysteinemia as a missing link between B12 deficiency and MAHA, so this possibility was further explored. Our patient similarly had significantly elevated serum homocysteine levels, confirming this suspicion of Vitamin B12 deficiency. Vitamin B12 replacement led to normalization of the elevated levels of homocysteine, the disappearance of schistocytes on the peripheral smear, and resolution of the microangiopathic hemolysis, thereby confirming the diagnosis. It is pertinent that intensivists not only know the importance of early recognition and treatment of TTP but are also familiar with rare conditions that can present in a similar fashion. PMID:27308258

  11. Defective circulating CD25 regulatory T cells in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Heck, Susanne; Patel, Vivek; Levan, Jared; Yu, Yu; Bussel, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies as a result of loss of tolerance. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Decreased levels of peripheral Tregs in patients with ITP have been reported. To test whether inefficient production or reduced immunosuppressive activity of Tregs contributes to loss of tolerance in patients with chronic ITP, we investigated the frequency and function of their circulating CD4+CD25hi Tregs. We found a com-parable frequency of circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs in patients and controls (n = 16, P > .05). However, sorted CD4+CD25hi cells from patients with chronic ITP (n = 13) had a 2-fold reduction of in vitro immunosuppressive activity compared with controls (n = 10, P < .05). The impaired suppression was specific to Tregs as shown by cross-mixing experiments with T cells from controls. These data suggest that functional defects in Tregs contribute to breakdown of self-tolerance in patients with chronic ITP. PMID:18420827

  12. The role of N-acetylcysteine in the treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Rottenstreich, Amihai; Hochberg-Klein, Sarit; Rund, Deborah; Kalish, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is an acute, thrombotic microangiopathy with a high mortality rate if left untreated. Plasma exchange (PEX) is the current standard of care. However, a significant number of patients are refractory to this treatment. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was recently suggested as a potential therapeutic adjunct for patients with TTP. This study reports a series of three patients with TTP successfully treated with NAC in addition to standard therapy. Detailed chart reviews on these patients were conducted. We discuss clinical features, laboratory findings and management of three patients who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies and low levels of ADAMTS13 were detected and confirmed the diagnosis of acquired TTP. Based upon their severe presentation or lack of response to initial treatment with PEX, corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive agents, NAC was added. Under this combined treatment, all three patients hada significant clinical improvement of symptoms with concurrent normalization of platelet count and ADAMTS13 activity level. This report highlights the potential therapeutic utility of NAC in the treatment of TTP. Randomized controlled studies will be required to better characterize the risk-to-benefit ratio of NAC in the treatment of TTP. PMID:26245827

  13. Successful rituximab treatment in an elderly patient with recurrent thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Etsuko; Yamanouchi, Jun; Hato, Takaaki; Takeuchi, Kazuto; Niiya, Toshiyuki; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    An 81-year-old man presenting with fever, neurological symptoms, thrombocytopenia, and hemolytic anemia was diagnosed with acquired idiopathic thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). His disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) activity was <1% and the ADAMTS13 inhibitor titer was 3.2 BU/ml. He received plasma exchange and steroid administration until remission was achieved. Seven months later, he suffered from paralysis of the right hand, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. We confirmed TTP recurrence based on ADAMTS13 activity <1% and an ADAMTS13 inhibitor titer of 19.4 BU/ml. Four infusions of rituximab were administered in addition to plasma exchange and steroid pulse therapy. Platelet count recovery was observed within 5 days. No severe side effects related to rituximab occurred. Although rituximab has not been approved for TTP in Japan, we report the efficacy and safety of rituximab in an elderly patient with recurrent TTP. We suggest that rituximab therapy should be started as soon as possible for recurrent TTP in patients with high titers of ADAMTS13 inhibitor. PMID:27498731

  14. Splenic dynamics of indium-111 labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjaelae, M.T.Sa.; Savolainen, S.; Nieminen, U.; Gripenberg, J.; Liewendahl, K.; Ikkala, E. )

    1989-09-01

    Splenic dynamics of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets and platelet-associated IgG in 33 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) were studied. Two half-lives were calculated for the biexponential splenic time-activity curve after i.v. injection of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets. There was no difference in the mean half-life of the rapid component of the splenic curve (ST1) when patients with negative or slightly positive platelet suspension immunofluorescence test (PSIFT) were compared to those with strongly positive PSIFT (3.0 {plus minus} 0.7 min vs. 3.6 {plus minus} 0.4, p greater than 0.05). Mean half-life of the slow component of the splenic curve (ST2) was found to be longer in patients with a strongly positive than a negative or weakly positive PSIFT (26 {plus minus} 5 min vs. 13.2 {plus minus} 1.0 min, p less than 0.01). It seems that determination of the two components of the splenic time-activity curve provides a useful method for studying platelet kinetics in ITP.

  15. Platelet antibodies of the IgM class in immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Wilson, S.B.; Tomaski, A.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1985-04-01

    The clinical course and response to therapy of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) are not completely determined by the level of IgG present on the platelet surface. It is possible that antibodies of other immunoglobulin classes also play a role in platelet destruction in some of these patients. Therefore, the authors studied 175 patients with ITP for the presence of IgM anti-platelet antibodies using radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM. They observed that 57% of patients with clinical ITP had increased levels of IgM on their platelets, compared with normal controls and patients with thrombocytopenia who did not have ITP. They obtained similar results using either radiolabeled polyclonal or monoclonal anti-IgM, reagents whose integrity was first characterized using erythrocytes coated with defined amounts of IgM antibody. Among patients with increased platelet-IgM there was a significant correlation both with the presence of increased platelet-C3 as well as the amount of platelet-C3. The authors demonstrated the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in the plasma of two of these patients who were further studied. These studies demonstrate the presence of warm-reacting IgM anti-platelet antibodies in some patients with ITP. They suggest that the binding of complement to platelets by IgM antibodies may initiate platelet clearance as well as enhance the effect of IgG antibodies in ITP.

  16. Interactions of von Willebrand factor and ADAMTS13 in von Willebrand disease and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Budde, U; Schneppenheim, R

    2014-01-01

    The function of von Willebrand factor (VWF), a huge multimeric protein and a key factor in platelet dependent primary haemostasis, is regulated by its specific protease ADAMTS13. The ADAMTS13 dependent degradation of VWF to its proteolytic fragments can be visualized as a characteristic so-called triplet structure of individual VWF oligomers by multimer analysis. Lack of VWF high molecular weight multimers (VWF-HMWM) or their pathologically enhanced degradation underlies a particular type of von Willebrand disease, VWD type 2A with a significant bleeding tendency, and may also be observed in acquired von Willebrand syndrome due to cardiovascular disease. In these conditions multimer analysis is an obligatory and powerful tool for diagnosis of VWD. The opposite condition, the persistence of ultralarge VWF (UL-VWF) multimers may cause the microangiopathic life-threatening disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). During the course of active TTP, UL-VWF is consumed in the hyaline thrombi formed in the microvasculature which will ultimately result in the loss of UL-VWF and VWF-HMWM. Therefore, VWF multimer analysis is not a valid tool to diagnose TTP in the active phase of disease but may be helpful for the diagnosis of TTP patients in remission. PMID:25010251

  17. Two cases of Vici syndrome associated with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Huenerberg, Katherine; Hudspeth, Michelle; Bergmann, Shayla; Pai, Shashidhar; Singh, Balvir; Duong, Angie

    2016-05-01

    Vici syndrome is a rare congenital disorder first described in 1988. To date, 31 cases have been reported in the literature. The characteristic features of this syndrome include: agenesis of the corpus callosum, albinism, cardiomyopathy, variable immunodeficiency, cataracts, and myopathy. We report two Hispanic sisters with genetically confirmed Vici syndrome who both developed Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. To our knowledge, this is an immunologic process that has been previously undescribed within the phenotype of Vici syndrome and should be added to the spectrum of variable immune dysregulation that can be found in these patients. PMID:26854214

  18. Neonates born to mothers with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a single-center experience of 20 years.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Turan; Tavil, Betül; Korkmaz, Ayşe; Ünal, Şule; Hanalioğlu, Damla; Yiğit, Şule; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla; Yurdakök, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Neonates born to mothers with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) have an increased risk of having thrombocytopenia and bleeding. The aim of our study was to determine maternal and fetal factors that can predict bleeding risk in neonates born to mothers with ITP, and effective treatment strategies by retrospective analysis of our single-center data. We performed a retrospective data review of neonates that were recorded as 'neonates born to mothers with ITP' in the Neonatal ICU of Hacettepe University, Ihsan Dogramacı Children's Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Medical records of 36 neonates born from 35 mothers were analyzed. Among the 36 neonates born to mothers with ITP, thrombocytopenia (platelet count of less than 150 × 10/l) was detected in 20 (56.0%) neonates on the first day of life. Twelve of the 20 neonates with thrombocytopenia (60.0%) required treatment to increase the platelet counts. Clinical findings related to thrombocytopenia occurred in three (15.0%) neonates, but none of them presented with severe bleeding. There was no statistically significant association between neonatal lowest platelet count and maternal lowest platelet count, maternal platelet count at the time of delivery, and duration of thrombocytopenia, respectively. Neonates born to mothers with ITP have an increased tendency to develop thrombocytopenia, but severe bleeding is very rare in these neonates. Clinicians should pay special attention to follow these neonates. According to our results, both intravenous immunoglobulin and methyl prednisolone were found to be in equivalent efficacy for the treatment of neonatal thrombocytopenia due to maternal ITP. PMID:26258676

  19. Changes in Follicular Helper T Cells in Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jue; Cui, Dawei; Liu, Yan; Jin, Jie; Tong, Hongyan; Wang, Lei; Ruan, Guoxiang; Lu, Yun; Yuan, Huiming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a primary autoimmune disease with a decreased platelet count caused by platelet destruction mediated mainly by platelet antibodies. T follicular helper (TFH) cells have demonstrated important roles in autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study is to explore the might role of TFH cells in the patients of ITP. Methods: Twenty-three ITP patients and 12 healthy controls (HC) were enrolled in this study. The frequency of circulating TFH cells in both the patients and HC was analyzed by flow cytometry. Serum interleukin (IL)-21 and IL-6 levels were measured using ELISA, and platelet antibodies were tested using a solid phase technique. Additionally, IL-21, IL-6, Bcl-6 and c-Maf mRNA expressions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were detected using real-time PCR. Results: The percentages of circulating CXCR5+ CD4+TFH cells with ICOShigh or PD-1high expression were significantly higher in the ITP patients than in the HC. Moreover, the frequencies of circulating CXCR5+ CD4+TFH cells with inducible costimulator (ICOS)high or programmed death-1 (PD-1)high expression were notably higher in ITP with platelet-antibody-positive ( ITP (+) ) patients than in ITP with platelet-antibody-negative ( ITP (-) ) patients and HC, as were the serum IL-21 and IL-6 levels (significant). Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the CXCR5+CD4+TFH cells with ICOShigh or PD-1high expression and the serum IL-21 levels of ITP (+) patients. Additionally, the mRNA expression levels of IL-21, IL-6, Bcl-6 and c-Maf were significantly increased in ITP patients, especially in ITP (+) patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrated TFH cells and effector molecules might play an important role in the pathogenesis of ITP, which are possible therapeutic targets in ITP patients. PMID:25561904

  20. Deficient activity of von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease in chronic relapsing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Furlan, M; Robles, R; Solenthaler, M; Wassmer, M; Sandoz, P; Lämmle, B

    1997-05-01

    In patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), excessive intravascular platelet aggregation has been associated with appearance in plasma of unusually large von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers. These extremely adhesive vWF multimers may arise due to deficiency of a "depolymerase" cleaving vWF to smaller molecular forms, either by reducing the interdimeric disulfide bridges or by proteolytic degradation. We studied the activity of a recently described vWF-cleaving protease in four patients with chronic relapsing TTP. Diluted plasma samples of TTP patients were incubated with purified normal human vWF in the presence of a serine protease inhibitor, at low ionic strength, and in the presence of urea and barium ions. The extent of vWF degradation was assayed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose gels and immunoblotting. Four patients, that included two brothers, with chronic relapsing TTP displayed either substantially reduced levels or a complete absence of vWF-cleaving protease activity. In none of these patient plasmas was an inhibitor of or an antibody against the vWF-cleaving protease established. Our data suggest that the unusually large vWF multimers found in TTP patients may be caused by deficient vWF-cleaving protease activity. Deficiency of this protease may be inherited in an autosomal recessive manner and seems to predispose to chronic relapsing TTP. The assay of the vWF-cleaving protease activity may be used as a sensitive diagnostic tool for identification of subjects with a latent TTP tendency. PMID:9129011

  1. Phenotypic analysis of bone marrow lymphocytes from children with acute thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Guiziry, Dalai E L; El, Gendy Wessam; Farahat, Nahla; Hassab, Hoda

    2005-01-01

    Hematogones are benign immature B cells that commonly populate the bone marrow of children. Their presence has been noted to interfere with the flow-cytometric analysis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), because their immunophenotype is similar to B-precursor cell lymphoblasts. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia is a clinical condition characterized by increased platelet destruction due to sensitization of platelets by autoantibodies. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and clinical impact of bone marrow hematogones in cases of acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) among children. This was done by immunophenotyping of bone marrow lymphocytes of ITP cases and controls and follow up of cases. This study was done on 25 cases of ITP, 12 females and 13 males, their age ranged from 2 to 13 years. A control group was included in the study, 15 cases of apparently healthy children with matching age and sex taken from among bone marrow donors. Cases and controls were subjected to bone marrow lymphocyte immunophenotyping with flow-cytometry to verify the presence of hematogones. A statistically significant increase in the percentage of hematogones was demonstrated in their bone marrows. An increased percentage of CD10+ lymphocytes was demonstrated; with a mean of 18+/-15.2%, CD19+ with a mean of 27+/-16.3% and CD34+ with a mean of 3.7+/-3.2%. No correlation was found between the percentage of hematogones and peripheral platelet count or bone marrow lymphocytic count. In conclusion, there is an increase in the bone marrow hematogones in ITP cases in comparison to normal controls. This could be the sequence of an immunological response to the cause which determined the disease, or the regeneration of the stem cell compartment following transient damage. PMID:16734134

  2. BONE MARROW NECROSIS DISCOVERED IN A PATIENT WITH SUSPECTED THROMBOTIC THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Hiral D.; Reese, Jessica A.; Cobb, Patrick W.; George, James N.

    2014-01-01

    A 48 year-old white man was hospitalized for evaluation of back pain. At time he reported that he had been in excellent health until three months before his hospitalization when he noticed difficulty walking when he got out of his car following a long trip. He said that “it just felt as though my legs wouldn’t move very well”. He did not see a doctor since this problem resolved within several days. Three weeks before his hospitalization, he thought he “had a viral illness” with cough and fatigue that persisted, together with subsequent abdominal discomfort. His primary care physician noted that his platelet and white blood cell counts were low which he attributed to a viral infection. An abdominal ultrasound reported minimal splenomegaly. He was treated with antibiotics and prednisone; all of his symptoms resolved and his platelet count increased. One week before his hospitalization he developed low back pain which made walking difficult. He also had fever and sweats. When these symptoms persisted he was admitted to the hospital. His physical examination was normal. His spleen was not palpable; he had no lymphadenopathy; his neurologic examination, including his gait, was normal. He had no back tenderness. His platelet count was 23,000/µL; white blood cell count, 3700/µL with a normal differential; hemoglobin, 13.5 gm/dL; creatinine, 1.7 mg/dL; LDH, 1737 U/L (normal, <190 U/L). Coagulation tests were normal; fibrinogen was 858 mg/dL. Examination of the peripheral blood smear demonstrated schistocytes and normal white cell morphology. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was suspected because of the thrombocytopenia, red cell fragmentation, high serum LDH and creatinine, the history of fever, the possibility that the difficulty walking may have been a neurologic manifestation of TTP, and – most important – no apparent alternative etiology. Treatment with plasma exchange (PEX) and corticosteroids was begun. PMID:25196665

  3. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    PubMed

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  4. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography

    PubMed Central

    Frydman, Galit H.; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L.; Fox, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  5. Intravenous anti-D treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: experience in 272 patients.

    PubMed

    Scaradavou, A; Woo, B; Woloski, B M; Cunningham-Rundles, S; Ettinger, L J; Aledort, L M; Bussel, J B

    1997-04-15

    We report the results of intravenous anti-D (WinRho, WinRho SD) therapy in 261 non-splenectomized patients treated at the New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center over the period from 1987 to 1994. Children (n = 124) and adult patients (n = 137) with classic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP; n = 156) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related thrombocytopenia (n = 105) and acute (n = 75) or chronic (n = 186) disease at the time of the initial anti-D treatment were studied. In addition, 11 previously splenectomized patients were treated as a separate group. Our objectives were to evaluate the following. (1) Efficacy of anti-D: The response after the initial infusion was analyzed according to clinical parameters, such as patient's age, HIV status, gender, disease duration, pretreatment platelet count, and hemoglobin value, as well as treatment-related factors, including the dose of anti-D, the solvent detergent treatment of the preparation, and the type of administration. (2) Use of anti-D as maintenance therapy: The duration of response after the initial infusion and the results of subsequent treatments were evaluated. (3) Safety/toxicity of anti-D: Postinfusion reactions and hemoglobin decrease after treatment were studied. Anti-D is a safe treatment providing a hemostatic platelet increase in greater than 70% of the Rh+ non-splenectomized patients. The group with the best results is HIV- children, but all patient groups respond and the effect lasts more than 21 days in 50% of the responders. Duration of response is not influenced by HIV status; furthermore, HIV+ patients show no adverse effects on hemoglobin decrease or HIV disease progression. Patients with chronic ITP after splenectomy have minimal or no response to intravenous anti-D. PMID:9108386

  6. Retrospective analysis of rituximab therapy and splenectomy in childhood chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ay, Yilmaz; Karapinar, Tuba H; Oymak, Yesim; Toret, Ersin; Demirag, Bengu; Ince, Dilek; Ozcan, Esin; Moueminoglou, Nergial; Koker, Sultan A; Vergin, Canan

    2016-06-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) results from accelerated platelet destruction mediated by autoantibodies to platelet glycoproteins. Some patients with chronic ITP are refractory to all therapies [steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), anti-D and immunosuppresive drugs] and have chronic low platelet counts and episodic bleeding. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of rituximab treatment and splenectomy in paediatric patients diagnosed with chronic and refractory ITP who were unresponsive to steroids, IVIG, cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Records of patients with chronic and refractory ITP in 459 patients with primary ITP who were followed up in our hospital from January 2005 to December 2014 were reviewed. Fifteen of patients received rituximab and/or applied splenectomy. Fifteen chronic ITP patients (10 boys, five girls) with a mean age of 10 years were enrolled in the study. Two of these patients were suffering from Evans syndrome. The median time since diagnosis of ITP was 10 years. The median follow-up duration after starting Rituximab and splenectomy were 13 and 9.5 months, respectively.None of the seven patients who were treated with rituximab achieved a response. A splenectomy was performed in six of the seven patients who had been treated with rituximab. Complete and partial responses were achieved in 67 and 33% of the patients, respectively. We evaluated the clinical characteristics and responses of chronic ITP patients who did not receive rituximab therapy and underwent a splenectomy. The success rate was 100% in the eight patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Rituximab therapy might not be beneficial for some children with severe chronic ITP who are refractory to standard agents. A splenectomy might be useful and preferable to rituximab. PMID:26656905

  7. Clinical significance of serum cytokine levels and thrombopoietic markers in childhood idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Giovanni Carlo; Giordano, Paola; Tesse, Riccardina; Piacente, Laura; Altomare, Maria; De Mattia, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological markers useful for defining children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) who are likely to develop the chronic form of the disease are partially lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical role of both immunological and thrombopoietic markers in children with ITP and correlate their levels with different disease stages. Materials and methods We enrolled 28 children with ITP at the onset of their disease, who were followed-up for a whole year and divided according to whether their disease resolved within the 12 months (n=13) or became chronic (n=15), 11 subjects with chronic ITP off therapy for at least 1 month at the time of enrolment, and 30 healthy matched controls. Serum levels of T helper type 1 and 2 and T regulatory-associated cytokines, such as interferon γ, tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL) 2, IL6, IL10, and thrombopoietin were measured in all children using quantitative immunoenzymatic assays, while reticulated platelets were evaluated by flow cytometric analysis. Results Serum IL10 levels were significantly higher in patients with an acute evolution of ITP than in either healthy controls (p<0.001) or patients with chronic progression of ITP (p<0.05). Reticulated platelet count and thrombopoietin levels were significantly higher in ITP patients at the onset of their disease, whether with acute resolution or chronic progression, than in healthy subjects (p<0.01; p<0.001), but did not differ between the groups of patients. Conclusion IL-10 seems to predict the clinical course of ITP, as it is significantly higher at the onset of disease in patients who obtain disease remission in less than 1 year. PMID:22153687

  8. CD16 and CD32 Gene Polymorphisms May Contribute to Risk of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiannan; Zhao, Liyun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Qingxu; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations of CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R gene polymorphisms with the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Published studies on CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R polymorphisms with susceptibility to ITP were systematically reviewed until April 1, 2014. The Cochrane Library Database, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) were used to search for relevant studies and then a meta-analysis was conducted by using Stata 12.0 software in order to produce consistent statistical results. RESULTS In total, 10 clinical case-control studies with 741 ITP patients and 1092 healthy controls were enrolled for quantitative data analysis. Results of this meta-analysis suggest that CD16 158F>V polymorphism had strong correlations with the susceptibility to ITP under 5 genetic models (all P<0.05). However, no similar associations were found between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the susceptibility to ITP (all P>0.05). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that CD16 158F>V polymorphism was associated with the increased risk of ITP among both Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Nevertheless, no statistically significant correlations between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the risk of ITP were observed among Caucasians and non-Caucasians (all P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that CD16 158F>V polymorphism may contribute to the increased risk of ITP, whereas CD32 131H>R polymorphism may not be an important risk factor for ITP. PMID:27315784

  9. CD16 and CD32 Gene Polymorphisms May Contribute to Risk of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiannan; Zhao, Liyun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Qingxu; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations of CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R gene polymorphisms with the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Material/Methods Published studies on CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R polymorphisms with susceptibility to ITP were systematically reviewed until April 1, 2014. The Cochrane Library Database, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) were used to search for relevant studies and then a meta-analysis was conducted by using Stata 12.0 software in order to produce consistent statistical results. Results In total, 10 clinical case-control studies with 741 ITP patients and 1092 healthy controls were enrolled for quantitative data analysis. Results of this meta-analysis suggest that CD16 158F>V polymorphism had strong correlations with the susceptibility to ITP under 5 genetic models (all P<0.05). However, no similar associations were found between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the susceptibility to ITP (all P>0.05). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that CD16 158F>V polymorphism was associated with the increased risk of ITP among both Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Nevertheless, no statistically significant correlations between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the risk of ITP were observed among Caucasians and non-Caucasians (all P>0.05). Conclusions Our findings indicate that CD16 158F>V polymorphism may contribute to the increased risk of ITP, whereas CD32 131H>R polymorphism may not be an important risk factor for ITP. PMID:27315784

  10. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  11. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TPP) successfully rescued by plasma exchange in the ICU: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, XIULI; WU, TIEJUN; ZHANG, XIHONG; QU, AIJUN; TIAN, SUOCHEN

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare, life-threatening disorder, which is characterized by thrombus formation in small blood vessels. The present study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data from two patients with severe TTP, who were treated successfully in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the Liaocheng People's Hospital in 2013. Comprehensive therapies were administered to the patients, including plasma exchange (PE), mechanical ventilation (case 1 only), steroid therapy, blood transfusion and anti-inflammatory treatment (case 2 only). The two patients returned to a stable state and were transferred back to the hematology department following PE. The positive outcome achieved for these patients suggests that early intervention involving bedside PE in the ICU may reduce the mortality rate of patients with severe TTP who have concurrent respiratory or circulatory failure and cannot be treated in the dialysis unit. PMID:27347058

  12. An infantile case of cytomegalovirus induced idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura with predominant proliferation of CD10 positive lymphoblast in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, K; Azuma, E; Komada, Y; Ito, M; Sakurai, M; Hironaka, T; Hirai, K

    1995-02-01

    An infant with cytomegalovirus infection (CMV) developed idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) at 4 months of age. A bone marrow (BM) aspiration showed a remarkable increase of immature megakaryocytes and prominent proliferation of lymphoblasts. Flow cytometric analysis of the bone marrow cells showed that the predominant cells in the lymphocyte cluster were of B-lineage (CD19) with CD10 (common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen) positive. Virus study showed a higher titer of CMV antibody. Cytomegalovirus DNA was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in urine, peripheral cells and marrow cells. Low-grade fever, diarrhea and petechiae were accompanied by mild liver dysfunction. Complete remission was made with intravenous high-dose immunoglobulin (IVIg) without progression to overt acute leukemia. The percentage of CD10+/CD19+ lymphocytes in bone marrow also diminished. We postulated that the proliferation of immature lymphocytes and megakaryocytes in bone marrow was caused by maturation arrest that might result from CMV infection. PMID:7754772

  13. Histochemical and biochemical observations of the spleen in atypical Niemann-Pick disease and in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Safanda, J; Fakan, F

    1981-01-01

    In a case of adolescent Niemann-Pick disease (NP) and in a case of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), the histologic picture of the spleen showed appreciable similarity in localization of sparing cells and in a number of histochemical tests. The sphingomyelin, which was the main organ phospholipid in both conditions, contained substantially elevated content of C24 fatty acids. Detailed analysis of spleen lipids showed great relative increase of lysobisphosphatidic acid and of cholesterol which was in NP mainly in free form but in ITP surprisingly mainly esterified, mostly to oleic and palmitic acid. Possible molecular mechanism of sphingomyelin storage was enzymologically followed in model conditions using separated lipid fractions from NP's spleen. The activity of sphingomyelinase (Cl. perfringens exotoxin) was in comparison to phospholipase C relatively specifically inhibited by lysobisphosphatidic acid. PMID:6168156

  14. Acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura induced by percutaneous ethanol injection during treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    AI, DING-LUN; LI, BO-TAO; PENG, XIAO-MING; ZHANG, LIN-ZHI; WANG, JING-YAN; ZHAO, YUN; YANG, BIN; YU, QIANG; LIU, CHUN-ZI; YANG, NING; WANG, HUA-MING; ZHOU, LIN

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous ethanol injection is an important localized treatment method for patients presenting with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Among the advantages of percutaneous ethanol injection are its minimal invasiveness, simplicity, low cost and low risk of complications. However, the increasing popularity of percutaneous ethanol injection has resulted in serious adverse effects attributed to individual variations. The present study describes the case of a patient who exhibited acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenic purpura, caused by percutaneous ethanol injection treatment for HCC. This complication was promptly identified, and platelet transfusion and injection of recombinant human interleukin-11 resulted in a rapid recovery of the patient's platelet count. Attention should be given to this rare complication in patients administered percutaneous ethanol injection treatment for HCC. PMID:26870287

  15. [Detection, diagnosis and analysis of the first case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura associated with anti-HPA-5b in China].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Zhong, Zhou-Lin; Li, Li-Lan; Shen, Wei-Dong; Wu, Guo-Guang

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the detection and diagnosis of the neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura (NAITP) caused by anti-HPA-5b antibody. The platelet count and clinical manifestation in the newborn were examined. The HPA-1-21bw genotypes of the newborn and her parents were detected by multiple-PCR and DNA sequencing. The HPA-specific antibody in the sera of newborn and her mother were detected and identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). The results indicated that the clinical manifestations of the newborn were lighter. The HPA genotyping showed that the genotype of the newborn was HPA-5ab, while that of her mother and father were HPA-5aa and HPA-5ab, respectively. The antibody against the platelet of newborn's father existed in the newborn's mother sera. The HPA antibody of the mother was identified as anti-HPA-5b. It is concluded that the newborn with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia purpura was caused by the antibody against HPA-5b. PMID:24763012

  16. [Latent malignant lymphoma diagnosed at autopsy in a patient with cold agglutinin disease coexisting thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura].

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Toru; Yamagata, Hiroki; Ishido, Aki; Tominaga, Takayuki; Kamei, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Toru

    2013-12-01

    An 89-year-old woman presented to our hospital with hemolytic anemia and a high titer of cold agglutinins. Red cell agglutination was observed on a blood smear. Agglutination visibly decreased after warming the blood; therefore, the patient was diagnosed with cold agglutinin disease (CAD). Bone marrow aspiration revealed no infiltration of malignant cells. Computed tomography indicated moderate splenomegaly. The patient had neither an infection nor autoimmune disease. Initial steroid therapy was ineffective and hemolysis worsened. Meanwhile, thrombocytopenia, delirium, fever, and schistocytes in the blood were observed. The progression of hemolysis was attributed not only to CAD but also to coexisting thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) because of the decreased ADAMTS 13 level. Autopsy revealed mild paraaortic lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. Microscopic examination revealed lymphoma cell infiltration in the spleen, liver, bone marrow, and paraaortic lymph nodes. These observations suggested that TTP and CAD were both secondary complications. This case highlights the importance of an autopsy for the detection of latent lymphoma, which can be difficult to diagnose before the patient's death. Careful examination to exclude lymphomas is important in patients with CAD at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24452150

  17. The effect of platelet autoantibodies on the course of the disease and clinical response of patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Sikorska, A; Konopka, L; Maślanka, K

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated the response to treatment of 409 idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients who were tested for the presence of platelet-associated autoantibodies by direct-platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and for the presence of plasma antibodies directed against the GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb and GPIa/IIa by monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA). In patients with platelet autoantibodies in comparison with patients without antibodies more frequently were observed the chronic form of disease (83.5%vs. 68.5%) and severe symptoms of haemorrhage diathesis (17.3%vs. 6.9%). Evaluation of the treatment response (to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and splenectomy) referred to patients with complete response, e.g. complete remission defined as platelet count of >100 x 10(9)/l for at least 2 years. The percentage of complete response in the whole population of ITP patients, both with and without autoantibodies regardless of the method of treatment, was similar (about 54%). However, the presence of platelet autoantibodies had effect on patients treated with corticosteroids: complete response approximately 71% (36/51) of patients with autoantibodies and in 60% (72/120) of patients without antibodies, as well as in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs (cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, vincristin and vinblastin); complete response approximately 51% (11/21) of patients with autoantibodies and in 34.8% (6/17) of patients without autoantibodies. The presence of autoantibodies had no effect on the response of splenectomy patients. PMID:18190469

  18. Human/BALB radiation chimera engrafted with splenocytes from patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura produce human platelet antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Dekel, B; Marcus, H; Shenkman, B; Shimoni, A; Shechter, Y; Canaan, A; Berrebi, A; Varon, D; Reisner, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that lethally irradiated normal strains of mice, radioprotected with severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) bone marrow, can be engrafted with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The human/mouse radiation chimera can mount marked humoral and cellular responses to recall antigens, as well as primary responses. In the present study, we adoptively transferred splenocytes from patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) into lethally irradiated BALB/c mice, radioprotected with SCID bone marrow. High titres of total human immunoglobulin appeared as early as 2 weeks post-transplant and declined after 6 weeks, while human anti-human platelet antibodies were detected 2-8 weeks after the transfer of splenocytes. The immunoglobulin G (IgG) fraction contained antibodies against glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (CD41) or GPIb/IX (CD42). The human platelet antibodies showed a low level of cross-reactivity with mouse platelets, and thrombocytopenia in the animals was not observed. Splenocytes from individual ITP patients differed in their capacity to produce either human platelet antibodies or total human immunoglobulin. Furthermore, antibodies produced in the murine system were not always identical to the original antibodies present in the serum of the patients. The study of the serological aspects of autoantibodies against human platelets in an animal model might be useful for the investigation of potential therapeutics in ITP. PMID:9767425

  19. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura-like syndromes following bone marrow transplantation: an analysis of associated conditions and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Roy, V; Rizvi, M A; Vesely, S K; George, J N

    2001-03-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) in patients following BMT are often uncertain and unsuccessful. To better understand the evaluation and management of these patients, we describe 17 patients treated with plasma exchange for a presumptive diagnosis of TTP following BMT during a 10 year period, 1989-1998. Because of the uncertainty of the diagnosis, these patients are described as having a 'TTP-like syndrome'. All 17 patients had received an allogeneic BMT. Comparison with the other 245 patients who had an allogeneic BMT during the same period demonstrated that patients with a TTP-like syndrome more frequently had unrelated and/or HLA-mismatched donors, and had also experienced more serious complications: grade III-IV acute GVHD and systemic bacterial, fungal, and viral infections. Three months after the diagnosis of the TTP-like syndrome, only four of 17 patients (24%) were alive; currently only one patient survives. These data emphasize: (1) the diagnosis of TTP following BMT is uncertain because of the presence of multiple BMT-associated complications. (2) The outcome of patients with TTP-like syndromes following BMT is poor. (3) Urgent intervention with plasma exchange when TTP is suspected following BMT may not always be appropriate. Alternative explanations for the signs and symptoms should be considered and treated aggressively. PMID:11319595

  20. Intracranial hemorrhage in acute and chronic childhood immune thrombocytopenic purpura over a ten-year period: an Egyptian multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Elalfy, Mohsen; Elbarbary, Nancy; Khaddah, Normine; Abdelwahab, Magy; El Rashidy, Farida; Hassab, Hoda; Al-Tonbary, Youssef

    2010-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is a rare but major cause of death in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). The authors reviewed data of 1,840 patient with ITP, from 5 pediatric hematology centers in Egypt from 1997 to 2007, to study the incidence and risk factors of ICH. Ten cases of ICH were identified with a median age at presentation of 7.5 years; 4 patients had acute ITP, 2 persistent and 4 chronic. The platelet count was <10 x 10(9)/l in 7 cases, and only 1 patient had a history of head trauma. Seven children were on treatment prior to or at the time of occurrence of ICH and all were treated by pharmacotherapy. Two children died shortly afterwards due to late referral to a specialized center. Our results suggest that treatment does not prevent ICH and that it can occur at any time during the course of the disease. Delayed referral can be considered a risk factor for unfavorable outcome of ICH, highlighting the importance of teaching sessions for patients and their parents to minimize subsequent morbidity and mortality of ICH in children with ITP. PMID:19955713

  1. Comparison of single port and three port laparoscopic splenectomy in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: Clinical comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Barbaros, Umut; Aksakal, Nihat; Tukenmez, Mustafa; Agcaoglu, Orhan; Bostan, Mustafa Sami; Kilic, Berkay; Kalayci, Murat; Dinccag, Ahmet; Seven, Ridvan; Mercan, Selcuk

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has become increasingly popular during the last decades. This prospective study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of single-port laparoscopic splenectomy compared with conventional multiport laparoscopic splenectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between February 2, 2009 and August 29, 2011, a total of 40 patients with the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura were included to study. Patients were alienated into two groups according to the procedure type including SILS and conventional multiport splenectomy. RESULTS: There were 19 patients in group 1, and 21 in group 2. Operative time was significantly shorter in group 1 versus group 2 (112.4 ± 13.56 vs 71.2 ±18.1 minutes, respectively, P < 0.05). One patient in group 1 had converted to laparatomy due to preoperative bleeding. Postoperative pain analyses (VAS Score) revealed superiority of SILS in the early post-operative days (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: SILS splenectomy is a safe and effective alternative to standard laparoscopic splenectomy. PMID:26195874

  2. Ticlopidine- and clopidogrel-associated thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP): review of clinical, laboratory, epidemiological, and pharmacovigilance findings (1989–2008)

    PubMed Central

    Zakarija, Anaadriana; Kwaan, Hau C.; Moake, Joel L.; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Pandey, Dilip K.; McKoy, June M.; Yarnold, Paul R.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Raife, Thomas J.; Cursio, John F.; Luu, Thanh Ha; Richey, Elizabeth A.; Fisher, Matthew J.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Tallman, Martin S.; Zheng, X. Long; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Bennett, Charles L.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a fulminant disease characterized by platelet aggregates, thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, neurologic changes, and mechanical injury to erythrocytes. Most idiopathic cases of TTP are characterized by a deficiency of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease, with thrombospondin-1-like domains) metalloprotease activity. Ironically, use of anti-platelet agents, the thienopyridine derivates clopidogrel and ticlopidine, is associated with drug induced TTP. Data were abstracted from a systematic review of English-language literature for thienopyridine-associated TTP identified in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the public website of the Food and Drug Administration, and abstracts from national scientific conferences from 1991 to April 2008. Ticlopidine and clopidogrel are the two most common drugs associated with TTP in FDA safety databases. Epidemiological studies identify recent initiation of anti-platelet agents as the most common risk factor associated with risks of developing TTP. Laboratory studies indicate that most cases of thienopyridine-associated TTP involve an antibody to ADAMTS13 metalloprotease, present with severe thrombocytopenia, and respond to therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); a minority of thienopyridine-associated TTP presents with severe renal insufficiency, involves direct endothelial cell damage, and is less responsive to TPE. The evaluation of this potentially fatal drug toxicity can serve as a template for future efforts to comprehensively characterize other severe adverse drug reactions. PMID:19180126

  3. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  4. Clinical Features and Treatment Outcomes of Primary Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura in Hospitalized Children Under 2-Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Farhangi, H; Ghasemi, A; Banihashem, A; Badiei, Z; Jarahi, L; Eslami, G; Langaee, T

    2016-01-01

    Background Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is the most prevalent cause of thrombocytopenia in children. Despite the importance of ITP in children under 2-years old, only a few publications are available in the literature.ITP usually presents itself as isolated thrombocytopenia and mucocutaneous bleeding. Materials and Methods This study was conducted on 187 under 2-year-old children diagnosed with ITP and treated at Dr. Sheikh Hospital from 2004 to 2011.In this retrospective study, clinical symptoms, laboratory findings, history of viral infections, vaccination history, and treatment efficacy in children under 2-years old with ITP were investigated.Patients were followed for one year after being discharged from the hospital. Results The risk of the disease developing into chronic form was higher in older children (0.001). ITP in children under 3-months old was significantly associated with vaccination (p=0.007). There was no significant differences between male and female patients in regards to newly diagnosed ITP, persistent, and chronic disease status (p = 0.21). No significant difference in bleeding symptoms was observed between patients under 3-months old and 3 to 24-months old (p=0.18). Conclusion Infantile ITP respond favorably to treatment. The risk of the disease developing into chronic form is higher in 3-to-24-month-old children compared to under-three-month olds. PMID:27222699

  5. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials for plasma exchange in the treatment of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, S J; Tusold, A; Benjamin, S; Stanworth, S J; Murphy, M F

    2007-02-01

    The mainstay of treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is plasma exchange (PE). A systematic review was undertaken to summarize the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evidence, to date, on PE as treatment for TTP. Seven randomized RCTs were identified till May 2005. A statistical reduction in mortality was found in patients receiving PE compared with patients receiving plasma infusion (relative risk 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.12-0.79). No statistical difference in mortality was found in trials comparing different replacement fluids for PE. There were few differences in the response to treatment and the resolution of the presenting signs of TTP in any trial. Lack of data prevented a full assessment of the incidence of adverse events. None of the studies included measured patients' quality of life. Further research is required to determine the benefits and side effects associated with different replacement fluids for PE. It is recommended that there should be consistency in the diagnostic criteria, measurement of clinical outcomes and length of follow up. Continued support of existing TTP patient registries and establishment of new registries would facilitate this. PMID:17266701

  6. Tumor necrosis factor-α -308G/A gene polymorphism in Egyptian children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    El Sissy, Maha H; El Sissy, A H; Elanwary, Sherif

    2014-07-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease characterized by increased platelet destruction. Although the cause of ITP remains unclear, it is accepted that both environmental and genetic factors play an important role in the development of the disease. Children with ITP have a T-helper 1-type cytokine pattern with elevated levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as in most autoimmune diseases. Researchers have shown that polymorphism in the TNF-α gene at position -308 affects gene transcriptions with increased TNF-α production. The current case-control study aimed at detecting the frequency of TNF-α -308G/A gene polymorphism as genetic markers in Egyptian children with ITP, and to clear out their possible role in choosing the treatment protocols of therapy, using PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Ninety-two ITP patients and 100 age and sex-matched healthy controls were recruited in the study. The results obtained revealed that the frequency of TNF-α -308A/A homotype in ITP patients was significantly higher than that of the controls, and conferred almost six-fold increased risk of ITP acquisition. The polymorphic A allele frequency was significantly higher in ITP patients than in the controls, conferring almost two-fold increased ITP risk. In conclusion, our study suggests the possibility that TNF-α -308 gene polymorphism may contribute to the susceptibility of childhood ITP in Egyptian children. PMID:24509339

  7. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura: Upshaw-Schulman syndrome: a cause of neonatal death and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Shastri, Sweta; Pandita, Aakash; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare disorder in children characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia. The classic Moschcowitz Pentads of TTP include hemolytic anemia, with fragmentation of erythrocytes, thrombocytopenia, diffuse and non-focal neurologic findings, decrease renal function and fever. We report a newborn who was diagnosed with congenital TTP. The newborn was admitted at age of 40 h, in our hospital, in view of respiratory distress with impending respiratory failure and red colored urine. On examination, the newborn was febrile, tachypneic, had deep icterus, pallor and no hepatosplenomegaly. Family history was significant with one unexplained neonatal death at age of 24 with symptoms of red colored urine. Examination of peripheral smear was diagnostic with the presence of fragmented RBCS, giant but fewer platelets consistent with a diagnosis of MAHA. The diagnosis of TTP was confirmed with low ADAMTS activity and gene analysis showed c 2203 G > T-p.Glu735X (domain TSP1-2) mutation in exon 18 of ADAMTS 13 gene. The newborn had rapid deterioration, with respiratory distress and refractory shock leading to death. Post-mortem bone marrow done showed marrow hyperplasia. PMID:26365135

  8. Complement Activation on Platelets Correlates with a Decrease in Circulating Immature Platelets in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 × 109/L) (p = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count less than 100K/μl) (p= 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacologic therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (p <0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes. PMID:19925495

  9. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the presence of connective tissue disease and HIV infection: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in a resource- constrained setting.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Rubeshan; Marais, Johannes Alexander; Brown, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a catastrophic disease and may occur in the presence of other confounding diseases. We present a case of TTP in a patient with connective tissue disease and HIV infection, in whom the diagnosis and management of TTP was challenging. It is important to understand the various underlying mechanisms that drive TTP in the presence of these comorbid diseases, so that an appropriate treatment strategy can be initiated. Our patient failed an initial trial of plasma infusion alone, but responded well to plasma exchange. PMID:27245723

  10. Life-threatening postpartum hemolysis, elevated liver functions tests, low platelets syndrome versus thrombocytopenic purpura – Therapeutic plasma exchange is the answer

    PubMed Central

    Nasa, Prashant; Dua, J. M.; Kansal, Sudha; Chadha, Geeta; Chawla, Rajesh; Manchanda, Manav

    2011-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of life-threatening microangiopathic disorders in a postpartum female includes severe preeclampsia–eclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver functions tests, low platelets syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. There is considerable overlapping in the clinical and laboratory findings between these conditions, and hence an exact diagnosis may not be always possible. However, there is considerable maternal mortality and morbidity associated with these disorders. This case underlines the complexity of pregnancy-related microangiopathies regarding their differential diagnosis, multiple organ dysfunction and role of therapeutic plasma exchange in their management. PMID:21814380

  11. Use of Recombinant Factor VIIa in a Pediatric Patient With Initial Presentation of Refractory Acute Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura and Severe Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Gurion, Reut; Siu, Anita; Weiss, Aaron R.; Masterson, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Severe bleeding in acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is rare but can cause significant complications to the patient. Here we report the case of a pediatric patient with acute ITP and hematuria refractory to anti-D immune globulin, high dose intravenous immunoglobulin G, and high dose steroids. Her hematuria was successfully treated with recombinant factor VIIa (rFVIIa). While further investigation on the use of rFVIIa in ITP is warranted, this case report contributes to the pediatric literature for its use during the course of an initial presentation of ITP with hemorrhagic complications. PMID:23258971

  12. FATAL OUTCOME OF INFECTION BY DENGUE 4 IN A PATIENT WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIC PURPURA AS A COMORBID CONDITION IN BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Pereira, Maira Alves; Iani, Felipe Campos de Melo; D'anunciação, Lorena; de Almeida, Jorge Luís Carvalho; Soares, Janer Aparecida Silveira; Ferraz, Marcela Lencine; Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is currently a major public-health problem. Dengue virus (DENV) is classified into four distinct serotypes, DENV 1-4. After 28 years of absence, DENV-4 was again detected in Brazil in 2010 in Roraima State, and one year later, the virus was identified in the northern Brazilian states of Amazonas and Pará, followed by Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. In Minas Gerais, the first confirmed case of DENV-4 occurred in the municipality of Frutal in 2011 and has now been isolated from a growing number of patients. Although DENV-2 is associated with the highest risk of severe forms of the disease and death due to the infection, DENV-4 has also been associated with severe forms of the disease and an increasing risk of hemorrhagic manifestations. Herein, the first fatal case of confirmed DENV-4 in Brazil is reported. The patient was an 11-year-old girl from the municipality of Montes Claros in northern Minas Gerais State, Brazil. She had idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura as a comorbid condition and presented with a fulminant course of infection, leading to death due to hemorrhagic complications. Diagnosis was confirmed by detection of Dengue-specific antibodies using IgM capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and semi-nested RT-PCR. Primary care physicians and other health-care providers should bear in mind that DENV-4 can also result in severe forms of the disease and lead to hemorrhagic complications and death, mainly when dengue infection is associated with coexisting conditions. PMID:24879007

  13. The Influence of Primary Cytomegalovirus or Epstein-Barr Virus Infection on the Course of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Smalisz-Skrzypczyk, Katarzyna; Romiszewski, Michał; Matysiak, Michał; Demkow, Urszula; Pawelec, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in children is usually triggered by a viral infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) or Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of CMV and EBV infections in children with first relapse of ITP, and the influence of these infections on the course and response to treatment of ITP. Sixty patients (30 boys and 30 girls) with ITP were enrolled into the study. We found that the age at the onset of ITP was from 1 month to 17 years (mean 7.0 ± 5.7 years), the platelet number was from 1 to 79 x 10(9)/L (mean 18.1 ± 19.0 x 10(9)/L) at the time of diagnosis and it increased from 17 to 395 x 10(9)/L (mean 134.4 ± 81.2 x 10(9)/L)(p < 0.05) after the first course of therapy. Forty seven patients required pharmacological treatment, the duration of the treatment was from 2 to 25 days (mean 6.1 ± 4.1 days). Relapses were observed in 27 (45%) of the patients. Active CMV infection was found in 19 patients (31.7%), EBV infection in 5 patients (8.3%), and both infections concomitantly in 1 patient (1.7%). The group of patients with CMV or EBV infection(n = 25) did not differ from the patients free of infection (n = 35) in regard to the age, number of platelets at onset, duration of treatment, number of platelets after treatment, number of relapses, and the interval between the onset and first relapse. In conclusion, active CMV or EBV infection is common in children with ITP. These infections do not seem to have an appreciable bearing on the clinical course and the response to treatment on children with ITP. PMID:26269027

  14. Rituximab therapy for chonic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura: a long-term follow-up analysis

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Chavez, Jaime; Montiel-Cervantes, Laura; Esparza, Miriam García-Ruiz; Vela-Ojeda, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term response to rituximab in patients with chronic and refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Adults with ITP fail to respond to conventional therapies in almost 30% of cases, developing a refractory disease. Rituximab has been successfully used in these patients. We used rituximab at 375 mg/m2, IV, weekly for a total of four doses in 18 adult patients. Complete remission (CR) was considered if the platelet count was >100 × 109/l, partial remission (PR) if platelets were >50 × 109/l, minimal response (MR) if the platelet count was >30 × 109/l and <50 × 109/l, and no response if platelet count remained unchanged. Response was classified as sustained (SR) when it was stable for a minimum of 6 months. Median age was 43.5 years (range, 17 to 70). Median platelet count at baseline was 12.5 × 109/l (range, 3.0 to 26.3). CR was achieved in five patients (28%), PR in five (28%), MR in four (22%), and two patients were classified as therapeutic failures (11%). Two additional patients were lost to follow-up. The median time between rituximab therapy and response was 14 weeks (range, 4 to 32). SR was achieved in 12 patients (67%). There were no severe adverse events during rituximab therapy. During follow-up (median, 26 months; range, 12 to 59), no other immunosuppressive drugs were used. In conclusion, rituximab therapy is effective and safe in adult patients with chronic and refractory ITP. Overall response rate achieved is high, long term, and with no risk of adverse events. PMID:17874322

  15. Does the site of platelet sequestration predict the response to splenectomy in adult patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura?

    PubMed

    Navez, Julie; Hubert, Catherine; Gigot, Jean-François; Navez, Benoit; Lambert, Catherine; Jamar, François; Danse, Etienne; Lannoy, Valérie; Jabbour, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Splenectomy is the only potentially curative treatment for chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in adults. However, one-third of the patients relapse without predictive factors identified. We evaluate the predictive value of the site of platelet sequestration on the response to splenectomy in patients with ITP. Eighty-two consecutive patients with ITP treated by splenectomy between 1992 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Platelet sequestration site was studied by (111)Indium-oxinate-labeled platelets in 93% of patients. Response to splenectomy was defined at last follow-up as: complete response (CR) for platelet count (PC) ≥100 × 10(9)/L, response (R) for PC≥30 × 10(9)/L and <100 × 10(9)/L with absence of bleeding, no response (NR) for PC<30 × 10(3)/L or significant bleeding. Laparoscopic splenectomy was performed in 81 patients (conversion rate of 16%), and open approach in one patient. Median follow-up was 57 months (range, 1-235). Platelet sequestration study was performed in 93% of patients: 50 patients (61%) exhibited splenic sequestration, 9 (11%) hepatic sequestration and 14 patients (17%) mixed sequestration. CR was obtained in 72% of patients, R in 25% and NR in 4% (two with splenic sequestration, one with hepatic sequestration). Preoperative PC, age at diagnosis, hepatic sequestration and male gender were significant for predicting CR in univariate analysis, but only age (HR = 1.025 by one-year increase, 95% CI [1.004-1.047], p = 0.020) and pre-operative PC (HR = 0.112 for > 100 versus <=100, 95% CI [0.025-0.493], p = 0.004) were significant predictors of recurrence-free survival in multivariate analysis. Response to splenectomy was independent of the site of platelet sequestration in patients with ITP. Pre-operative platelet sequestration study in these patients cannot be recommended. PMID:25275667

  16. Kinetics and sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled platelets in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a quantitative study

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns, A.D.; Loetter, M.G.; Badenhorst, P.N.; de Kock, F.; Pieters, H.; Herbst, C.; van Reenen, O.R.; Kotze, H.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1982-04-01

    Kinetics and quantification of the sites of destruction of /sup 111/In-oxine-labeled autologous platelets were investigated in eight patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. The mean platelet count was 17 +/- 9 X 10(9)/liter; platelets were separated by differential centrifugation and labeled with 5.6 +/- 2.5 MBq /sup 111/In. Whole body and organ /sup 111/In-platelet distribution was quantitated with a scintillation camera and a computer-assisted imaging system acquisition matrix. Areas of interest were selected with the computer and organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity expressed as a percentage of whole body activity. Mean platelet survival was 49.5 +/- 29.6 hr and the survival curves were exponential. Equilibrium percentage organ /sup 111/In-radioactivity was (normal values in parentheses): spleen 33.7 +/- 8.8 (31.1 +/- 10.2); liver 16.1 +/- 9.5 (13.1 +/- 1.3); thorax 22.8 +/- 3.7 (28.2 +/- 5.6). Percentage organ /sup 111/In-activity at the time when labeled platelets had disappeared from the circulation was: spleen 44.5 +/- 16.4 (40 +/- 16); liver 16.0 +/- 11.5 (32.4 +/- 7.2); thorax 19.7 +/- 6.0 (17.7 +/- 10.3). Thorax activity corresponds to bone marrow radioactivity. Three patterns of platelet sequestration were evident. Three patients had mainly splenic sequestration, two mainly hepatic sequestration, and three diffuse reticuloendothelial system sequestration with a major component of platelets destroyed in the bone marrow. Splenectomy was performed in two patients. The pattern of /sup 111/In-platelet sequestration was not predictive of response of glucocorticoid therapy or indicative of the necessity for splenectomy. Quantitative /sup 111/In-labeled autologous platelet kinetic studies provide a new tool for the investigation of platelet disorders.U

  17. A rare association of localized scleroderma type morphea, vitiligo, autoimmune hypothyroidism, pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The localized scleroderma (LS) known as morphea, presents a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Current classification schemes divide morphea into categories based solely on cutaneous morphology, without reference to systemic disease or autoimmune phenomena. This classification is likely incomplete. Autoimmune phenomena such as vitiligo and Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with LS have been reported in some cases suggesting an autoimmune basis. To our knowledge this is the first case of a morphea forming part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome (MAS) and presenting simultaneously with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis. Case presentation We report an uncommon case of a white 53 year old female patient with LS as part of a multiple autoimmune syndrome associated with pneumonitis, autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and central nervous system vasculitis presenting a favorable response with thrombopoietin receptor agonists, pulses of methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Conclusion Is likely that LS have an autoimmune origin and in this case becomes part of MAS, which consist on the presence of three or more well-defined autoimmune diseases in a single patient. PMID:23256875

  18. Differential effect of corticosteroids on serum cystatin C in thrombocytopenic purpura and leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bardi, Edit; Dobos, Eva; Kappelmayer, János; Kiss, Csongor

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the influence of steroid therapy on serum cystatin C (cysC) concentrations in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and idiopthiás thrombocytopenias purpura (ITP). We studied 17 patients with ITP (girls: boys =5:12, mean age: 7.6 yrs, range between 1 to 17 years) and 18 patients with ALL (girls: boys =6:12, mean age: 6.3 yrs, range between 2 to 17 years). CysC and white blood cell count (WBC) in both group of patients were determined before and after 300 mg/m(2) cumulative dose of steroid therapy. Corticosteroids increased the level of cysC in both groups of patients, however significant increase was found only in ITP patients between pre- and posttreatment values (0.96 +/-0.27 mg/L vs. 1.16 +/- 0.3 mg/L, p =0,02). Pretreatment cysC concentrations were within the reference range in patients with ITP but not with ALL and were significantly higher in ALL patients, than in ITP patients (1.23 +/- 1,12 mg/L vs. 0.96 +/- 0.27 mg/L, p =0,02). Pretreatment WBC of ALL patients were significantly higher than of ITP patients (22.58 G/L, min. 3.5 G/L, max. 102.1 G/L vs. 7.46 G/L, min. 4.8 G/L, max. 12.3 G/L, p =0.03). We have found significant correlation between pretreatment cysC and WBC values in ALL patients (p = 0.04). Although the concentration of cysC may be slightly and reversibly influenced by corticosteroid treatment, cysC is sensitive to detect early and moderate deterioration of GFR in children with cancer. PMID:20084479

  19. Safety and Efficacy of Gammaplex® in Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ClinicalTrials.gov - NCT00504075)

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Clive H.; Gillanders, Kate R.; Stratford Bobbitt, Margaret E.; Gascoigne, Ernie W.; Leach, Samantha J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives This multicentre, open-label study investigated the safety and efficacy of Gammaplex, a 5% Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIg), in patients with idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Materials and Methods Patients were between the ages of 6 and 70 years; had ITP for at least six months and had a platelet count ≤20×109/L. Eligible patients were dosed with 1 g/kg of Gammaplex on two consecutive days, followed by assessment of safety and efficacy on Days 3, 5, 9, 14, 21, 32 and 90. Response was defined as the increase in platelet count to a threshold of ≥50×109/L on or before Day 9 after the first dose of Gammaplex. Results All 35 patients received at least one infusion of Gammaplex. Twenty-nine (83%) patients responded to Gammaplex, similar to the historical control, with a 95% lower one-sided confidence interval of 68.9%. Median duration of response was 10.0 days, with an overall reduction in bleeding episodes. Gammaplex provided supranormal concentrations of total IgG; mean peak concentration (Cmax) of 45.3 g/L (4.53 g/dL), with a mean half-life of 28.5 days. Fifteen patients reported 63 Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs); the most common were headache (10 patients), vomiting (6 patients) and pyrexia (5 patients). Five of these ADRs were considered serious, one patient had three concurrent Serious Adverse Events (SAEs); these were vomiting, dehydration and headache. Two other patients each had one SAE (headache). There were no unexpected Adverse Events (AEs) or thromboembolic episodes and no significant changes in vital signs, biochemical, haematological and virology results. Conclusion: Gammaplex achieved a very high concentration of serum IgG but was well-tolerated and effective in the treatment of ITP with a similar degree of efficacy to the pre-determined historical control group and the pre-set statistical criteria. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00504075 Clinical Trials Registry India 000016 PMID:24892422

  20. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68-90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  1. Generation of Anti-Murine ADAMTS13 Antibodies and Their Application in a Mouse Model for Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, Louis; Tersteeg, Claudia; Roose, Elien; Vandenbulcke, Aline; Vandeputte, Nele; Pareyn, Inge; De Cock, Elien; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter; Deckmyn, Hans; De Meyer, Simon F.; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening thrombotic microangiopathy linked to a deficiency in the metalloprotease ADAMTS13. In the current study, a novel mouse model for acquired TTP was generated to facilitate development and validation of new therapies for this disease. Therefore, a large panel (n = 19) of novel anti-mouse ADAMTS13 (mADAMTS13) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of mouse origin was generated. Inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs were identified using the FRETS-VWF73 assay. Four mAbs strongly inhibited mADAMTS13 activity in vitro (∼68–90% inhibition). Injecting a combination of 2 inhibitory mAbs (13B4 and 14H7, 1.25 mg/kg each) in Adamts13+/+ mice resulted in full inhibition of plasma ADAMTS13 activity (96 ± 4% inhibition, day 1 post injection), leading to the appearance of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (UL-VWF) multimers. Interestingly, the inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs 13B4 and 14H7 were ideally suited to induce long-term ADAMTS13 deficiency in Adamts13+/+ mice. A single bolus injection resulted in full ex vivo inhibition for more than 7 days. As expected, the mice with the acquired ADAMTS13 deficiency did not spontaneously develop TTP, despite the accumulation of UL-VWF multimers. In line with the Adamts13-/- mice, TTP-like symptoms could only be induced when an additional trigger (rVWF) was administered. On the other hand, the availability of our panel of anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs allowed us to further develop a sensitive ELISA to detect ADAMTS13 in mouse plasma. In conclusion, a novel acquired TTP mouse model was generated through the development of inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs. Consequently, this model provides new opportunities for the development and validation of novel treatments for patients with TTP. In addition, these newly developed inhibitory anti-mADAMTS13 mAbs are of great value to specifically study the role of ADAMTS13 in mouse models of thrombo-inflammatory disease. PMID:27479501

  2. Non-thrombocytopenic purpura in familial Mediterranean fever-comorbidity with Henoch-Schönlein purpura or an additional rare manifestation of familial Mediterranean fever?

    PubMed

    Ben-Chetrit, Eldad; Yazici, Hasan

    2016-07-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a relatively common vasculitis mainly affecting children. It is characterized by purpuric skin rash, abdominal cramping, and haematuria. Skin biopsies taken from Henoch-Schönlein purpura lesions disclose perivascular IgA deposits. FMF is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by recurrent attacks of fever lasting 2-3 days which resolve spontaneously. Typical manifestations of the disease are peritonitis, pleuritis, pericarditis, arthritis and erysipelas-like erythema usually affecting the lower limbs. Over the years many reviews emphasized the clinical impression that Henoch-Schönlein purpura is more common among FMF patients than in healthy control population. In this review we summarize these reports and show that sometimes Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with FMF differs from typical isolated Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and this is also the case with polyarteritis nodosa and SpA associated with FMF. It is suggested that these clinical manifestations (polyarteritis nodosa, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and SpA) should be considered to be associated with FMF as part of what we call FMF rather than as co-existing additional separate clinical entities. PMID:26464521

  3. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura During Maintenance Phase of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Rare Coexistence Requiring a High Degree of Suspicion, a Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bayhan, Turan; Ünal, Şule; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia may develop in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) due to myelosuppression of chemotherapy or relapse. Here we report a pediatric patient with ALL whose platelet counts decreased at the 102nd week of maintenance treatment. Thrombocytopenia was refractory to platelet infusions and bone marrow aspiration revealed remission status for ALL along with increased megakaryocytes. The cessation of chemotherapy for 2 weeks caused no increase in thrombocyte counts. The viral serology was unrevealing. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was established. After administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, the thrombocytopenia resolved. When thrombocytopenia occurs in patients with ALL in remission, ITP should be kept in mind after exclusion of the more common etiologies. PMID:25913619

  4. Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura due to antibody-mediated ADAMTS13 deficiency precipitated by a localized Castleman's disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Thais Celi Lopes; Orsi, Fernanda Andrade; Colella, Marina Pereira; Percout, Priscila de Oliveira; Moura, Muriel Silva; Dias, Maria Almeida; Lins, Betina Diniz; Paula, Erich Vinicius de; Vassallo, Jose; Annichino-Bizzachi, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    Acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor causing thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) may be precipitated by some infections, inflammatory diseases or neoplasia. We reported a case of refractory TTP precipitated by a newly diagnosed localized Castleman's disease (CD). TTP was initially treated with plasma exchange and immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids; however the treatment failed to promote sustained response. During hospitalization, an abdominal tumor was diagnosed and resected; the histological analysis revealed a CD of hyaline-vascular variant rich stroma. After tumor removal, the patient achieved a long-lasting clinical remission and normalized ADAMTS13 activity. This clinical case describes a novel association of acquired ADAMTS13 inhibitor and CD. The antibody to ADAMTS13 developed along with the systemic manifestation of CD and promptly disappeared after the resection of the tumor. There are reports of neoplasia-associated thrombotic microangiopathy however direct evidence of CD-dependent ADAMTS13 inhibitor had not yet been reported. PMID:24853254

  5. Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura During Maintenance Phase of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Rare Coexistence Requiring a High Degree of Suspicion, a Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Turan; Ünal, Şule; Gümrük, Fatma; Çetin, Mualla

    2015-12-01

    Thrombocytopenia may develop in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) due to myelosuppression of chemotherapy or relapse. Here we report a pediatric patient with ALL whose platelet counts decreased at the 102nd week of maintenance treatment. Thrombocytopenia was refractory to platelet infusions and bone marrow aspiration revealed remission status for ALL along with increased megakaryocytes. The cessation of chemotherapy for 2 weeks caused no increase in thrombocyte counts. The viral serology was unrevealing. A diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) was established. After administration of intravenous immunoglobulin, the thrombocytopenia resolved. When thrombocytopenia occurs in patients with ALL in remission, ITP should be kept in mind after exclusion of the more common etiologies. PMID:25913619

  6. [A Case of Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura in a Patient Undergoing FOLFOX6 plus Panitumumab Therapy for Unresectable Recurrent Rectal Cancer with a Rapidly Progressive Course].

    PubMed

    Kato, Kuniyuki; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Oyama, Kenichi; Hatano, Yoshiaki; Nozawa, Tatsuru; Ishibashi, Masahisa; Konda, Ryuichiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A 71-year-old male patient began FOLFOX6 plus panitumumab treatment for unresectable recurrent rectal cancer. He developed thrombocytopenia after 2 courses of treatment and therefore a platelet transfusion was performed. The day after transfusion, the patient developed jaundice and hematuria. His lactate dehydrogenase levels had increased and a peripheral blood smear review revealed the presence of schistocytes. Anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies were present, and there was a reduction in ADAMTS13 activity. The patient was diagnosed with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and treated with a plasma exchange. The day after the plasma exchange, his clinical condition rapidly worsened and he died. Thrombocytopenia due to chemotherapy often appears as myelosuppression. If conditions such as jaundice, indirect bilirubinemia, or hematuria appear during the course of chemotherapy, this condition must be considered as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26809542

  7. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... any of the following: Abnormally heavy periods in women Bleeding into the skin , often around the shins, causing a skin rash that looks like pinpoint red spots (petechial rash) Easy bruising Nosebleed or bleeding in the mouth

  8. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood. As the blood is passed through a machine that separates blood into its different parts, the abnormal plasma is removed and your blood cells are saved. Your blood cells are then combined with normal plasma from a donor, and then ...

  9. Anti-platelet antibodies associated with the Canale–Smith syndrome bind to the same platelet glycoprotein complexes as those of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura patients

    PubMed Central

    GRODZICKY, T; BUSSEL, J B; ELKON, K B

    2002-01-01

    The Canale–Smith syndrome (CSS) is an inherited disease characterized by massive lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly and systemic autoimmunity to erythrocytes and platelets. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is an autoimmune disease in which approximately 60–80% of patients have anti-platelet antibodies directed against specific platelet glycoprotein complexes (GPCs) located on their membrane: GP IIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, and GPIa/IIa. Almost all (95–100%) of the antibody-positive patients have antibodies directed against GPIIb/IIIa alone, or in combination with other glycoprotein targets. Our objective was to determine the specificities of the anti-platelet antibodies in CSS patients. The detection of anti-platelet antibodies was performed using a commercially available ELISA, the Pak-AUTO (GTI, Brookfield, WI), in which highly purified GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, and GPIa/IIa are immobilized on microtitre plates, incubated with serum or plasma, and subsequently developed with an antihuman polyclonal immunoglobulin. Of 14 CSS patients tested, 11 (79%) had anti-platelet antibodies in their serum directed toward at least one of the three major GPC, nine (82%) of which were against GPIIb/IIIa alone or in combination. Antibodies detected in the sera of ITP patients had similar specificities. No such antibodies were detected in samples from 25 consecutive normal controls. These results demonstrate that a genetically defined defect in lymphocyte apoptosis results in a humoral autoimmune response with anti-platelet specificities very similar to the common idiopathic form of autoimmune thrombocytopenia. PMID:11876752

  10. Total Hip Arthroplasty for Rapidly Destructive Coxarthrosis in a Patient with Severe Platelet Deficiency due to Liver Cirrhosis and Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Hama, Shunpei; Inori, Fumiaki; Momose, Dai; Konishi, Sadahiko

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly destructive coxarthrosis (RDC) causes rapid and extreme destruction of the hip joint, which was reported by Postel and Kerboull. RDC is commonly unilateral and occurs mostly in elderly women. Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by a low platelet count that is the result of both immune-mediated platelet destruction and suppression of platelet production. In patients with ITP undergoing surgery, bleeding associated with a low preoperative platelet count can lead to unsuccessful outcomes. To the best of our knowledge, there has been only one report describing total hip arthroplasty (THA) for patients with ITP and there have been no reports of THA for RDC with a very low platelet count due to liver cirrhosis (LC) and ITP. We report the case of a patient who had right RDC and a very low platelet count due to LC and ITP in whom THA was successfully performed. Furthermore, this case was also unique in that her platelet count increased after THA. THA for right RDC might resolve ITP by relieving inflammation of the right hip since her platelet count recovered after THA. PMID:26064742

  11. The comparison of perceived stress in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura patients referred to Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital with healthy people in Isfahan, Iran, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mental stress and daily crises comprise a part of physical and mental threats. Perceived stress is a physical and mental threat, as well. Perceived stress is a psychological process during which the individual considers his/ her physical and psychological welfare as being threatened. Since idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is one of the chronic diseases being able to affect patients' perceived stress, this study was conducted to compare perceived stress in ITP patients and healthy people. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-comparative study with control and case groups. In this study, 64 ITP patients referring Seyed Al-Shohada Hospital and the same number of healthy individuals from the patients' neighborhood, as the control group, were selected randomly and compared. The Kohen Perceived Stress Standard Questionnaire was used to collect the data. The data were analyzed by SPSS and Student’s independent t-test, chi-square, and Mann-Whitney test. Results : 64.1%, 59.4% and 53.1% of participants in case group were older than 35 years old, female and had elementary education. 78.1% of case group had severe perceived stress. 70.3% of participants in control group experienced mild perceived stress. Mann-Whitney test showed significant difference between two groups in level of stress (p<0.001). Conclusion: In ITP patients, perceived stress was considerable. Planning interventional measures to determine stress-making agents and subside or at least control them is very essential. PMID:25922646

  12. Micromegakaryocytes in a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and chronic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Mattina, T; Romano, V; Milana, G; Mollica, F; Schilirò, G

    1996-03-15

    Thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia is frequently reported in patients with partial 11q deletion but there are no reports on bone marrow morphology of these patients. We report on a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and its classical clinical manifestations including chronic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom micromegakaryocytes were found in the bone marrow aspirate. This is the first report of the presence of micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow of a patient with 11q deletion. Accurate examination of the bone marrow of other patients with the 11q deletion may clarify whether the observation of micromegakaryocytes is common in these patients. Micromegakaryocytes may indicate a defect of development. Two genes for two DNA binding proteins that are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis map in the 11q region: Ets-1, that maps to 11q24, close to D11S912, and the nuclear-factor-related-kB gene that maps to 11q24-q25. It is possible that these genes, when present in only one copy, result in thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia as observed in this patient. PMID:8882392

  13. Ticlopidine-, Clopidogrel-, and Prasugrel-Associated Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A 20-Year Review from the Southern Network on Adverse Reactions (SONAR)

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sony; Dunn, Brianne L.; Qureshi, Zaina P.; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Kwaan, Hau C.; Pandey, Dilip K.; McKoy, June M.; Barnato, Sara E.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Cursio, John F.; Weiss, Ivy; Raife, Thomas J.; Carey, Patricia M.; Sarode, Ravindra; Kiss, Joseph E.; Danielson, Constance; Ortel, Thomas L.; Clark, William F.; Rock, Gail; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Zheng, X. Long; Chen, Hao; Chen, Fei; Armstrong, John M.; Raisch, Dennis W.; Bennett, Charles L.

    2013-01-01

    Thienopyridine-derivatives (ticlopidine, clopidogrel, and prasugrel) are the primary antiplatelet agents. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare drug-associated syndrome, with the thienopyridines being the most common drugs implicated in this syndrome. We reviewed 20 years of information on clinical, epidemiologic, and laboratory findings for thienopyridine-associated TTP. Four, 11, and 11 cases of thienopyridine-associated TTP were reported in the first year of marketing of ticlopidine (1989), clopidogrel (1998), and prasugrel (2010), respectively. As of 2011, the FDA received reports of 97 ticlopidine-, 197 clopidogrel-, and 14 prasugrel-associated TTP cases. Severe deficiency of ADAMTS-13 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 motif, member 13) was present in 80% and antibodies to 100% of these TTP patients on ticlopidine, 0% of the patients with clopidogrel-associated TTP (p < 0.05), and an unknown percentage of patients with prasugrel-associated TTP. TTP is associated with use of each of the three thienopyridines, although the mechanistic pathways may differ. PMID:23111862

  14. Anti-D (WinRho SD) treatment of children with chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura stimulates transient cytokine/chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Semple, J W; Allen, D; Rutherford, M; Woloski, M; David, M; Wakefield, C; Butchart, S; Freedman, J; Blanchette, V

    2002-03-01

    Intravenous anti-D is often used in the treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), but little is known about its mechanisms of action. To investigate anti-D's potential in vivo mechanism(s) of action, a small group (N = 7) of children with chronic AITP was studied. The children initially received either 25 or 50 microg/kg of WinRho-SD in a four-cycle cross-over trial, and peripheral blood samples from the first and third cycles were assessed for cytokine levels at pre-treatment, 3 hr, 1 day, and 8 days post-treatment. Results showed that platelet counts significantly increased in all the children by day 8 post-treatment. Analysis of serum by ELISA showed that there was a significant but transient rise in both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine levels (e.g., IL1RA, IL6, GM-CSF, MCP-1 alpha, TNF-alpha and MCP-1) by 3 hr post-treatment in both cycles which returned to baseline levels by 8 days post-treatment. These results suggest that anti-D administration may initially activate the RES in the form of cytokine/chemokine secretion, which is subsequently followed by an increase in platelet counts. It is possible that the induced cytokine/chemokine storm may have an effect on several physiological processes such as those mediating either adverse effects or potentially RES phagocytic activity. PMID:11891813

  15. Veltuzumab, an anti-CD20 mAb for the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Milani, Cannon; Castillo, Jorge

    2009-04-01

    Veltuzumab is a humanized, second-generation anti-CD20 mAb currently under development by Immunomedics Inc for the potential treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Licensee Nycomed is developing veltuzumab for the potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Veltuzumab contains 90 to 95% human antibody sequences with identical antigen framework regions to epratuzumab (a humanized anti-CD22 mAb) and similar antigen-binding determinants to rituximab (chimeric, anti-CD20 mAb and the first-line treatment of aggressive and indolent NHL). In vitro studies have demonstrated that veltuzumab has enhanced binding avidities and a stronger effect on complement-dependent cytotoxicity compared with rituximab in selected cell lines. In dose-finding phase I/II clinical trials in patients with low-grade NHL, intravenous veltuzumab demonstrated a substantial rate of complete responses in concurrence with shorter and more tolerable infusions compared with rituximab. Currently there has been no evidence of an immune response to repeated administrations, and no serious adverse events related to veltuzumab treatment in patients with NHL. Veltuzumab is undergoing clinical trials using a low-dose subcutaneous formulation in patients with NHL, CLL and ITP. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to clarify the role veltuzumab will play in a market where the therapy of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is dominated by rituximab. PMID:19330725

  16. Platelet-associated autoantibodies as detected by a solid-phase modified antigen capture ELISA test (MACE) are a useful prognostic factor in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Fabris, Fabrizio; Scandellari, Raffaella; Ruzzon, Elisabetta; Randi, Maria Luigia; Luzzatto, Guido; Girolami, Antonio

    2004-06-15

    There were 50 consecutive idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) adult patients (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/L) grouped according to positivity or negativity of a solid-phase modified antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test (MACE) against glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa), Ib/IX, and IIa/IIIa. Observation started on the day of MACE assay and lasted at least 6 months. Clinical worsening was defined as the need for starting or modifying therapy because of thrombocytopenia lower than 20 x 10(9)/L or patient admission due to bleeding symptoms. MACE-positive patients had a higher probability of clinical worsening than MACE-negatives (P <.004). The proportion of patients worsening was 18 (72%) of 25 among MACE-positives and 8 (32%) of 25 among MACE-negatives. The median time to clinical worsening was 2.1 months for MACE-positive patients and 27.7 months for MACE-negatives. The assay of specific platelet autoantibodies may be a useful prognostic tool for the clinical course of ITP. PMID:14976036

  17. Low-dose autologous in vitro opsonized erythrocytes. Radioimmune method and autologous opsonized erythrocytes for refractory autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Ambriz, R.; Munoz, R.; Pizzuto, J.; Quintanar, E.; Morales, M.; Aviles, A.

    1987-01-01

    Adult patients with chronic autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (ATP), which proved refractory to various treatments, received a single dose of autologous in vitro opsonized erythrocytes with 100 micrograms of anti-D IgG. In 1983, 30 of these patients were treated with autologous erythrocytes that had been opsonized and labeled with 25 mCi (740 MBq) of technetium Tc 99m; this treatment was designated as the radioimmune method. Favorable responses were noted in 36% of patients so treated. In 1985, another group of 16 patients with refractory ATP received therapy with autologous opsonized erythrocytes (AOPE) and 55% of these patients showed favorable responses. Five (17%) of the patients treated using the radioimmune method attained a complete, long-term (greater than 35 months) remission of their ATP, and five (31%) of the patients treated using AOPE remained in complete remission over 270 days after cessation of therapy. Major complications were not seen. We concluded that the interaction of macrophages with low-dose AOPE is a successful therapeutic approach in ATP refractory to standard treatment.

  18. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  19. Micromegakaryocytes in a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and chronic thrombocytopenic purpura

    SciTech Connect

    Gangarossa, S.; Mattina, T.; Romano, V.; Milana, G.; Mollica, F.; Schiliro, G.

    1996-03-15

    Thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia is frequently reported in patients with partial 11q deletion but there are no reports on bone marrow morphology of these patients. We report on a patient with partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11 [del(11)(q24.2qter)] and its classical clinical manifestations including chronic thrombocytopenic purpura in whom micromegakaryocytes were found in the bone marrow aspirate. This is the first report of the presence of micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow of a patient with 11q deletion. Accurate examination of the bone marrow of other patients with the 11q deletion may clarify whether the observation of micromegakaryocytes is common in these patients. Micromegakaryocytes may indicate a defect of development. Two genes for two DNA binding proteins that are likely to be involved in hematopoiesis map in the 11q region: Ets-1, that maps to 11q24, close to D11S912, and the nuclear-factor-related-kB gene that maps to 11q24-q25. It is possible that these genes, when present in only one copy, result in thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia as observed in this patient. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Endobronchial hemorrhage after intubation with double-lumen endotracheal tube in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura for minimally invasive cardiac surgery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Nam Won

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS) requires lung isolation. Lung isolation is usually achieved with double-lumen endotracheal tube (DLT). Patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) have an increased risk of bleeding events. We suspected endobronchial hemorrhage after exchange of DLT during induction of anesthesia for replacement of mitral valve in a 62-year-old man with a known ITP. The MICS was stopped and bronchial artery embolization was performed in the angiographic room. In the present case, in order to reduce the risk of bronchial arterial injury in ITP patient we intubated with single lumen endotracheal tube. Lung isolation led to achievement of intermittent total lung deflation. Based on the results, we recommend a high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and platelet transfusion prior to cardiac surgery in patients with ITP to increase platelet count. Moreover, it is proposed that in order to clear the vision during the operation, ventilation can be held or made intermittent both prior to cardiopulmonary bypass or at its conclusion to permit exposure. PMID:24567815

  1. The child with immune thrombocytopenic purpura: is pharmacotherapy or watchful waiting the best initial management? A panel discussion from the 2002 meeting of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula; Tarantino, Michael D; Buchanan, George R; Bussel, James B; George, James N

    2004-02-01

    The initial management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is a topic of debate among pediatric hematologists. The decision whether to start a patient on pharmacotherapy or to employ an approach of watchful waiting and patient education is problematic for this group of physicians. A wide variety of research studies and review articles have been published on either side of this debate. Here, the proceedings from a panel discussion, held at the 2002 American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology meeting, are presented. The panel, composed of experts on both sides of the debate, presented the rationale, benefits, and risks of both pharmacotherapy and the watchful waiting strategy. PMID:14767210

  2. The Relationship between Self-esteem and Quality of Life of Patients with Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura at Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran, in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a chronic disease which is accompanied with hopelessness and loss of the sense of well-being due to its symptoms and treatment. It also affects patients' sense of social and spiritual well-being. This disorder decreases patients' self-esteem and their quality of life by changing their mental image and self-confidence. This study was performed to find the relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive-analytical study on 64 patients with ITP who referred to Isfahan's Sayed Al-Shohada Hospital, Iran. In this study, patients with ITP were selected randomly using a random number chart. The data collection tools consisted of the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF and Coopersmith Self-esteem Inventory (CSEI). Data were analyzed using SPSS and chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests and the Pearson and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients. Results: In total, 64 patients completed the questionnaires. Results showed that 32% of subjects were over 36 years of age and 59% were women. In addition, 29.7% of ITP patients had low self-esteem and quality of life. Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between self-esteem and quality of life of patients with ITP. Conclusions: The results of the present study showed that considerable attention must be paid to self-esteem, as one of the most important factors influencing the promotion of quality of life. Therefore, it is suggested that patient’s self-esteem be improved by the implementation of educational and psychological programs in order to decrease the consequences of poor quality of life. PMID:27252807

  3. Evaluation of the effects of and earliest response rate to anti-D treatment in children with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Aytaç, Selin; Olcay, Lale; Tunç, Bahattin; Ozbek, Namik; Aydinok, Yeşim

    2010-01-01

    In this pilot study, 30 (14 male, 16 female; median age: 8 years, range: 2-18) chronic non-splenectomized idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients with Rh+ blood group and their 49 attacks were evaluated after intravenous (i.v.) anti-D (WinRho SDF, Cangene Corporation, Winnipeg, MB, Canada) treatment at a dose of 50 microg/kg x 3 days (n = 21 cases; 35 attacks) or a single dose of 75 microg/kg (n = 9 cases; 14 attacks) to define the hemostatic dose of anti-D. Five of 30 patients (22/49 attacks) were resistant to steroid, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and vincristine treatment. Hemoglobin (Hb), white blood cells (WBC), platelets (plt) and reticulocytes (ret) were evaluated before and after treatment during the follow-up in sequences on the 1st, 7th, 14th and 21st days after anti-D treatment if the patients had no symptom. All patients, even the resistant ones, experienced an increase in plt count to provide protection from bleeding (> or = 20 x 10(9)/L in patients with symptoms, > or = 10 x 10(9)/L in patients without symptoms). The plt responses of one resistant and five non-resistant patients treated with a single 75 microg/kg dose of i.v. anti-D in 8 attacks were monitored at the 2nd, 4th, 8th, 24th and 48th hours of the treatment. A protective plt level was attained within 2 hours in 6 attacks of five non-resistant cases and in 24 hours in the remaining 2 attacks of one resistant case. This pilot study suggests that anti-D treatment in ITP patients is effective and can increase plt to a level adequate enough to protect from hemorrhage within 2 hours, when given in a 75 microg/kg dose. A few adverse events (i.e. chills, hemolysis and hemoglobinuria) resolved without intervention. PMID:20560246

  4. Efficacy, safety, and dose response of intravenous anti-D immune globulin (WinRho SDF) for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, A; Mauger, D

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed data from 20 children treated for acute or chronic idiopathic (immune) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) at a single institution to determine the relationship between dose of intravenous anti-D immune globulin (WinRho SDF; Nabi, Boca Raton, FL), increase in platelet count, and decrease in hemoglobin in the therapy of ITP. Higher doses of anti-D were clearly associated with a greater therapeutic response in the platelet count, with no increase in hemolysis for both acute and chronic ITP. A significant correlation was found between dose and peak increase in platelet count measured in the 14 days following administration. This effect was present for both acute ITP (17 infusions, P = .0001) and chronic ITP (30 infusions, P = .038). Although hemolysis was seen in nearly all infusions, with a median hemoglobin fall of 1.9 g/dL (range, 0 to 4.2), the decrease in hemoglobin was greater than 2.5 for only three infusions, and the largest fall in hemoglobin (4.2) was in a child with an underlying hemolytic anemia. Furthermore, for both acute and chronic ITP there was no relationship between the decrease in hemoglobin and the dose given (P = .22), nor between the increase in platelet count and fall in hemoglobin (P = .27). This analysis supports the use of higher doses of anti-D for the treatment of ITP, and demonstrates the need for a trial of high-dose anti-D (>100 microg/kg) in acute and chronic ITP. PMID:9523746

  5. Inhibitory autoantibodies against ADAMTS-13 in patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura bind ADAMTS-13 protease and may accelerate its clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SHELAT, S. G.; SMITH, P.; AI, J.; ZHENG, X. L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Many patients with acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) harbor autoantibodies that may bind and/or inhibit ADAMTS-13 proteolytic activity and accelerate its clearance in vivo. Methods To test this hypothesis, we determined ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen levels in parallel plasma samples from patients clinically diagnosed with TTP. Collagen binding, GST-VWF73 and FRETS-VWF73 assays were used to determine ADAMTS-13 activity and to detect inhibitory autoantibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation plus Western blotting (IP/WB) were used to detect total anti-ADAMTS-13 IgG (inhibitory and non-inhibitory). Results Among 40 patients with TTP (21 idiopathic and 19 non-idiopathic), inhibitory autoantibodies were detected (by FRETS-VWF73) in 52% of idiopathic and 0% of non-idiopathic TTP patients. In contrast, non-inhibitory IgG autoantibodies were detected in 29% of idiopathic and 50% of non-idiopathic TTP patients. The concentration of inhibitory IgG autoantibody in idiopathic TTP patients was significantly higher than that of non-inhibitory IgG in either idiopathic or non-idiopathic TTP patients. Idiopathic TTP patients demonstrated significantly reduced ADAMTS-13 activity compared with non-idiopathic patients, but only slightly lower ADAMTS-13 antigen levels. Interestingly, patients with inhibitory autoantibodies exhibited significantly lower ADAMTS-13 antigen levels than those with only non-inhibitory IgG autoantibodies or no autoantibody. Serial plasma exchanges increased levels of ADAMTS-13 activity and antigen concurrently in patients with inhibitory autoantibodies. Conclusion The identification of severe ADAMTS-13 deficiency and autoantibodies or inhibitors appears to be assay-dependent; the inhibitory IgG autoantibodies, in addition to binding and inhibiting ADAMTS-13 proteolytic activity, may accelerate ADAMTS-13 clearance in vivo. PMID:16879212

  6. Intravenous anti-D treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: analysis of efficacy, toxicity, and mechanism of effect.

    PubMed

    Bussel, J B; Graziano, J N; Kimberly, R P; Pahwa, S; Aledort, L M

    1991-05-01

    The efficacy, toxicity, and mechanism of effect of intravenous Anti-D (Winrho) were studied in 43 Rh+ patients with immune thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) who had not undergone splenectomy and in three already splenectomized patients. The mean platelet increase for the 43 nonsplenectomized patients was 95,000/microL (median 43,000/microL). Children had greater acute platelet responses than did adults. Human immunodeficiency virus status and duration of thrombocytopenia did not affect response. Maintenance treatment was given to patients as needed: the average interval between infusions was 24 days. The three splenectomized patients had no platelet response whatsoever. Toxicity was minimal; infusions were completed in less than 5 minutes. The generally accepted mechanism of effect of Anti-D has been Fc receptor blockade by substitution of antibody-coated red blood cells for antibody-coated platelets. Evidence is presented suggesting that the effect of IV Anti-D is not limited to Fc receptor blockade, including: (1) no correlation of parameters of hemolysis with platelet increase; (2) a 48- to 72-hour delay before platelet increase; (3) a tendency of the change in monocyte Fc receptor I expression to correlate with platelet increase; and (4) increased in vitro production of antibodies to sheep red blood cells following IV Anti-D infusion. PMID:1850307

  7. A multi-centre, single-arm, open-label study evaluating the safety and efficacy of fixed dose rituximab in patients with refractory, relapsed or chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (R-ITP1000 study).

    PubMed

    Tran, Huyen; Brighton, Tim; Grigg, Andrew; McRae, Simon; Dixon, Joanna; Thurley, Daniel; Gandhi, Maher K; Truman, Matt; Marlton, Paula; Catalano, John

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of a fixed-dose rituximab schedule was prospectively explored in primary/acute refractory, relapsed or chronic (platelet count >10 × 10(9) /l and ≤50 × 10(9) /l) idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Patients received two doses of rituximab (1000 mg) on days 1 and 15 and were followed-up on weeks 1-8, 12, 26, 39 and 52. A total of 122 patients were included in the safety population; efficacy was analysed in 108 patients. Overall response rate (ORR) at week 8, defined as the proportion of patients achieving complete response (CR; platelet count >150 × 10(9) /l) or partial response (PR; platelet count >50 × 10(9) /l) was 44%. Therapeutic response, defined as achieving a response at week 8, with at least a minor response (MR; platelet count >30 × 10(9) /l), sustained up to weeks 26 and 52 and accompanied by a reduction in ITP medications, was achieved in 44% (week 26) and 35% (week 52) of patients, respectively. Treatment was well tolerated with no safety concerns. While this study failed to meet its primary endpoint of an ORR of 50%, the efficacy of two fixed doses of rituximab appear to provide similar efficacy to the standard 375 mg/m(2) four-dose schedule in relapsed/chronic ITP. PMID:25041261

  8. Clinical significance of HLA-DR+, CD19+, CD10+ immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell detection in bone marrow lymphocytes from children affected with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Callea, V; Comis, M; Iaria, G; Sculli, G; Morabito, F; Lombardo, V T

    1997-01-01

    In children with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), bone marrow lymphocytes can express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) pattern with no evidence of leukemia or lymphoma. Bone marrow lymphocytes from 23 children and 20 adults affected with ITP were studied to determine the incidence and the clinical impact of lymphocytes with the immature B-cell phenotype and CD34+ cell expression. In this investigation we identified a group consisting of 52% of the children who showed the immature B phenotype, while the remaining 48%, similarly to adult ITP displayed an increase of T-cell antigens. CD34 was positive in 53% of children, but it was present in only half of the patients with the immature B phenotype and it was always absent in adults. IgH genes disclosed a germline configuration in all six patients in the immature B phenotype group. No difference was found in the two groups of children in terms of age, presentation of the disease or final outcome. Finally, no patient in either children's group has developed an acute lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:9299867

  9. [Metastatic prostate cancer complicated with chronic disseminated intravascular coagulopathy causing acute renal failure, mimicking thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and hemolytic uremic syndrome: pathomechanism, differential diagnosis and therapy related to a case].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Ragán, Márton; Kalmár, Katalin; Kovács, Lajos; Varga, Erzsébet; Varga, Tünde; Rakonczai, Ervin

    2010-12-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) is characterized as activation of the clotting system resulting in fibrin thrombi, gradually diminishing levels of clotting factors with increased risk of bleeding. Basically two types of DIC are distinguished: (1) chronic (compensated) - with alteration of laboratory values and (2) acute (non-compensated) - with severe clinical manifestations: bleeding, shock, acute renal failure (ARF), transient focal neurologic deficit, delirium or coma. Chronic DIC related to metastatic neoplasia is caused by pancreatic, gastric or prostatic carcinoma in most of the cases. Incidence rate of DIC is 13-30% in prostate cancer, among those only 0.4-1.65% of patients had clinical signs and symptoms of DIC. In other words, chronic DIC is developed in one of eight patients with prostate cancer. DIC is considered as a poor prognostic factor in prostatic carcinoma. The similar clinical and laboratory findings of TTP-HUS (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - hemolytic uremic syndrome) and DIC makes it difficult to differentiate between them. A 71 years old male patient with known chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, benign prostatic hyperplasia, significant carotid artery stenosis, gastric ulcer and alcoholic liver disease was admitted to another hospital with melena. Gastroscopy revealed intact gastric mucosa and actually non-bleeding duodenal ulcer covered by clots. Laboratory results showed hyperkalemia, elevated kidney function tests, indirect hyperbilirubinemia, increased liver function tests, leukocytosis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and elevated international normalized ratio (INR). He was treated with saline infusions, four units of red blood cells and one unit of fresh frozen plasma transfusions. Four days later he was transported to our Institution with ARF. Physical examination revealed dyspnoe, petechiae, hemoptoe, oliguria, chest-wall pain and aggressive behavior. Thrombocytopenia, signs of MAHA (fragmentocytes and helmet cells

  10. Effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori infection on anti-platelet glycoprotein antibody producing B cells in patients with primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuan-Shan; Kuang, Li-Ping; Zhuang, Chun-Lan; Jiang, Jia-Dian; Shi, Man

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) positive Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori or HP) infection on circulating B cells producing specific platelet glycoprotein antibodies and the association between therapeutic outcomes in primary idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) patients. Methods: A total of 76 newly diagnosed primary ITP patients were included in the study which was conducted at the first affiliated hospital of Shantou University Medical college, in Shantou city China, between January 2013 and January 2014. These patients were tested for H. pylori infection by 13C urea breath test and for anti-CagA antibody in H. pylori positive cases by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Anti-GPIb and anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells were measured using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay in all ITP patients and 30 controls. Anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) was also detected in ITP patients. Results: The numbers of anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibody-producing B cells in HP+CagA+ patients were higher than in HP+CagA- or HP- patients. However, anti-GPIb antibody-producing B cells were found higher in HP- patients. Analysis of treatment outcomes showed that a therapeutic response was more likely in patients presenting anti-GPIIb/IIIa B cells, but the poor response was found to be associated with anti-GPIb B cells and ANA presences. Conclusion: CagA antigen of H. pylori may induce anti-GPIIb/IIIa antibodies production by a molecular mimicry mechanism. Anti-GPIIb/IIIa and anti-GPIb antibody producing B Cells detection is useful for predicting treatment effects of primary ITP. PMID:25878627

  11. Investigation of whether the acute hemolysis associated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human) administration for treatment of immune thrombocytopenic purpura is consistent with the acute hemolytic transfusion reaction model

    PubMed Central

    Gaines, Ann Reed; Lee-Stroka, Hallie; Byrne, Karen; Scott, Dorothy E.; Uhl, Lynne; Lazarus, Ellen; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune thrombocytopenic purpura and secondary thrombocytopenia patients treated with Rho(D) immune globulin intravenous (human; anti-D IGIV) have experienced acute hemolysis, which is inconsistent with the typical presentation of extravascular hemolysis—the presumed mechanism of action of anti-D IGIV. Although the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis has not been established, the onset, signs/symptoms, and complications appear consistent with the intravascular hemolysis of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions (AHTRs). In transfusion medicine, the red blood cell (RBC) antigen-antibody incompatibility(-ies) that precipitate AHTRs can be detected in vitro with compatibility testing. Under the premise that anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis results from RBC antigen-antibody–mediated complement activation, this study evaluated whether the incompatibility(-ies) could be detected in vitro with a hemolysin assay, which would support the AHTR model as the hemolytic mechanism. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Seven anti-D IGIV lots were tested to determine the RBC antibody identities in those lots, including four lots that had been implicated in acute hemolytic episodes. Hemolysin assays were performed that tested each of 73 RBC specimens against each lot, including the RBCs of one patient who had experienced acute hemolysis after anti-D IGIV administration. RESULTS Only two anti-D IGIV lots contained RBC antibodies beyond those expected. No hemolysis endpoint was observed in any of the hemolysin assays. CONCLUSION Although the findings did not support the AHTR model, the results are reported to contribute knowledge about the mechanism of anti-D-IGIV–associated acute hemolysis and to prompt continued investigation into cause(s), prediction, and prevention of this potentially serious adverse event. PMID:19220820

  12. Foetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Cecile

    2006-01-01

    Foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from maternal alloimmunisation against foetal platelet antigens inherited from the father and different from those present in the mother, and usually presents as a severe isolated thrombocytopaenia in otherwise healthy newborns. The incidence has been estimated at 1/800 to 1/1 000 live births. NAIT has been considered to be the platelet counterpart of Rh Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn (RHD). Unlike RHD, NAIT can occur during a first pregnancy. The spectrum of the disease may range from sub-clinical moderate thrombocytopaenia to life-threatening bleeding in the neonatal period. Mildly affected infants may be asymptomatic. In those with severe thrombocytopaenia, the most common presentations are petechiae, purpura or cephalohaematoma at birth, associated with major risk of intracranial haemorrhage (up to 20% of reported cases), which leads to death or neurological sequelae. Alloimmune thrombocytopaenia is more often unexpected and is usually diagnosed after birth. Once suspected, the diagnosis is confirmed by demonstration of maternal antiplatelet alloantibodies directed against a paternal antigen inherited by the foetus/neonate. Post-natal management involves transfusion of platelets devoid of this antigen, and should not be delayed by biological confirmation of the diagnosis (once the diagnosis is suspected), especially in case of severe thrombocytopaenia. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential to reduce the chances of death and disability due to haemorrhage. Due to the high rate of recurrence and increased severity of the foetal thrombocytopaenia in successive pregnancies, antenatal therapy should be offered. However, management of high-risk pregnancies is still a matter of discussion. PMID:17032445

  13. [Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Díaz, E; Ginovart Galiana, G

    2003-06-01

    Fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is the commonest cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. This disorder is due to the destruction of fetal platelets by a maternal platelet-specific antibody caused by fetal-maternal incompatibility. The most serious complication is intracranial hemorrhage (10-30 % of newborns), which may cause death (10 % of the reported cases) or irreversible neurological sequelae (20 %). The diagnosis is usually made after birth when most affected neonates have petechiae, purpura or overt bleeding. The degree of severity varies according to platelet count. Current methods allow detection of maternal platelet alloantibodies (usually HPA-1a). Clinical grounds and the exclusion of other causes of neonatal thrombocytopenia are required to establish an accurate diagnosis. Recurrence of this disease is very high and has prompted clinicians to develop antenatal prophylactic programs in subsequent pregnancies. However, the optimal treatment of at-risk pregnancies remains controversial. The early diagnosis of this process allows effective therapy based on the infusion of compatible platelets and IgG immunoglobulins when hemorrhage is not obvious. Antenatal management of subsequent pregnancies can prevent recurrence of thrombocytopenia and intracranial hemorrhage. The aim of this review is to draw pediatricians' attention to the importance of this probably under-diagnosed disease in which early diagnosis can prevent potentially severe complications. PMID:12781112

  14. Chronic Idiopathic Thrombocytogenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Pineo, G. F.

    1984-01-01

    Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a relatively common cause of an acquired hemostatic defect. It is important for family physicians to recognize this disorder, because of its insidious onset and the fact that it most commonly affects women of childbearing age. Chronic ITP is due to an antibody in the plasma which attaches to platelets and leads to their destruction in the reticuloendothelial system. The antibody can cross the placenta and affect the fetus. Although the condition may not disappear, in the vast majority of patients it can be controlled with current therapy, including prednisone, splenectomy and immunosuppressive agents. Although the mortality rate is low, patients with severe thrombocytopenia may have significant bleeding problems requiring special measures such as platelet transfusions, intravenous gammaglobulin, plasmapheresis and emergency splenectomy. Upon diagnosis, these patients should be referred to a large, specialized centre. PMID:21279099

  15. How Is Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and surgery. Treatments are done in a hospital. Plasma Therapy Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It ... nutrients to your body. TTP is treated with plasma therapy. This includes: Fresh frozen plasma for people ...

  16. The geoepidemiology of immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Deane, Sean; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2010-03-01

    First described in 1735 (Watson-Williams et al., 1958), immune-mediated platelet destruction is a phenomenon of protean associations that has historically varied in its definition. Recently, consensus guidelines were proposed for a standardized system of nomenclature that preserves the acronym "ITP" but encompasses a number of causes of immune-mediated thrombocytopenias, including both primary immune thrombocytopenia as well as such entities as thrombocytopenia associated with connective tissue diseases or cancer. In this paper, we will focus on current aspects of geoepidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of adult and pediatric primary immune thrombocytopenia. It is clear that both genetic and extrinsic factors exist for ITP and are likely different between children and adults. Immune thrombocytopenia remains a challenging problem but our understanding of its pathophysiology has greatly improved. PMID:19945546

  17. Psychogenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sharmila; Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Nath, Saswati

    2013-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura, also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome, is a rare, distinctive, localized cutaneous reaction pattern mostly affecting psychologically disturbed adult women. Repeated crops of tender, ill-defined ecchymotic lesions on the extremities and external bleeding from other sites characterize the condition. We report here a case of psychogenic purpura because of the rarity of the condition and to emphasize the importance of consideration of this entity during evaluation of a patient with recurrent ecchymoses. Early diagnosis of this condition will not only minimize the cost of the medical evaluation but will also benefit the patient. PMID:23825859

  18. Progressive Pigmentary Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Progressive Pigmentary Purpura Share | Progressive pigmentary purpura (we will call it PPP) is a group ... conditions ( Schamberg's disease , Lichenoid dermatitis of Gourgerot-Blum, purpura annularis telangiectodes of Majocchi and Lichen aureus). Schamberg's ...

  19. Detection and effects on platelet function of anti-platelet antibody in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, S; Gaunt, S D; McClure, J J; Oliver, J

    1999-01-01

    Horse mares carrying mule foals were immunized during the last trimester of pregnancy with whole acid-citrate-dextrose-anticoagulated donkey blood to experimentally induce neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia occurred in the neonatal mule foals born to immunized horse mares within 24 hours after ingestion of their dams' colostrum. Mule foals born to mares not immunized with donkey blood did not develop thrombocytopenia. These findings suggest that antibodies may have been directed against a donkey platelet antigen present in the mule foals but not present in their dams. The objectives of this study were to determine whether anti-platelet antibody could be detected in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, to identify any platelet proteins recognized by serum antibody in these foals, and to determine if platelet function was altered by sera from these mule foals. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated significantly higher absorption at 1:200 of platelet-bindable immunoglobulin G in serum from thrombocytopenic mule foals, compared with nonthrombocytopenic mule foals. Sera from thrombocytopenic and nonthrombocytopenic mule foals produced similar binding patterns in western immunoblots with donkey platelet proteins separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Maximal platelet aggregation and relative slope of aggregation in response to collagen were significantly inhibited after incubation with sera from thrombocytopenic mule foals. These results suggest that mule foals with induced alloimmune thrombocytopenia have serum antibodies that bind to platelets and may compete with collagen binding sites to impair platelet aggregation. PMID:10587252

  20. Fetal/Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia: Pathogenesis, Diagnostics and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Brojer, Ewa; Husebekk, Anne; Dębska, Marzena; Uhrynowska, Małgorzata; Guz, Katarzyna; Orzińska, Agnieszka; Dębski, Romuald; Maślanka, Krystyna

    2016-08-01

    Fetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a relatively rare condition (1/1000-1/2000) that was granted orphan status by the European Medicines Agency in 2011. Clinical consequences of FNAIT, however, may be severe. A thrombocytopenic fetus or new-born is at risk of intracranial hemorrhage that may result in lifelong disability or death. Preventing such bleeding is thus vital and requires a solution. Anti-HPA1a antibodies are the most frequent cause of FNAIT in Caucasians. Its pathogenesis is similar to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) due to anti-RhD antibodies, but is characterized by platelet destruction and is more often observed in the first pregnancy. In 75 % of these women, alloimmunization by HPA-1a antigens, however, occurs at delivery, which enables development of antibody-mediated immune suppression to prevent maternal immunization. As for HDN, the recurrence rate of FNAIT is high. For advancing diagnostic efforts and treatment, it is thereby crucial to understand the pathogenesis of FNAIT, including cellular immunity involvement. This review presents the current knowledge on FNAIT. Also described is a program for HPA-1a screening in identifying HPA-1a negative pregnant women at risk of immunization. This program is now performed at the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine in cooperation with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education in Warsaw as well as the UiT The Arctic University of Norway. PMID:26564154

  1. Henoch-Schonlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Vasculitis / Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Fast Facts First Description Who gets Henoch-Schönlein ... to serious kidney involvement. Who gets Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (the “typical” patient)? Usually, HSP affects a child ...

  2. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-13

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Immune Thrombocytopenia

  3. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, J P; Caradeux, J; Norwitz, Errol R; Illanes, S E

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is a relatively uncommon disease, but is the leading cause of severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn. It can cause severe complications and long-term disabilities. The main objective of screening is to reduce both the morbidity and mortality associated with FMAIT, primarily by preventing intracranial hemorrhage. However, controversy surrounds both pre- and antenatal management. This article discusses pathogenesis, screening, diagnosis, and both pre- and neonatal management of FMAIT. PMID:23687553

  4. The clinical implications of adult-onset henoch-schonelin purpura

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein Purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis mediated by IgA-immune complex deposition. It is characterized by the clinical tetrad of non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. Pathologically, it can be considered a form of immune complex-mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis (LCV) involving the skin and other organs. Though it primarily affects children (over 90% of cases), the occurrence in adults has been rarely reported. Management often involves the use of immunomodulatory or immune-suppressive regimens. PMID:21619657

  5. Henoch Schonlein purpura associated with bee sting: case report.

    PubMed

    Gálvez-Olortegui, José; Álvarez-Vargas, Mayita; Durand-Vergara, Juan; Díaz-Lozano, Marisol; Gálvez-Olortegui, Tomas; Armas-Ramírez, Indira; Hilario-Vargas, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Henoch Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a common childhood vasculitis, characterized by a non-thrombocytopenic palpable purpura and systemic features. It can be triggered by conditions like infections and insect bites. We present the case of a six-year-old girl with palpable maculopapular lesions on the lower limbs, itching, mild pain, swelling of feet, limitation of limb mobility, and a history of bee sting. Thigh skin biopsy was performed, with a report of leucocytoclastic vasculitis, and was diagnosed as HSP. She was prescribed bed rest, and was given oral hydration. The patient outcome was favorable and was discharged after five days. This is the fifth report of a HSP case associated with a bee sting with an uncomplicated course, which is in contrast to previous case reports. PMID:26610057

  6. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura following successful treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tannir, N M; Kantarjian, H

    2001-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) at diagnosis. It is a universal side effect of dose-intensive regimens employed in the treatment of adult ALL. In patients with ALL who achieve remission, thrombocytopenia frequently indicates relapse. We report three adult patients successfully treated for ALL who developed thrombocytopenia and were found to have immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (ITP). Possible pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying the association of ALL and ITP are discussed. PMID:11342378

  7. Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    CONSTANTINESCU, Simona; ZAMFIRESCU, Vlad; VLADAREANU, Prof. Radu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is the commonest cause of severe neonatal thrombocytopenia. FNAIT is usually suspected in neonates with bleeding or severe, unexplained, and/or isolated postnatal thrombocytopenia. Affected fetuses should be managed in referral centers with experience in the ante-natal management of FNAIT. Close collaboration is required between specialists in fetal medicine, obstetrics, hematology/transfusion medicine, and pediatrics. The mother and her partner should be provided with detailed information about FNAIT and its potential clinical consequences, and the benefits and risks of different approaches to ante-natal management. There has been huge progress in the ante-natal management of FNAIT over the last 20 years. However, the ideal effective treatment without significant side effects to the mother or fetus has yet to be determined. Key issues: Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a condition that is underdiagnosed. Immunization seldom occurs in the first pregnancy. Immunization takes place in association with delivery in most cases. Anti-HPA-1a level is a predictor for the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23482913

  8. Atypical course of Henoch-Schonlein purpura in an adult patient

    PubMed Central

    Górnikiewicz-Brzezicka, Bożena; Brzezicki, Jan; Rymko, Marcin; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is vasculitis of small blood vessels characterized by deposits of IgA immune complexes and also non-thrombocytopenic purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and renal involvement. It affects people of all ages, but most cases occur in children between 2 and 11 years old, more frequently in boys. The disease is much less common in adults, who often have a more severe course of the disease. The paper presents the case of a 38-year-old female patient with insidious course of the disease, initially dominant skin symptoms and joint pain without signs of inflammation. Symptoms of the disease were initially uncharacteristic and mild, and did not suggest severe and rapid course of the disease. The patient required hospitalization in several departments before final diagnosis of Henoch-Schonlein purpura. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppression. Despite the rapid course of the disease, treatment was effective. The patient was discharged in good condition. PMID:27407252

  9. Sairei-to therapy on alloimmune recurrent spontaneous abortions and alloimmune-, autoimmune complicated recurrent spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Kano, Takashi; Shimizu, Masahiko; Kanda, Takayoshi; Hijikata, Yasuyo

    2010-01-01

    Alloimmune recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) cases that could not be treated with lymphocyte transfusion due to medical and social reasons were treated with Sairei-to therapy as an emergency measure and all four cases resulted in live births. This may show that Sairei-to treatment is effective in preventing alloimmune RSA. The efficacy of Sojyutsu-Sairei-to and Byakujyutsu-Sairei-to on autoimmune RSA has already been proven. When they were used in the treatment of alloimmune-, autoimmune complicated RSA, the abortion prevention rates were 65.4% and 82.3% respectively. These results indicate that Sairei-to is effective in the treatment of alloimmune RSA and alloimmune-, autoimmune complicated RSA. PMID:20626056

  10. Thrombocytopenic syndromes in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Matthew; Malinowski, Ann K; Shehata, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    The physiological changes in pregnancy result in platelet counts that are lower than in nonpregnant women. Consequently, thrombocytopenia is a common finding occurring in 7-12% of pregnant women. Gestational thrombocytopenia, the most common cause of low platelet counts, tends to be mild in most women and does not affect maternal, fetal or neonatal outcomes. Gestational thrombocytopenia needs to be distinguished from other less common causes of isolated thrombocytopenia, such as immune thrombocytopenia, which affects approximately 3% of thrombocytopenic pregnant women and can lead to neonatal thrombocytopenia. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and thrombotic microangiopathies are both associated with thrombocytopenia. They share a considerable number of similar characteristics and are associated with significant maternal and neonatal morbidity and rarely mortality. Accurate identification of the aetiology of thrombocytopenia and appropriate management are integral to optimizing the pregnancy, delivery and neonatal outcomes of this population. Clinical cases are described to illustrate the various aetiologies of thrombocytopenia in pregnancy and their treatment. PMID:27512485

  11. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; McFarland, Janice G.; Curtis, Brian R.; Aster, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, (NAIT) is caused by maternal antibodies raised against alloantigens carried on fetal platelets. Although many cases are mild, NAIT is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in newborns and is the most common cause of intracranial haemorrhage in full-term infants. In this report, we review the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis and prenatal and post-natal management of NAIT and highlight areas of controversy that deserve the attention of clinical and laboratory investigators. PMID:23384054

  12. Systemic lupus erythematosus and thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura: a refractory case without lupus activity.

    PubMed

    Garcia Boyero, Raimundo; Mas Esteve, Eva; Mas Esteve, Maria; Millá Perseguer, M Magdalena; Marco Buades, Josefa; Beltran Fabregat, Juan; Cañigral Ferrando, Guillermo; Belmonte Serrano, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The association between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) has been infrequently reported. Usually, patients with TTP have more SLE activity and frequent renal involvement. Here we present a case of TTP associated to low-activity SLE. The absence of renal and major organ involvement increased the difficulty in making the initial diagnosis. ADAMTS13 activity in plasma in this patient was very low, as seen in other similar cases. The evolution of the patient was poor, needing plasma exchanges and immunosuppressive therapy, including the use of rituximab. PMID:23473755

  13. Safety and Efficacy Study of Romiplostim (AMG 531) to Treat ITP in Pediatric Subjects

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-18

    Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Thrombocytopenia in Pediatric Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP); Thrombocytopenia in Subjects With Immune (Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP)

  14. Nodular purpura in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Nagi, N. A.; Al-Dubooni, H. M.; Al-Shirkat, S. A. R.

    1982-01-01

    Seventeen infants with nodular purpura are reported. All these infants suffered from a coagulation abnormality due to vitamin K deficiency. Contributing factors were breast-feeding, the use of milk substitutes, diarrhoea and antimicrobial therapy. The patients responded rapidly and completely to parenteral vitamin K. In the management of infantile diarrhoea use of antibiotics should be restricted to specific bacteriologically proven cases. Vitamin K administration is suggested in infants with prolonged gastroenteritis and limited milk intake and particularly those receiving antibiotics. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:7111112

  15. Fatal purpura fulminans and Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome from fulminant Streptococcus pneumoniae sepsis in an asplenic young adult.

    PubMed

    Hale, Andrew J; LaSalvia, Mary; Kirby, James E; Kimball, Allison; Baden, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Asplenic patients are at increased risk for sepsis and fulminant infection. Sepsis in these patients is typically secondary to encapsulated bacteria, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the most frequent pathogen. Rare complications of severe sepsis include purpura fulminans and bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome). We present the case of a 36-year-old woman, healthy except for splenectomy years prior for idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura treatment, who presented with fever. Upon presentation to our hospital, three hours after symptoms onset, she had purpura fulminans and shock. Despite timely antimicrobials and maximal resuscitative efforts, her disease progressed and she expired 12 hours after symptoms onset. Autopsy revealed bilateral adrenal hemorrhage; acute adrenal crisis likely contributed to her refractory shock. Prior to her presentation, she had not received guideline-based post-splenectomy care. Sepsis in asplenic patients can be fulminant and rapidly fatal. Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the most frequent cause, despite decreasing rates in recent years related to widespread pneumococcal vaccination. Guideline-based vaccinations and "pill-in-pocket" therapy can be life-saving for asplenic patients. Purpura fulminans represents an extreme manifestation of disseminated intravascular coagulation, is more common in asplenic patients, and portends a poor prognosis. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome can be seen concurrently with purpura fulminans and further portends a poor prognosis; pre-mortem diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. PMID:27583208

  16. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  17. Alloimmunity and Tolerance in Corneal Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amouzegar, Afsaneh; Chauhan, Sunil K; Dana, Reza

    2016-05-15

    Corneal transplantation is one of the most prevalent and successful forms of solid tissue transplantation. Despite favorable outcomes, immune-mediated graft rejection remains the major cause of corneal allograft failure. Although low-risk graft recipients with uninflamed graft beds enjoy a success rate ∼90%, the rejection rates in inflamed graft beds or high-risk recipients often exceed 50%, despite maximal immune suppression. In this review, we discuss the critical facets of corneal alloimmunity, including immune and angiogenic privilege, mechanisms of allosensitization, cellular and molecular mediators of graft rejection, and allotolerance induction. PMID:27183635

  18. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  19. Powerlifter's purpura: a valsalva-associated phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Joseph C; Suh, Philip S

    2002-08-01

    The causes of purpura can be classified into intravascular, vascular, and extravascular mechanisms. We describe a case of cervicofacial purpura in a powerlifter attributed to the accompanying Valsalva-associated increased arterial pressure. Powerlifting should be added to the list of activities that may cause purpura. PMID:12234164

  20. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Page Content On this page: What is Henoch- ... to Remember Clinical Trials What is Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP)? Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a disease that ...

  1. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 75: Management of alloimmunization during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2006-08-01

    When any fetal blood group factor inherited from the father is not possessed by the mother, antepartum or intrapartum fetal-maternal bleeding may stimulate an immune reaction in the mother Maternal immune reactions also can occur from blood product transfusion. The formation of maternal antibodies, or"alloimmunization,' may lead to various degrees of transplacental passage of these antibodies into the fetal circulation. Depending on the degree of antigenicity and the amount and type of antibodies involved, this transplacental passage may lead to hemolytic disease in the fetus and neonate. Undiagnosed and untreated, alloimmunization can lead to significant perinatal morbidity and mortality. Advances in Doppler ultrasonography have led to the development of noninvasive methods of management of alloimmunization in pregnant women. Together with more established protocols, Doppler ultrasound evaluation may allow for a more thorough and less invasive workup with fewer risks to the mother and fetus. Prevention of alloimmunization is addressed in another Practice Bulletin (1). PMID:16880320

  2. Modulation of Alloimmunity by Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Thiago J.; Lang, Benjamin J.; Lopes, Rafael L.; Bonorino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms that evolved for host defense against pathogens and injury are also responsible for transplant rejection. Host rejection of foreign tissue was originally thought to be mediated mainly by T cell recognition of foreign MHC alleles. Management of solid organ transplant rejection has thus focused mainly on inhibition of T cell function and matching MHC alleles between donor and host. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that the magnitude of the initial innate immune responses upon transplantation has a decisive impact on rejection. The exact mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have yet to be characterized. Ischemic cell death and inflammation that occur upon transplantation are synonymous with extracellular release of various heat shock proteins (Hsps), many of which have been shown to have immune-modulatory properties. Here, we review the impact of Hsps upon alloimmunity and discuss the potential use of Hsps as accessory agents to improve solid organ transplant outcomes. PMID:27555846

  3. Responder individuality in red blood cell alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Körmöczi, Günther F; Mayr, Wolfgang R

    2014-11-01

    Many different factors influence the propensity of transfusion recipients and pregnant women to form red blood cell alloantibodies (RBCA). RBCA may cause hemolytic transfusion reactions, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and may be a complication in transplantation medicine. Antigenic differences between responder and foreign erythrocytes may lead to such an immune answer, in part with suspected specific HLA class II associations. Biochemical and conformational characteristics of red blood cell (RBC) antigens, their dose (number of transfusions and pregnancies, absolute number of antigens per RBC) and the mode of exposure impact on RBCA rates. In addition, individual circumstances determine the risk to form RBCA. Responder individuality in terms of age, sex, severity of underlying disease, disease- or therapy-induced immunosuppression and inflammation are discussed with respect to influencing RBC alloimmunization. For particular high-risk patients, extended phenotype matching of transfusion and recipient efficiently decreases RBCA induction and associated clinical risks. PMID:25670932

  4. Cyclosporin for treatment of life-threatening alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Tilly, H; Azagury, M; Bastit, D; Lallemand, A; Piguet, H

    1990-05-01

    We describe a 16-year-old girl with aplastic anemia who, 1 year after initial diagnosis developed a refractory state to platelet transfusions due to alloimmunization and resulting in severe bleeding. Treatment with cyclosporin, initially prescribed as treatment of the bone marrow failure, resulted in prompt decrease in lymphocytotoxic antibodies, which paralleled a marked improvement in platelet recovery. To our knowledge, such a dramatic effect of cyclosporin on alloimmunization has not been previously reported and merits further attention. PMID:2327409

  5. Fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and maternal intravenous immunoglobulin infusion

    PubMed Central

    Giers, Günther; Wenzel, Folker; Stockschläder, Markus; Riethmacher, Regina; Lorenz, Horst; Tutschek, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background Different therapeutic approaches have been used in fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, but many centers administer immunoglobulin G infusions to the pregnant woman. We studied the effect of maternal antenatal immunoglobulin infusions on fetal platelet counts in pregnancies with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Design and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical courses of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia whose mothers were treated with immunoglobulin G infusions in a single center between 1999 and 2005. In a center-specific protocol, weekly maternal immunoglobulin G infusions were given to 25 pregnant women with previously affected neonates and four women with strong platelet antibodies, but no previous history of fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia; before each infusion diagnostic fetal blood sampling was performed to determine fetal platelet counts and immunoglobulin G levels. Results There were 30 fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, confirmed by initial fetal blood sampling showing fetal platelet counts between 4×109/L and 130×109/L and antibody-coated fetal platelets using a glycoprotein specific assay. Despite weekly antenatal maternal immunoglobulin G infusions fetal platelet counts did not change significantly. Maternal and fetal immunoglobulin G levels, measured before every infusion, increased significantly with the number of maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. Conclusions In this group of fetuses with fetal alloimmune thrombocytopenia no consistent increase of fetal platelets was achieved as a result of regular maternal immunoglobulin G infusions. PMID:20534698

  6. Alloimmunization in multitransfused liver disease patients: Impact of underlying disease

    PubMed Central

    Bajpai, Meenu; Gupta, Shruti; Jain, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Transfusion support is vital to the management of patients with liver diseases. Repeated transfusions are associated with many risks such as transfusion-transmitted infection, transfusion immunomodulation, and alloimmunization. Materials and Methods: A retrospective data analysis of antibody screening and identification was done from February 2012 to February 2014 to determine the frequency and specificity of irregular red-cell antibodies in multitransfused liver disease patients. The clinical and transfusion records were reviewed. The data was compiled, statistically analyzed, and reviewed. Results: A total of 842 patients were included in our study. Alloantibodies were detected in 5.22% of the patients. Higher rates of alloimmunization were seen in patients with autoimmune hepatitis, cryptogenic liver disease, liver damage due to drugs/toxins, and liver cancer patients. Patients with alcoholic liver disease had a lower rate of alloimmunization. The alloimmunization was 12.7% (23/181) in females and 3.17% (21/661) in males. Antibodies against the Rh system were the most frequent with 27 of 44 alloantibodies (61.36%). The most common alloantibody identified was anti-E (11/44 cases, 25%), followed by anti-C (6/44 cases, 13.63%). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that alloimmunization rate is affected by underlying disease. Provision of Rh and Kell phenotype-matched blood can significantly reduce alloimmunization. PMID:27605851

  7. A rare manifestation of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia

    PubMed Central

    Jerónimo, Monica; Azenha, Cátia; Mesquita, Joana; Pereira, Dolores Faria

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopaenia (NAIT) results from a fetomaternal incompatibility with maternal sensitisation against a fetal human platelet antigen (HPA) and antibodies transfer to the fetal circulation, leading to platelet destruction. The clinical presentation is variable and isolated intraocular haemorrhage is rare. We present the case of a male newborn, with intrauterine growth restriction, born at 29 weeks due to pre-eclampsia. He presented proptosis of the left eye, hyphaema and elevated intraocular pressure, with no other signs of haemorrhage. Severe thrombocytopaenia was found (27×109/L). Perinatal infection and maternal thrombocytopaenia were excluded. Positive anti-HPA-1a and antihuman leucocyte antigen class I alloantibodies were found in the mother. Platelet crossmatch between the father's platelets and mother's plasma was positive. Platelet transfusions and intravenous immunoglobulin were given with favourable response. This case highlights an unusual presentation of NAIT, which should be suspected in the presence of severe thrombocytopaenia in the first 24–72 h of life. PMID:24891486

  8. Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: prenatal interventions.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Marije M; Oepkes, Dick

    2011-07-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a potentially devastating condition, which may lead to intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in the fetus or neonate, often with death or major neurological damage as consequence. In the absence of screening, preventive measures are only possible in the next pregnancy of women with an affected child. Controversy exists on the best intervention to minimise the risk of ICH. Most centres have abandoned treatment with serial fetal blood sampling (FBS) and platelet transfusions, because of a high rate of complications and the availability of quite effective non-invasive alternatives. In pregnancies with FNAIT and a previous affected child without ICH, weekly intravenous administration of immunoglobulins to the mother appears close to 100% effective to prevent fetal or neonatal ICH. Some centres add prednisone; this combination leads to slightly higher platelet counts at birth. In pregnant women with a previous child with ICH, the recurrence risk seems particularly high, and more aggressive maternal medical treatment is recommended, starting earlier with immunoglobulins. Whether a higher intravenous immunoglobulin dose or the addition of prednisone is really necessary is unclear. What does seem to be clear is that the use of FBS should be minimised, possibly even abandoned completely. PMID:21618560

  9. [Treatment of chronic refractory idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura. 10 years experience at the Salvador Zubiran National Institute of Nutrition].

    PubMed

    Pita-Ramírez, L; Hurtado-Monroy, R; Labardini-Méndez, J

    1992-01-01

    A total of 126 patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura were diagnosed from January 1980 to January 1990 in our institute. In this group of patients, 21 were refractory to prednisone therapy, splenectomy or both, or had had a relapse after a good response with these treatments. They were given other therapies. There was enough information for evaluation in 16 of the 21 patients. The treatment responses were classified according to the post-therapy platelet counts: complete response (CR) = > 150 x 10(9)/L for more than three months; partial response (PR) = 50-150 x 10(9)/L for more than three months; any response (AR) = CR + PR; no response (NR) = < 50 x 10(9)/L. There were 15 women and one male. The median age was 41 years (range 11 to 65). 6-mercaptopurine was given in all patients with CR = 31.2%, PR = 18.8%, AR = 50% and NR = 50%. Seven patients received cyclophosphamide with CR = 28.6%, PR = 14.3%, AR = 42.9% and NR = 57%. Vincristine was given in four patients with only one PR. Interferon alpha 2B was given in four patients with two transitory PR. One patient received colchicine and vitamin C without response. It is concluded that 6-mercaptopurine and cyclophosphamide are useful drugs in refractory thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:1485028

  10. Crystallographic Structure of the Human Leukocyte Antigen DRA, DRB3*0101: Models of a Directional Alloimmune Respone and Autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Parry,C.; Gorski, J.; Stern, L.

    2007-01-01

    We describe structural studies of the human leukocyte antigen DR52a, HLA-DRA/DRB3*0101, in complex with an N-terminal human platelet integrin {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III glycoprotein peptide which contains a Leu/Pro dimorphism. The 33:Leu dimorphism is the epitope for the T cell directed response in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura in individuals with the {alpha}II{sub B}{beta}III 33:Pro allele, and defines the unidirectional alloimmune response. This condition is always associated with DR52a. The crystallographic structure has been refined to 2.25 {angstrom}. There are two {alpha}{beta} heterodimers to the asymmetric unit in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The molecule is characterized by two prominent hydrophobic pockets at either end of the peptide binding cleft and a deep, narrower and highly charged P4 opening underneath the beta 1 chain. Further, the peptide in the second molecule displays a sharp upward turn after pocket P9. The structure reveals the role of pockets and the distinctive basic P4 pocket, shared by DR52a and DR3, in selecting their respective binding peptide repertoire. We observe an interesting switch in a residue from the canonically assigned pocket 6 seen in prior class II structures to pocket 4. This occludes the P6 pocket helping to explain the distinctive '1-4-9' peptide binding motif. A {beta}57 Asp {yields} Val substitution abrogates the salt-bridge to {alpha}76 Arg and along with a hydrophobic {beta}37 is important in shaping the P9 pocket. DRB3*0101 and DRB1*0301 belong to an ancestral haplotype and are associated with many autoimmune diseases linked to antigen presentation, but whereas DR3 is susceptible to type 1 diabetes DR52a is not. This dichotomy is explored for clues to the disease.

  11. A severe case of intracranial hemorrhage due to alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Cota, Francesco; Zuppa, Antonio Alberto; Luciano, Rita; Gallini, Francesca; Savarese, Immacolata; Alighieri, Giovanni; Orchi, Claudia; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2008-11-01

    Alloimmune thrombocytopenia (AIT) is an important cause of intrauterine hemorrhagic lesions that result from platelet-antigen incompatibility between mother and foetus. Foetal platelets are destroyed by cross-reactive maternal antibodies that cross the placenta. The most serious complication of AIT is foetal intracranial bleeding that may eventually result in intrauterine death or severe neurological impairments. PMID:19031280

  12. [Management of feto-maternal red cell allo-immunizations].

    PubMed

    Bricca, P; Guinchard, E; Guitton Bliem, C

    2011-04-01

    Feto-maternal red cell alloimmunization is defined by the presence in a pregnant woman of alloantibodies directed against blood group antigens present on the red blood cells of the fetus and inherited from the father. It arises from the immune response to a first contact to these same antigens during a prior transfusion, transplant or pregnancy. The placental transfer and the fixation of the antibodies on the fetal red cells antigenic targets lead to a haemolysis in the fetus and the newborn. The resulting haemolytic disease can show different clinical forms, from a mild anaemia with neonatal hyperbilirubinemia to a major fetal damage with stillbirth caused by hydrops fetalis. The objective of management strategies of feto-maternal alloimmunization is to detect and monitor maternal alloimmunization and to appreciate the effects on the fetus or the newborn. Since a few years, some new non-invasive techniques of surveillance are used, for instance fetal RHD genotyping on maternal plasma and evaluation of fetal anaemia through velocimetry measurement of the blood flow in the middle cerebral artery. The need for a careful postnatal surveillance has to be emphasized due to the neonatal anaemia, which can be prolonged, and to the resurgence of cases of severe neonatal icteruses recently reported by the Académie de Médecine. The policy of prevention of anti-RH1 alloimmunization should also benefit from the evolution of biological techniques by allowing an improved targeting of concerned women. PMID:21397546

  13. Idiopathic thromobocytopenic purpura in two mothers of children with DiGeorge sequence: A new component manifestation of deletion 22q11?

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, A.; Philip, N.; Michel, G.

    1997-04-14

    The phenotypic spectrum caused by the microdeletion of chromosome 22q11 region is known to be variable. Nearly all patients with DiGeorge sequence (DGS) and approximately 60% of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome exhibit the deletion. Recent papers have reported various congenital defects in patients with 22q11 deletions. Conversely, some patients have minimal clinical expression. Ten to 25% of parents of patients with DGS exhibit the deletion and are nearly asymptomatic. Two female patients carrying a 22q11 microdeletion and presenting with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura are reported. Both had children with typical manifestations of DGS. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. How we use WinRho in patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Stotler, Brie A; Schwartz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that affects children and adults. WinRho SDF is a D immune globulin product that is Food and Drug Administration approved for the treatment of ITP in D+ pediatric and adult patients. WinRho is a plasma-derived biologic product dispensed from blood banks. Transfusion medicine physicians serve as a resource to health care providers regarding blood component and derivative usage and, as such, should be familiar with the use of WinRho for ITP, including the dosage, administration, and contraindications. This report details the transfusion medicine consultation practice and guidelines at a tertiary care academic medical center for the usage of WinRho SDF in patients with ITP. PMID:26094894

  15. Management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura: targeting insufficient megakaryopoiesis as a novel therapeutic principle

    PubMed Central

    Rank, Andreas; Weigert, Oliver; Ostermann, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, anti-platelet autoantibodies accelerating platelet clearance from the peripheral circulation have been recognized as the primary pathopysiological mechanism in chronic immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recently, increasing evidence supports the co-existence of insufficient megakaryopoiesis. Inadequate low thrombopoietin (TPO) levels are associated with insufficient proliferation and differentiation of megakaryocytes, decreased proplatelet formation, and subsequent platelet release. Recently two novel activators of TPO receptors have been made available: romiplostim and eltrombopag. In several phase III studies, both agents demonstrated increase of platelet counts in about 80% of chronic ITP patients within 2 to 3 weeks. These agents substantially broaden the therapeutic options for patients with chronic ITP although long-term results are still pending. This review will provide an update on the current conception of underlying mechanisms in ITP and novel, pathophysiologically based treatment options. PMID:20531970

  16. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and its look-alikes: a single institution experience.

    PubMed

    Bellone, Michael; Chiang, Jason; Ahmed, Tahmeena; Galanakis, Dennis; Senzel, Lisa

    2012-02-01

    At presentation, variant or "look-alike" conditions can resemble TTP. We reviewed charts of 26 consecutive patients treated for presumed TTP. Of 15 classic TTP patients, 11 were tested for ADAMTS13; all showed severe deficiency, and inhibitor levels correlated with probability of relapse. The variant TMA group consisted of 8 patients who had active clinical disorders which overlapped with TTP. Variant TMA patients had higher creatinine and worse prognosis than classic TTP patients. "Look-alike" disorders included ITP with intravascular hemolysis following administration of WinRho™, and human granulocytic anaplasmosis. These conditions had not been previously described as TTP look-alikes. PMID:22154043

  17. Intravenous immunoglobulin therapy of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bussel, J B; Hilgartner, M W

    1987-09-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin is not only a dramatic clinical therapy, but it is also extremely interesting in regard to mechanism of action. The high cost of therapy limits its application, yet it appears to be equal to or perhaps slightly more effective than corticosteroids as a treatment of ITP and is far less toxic with prolonged use. The appropriate place for its exact use remains to be determined but probably includes patients urgently requiring rapid platelet increases (in conjunction with steroids), treatment of immunocompromised patients, and treatment of chronic patients, either children to avoid splenectomy or adults with severe disease after splenectomy. Controlled trials to resolve these clinical questions are urgently needed. Existing studies on its mechanisms of actions are very interesting and have furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of ITP. Although future work may lead to further applications, initial enthusiasm for the use of IVGG in the treatment of other autoimmune diseases with the exception of myasthenia gravis has been limited by subsequent clinical experience. PMID:2452151

  18. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, E. L.

    1990-01-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review. PMID:2293501

  19. Prevention of HLA alloimmunization: Role of leukocyte depletion and UV-B irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, E.L. )

    1990-09-01

    HLA alloimmunization is a major cause of the platelet refractory state. The stimulus for HLA alloimmunization is believed to derive from incompatibility between the recipient's lymphocytes and the passenger donor lymphocytes contained in transfused red cells or platelet concentrates. Two techniques to prevent post-transfusion HLA alloimmunization include filtration, which physically removes the donor lymphocytes, and UV-B irradiation, which renders the donor leukocytes biologically inactive. The role of these two techniques in the prevention of HLA alloimmunization is the focus of this review.42 references.

  20. An improbable and unusual case of thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaymon; Patel, Preeti; Ahmed, Zohair

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening medical emergency which may be difficult to recognize given the wide spectrum in which it presents. A delay in treatment may be catastrophic as untreated cases of TTP have a mortality rate exceeding 90%. Given the high fatality rate of untreated TTP and its range of presenting symptoms, we present our unusual case of TTP in a post-splenectomy patient with early treatment and positive outcome. This case describes a 54-year-old female who presented with hematuria and gingival bleeding, followed by the development of a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Her past medical history was significant for multiple episodes of TTP, the last of which resulted in a splenectomy and a 20-year history of remission thereafter. On exam, she was alert, well appearing, and neurologically intact. Her only significant finding was a bilateral lower extremity petechial rash. Laboratory studies revealed mild anemia and thrombocytopenia, an elevated lactate dehydrogenase, and a decreased haptoglobin. Peripheral smear showed poikilocytosis, helmet cells, and schistocytes. Corticosteroid therapy was promptly initiated, her platelets were monitored closely, and she underwent urgent therapeutic plasma exchange. Due to the risk of significant morbidity and mortality that may result from delayed treatment of TTP as well as the significant variations of presentation, TTP requires a consistently high index of suspicion. Our patient suffered multiple relapses of TTP within a 30-year span, underwent splenectomy in early adulthood, and presented with atypical symptoms during her most recent relapse illustrating how persistent TTP can be as well as how unusually it may present. Providers should be aware of the vast spectrum of presentation and remember that TTP may recur following splenectomy despite prolonged remission. PMID:27609730

  1. Alloimmunization of patients by blood units harboring distinct DEL variants.

    PubMed

    St-Louis, Maryse; Lebrun, André; Goldman, Mindy; Lavoie, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    The alloimmunization potential of many RHD variants is unknown, and it can be explored by lookback and traceback studies. Hema-Quebec (HQ) investigated the RHD status of 3980 D- repeat blood donors. Thirteen were found to be RHD positive: 4 RHD*1p, and 1 RHD*487delACAG, which show a Dphenotype;and 1 RHD*885T and 7 RHD*(93-94insT) causing a DEL phenotype when C antigen is present. Look back studies were done to verify the alloimmunization potential of these eight DEL donors. Coincidentally, Canadian Blood Services (CBS)performed a trace back study by investigating the RHD status of donors after aD- recipient developed anti-Dafter transfusion of two D- red blood cell (RBC) units. Donor genotyping was done either manually (HQ) or using the Progenika Bloodchip platform(CBS). Donations were traced through computer records. Letters were sent to hospital blood bank physicians to verify the presence of anti-Din recipients and to donors to request repeat samples.A total of 118 RBC units were transfused, 82 to D- recipients.Anti-D was found in three patients transfused with RHD*(93-94insT) DEL red blood cells. One donor presenting the same DEL variant was involved in the trace back study. Even without strong evidence clearly demonstrating the alloimmunization potential of DEL variants, whenever HQ or CBS identifies a donor harboring a DEL phenotype, his or her D status will be changed from DtoD+ to protect against the potential alloimmunization risk. PMID:24689683

  2. [Purpura: primary systemic amyloidosis manifestation].

    PubMed

    Lestre, Sara; Gonçalves, Andreia; João, Alexandre; Ferreira, Ana; Apetato, Margarida

    2009-01-01

    Primary Systemic Amyloidosis (AL) is the most frequent form of systemic amyloidosis and its morbilility is associated with immunoglobulin light chains deposition in vital organs. The mucocutaneous manifestations occur in about 30-40% of the cases and are important in diagnostic suspicion, once they appear in early stages of disease. We report a 71-years-old female patient, with disseminated purpura and cutaneous fragility with 6 months of evolution, accompanied by recent complaints of dysphagy. The first laboratory evaluation didn't show any alterations. The histological and immunohistochemical study of subcutaneous abdominal fat and skin biopsy showed lambda type amyloid protein. In the systemic work-up, we highlight a proteinúria > 1g/24h with Bence Jones proteins and the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain (lambda type) in serum immunoelectrophoresis. With the diagnosis of primary systemic amyloidosis, treatment with prednisolone and melphalan was started. PMID:19686633

  3. Immunophenotypic parameters and RBC alloimmunization in children with sickle cell disease on chronic transfusion.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Robert S; Horan, John T; Fasano, Ross M; Meyer, Erin; Josephson, Cassandra D; Winkler, Anne M; Yee, Marianne E M; Kean, Leslie S; Hendrickson, Jeanne E

    2015-12-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cell (RBC) antigens is a cause of morbidity and mortality in transfused patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). To investigate distinguishing characteristics of patients who develop RBC alloantibodies after transfusion (responders) versus those who do not (non-responders), a cross-sectional study of 90 children with SCD on chronic RBC transfusion therapy at a single institution was conducted in which 18 immune parameters (including T and B cell subsets) were tested via flow cytometry, and medical records were reviewed. RBC alloimmunization was present in 26/90 (29%) patients, with anti-E, K, and C among the most commonly detected alloantibodies despite prophylactic matching for these antigens at the study institution. In addition, RBC autoantibodies had been detected in 18/26 (69%) of alloimmunized versus 7/64 (11%) of non-alloimmunized patients (P < 0.0001). Alloimmunized patients were significantly older (median 13.0 years vs. 10.7 years, P = 0.010) and had more RBC unit exposures (median 148 U vs. 82 U, P = 0.020) than non-alloimmunized patients. Sex, age at initiation of chronic transfusion, splenectomy, stroke, and transfusion outside of the study institution were not significantly associated with RBC alloimmunization. Alloimmunized patients had a significantly increased percentage of CD4+ T memory cells compared to non-alloimmunized patients (57% vs. 49%, P = 0.0047), with no other significant differences in immune cell subsets or laboratory values detected between these groups. Additional research of RBC alloimmunization is needed to optimize transfusion therapy and to develop strategies to prevent alloimmunization. PMID:26361243

  4. [Difficulties of the care of public antigen alloimmunization].

    PubMed

    Ben Amor, I; Rekik, T; Louati, N; Lahiani, W; Rekik, H; Peyrard, T; Menif, H; Gargouri, J

    2016-05-01

    Alloimmunization against high-frequency erythrocyte antigens is a problematic situation in terms of laboratory diagnosis, transfusion and obstetrical management. We report the case of a pregnant woman alloimmunized against public Ag. We detail the difficulties of alloantibody (Ab) identification and transfusion management of the deliveries. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was hospitalized in gynecology and obstetrics departments at 36 weeks of gestation for assessment of hydrops fetalis. Antibody identification test revealed the presence of a pan-reactive antibody. Investigations realized in CNRGS (Paris) concluded in anti-GE2+anti-RH3+autoantibody. The red cell phenotype was GE: -2,3. A therapeutic interruption of the pregnancy was indicated. A program of autologous transfusion was organized with withdrawal of 2 units of blood. The 2nd pregnancy took place normally. Before delivery, an autologous blood reserve consisting of 2 red cell packs and 2 fresh frozen plasma was withdrawn and transfused after delivery. The management of anti-public alloimmunization poses several problems. The first one is of diagnostic nature with, on the one hand, the difficulty of Ab identification by the available red cell panels and, on the other hand, the possible presence of alloantibodies of transfusional or obstetric interest masked by anti-public Ab. The second is represented by transfusional care of these patients. In the absence of a national reserve of frozen rare blood, the autologous transfusion remains the only alternative. However, it can answer only a limited number of indications and only in case of moderate blood loss. PMID:26826911

  5. Indian tick typhus presenting as Purpura fulminans

    PubMed Central

    Tirumala, Suhasini; Behera, Bijayini; Jawalkar, Srikanth; Mishra, Pradeep Kumar; Patalay, Pavithra Vani; Ayyagari, Sudha; Nimmala, Pavani

    2014-01-01

    Seriously ill patients presenting with purpura fulminans, sepsis and multi-organ failure often require extensive diagnostic workup for proper diagnosis and management. Host of common infections prevalent in the tropics, e.g. malaria, dengue; other septicemic infections e.g. meningococcemia, typhoid, leptospirosis, toxic shock syndrome, scarlet fever, viral exanthems like measles, infectious mononucleosis, collagen vascular diseases (Kawasaki disease, other vasculitis) diseases, and adverse drug reactions are often kept in mind, and the index of suspicion for rickettsial illness is quite low. We present a case of Indian tick typhus presenting with purpura fulminans (retiform purpura all over the body), sepsis and multiorgan failure without lymphadenopathy and eschar, successfully treated with doxycycline and discharged home. Hence, a high index clinical suspicion and prompt administration of a simple therapy has led to successful recovery of the patient. PMID:25097365

  6. Psychogenic Purpura (Gardner-Diamond Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic purpura, also known as Gardner-Diamond syndrome or autoerythrocyte sensitization syndrome, is a rare condition characterized by spontaneous development of painful edematous skin lesions progressing to ecchymosis over the next 24 hours. Severe stress and emotional trauma always precede the skin lesions. The condition is most commonly seen in women, but isolated cases have been reported in adolescents and in males. Psychodermatologic evaluation and dermatology and psychiatry liaison have been successful in the treatment of these patients. This report provides an overview of psychogenic purpura and presents the case of a 15-year-old girl. PMID:26137346

  7. Notch signaling in hematopoietic cell transplantation and T cell alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ebens, Christen; Maillard, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling can regulate both hematopoietic progenitors and alloimmune T cells in the setting of allogeneic bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Ex vivo culture of multipotent blood progenitors with immobilized Delta-like ligands induces supraphysiological Notch signals and can markedly enhance progenitor expansion. Infusion of Notch-expanded progenitors shortened myelosuppression in preclinical and early clinical studies, while accelerating T cell reconstitution in preclinical models. Notch also plays an essential role in vivo to regulate pathogenic alloimmune T cells that mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the most severe complication of allo-HCT. In mouse allo-HCT models, Notch inhibition in donor-derived T cells or transient blockade of Delta-like ligands after transplantation profoundly decreased GVHD incidence and severity, without causing global immunosuppression. These findings identify Notch in T cells as an attractive therapeutic target to control GVHD. In this review, we discuss these contrasting functions of Notch signaling with high translational significance in allo-HCT patients. PMID:24050990

  8. Alloimmunization due to red cell antibodies in Rhesus positive Omani Pregnant Women: Maternal and Perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al-Rubkhi, Ikhlass S.; Al-Duhli, Maymoona; Al-Harrasi, Yusra; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization due to antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens (other than rhesus [Rh] antigen) and report the maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with minor RBCs antibodies alloimmunization who were followed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2011 to June 2013. Maternal characteristics, antibody type, antibody titer in addition to perinatal and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. Results: There were 1160 patients with Rh positive status in the study. The most common ABO blood group was O, followed by A, B, and AB. We found 33 out of 1160 Rh positive women alloimmunized with minor RBCs antibodies that gave a prevalence of minor RBCs alloimmunization of 2.7%. The most frequent antibody was anti-E 38%, followed by anti-c 17% and anti-kell 17%. 6 of these 33 patients were identified to have significant antibody titer, and two cases showed evidence of fetal anemia. Only one case required an intrauterine blood transfusion. The most common neonatal complication was jaundice in 53%, followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28%. Two cases complicated by neonatal anemia required a postnatal blood transfusion. Conclusion: Alloimmunization with anti-E, anti-c, and anti-kell were the most common antibodies among the study group. Minor RBCs alloimmunization was an important cause of neonatal morbidity. PMID:26420934

  9. Early occurrence of red blood cell alloimmunization in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sins, Joep W R; Biemond, Bart J; van den Bersselaar, Sil M; Heijboer, H; Rijneveld, Anita W; Cnossen, Marjon H; Kerkhoffs, Jean-Louis H; van Meurs, Alfred H; von Ronnen, F B; Zalpuri, Saurabh; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Ellen van der Schoot, C; de Haas, Masja; van der Bom, Johanna G; Fijnvandraat, Karin

    2016-08-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a major complication of transfusion therapy in sickle cell disease (SCD). Identification of high-risk patients is hampered by lack of studies that take the cumulative transfusion exposure into account. In this retrospective cohort study among previously non-transfused SCD patients in the Netherlands, we aimed to elucidate the association between the cumulative transfusion exposure, first alloimmunization and independent risk factors. A total of 245 patients received 11 952 RBC units. Alloimmunization occurred in 43 patients (18%), half of them formed their first alloantibody before the 8th unit. In patients with exposure to non-extended matched transfusions (ABO and RhD) the cumulative alloimmunization risk increased up to 35% after 60 transfused units. This was significantly higher compared to a general transfused population (HR 6.6, CI 4.2-10.6). Receiving the first transfusion after the age of 5 was an independent risk factor for alloimmunization (HR 2.3, CI 1.0-5.1). Incidental, episodic transfusions in comparison to chronic scheme transfusions (HR 2.3, CI 0.9-6.0), and exposure to non-extended matched units in comparison to extended matching (HR 2.0, CI 0.9-4.6) seemed to confer a higher alloimmunization risk. The majority of first alloantibodies are formed after minor transfusion exposure, substantiating suggestions of a responder phenotype in SCD and stressing the need for risk factor identification. In this study, older age at first transfusion, episodic transfusions and non-extended matched transfusions appeared to be risk factors for alloimmunization. Am. J. Hematol. 91:763-769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27102719

  10. Predictors of Red Cell Alloimmunization in Kurdish Multi Transfused Patients with Hemoglobinopathies in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Mousawi, Muqdad M N; Al-Allawi, Nasir A S; Alnaqshabandi, Rubad

    2015-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are significant health problems in Iraq, including its Northern Kurdistan region. One of the essential components of management of these disorders is regular lifelong blood transfusions. The latter is associated with several complications including red cell alloimmunization. No study has looked at the frequency of alloimmunization and its associations in the country. To address the latter issue, 401 multi transfused patients [311 with β-thalassemia (β-thal) syndrome and 90 with sickle cell disease], registered at a large thalassemia care center in Iraqi Kurdistan had their records reviewed, and their sera tested for atypical antibodies using screening and extended red cell panels. Red cell alloimmunization was detected in 18 patients (4.5%) with a total of 20 alloantibodies, while no autoantibodies were detected. The most frequent alloantibody was anti-E, followed by anti-D, anti-K, anti-C(w), anti-C, anti-c and anti-Le(a). Ethnicity was an important predictor of alloimmunization, while age at start of transfusion (>2 vs. ≤2 years) (p = 0.005), Rhesus D (RhD) negative status (p = 0.0017) and history of previous transfusion reactions (p = 0.007) showed a statistically significant higher rate of alloimmunization. However, patients' age, gender, number of units transfused, underlying diagnosis and splenectomy were not significantly associated with alloimmunization. Based on our observations, measures to reduce alloimmunization rates may include extended matching for Rhesus and Kell antigens and early initiation of blood transfusions. PMID:26327166

  11. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  12. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥ 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  13. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody complexes on platelets of seropositive thrombocytopenic homosexuals and narcotic addicts.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M; Lennette, E T; Byrne, B; Poiesz, B

    1988-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection develop an immunologic thrombocytopenic purpura associated with markedly elevated platelet IgG, IgM, and C3C4 as well as serum immune complexes determined by the polyethylene glycol (PEG) method. Analysis of their serum PEG-precipitable immune complexes as well as platelet acid eluates revealed the presence of anti-HIV-1 antibody existing as a complex that eluted in the void volume of a Sephadex G-200 gel-filtration column. The complex binds to washed normal platelets, whereas affinity-purified anti-HIV-1 (gp120) antibody does not. HIV-1 antigen or proviral DNA was not detectable in the immune complexes or platelet extracts. However, anti-antibodies directed against anti-HIV-1 antibody were detectable in the immune complexes as well as platelet eluates. Approximately 50% of eluted platelet IgG contained anti-HIV-1 antibody. Thus the markedly elevated platelet immunoglobulin is partly due to the presence of anti-HIV-1 antibody complexes. This may be responsible for the enhanced platelet clearance and thrombocytopenia in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related immunologic thrombocytopenia. Images PMID:3200854

  14. Psychogenic purpura: a most distressing case.

    PubMed

    Koblenzer, P J; Koblenzer, C S

    1990-01-01

    A case of psychogenic purpura is likely to be unforgettable for everyone concerned. The patient's bizarre and dramatic appearance can frighten both the patient and medical personnel unfamiliar with the condition, causing panic and intense demands for drastic, inappropriate remedies. Our second experience with this condition was such a memorable case. We stress how difficult it can be to withstand the pressures of colleagues, the patient, and his or her family, and how important it sometimes is to be resolute regarding the need for conservative management. PMID:2298043

  15. Successful management of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in the second pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Fabiana Mendes; Hibner, Sergio; Costa, Thiago Henrique; Dezan, Marcia Regina; Aravechia, Maria Giselda; Pereira, Ricardo Antonio D'Almeida; Kondo, Andrea Tiemi; D'Amico, Élbio Antônio; Mota, Mariza; Kutner, José Mauro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia is a serious disease, in which the mother produces antibodies against fetal platelet antigens inherited from the father; it is still an underdiagnosed disease. This disease is considered the platelet counterpart of the RhD hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, yet in neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia the first child is affected with fetal and/or neonatal thrombocytopenia. There is a significant risk of intracranial hemorrhage and severe neurological impairment, with a tendency for earlier and more severe thrombocytopenia in subsequent pregnancies. This article reports a case of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in the second pregnancy affected and discusses diagnosis, management and the clinical importance of this disease. PMID:24728253

  16. Study of alloimmunization and autoimmunization in Iranian β-thalassemia major patients

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Kambiz; Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thalassemia is one of the most common monogenic disorders characterized by reduced production of globin chains. Although regular red blood cell (RBC) transfusion support is the main treatment for these patients, it may be associated with complications such as RBC alloimmunization. Aim: The study aimed to determine the incidence of alloimmunization and autoimmunization to RBC antigens in β-thalassemia major patients from Zanjan, Zanjan Province, Iran. Materials and Methods: A total of 49 β-thalassemia major patients comprising 24 females and 25 males (mean age: 18.59 ± 8.16 years; range: 2-40 years) from Northwest Iran were included in a cross-sectional study. Alloantibody screening and identification were done using 3-cell and 10-cell reagent red blood cells, respectively. Autoantibody detection was performed using direct Coomb's test. Results: The incidence of alloimmunization was 16.32% with 10 alloantibodies identified in 8 patients. The most common clinically significant alloantibody identified in alloimmunized patients was anti-Kell (K-antigen) (60%) followed by anti-Rhesus (Rh) (E, c-antigens). The rate of alloimmunization was significantly lower in patients transfused with leukoreduced RBCs compared with those transfused with nonleukoreduced RBCs (9.53% vs 57.14%, P = 0.001). There was no significant correlation between alloantibody formation and the age, gender, hemoglobin levels, number of transfused units, and splenectomy. Conclusion: Transfusion of leukoreduced and phenotypically matched red blood cells for Kell (K) and Rh (E, c) antigens may help reduce the alloimmunization rate in Iranian β-thalassemia major patients. Moreover, autoimmunization to RBC antigens was rare in our patients. PMID:27011679

  17. The use of vinca alkaloids in preparation for splenectomy of corticosteroid refractory chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura patients.

    PubMed

    Szczepanik, A B; Sikorska, A; Slomkowski, M; Konopka, L

    2007-10-01

    Administration of vinca alkaloids (VA) to chronic corticosteroid refractory immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients results in a temporary increase of platelet count. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of vinca alkaloids in preparing adult corticosteroid refractory chronic ITP patients for splenectomy as well as to compare the costs of this method with costs of applying intravenous immunoglobulins. The study included 12 chronic ITP patients refractory to corticosteroids applied for 3-144 months. The patients were prepared for splenectomy with average 3.0 (from 1 to 4) 2-h intravenous infusions of vinca alkaloids at 7 day intervals. In eight patients, vincristin was used in a total dose of 6 mg (2 mg per infusion), in two patients, vinblastin was used in total dose of 30 mg (10 mg per infusion), and in two patients, vincristin and vinblastin infusions were administered alternatively. In nine of the 12 treated patients (75%) the platelet count increased to > or = 80 x 10(9)/l, which allowed safe splenectomy. Three patients unreactive to VA treatment were prepared for splenectomy with intravenous gammaglobulin infusions. Splenectomy was performed in 12 patients, in eight with laparoscopic method, in four with classic method. No complications during surgical intervention were observed. In none of the VA treated patients was myelosupression or liver or/and kidney dysfunction observed. Splenectomy resulted in normalization of platelet count in all patients after operation and in six of nine patients followed up for 10 months (on the average). Matching of VA costs with treatment efficacy and comparison with similar costs for intravenous immunoglobulin treatment revealed many fold lower costs of the former method. PMID:17824915

  18. The role of the bone marrow examination in the diagnosis of immune thrombocytopenic purpura: case series and literature review.

    PubMed

    Jubelirer, Steven J; Harpold, Robert

    2002-01-01

    The need for a bone marrow examination was assessed in patients with clinical and laboratory features consistent with ITP; the literature was reviewed. The records of all patients undergoing a bone marrow examination between January 1988 to January 1998 were retrospectively reviewed to determine which were motivated by the suspicion of ITP. Data were collected from hospital and outpatient medical and pathology records. Eighty-six patients with isolated thrombocytopenia (i.e., normal white blood cell count, hemoglobin, peripheral smear and clotting studies) were studied. The bone marrow was consistent with ITP in 82 patients, (i.e., normal or increased megakaryocytes and other hemopoietic lineages normal.) Four patients had decreased megakaryocytes, but all patients responded to corticosteroids. All 86 patients were followed up for a median of 22 months after bone marrow aspiration (range, 2-76 months.) During that time, none of the patients developed features to suggest an alternative diagnosis to ITP. The initial clinical and laboratory findings of 99 patients with acute leukemia were also reviewed; all had features atypical of ITP. These data suggest that routine performance of a bone marrow examination for the diagnosis of ITP is not necessary, provided that a thorough history and physical examination are performed and that the complete blood cell count, peripheral blood smear, and routine clotting studies show no abnormalities apart from thrombocytopenia. The findings of seven prior retrospective studies, two in adults and five in children are consistent with the previous findings. However, the value of marrow investigation in ITP remains unresolved and data from a large prospective study would be helpful. PMID:11991243

  19. Quantitative kinetics of In-111 autologous (In-AP) and homologous (Cr-HP) platelets in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)

    SciTech Connect

    Lotter, M.G.; Heyns, A.D.P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Minnaar, P.C.

    1984-01-01

    Contrary to the accepted view, the authors have found that platelet turnover is not always increased in ITP if the mean platelet survival time (PS) is measured with In-AP. The authors investigated the possible cause of the discrepancy by comparing kinetics of In-AP with those of Cr-HP in 10 patients with ITP. PS was estimated with the multiple hit model. The equilibrium and final in vivo distribution of In-AP was quantitated with the geometrical mean method. The patients could be divided into either those with splenic or diffuse RES platelet destruction. The authors conclude that in ITP platelet survival of In-AP is significantly (P < .05) longer than that of Cr-HP. Platelet turnover measured with In-AP is only normal in patients with mainly splenic platelet sequestration. Results with Cr-HP give a false impression of PS. It seems that in ITP those patients with severe disease also have a platelet production defect.

  20. Computer methodology for simulation and prediction of alloimmune responses: expected antibody specificities.

    PubMed

    Altarriba, J; Zarazaga, I; Amorena, B

    1983-01-01

    The methodology presented here was developed for simulating planned alloimmunization results, with regard to the type and number of expected antibody specificities. The computer program designed for this purpose was adapted to an immunogenetic model using Boolean algebra. It was written to help immunogeneticists avoid handling routine data preceding selection of donor-recipient pairs, specially concerning blood type alloimmunizations in animals: all of the donor-recipient combinations and the expected antibody specificities (their limit number being specified in each particular immunization program) are provided in the print-out. PMID:6661908

  1. Recurrent adult onset Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Neil; Guido, Bruce; Mago, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura is an immunoglobulin A (IgA)-immune complex mediated leukocytoclastic vasculitis that classically manifests with palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria or proteinuria. The condition is much more predominant in children (90% of cases) and commonly follows an upper respiratory infection. We present a case of recurrent Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) complicated by nephritis in an adult female initially categorized as IgA nephropathy (IgAN). We review the pathophysiologic basis of HSP nephritis as the variant of HSP accompanied by renal involvement and its pathogenetic commonality with IgA nephropathy. PMID:27617937

  2. DRESS syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura: are they related?

    PubMed Central

    Sandouk, Zahrae; Alirhayim, Zaid; Khoulani, Dania; Hassan, Syed

    2012-01-01

    A middle-aged man diagnosed with a drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptom (DRESS) syndrome, secondary to phenytoin use, subsequently developed thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura. The patient improved with steroids and plasmapheresis. Their diagnosis can be challenging, and an early recognition and treatment are critical owing to their high mortality rates. Both diseases are thought to be of an autoimmune origin, and a potential relationship between them led to the consideration of the DRESS syndrome as an aetiology for thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura in this case. We concluded that two possibilities exist: some type of antibody developed during the clinical presentation of DRESS syndrome and subsequently resulted in an inhibition of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type-1 motif, member 13 (ADAMTS13) leading to thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura, or perhaps this patient's autoimmune predisposition to thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura contributed to the drug reaction. PMID:23152183

  3. Massive soft tissue infections: necrotizing fasciitis and purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Woodard, Charles R; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis and purpura fulminans are two destructive infections that involve both skin and soft tissue. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by widespread necrosis of subcutaneous tissue and the fascia. Historically, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus has been identified as a major cause of this infection. However, this monomicrobial infection is usually associated with some underlying cause, such as diabetes mellitus. During the last two decades, scientists have found that the pathogenesis of necrotizing fasciitis is polymicrobial. The diagnosis of necrotizing fasciitis must be made as soon as possible by examining the skin inflammatory changes. Magnetic resonance imaging is strongly recommended to detect the presence of air within the tissues. Percutaneous aspiration of the soft tissue infection followed by prompt Gram staining should be conducted with the "finger-test" and rapid-frozen section biopsy examination. Intravenous antibiotic therapy is one of the cornerstones of managing this life-threatening skin infection. Surgery is the primary treatment for necrotizing fasciitis, with early surgical fasciotomy and debridement. Following debridement, skin coverage by either Integra Dermal Regeneration Template or AlloDerm should be undertaken. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy complemented by intravenous polyspecific immunoglobulin are useful adjunctive therapies. Purpura fulminans is a rare syndrome of intravascular thrombosis and hemorrhagic infarction of the skin; it is rapidly progressive and accompanied by vascular collapse. There are three types of purpura fulminans: neonatal purpura fulminans, idiopathic or chronic purpura fulminans, and acute infectious purpura fulminans. Clinical presentation of purpura fulminans involves a premonitory illness followed by the rapid development of a septic syndrome with fever, shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. The diagnosis and treatment of these conditions is best accomplished in a regional burn

  4. Purpura Fulminans Secondary to Rickettsial Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Holyachi, Renuka; Kadeli, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Purpura fulminans is an acute life threatening disorder characterized by cutaneous haemorrhagic manifestations and necrosis caused by disseminated intravascular coagulation and dermal vascular thrombosis. In this case a 60-year-old male presented with purpuric lesions over both upper and lower limbs and consumption coagulopathy following rickettsial infection. It was diagnosed as purpura fulminans secondary to rickettsial infection with disseminated intravascular coagulation and treated with replacement of platelets and coagulation factors along with antibiotics and doxycycline. PMID:26673422

  5. Bleeding into the skin

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the tissue in larger flat areas (called purpura ), or in a very large bruised area (called ... in the newborn) Aging skin (ecchymosis) Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (petechiae and purpura) Henoch-Schonlein purpura (purpura) Leukemia ( ...

  6. Frequency and Specificity of Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Chilean Transfused Patients

    PubMed Central

    Caamaño, José; Musante, Evangelina; Contreras, Margarita; Ulloa, Hernán; Reyes, Carolina; Inaipil, Verónica; Saavedra, Nicolás; Guzmán, Neftalí

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Alloimmunization is an adverse effect of blood transfusions. In Chile, alloimmunization frequency is not established, and for this reason the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and specificity of red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies in Chilean transfused subjects. Methods Records from 4,716 multi-transfused patients were analyzed. In these patients, antibody screening was carried out prior to cross-matching with a commercially available two-cell panel by the microcolum gel test, and samples with a positive screen were analyzed for the specificity of the alloantibody with a 16-cell identification panel. Results The incidence of RBC alloimmunization in transfused patients was 1.02% (48/4,716) with a higher prevalence in women (40/48). We detected 52 antibodies, the most frequent specificities identified were anti-E (30.8%), anti-K (26.9%), anti-D (7.7%), and anti-Fya (5.8%). The highest incidence of alloantibodies was observed in cancer and gastroenterology patients. Conclusion The data demonstrated a low alloimmunization frequency in Chilean transfused patients, principally associated with antibodies anti-E, anti-K, anti-D, and anti-Fya. PMID:25960709

  7. Frequency of Red Cell Alloimmunization and Autoimmunization in Thalassemia Patients: A Report from Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Talukder, Biplabendu; Bhattacharya, Prasun; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization and autoimmunization remain a major problem in transfusion dependent thalassemic patients. There is a paucity of data on the incidence of RBC alloimmunization and autoimmunization in thalassemic patients from eastern part of India, as pretransfusion antibody screening is not routinely performed. Aims. To assess the incidence of RBC alloimmunization and autoimmunization in transfusion dependent thalassemic patients in eastern India. Materials and Methods. Total 500 thalassemia cases were evaluated. The antibody screening and identification were performed with commercially available panel cells (Diapanel, Bio-rad, Switzerland) by column agglutination method. To detect autoantibodies, autocontrol and direct antiglobulin tests were carried out using polyspecific coombs (IgG + C3d) gel cards in all patients. Results. A total of 28 patients developed RBC alloimmunization (5.6%) and 5 patients had autoantibodies (1%). Alloantibody against c had the highest incidence (28.57%) followed by E (21.42%). Five out of 28 (17.85%) patients had developed antibodies against both c and E. Conclusion. Data from this study demonstrate that the RBC alloantibody and autoantibody development rates are significant in our region. Thus, pretransfusion antibody screening needs to be initiated in eastern India in order to ensure safe transfusion practice. PMID:26425124

  8. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... develop frequent bruising or red or purple spots (purpura) on the skin caused by bleeding just under ... of immune thrombocytopenia: Genetic Testing Registry: Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura Johns Hopkins Medicine MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura ( ...

  9. Emerging science, emerging ethical issues: who should fund innate alloimmunity-suppressing drugs?

    PubMed

    Land, W G; Gutmann, Th; Daar, A S

    2008-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence suggests that the innate immune system plays a critical role in allograft rejection. Any injury to the donor organ, e.g. the reperfusion injury, induces an inflammatory milieu in the allograft which appears to be the initial event for activation of the innate immune system. Injury-induced intragraft damage- associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are recognized by donor-derived and recipient-derived, TLR4/2-bearing immature dendritic cells (iDCs). After recognition, these cells mature and initiate allorecognition/alloactivation in the lymphoid system of the recipient. Indeed, the key "innate" event, leading to activation of the adaptive alloimmune response, is the injury-induced, TLR4-triggered, and NFkappaB-mediated maturation of DCs ("innate alloimmunity"). Time-restricted treatment of innate immune events would include 1) treatment of the donor during organ removal, 2) in-situ/ex-vivo treatment of the donor organs alone, and 3) treatment of the recipient during allograft reperfusion and immediately postoperatively. Treatment modalities would include 1) minimization of the oxidative allograft injury with the use of antioxidants; 2) prevention of the TLR4-triggered maturation of DCs with the use of TLR4-antagonists; 3) inhibition of complement activation with the use of complement inhibiting agents. According to data from clinical and experimental studies it can be assumed that successful suppression of innate alloimmune events results in either subsequent significant reduction in, or even complete avoidance of the currently applied adaptive alloimmunity-suppressing drugs. However, in view of the time-restricted period of treatment, and the fear to potentially destroy its own business with currently applied alloimmunity-suppressing drugs, the pharmaceutical industry is still, but quite legitimately, reluctant to invest in the high cost of clinical development of those drugs for transplant patients because there are no marketing interests

  10. Endoscopy in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle C; Tadros, Micheal; Vaziri, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of endoscopic procedures in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a literature search for English language studies in which patients with neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia underwent endoscopy. Studies were included if endoscopic procedures were used as part of the evaluation of neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients, yielding 13 studies. Two studies in which endoscopy was not a primary evaluation tool were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified by two independent reviewers on PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid databases. RESULTS: Most of the studies had high diagnostic yield with relatively low complication rates. Therapeutic endoscopic interventions were performed in more than half the studies, including high-risk procedures, such as sclerotherapy. Platelet transfusion was given if counts were less than 50000/mm3 in four studies and less than 10000/mm3 in one study. Other thrombocytopenic precautions included withholding of biopsy if platelet count was less than 30000/mm3 in one study and less than 20000/mm3 in another study. Two of the ten studies which examined thrombocytopenic patient populations reported bleeding complications related to endoscopy, none of which caused major morbidity or mortality. All febrile neutropenic patients received prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics in the studies reviewed. Regarding afebrile neutropenic patients, prophylactic antibiotics were given if absolute neutrophil count was less than 1000/mm3 in one study, if the patient was undergoing colonoscopy and had a high inflammatory condition without clear definition of significance in another study, and if the patient was in an aplastic phase in a third study. Endoscopy was also withheld in one study for severe pancytopenia. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy can be safely performed in patients with thrombocytopenia/neutropenia. Prophylactic platelet transfusion and/or antibiotic administration prior to endoscopy may be

  11. Study of red blood cell alloimmunization in multitransfused thalassemic children of Jammu region

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena; Kapoor, Raman; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis in Jammu region. Although RBC transfusion is life saving for these patients, it may be associated with some complications like RBC alloimmunization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and the most common alloantibodies involved. Material and Methods: This was a descriptive study involving a total of 70 thalassemic patients in the age range of 2-17 years receiving regular blood transfusions, registered at SMGS Blood Bank, Jammu. Relevant clinical and laboratory data was collected with reference to age at the start of transfusions, total number of transfusions received and splenectomy status. Antibodies screening, antibody identification, and cross matching was done on allpatient samples included in the study, during the period between November 2009 and October 2010. Results: In this study, a total of six alloantibodies six patients (8.5%) and one autoantibody (1.42%) was detected. All identified alloantibodies belonged to Rh system (i.e. anti-E, in 3 patients (50%), anti D, in one patient (16.66%)) and Kell system (anti-K, in two patients (33.34%)). Higher frequency of alloimmunization was found, with increase in number of transfusions and in those who received transfusions after 1 year of age. Alloimmunization was not significantly associated with gender and splenectomy status (P-value > 0.05). Conclusion: Red cell alloantibodies developed in 8.5% of thalassemic patients and 1.42% had autoantibodies. The most common alloantibodies identified were anti Rh system antibodies (anti-E and anti-D) present in 50% and 16.66% of patients respectively. Alloimmunization is not an uncommon problem faced by blood banks and finding compatible units for regularly transfused thalassemic patients may become very difficult. In order to reduce alloimmunization, a policy for performing extended red cell phenotyping of these patients is essential and

  12. Treatment of D alloimmunization in pregnancy with plasmapheresis and intravenous immune globulin: case report.

    PubMed

    Fernández Alba, Juan J; León, Raquel; González-Macías, Carmen; Paz, Antonio; Prado, Fabiana; Moreno, Luis J; Torrejón, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of D alloimmunization occurs between 0.15% and 0.4%. The anti-D can cross the placenta and cause hemolysis and fetal anemia. At present, a Doppler study of the middle cerebral artery allows the monitoring of the degree of fetal anemia. The treatment in cases of moderate to severe anemia in fetuses of less than 34-35 weeks of gestation is intrauterine transfusion via cordocentesis. However, with high titers of anti-D, in the absence of fetal anemia it is possible to modulate the maternal immune response by plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin administration. We present a case report of an Rh(D) alloimmunized pregnancy treated with plasmapheresis followed by intravenous immunoglobulin administration. We performed a caesarean section at 31 weeks, 5 days of gestation. The hemoglobin at birth was 13.8 g/dl and hematocrit 40.8%. Intrauterine transfusion was not necessary. PMID:25312036

  13. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  14. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization. PMID:27186530

  15. [Henoch-Schonlein purpura involving the penis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Croche Santander, Borja; Campos, Elena; Sánchez, Adela; Marcos, Laura; Díaz, Isabel; Toro, Cristóbal

    2016-08-01

    Schonlein-Henoch purpura accounts for the majority of cases of systemic vasculitis in children. Classical presentation is characterized by palpable purpura, glomerulonephritis, arthralgias and abdominal pain. Although genitourinary manifestations, in form of testicular and scrotal involvement, have been widely described, penile involvement remains an extremely rare complication. We report a case of a 6-year-old boy who presented with purpuric rash on the glans, prepuce and penile shaft, with painful edema in the penile region. He also had a 3-days history of fever, palpable purpuric rash on the buttocks and lower extremities along with right wrist pain. He was admitted with the diagnosis of Schonlein-Henoch purpura with penile involvement. After 2 days on oral steroids therapy (prednisone) a marked improvement was observed. PMID:27399026

  16. Sepsis-induced purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella multocida.

    PubMed

    Borges, Lisa; Oliveira, Nelson; Cássio, Isabel; Costa, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted with a cutaneous rash associated with septic shock and multiorganic failure, 6 days after a dog bite. He was started on empiric antibiotherapy and supportive measures. The patient's condition aggravated, with need for invasive mechanical ventilation and intermittent haemodialysis, and evolution from a petechiae-like rash to purpura and gangrene, culminating in bilateral lower limb amputation. The blood cultures revealed only Pasteurella multocida, after 10 days of incubation. P multocida infection is a rare cause of soft tissue infection that subsides with oral antibiotherapy. Infections causing sepsis are rare and appear in immunocompromised patients. Purpura fulminans induced by sepsis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This syndrome should be recognised promptly, so early treatment is instituted. We found no case reports of purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella infections in our literature review. PMID:24554680

  17. Sepsis-induced purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella multocida

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Lisa; Oliveira, Nelson; Cássio, Isabel; Costa, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    A 52-year-old man was admitted with a cutaneous rash associated with septic shock and multiorganic failure, 6 days after a dog bite. He was started on empiric antibiotherapy and supportive measures. The patient's condition aggravated, with need for invasive mechanical ventilation and intermittent haemodialysis, and evolution from a petechiae-like rash to purpura and gangrene, culminating in bilateral lower limb amputation. The blood cultures revealed only Pasteurella multocida, after 10 days of incubation. P multocida infection is a rare cause of soft tissue infection that subsides with oral antibiotherapy. Infections causing sepsis are rare and appear in immunocompromised patients. Purpura fulminans induced by sepsis is a rare, life-threatening disorder. This syndrome should be recognised promptly, so early treatment is instituted. We found no case reports of purpura fulminans caused by Pasteurella infections in our literature review. PMID:24554680

  18. [Severe digestive manifestations of rheumatoid purpura in adults].

    PubMed

    Roche, B; Blazquez, M; Charlier, A; Bognel, J C

    1994-01-01

    The authors report three cases of Scholein-Henoch's purpura in adults which were characterized by atypical severity of the digestive signs which led to laparotomy. In one case, the digestive signs preceded the onset of the cutaneous purpura, which made the diagnosis difficult. The digestive impact was confirmed endoscopically (petechia, ulceration, ulcerated stenosis) in two of the three patients. Damage of the small intestine predominated, as in the literature, but only one patient required resection of the intestine. These observations highlight the importance of endoscopic exploration in cases of abdominal signs combined with Scholein-Henoch's purpura in adults. They also demonstrate the difficulty of evaluating the prognosis and treatment in severe, peritoneo-occlusive forms. PMID:8192421

  19. Staphylococcal Purpura Fulminans: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Honarpisheh, Hedieh; Camp, Robert; Lazova, Rossitza

    2015-08-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is associated with several infections and most commonly with meningococcemia. However, there are only a few reports of this entity in association with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-producing Staphylococcus aureus. We report a 53-year-old man who presented with fever, progressive hemodynamic instability, multiorgan failure, and thrombocytopenia following lobectomy for a solitary lung metastasis from rectal adenocarcinoma. He developed progressive generalized eruption of nonblanching red, purple, and black macules, papules, and plaques on the trunk and extremities consistent with PF. He died on postadmission day 3. Autopsy examination revealed purulent pleural exudate, which grew toxic shock syndrome toxin-1-producing S. aureus. Premortem and autopsy skin biopsies demonstrated epidermal necrosis, subepidermal bullae, and fibrin thrombi within small cutaneous vessels with minimal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation and without accompanying vasculitis. With this case report, we would like to draw attention to the fact that staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome-associated PF may be highly underrecognized and much more common than reflected in the literature. PMID:25099358

  20. Alloimmunization is associated with older age of transfused red blood cells in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Payal C.; Deal, Allison M.; Pfaff, Emily R.; Qaqish, Bahjat; Hebden, Leyna M.; Park, Yara A.; Ataga, Kenneth I.

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization is a significant clinical complication of sickle cell disease (SCD). It can lead to difficulty with cross-matching for future transfusions and may sometimes trigger life-threatening delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the association of clinical complications and age of RBC with alloimmunization in patients with SCD followed at a single institution from 2005 to 2012. One hundred and sixty six patients with a total of 488 RBC transfusions were evaluated. Nineteen patients (11%) developed new alloantibodies following blood transfusions during the period of review. The median age of RBC units was 20 days (interquartile range: 14–27 days). RBC antibody formation was significantly associated with the age of RBC units (P = 0.002), with a hazard ratio of 3.5 (95% CI: 1.71–7.11) for a RBC unit that was 7 days old and 9.8 (95% CI: 2.66–35.97) for a unit that was 35 days old, 28 days after the blood transfusion. No association was observed between RBC alloimmunization and acute vaso-occlusive complications. Although increased echocardiography-derived tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRV) was associated with the presence of RBC alloantibodies (P = 0.02), TRV was not significantly associated with alloimmunization when adjusted for patient age and number of transfused RBC units. Our study suggests that RBC antibody formation is significantly associated with older age of RBCs at the time of transfusion. Prospective studies in patients with SCD are required to confirm this finding. PMID:25963831

  1. Red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients awaiting kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Silvia Fernandes Ribeiro; Ferreira, Gláucia Maria; da Silva, Sonia Leite; Alves, Tânia Maria de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Ilana Farias; Ribeiro, Thyciana Rodrigues; Cavalcante, Maria do Carmo Serpa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of red blood cell and leukocyte alloimmunization in patients with chronic kidney disease awaiting kidney transplantation. Methods In this cross-sectional and prospective study, the serum of 393 chronic kidney disease patients on a transplant waiting list in Ceará, Northeastern Brazil were tested for red cell and leukocyte antibodies. In addition, demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected. Results The average age in the sample of 393 patients was 34.1 ± 14 years. Slightly more than half (208; 52.9%) were male. The average numbers of transfusions and gestations were 3.1 ± 3.3 and 1.6 ± 6, respectively. One third (33.6%) were alloimmunized: 78% with leukocyte antibodies, 9.1% with red cell antibodies and 12.9% with both. Red cell antibodies were detected in 29 cases (7.4%), 17 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001). The most frequently detected red cell antibodies belonged to the Rh (24.1%) and Kell (13.8%) blood group systems. Leukocyte antibodies were detected in 30.5% of cases, 83 of whom were women, who had received more transfusions than the males (p-value < 0.0001) and were more reactive to panel reactive antibodies (p-value < 0.0001). The mean alloreactivity to panel reactive antibodies was 47.7 ± 31.2%. Conclusion Chronic kidney disease patients on the transplant waiting list in Ceará, Brazil, display high rates of red cell (7.4%) and leukocyte (30.5%) alloimmunization. In this sample, alloimmunization was significantly associated with the number of transfusions and gender. PMID:23904808

  2. Red Cell Alloimmunization to Rhesus Antigen Among Pregnant Women Attending a Tertiary Care Hospital in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al Harrasi, Yusra; Al-Duhli, Maymoona; Al-Rubkhi, Ikhlass; Al-Riyami, Nihal; Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Pathare, Anil V.; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The detection of maternal alloimmunization against red cell antigens is vital in the management of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. We sought to measure the presence of allosensitization to Rhesus D (RhD) antibodies in antenatal women attending a tertiary care hospital and assess the fetal outcome in sensitized women. 
Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of pregnant Omani women who registered at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between June 2011 and June 2013. Pregnant women were tested for ABO blood type and were screened for RhD antigen and antibodies at their first antenatal clinic visit. In women who tested positive for the RhD antibodies, an antibody titer was performed to evaluate the severity of their case. Results Data was available on 1,251 pregnant women who were managed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. The prevalence of RhD negative pregnant women was 7.3%. Blood group O was the most common followed by A, B, and AB. The rate of RhD negative alloimmunization was 10%, and anti-D was the most common antibody detected. There were no stillbirths or neonatal deaths. Postnatal transfusion was necessary for only one baby. Conclusions The prevalence of RhD negativity was comparable to other Asian countries. Previous RhD alloimmunization and history of miscarriages were the most common maternal medical history. PMID:26813962

  3. Neonatal liver failure owing to gestational alloimmune liver disease without iron overload.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Inui, Ayano; Kawamoto, Manari; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Haruki; Kasahara, Mureo; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2015-05-01

    Although neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is a well-known cause of liver failure during the neonatal period and iron deposition in extrahepatic tissues is considered essential in the diagnosis of NH, there is no consensus regarding the pathology or diagnostic criteria of NH. Recent studies of immunohistochemical assays have shown that the C5b-9 complex (the terminal membrane attack complement complex) is strongly expressed in the liver of NH cases, suggesting that a gestational alloimmune mechanism is the cause of liver injury. The patient was a low birthweight primiparous male born at 37 weeks of gestation by vaginal delivery. Blood tests 3 h after birth showed signs of liver failure, including high transferrin saturation, resembling the clinical characteristics of NH. However, magnetic resonance imaging and a lip biopsy showed no obvious iron deposition outside the liver. The patient was refractory to exchange transfusion and immunoglobulin therapy but was successfully treated by liver transplantation. Histologically, the explanted liver showed established cirrhosis, with large amounts of human C5b-9 in the residual hepatocytes, suggesting the alloimmune mechanism of liver injury was the cause of his liver failure. Liver failure caused by a gestational alloimmune mechanism should be considered in patients with antenatal liver failure, even without obvious extrahepatic siderosis. PMID:24976253

  4. Genetics of Transfusion Recipient Alloimmunization: Can Clues from Susceptibility to Autoimmunity Pave the Way?

    PubMed Central

    Tatari-Calderone, Zohreh; Luban, Naomi L.C.; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Summary The search for genetic determinants of alloimmunization in sickle cell disease transfusion recipients was based on two premises: i) that polymorphisms responsible for stronger immune and/or inflammatory responses and hemoglobin βS mutation were co-selected by malaria; and ii) that stronger responder status contributes to development of lupus. We found a marker of alloimmunization in the gene encoding for Ro52 protein, also known as Sjögren syndrome antigen 1 (SSA1) and TRIM21. Surprisingly, the nature of the association was opposite of that with lupus; the same variant of a polymorphism (rs660) that was associated with lupus incidence was also associated with induction of tolerance to red blood cell antigens during early childhood. The dual function of Ro52 can explain this apparent contradiction. We propose that other lupus/autoimmunity susceptibility loci may reveal roles of additional molecules in various aspects of alloimmunization induced by transfusion as well as during pregnancy. PMID:25670931

  5. Associations of Rhesus and non-Rhesus maternal red blood cell alloimmunization with stillbirth and preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Lee, Brian K; Wikman, Agneta T; Johansson, Stefan; Reilly, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with anti-D antibodies are well-recognized, much less is known concerning alloimmunization with other red blood cell antibodies detected during routine maternal screening. To date, most reports of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with non-anti-D antibodies have been from small case studies. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of maternal alloimmunization with specific red blood cell antibodies and the risks of preterm birth and stillbirth in the Swedish population. Methods: All antibody screening, outcome and covariate data were obtained through linkages of Swedish national health and data registers. Follow-up in these population-based registers was available up to 31 December 2002. The final study sample consisted of 1 022 569 singleton births from 668 952 mothers during 1987–2002. Results: In total, 1.3% of the 1 022 569 study pregnancies were alloimmunized. In adjusted logistic regression models, compared with having no antibodies, alloimmunization with anti-D, anti-E, anti-C and anti-c was associated with increased risk of both stillbirth and preterm birth. In addition, anti-Kell was associated with increased risk of preterm birth and anti-Lea with increased risk of stillbirth. Compared with firstborn children, risk of preterm birth associated with alloimmunization was greater in subsequent births Conclusions: In the largest study to date, alloimmunization with Rhesus, K- and -Lea red blood cell antibodies increased the risk of preterm birth and/or stillbirth. The association of anti-Lea with stillbirth was an unexpected finding. Further study of the consequences of non-anti-D alloimmunization is warranted. PMID:24801308

  6. Henoch-Schönlein purpura and meningococcal B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Sexton, K; McNicholas, A; Galloway, Y; Radke, S; Kieft, C; Stehr-Green, P; Reid, S; Neutze, J; Drake, R

    2009-03-01

    The risk of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) following vaccination with a group B meningococcal vaccine was assessed through active hospital safety monitoring. There was no increase in the relative incidence of HSP within 30 days after vaccination nor recurrence in HSP cases who received one or more further vaccine doses (re-challenge). PMID:18650242

  7. [Ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    PubMed

    Marting, A; Defrance, P; Wain, E; Van Severen, M; Deflandre, J

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and duodenal ulcers can meet many etiologies. We report the case of a young adult with an ulcerated duodenitis revealing Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The abdominal symptoms preceded the emergence of the classical cutaneous signs of the disease. PMID:26376566

  8. Oral purpura as the first manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Robert Stuart; Sloan, Philip; Farr, David; Carrozzo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Oral blood blisters and purpura are rare features of primary systemic amyloidosis (amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis). We report a case in which these unusual presentations led to a diagnosis of amyloidosis, which enabled effective treatment before organ failure. PMID:26708800

  9. Purpura Fulminans Due to Acquired Protein C Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Devdeep; Pal, Priyankar; Kundu, Ritabrata

    2015-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) may be the presenting symptom in a patient with protein C (PC) deficiency. It is a hematological emergency and presents with extensive areas of hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin. PC deficiency is usually genetically inherited. However, we report a 1 year and 4 months boy, who presented with acquired PC deficiency possibly of postinfectious etiology and developed PF. PMID:26677306

  10. Vasculitic purpura in vinyl chloride disease: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Magnavita, N.; Bergamaschi, A.; Garcovich, A.; Giuliano, G.

    1986-05-01

    Vinyl chloride (VC), a volatile substance mostly used for polyvinyl chloride (PVC) synthesis, is a systemic toxicant particularly noxious to endothelium. Angiosarcoma of the liver, Raynaud's phenomenon, scleroderma-like lesions, acroosteolysis and neuritis are known to be typical vinyl chloride-associated manifestations (VC disease). A so far unknown feature of the disease is purpura. This was first observed by the authors in a worker of a PVC-producing plant. The skin eruption was characterized by small purpuric maculae with tiny, palpable spots and papulae, mostly concentrated on the lower part of the legs, changing into bullae, pustules and crusts and tending to spontaneous regression after withdrawal from VC exposure. A skin biopsy revealed marked inflammatory reaction with a mostly lymphocytic and histiocytic infiltration around and in the walls of dermal arterioles. The finding of increased circulating immune complexes and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies strengthens the hypothesis that immunologic changes play a role in the appearance of ''vinylic purpura.''

  11. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lozo, Svjetlana; Atabeygi, Amir; Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  12. Successful prevention of post-transfusion Rh alloimmunization by intravenous Rho (D) immune globulin (WinRho SD).

    PubMed

    Anderson, B; Shad, A T; Gootenberg, J E; Sandler, S G

    1999-03-01

    Alloimmunization to the D blood group antigen following the transfusion of D-positive red blood cells to a D-negative recipient may be prevented in most persons by a prompt and adequate dose of Rho (D) immune globulin (RhIG). Until recently, the only RhIG approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this indication required intramuscular injection, an inconvenient and painful route for the relatively large volume that may be required. We describe the successful prevention of Rh alloimmunization following the unintentional transfusion of D-positive red blood cells to a D-negative infant by the intravenous infusion of WinRho SD, a new RhIG that is FDA-approved for prevention of post-transfusion Rh alloimmunization by intravenous administration. We believe that this more convenient and less painful approach should be the treatment of choice for preventing Rh alloimmunization following the transfusion of D-positive red cells to a D-negative recipient. PMID:10072121

  13. Extreme Elevation of Alkaline Phosphatase in a Pregnancy Complicated by Gestational Diabetes and Infant with Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Healey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    There have been few case reports of isolated elevation of alkaline phosphatase beyond the normal physiologic amount with subsequent return to baseline after delivery. Here we present a similar case of extreme elevation of alkaline phosphatase in a pregnancy complicated by gestational diabetes and subsequently by neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). PMID:27610256

  14. Recent progress in understanding the pathogenesis of fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2015-12-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) occurs in c. 1 in 1000 births and is caused by maternal antibodies against human platelet alloantigens that bind incompatible fetal platelets and promote their clearance from the circulation. Affected infants can experience bleeding, bruising and, in severe cases, intracranial haemorrhage and even death. As maternal screening is not routinely performed, and first pregnancies can be affected, most cases are diagnosed at delivery of a first affected pregnancy. Unlike its erythrocyte counterpart, Haemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn, there is no prophylactic treatment for FNAIT. This report will review recent advances made in understanding the pathogenesis of FNAIT: the platelet alloantigens involved, maternal exposure and sensitization to fetal platelet antigens, properties of platelet Immunoglobulin G antibodies, maternal-fetal antibody transport mechanisms and efforts to develop an effective FNAIT prophylaxis. PMID:26344048

  15. Mouse model of alloimmune-induced vascular rejection and transplant arteriosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Enns, Winnie; von Rossum, Anna; Choy, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Vascular rejection that leads to transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) is the leading representation of chronic heart transplant failure. In TA, the immune system of the recipient causes damage of the arterial wall and dysfunction of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. This triggers a pathological repair response that is characterized by intimal thickening and luminal occlusion. Understanding the mechanisms by which the immune system causes vasculature rejection and TA may inform the development of novel ways to manage graft failure. Here, we describe a mouse aortic interposition model that can be used to study the pathogenic mechanisms of vascular rejection and TA. The model involves grafting of an aortic segment from a donor animal into an allogeneic recipient. Rejection of the artery segment involves alloimmune reactions and results in arterial changes that resemble vascular rejection. The basic technical approach we describe can be used with different mouse strains and targeted interventions to answer specific questions related to vascular rejection and TA. PMID:26066300

  16. Micromanaging alloimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mandy L

    2016-07-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that microbes have a large influence on immune function. Previous studies have linked pathogenic microorganisms with decreased allograft tolerance and subsequent rejection. In this issue of the JCI, Lei and colleagues demonstrate that commensal organisms also influence the host response to allograft transplantation. Using murine skin and cardiac transplant models, the authors demonstrate that allograft rejection is accelerated in mice with a normal microbiome compared with germ-free animals and antibiotic-treated mice. The increased graft rejection observed in conventional animals was due to enhanced T cell priming and was mediated through type I IFN. Together, these results suggest that altering a patient's microbial community prior to transplant could improve allograft acceptance. PMID:27322057

  17. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  18. Special Blood Donation Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of abnormal antibody formation), and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (a rare clotting disorder). In cytapheresis, excess numbers ... generally does not cure them. However, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura can be cured with apheresis. Directed or designated ...

  19. What Causes Thrombocytopenia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transfusion Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Immune Thrombocytopenia Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... low platelet count. Two examples are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). TTP is ...

  20. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  1. Drug-related Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Escudero, A; Lucas, E; Vidal, J B; Sánchez-Guerrero, I; Martínez, A; Illán, F; Ramos, J

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with Henoch-Schönlein Purpura related to a treatment with cefuroxime and diclofenac who presented important systemic manifestations including a glomerulonephritis with IgA mesangial deposits. Skin testing with beta lactam antibiotics and diclofenac were negative in immediate and late reaction as well as RAST test to penicillins G and V. No cautious administration of drugs was done because of the illness severity. Although a reaction to diclofenac could not be excluded we thought that the more probably implicated drug was cefuroxime because the patient referred a purpuric rash after the intake of cephradine for a mastitis, ten years ago. PMID:8882757

  2. Refractory Immunological Thrombocytopenia Purpura and Splenectomy in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Macías, Santiago; Fino-Velásquez, Laura-Marcela; Vargas-Barato, Felipe E.; Guerra-Galue, Lucio; Reyes-Beltrán, Benjamín; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is defined as a platelet count of less than 100,000 platelets per microlitre (mcL). Thrombocytopenia develops in approximately 6-7% of women during pregnancy and at least 3% of these cases are caused by immunological platelet destruction. Herein, we present a pregnant woman who develops at the first trimester autoimmune thrombocytopenia purpura associated with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. The disease was refractory to pharmacological treatments but had a favourable response to splenectomy. The patient carried the pregnancy to term without complication and gave birth to a healthy baby girl. PMID:26798527

  3. Maternal alloimmunization against the rare platelet-specific antigen HPA-9b (Maxa) is an important cause of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Julie A.; Balthazor, Stephanie M.; Curtis, Brian R.; McFarland, Janice G.; Aster, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NATP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the newborn. Optimal management of subsequent pregnancies requires knowledge of the alloantigen that caused maternal immunization, but this is possible only in a minority of cases. This study investigated whether this can be explained in part by maternal immunization against the “rare” alloantigen HPA-9b (Maxa), implicated previously only in a single NATP case. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Archived paternal DNA from unresolved cases of NATP and normal individuals was typed for platelet (PLT)-specific antigens with real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. PLT-specific alloantibodies were characterized by flow cytometry and solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Recombinant GPIIb/IIIa was expressed in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. Clinical information was obtained directly from attending physicians. RESULTS Six of 217 fathers were positive for the presence of HPA-9b (Maxa), an incidence about seven times that in the general population. In each of five cases studied, maternal serum samples reacted with intact paternal PLTs and paternal GPIIb/IIIa. Only one of three serum samples tested recognized recombinant GPIIb/IIIa carrying the HPA-9b (Maxa) mutation. These seemingly discrepant reactions may reflect different requirements for oligosaccharides linked to residues close to the mutation in GPIIb that determines HPA-9b (Maxa). NATP in the affected children was severe and was associated with intracranial hemorrhage in three of six infants on whom information was obtained. CONCLUSIONS Maternal immunization against HPA-9b (Maxa) is an important cause of NATP and should be considered in cases of apparent NATP not resolved on the basis of maternal-fetal incompatibility for “common” PLT antigens. PMID:16131382

  4. Anti-TJa alloimmunization (anti-PP1Pk): two consecutive pregnancies of an anti-TJa-carrying patient.

    PubMed

    Haentjens-Verbeke, K; Dufour, P h; Vinatier, D; Tordjeman, N; Monnier, J C; Manessier, L

    1996-01-01

    Anti-TJa alloimmunization is an extremely rare condition which can cause miscarriages during the first and second terms of pregnancy. At 20-year-old female patient, an anti-TJa carrier, was given plasma transfusions in the course of her first two pregnancies. The cordocentesis, which was the main follow-up test during the first pregnancy, could not be carried out during the second pregnancy due to the presence of a huge subchorionic hematoma. Both pregnancies were characterized by fetal growth retardation, which was particularly considerable in one. Due to chronic fetal distress, both infants were delivered prematurely by cesarean section. The immunohematological data concerning anti-TJa alloimmunization and the different palliative treatments available to date are reviewed. PMID:8838768

  5. Urological Manifestations of Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Dalpiaz, Amanda; Schwamb, Richard; Miao, Yimei; Gonka, Jacquelyn; Walzter, Wayne; Khan, Sardar A.

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is an immune-mediated systemic vasculitis generally found in children. The standard manifestations of HSP are palpable purpura, arthritis, abdominal pain, and renal complications. Although less common, there are significant urological manifestations associated with HSP. The primary objective of this review is to encourage better understanding and management of HSP by emphasizing the common and rare manifestations of HSP, how they are diagnosed, and the latest treatment options for mild to severe complications. Medline searches of HSP and its urological manifestations were conducted along with searches on current diagnostic and treatment methods. Urological manifestations of HSP involve the kidney, ureter, bladder, prostate, scrotum, testicle, and penis. Diagnosis and management of HSP are not always clear due to differential diagnosis and diversity of symptom presentation. Treatment for HSP is mainly supportive and includes use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for pain relief. In more severe cases, glucocorticoids, methylprednisolone, plasmapheresis, and peritoneal and hemodialysis are reported successful. It is important to note different symptoms of HSP in order to distinguish HSP from other diseases. Early diagnosis may prevent severe complications. Treatment options vary from conservative to invasive depending on the severity of the disease and time frame of diagnosis. PMID:26889120

  6. RhIL-11 treatment normalized Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 imbalance in in human immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP).

    PubMed

    Lin, Ying; Zhou, Xieming; Guo, Wenjian; Li, Qianqian; Pan, Xiahui; Bao, Yunhua; He, Muqing; Zhu, Baoling; Lin, Xiaoji; Jin, Limin; Yao, Rongxin

    2016-09-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune hemorrhagic disorder characterized by reduction in platelet counts. T helper 1 (Th1) cells polarization with an increased shift of Th1/Th2 ratio has been reported in ITP. This shift is associated with transcription factor T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) upregulation and GATA-binding protein 3 (GATA-3) downregulation, leading to an increased T-bet/GATA-3 ratio. Our previous in vitro study showed that recombinant human interleukin-11 (rhIL-11) could normalize Th1/Th2 imbalance in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from adult ITP patients, which co-occurred with T-bet/GATA-3 ratio restoration. In this report, we investigated whether rhIL-11 had therapeutic effect in clinical ITP patients and whether rhIL-11 treatment could normalize Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 levels in vivo. We found rhIL-11 treatment had a response rate of 67.7% and significantly decreased Th1 and T-bet levels but increased Th2 and GATA-3 levels in ITP patients who showed good response, normalizing Th1/Th2 and T-bet/GATA-3 ratios similar to that in healthy controls. Thus our study suggested rhIL-11 was effective with tolerable adverse effects in ITP. The treatment strategy warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:27235596

  7. Connective Tissue Disease Following Hepatitis B Vaccination; Topiramate-Associated Fatal Heat Stroke; Ramelteon-Induced Autoimmune Hepatitis; Acute Oxaliplatin-Induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this feature is to heighten awareness of specific adverse drug reactions (ADRs), discuss methods of prevention, and promote reporting of ADRs to the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) MedWatch program (800-FDA-1088). If you have reported an interesting, preventable ADR to MedWatch, please consider sharing the account with our readers. Write to Dr. Mancano at ISMP, 200 Lakeside Drive, Suite 200, Horsham, PA 19044 (phone: 215-707-4936; e-mail: mmancano@temple.edu). Your report will be published anonymously unless otherwise requested. This feature is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) in cooperation with the FDA’s MedWatch program and Temple University School of Pharmacy. ISMP is an FDA MedWatch partner. PMID:24715739

  8. Do the acute platelet responses of patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) to IV anti-D and to IV gammaglobulin predict response to subsequent splenectomy?

    PubMed

    Bussel, J B; Kaufmann, C P; Ware, R E; Woloski, B M

    2001-05-01

    The acute platelet response to Intravenous Gammaglobulin (IVIG) has been reported to predict response to subsequent splenectomy of patients with ITP. The current study was undertaken to determine if the platelet response to IV anti-D (Winrho-SDF) predicts response to subsequent splenectomy. The 61 HIV-uninfected children and adults in this study had taken part in the pre-licensing studies of IV anti-D and were all those who not only had evaluable platelet responses to IV anti-D but also had undergone splenectomy and had information available describing its 1-year outcome. Results of treatment with IVIG were available in 38 of these 61 patients. Neither response to the initial infusion of IV anti-D, nor response to the initial or last IVIG, predicted the response in either children or adults to subsequent splenectomy. However, response to the last anti-D infusion in adults was strongly correlated (P = 0.003) to response to subsequent splenectomy as was hemolysis >/=2.0 gm/dl after IV anti-D (P = 0.03). There was no overall relationship between response to IV anti-D or IVIG, and response to subsequent splenectomy. However, a good platelet response in adults to the last IV anti-D and a hemoglobin decrease >/=2.0 gm/dl both appeared to predict response to subsequent splenectomy. PMID:11279654

  9. Correlation of Notch1/Hes1 Genes Expression Levels in Egyptian Paediatric Patients with Newly Diagnosed and Persistent Primary Immune(Idiopathic) Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Gawdat, Rania Mohsen; Hammam, Amira Ahmed; Ezzat, Dina Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Notch signalling is involved in the development of several autoimmune diseases, one of such diseases is ITP. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the expression levels of Notch1 receptor and its target Hes1 gene in Egyptian paediatric ITP patients. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was used to analyse the expression levels of Notch1 and Hes1 in 42 children with primary ITP (22 newly diagnosed and 20 persistent) cases. Twenty age and sex matched non-ITP controls were included. The expression levels of Notch1 were higher in newly diagnosed and persistent cases than controls with high statistical significant difference (P value < 0.001, P < 0.001) respectively, similarly as regards the expression levels of HES1 (P value < 0.001, P < 0.007) respectively. A significant positive correlation was found between Notch1 and Hes1 expression levels in newly diagnosed cases (r = 0.587, P value = 0.004). There was an association between levels of both genes in most of ITP patients but Hes1 was markedly elevated than Notch1 in few cases. High expression levels of Notch1/Hes1 indicated the important role of Notch signalling in both newly diagnosed and persistent ITP. High expression levels of Hes1 than Notch1 may shed light on its value as a therapeutic target for future research in ITP. PMID:27429531

  10. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  11. Simultaneous Manifestation of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia and Multiple Myeloma during Treatment by Prednisolone and Eltrombopag for Immune-Mediated Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Masao; Inoue, Morihiro; Kodama, Kenichiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Hua, Jian

    2016-01-01

    An 80-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and prednisolone together with eltrombopag was started, leading to significant improvement of platelet counts. Four years later, there was a prominent increase of peripheral blood monocytes, which was accompanied by recurrence of thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspirates and serum electrophoresis revealed coexistence of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and multiple myeloma (MM). The patient received lenalidomide plus dexamethasone therapy but died due to exacerbation of the disorder. It was supposed that thrombocytopenia was secondarily caused by CMML and MM developed at a later period. PMID:27597907

  12. Platelet kinetics and scintigraphic imaging in thrombocytopenic malaria patients.

    PubMed

    Karanikas, Georgios; Zedwitz-Liebenstein, Konstantin; Eidherr, Harald; Schuetz, Matthias; Sauerman, Robert; Dudczak, Robert; Winkler, Stefan; Pabinger, Ingrid; Kletter, Kurt

    2004-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common occurrence in acute malaria. It is attributed, among other factors, to excessive splenic platelet pooling and a shortened platelet lifespan. The aim of our study was to evaluate the platelet kinetics and sequestration site by isotopic studies in uncomplicated malaria-induced thrombocytopenia. Seven thrombocytopenic malaria patients (74,000+/-36,000 platelets/ micro l) were included in the study. Autologous (111)In-labeled platelet scintigraphy was performed up to 96 hours (h) post injection (p.i.) to evaluate the platelet sequestration site. Late sequestration for the spleen (S) and the liver (L) was analyzed according to the following activity ratios: S (spleen count on the last day of the platelet lifespan / spleen count at 30 min) and L (liver count on the last day of the platelet lifespan / liver count at 30 min). Additionally, platelet survival studies were performed. A normal late sequestration (S: 0.95+/-0.06 and L: 1.04+/-0.08; normal values, S and L: 1+/-0.2.) was observed in all of our patients. The platelet lifespan was reduced (1 to 4 days; normal range, 7-9 days), recovery was normal (mean, 63+/-6%; normal range, 55-75%), and the turnover rate was enhanced (mean, 95,000+/-80,000/ micro l/day; normal value, 35,000+/-4,500/ micro l/ day). According to the results of scintigraphy, the sequestration site by uncomplicated malaria-induced thrombocytopenia appears to be non-splenic and/or hepatic, yet diffuse. PMID:14983232

  13. Purpura fulminans associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in an asplenic pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Konda, S; Zell, D; Milikowski, C; Alonso-Llamazares, J

    2013-09-01

    Purpura fulminans is a rapidly progressive syndrome of small-vessel thrombosis and hemorrhagic necrosis of the skin accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation. We describe a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae septicemia in an asplenic 5-year-old boy on oral tacrolimus, with a past medical history of multivisceral organ transplantation and subsequent development of purpura fulminans on his chest and distal extremities. The acute infectious form of purpura fulminans is usually caused by gram-negative bacteria. Cases secondary to gram-positive encapsulated bacteria usually occur when individuals are immuno-suppressed or have anatomic or functional asplenia. Our patient had both, which likely increased his susceptibility, and he responded well to antimicrobial therapy in addition to prophylactic coverage in the setting of his immunosuppression. We review the literature for similar cases due to S. pneumoniae in the pediatric population and discuss the etiology and treatment of purpura fulminans. PMID:23985086

  14. Acute Scrotal Swelling in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Sunny; Mohan, Muhunthan; Jennings, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis characterized classically by purpura, arthritis and abdominal pain. Epididymitis/orchitis is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. Testicular or scrotal involvement has been reported in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and must be distinguished from testicular torsion. We report a case of a 5 year old boy diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with acute scrotal swelling. He was managed successfully with conservative approach. The history, clinical examination findings and scrotal ultrasound evaluation should suffice to make the correct diagnosis and avoid surgery. Steroid treatment and/or antibiotics appeared to be effective for this condition. PMID:27169017

  15. Acute Scrotal Swelling in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sunny; Mohan, Muhunthan; Jennings, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a systemic vasculitis characterized classically by purpura, arthritis and abdominal pain. Epididymitis/orchitis is rarely seen as a complication of HSP. Testicular or scrotal involvement has been reported in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura and must be distinguished from testicular torsion. We report a case of a 5 year old boy diagnosed with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with acute scrotal swelling. He was managed successfully with conservative approach. The history, clinical examination findings and scrotal ultrasound evaluation should suffice to make the correct diagnosis and avoid surgery. Steroid treatment and/or antibiotics appeared to be effective for this condition. PMID:27169017

  16. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura Associated with Gangrenous Appendicitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    SEMEENA, NK; ADLEKHA, Shashikant

    2014-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein Purpura (HSP) is a leucocytoclastic vasculitis of unclear aetiology characterised by symmetrical, non-traumatic, nonthrombocytopenic purpura mostly involving the lower limbs and buttocks, as well as arthritis, gastrointestinal manifestations, and occasional nephritis. A 35 years old male presented with purpuric rash on the lower extremities, abdominal pain, fever, arthralgia, and melaena. A diagnosis of HSP with appendicitis was made, which is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. PMID:24876811

  17. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia caused by human leucocyte antigen-B27 antibody.

    PubMed

    Thude, H; Schorner, U; Helfricht, C; Loth, M; Maak, B; Barz, D

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) occurs when maternal alloantibodies to antigens presented on foetal platelets cause their immune destruction. Whether human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies can cause NAIT is controversial. Here, a patient was described who suffered from a NAIT caused by an HLA-B27 antibody. Sera from the mother and the newborn were tested for human platelet antigen antibodies and HLA antibodies by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay, solid phase-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lymphocytotoxicity assay (LCT) and flow cytometric analysis. No antibodies against cluster designation (CD)109 and platelet glycoproteins of the father were found in patient's and mother's serum. However, HLA ELISA was used to identify HLA antibody in both sera. The antibody was specified as HLA-B27 antibody. Typing results showed that the father descended HLA-B27 antigen on patient and his brother. The mother was HLA-B27 negative. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-B27 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. PMID:16623921

  18. Feto-maternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: a literature review and statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J A; Burrows, R F

    2001-02-01

    Exploring prognostic factors that determine outcomes in fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT), a search of Medline was performed covering the years 1966 to April 1998. 376 articles were collected and reviewed; 140 articles contained the case histories of 297 mothers and 433 pregnancies that fulfilled entry criteria. More than 30 data variables were sought from these cases. The data were analysed using SPSS and Arcus Quickstat Biomedical. Nineteen different antigen incompatibilities were documented, the majority being human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a (77.3%), HPA-3a (3.5%) and HPA-5b (3.5%). The relative risk reduction (RRR) in mortality with any intervention was 57% (0.19-0.77) p = 0.009. Treatment of HPA-1a (PlA1) pregnancies with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) increased the likelihood of a neurologically normal outcome, relative risk (RR) 1.68, confidence interval (1.3-2.2) p = 0.0003. Treatment of HPA-1a (PlA1) pregnancies with only antenatal complementary platelet transfusions increased the likelihood of a neurologically normal outcome, RR 1.63 (1.1-2.1) p = 0.01. Despite reviews of more than 400 cases of FMAIT, few prognostic variables are identifiable. Although IVIG appears to reduce the risk of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), the dosage and timing of IVIG treatment was varied. This study highlights the need for standardised and directed research. PMID:11284646

  19. Henoch-Schonlein purpura: ultrasonography of scrotal and penile involvement

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Testicular or scrotal involvement has been reported in children with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP), but there are very few reports on penile involvement. We report the initial and follow-up ultrasonographic findings of scrotal and penile involvement of HSP in a 5-year-old boy. On ultrasonography, scrotal soft tissue thickening and epididymal swelling with increased vascularity were noted, and on the penis, a focal mass-like lesion appeared on the dorsal surface of the distal penis, having a hypoechoic mass-like appearance without visible vascular flow on a Doppler study. After 2 days of treatment, follow-up ultrasonography showed normal scrotum and penis with a resolved soft tissue mass-like lesion. Therefore, we think that HSP ultrasonographic findings involving the scrotum and penis might help to diagnose scrotal and penile involvement in a case of HSP and to avoid unnecessary medication and/or surgical procedures. PMID:25541068

  20. Purpura fulminans secondary to rickettsial infections: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Katoch, Saloni; Kallappa, Ravindra; Shamanur, Murugesh B.; Gandhi, Sneha

    2016-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a descriptive term used to describe a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by rapidly progressive purpuric lesions that may develop into extensive areas of skin necrosis, and peripheral gangrene. This rare disorder is associated with laboratory evidence of consumptive coagulopathy and is often fatal. PF is usually associated with many infections, most notably with meningococcal, staphylococcal, and streptococcal infections. However, there are very few reports of this entity with spotted fever and scrub typhus from India. Rickettsial infections are an underdiagnosed group of diseases presenting as acute febrile illness, with high mortality in untreated cases. Of the available tests, Weil–Felix is a handy and economical tool for early diagnosis of this fatal disease especially in resource poor settings. We present four infants with PF secondary to rickettsial fever diagnosed by the Weil–Felix test. PMID:26955583

  1. Purpura fulminans secondary to rickettsial infections: A case series.

    PubMed

    Katoch, Saloni; Kallappa, Ravindra; Shamanur, Murugesh B; Gandhi, Sneha

    2016-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a descriptive term used to describe a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by rapidly progressive purpuric lesions that may develop into extensive areas of skin necrosis, and peripheral gangrene. This rare disorder is associated with laboratory evidence of consumptive coagulopathy and is often fatal. PF is usually associated with many infections, most notably with meningococcal, staphylococcal, and streptococcal infections. However, there are very few reports of this entity with spotted fever and scrub typhus from India. Rickettsial infections are an underdiagnosed group of diseases presenting as acute febrile illness, with high mortality in untreated cases. Of the available tests, Weil-Felix is a handy and economical tool for early diagnosis of this fatal disease especially in resource poor settings. We present four infants with PF secondary to rickettsial fever diagnosed by the Weil-Felix test. PMID:26955583

  2. Vancomycin-induced Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a small-vessel systemic vasculitis. Although its exact pathophysiology remains unknown, Henoch-Schönlein purpura has been reported in association with various medical conditions including hypersensitivity. We report the case of a patient with vancomycin-induced Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Case presentation A 42-year-old Caucasian man who had previously undergone a heart transplant was diagnosed as having an intra-abdominal abscess after he underwent a Hartmann procedure. At 15 days after initiation of antibiotic therapy including vancomycin, he developed a purpuric rash of the lower limbs, arthralgia, and macroscopic hematuria. At that time, our patient was already on hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease. Henoch-Schönlein purpura was diagnosed. After a second 15-day course of vancomycin, a second flare of Henoch-Schönlein purpura occurred. Skin biopsies showed leucocytoclastic vasculitis with IgA deposits and eosinophils in the peri-capillary inflammatory infiltrate, suggesting an allergic mechanism. After vancomycin was stopped, we did not observe any further flares. Only five cases of isolated cutaneous vasculitis, one case of lupus-like syndrome and one case of Henoch-Schönlein purpura after vancomycin treatment have been described to date in the literature. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware that systemic vasculitis can be induced by some treatments. Vancomycin is a widely prescribed antibiotic. Occurrence of rare but serious Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with vancomycin requires its prompt discontinuation. PMID:22490390

  3. Red blood cell alloimmunization is influenced by the delay between Toll-like receptor agonist injection and transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Elayeb, Rahma; Tamagne, Marie; Bierling, Philippe; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Vingert, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Murine models of red blood cell transfusion show that inflammation associated with viruses or methylated DNA promotes red blood cell alloimmunization. In vaccination studies, the intensity of antigen-specific responses depends on the delay between antigen and adjuvant administration, with a short delay limiting immune responses. In mouse models of alloimmunization, the delay between the injection of Toll-like receptor agonists and transfusion is usually short. In this study, we hypothesized that the timing of Toll-like receptor 3 agonist administration affects red blood cell alloimmunization. Poly(I:C), a Toll-like receptor 3 agonist, was administered to B10BR mice at various time points before the transfusion of HEL-expressing red blood cells. For each time point, we measured the activation of splenic HEL-presenting dendritic cells, HEL-specific CD4+ T cells and anti-HEL antibodies in serum. The phenotype of activated immune cells depended on the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-dependent inflammation. The production of anti-HEL antibodies was highest when transfusion occurred 7 days after agonist injection. The proportion of HEL-presenting CD8α+ dendritic cells producing interleukin-12 was highest in mice injected with poly(I:C) 3 days before transfusion. Although the number of early-induced HEL-specific CD4+ T cells was similar between groups, a high proportion of these cells expressed CD134, CD40 and CD44 in mice injected with poly(I:C) 7 days before transfusion. This study clearly shows that the delay between transfusion and Toll-like receptor-induced inflammation influences the immune response to transfused red blood cells. PMID:26430173

  4. Sequestration of anti-platelet GPIIIa antibody in rheumatoid factor immune complexes of human immunodeficiency virus 1 thrombocytopenic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Karpatkin, S; Nardi, M A; Hymes, K B

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1-related idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (HIV-1-ITP) patients have a 4-fold increased percentage of CD5+ B cells and a 4.8-fold increased percentage of serum immune complexes precipitated by polyethylene glycol (PEG-ICs) compared to control subjects, as reported previously. Since CD5+ B cells produce predominantly IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) vs. Fc of IgG and PEG-ICs contain high levels of IgM, we looked for the presence of RF in the immune complexes of HIV-1-ITP patients. PEG-ICs were adsorbed to protein A and dissociated with acid, and IgM and IgG were purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography. Solid-phase ELISA was used to measure antibody specificity vs. platelets, Fc, and HIV-1 gp120, p24, and CD4. Dissociated IgG antibody reacted with platelets, HIV-1 gp120, p24, and CD4, but not with Fc. Serum IgG did not react with platelets or Fc but did react with HIV-1 gp120, p24, and CD4. Both PEG-IC IgM and serum IgM reacted with Fc as well as the other four antigens. Control IgM and IgG were unreactive. Isolated IgM from PEG-ICs relocated approximately 50% of the IgG preincubated with IgM to the Vo region of a G200 gel-filtration column. Anti-platelet IgG but not IgM could be affinity-purified from fixed platelets. Both F(ab')2 fragments of anti-platelet IgG and the total PEG-IC bound to platelets in a saturation-dependent manner. F(ab')2 of anti-platelet IgG inhibited 50% binding of PEG-IC to platelets at an F(ab')2/complex ratio of 3:1 (wt/wt). Scatchard analysis revealed two classes of binding sites: high-affinity Kd values of 0.8-1.8 nM and lower-affinity Kd values of 6.6-12.3 nM with respective numbers of binding sites of 44,000-57,000 and 122,000-256,000 (n = 4). Anti-platelet IgG of 6/6 patients precipitated GPIIIa from platelet lysates of surface 125I-labeled platelets. Platelet count correlated inversely with anti-platelet IgG (r = -0.73; P < 0.01; n = 27). Thus, PEG-ICs of HIV-1-ITP patients contain IgM RF, which

  5. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia in the Irish population: a discrepancy between observed and expected cases

    PubMed Central

    Davoren, A; McParland, P; Barnes, C A; Murphy, W G

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To estimate the rate of detection of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAITP) in the Irish population, to investigate clinical presentation and outcome in affected infants, and to determine the extent, if any, to which this condition is underdiagnosed at present. Methods: Cases were collected in a retrospective fashion from a review of platelet serology laboratory records from January 1992 to December 2000. Clinical data were obtained from hospital records. Testing for maternal antiplatelet antibody was by one or more of the following: the platelet suspension immunofluorescence test, a commercial antigen capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (GTI-PakPlus™), and the monoclonal antibody immobilisation of platelet antigens assay. Platelet antigen typing was by the polymerase chain reaction technique with sequence specific primers. Results: Twenty seven serologically verified cases of NAITP were identified in 18 families. Maternal antibody to human platelet antigen 1a accounted for 25 of the 27 confirmed cases. Twenty one of 26 infants were born with severe thrombocytopenia. Nineteen of 27 infants had bleeding manifestations at birth. Petechiae and bruising were most commonly observed (n = 17). There were no documented cases of intracranial haemorrhage in this group but systematic cranial ultrasound was not performed. Conclusions: Screening studies in predominantly white populations have estimated the incidence of NAITP to be between 1 in 1000 and 1 in 2000 live births. With 50 000 births each year in Ireland, these results give a clinical detection rate for NAITP of just 1 case in 16 500 live births, strongly suggesting that NAITP is currently underdiagnosed. Antenatal screening to detect women at risk of having babies with NAITP is now scientifically feasible and should be considered. PMID:11919215

  6. Relapses in patients with Henoch–Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Calvo-Río, Vanesa; Hernández, José Luis; Ortiz-Sanjuán, Francisco; Loricera, Javier; Palmou-Fontana, Natalia; González-Vela, Maria C.; González-Lamuño, Domingo; González-López, Marcos A.; Armesto, Susana; Blanco, Ricardo; González-Gay, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To further investigate into the relapses of Henoch–Schönlein purpura (HSP), we analyzed the frequency, clinical features, and predictors of relapses in series of 417 unselected patients from a single center. After a median follow-up of 12 (interquartile range [IQR]: 2–38) years, almost one-third of the 417 patients (n = 133; 32%; 85 men/48 women) had experienced at least 1 relapse. At the time of disease diagnosis, patients who later experienced relapses had less commonly infections than those who never suffered flares (30.8% vs 41.9%; P = 0.03). In contrast, patients who experienced relapses had a longer duration of the first episode of palpable purpura than those without relapses (palpable purpura lasting >7 days; 80.0% vs 68.1%; P = 0.04). Abdominal pain (72.3% vs 62.3%; P = 0.03) and joint manifestations (27.8% vs 15.5%; P = 0.005) were also more common in patients who later developed relapses. In contrast, patients who never suffered relapses had a slightly higher frequency of fever at the time of disease diagnosis (9.3% vs 3.8%; P = 0.06). At the time of disease diagnosis, corticosteroids were more frequently given to patients who later had relapses of the disease (44% vs 32% in nonrelapsing patients; P = 0.03). Relapses generally occurred soon after the first episode of vasculitis. The median time from the diagnosis of HSP to the first relapse was 1 (IQR: 1–2) month. The median number of relapses was 1 (IQR 1–3). The main clinical features at the time of the relapse were cutaneous (88.7%), gastrointestinal (27.1%), renal (24.8%), and joint (16.5%) manifestations. After a mean ± standard deviation follow-up of 18.9 ± 9.8 years, complete recovery was observed in 110 (82.7%) of the 133 patients who had relapses. Renal sequelae (persistent renal involvement) was found in 11 (8.3%) of the patients with relapses. The best predictive factors for relapse were joint and gastrointestinal manifestations at HSP diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]: 2

  7. Mathematical model of platelet turnover in thrombocytopenic and nonthrombocytopenic preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Mudit; Sola-Visner, Martha; Widness, John A; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Mager, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia affects 22-35% of all neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units. The purpose of this study was to develop a mathematical model for characterizing platelet (PLT) kinetics in thrombocytopenic preterm neonates. Immature PLT fraction (IPF) and PLT counts were measured for up to 35 days after birth in 27 very low birth weight preterm neonates. PLT transfusions were administered to 8 of the 27 (24%) subjects. The final model included a series of four transit compartments to mimic the production and survival of IPF and PLT. Model parameters were estimated using nonlinear mixed effects modeling with the maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. The model adequately captured the diverse phenotypes expressed by individual subject profiles. Typical population survival values for IPF and PLT life spans in nonthrombocytopenic patients were estimated at 0.912 and 10.7 days, respectively. These values were significantly shorter in thrombocytopenic subjects, 0.429 and 2.56 days, respectively. The model was also used to evaluate the influence of growth and laboratory phlebotomy loss on the time course of IPF and PLT counts. Whereas incorporating body weight was essential to correct for expanding blood volume due to growth, phlebotomy loss, a possible covariate, did not significantly influence PLT kinetics. This study provides a platform for identifying potential covariates that influence the interindividual variability in model parameters regulating IPF and PLT kinetics and for evaluating future pharmacological therapies for treating thrombocytopenic neonates. PMID:25362135

  8. Interaction between ICOS-B7RP1 and B7-CD28 costimulatory pathways in alloimmune responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Salama, Alan D; Yuan, Xueli; Nayer, Ali; Chandraker, Anil; Inobe, Manabu; Uede, Toshimutsu; Sayegh, Mohamed H

    2003-04-01

    The B7-CD28 pathway is one of the foremost costimulatory pathways involved in T-cell activation. Recently, a number of additional costimulatory pathways have been described and preliminary data suggest that they play important roles in alloimmunity. However, the interactions between these different pathways are not well understood. We studied the effect of targeting ICOS ligand, B7RP1, in a rat cardiac transplant model, with and without concomitant blockade of the B7 pathway using CTLA4Ig. In a fully mismatched WF to LEW vascularized cardiac allograft model, without therapy, grafts were acutely rejected (MST 10.8 +/- 1.6 days). Early (day of transplant) B7RP1 blockade with ICOSIg alone had little effect on graft survival and rather than being additive with B7 blockade, ICOSIg abrogated the prolonged graft survival induced by CTLA4Ig treatment. By contrast, delayed (day 2 post-transplant) blockade of B7RP1 did not have such an effect. These findings were not related to cytokine deviation but may be in part related to the pattern of down-regulation of B7.2 expression following early B7RP1 blockade. This is the first report describing the complex interactions between ICOS-B7RP1 and B7-CD28 costimulatory pathways in alloimmunity in vivo. PMID:12694060

  9. In vitro propagation of Dioscorea alata var. purpurae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Heena J; Lele, S S

    2012-07-01

    Dioscorea alata var. purpurae (Indian purple yam) is an important source of diosgenin, a triterpenoid that is used as a raw material in the synthesis of corticosteroid hormones. These drugs are used for the treatment of pharmacological conditions such as arthritis. This paper reports in vitro propagation of explants of various parts of Dioscorea-tuber, leaves, and nodes. Murashige and Skoog media supplemented with hormones and additives was used to get maximum callus initiation and shoot/root induction. All the cultures were maintained at 25 ± 2 °C under cool-white fluorescent tubes with 16-h photoperiod. Callus initiation was observed from 8th to 11th day of inoculation, and subsequent root/shoot was initiated in nodal callus after 21 days. Hormones such as kinetin, indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, α-naphthalene acetic acid, and thiadizuron did not show significant enhancement. Also, there was no need for supplementing additives (silver nitrate, glutamine, L-: asparagine monohydrate, polyethylene glycol). Combination of 6-benzylaminopurine (0.2 ppm) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2 ppm) hormones gave the best results, and all parts of the plants gave similar callus induction. PMID:22476929

  10. [Management of chicken pox purpura fulminans: a pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Domergue, S; Rodiere, M; Bigorre, M; Guye, E; Captier, G

    2006-06-01

    The authors report a case of a 4 years old girl who had presented a chicken-pox purpura fulminans. Lesions appeared 5 days after chicken-pox start and were quickly evoluted in cutaneous and sub-cutaneous necrosis on external side of thighs and behind side of right calf. A medical management was done with fresh plasma, blood, antithrombine 3, and fibrin. Specifics treatments were done: heparin and activated C protein. Surgical treatment was realised 5 weeks later. It consisted of clean necrosis areas and put a thin skin graft witch was took on the scalp. The evolution was fast good. The follow-up is 3 years without big esthetic and functional consequences. Some cases of this pathology were described in literature with serious lesions. The management should be multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment should be realised when lesions are stabilized. Scalp is a donor site for skin graft very interesting because of big quantity of skin and not esthetic consequence. PMID:16504361

  11. [Massive colorectal hemorrhage in adult Schönlein-Henoch purpura].

    PubMed

    Novák, J; Libor, J

    1993-07-01

    Schönlein-Henoch purpura is a well known syndrome, rare in adults, and is seldom accompanied with extensive colorectal haemorrhage. In abdominal purpura, the small bowel is more frequently involved, but cases of oesophageal, gastroduodenal and colorectal localisation also have been reported. The cases with colorectal bleeding, appearing in adulthood and elderly patients, could cause differential diagnostic problems. Described endoscopic features of one patient, who was referred to our department, because of colorectal bleeding. The treatment, course of disease and endoscopic follow-up is presented. No previous endoscopic documentation of this type of localisation has been reported in Hungarian literature, so far. PMID:8351133

  12. Stroke and skin rash: A rare case of Henoch-Schonlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Kaushik; Chatterjee, Atri; Sau, Jyoti Tanmay; Dey, Sandip

    2012-10-01

    Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that is rare in adults. Here, we present a case of a woman who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis and ischemic stroke. The patient met the diagnostic criteria of HSP. However, cerebrovascular disease is reported as an uncommon, yet fatal, complication of HSP. The patient responded to aggressive immunosuppression with pulses of corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide. In the absence of an established protocol of treatment of such neurologic emergency in HSP patients, this report demonstrates a successful outcome. PMID:23349600

  13. Acute Esophageal Necrosis Presenting With Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory R.; Malik, Zubair; Schey, Ron

    2015-01-01

    A 63-year-old woman with abdominal pain and melena developed a palpable, purpuric rash and acute kidney injury. Skin and kidney biopsy confirmed Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Upper endoscopy revealed diffuse, circumferential, black-appearing mucosa of the esophagus consistent with acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as black esophagus. AEN is a very rare cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of AEN associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura or other vasculitis. PMID:26504868

  14. A case of anaphylactoid purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    REN, XIANQING; ZHANG, WENJUAN; DANG, WEILI; ZHAI, WENSHENG; GUO, QINGYIN; DING, YIN; YANG, XIAOQING

    2013-01-01

    Cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage are rare. Mild cases are easily ignored due to a lack of evident bleeding, and severe cases may be fatal. We have only treated one patient with Henoch-Schönlein nephritis (HSPN), a female child. The clinical manifestations were not evident, however, the imaging manifestations were clear. Finally, the patient was definitively diagnosed with HSPN accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage. Following treatment with antiinflammatory and steroidal agents, tripterygium glycosides and traditional Chinese medicine, the patient recovered. In the present study, we report the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, with a review of the literature. PMID:23737885

  15. Banking of pluripotent adult stem cells as an unlimited source for red blood cell production: potential applications for alloimmunized patients and rare blood challenges.

    PubMed

    Peyrard, Thierry; Bardiaux, Laurent; Krause, Claire; Kobari, Ladan; Lapillonne, Hélène; Andreu, Georges; Douay, Luc

    2011-07-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is now considered a well-settled and essential therapy. However, some difficulties and constraints still occur, such as long-term blood product shortage, blood donor population aging, known and yet unknown transfusion-transmitted infectious agents, growing cost of the transfusion supply chain management, and the inescapable blood group polymorphism barrier. Red blood cells can be now cultured in vitro from human hematopoietic, human embryonic, or human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). The highly promising hiPSC technology represents a potentially unlimited source of RBCs and opens the door to the revolutionary development of a new generation of allogeneic transfusion products. Assuming that in vitro large-scale cultured RBC production efficiently operates in the near future, we draw here some futuristic but realistic scenarios regarding potential applications for alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group. We retrospectively studied a cohort of 16,486 consecutive alloimmunized patients (10-year period), showing 1 to 7 alloantibodies with 361 different antibody combinations. We showed that only 3 hiPSC clones would be sufficient to match more than 99% of the 16,486 patients in need of RBC transfusions. The study of the French National Registry of People with a Rare Blood Phenotype/Genotype (10-year period) shows that 15 hiPSC clones would cover 100% of the needs in patients of white ancestry. In addition, one single hiPSC clone would meet 73% of the needs in alloimmunized patients with sickle cell disease for whom rare cryopreserved RBC units were required. As a result, we consider that a very limited number of RBC clones would be able to not only provide for the need for most alloimmunized patients and those with a rare blood group but also efficiently allow for a policy for alloimmunization prevention in multiply transfused patients. PMID:21377319

  16. Group A Escherichia coli-Related Purpura Fulminans: an Unusual Manifestation Due to an Unusual Strain?

    PubMed Central

    Amara, Marlène; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Bedel, Jérôme; Mira, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Virginie; Socha, Koryna; Bruneel, Fabrice; Pangon, Béatrice; Bédos, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We describe an exceptional case of life-threatening group A Escherichia coli-induced purpura fulminans. Genotyping of common polymorphisms in genes involved in innate immunity or coagulation did not reveal known susceptibility to such a manifestation. Genetic analysis of the strain revealed an unusual conserved virulence plasmidic region, pointing out its potential virulence. PMID:25232165

  17. A Novel Use of Tisseel in the Setting of Uncontrolled Bleeding in a Thrombocytopenic Patient With Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John S.; Gonzalez, Ricardo; Spiess, Philippe E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of an 87-year-old female who was evaluated for an 8.5 cm left sided renal mass concerning for malignancy. The patient was transiently thrombocytopenic over the previous 4 months with platelet counts ranging from 50,000 to 125,000 plt/mcL and experienced diffuse hemorrhage during radical nephrectomy with failure to achieve mechanical hemostasis or fulguration. Following Surgicel (Ethicon; Somerville, New Jersey) application, we applied Tisseel (Baxter; Deerfield, IL) to the nephrectomy bed with complete hemostasis of bleeding foci. Tisseel saved this thrombocytopenic patient with uncontrolled bleeding and should have this clinical utility recognized. PMID:26793579

  18. Recombinant HPA-1a antibody therapy for treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: proof of principle in human volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Nina; Hawkins, Louise; Grehan, Nicola; Cookson, Philip; Garner, Steve F.; Crisp-Hihn, Abigail; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Evans, Amanda; Balan, Kottekkattu; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Armour, Kathryn L.; Clark, Mike R.; Williamson, Lorna M.

    2013-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, caused by the maternal generation of antibodies against fetal human platelet antigen-1a (HPA-1a), can result in intracranial hemorrhage and intrauterine death. We have developed a therapeutic human recombinant high-affinity HPA-1a antibody (B2G1Δnab) that competes for binding to the HPA-1a epitope but carries a modified constant region that does not bind to Fcγ receptors. In vitro studies with a range of clinical anti–HPA-1a sera have shown that B2G1Δnab blocks monocyte chemiluminescence by >75%. In this first-in-man study, we demonstrate that HPA-1a1b autologous platelets (matching fetal phenotype) sensitized with B2G1Δnab have the same intravascular survival as unsensitized platelets (190 hours), while platelets sensitized with a destructive immunoglobulin G1 version of the antibody (B2G1) are cleared from the circulation in 2 hours. Mimicking the situation in fetuses receiving B2G1Δnab as therapy, we show that platelets sensitized with a combination of B2G1 (representing destructive HPA-1a antibody) and B2G1Δnab survive 3 times as long in circulation compared with platelets sensitized with B2G1 alone. This confirms the therapeutic potential of B2G1Δnab. The efficient clearance of platelets sensitized with B2G1 also opens up the opportunity to carry out studies of prophylaxis to prevent alloimmunization in HPA-1a–negative mothers. PMID:23656729

  19. Replacement therapy with protein C concentrate in infants and adolescents with meningococcal sepsis and purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Ettingshausen, C E; Veldmann, A; Beeg, T; Schneider, W; Jäger, G; Kreuz, W

    1999-01-01

    We report the effects of substitution with a virus-inactivated protein C (PC) concentrate in disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in infants and children with meningococcal sepsis associated with purpura fulminans. It was a prospective open-label study. Eight pediatric and adolescent patients age 0.2 to 18.25 years with DIC associated with severe acquired PC deficiency (range 0.02 to 0.48 IU/mL; median, 0.22 IU/mL) in meningococcal septic shock and purpura fulminans were studied. Replacement therapy was initiated with a virus-inactivated PC concentrate with an initial intravenous bolus of 80 to 120 IU/kg followed by 50 IU/kg up to six times per day as an adjunctive therapeutic regimen to otherwise optimal intensive care treatment. After initial PC administration, plasma PC levels rose to normal ranges and were maintained under PC replacement therapy. Improving or even normalizing global hemostatic parameters were assessed in all patients. Markedly elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) levels prior to treatment, reflecting a reduced fibrinolytic potential, decreased rapidly under PC substitution. Concomitantly improving signs of purpura fulminans reflected by decreasing size of skin lesions, demonstrated a restoring microcirculation. Six of the eight patients survived. One patient required limb amputation; two patients died because of multiorgan failure. Both presented with a severely low plasma PC activity of 0.02 IU/mL on admission to the hospital. No adverse effects were observed with the PC concentrate administration. It can be concluded that the administration of PC concentrate had a marked benefit on the deranged coagulation status of patients with purpura fulminans and meningococcal septicemia. Normalization or even partial correction of hemostasis as well as improvement of microcirculation accompanied by improving signs of purpura fulminans were demonstrated in all patients. PMID:10632475

  20. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C.; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. Methods We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Results Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Discussion Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:23652405

  1. Anti-F(ab')2 antibodies in thrombocytopenic patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, J R; Lennette, E T; Karpatkin, S

    1986-01-01

    22 homosexual or narcotic addict patients at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or with AIDS, were studied for the presence of antiimmunoglobulin antibodies and circulating immune complexes (20 were thrombocytopenic, 6 had AIDS). Circulating immune complex levels were 10-fold higher than levels in normal subjects. IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were noted in homosexual as well as narcotic addict patients. Of 16 homosexual patients, 7 had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody of moderate to marked titer with broad reactivity against autologous, homologous, and control F(ab')2 fragments. Three others demonstrated limited reactivity against one or two F(ab')2 fragments. The remaining six patients were negative. Six of six narcotic addict patients had IgG anti-F(ab')2 antibody, five with limited reactivity, one with broad reactivity. In contrast, neither elevated circulating immune complexes nor anti-F(ab')2 antibodies were detectable in six autoimmune thrombocytopenic patients. Anti-F(ab')2 antibody could be affinity purified from serum or circulating immune complexes. Anti-F(ab')2 reactivity correlated with circulating immune complex levels, r = 0.83, P less than 0.01. PMID:3011860

  2. Thromboelastometric Monitoring of the Hemostatic Effect of Platelet Concentrates Transfusion in Thrombocytopenic Children Undergoing Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Cristina; Cadamuro, Janne; Jones, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic platelet concentrates transfusion represents a therapeutic choice in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated the effects of platelet concentrates transfusion on thromboelastometric parameters of platelet function in 36 transfusion occasions for 11 thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy. Pre- and posttransfusion (1-2 hours) blood samples were analyzed using standard coagulation tests and thromboelastometry (ROTEM) measurements (EXTEM and FIBTEM tests). Platelet component of the clot was calculated based on the EXTEM and FIBTEM maximum clot elasticity (MCE) results. After transfusion, mean platelet count increased from 16.5 × 109/L to 43.0 × 109/L (P < .001) and platelet component increased from 34.1 to 73.0 (P < .001). Statistically significant increases for posttransfusion EXTEM parameters A10, A20, and maximum clot firmness (MCF) were observed compared to pretransfusion values (P < .001). The EXTEM α-angle values increased posttransfusion (P < .05). The FIBTEM measurements were comparable pre- and posttransfusion. The study showed that platelet concentrates transfusion in thrombocytopenic children undergoing chemotherapy improves platelet-related coagulation pattern. PMID:25525046

  3. Anti-Human Platelet Antigen-1a Immunoglobulin G Preparation Intended to Prevent Fetal and Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Weng, Ying-Jan; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Björn; Kjaer, Mette; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a severe disease that is caused by maternal alloantibodies generated during pregnancy or at delivery as a result of incompatibility between maternal and fetal human platelet antigens (HPAs) inherited from the father. Antibody-mediated immune suppression using anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulins is thought to be able to prevent FNAIT caused by HPA-1a. A fractionation process to prepare anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) from human plasma was therefore developed. Anti-HPA-1a plasma was obtained from volunteer mothers who underwent alloimmunization against HPA-1a during a previous pregnancy. Plasma was cryoprecipitated and the supernatant treated with caprylic acid and solvent/detergent (S/D), purified by chromatography, nanofiltered, concentrated, and sterile-filtered. The anti-HPA-1a immunoglobulin fraction was characterized for purity and safety. PAK12 and quantitative monoclonal antibody immobilization of platelet antigen (MAIPA) assays were used to detect anti-HPA-1a IgG. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) removal during nanofiltration was assessed by spiking experiments, using cell culture-derived reporter HCV and luciferase analysis. The caprylic acid treatment precipitated non-Ig proteins yielding a 90% pure Ig supernatant. S-HyperCel chromatography of the S/D-treated supernatant followed by HyperCel STAR AX provided high IgG recovery (>80%) and purity (>99.5%), and efficient IgA and IgM removal. Concentrations of complement factors C3 and C4 were < 0.5 and < 0.4 mg/dL, respectively. The final IgG could be nanofiltered on Planova 20N under conditions removing more than 3 log HCV infectivity to baseline mock infection level, and concentrated to ca. 30 g/L. Proteolytic activity and thrombin generation were low in the final fraction. The Pak12 and MAIPA assays showed good recovery of anti-HPA-1a throughout the process. Clinical-grade HPA-1a IgG can be prepared using a process compliant with current quality requirements

  4. [Mild hemophilia A fortuitously discovered during Henoch-Schönlein purpura].

    PubMed

    Joly, B; d'Oiron, R; Desconclois, C; Bendelac, L; Rafowicz, A; Meyzer, C; Labrune, P; Veyradier, A

    2015-11-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is a common form of immunological vasculitis in children. Hemophilia A is a genetic disorder, inherited in a X-linked recessive pattern, and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage or prolonged bleeding due to factor VIII deficiency. The clinical signs depend on the severity of factor VIII deficiency. We herein report the case of a 4-year-old boy admitted to the emergency room for typical rheumatoid purpura, associated with a lengthening of aPTT, whose exploration had uncovered mild hemophilia A. Laboratory assays should explore lengthening of aPTT: firstly the presence of lupus anticoagulant without bleeding risk, in an inflammatory context; secondly a deficiency of VWF and one of the factors involved in the extrinsic coagulation pathway associated with bleeding risk. PMID:26412326

  5. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura

    PubMed Central

    Sivrioglu, Ali Kemal; Incedayi, Mehmet; Mutlu, Hakan; Meral, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis that affects the gastrointestinal and central nervous systems and the kidneys. The disease primarily affects children, but may occur in elderly children with allergic purpura and also in adults. Central nervous system involvement may be the first sign; however, it is rarely encountered. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical syndrome of encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbance and seizures. Its radiological signs can be observed in grey and white matter at the posterior region of the cerebral hemispheres. HSP should be considered in children with PRES in the presence of rash, joint and gastrointestinal symptoms. We reported a 5-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure and PRES by reason of HSP. PMID:23946524

  6. Petechiae and purpura: the ominous and the not-so-obvious?

    PubMed

    Block, Stan L

    2014-08-01

    Petechiae and purpura are among the most alarming findings a pediatrician will commonly observe in the office. Severity of illness can range from a temper tantrum, to common viral infections, to the most deadly infections and diseases. To avoid many of the pitfalls in diagnosis, practitioners will need to be thorough in history taking, assessing fever and immunization status, and physical examination. In addition, a few simple laboratory tests will usually be needed and possibly a manual differential. PMID:25102482

  7. Mycoplasma pneumoniae as a trigger for Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children.

    PubMed

    Kuźma-Mroczkowska, Elżbieta; Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Szymanik-Grzelak, Hanna; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of respiratory tract infections in children. Extrapulmonary manifestations are seen in up to 25% of infected patients. Extrapulmonary complications are associated with the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, skin changes, myocarditis, pericarditis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. The majority of extrapulmonary symptoms are associated with skin changes such as exanthematous skin eruptions, erythema nodosum, urticaria, Stevens-Jonson syndrome. M. pneumoniae stimulates production of the interleukins and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and can cause vasculitis. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a leucoclastic vasculitis that affects small vessels. Clinical manifestations of HSP include typical rash, arthritis, gastrointestinal and sometimes renal involvement. The main feature in HSP is abnormal IgA deposits in vessel walls. Circulating abnormal glycosylated IgA 1 and IgG antibodies form immune complexes: IgA1-IgG and anti-IgA 1. Immune complexes activate cytokines, parts of complement and influence directly the endothelium. We report cases of three children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with prolonged and recurrent skin and joint changes. The serological analysis (positive serum IgM) confirmed Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Treatment with clarithromycin caused complete regression of disease. We suggest that in the case of prolonged symptoms of vasculitis due to Henoch-Schönlein purpura, Mycoplasma pneumonia infection may be a potential cause of exacerbation of the disease. PMID:26862316

  8. Mycoplasma pneumoniae as a trigger for Henoch-Schönlein purpura in children

    PubMed Central

    Pańczyk-Tomaszewska, Małgorzata; Szmigielska, Agnieszka; Szymanik-Grzelak, Hanna; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of respiratory tract infections in children. Extrapulmonary manifestations are seen in up to 25% of infected patients. Extrapulmonary complications are associated with the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, skin changes, myocarditis, pericarditis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and thrombosis. The majority of extrapulmonary symptoms are associated with skin changes such as exanthematous skin eruptions, erythema nodosum, urticaria, Stevens-Jonson syndrome. M. pneumoniae stimulates production of the interleukins and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and can cause vasculitis. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a leucoclastic vasculitis that affects small vessels. Clinical manifestations of HSP include typical rash, arthritis, gastrointestinal and sometimes renal involvement. The main feature in HSP is abnormal IgA deposits in vessel walls. Circulating abnormal glycosylated IgA 1 and IgG antibodies form immune complexes: IgA1-IgG and anti-IgA 1. Immune complexes activate cytokines, parts of complement and influence directly the endothelium. We report cases of three children with Henoch-Schönlein purpura with prolonged and recurrent skin and joint changes. The serological analysis (positive serum IgM) confirmed Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Treatment with clarithromycin caused complete regression of disease. We suggest that in the case of prolonged symptoms of vasculitis due to Henoch-Schönlein purpura, Mycoplasma pneumonia infection may be a potential cause of exacerbation of the disease. PMID:26862316

  9. Regulatory T cells sequentially migrate from the site of tissue inflammation to the draining LN to suppress the alloimmune response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nan; Schröppel, Bernd; Lal, Girdhari; Jakubzick, Claudia; Mao, Xia; Chen, Dan; Yin, Na; Jessberger, Rolf; Ochando, Jordi C.; Ding, Yaozhong; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2009-01-01

    To determine site and mechanism of suppression, regulatory T cell (Treg) migration and function were investigated in an islet allograft model. Treg first migrated from blood to the inflammed allografts, this depended on CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, and P- and E-selectin ligands, and was essential for suppression of alloimmunity. In the allograft, Treg were activated, upregulated effector molecules, migrated to the draining lymph nodes (dLN) in a CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 fashion, and this movement was essential for optimal suppression. Treg inhibited dendritic cell migration in a TGFβ and IL-10 dependent fashion; and suppressed antigen specific T effector cell migration, accumulation, and proliferation in dLNs and allografts. These results showed that sequential migration from blood to the target tissue and then to dLNs were required for nTreg to differentiate and execute fully their suppressive function, by inhibiting DC in the peripheral tissue, and T effector cell responses in dLN and allografts. PMID:19303390

  10. [Autoimmune-alloimmune neonatal neutropenia. Serum reactive IgG and neutrophil-specific phenotype detected by flow cytometry].

    PubMed

    Riera, Norma E; Kantor, Gustavo L; Khoury, Marina; Nucci, Rodrigo Parias; Rapetti, Maria Cristina; Aixala, Monica; Goldsztein, Sofia; Flores, Gabriela; de Bracco, Maria M de E

    2006-01-01

    Auto or alloantibodies reactive with neutrophils define immune neutropenia. Alloimmune neonatal neutropenia is caused by maternal sensitization to paternal neutrophil antigens, resulting in IgG antibodies that are transferred to the fetus through the placenta. We present the studies in 4 children from 3 families with neutropenia of unknown origin (two of them were brothers). They were evaluated by flow cytometry in parallel with leukoagglutination. Reference values were established for serum reactive IgG in healthy volunteers for three dilutions (1/2, 1/5 and 1/20), both for the autologous reaction (serum and cells of the same individual) and for the heterologous reaction (serum and cells of different individuals). Results were expressed by an index defined by the quotient of the mean fluorescence intensity of the patient's serum divided by that of the reference serum. Serum reactive/agglutinant factors and circulating immune complexes were evaluated in patients and parents serum. Neutrophil specific phenotypes were determined for HNA-1a, HNA-1b and HNA-2a. Reactive IgG/agglutinant factors were found in 4 children. Two maternal sera were reactive against paternal and/or children neutrophils. Circulating immune complexes were detected in 2/4 children sera and were negative in 3/3 maternal sera. Maternal/children incompatibility was detected in the four cases. The three mothers had the same phenotype: homozygous NA1/NA1, NB1+. PMID:17137169

  11. Glycosylation pattern of anti-platelet IgG is stable during pregnancy and predicts clinical outcome in alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Sonneveld, Myrthe E; Natunen, Suvi; Sainio, Susanna; Koeleman, Carolien A M; Holst, Stephanie; Dekkers, Gillian; Koelewijn, Joke; Partanen, Jukka; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Wuhrer, Manfred; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2016-07-01

    Fetal or neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is a potentially life-threatening disease where fetal platelets are destroyed by maternal anti-platelet IgG alloantibodies. The clinical outcome varies from asymptomatic, to petechiae or intracranial haemorrhage, but no marker has shown reliable correlation with severity, making screening for FNAIT impractical and highly inefficient. We recently found IgG Fc-glycosylation towards platelet and red blood cell antigens to be skewed towards decreased fucosylation, increased galactosylation and sialylation. The lowered core-fucosylation increases the affinity of the pathogenic antibodies to FcγRIIIa and FcγRIIIb, and hence platelet destruction. Here we analysed the N-linked glycans of human platelet antigen (HPA)-1a specific IgG1 with mass spectrometry in large series of FNAIT cases (n = 166) including longitudinal samples (n = 26). Besides a significant decrease in Fc-fucosylation after the first pregnancy (P = 0·0124), Fc-glycosylation levels remained stable during and after pregnancy and in subsequent pregnancies. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified anti-HPA-1a -fucosylation (P = 0·006) combined with galactosylation (P = 0·021) and antibody level (P = 0·038) correlated with bleeding severity, making these parameters a feasible marker in screening for severe cases of FNAIT. PMID:27017954

  12. Immune-mediated thrombocytopenias: basic and immunological aspects.

    PubMed

    Porcelijn, L; von dem Borne, A E

    1998-06-01

    Acute idiopathic or autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) is a disorder found mainly in children, usually preceded by a viral infection, with a higher incidence in the autumn and winter. The platelet-specific autoantibodies in acute childhood AITP are more often of the IgM class. Chronic AITP occurs mostly in adults. The platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) detects platelet-specific autoantibodies with a sensitivity of 65-75%. The autoantibodies in chronic AITP are classified as IgG in 95%, IgM in 26% and IgA in 4% of cases. The antibodies are usually bound to platelets and are detectable as free circulating antibodies in about 40%. AITP in pregnancy may cause neonatal AITP by autoantibodies of the IgG class which pass the placenta barrier. The rare neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (NAITP) are caused by IgG alloantibodies against HPA-1a in 75-90%, HPA1b in 3-5%, HPA 3a in 4-5%, HPA5b in 6-19% and against private platelet antigens in 3%. To confirm the diagnosis of NAITP requires extensive serological testing of the child, and the parents have to be typed for the important platelet-specific antigens by PIFT, monoclonal antibody immobilisation of platelet antigens (MAIPA) and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques. Three mechanisms of drug-induced thrombocytopenias are described. Platelets of both the donor and the patient are destroyed in post-transfusion thrombocytopenic purpura (PTP) but PTP does not occur again if incompatible platelets are re-administered. PMID:10097811

  13. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  14. Anaphylactoid Purpura Manifested after Acute Gastroenteritis with Severe Dehydration in an 8-Year-Old Male Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2015-12-01

    Anaphylactoid purpura, also known as Henoch-Schönleinpurpura (HSP), is an IgA-mediated vasculitis that tends to be a benign disease of childhood. Up to 50% of cases are preceded by an upper tract respiratory infection caused by group-A beta-hemolytic streptococcus and present with the common tetrad of abdominal pain, arthritis, purpuric rash, and renal involvement. The majority of patients recover completely. Here we document a rare case of anaphylactoid purpura which manifested with skin lesions in the form of palpable purpura following about of acute gastroenteritis with severe dehydration; it was treated with a short regimen of steroid therapy, which resulted in the complete remission of the disease. We conclude that prompt diagnosis and multidisciplinary intervention will lead to appropriate management-consisting of the installation of early short-course steroid therapy and thus, prevent further complications and the recurrence of the disease. PMID:26602584

  15. Bruising and Bleeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... or purple dots (petechiae), red or purple patches (purpura), bruises (ecchymoses), or small blood vessels that are ... syndrome HIV infection Immune thrombocytopenia Leukemia Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Increased number of platelets (which often causes excessive ...

  16. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  17. How Is Immune Thrombocytopenia Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Thrombocytopenia Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... who have bleeding symptoms, other than merely bruising (purpura), usually are treated. Children who have mild ITP ...

  18. Spleen removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders of blood cells, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), hereditary spherocytosis , thalassemia, hemolytic anemia , and hereditary ... spherocytic anemia Hemolytic anemia Hodgkin lymphoma Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Patient Instructions Spleen removal - child - discharge Spleen ...

  19. [PREVFNAIT prevention of foetal/neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) in Polish foetuses and newborns--the PREVFNAIT program].

    PubMed

    Uhrynowska, Małgorzata Ewa; Dębska, Marzena; Guz, Katarzyna; Orzińska, Agnieszka; Wróbel, Agnieszka; Maślanka, Krystyna; Dębski, Romuald; Brojer, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The scientific goals related to the grant include 1) estimation of FNAIT prevalence in Poland and 2) search for biomarkers to predict the risk of the antibody production and severity of fetal thrombocytopenia. Fetal/Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) is caused by destruction of fetal blood platelets due to maternal antibodies. This condition, which most commonly results from incompatibility between the mother and the fetus for the Human Platelet Antigen-1a (HPA-1a), may lead to intracranial hemorrhage, damage of the central nervous system (CNS) and even death of the fetus or the newborn. It can be the cause of strokes in term newborns. FNAIT is usually attributed to the presence of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. Its incidence rate is estimated at approximately 1/1000-2000 live births. In the absence of a screening program, it is usually diagnosed after birth of a child with symptoms of thrombocytopenia or CNS hemorrhage. Monitoring of antibody production and thrombocytopenia treatment to effectively minimize the risk of stroke are therefore launched only at the next pregnancy. Testing indications are broader to include fetal ultrasound for symptoms of stroke to the CNS, ventricular enlargement or hydrocephalus, and obstetric failure. Diagnostic process is also recommended prior to the planned cordocentesis, in vitro fertilization and in sisters of mothers with children with FNAIT history. HPA-1a testing remains the best method for diagnosing pregnancies at risk. The detection frequency for FNAIT in Poland remains low. Therefore, the Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine (IHTM) will have performed such HPA-1a antigen testing in 30 000 Polish women within the framework of the PREVFNAIT program by March 2016. HPA-1a negative women (2% of the population) are a risk group for production of anti- HPA-1a antibodies responsible for FNAIT therefore all of them will be monitored for the presence and activity of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. Such testing will be

  20. Purpura Fulminans Associated with Hemiparesis Following Measles Infection in a Nigerian Girl: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Aliyu

    2013-01-01

    Purpura fulminans is a life-threatening hematologic emergency characterized by extensive skin necrosis with hemorrhagic infarction, hypotension and gangrene which may arise from severe sepsis; mostly gram negative sepsis though also associated with some gram positive organisms, similarly viral infections like varicella and measles have been implicated; it may also arise from congenital deficiency of the anticoagulants protein C, S, and antithrombin III; and it may also be idiopathic. Its clinical manifestation may be quite extensive resulting in multiorgan failure. Treatment will require aggressive management with use of fresh frozen plasma, heparin, antibiotics, and surgical debridement of necrotic tissue. PMID:26664850

  1. Koebner's Phenomenon in Childhood Henoch-Schönlein Purpura: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shreya; Chandrasekaran, Venkatesh; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Mekala, Suresh; Mahadevan, Subramanian

    2016-07-01

    Koebner's phenomenon occurs rarely in connection with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP). We report two children with HSP who developed Koebner's phenomenon on the second day after the onset of rash. The first was an 11-year-old girl with rheumatic heart disease who presented with abdominal pain for 1 month and subsequently developed rash and nephritis. The second patient was a 7-year-old girl who presented with rash and polyarthritis. To the best of our knowledge, Koebner's phenomenon in childhood HSP has not been reported. PMID:27282588

  2. Effects of Increased Von Willebrand Factor Levels on Primary Hemostasis in Thrombocytopenic Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Wannhoff, Andreas; Müller, Oliver J.; Friedrich, Kilian; Rupp, Christian; Klöters-Plachky, Petra; Leopold, Yvonne; Brune, Maik; Senner, Mirja; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schemmer, Peter; Katus, Hugo A.; Gotthardt, Daniel N.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with liver cirrhosis procoagulant and anticoagulant changes occur simultaneously. During primary hemostasis, platelets adhere to subendothelial structures, via von Willebrand factor (vWF). We aimed to investigate the influence of vWF on primary hemostasis in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore we assessed in-vitro bleeding time as marker of primary hemostasis in cirrhotic patients, measuring the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) closure times with collagen and epinephrine (Col-Epi, upper limit of normal ≤165 s) or collagen and ADP (Col-ADP, upper limit of normal ≤118 s). If Col-Epi and Col-ADP were prolonged, the PFA-100 was considered to be pathological. Effects of vWF on primary hemostasis in thrombocytopenic patients were analyzed and plasma vWF levels were modified by adding recombinant vWF or anti-vWF antibody. Of the 72 included cirrhotic patients, 32 (44.4%) showed a pathological result for the PFA-100. They had mean closure times (± SD) of 180±62 s with Col-Epi and 160±70 s with Col-ADP. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematocrit (P = 0.027) and vWF-antigen levels (P = 0.010) are the predictors of a pathological PFA-100 test in cirrhotic patients. In 21.4% of cirrhotic patients with platelet count ≥150/nL and hematocrit ≥27.0%, pathological PFA-100 results were found. In thrombocytopenic (<150/nL) patients with cirrhosis, normal PFA-100 results were associated with higher vWF-antigen levels (462.3±235.9% vs. 338.7±151.6%, P = 0.021). These results were confirmed by multivariate analysis in these patients as well as by adding recombinant vWF or polyclonal anti-vWF antibody that significantly shortened or prolonged closure times, respectively. In conclusion, primary hemostasis is impaired in cirrhotic patients. The effect of reduced platelet count in cirrhotic patients can at least be partly compensated by increased vWF levels. Recombinant vWF could be an alternative to platelet transfusions in the future. PMID

  3. Effects of increased von Willebrand factor levels on primary hemostasis in thrombocytopenic patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Wannhoff, Andreas; Müller, Oliver J; Friedrich, Kilian; Rupp, Christian; Klöters-Plachky, Petra; Leopold, Yvonne; Brune, Maik; Senner, Mirja; Weiss, Karl-Heinz; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schemmer, Peter; Katus, Hugo A; Gotthardt, Daniel N

    2014-01-01

    In patients with liver cirrhosis procoagulant and anticoagulant changes occur simultaneously. During primary hemostasis, platelets adhere to subendothelial structures, via von Willebrand factor (vWF). We aimed to investigate the influence of vWF on primary hemostasis in patients with liver cirrhosis. Therefore we assessed in-vitro bleeding time as marker of primary hemostasis in cirrhotic patients, measuring the Platelet Function Analyzer (PFA-100) closure times with collagen and epinephrine (Col-Epi, upper limit of normal ≤ 165 s) or collagen and ADP (Col-ADP, upper limit of normal ≤ 118 s). If Col-Epi and Col-ADP were prolonged, the PFA-100 was considered to be pathological. Effects of vWF on primary hemostasis in thrombocytopenic patients were analyzed and plasma vWF levels were modified by adding recombinant vWF or anti-vWF antibody. Of the 72 included cirrhotic patients, 32 (44.4%) showed a pathological result for the PFA-100. They had mean closure times (± SD) of 180 ± 62 s with Col-Epi and 160 ± 70 s with Col-ADP. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematocrit (P = 0.027) and vWF-antigen levels (P = 0.010) are the predictors of a pathological PFA-100 test in cirrhotic patients. In 21.4% of cirrhotic patients with platelet count ≥ 150/nL and hematocrit ≥ 27.0%, pathological PFA-100 results were found. In thrombocytopenic (< 150/nL) patients with cirrhosis, normal PFA-100 results were associated with higher vWF-antigen levels (462.3 ± 235.9% vs. 338.7 ± 151.6%, P = 0.021). These results were confirmed by multivariate analysis in these patients as well as by adding recombinant vWF or polyclonal anti-vWF antibody that significantly shortened or prolonged closure times, respectively. In conclusion, primary hemostasis is impaired in cirrhotic patients. The effect of reduced platelet count in cirrhotic patients can at least be partly compensated by increased vWF levels. Recombinant vWF could be an alternative to platelet transfusions in the future

  4. The Development of Severe Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia due to Anti-HPA-1a Antibodies Is Correlated to Maternal ABO Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Mette Kjær; Kjeldsen-Kragh, Jens; Olsson, Martin L.; Skogen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Background. Maternal alloantibodies against HPA-1a can cross placenta, opsonize foetal platelets, and induce neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). In a study of 100, 448 pregnant women in Norway during 1995–2004, 10.6% of HPA-1a negative women had detectable anti-HPA-1a antibodies. Design and Methods. A possible correlation between the maternal ABO blood group phenotype, or underlying genotype, and severe thrombocytopenia in the newborn was investigated. Results. We observed that immunized women with blood group O had a lower risk of having a child with severe NAIT than women with group A; 20% with blood group O gave birth to children with severe NAIT, compared to 47% among the blood group A mothers (relative risk 0.43; 95% CI 0.25–0.75). Conclusion. The risk of severe neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia due to anti-HPA-1a antibodies is correlated to maternal ABO types, and this study indicates that the observation is due to genetic properties on the maternal side. PMID:22110529

  5. Brazilian purpuric fever: epidemic purpura fulminans associated with antecedent purulent conjunctivitis. Brazilian Purpuric Fever Study Group.

    PubMed

    1987-10-01

    In late 1984, 10 children in a small, rural town in Brazil had high fever associated with vomiting and abdominal pain. Within 12-48 h of the onset of fever, purpura developed associated with vascular collapse and peripheral necrosis. All 10 children died. Cerebrospinal fluid examinations did not suggest meningitis and, when done, tests were negative for Neisseria meningitidis. Other culture, serological, and necropsy examinations did not reveal a cause. Case-finding uncovered another cluster of similar illness in children in a second town and sporadic cases in five other cities. Two case-control studies demonstrated that children who became ill were significantly more likely than control children to have had conjunctivitis during the month before illness. This conjunctivitis was purulent, preceded the onset of more severe disease by 3-15 days, and had resolved before fever began. Although no conjunctival cultures were obtained from case-children, Haemophilus aegyptius was the most common pathogen isolated from other conjunctival cultures during the epidemic. This organism was also isolated from a non-aseptic skin scraping from 1 case child. A 25-megadalton plasmid distinguished the H aegyptius isolates epidemiologically associated with illness from other Brazilian conjunctival isolates. Brazilian purpuric fever is a newly recognized syndrome of epidemic purpura fulminans associated with antecedent purulent conjunctivitis, possibly caused by H aegyptius. PMID:2888985

  6. Henoch-Schönlein without Purpura: A Case Report and Review Literature.

    PubMed

    Jarasvaraparn, Chaowapong; Lertudomphonwanit, Chatmanee; Pirojsakul, Kwanchai; Worawichawong, Suchin; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Treepongkaruna, Suporn

    2016-04-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a multi-organ vasculitis involving skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract, and kidneys. The present study reported a 5-year-old boy presenting with intense abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and protein-losing enteropathy. Investigations for infectious enteritis were negative. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed swelling and erythematous mucosa with hemorrhagic spots at duodenal bulb to the third part of duodenum. Histopathology of endoscopic biopsies revealed non-specific duodenitis. HSP was suspected, based on duodenitis and the presence of inflammatory markers without identifiable causes. Corticosteroid was started resulting in marked improvement of his clinical symptoms. Two weeks later, he developed nephrotic-range proteinuria, thus kidney biopsy was performed. Renal histology was consistent with IgA nephropathy, supporting the diagnosis of HSP This report emphasizes that patients with HSP may not always show visible purpura, and the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. GI endoscopy and renal biopsy may be helpful for the diagnosis in selected patients presenting with atypical presentations. PMID:27396230

  7. [Varicella-associated purpura fulminans and deep vein thrombosis: a pediatric case report].

    PubMed

    Baur, A; Pouyau, R; Meunier, S; Nougier, C; Teyssedre, S; Javouhey, E; Floret, D; Gillet, Y

    2011-07-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) and deep vein thrombosis are rare complications secondary to chicken pox disease. The presence of antibodies reflects an ongoing immunological process and requires specialized management. The present study reports a 4-year-old boy with no medical history who presented with purpura on the legs 10 days after chicken pox eruption. Laboratory tests showed a disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with low plasma protein C and S activities, and the presence of anti-protein S antibodies. A replacement therapy with protein C infusions and fresh frozen plasma was prescribed. The patient also underwent regular sessions of hyperbaric oxygen followed by the surgery. Fourteen days after the beginning of the purpuric lesions, he presented deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs and was treated with unfractionated heparin. This case report illustrates the pathophysiology of DVT occurring in a patient with chicken pox disease (i.e., acquired protein C and S deficiencies and anti-protein S autoantibodies) and emphasizes the utility of thrombophilia testing in order to better adapt treatment. PMID:21616651

  8. Immunoglobulin A multiple myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with reduced sialylation of IgA1.

    PubMed

    Van Der Helm-Van Mil, Annette H M; Smith, Alice C; Pouria, Shideh; Tarelli, Edward; Brunskill, Nigel J; Eikenboom, Heroen C J

    2003-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is characterized by immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) depositions in blood vessels of the skin or in glomeruli, resulting from altered hinge region O-glycosylation. Henoch-Schönlein purpura is seldom reported as a complication of IgA1 myeloma, even when the circulating IgA concentration is very high. We report two patients with IgA1 myeloma presenting with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. The O-glycosylation of these patients' IgA1 was studied. Both patients showed increased binding to peanut agglutinin lectin, suggesting a low degree of sialylation of the hinge region of IgA1 that was confirmed by mass spectrometry. IgA multiple myeloma, secreting IgA1 molecules with decreased sialylation, presenting with a Henoch-Schönlein purpura-like syndrome was diagnosed. PMID:12956761

  9. An Elevated Fetal IL-6 Concentration Can Be Observed In Fetuses with Anemia Due To Rh Alloimmunization: Implications for the Understanding of the Fetal Inflammatory Response Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbuch, Edi; Romero, Roberto; Gomez, Ricardo; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hassan, Sonia S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) has been described in the context of preterm labor and preterm PROM and is often associated with intra-amniotic infection/inflammation. This syndrome is characterized by systemic fetal inflammation and operationally-defined by an elevated fetal plasma interleukin (IL)-6. The objective of this study was to determine if FIRS can be found in fetuses with activation of their immune system, such as the one observed in Rh alloimmune-mediated fetal anemia. Methods Fetal blood sampling was performed in sensitized Rh-D negative women with suspected fetal anemia (n=16). Fetal anemia was diagnosed according to reference range nomograms established for the assessment of fetal hematologic parameters. An elevated fetal plasma IL-6 concentration was defined using a cutoff of >11 pg/mL. Concentrations of IL-6 were determined by immunoassay. Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. Results 1) The prevalence of an elevated fetal plasma IL-6 was 25% (4/16); 2) there was an inverse relationship between the fetal hematocrit and IL-6 concentration - the lower the hematocrit, the higher the fetal IL-6 (r= −0.68, p=0.004); 3) fetuses with anemia had a significantly higher plasma IL-6 concentration than those without anemia (3.74 pg/ml, interquartile range (IQR) 1.18–2.63 vs. 1.46 pg/ml, IQR 1.76–14.7; p=0.02); 4) interestingly, all fetuses with an elevated plasma IL-6 concentration had anemia (prevalence 40%, 4/10), while in the group without anemia, none had an elevated fetal plasma IL-6. Conclusions An elevation in fetal plasma IL-6 can be observed in a subset of fetuses with anemia due to Rh alloimmunization. This observation suggests that the hallmark of FIRS can be caused by non-infection-related insults. Further studies are required to determine whether the prognosis of FIRS caused by intra-amniotic infection/inflammation is different from that induced by alloimmunization. PMID:20701435

  10. Anti-KEL7 (anti-Js(b)) alloimmunization diagnostic supported by molecular KEL*6,7 typing in a pregnant woman with previous intrauterine deaths.

    PubMed

    Boturão-Neto, Edmir; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Oliveira Barros, Melca Maria; Barretto de Mello, Adriana; Fabron, Antonio; Orlando Bordin, José

    2006-12-01

    Anti-KEL7 (anti-Js(b)) is a rare antibody that has been related to haemolytic transfusion reactions and HDN. We report a case of anti-KEL7 alloimmunization detected in a pregnant woman who had an obstetric previous history of four miscarriages and one stillborn. Employing classical immunohematological techniques, we studied the propositus and her available relatives. Due to the unavailability of commercial anti-KEL6 and anti-KEL7 reagents, we used a KEL*6,7 genotyping method as an alternative tool to contribute with the identification of the alloantibody origin. The results of KEL genotyping showed that the propositus was KEL*6/6 homozygous, while her second partner was KEL*7/7 homozygous. PMID:17097348

  11. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in patient with autoimmune hepatitis and purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Rathor, Neha; Khillan, Vikas; Sarin, S K

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiosis is usually an asymptomatic chronic nematodal disease. The term hyperinfection is used to denote autoinfection, a phenomenon in which the number of worms increases enormously. Development or exacerbation of gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms is seen, (A) and the detection of increased numbers of larvae in stool and or sputum is the hallmark. It is known to occur with a change in immune status of the host; this can occur due to immunosuppressants. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is also known to suppress host immunity. Due to the nonspecific presentation, the diagnosis is frequently missed, and the outcome remains poor with 15-87% mortality despite therapy. We report here a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection following immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune hepatitis and concomitant CMV infection with purpura fulminance and frank sepsis, with fatal outcome. PMID:26955218

  12. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in patient with autoimmune hepatitis and purpura fulminans

    PubMed Central

    Rathor, Neha; Khillan, Vikas; Sarin, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Strongyloidiosis is usually an asymptomatic chronic nematodal disease. The term hyperinfection is used to denote autoinfection, a phenomenon in which the number of worms increases enormously. Development or exacerbation of gastrointestinal and pulmonary symptoms is seen, (A) and the detection of increased numbers of larvae in stool and or sputum is the hallmark. It is known to occur with a change in immune status of the host; this can occur due to immunosuppressants. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is also known to suppress host immunity. Due to the nonspecific presentation, the diagnosis is frequently missed, and the outcome remains poor with 15–87% mortality despite therapy. We report here a case of Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection following immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune hepatitis and concomitant CMV infection with purpura fulminance and frank sepsis, with fatal outcome. PMID:26955218

  13. Disseminate intradermal bacterial colonization presenting as palpable purpura in lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shelley, W B; Zolin, W D

    1983-05-01

    A patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suddenly developed a disseminated monomorphic eruption of purpuric papules. The papules were initially thought to be lesions of vasculitis, leukemia cutis, or septic emboli. Histologic study, however, revealed large focal colonies of gram-positive cocci within the dermis. It is postulated that a bacteremia of antibiotic-resistant cocci led to dissemination of these organisms into a virtually defenseless skin. The patient's pancytopenia and consequent immune paralysis are viewed as accounting for this focal bacterial colonization and for the remarkable absence of clinical and histologic inflammatory response. Such hematogenous noninflammatory bacterial colonization of the skin must be added to the differential diagnosis of palpable purpura. PMID:6575017

  14. Thrombocytosis following splenectomy and aortic valve replacement for idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura with bicuspid aortic valve

    PubMed Central

    Katiyar, Sarika; Ganjsinghani, Payal Kamlesh; Jain, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopaenic purpura (ITP) patients are at high risk for complications during and after cardiac surgeries involving cardiopulmonary bypass. The main clinical problem of primary ITP is an increased risk of bleeding although bleeding may not always be present. More recently, thrombosis has become appreciated as another potential complication of the procedure. We report a 22-year-old female patient with ITP with bicuspid aortic valve and splenomegaly, who underwent uncomplicated aortic valve replacement and splenectomy simultaneously. She was readmitted with chest pain due to coronary thrombosis following splenectomy which made the management difficult. We describe our experience in managing this patient who presented with thrombotic complication rather than bleeding in post-operative period and the challenges met in maintaining appropriate anticoagulation for aortic valve replacement as well as thrombosis, post-splenectomy PMID:26379295

  15. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  16. Bilateral cystoid macular oedema and cotton wool spots associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Luke; Mathews, Divya

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of a male patient having bilateral cystoid macular oedema and cotton wool spots associated with Henoch-Schonlein purpura. He presented with decreased vision bilaterally measuring 0.2 (6/9.5) on the right and 0.5 (6/19) on the left. He has chronic hypertension with blood pressure averaging 150/90. His blood pressure was raised at 180/110 and with treatment reduced to 164/99. There were no other signs of malignant hypertensive retinopathy. He was treated with oral prednisolone and noticed a significant improvement the following day. An objective measurement performed 2 days later was -0.10 (6/4.8) bilaterally with resolution of macular oedema. PMID:23933864

  17. Association of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura in a patient with pernicious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Podder, Sidhertha; Cervates, Jose; Dey, Bimalangshu R

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anaemia is an autoimmune disease caused by intrinsic factor antibody; it leads to vitamin B12 deficiency and is marked by ineffective erythropoiesis. Haematological features reveal macrocytosis, hyperchromasia and hypersegmented neutrophils. Schistocytes are typically seen in microangiopathy, such as in thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura (TTP)/haemolytic uraemic syndrome or disseminated intravascular haemolysis (DIC). We report a case of a patient with severe anaemia who presented to the emergency room. Peripheral smear revealed macrocytosis, hypersegmented neutrophils and marked schistocytosis. The patient also had high reticulocyte count with high serum lactate dehydrogenase, elevated D-dimer, low fibrinogen and low haptoglobin. Vitamin B12 level came back low and the presence of intrinsic factor antibody confirmed pernicious anaemia. ADAMTS13 level was noted to be mildly reduced, which raised the suspicion of the association of acquired TTP with pernicious anaemia. Acquired TTP is another autoimmune disorder and its association with pernicious anaemia needs further evaluation. PMID:26464409

  18. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Pangonis, Scott; Patamasucon, Pisespong; Fitzpatrick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF) are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date. PMID:27006958

  19. Purpura fulminans and severe sepsis due to Pasteurella multocida infection in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Konda, Monoj Kumar; Chang, Stephanie; Zaccheo, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old woman was admitted into the intensive care unit, with severe sepsis and renal failure. She developed purpura fulminans (PF) of bilateral upper and lower extremities along with gangrene on the tips of her fingers and toes. Blood cultures confirmed Pasteurella multocida as the causative organism. Despite aggressive supportive measures, the patient remained dependent on high doses of vasopressors and the gangrene progressed. She ultimately succumbed to her underlying severe sepsis. PF is a rare and fatal dermatological emergency commonly seen in children, but it also occurs in adults. Acute infectious PF occurs secondary to severe sepsis and P. multocida is a rare cause of PF. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of PF due to P. multocida in an adult. PMID:27298290

  20. Developing recombinant HPA-1a–specific antibodies with abrogated Fcγ receptor binding for the treatment of fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ghevaert, Cedric; Wilcox, David A.; Fang, Juan; Armour, Kathryn L.; Clark, Mike R.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Williamson, Lorna M.

    2008-01-01

    Fetomaternal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FMAIT) is caused by maternal generation of antibodies specific for paternal platelet antigens and can lead to fetal intracranial hemorrhage. A SNP in the gene encoding integrin β3 causes a clinically important maternal-paternal antigenic difference; Leu33 generates the human platelet antigen 1a (HPA-1a), whereas Pro33 generates HPA-1b. As a potential treatment to prevent fetal intracranial hemorrhage in HPA-1a alloimmunized pregnancies, we generated an antibody that blocks the binding of maternal HPA-1a–specific antibodies to fetal HPA-1a1b platelets by combining a high-affinity human HPA-1a–specific scFv (B2) with an IgG1 constant region modified to minimize Fcγ receptor–dependent platelet destruction (G1Δnab). B2G1Δnab saturated HPA-1a+ platelets and substantially inhibited binding of clinical HPA-1a–specific sera to HPA-1a+ platelets. The response of monocytes to B2G1Δnab-sensitized platelets was substantially less than their response to unmodified B2G1, as measured by chemiluminescence. In addition, B2G1Δnab inhibited chemiluminescence induced by B2G1 and HPA-1a–specific sera. In a chimeric mouse model, B2G1 and polyclonal Ig preparations from clinical HPA-1a–specific sera reduced circulating HPA-1a+ platelets, concomitant with transient thrombocytopenia. As the Δnab constant region is uninformative in mice, F(ab′)2 B2G1 was used as a proof of principle blocking antibody and prevented the in vivo platelet destruction seen with B2G1 and polyclonal HPA-1a–specific antibodies. These results provide rationale for human clinical studies. PMID:18654666

  1. Adjuvant treatments for Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zaffanello, Marco; Brugnara, Milena; Franchini, Massimo; Fanos, Vassilios

    2009-01-01

    Background: The management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (HSPN) in childhood is controversial. Adjuvant therapies such as immunoglobulin, anticoagulants, and vitamins have been used with conventional treatments despite a lack of evidence of their efficacy. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the scientific literature regarding adjuvant treatments administered with conventional drugs in the treatment of childhood HSPN. Methods: Published articles were identified from the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (1988–December 2008; key words: Henoch-Schönlein nephritis and Henoch-Schönlein purpura). The search was limited to published English-language studies on therapeutic options for HSPN in children. Results: A total of 12 studies were identified and included in this review; most (n = 8) were case series or retrospective studies. Studies of conventional therapy combined with adjuvant treatment should be interpreted with caution. In particular, factor XIII administration was reported to improve kidney symptoms in 1 study. Based on the results from 9 studies, no convincing evidence on intravenous immunoglobu-lin, urokinase, or anticoagulants was identified. No substantial information was available on the benefit of antiplatelet agents or heparin in treating HSPN. Integrating treatment with vitamin E was not recommended based on the results from 1 randomized controlled trial. Fish oil was reported to be effective in 1 case series. Conclusions: Studies concerning the treatment of HSPN in children with adjuvant therapies were retrospective and recommendations were drawn from level IV evidence. One randomized controlled trial on the use of tocopherol as adjuvant treatment was identified; however, no clinical utility was reported. At present, there is no strong evidence supporting benefits with the use of adjuvant treatments. PMID:24683235

  2. [Clinical research on effectiveness of 2 110 patients with Henoch Schonlein purpura from 19 comprehensive hospitals in real world].

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo-Yue; Zhuang, Yan; Wang, Yong-Yan

    2014-09-01

    Nineteen comprehensive hospital information system (HIS) data are collected. Cleaning up the database, then analysis the patients' information. Using the basic description method and association rules to analysis the data. Analysis the data come from HIS database, we found that in 2 110 patients, main five complications are Henoch Schonlein purpura nephritis, upper respiratory tract infections, renal insufficiency, virus infection and glomerulonephritis (chronic), treatment of chemical drugs with sugar cortical hormone and anti infection drugs, such as intravenous input cephalosporin drugs. Traditional Chinese medicine with blood-activating and stasis-resolving medicine, heat clearing and detoxifying medicine. Combination scheme with blood-activating and stasis-resolving medicine joint glucocorticoid, followed by blood-activating and stasis-resolving medicine combined antiallergic drugs, heat-clearing and detoxifying medicine combined antiallergic drugs. Promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis is an important part of traditional Chinese medicine treatment in patients with Henoch Schonlein purpura. PMID:25532391

  3. Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia presenting as reticulate purpura and bullae in a patient with hepatitis B virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, S; Chang, S E; Kim, K R; Choi, J H; Sung, K J; Moon, K C; Koh, J K

    2001-09-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia (WM) include purpura, ulcers, urticaria, leukocytoclastic vasculitis, and immunobullous dermatoses. No association has been reported previously of WM and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. A 40-year-old female HBV carrier was admitted to hospital because of generalized oedema, oliguria, haematuria, hypertension, fever and blood-tinged sputum. Cutaneous manifestations included generalized petechiae, palpable purpura mainly on the legs, multiple necrotic ulcerations and gangrenous changes on the toes, and necrotic, giant confluent reticulate purpura on the trunk surmounted by several tense bullae. Laboratory investigations revealed monoclonal gammopathy of IgM kappa type (6.7 g/L), membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis associated with HBV infection, Bence Jones proteinuria, and an increased number of abnormal plasmacytoid cells in the bone marrow. Pathologic examination demonstrated immune complex-mediated vasculitis with deposits of IgM in the walls of dermal vessels and secondary subepidermal bulla formation. HBV infection may have caused WM or modified the clinical course in this fatal case. PMID:11678879

  4. [Henoch-Schönlein purpura in a cocaine consumer man with HIV infection and ANCA-p positivity].

    PubMed

    De Paoli, María C; Moretti, Dino; Scolari Pasinato, Carlos M; Buncuga, Martín G

    2016-01-01

    The Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a small vessel vasculitis with IgA immune complex deposition. The presentation in adults is rare and severe. Reported cases of HSP in patients infected with HIV are scarce. Neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are commonly found in other systemic vasculitis, but rarely in HSP and even more unusual the perinuclear pattern. Beside small vessel vasculitis, positivity of ANCA can be detected in a number of different pathological conditions in association with infectious processes, including HIV, or cocaine use, and especially the pattern of ANCA-p, associated with drugs, inflammatory bowel or autoimmune diseases. We report the case of a 35 years old man with toxic habits (cocaine, marijuana) who consulted for abdominal pain, hematochezia and purpura on lower extremities, and later fever, joint pain and progression of purpura associated with nephritic syndrome and ANCA-p (+). During hospitalization HIV infection was detected. Renal biopsy showed IgA nephropathy with favorable response to corticosteroid and antiproteinuric treatment. The communication of the case is due to the rarity of the presentation and therapeutic diagnostic challenge. It remains to elucidate the role of ANCA in the pathogenesis and management of adult PSH. PMID:27576285

  5. A Lower Proportion of Regulatory B Cells in Patients with Henoch–Schoenlein Purpura Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhihui; Zhao, Songchen; Zhang, Li; Li, Man; Sun, Xiguang; Jiang, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Background Henoch—Schoenlein purpura is the one of most common types of systemic vasculitis that involves impaired renal function and Henoch-Schoenlein purpura nephritis (HSPN). The diagnosis of this condition is largely based on immunohistologic detection of immunoglobulin A1-containing immune complex in the glomerular deposits of mesangium. Despite clinical advances, the etiopathogenesis of HSPN is still largely unknown. Methods In this study, we enrolled 25 newly diagnosed HSPN patients and 14 healthy controls. Then, fractions of B cell subtypes were determined in venous blood using flow cytometry. The serum interleukin (IL)-10 concentration was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Compared to those in healthy controls, the numbers of CD38+CD19+, CD86+CD19+, CD38+CD86+CD19+, and CD95+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood were significantly higher in HSPN patients. In contrast, the numbers of CD5+CD19+, IL-10+CD19+, CD5+CD1d+CD19+, and IL-10+CD5+CD1d+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration were significantly lower in HSPN patients. Following treatment, the numbers of CD38+CD19+ and CD86+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood were significantly reduced in HSPN patients. However, the numbers of CD5+CD1d+CD19+, CD5+CD1d+IL-10+CD19+, and IL-10+CD19+ B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration were significantly increased in HSPN patients following treatment. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was negatively correlated with the number of CD38+CD19+ B cells but positively correlated with the numbers of IL-10+CD19+, CD1d+CD5+CD19+, and IL-10+CD1d+CD5+CD19+B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration. The 24-h urinary protein concentration was positively correlated with the number of CD38+CD19+B cells but negatively correlated with the numbers of IL-10+CD19+, CD1d+CD5+CD19+, and IL-10+CD1d+CD5+CD19+B cells per microliter of blood and the serum IL-10 concentration

  6. Lifetime cost of meningococcal disease in France: Scenarios of severe meningitis and septicemia with purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Stève; Wright, Claire; Voisine, Jimmy; Olivier, Catherine W; Gaudelus, Joël

    2016-01-01

    Invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is life-threatening and can result in severe sequelae. In France, no data have been published on the costs of severe IMD cases. Two realistic scenarios were developed with national experts (clinicians and social workers): a 6-year-old child with purpura fulminans with amputation of both legs below the knee (case A) and a 3-year-old with meningitis and severe neurological sequelae (case B). Additional scenarios included other typical sequelae of IMD such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), profound deafness and epilepsy. Data on healthcare, disability, educational and other resource use were obtained from experts and families of patients with similar sequelae. Unit costs (2013) were mainly obtained from the literature and the National Health Insurance (NHI). Time horizon was based on life expectancies of patients (77 and 55 years, respectively). A 4% discount rate decreasing to 2% after 30 years was applied. Costs are presented from the perspective of the NHI, publicly funded organizations and patients' families or their private health insurances. purpura fulminans with amputations is associated with a lifelong discounted cost of €768,875. Adding CKD doubles the amount (€1,480,545). Meningitis with severe neuro-cognitive sequelae results in a lifelong discounted cost of €1,924,475. Adding profound deafness and epilepsy slightly increases the total cost (€2,267,251). The first year is the most expensive in both scenarios (€166,890 and €160,647 respectively). The main cost drivers for each scenario are prostheses and child/adult stays in healthcare facilities, respectively. Overall, patients' families or his private insurance had to pay around 13% of total cost (101,833€ and 258,817€, respectively). This study fills a gap in the body of knowledge on IMD sequelae care and lifetime costs in France. The potentially high economic burden of IMD, in addition to its physical, psychological and social burden, reinforces the

  7. Current views of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and Henoch-Schonlein purpura in children

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Li-Jing; Mao, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the factors involved in the pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal diseases and may play a potential role in certain extra-intestinal diseases. H. pylori infection are mainly acquired during childhood, and it has been reported that in endemic areas of China the infection rates are extraordinarily higher in HSP children, particular those with abdominal manifestations. Furthermore, eradication therapy may ameliorate Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) manifestations and decrease the recurrence of HSP. Therefore, results suggested that detection of H. pylori infection by appropriate method ought to be applied in HSP children. Current evidences indicate that local injury of gastric mucosa and immunological events induced by H. pylori infection are involved in the development of HSP. Increased serum IgA, cryoglobulins, C3 levels, autoimmunity, proinflammatory substances and molecular mimicry inducing immune complex and cross-reactive antibodies caused by H. pylori infection might play their roles in the course of HSP. However, there are no investigations confirming the causality between H. pylori infection and HSP, and the pathogenesis mechanism is still unclear. More bench and clinical studies need to be executed to elaborate the complex association between H. pylori and HSP. PMID:26862506

  8. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Henoch-Schonlein Purpura and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fidan, Kibriya; Kandur, Yasar; Ucar, Murat; Gucuyener, Kivilcim; Soylemezoglu, Oguz

    2016-07-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological syndrome, composed of symptoms such as headache, seizures, visual disturbances, lethargy, confusion, stupor, focal neurologic findings and radiological findings of bilateral gray and white matter abnormalities suggestive of edema in the posterior regions of the cerebral hemispheres. PRES is associated with significant morbidity and mortality if it is not expeditiously recognized. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) represents the most sensitive imaging technique for recognizing PRES. PRES has been seen in various clinical settings including renal disorders such as acute glomerulonephritis, lupus nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and drug usage such as calcineurin inhibitors. We aimed to present two study cases for such clinical setting. In this report, we present two patients with PRES in whom the primary diagnosis was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). Both of them were treated with anticonvulsant and proper antihypertensive drugs. A repeated MRI scan of the head, an ophthalmologic assessment, and a follow-up electroencephalogram produced normal results with no sequelae. Early recognition of PRES as a complication during different diseases and therapies in childhood may facilitate the appropriate treatment, so that intensive treatment should be performed as soon as possible to avoid neurological sequelae. PMID:27298664

  9. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress and Erythrocyte Properties in Children with Henoch-Shoenlein Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Gurses, Dolunay; Parlaz, Nusret; Bor-Kucukatay, Melek; Kucukatay, Vural; Erken, Gulten

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective Pathogenesis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is not clearly defined. The present study was conducted to investigate the alterations in erythrocyte deformability and oxidative stress in HSP and to examine the possible relationship between erythrocyte deformability and organ involvement in this disease. Methods Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, total antioxidant status (TAS), erythrocyte deformability and aggregation were measured in 21 children with HSP at the disease onset and during the remission period in comparison with healthy subjects. Findings HSP patients at the active stage had significantly higher MDA and lower TAS levels (P<0.05). Erythrocyte deformability was decreased at the active-stage and increased again at the remission period of HSP (P<0.05). Erythrocyte deformability was significantly decreased at four different shear stresses in patients with gastrointestinal system or renal involvement; and decreased at six different shear stresses in patients with gastrointestinal system, and renal involvement compared to the patients without organ involvement (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed in aggregation parameters (P>0.05). Conclusion The present findings emphasize the association between impaired erythrocyte deformability and organ involvement in HSP. PMID:25535535

  10. Inherited protein C deficiency and coumarin-responsive chronic relapsing purpura fulminans in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Branson, H E; Katz, J; Marble, R; Griffin, J H

    1983-11-19

    A coumarin-responsive chronic relapsing purpura fulminans syndrome is described in a protein-C-deficient newborn infant. Episodes of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and cutaneous gangrene, which first appeared at age 11 h, were effectively controlled for 28 months with transfusions of fresh-frozen plasma. Cryoprecipitate and cryoprecipitate-poor plasma induced remissions as long as those induced by fresh-frozen plasma (less than or equal to 72 h). Coumarins sustained a cryoprecipitate-induced remission for 19 days: they were then electively discontinued and 17 h later the patient had an acute exacerbation of DIC with haemorrhaging. Family studies showed protein C levels of 31-40% in the subject's symptom-free mother and full and half brothers. DIC, the coumarin effect, and the inherited protein C abnormality appear to have contributed to the extremely low plasma levels (less than or equal to 6%) of protein C in the patient. This experience suggests that protein C deficiency may greatly compromise the ability of newborn infants to control consumptive disorders. PMID:6139528

  11. [A case of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteriosis during purpura associated with hypergammaglobulinemia and hepatitis type C].

    PubMed

    Ueno, Shiro; Miyauchi, Shunichi; Umekita, Kunihiko; Kusumoto, Norio; Takajo, Ichiro; Kuroki, Masayuki; Kai, Yasufumi; Nagatomo, Yasuhiro; Okayama, Akihiko

    2008-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman with hepatitis due to hepatitis C virus followed up using oral predonisolone (3 mg/day) for two years because of hypergammaglobulinemia-associated purpura reported fever and lumbago in February 2005. Upon admission in June, she was found in chest-computed tomography to have atelectasia in the right middle lung lobe and a nodule with a cavity in the right lower lobe. She tested positive for tuberculous glycolipid antibody. Gallium scintigraphy showed an abnormal accumulation in the lower lumbar vertebra. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal enhancement at L4, L5, and their intervertebral disc. Mycobacterium intracellulare (M. intracellulare) was detected in blood culture, bronchoalveolar lavage, and a biopsy specimen from the intervertebral disc, yielding a diagnosis of disseminated nontuberculous mycobacteriosis (NTM) due to M. intracellulare. She was treated with clarithromycin (CAM), ethambutol (EB), and rifampicin (RFP), but EB and RFP were discontinued due to of the fever they induced. She was then treated with a combination of CAM, levofloxacin, and streptomycin and followed up as an out patient. Based on case reports of disseminated NTM infection in Japan, the prognosis is poor and a protocol must be established for its treatment. PMID:19086421

  12. Severe Henoch-Schönlein purpura with infliximab for ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Shi, Yan-Hong; He, Chong; Liu, Chang-Qin; Wang, Jun-Shan; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Min; Wu, Rui-Jin; Feng, Xiao-Yue; Liu, Zhan-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Infliximab (IFX) is an anti-tumor necrosis factor chimeric antibody that is effective for treatment of autoimmune disorders such as Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis (UC). IFX is well tolerated with a low incidence of adverse effects such as infections, skin reactions, autoimmunity, and malignancy. Dermatological manifestations can appear as infusion reaction, vasculitis, cutaneous infections, psoriasis, eczema, and skin cancer. Here, we present an unusual case of extensive and sporadic subcutaneous ecchymosis in a 69-year-old woman with severe UC, partial colectomy and cecostomy, following her initial dose of IFX. The reaction occurred during infliximab infusion, and withdrawal of IFX led to gradual alleviation of her symptoms. We concluded that Henoch-Schönlein purpura, a kind of leukocytoclastic vasculitis, might have contributed to the development of the bruising. Although the precise mechanisms of the vasculitis are still controversial, such a case highlights the importance of subcutaneous adverse effects in the management of UC with IFX. PMID:26019477

  13. Self-organizing phenomena induced by LLLT in Henoch-Schoenlein purpura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ailioaie, Laura; Ailioaie, C.

    2001-06-01

    Henoch-Schoenlein purpura is characterized by vasculitis of small vessels, particularly those of the skin, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney. Patients have characteristic purpuric skin rash plus all or some of the following: migratory polyarthralgias or polyarthritis, colicky abdominal pain, nephritis. Because until now there is no satisfactory treatment, we applied low level laser therapy (LLLT) in order to compare it with the classical therapy. Twenty-three children (2-15 years of age) have been treated at debut of the disease. They were randomly divided: group A (11 children) received LLLT; group B (12 children) was administrated classical therapy. Two GaAlAs diode lasers (670 nm and 830 nm) were used. The density of energy (4-8 J/cm2), irradiating frequency (2.4 Hz) was applied one session daily, using scanning technique under a special treatment protocol on cutaneous purpuric areas (20 sessions). The best results were obtained in laser group. Despite the complex medication, some patients from group B fell back into the former state after apparent improvement, and two children developed nephritis. The results could be explained by self-organization. LLLT is acting as a trigger factor causing certain systemic effects through circulating blood and a response of the entire immune system, by way of synergetic mechanisms.

  14. Skin Necrosis and Purpura Fulminans in Children With and Without Thrombophilia--A Tertiary Center's Experience.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Strauss, Tzipora; Rubinstein, Marina; Ben Harush, Miriam; Revel-Vilk, Shoshana; Kapelushmik, Joseph; Paret, Gideon; Kenet, Gili

    2015-01-01

    Purpura fulminans (PF) is a very rare clinicopathologic skin disorder comprising dermal microvascular thrombosis associated with perivascular hemorrhage of multiple origins. It may occur as the presenting symptom of severe congenital deficiency of protein C (PC) or protein S (PS) during the newborn period, or later in life following oral anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists, or of sepsis that may be associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Treatment consists of anticoagulants and PC concentrates during acute episodes. We report our experience in the diagnosis and management of pediatric PF. The medical records of the 6 children aged 2-16 years (median: 5 years) who presented with PF to our tertiary care center between 1996 and 2013 were studied. The thrombophilia workup revealed either the presence of congenital homozygous PC deficiency, prothrombotic polymorphisms (factor V Leiden and FIIG20210A heterozygosity), acquired PC/PS deficiency, or no discernible thrombophilia. The skin necrosis resolved following conservative fresh-frozen plasma/anticoagulant therapy in 2 cases, whereas 3 children required interventional plastic surgery. The sixth case, a 10-year-old child with severe PC deficiency, heterozygous factor V Leiden, and FIIG20210A, received recombinant activated PC. PF in childhood is rare and has multiple etiologies. Understanding of the variable pathogenesis and risk factors will facilitate diagnosis and appropriate clinical management. PMID:26436558

  15. IgA myeloma presenting as Henoch-Schönlein purpura with nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zickerman, A M; Allen, A C; Talwar, V; Olczak, S A; Brownlee, A; Holland, M; Furness, P N; Brunskill, N J; Feehally, J

    2000-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) are both characterized by IgA-mediated tissue injury, including mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Abnormalities of IgA1 glycosylation are described in IgA nephropathy and HSP nephritis. IgA-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been inconsistently described in the serum of patients with HSP. In IgA myeloma, the paraprotein-mediated renal lesion is typically cast nephropathy; IgAN or HSP have only rarely been reported in myeloma even when an IgA paraprotein is circulating in large concentrations. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with IgA myeloma who presented with HSP including nephritis and rapidly progressive renal failure. His IgA1 had altered O-glycosylation in the pattern seen in IgAN and also contained an IgA-ANCA. This case adds further weight to the evidence that IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormalities predispose to mesangial IgA deposition and also that IgA-ANCA may have a pathogenic role in the development of HSP. PMID:10977812

  16. Hemolytic disease of the newborn associated with anti-Jra alloimmunization in a twin pregnancy: the first case report in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungsuk; Park, Min-Jeong; Sung, Tae-Jung; Choi, Ji Seon; Hyun, Jungwon; Park, Kyoung Un; Han, Kyou-Sup

    2010-10-01

    Jr(a) is a high-frequency antigen found in all ethnic groups. However, the clinical significance of the anti-Jr(a) antibody has remained controversial. Most studies have reported mild hemolytic disease of the newborn and fetus (HDNF) in Jr(a)-positive patients. Recently, fatal cases of HDNF have also been reported. We report the first case of HDNF caused by anti-Jr(a) alloimmunization in twins in Korea. A 33-yr-old nulliparous woman with no history of transfusion or amniocentesis was admitted at the 32nd week of gestation because of vaginal bleeding caused by placenta previa. Anti-Jr(a) antibodies were detected in a routine laboratory examination. An emergency cesarean section was performed at the 34th week of gestation, and 2 premature infant twins were delivered. Laboratory examination showed positive direct antiglobulin test and Jr(a+) phenotype in the red blood cells and the presence of anti-Jr(a) antibodies in the serum in both neonates. The infants underwent phototherapy for neonatal jaundice; this was followed by conservative management. They showed no further complications and were discharged on the 19th postpartum day. Preparative management to ensure the availability of Jr(a-) blood, via autologous donation, and close fetal monitoring must be performed even in cases of first pregnancy in Jr(a-) women. PMID:20890084

  17. Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with a neuroblastoma: Report of one case and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qiaoli; Cao, Shanshan; Zhang, Hongwen; Geng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Summary Malignancies such as solid tumors and hematologic malignancies can often induce or be associated with Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) in older males but not in children. Described here is the case of a 5-year-old boy who clinically presented with HSP. An imaging study of the abdomen revealed a right retroperitoneal neoplasm that histopathology postoperatively confirmed to be a neuroblastoma. Malignancies are sometimes associated with HSP mostly in older males, though children are affected, albeit rarely. Thus, all patients with HSP must be carefully examined to identify or exclude an underlying disease. PMID:25343092

  18. Acute penile pain and swelling in a 4-year-old child with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Tewary, Kishor Kumar; Khodaghalian, Bernadette; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common vasculitis found in children. It usually affects the small vessels of the skin, joints, gastrointestinal tract and, more rarely, kidneys, brain, lungs and genitalia. Apart from classical presentation with purpuric rashes around buttocks and lower extremities, features such as arthralgia, abdominal pain, haematuria and proteinuria as well as scrotal swelling have been described in the literature. Penile involvement is rare and is not commonly described. We describe a child with HSP who developed penile involvement. We review the literature of all the cases reported in detail, in order to highlight useful clinical presentation, management and prognosis of this rare manifestation. PMID:25858918

  19. Henoch-Schönlein purpura complicated by acalculous cholecystitis and intussusception, and following recurrence with appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güler, Ekrem; Çetinkaya, Ahmet; Karakaya, Ali Erdal; Göksügür, Yalçın; Katı, Ömer; Güler, Ahmet Gökhan; Davutoğlu, Mehmet

    2016-05-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is the most common childhood systemic vasculitis. Gastro-intestinal involvement occurs in two-thirds of patients. The characteristic skin lesions generally precede abdominal symptoms or present concurrently. A 7-year-old boy presented with intussusception and acalculous cholecystitis and had a cholecystectomy. Two weeks later he was re-admitted with features typical of HSP which responded to corticosteroids. Eleven months later he presented with abdominal pain and recurrence of HSP and, at laparotomy, there was acute appendicitis. This is the first case of a child presenting with HSP complicated by acalculous cholecystitis. PMID:27077617

  20. Cocaine/levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis with retiform purpura and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Veronese, F.V.; Dode, R.S.O.; Friderichs, M.; Thomé, G.G.; da Silva, D.R.; Schaefer, P.G.; Sebben, V.C.; Nicolella, A.R.; Barros, E.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    Levamisole has been increasingly used as an adulterant of cocaine in recent years, emerging as a public health challenge worldwide. Levamisole-associated toxicity manifests clinically as a systemic vasculitis, consisting of cutaneous, hematological, and renal lesions, among others. Purpura retiform, cutaneous necrosis, intravascular thrombosis, neutropenia, and less commonly crescentic nephritis have been described in association with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) and other autoantibodies. Here we report the case of a 49-year-old male who was a chronic cocaine user, and who presented spontaneous weight loss, arthralgia, and 3 weeks before admission purpuric skin lesions in the earlobes and in the anterior thighs. His laboratory tests on admission showed serum creatinine of 4.56 mg/dL, white blood count 3,800/μL, hemoglobin 7.3 g/dL, urinalysis with 51 white blood cells/μL and 960 red blood cells/μL, and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio 1.20. Serum ANCA testing was positive (>1:320), as well as serum anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-proteinase 3 antibodies. Urine toxicology screen was positive for cocaine and levamisole, with 62.8% of cocaine, 32.2% of levamisole, and 5% of an unidentified substance. Skin and renal biopsies were diagnostic for leukocytoclastic vasculitis and pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis, respectively. The patient showed a good clinical response to cocaine abstinence, and use of corticosteroids and intravenous cyclophosphamide. Last serum creatinine was 1.97 mg/dL, white blood cell count 7,420/μL, and hemoglobin level 10.8 g/dL. In levamisole-induced systemic vasculitis, the early institution of cocaine abstinence, concomitant with the use of immunosuppressive drugs in severe cases, may prevent permanent end organ damage and associate with better clinical outcomes. PMID:27119429

  1. Predictors of hospital length of stay in pediatric Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Neta; Mimouni, Francis B; Friedel, Nadav; Amarilyo, Gil

    2015-09-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a common, benign vasculitis in childhood which occasionally follows a protracted course and prolonged length of hospital stay. We aimed to determine clinical and laboratory characteristics that allow prediction of prolonged length of hospital stay (4 or more days) in HSP patients. We have retrospectively reviewed all HSP cases that were admitted to the Dana Duek Children's hospital between 2000 and 2013. Univariable analysis was performed to study the variables that were statistically related to length of hospital stay. These variables along with other clinically relevant variables were analyzed using stepwise backward multiple regression analysis. Variables that remained significant in the final analysis were correlated with length of stay, were each given specific weight (according to their contribution to the final R(2)) and were used to assemble an HSP presentation severity score. Out of 107 charts that were screened, 89 children were retrieved for analysis. In univariate analysis, variables that were associated with prolonged (>4 days) length of stay were: abdominal pain as initial sole presentation, C-reactive protein (CRP) 45 mg/dL (1 or 0 point) and patient's age > 6 years (0.5 or 0 points). A score of ≥3 in patients diagnosed with HSP predicted a prolonged length of stay with a positive predictive value of 93 %. The HSP presentation severity score index that we describe here may serve as a practical tool to assess severity of HSP which may eventually reflected as prolonged length of hospital stay. This score should be validated in the future in an ongoing prospective study. PMID:25804958

  2. Increased serum HMGB1 levels in patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Guo, Zai-Pei; Wang, Wen-Ju; Qin, Sha; Cao, Na; Li, Meng-Meng

    2014-06-01

    High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) has been implicated as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. However, information about HMGB1 in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is still unclear. Herein, we investigated the role of HMGB1 in patients with HSP and the pro-inflammatory effects of HMGB1 on human dermal microvascular endothelial cell line (HMEC-1). Serum HMGB1 levels in patients with HSP together with patients with allergic vasculitis (AV) and urticarial vasculitis (UV) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HMEC-1 cells were treated with HMGB1 at concentrations ranging from 4 ng/ml to 100 ng/ml. Serum HMGB1 levels were significantly increased in patients with HSP, AV and UV, when compared with those in control group. Moreover, abundant cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in endothelial cells in lesional skin of HSP patients. Using membrane cytokine antibody array, we indicate that HMGB1 markedly induced TNF-α and IL-6 release in cultured supernatant. Furthermore, by real-time quantitative PCR and ELISA, the effects of HMGB1 on these cytokines production in HMEC-1 cells were established. Finally, Western blot data revealed that HMGB1 can induce phosphorylation of inhibitor of κB-α (IκBα) and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 in HMEC-1 cells. In conclusion, this study provides first observations on the association of HMGB1 with HSP. We suggest that HMGB1 may be an important mediator of endothelial inflammation through the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 production and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HSP. PMID:24758390

  3. Henoch-Schönlein purpura from vasculitis to intestinal perforation: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Saisawat, Pawaree; Thanachatchairattana, Pornsri; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2016-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is generally a self-limited vasculitis disease and has a good prognosis. We report a 4-year-old Thai boy who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal colicky pain, seizure, and eventually developed intestinal ischemia and perforation despite adequate treatment, including corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, could not detect intestinal ischemia prior to perforation. In this patient, we also postulated that vasculitis-induced mucosal ischemia was a cause of the ulcer, leading to intestinal perforation, and high-dose corticosteroid could have been a contributing factor since the histopathology revealed depletion of lymphoid follicles. Intestinal perforation in HSP is rare, but life-threatening. Close monitoring and thorough clinical evaluation are essential to detect bowel ischemia before perforation, particularly in HSP patients who have hematochezia, persistent localized abdominal tenderness and guarding. In highly suspicious cases, exploratory laparotomy may be needed for the definite diagnosis and prevention of further complications. PMID:27468201

  4. Henoch-Schönlein purpura from vasculitis to intestinal perforation: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lerkvaleekul, Butsabong; Treepongkaruna, Suporn; Saisawat, Pawaree; Thanachatchairattana, Pornsri; Angkathunyakul, Napat; Ruangwattanapaisarn, Nichanan; Vilaiyuk, Soamarat

    2016-07-14

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is generally a self-limited vasculitis disease and has a good prognosis. We report a 4-year-old Thai boy who presented with palpable purpura, abdominal colicky pain, seizure, and eventually developed intestinal ischemia and perforation despite adequate treatment, including corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. Imaging modalities, including ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, could not detect intestinal ischemia prior to perforation. In this patient, we also postulated that vasculitis-induced mucosal ischemia was a cause of the ulcer, leading to intestinal perforation, and high-dose corticosteroid could have been a contributing factor since the histopathology revealed depletion of lymphoid follicles. Intestinal perforation in HSP is rare, but life-threatening. Close monitoring and thorough clinical evaluation are essential to detect bowel ischemia before perforation, particularly in HSP patients who have hematochezia, persistent localized abdominal tenderness and guarding. In highly suspicious cases, exploratory laparotomy may be needed for the definite diagnosis and prevention of further complications. PMID:27468201

  5. Fetal intracranial haemorrhages caused by fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: an observational cohort study of 43 cases from an international multicentre registry

    PubMed Central

    Tiller, Heidi; Kamphuis, Marije M; Flodmark, Olof; Papadogiannakis, Nikos; David, Anna L; Sainio, Susanna; Koskinen, Sinikka; Javela, Kaija; Wikman, Agneta Taune; Kekomaki, Riitta; Kanhai, Humphrey H H; Oepkes, Dick; Husebekk, Anne; Westgren, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterise pregnancies where the fetus or neonate was diagnosed with fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) and suffered from intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), with special focus on time of bleeding onset. Design Observational cohort study of all recorded cases of ICH caused by FNAIT from the international No IntraCranial Haemorrhage (NOICH) registry during the period 2001–2010. Setting 13 tertiary referral centres from nine countries across the world. Participants 37 mothers and 43 children of FNAIT pregnancies complicated by fetal or neonatal ICH identified from the NOICH registry was included if FNAIT diagnosis and ICH was confirmed. Primary and secondary outcome measures Gestational age at onset of ICH, type of ICH and clinical outcome of ICH were the primary outcome measures. General maternal and neonatal characteristics of pregnancies complicated by fetal/neonatal ICH were secondary outcome measures. Results From a total of 592 FNAIT cases in the registry, 43 confirmed cases of ICH due to FNAIT were included in the study. The majority of bleedings (23/43, 54%) occurred before 28 gestational weeks and often affected the first born child (27/43, 63%). One-third (35%) of the children died within 4 days after delivery. 23 (53%) children survived with severe neurological disabilities and only 5 (12%) were alive and well at time of discharge. Antenatal treatment was not given in most (91%) cases of fetal/neonatal ICH. Conclusions ICH caused by FNAIT often occurs during second trimester and the clinical outcome is poor. In order to prevent ICH caused by FNAIT, at-risk pregnancies must be identified and prevention and/or interventions should start early in the second trimester. PMID:23524102

  6. Performance of automated platelet quantification using different analysers in comparison with an immunological reference method in thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Trabuio, Ernesto; Valverde, Sara; Antico, Francesco; Manoni, Fabio; Gessoni, Gianluca

    2009-01-01

    Background Rapidly available and accurate platelet counts play an important role in the evaluation of haemorrhagic status and in assessing the need for platelet transfusions. We, therefore, evaluated platelet counting performance of haematology analysers using optical, impedance and immunological methods in thrombocytopenic patients. Materials and Methods We considered 99 patients with a platelet (plt) count under 50x109 plt/L. We compared the platelet counts obtained using ADVIA 2120 (optical method), Cell-Dyn Sapphire (optical, impedance and immunological methods with CD61) and a reference, double staining (CD41+CD61) immunological method. Results The platelet counts of all the considered methods showed good correlation with those of the reference method, despite an overestimation in platelet quantification. The degree of inaccuracy was greater for platelet counts under 20 x109 plt/L. Conclusions Clinicians who use platelet thresholds below 20 x109 plt/L for making clinical decisions must be aware of the limitations in precision and accuracy of cell counters at this level of platelet count. Inaccurate counts of low platelet numbers could create problems if attempts are made to reduce the threshold below 20x109 plt/L. PMID:19290080

  7. Clinical features and outcomes of diffuse endocapillary proliferation Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in children

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haidong; Mao, Jianhua; Xu, Yanping; Gu, Weizhong; Zhu, Xiujuan; Liu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the outcomes of childhood diffuse endocapillary proliferation Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis (DEP-HSPN) in response to early diagnosis and prompt treatment. METHODS: Eleven cases of DEP-HSPN in children were investigated in comparison to HSPN without diffuse endocapillary proliferation (non-DEP-HSPN). RESULTS: DEP-HSPN had a higher prevalence of nephrotic syndrome but a lower prevalence of hematuria compared to non-DEP-HSPN. IgA, IgG and IgM antibody deposition was found in DEP-HSPN by histopathological examination. Proteinuria cleared in all 11 cases through treatment with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. However, half of the DEP-HSPN patients continuously had hematuria after treatment. CONCLUSION: The early diagnosis and prompt initiation of immunosuppressive treatment based on renal biopsy are important for achieving favorable outcomes.

  8. Joint effusions and purpura in multiply-transfused adult beta-thalassemia- clinical pointers to diagnosis of scurvy.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Pandey, A K

    2013-01-01

    Periodic transfusions and effective chelation have ensured that thalassemics survive in to adulthood but their life is punctuated by peculiar problems in adulthood. Three cases of scurvy are being reported presenting uniquely as purpura, right hip joint effusion and right knee joint effusion with haemorrhage in prepatellar and retropatellar bursae, respectively over an 18 month period (2009-2010). The first two cases did give a history of gum bleed. None had any coagulation disturbance or transfusion-transmitted infections or connective tissue disorder. All the three cases responded dramatically to vitamin C supplementation. It is imperative to keep in mind that recurrent blood transfusions are associated with a state of subclinical vitamin C deficiency and overt scurvy may manifest as cumulative number of transfusions increase, as in adult thalassemics. PMID:24899338

  9. Penile Skin Involvement as the First Presentation of Henoch-Schonlein Purpura Report of Nine Cases and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Paydary, Koosha; Emamzadeh Fard, Sahra; Mahboubi, Amir Hassan; Ziaee, Vahid; Moradinejad, Mohammad Hassan; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Involvement of penis is a rare presentation in henoch-schonlein purpura (HSP). The presentations are mainly due to the deposition of immunoglobulin A (IgA) into the vessel walls. In this report, we present the clinical history of nine HSP cases that presented with penile skin involvement. Case Presentation: All patients were referred in the acute phase of HSP. Penile skin involvement was evident as erythema, edema, ecchymosis, or induration of prepuce and/or penile shaft, that appeared simultaneously with skin rash in seven patients. Gastrointestinal involvement was positive in six patients. Patients were treated with steroids and follow up visits were normal except for one patient that developed crescentic glomerulonephritis. Conclusions: We present nine cases of HSP with penile involvement in order to indicate another rare aspect of HSP and its possible complications as well as its appropriate treatment. PMID:26396696

  10. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura with Adalimumab Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    LaConti, Joseph J; Donet, Jean A; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Sussman, Daniel A; Ascherman, Dana; Deshpande, Amar R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) inhibitor therapy has signified an important milestone in the fight against many rheumatological disorders and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cutaneous adverse events caused by this class of medications are well known but relatively uncommon. Most reactions are mild and rarely warrant treatment withdrawal. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a disease with cutaneous vasculitis, arthritis, and gastrointestinal and renal involvement that is usually seen in children, though the worst complications are typically seen in adults. We present a case of HSP complicating adalimumab treatment in a patient with ulcerative colitis who had achieved endoscopic remission. We review similar cases reported in the literature and discuss the consequences of these autoimmune diseases. PMID:27529048

  11. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura with Adalimumab Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Donet, Jean A.; Cho-Vega, Jeong Hee; Sussman, Daniel A.; Deshpande, Amar R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) inhibitor therapy has signified an important milestone in the fight against many rheumatological disorders and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Cutaneous adverse events caused by this class of medications are well known but relatively uncommon. Most reactions are mild and rarely warrant treatment withdrawal. Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a disease with cutaneous vasculitis, arthritis, and gastrointestinal and renal involvement that is usually seen in children, though the worst complications are typically seen in adults. We present a case of HSP complicating adalimumab treatment in a patient with ulcerative colitis who had achieved endoscopic remission. We review similar cases reported in the literature and discuss the consequences of these autoimmune diseases. PMID:27529048

  12. Differences in Platelet Function In Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and Myelodysplasia Compared to Equally Thrombocytopenic Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Babula, Bracken; Linden, Matthew D.; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Feldman, Eric J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe thrombocytopenia is a major risk factor for haemorrhage, and yet platelet function and bleeding risk at low platelet counts are poorly understood because of limitations of platelet function testing at very low platelet counts. Objectives To examine and compare platelet function in severely thrombocytopenic patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplasia (MDS) to patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Methods Whole blood flow cytometric measurement of platelet activation and platelet reactivity to agonists was correlated with the immature platelet fraction (IPF) and bleeding symptoms. Results Compared with patients with ITP, patients with AML/MDS had smaller platelets, lower IPF, and substantially lower platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb both with and without addition of ex vivo ADP or TRAP. In both ITP and AML/MDS, increased platelet surface GPIb on circulating platelets and expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and GPIb on ex vivo activated platelets correlated with a higher IPF. Whereas platelet reactivity was higher for AML/MDS patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding, platelet reactivity was lower for ITP patients with bleeding than those with no bleeding. Conclusions AML/MDS patients have lower in vivo platelet activation and ex vivo platelet reactivity than patients with ITP. The proportion of newly-produced platelets correlates with the expression of platelet surface markers of activation. These differences might contribute to differences in bleeding tendency between AML/MDS and ITP. This study is the first to define differences in platelet function between AML/MDS patients and ITP patients with equivalent degrees of thrombocytopenia. PMID:21920014

  13. Cocaine-associated retiform purpura: a C5b-9-mediated microangiopathy syndrome associated with enhanced apoptosis and high levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Magro, Cynthia M; Wang, Xuan

    2013-10-01

    Cocaine-associated retiform purpura is a recently described entity characterized by striking hemorrhagic necrosis involving areas of skin associated with administration of cocaine. Levamisole, an adulterant in cocaine, has been suggested as the main culprit pathogenetically. Four cases of cocaine-associated retiform purpura were encountered in the dermatopathology practice of C. M. Magro. The light microscopic findings were correlated with immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence studies. All 4 cases showed a very striking thrombotic diathesis associated with intravascular macrophage accumulation. Necrotizing vasculitis was noted in 1 case. Striking intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1)/CD54 expression in vessel wall along with endothelial expression of caspase 3 and extensive vascular C5b-9 deposition was observed in all biopsies examined. Cocaine-induced retiform purpura is a C5b-9-mediated microvascular injury associated with enhanced apoptosis and prominent vascular expression of ICAM-1, all of which have been shown in prior in vitro and in vivo murine models to be a direct effect of cocaine metabolic products. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody and antiphospholipid antibodies are likely the direct sequelae of the proapoptotic microenvironment. The inflammatory vasculitic lesion could reflect the downstream end point reflective of enhanced ICAM-1 expression and the development of antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody. Levamisole likely works synergistically with cocaine in the propagation of this syndromic complex. PMID:23392134

  14. Living with Immune Thrombocytopenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Links Related Topics Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Thrombocytopenia Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Send a link ... possible effects of the treatment on the unborn baby. Women who have mild cases of ITP usually can ...

  15. Platelet count

    MedlinePlus

    ... reactions Cancer Certain medicines Bone marrow disease called polycythemia vera Bone marrow making too many platelets without a ... leukemia (CML) Hemolytic anemia Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Polycythemia vera Thrombocytopenia Patient Instructions Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Update ...

  16. Hemostatic Function and Transfusion Efficacy of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates Treated with Gamma Irradiation in Use for Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mei; Xu, Wei; Wang, Bao-Long; Su, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background During the transfusion of blood components, the transfer of allogeneic donor white blood cells (WBCs) can mediate transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). To minimize the reaction, exposure of blood products to gamma irradiation is currently the standard of care. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare hemostatic function, transfusion efficacy, and safety of gamma-irradiated single-donor apheresis platelet concentrates (PCs) and of conventional non-irradiated PCs in patients with chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. Methods 20 double-dose single-donor leukoreduced PCs were split in two identical units; one was gamma-irradiated with 25 Gy (study arm A) and the other remains non-irradiated (study arm B). Both units were stored under equal conditions. Hematologic patients were randomly assigned to receive gamma-irradiated or conventional non-irradiated PCs. Hemostatic function was evaluated by thrombelastography (TEG). TEG measurements were taken pre transfusion and 1 and 24 h post transfusion. TEG profiles were measured, noting the time to initiate clotting (R), the angle of clot formation (α), and the maximum amplitude (clot strength (MA)). Whole blood samples were collected from these thrombocytopenic patients at 1 and 24 h for PLT count increments (CIs) and corrected count increments (CCIs) with assessments of transfusion efficacy. Time to next PLT transfusion, transfusion requirement of RBCs, active bleeding, and adverse events (AEs), were analyzed. Results No differences could be found in hemostatic function parameters (MA, R, and α) between study arms A and B (all p values > 0.096) pre transfusion as well as 1 and 24 h post transfusion. No differences between study arms A and B were observed for mean (± standard deviation (SD)) 1-hour CCI (12.83 ± 6.33 vs. 11.59 ± 5.97) and 24-hour CCI (6.56 ± 4.10 vs. 5.76 ± 4.05). Mean 1-hour CI and 24-hour CI were not significantly different in both study arms (p = 0

  17. Circulating adhesion molecules ICAM-1, E-selectin, and von Willebrand factor in Henoch-Schönlein purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Söylemezoglu, O; Sultan, N; Gursel, T; Buyan, N; Hasanoglu, E

    1996-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play an important part in leucocyte transendothelial migration and thus may provide a useful marker of surface expression at inflammatory sites. In 20 patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura serum intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin, and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) were determined by ELISA during the active and inactive phase of the disease. Twelve healthy children were studied as a control group. Serum ICAM-1 concentrations increased during the active phase of the disease and differed significantly compared with the inactive phase (p < 0.05). However ICAM-1 in the active phase did not differ significantly compared with controls (p = 0.08). Serum E-selectin concentrations did not differ in the active and inactive phase of the disease. By contrast, vWF increased in the active phase of the disease and differed significantly compared with inactive disease and control groups (p < 0.01). Considering the adhesion molecules and vWF, only vWF correlated well with the C reactive protein measurement in the active phase, which is considered a good marker of disease activity. These data suggest that plasma vWF is a good marker of vascular inflammation and endothelial damage. Circulating ICAM-1 might be an additional parameter in some of the patients. PMID:9014604

  18. Antigenic Complementarity in the Origins of Autoimmunity: A General Theory Illustrated With a Case Study of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Couturier, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    We describe a novel, testable theory of autoimmunity, outline novel predictions made by the theory, and illustrate its application to unravelling the possible causes of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP). Pairs of stereochemically complementary antigens induce complementary immune responses (antibody or T-cell) that create loss of regulation and civil war within the immune system itself. Antibodies attack antibodies creating circulating immune complexes; T-cells attack T-cells creating perivascular cuffing. This immunological civil war abrogates the self-nonself distinction. If at least one of the complementary antigens mimics a self antigen, then this unregulated immune response will target host tissues as well. Data demonstrating that complementary antigens are found in some animal models of autoimmunity and may be present in various human diseases, especially ITP, are reviewed. Specific mechanisms for preventing autoimmunity or suppressing existing autoimmunity are derived from the theory, and critical tests proposed. Finally, we argue that Koch's postulates are inadequate for establishing disease causation for multiple-antigen diseases and discuss the possibility that current research has failed to elucidate the causes of human autoimmune diseases because we are using the wrong criteria. PMID:16603444

  19. Expansion of Circulating T Follicular Helper Cells in Children with Acute Henoch-Schönlein Purpura.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jue; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lei; Ruan, Guoxiang; Yuan, Huiming; Fang, Hong; Wu, Jianyong; Cui, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a common systemic small vessel vasculitis in children with disorder autoimmune responses. T follicular helper (TFH) cells play crucial roles in regulating immune responses. The aim of our study was to investigate the probable role of TFH cells in the pathogenesis of children with HSP. In this study, the frequency of circulating CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells with inducible costimulator (ICOS) expression in the children with acute HSP was significantly higher than that in healthy controls (HCs) but not CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells with programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression. Moreover, serum levels of IL-21 and IL-6 cytokines, IgA, and C3 in HSP children were also significantly higher than those in HCs. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of circulating ICOS(+)CXCR5(+)CD4(+)TFH cells and the serum IL-21 or IgA levels of acute HSP children, respectively. Additionally, the mRNA expression levels of interleukin- (IL-) 21, IL-6, and transcriptional factors (B-cell lymphoma-6, Bcl-6) were also significantly increased in peripheral blood from acute HSP children compared to HCs. Taken together, these findings suggest that TFH cells and associated molecules might play critical roles in the pathogenesis of HSP, which are possible therapeutic targets in HSP children. PMID:26491701

  20. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis: Case report with history of urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura triggered by medical abortion.

    PubMed

    Mbonile, Lumuli

    2016-04-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is a rare autoimmune response to raised endogenous progesterone levels that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Cutaneous, mucosal lesions and other systemic manifestations develop cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when progesterone levels are elevated. APD symptoms usually start 3 - 10 days before menstruation and resolve 1 - 2 days after menstruation ceases. A 30-year-old woman presented with urticaria, petechiae and palpable pinpoint purpura lesions of the legs, forearms, neck and buttocks 1 week prior to her menses starting and 2 months after a medical abortion. She was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and topical steroids were prescribed. Her skin conditions did not improve and were associated with her menstrual cycle. We performed an intradermal test using progesterone, which was positive. She was treated with oral contraceptive pills and the symptoms were resolved. This is a typical case of APD triggered by increased sensitivity to endogenous progesterone induced a few months after medical abortion. PMID:27032848

  1. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients With Life Threatening Autoimmune Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Purpura, Schoenlein-Henoch; Graft Versus Host Disease; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Rheumatoid Arthritis; Churg-Strauss Syndrome; Hypersensitivity Vasculitis; Wegener's Granulomatosis; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Giant Cell Arteritis; Pure Red Cell Aplasia; Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis; Polyarteritis Nodosa; Autoimmune Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Takayasu Arteritis

  2. Similar disturbances in B cell activity and regulatory T cell function in Henoch-Schonlein purpura and systemic lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Beale, M.G.; Nash, G.S.; Bertovich, M.J.; MacDermott, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    The immunoglobulin synthesizing activities of peripheral mononuclear cells (MNC) from five patients with Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP) and eight patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were compared. Cumulative amounts of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesized and secreted by unstimulated and PWM-stimulated patient cells over a 12-day period were determied in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. In unstimulated control cultures mean rates of IgM, IgG, and IgA synthesis were less than 250 ng/ml. The synthetic activities of patient MNC were markedly increased. In HSP cultures IgA was the major immunoglobulin class produced (2810 x/divide 1.33 ng/ml) followed by IgG (1754 x/divide 1.32 ng/ml) and IgM (404 x/divide 1.16 ng/ml). In SLE cultures IgA and IgG syntheses were equally elevated (4427 x/divide 1.20 and 4438 x/divide 1.49 ng/ml, respectively) whereas IgM synthesis averaged 967 x/divide 1.66 ng/ml. PWM stimulation of pateient MNC caused a sharp decline in the synthesis of all three immunoglobulin classes. After T cell depletion B cell-enriched fractions from HSP and SLE patients maintained high levels of IgA and IgG synthesis that were inhibited by PWM and by normal allogeneic but not autologous T cells. In PWM-stimulted co-cultures, patient T cells nonspecifically suppressed the synthetic activities of autologous and control B cells. in contrast patient B cells achieved normal levels of immunoglobulin synthesis when cultured with control T cells plus PWM. In longitudinal studies patient B and T cell disturbances persisted despite clinical improvement.

  3. [Frequency of platelet specific alloantigens HPA-1a (P1A1) and HPA-4a (Pen(a)) expression in Chilean population].

    PubMed

    Pereira, J; Rodríguez, S; Pizarro, I; Mezzano, D

    1992-08-01

    The phenotype frequency of platelet-specific alloantigens has been reported to vary with the ethnic composition of the population under study and the only two HPA-4a negative individuals found in the United States were of Hispanic origin; therefore, the aim of this work was to define the frequency of expression of these systems in the Chilean population. Using an ELISA with captured antigen by monoclonal antibodies, 604 blood donors were typed for the platelet-specific antigen systems HPA-1 and HPA-4. Eight samples typed negative for HPA-1a (1.32%) and 596 typed positive (98.68%). The calculated gene frequencies were 0.88 for HPA-1a (gene frequency > 0.99). Since these antigens are involved in thrombocytopenic disorders such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia and post-transfusion purpura, their frequency in a population is of clinical relevance. The gene frequency found for HPA-1a is higher than in Europeans (0.85) and lower than in Mapuche Indians (0.99), which is to be expected from the ethnic origin of our population. The absence of HPA-4a negatives in this study does not support our original hypothesis of a higher polymorphism of this system among hispanics. PMID:1340957

  4. Hematologic complications of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Townsley, Danielle M

    2013-07-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This review discusses specifically the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations; however, care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist, and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets), or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy, and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  5. Hematologic Complications of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Danielle M.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy induces a number of physiologic changes that affect the hematologic indices, either directly or indirectly. Recognizing and treating hematologic disorders that occur during pregnancy is difficult owing to the paucity of evidence available to guide consultants. This paper specifically reviews the diagnosis and management of benign hematologic disorders occurring during pregnancy. Anemia secondary to iron deficiency is the most frequent hematologic complication and is easily treated with oral iron formulations,; however care must be taken not to miss other causes of anemia, such as sickle cell disease. Thrombocytopenia is also a common reason for consulting the hematologist and distinguishing gestational thrombocytopenia from immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, or thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is essential since the treatment differs widely. Occasionally the management of mother and infant involves the expeditious recognition of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), a condition that is responsible for severe life-threatening bleeding of the newborn. Additionally, inherited and acquired bleeding disorders affect pregnant women disproportionately and often require careful monitoring of coagulation parameters in order to prevent bleeding in the puerperium. Finally, venous thromboembolism (VTE) during pregnancy is still largely responsible for mortality during pregnancy and the diagnosis, treatment options and guidelines for prevention of VTE during pregnancy are explored. PMID:23953339

  6. Association between IL17A and IL17F polymorphisms and risk of Henoch-Schonlein purpura in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Pan, Yanxiang; Li, Wei; Fu, Haidong; Zhang, Junfeng; Shen, Hongqiang; Han, Xiucui

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that interleukin-17 and Th17 cell play an important role in the pathogenesis of childhood Henoch-Schonlein purpura (HSP). The purpose of our study is to elucidate whether the IL17A and IL17F gene polymorphisms are susceptibility genes for the development of HSP in Chinese children. A total of 148 HSP patients and 202 controls were enrolled for analyzing the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of IL17A (rs2275913, rs8193037 and rs3819025) and IL17F (rs763780 and rs9463772). TaqMan Real-Time polymerase chain reaction method was used in SNP genotyping. Compared to the healthy controls, the IL17A rs2275913 variant allele A showed a significant association with HSP [odds ratio (OR) 0.70; 95 % CI 0.51-0.94, P = 0.018]. Genotyping analysis demonstrated rs2275913 was associated with a decreased HSP risk (G/A vs. G/G: OR 0.56; 95 % CI 0.33-0.95; A/A vs. G/G: OR 0.46; 95 % CI 0.24-0.86; P = 0.032). Also, our findings showed that the A allele of IL17A rs3819025 was associated with a higher risk of HSP nephritis (OR 1.61; 95 % CI 1.00-2.58; P = 0.047). In addition, a risk haplotype of IL17A (GGA) was found (OR 1.84; 95 % CI 1.17-2.88; P = 0.008). However, no significant differences between HSP patients and healthy controls were observed when comparing genotype, allele or haplotype frequencies of the IL17F rs763780 and rs9463772 polymorphisms. In this study, we confirmed that the rs2275913 polymorphism of the IL17A gene was associated with susceptibility to HSP in Chinese children. However, there was no relationship between IL17F rs763780 and rs9463772 polymorphisms and HSP susceptibility. PMID:27021337

  7. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kerbrat, Stéphane; Vingert, Benoit; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Castellano, Flavia; Renault-Mihara, François; Dos Reis Tavares, Silvina; Surenaud, Mathieu; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Boczkowski, Jorge; Guellaën, Georges; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Le Gouvello, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4+ T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15kDa) is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4+ T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4+ T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4+ T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4+ CD62L+ PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response. PMID:26317969

  8. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerbrat, Stéphane; Vingert, Benoit; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Castellano, Flavia; Renault-Mihara, François; Dos Reis Tavares, Silvina; Surenaud, Mathieu; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Boczkowski, Jorge; Guellaën, Georges; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Le Gouvello, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4(+) T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15 kDa) is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4(+) T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+) T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4(+) CD62L(+) PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response. PMID:26317969

  9. [Management of complex thrombocytopenia with thrombelastometry : a case of simultaneous posttransfusion purpura and heparin-induced thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Haeberle, H A; Menzel, D; Unertl, K; Nohé, B

    2011-12-01

    The case presented describes the combined onset of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia II (HIT) and post-transfusion purpura (PTP) 5-10 days following exposure to heparin and blood transfusion during aortic dissection repair. On day 4 the platelet count decreased by 40% and D-dimers started to increase again. Despite a low clinical probability for HIT-II at this time (4T score of 3) serological testing was done the next day and yielded a negative test result. Following a transient rise after platelet transfusion another 40% decrease in platelet count occurred on day 8. To increase precision of the 4T score, screening ultrasonography was performed and identified a clinically unapparent jugular vein thrombosis. As this increased the 4T score to 6 points, serological testing was repeated and now showed the presence of HIT-II antibodies. Despite switching from heparin to argatroban the platelet count continued to decrease to <5×10(3)/µl. Conventional clotting tests showed a prolonged prothrombin time and severe hypofibrinogenemia. Because of the female sex, age >50 years, history of pregnancy and transfusion 8 days before, PTP was suspected. The alteration of the plasmatic coagulation, however, could not be explained by PTP. Therefore, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and interference of argatroban with conventional clotting tests were considered as alternative diagnoses. In order to differentiate between the two alternatives rotational thrombelastometry (ROTEM®) was performed and revealed an increased functional fibrinogen level without signs of hyperfibrinolysis. This argued for an interference of argatroban with the Clauss method of fibrinogen measurement and rendered DIC unlikely. Under suspicion of PTP, treatment with immunoglobulin was initiated and blood transfusions were avoided. Detection of PTP antibodies 1 day later confirmed the combined presence of PTP and HIT-II. As hyperfibrinogenemia compensated for the effects of thrombocytopenia on clot

  10. Modulating alloimmune responses with plasmapheresis and IVIG.

    PubMed

    Warren, Daniel S; Simpkins, Christopher E; Cooper, Matthew; Montgomery, Robert A

    2005-06-01

    Antibody-mediated barriers to renal transplantation, including donor specific anti-HLA and anti-blood group antibodies, have become an increasingly important issue over the last forty years as the organ shortage has continued to expand. The inevitable result of the unmet demand for compatible organs has been a continuous increase in recipient waiting times. Over the last decade, two treatment strategies have been developed to address this problem. These regimens rely on the immunomodulatory properties of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) administered alone at relatively high doses, or at lower doses in combination with the non-selective depletion of antibodies from plasmapheresis. Both protocols have been successfully used for desensitization of patients with donor-specific anti-HLA antibody and have allowed for renal transplantation with excellent outcomes. The combined strategy of plasmapheresis/IVIG has also been successfully employed for renal transplantation in recipients of ABO blood group incompatible kidneys. This review will provide an overview of these therapies and their application to incompatible renal transplantation. PMID:15975035

  11. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  12. Purpura thrombopénique amégacaryocytaire acquis: penser au lupus érythémateux systémique

    PubMed Central

    Ernestho-ghoud, Indretsy Mahavivola; Rahamefy, Odilon; Ranaivo, Irina Mamisoa; Andrianarison, Malalaniaina; Ramarozatovo, Lala Soavina; Rabenja, Fahafahantsoa Rapelanoro

    2015-01-01

    L'amegacaryocytose acquise est exceptionnellement décrite au cours d'un Lupus Erythémateux Systémique (LES) à Madagascar. Nous rapportons la première observation d'un Purpura Thrombopénique Amegacaryocytaire Acquis (PTAA) simulant un Purpura Thrombopénique Idiopathique (PTI) révélateur d'un LES. Il s'agissait d'une femme de 24 ans, sans antécédents particuliers. Elle présentait un syndrome hémorragique avec une thrombopénie à 10 000/mm3. Le diagnostic de PTI était retenu avant l'hospitalisation. Elle avait reçu une corticothérapie mais ceci n’était pas suivi d'amélioration. A l'unité de Dermatologie, elle se plaignait d'une baisse de l'acuité visuelle. Elle était en bon état général. On retrouvait une tachycardie à 110 bpm, un érythème malaire en verspertilio typique et une pâleur cutanéo-muqueuse. Une hémorragie oculaire bilatérale était objectivée à l'examen ophtalmologique. Les examens paracliniques montraient une thrombopénie à 31000/mm3, une anémie microcytaire à 48g/dL. Les examens immunologiques étaient non réalisés. Un LES avec atteinte cutanée et hématologique était retenu. Un bolus de corticothérapie était administrée associée à une transfusion sanguine. L’évolution était marquée par l'apparition d'un signe d'engagement cérébral faisant suspecter un neurolupus. Le scanner cérébral révélait une hémorragie cérébrale avec une hydrocéphalie aigue traitée par un inhibiteur de l'anhydrase carbonique mais le neurolupus n’était pas écarté. L'anémie disparaissait par contre la thrombopénie s'aggravait à 16000/mm3. Le médullogramme montrait l'absence des mégacaryocytes. L’évolution était favorable à huit mois de suivi après un relais per os de la corticothérapie par la dose de 1 mg/kg/j à dose dégressive à huit mois de suivi. Les atteintes neurologiques, ophtalmologiques et hématologiques étaient compatible avec le diagnostic d'un LES. La persistance d'une thrombopénie doit

  13. Is Dosing of Therapeutic Immunoglobulins Optimal? A Review of a Three-Decade Long Debate in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jacqueline; Quinti, Isabella; Eibl, Martha; Chapel, Helen; Späth, Peter J.; Sewell, W. A. Carrock; Salama, Abdulgabar; van Schaik, Ivo N.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Peter, Hans-Hartmut

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of immunoglobulins (Ig) is increasing due to better recognition of antibody deficiencies, an aging population, and new indications. This review aims to examine the various dosing regimens and research developments in the established and in some of the relevant off-label indications in Europe. The background to the current regulatory settings in Europe is provided as a backdrop for the latest developments in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and in immunomodulatory indications. In these heterogeneous areas, clinical trials encompassing different routes of administration, varying intervals, and infusion rates are paving the way toward more individualized therapy regimens. In primary antibody deficiencies, adjustments in dosing and intervals will depend on the clinical presentation, effective IgG trough levels and IgG metabolism. Ideally, individual pharmacokinetic profiles in conjunction with the clinical phenotype could lead to highly tailored treatment. In practice, incremental dosage increases are necessary to titrate the optimal dose for more severely ill patients. Higher intravenous doses in these patients also have beneficial immunomodulatory effects beyond mere IgG replacement. Better understanding of the pharmacokinetics of Ig therapy is leading to a move away from simplistic “per kg” dosing. Defective antibody production is common in many secondary immunodeficiencies irrespective of whether the causative factor was lymphoid malignancies (established indications), certain autoimmune disorders, immunosuppressive agents, or biologics. This antibody failure, as shown by test immunization, may be amenable to treatment with replacement Ig therapy. In certain immunomodulatory settings [e.g., idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)], selection of patients for Ig therapy may be enhanced by relevant biomarkers in order to exclude non-responders and thus obtain higher response rates. In this review, the developments in dosing of therapeutic

  14. Platelets are versatile cells: New discoveries in hemostasis, thrombosis, immune responses, tumor metastasis and beyond.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Zhang, Dan; Oswald, Brigitta Elaine; Carrim, Naadiya; Wang, Xiaozhong; Hou, Yan; Zhang, Qing; Lavalle, Christopher; McKeown, Thomas; Marshall, Alexandra H; Ni, Heyu

    2016-12-01

    Platelets are small anucleate blood cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and cleared in the reticuloendothelial system. At the site of vascular injury, platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation constitute the first wave of hemostasis. Blood coagulation, which is initiated by the intrinsic or extrinsic coagulation cascades, is the second wave of hemostasis. Activated platelets can also provide negatively-charged surfaces that harbor coagulation factors and markedly potentiate cell-based thrombin generation. Recently, deposition of plasma fibronectin, and likely other plasma proteins, onto the injured vessel wall has been identified as a new "protein wave of hemostasis" that may occur even earlier than the first wave of hemostasis, platelet accumulation. Although no experimental evidence currently exists, it is conceivable that platelets may also contribute to this protein wave of hemostasis by releasing their granule fibronectin and other proteins that may facilitate fibronectin self- and non-self-assembly on the vessel wall. Thus, platelets may contribute to all three waves of hemostasis and are central players in this critical physiological process to prevent bleeding. Low platelet counts in blood caused by enhanced platelet clearance and/or impaired platelet production are usually associated with hemorrhage. Auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenias such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia may cause life-threatening bleeding such as intracranial hemorrhage. When triggered under pathological conditions such as rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque, excessive platelet activation and aggregation may result in thrombosis and vessel occlusion. This may lead to myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke, the major causes of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Platelets are also involved in deep vein thrombosis and thromboembolism, another leading cause of mortality. Although fibrinogen has been

  15. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  16. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2016-03-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  17. HUS and TTP in Children.

    PubMed

    Trachtman, Howard

    2013-12-01

    This review describes the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation, clinical causes, treatment, and long-term prognosis of pediatric patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy. The focus is on hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the most common phenotypes of thrombotic microangiopathy. PMID:24237985

  18. HUS AND TTP

    PubMed Central

    Trachtman, Howard

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This review will describe the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation, clinical causes, treatment, and long-term prognosis of pediatric patients who present with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). The focus will be on hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), the most common phenotypes of TMA. PMID:24237985

  19. Evaluation of serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein levels as biomarkers of Henoch-Schönlein purpura in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Teng, Xu; Wang, Yang; Lin, Nan; Sun, Mei; Wu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) is a vasculitic disorder resulting from autoinflammatory-mediated tissue injury. Procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are two biomarkers of the immune response that recognize bacterial infection and inflammation, respectively. This study tested whether levels of PCT and CRP were associated with selected clinical features, disease severity, and organ damage in HSP. Eighty-nine pediatric patients with HSP were analyzed for clinical manifestations and organ damage. Serum CRP, PCT, and occult blood in the urine and stool (prior to steroid therapy) were measured. Disease severity was classified according to previously established clinical classifications. Sixty patients (67.4 %) had a low clinical score (LCS) of <4 (group A) while 29 patients (32.5 %) had a high clinical score (HCS) of ≥4 (group B). When patients were then classified by the presence of gastrointestinal bleeding, 66 (74.2 %) cases lacked alimentary tract hemorrhage (group C) while 23 (25.8 %) cases presented with gastrointestinal bleeding (group D). There were no significant differences in CRP (group A: median = 5.26, range = 1.00-77.60 vs. group B: median = 8.59, range = 1.00-144.00 mg/l; u = 1.397) or PCT levels (group A: median = 0.05, range = 0.05-0.24 vs. group B: median = 0.08, range = 0.05-1.02 ng/ml; u = 1.709) between groups A and B. When serum PCT levels were examined in relation to gastrointestinal bleeding, the levels of serum PCT were higher in group D than group C patients (group D: median = 0.09, range = 0.05-1.02 vs. group C: median = 0.05, range = 0.05-0.32 ng/ml; u = 2.849). It is important to note that the average PCT level was below the threshold for a systemic bacterial infection (0.5 ng/ml). We did not observe a correlation between CRP levels and the absence or presence of GI bleeding in groups C or D (group C: median = 4.66, range = 1.00-144.00 vs. group D: median

  20. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  1. Petechial rash in children: a clinical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Barnetson, Laura; Heaton, Paul Anthony; Palmer, Sarah; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-05-01

    Children with a petechial rash commonly present to emergency departments. The rash can be associated with serious illnesses, such as invasive meningococcal disease (IMD), but is usually associated with less severe conditions. This article discusses the common and important causes of petechial rash, including IMD, viral illnesses, trauma, Henoch-Schönlein purpura and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. It also analyses the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) ( 2014 ) pathway for management of petechial rash in children and examines treatment of the various causes. The article includes two relevant case studies and discusses the role of emergency nurses. PMID:27165395

  2. Immunoregulatory Effects of Everolimus on In Vitro Alloimmune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Josh; Miller, Joshua; Huang, Xuemei; Gallon, Lorenzo; Leventhal, Joseph R.; Mathew, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Everolimus (EVL) is a novel mTOR-inhibitor similar to sirolimus (SRL) that is used in organ transplant recipients, often in combination with tacrolimus (TAC) or mycophenolate (MPA). The current study aims to determine its effects on regulatory T cells. Increasing concentrations of EVL, MPA and TAC alone or in combination were added to MLRs of healthy volunteers. Lymphoproliferation by 3H-TdR incorporation and the percentage of newly generated CD4+CD127-CD25+FOXP3+ (total Treg) and CD4+CD127-CD25HighFOXP3+ (natural Treg) in CFSE labeled responder cells were assessed by flow cytometry. In comparison to medium controls, EVL and other agents dose-dependently inhibited 3H-TdR incorporation in HLA-2DR-matched and HLA-mismatched MLRs (n = 3–10). However, EVL significantly amplified newly generated total and natural Tregs in CFSE labeled responder cells (p<0.05) at all concentrations, while MPA and SRL did this only at sub-therapeutic concentrations and inhibited at therapeutic levels. In contrast, TAC inhibited newly generated Tregs at all concentrations. When tested in combination with TAC, EVL failed to reverse TAC inhibition of Treg generation. Combinations of EVL and low concentrations of MPA inhibited proliferation and amplified Treg generation in an additive manner when compared to medium controls or each drug tested alone (p<0.05). The relative tolerogenic effect from high to low was EVL > SRL> MPA > TAC. If the results from these in vitro studies are extrapolated to clinical transplantation, it would suggest EVL plus low concentrations of MPA may be the most tolerogenic combination. PMID:27275747

  3. Viral Induced CD28 Loss Evokes Costimulation Independent Alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Danny; Espinosa, Jaclyn E.; Stempora, Linda; Iwakoshi, Neal N.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Belatacept, a B7-specific fusion protein, blocks CD28-B7 costimulation and prevents kidney allograft rejection. However, it is ineffective in a sizable minority of patients. Although T cell receptor and CD28 engagement is known to initiate T cell activation, many human antigen-experienced T cells lose CD28, and can be activated independent of CD28 signals. We posit that these cells are central drivers of costimulation blockade resistant rejection (CoBRR) and propose that CoBRR might relate to an accumulation of CD28- T cells resulting from viral antigen exposure. Materials and Methods We infected C57BL/6 mice with Polyomavirus (a BK virus analog), murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV; a human CMV analog), and gammaherpes virus (HV68; an Epstein-Barr virus analog) and assessed for CD28 expression relative to mock infection controls. We then employed mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) assays to assess the alloreactive response of these mice against MHC-mismatched cells. Results We demonstrated that infection with Polyomavirus, murine CMV, and HV68 can induce CD28 down-regulation in mice. We showed that these analogs of clinically relevant human viruses enable lymphocytes from infected mice to launch an anamnestic, costimulation blockade resistant, alloreactive response against MHC-mismatched cells without prior alloantigen exposure. Further analysis revealed that gammherpesvirus-induced oligoclonal T cell expansion is required for the increased alloreactivity. Conclusion Virus exposure results in reduced T cell expression of CD28, the target of costimulation blockade therapy. These viruses also contribute to increased alloreactivity. Thus, CD28 down-regulation following viral infection may play a seminal role in driving CoBRR. PMID:25801976

  4. 5-Aminolevulinic acid regulates the inflammatory response and alloimmune reaction.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Masayuki; Nishio, Yoshiaki; Ito, Hidenori; Tanaka, Tohru; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-08-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a naturally occurring amino acid and precursor of heme and protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Exogenously administrated 5-ALA increases the accumulation of PpIX in tumor cells specifically due to the compromised metabolism of 5-ALA to heme in mitochondria. PpIX emits red fluorescence by the irradiation of blue light and the formation of reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen. Thus, performing a photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) using 5-ALA have given rise to a new strategy for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In addition to the field of tumor therapy, 5-ALA has been implicated in the treatment of inflammatory disease, autoimmune disease and transplantation due to the anti-inflammation and immunoregulation properties that are elicited with the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1, an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the oxidative degradation of heme to free iron, biliverdin and carbon monoxide (CO), in combination with sodium ferrous citrate (SFC), because an inhibitor of HO-1 abolishes the effects of 5-ALA. Furthermore, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and heme are involved in the HO-1 expression. Biliverdin and CO are also known to have anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory functions. We herein review the current use of 5-ALA in inflammatory diseases, transplantation medicine, and tumor therapy. PMID:26643355

  5. Is it safe to avoid bone marrow examination in suspected itp?

    PubMed

    Naithani, Rahul; Kumar, Rajat; Mahapatra, M; Agrawal, Neerja; Pati, H P; Choudhry, V P

    2007-01-01

    Two children with suspected ITP are described. One child was treated outside with corticosteroids and was diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Another child was fresh and diagnosed as acute myeloid leukemia on bone marrow aspirate examination. Both the children had no physical or peripheral smear finding suggestive of leukemia. We suggest that a bone marrow examination is required in developing countries for evaluation of thrombocytopenia before labeling it an immune thrombocytopenic purpura. PMID:17454791

  6. The presence of precursors of benign pre-B lymphoblasts (hematogones) in the bone marrow of a paediatric patient with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Madrid, F; Uberos, J; Díaz-Molina, M; Ramírez-Arredondo, A; Jiménez-Gámiz, P; Molina-Carballo, A

    2008-01-01

    Hematogones are normal B-lymphoid precursors that multiply in the bone marrow of small children and of adults with ferropenic anaemia, neuroblastoma or idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. They are not normally found in peripheral blood, and the immunophenotype is virtually indistinguishable from that of B lymphoblasts. We discuss the case of a 3-month infant with an active cytomegalovirus infection, with hepatitis and pancytopenia associated with 13% hematogones in the bone marrow. PMID:21892313

  7. Verotoxinogenic Citrobacter freundii associated with severe gastroenteritis and cases of haemolytic uraemic syndrome in a nursery school: green butter as the infection source.

    PubMed

    Tschape, H; Prager, R; Streckel, W; Fruth, A; Tietze, E; Böhme, G

    1995-06-01

    A summer outbreak of severe gastroenteritis followed by haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a nursery school and kindergarten is described. Sandwiches prepared with green butter made with contaminated parsley were the likely vehicle of infection. The parsley originated from an organic garden in which manure of pig origin was used instead of artificial fertilizers. Clonally identical verotoxinogenic Citrobacter freundii were found as causative agents of HUS and gastroenteritis and were also detected on the parsley. PMID:7781732

  8. Thrombocytopenia-associated multi-organ failure caused by diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Alsaied, Tarek; Goldstein, Stuart L; Kaddourah, Ahmad; Poynter, Sue E

    2016-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia-associated multi-organ failure (TAMOF) is an increasingly reported entity in the pediatric intensive care unit. The clinical presentation is similar to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, but with no evidence of hemolysis and no schistocytes on peripheral smear. We report a case of TAMOF induced by diabetic ketoacidosis and treated with therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE). Early diagnosis and initiation of TPE significantly decrease the morbidity associated with TAMOF. PMID:26712331

  9. Intermittent cyclophosphamide treatment of autoimmune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Brian; Maxwell, Ian; Hryniuk, William

    1974-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide was given intermittently rather than daily to 14 patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura. Eight patients responded and six did not. In those who responded the rise in platelet count was rapid, and in all patients the lack of toxicity was striking. Intermittent cyclophosphamide seems effective in some cases of autoimmune thrombocytopenia and is safe, at least in the short term. Controlled trials would be required to prove that intermittent is better than daily administration. PMID:4473260

  10. TTP presenting as refractory hypoglycemia in a patient with thromboangiitis obliterans.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Ashley; Gingold, Daniel B; Calvello, Emilie J B

    2014-12-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a challenging diagnosis to make in the emergency department. We present a case of TTP initially presenting with refractory hypoglycemia in a woman with thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease). To our knowledge, this is the first description of the association of hypoglycemia and thromboangiitis obliterans with TTP. We briefly review key aspects of the acute diagnosis and management of hypoglycemia and TTP pertinent to the emergency physician. PMID:24929773

  11. [Etiology and treatment of thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Bargetzi, M J

    2004-02-01

    Thrombocytopenia has many causes. History, clinical examination of the patient, and a careful analysis of the peripheral blood smear may already lead to the etiology of cytopenia. The aim of the treatment is the correction of the underlying disease. In the management of immune thrombocytopenic purpura, the most common form of thrombocytopenia in adults, the goal is to avoid hemorrhages and not to increase the platelet value to normal. PMID:15018402

  12. Rituximab off label use for difficult-to-treat auto-immune diseases: reappraisal of benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Sailler, Laurent

    2008-02-01

    Rituximab is increasingly used off label for difficult-to-treat auto-immune diseases. We reviewed the main case series or clinical studies to identify the best indications of rituximab and the situations at substantial risks for adverse events. Refractory immune thrombocytopenic purpura was the main indication. However, the long term benefit-to-risk ratio of rituximab treatment before or after splenectomy is unknown. A single 375 mg/m2 infusion may be as efficacious as the classical four infusions cycle. Rituximab is the best treatment for cold agglutinin disease. In warm agglutinin auto-immune anaemia, its efficacy has essentially been reported in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and in children. In CLL patients, lethal adverse events occurred in patients also receiving cyclophosphamide. Rituximab seems to have an interesting benefit-to-risk ratio in Wegener granulomatosis (excepted in granulomatous lesions), HCV-associated symptomatic cryoglobulinemia in patients unresponsive to anti-viral therapy, pemphigus and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Efficacy and safety data in lupus are difficult to interpret. Serum sickness disease is not exceptional in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), lupus and sicca syndrome patients. A substantial infectious risk has been reported in pemphigus patients and in post-renal transplant cryoglobulinemia. Double-blind randomised controlled trials and phase IV studies are mandatory in most clinical settings to confirm the overall favourable perception of rituximab benefit to risk ratio. PMID:18270863

  13. Tuberculose pulmonaire révélée par un purpura thrombopénique chez l'enfant-à propos d'un cas clinique observé au service de pédiatrie des Cliniques Universitaires de Lubumbashi

    PubMed Central

    Lubala, Toni Kasole; Mutombo, Augustin Mulangu; Munkana, Arthur Ndundula; Manika, Michel Muteya

    2012-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'un enfant de 7 ans, de sexe masculin ayant présenté un purpura thrombopénique avec épistaxis, hématémèse, otorragies et pétéchies généralisées. Durant la même hospitalisation, nous avons mis en évidence une tuberculose pulmonaire documentée par la présence de bacilles acido-alcoolo résistants à l'examen des crachats. Nous avons observé une majoration du taux de plaquettes en une semaine de corticothérapie intraveineuse à haute dose, avant l'instauration d'une poly chimiothérapie antituberculeuse. Nous rappelons également la controverse que suscite la prise en charge de cette association rarement rapportée. PMID:23077696

  14. Purpura and leukopenia in a cocaine user.

    PubMed

    Dezman, Zachary; Rimi, Barbara; McClain, Joshua

    2016-08-01

    A previously healthy 42-year-old woman presented to the emergency department (ED) for arthralgias and painful lesions on her ears, feet, and knee (Figures 1 and 2) that had developed over the last month. She had no significant past medical history and was not taking any prescribed medications. The rash was purpuric with violaceous borders and hemorrhagic bullae. While she had mild pain with movement, her joint examination was otherwise normal and without signs of infection. ED laboratory testing revealed leukopenia (2500/mm(3)) and cocaine metabolites in her urine. PMID:27174436

  15. Henoch-Schönlein Purpura

    MedlinePlus

    ... completely, though kidney damage is the most likely long-term complication. In adults, HSP can lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and kidney failure, described as end-stage renal disease when treated with blood-filtering treatments called dialysis or a kidney transplant. 1 McCarthy JH, Tizard ...

  16. Suspects in the tale of lupus-associated thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, P D; Routsias, J G; Giannouli, S; Tasidou, A; Tzioufas, A G; Voulgarelis, M

    2006-01-01

    Immunologically mediated thrombocytopenia is a frequent clinical manifestation in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Autoantibodies targeting platelet membrane glucoproteins have a central role in peripheral platelet destruction. Autoantibodies against thrombopoietin are also present in about one-third of patients, but their pathogenetic role is obscure. Thirty-eight serum samples from SLE patients were tested for anti-platelet antibodies, anti-thrombopoietin antibodies and levels of circulating thrombopoietin. Bone marrow histology was also assessed. Thirty-nine per cent of sera displayed anti-thrombopoietin antibodies and 29% had circulating anti-platelet antibodies. Anti-thrombopoietin antibodies were associated with lower thrombopoietin concentrations, and lower mean platelet values in long-term follow-up. Anti-platelet antibodies were present in about 40% of thrombocytopenic and non-thrombocytopenic individuals but were absent in patients who had recovered from thrombocytopenia, supporting their pathogenetic role. Both autoantibodies were absent in control sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren’s syndrome. Decreased bone marrow cellularity, normal or low number of hypolobulated, pyknotic megakaryocytes and stromal alterations were prominent findings in thrombocytopenic SLE patients, suggesting a defect in megakaryopoiesis. These findings were not evident in specimens from patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who had increased megakaryocytes, normal cellularity and absence of stromal alterations. In conclusion, peripheral destruction due to platelet autoantibodies, anti-thrombopoetin antibodies, lower effective circulating thrombopoetin and impaired compensatory response due to bone marrow damage interact in SLE and thrombocytopenia ensues. PMID:16792676

  17. Vaccinations and secondary immune thrombocytopenia with antiphospholipid antibodies by human papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bizjak, Mojca; Bruck, Or; Kanduc, Darja; Praprotnik, Sonja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and concomitant positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) following vaccination with a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. During the course of a disease, she developed clinical manifestation with bleeding and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. Consequently, the number of her platelets remained critically low and she was put on corticosteroids and rituximab. Since then, her platelet count remain within the normal range, but her aPL are still present. PMID:27312165

  18. Plasmapheresis in Clinical Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Linker, Charles

    1983-01-01

    Large-volume plasma exchange can now be rapidly and safely done using cell separator technology. Significant depletion of immunoglobulins and immune complexes can be achieved by repeated intensive plasmapheresis, but sustained depletion of these constituents requires concomitant immunosuppressive therapy. Plasmapheresis appears to work in some disorders by removing pathogenic antibodies, but other mechanisms of action have been postulated. It is the treatment of choice for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and for the hyperviscosity syndrome due to macroglobulinemia. Apheresis can be useful in the treatment of many other disorders, most notably myasthenia gravis, glomerulonephritis associated with hemoptysis (Goodpasture's syndrome), refractory systemic lupus erythematosus, cryoglobulinemia and immune cytopenic disorders. Images PMID:6601332

  19. Pathophysiology of tumour-induced microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Chalasani, Pavani; Segar, Jennifer M; Marron, Marilyn; Stopeck, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia (CA-MAHA) is a syndrome characterised by Coombs-negative haemolytic anaemia and thrombocytopenia. It is primarily seen in advanced solid tumours and is distinct from thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/haemolytic uraemic syndrome. Diagnosis is often delayed and patients have a high mortality. We present the case of CA-MAHA in a patient with metastatic breast cancer treated successfully with early initiation of chemotherapy. In addition, we report longitudinal laboratory evaluation of circulating tumour cells and microparticles and suggest a hypothesis for the mechanism behind CA-MAHA. PMID:26744538

  20. An unusual complication after interventional cardiology reveals and infrequent condition: Idiopathic CD4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fica, Alberto; Verdugo, Fernando; Landaeta, María V; Flores, Alfredo; Roessler, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is of rare occurrence after interventional procedures with few events reported until now. A 74 year-old man with a past medical history of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, splenectomy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and polymyalgia rheumatica developed HZ on the right median nerve 7 days after he underwent a coronariography for managing an acute coronary syndrome. He evolved with cutaneous dissemination and required intravenous acyclovir therapy. Laboratory evaluation disclosed a previously unknown idiophatic CD4 lymphocytopenia. HZ should be added to the list of complications after interventional cardiology and associated immunosuppressive factors ruled out. PMID:26768667

  1. Parvovirus B19 infection presenting as pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a transient and progressive course in two children.

    PubMed

    Yetgin, Sevgi; Cetin, Mualla; Aslan, Deniz; Ozyurek, Emel; Oyürek, Emel; Anlar, Banu; Uçkan, Duygu

    2004-10-01

    Parvovirus B19 is the causative agent of various forms of hematologic diseases such as aplastic crisis in patients with hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, hypoplastic anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. In addition, parvovirus B19 infection may precede or be associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The authors present two cases of parvovirus B19 infection and bone marrow infiltration with pre-B-cell lymphoblasts; one patients was diagnosed as having ALL, and the other patient, with neurologic findings, showed total resolution of the blastic morphology and phenotype. PMID:15454845

  2. Acquired Platelet Dysfunction with Eosinophilia (APDE) Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Diksha D; Nayar, Priyanka S; Manchanda, Rumma V

    2016-06-01

    Acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia (APDE) is a syndrome which has transient state of platelet dysfunction in the presence of marked eosinophilia. This bleeding disorder, otherwise known as "non-thrombocytopenic purpura with eosinophilia", occurs commonly in children from South-East Asia. We report an 11 years old male child, who presented with ecchymotic patches over lower limbs, of recent onset. His hemogram revealed increased eosinophils with a normal platelet count. Coagulation screen revealed normal parameters except increase in bleeding time. Platelet aggregation studies showed normal platelet aggregation with ristocetin, reduced aggregation with ADP and no aggregation was seen with collagen. PMID:27408400

  3. Proportion of drug-related serious rare blood dyscrasias: estimates from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Andersohn, Frank; Bronder, Elisabeth; Klimpel, Andreas; Garbe, Edeltraut

    2004-11-01

    Drugs are an important cause of serious rare blood dyscrasias. To estimate the proportion of drug-related cases, we used data from the ongoing Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The analysis included a total of 171 cases. The number of cases in which a drug etiology was assessed as at least "possible" was n = 29 (97%) for acute agranulocytosis, n = 4 (0.21%) for aplastic anemia, n = 8 (26%) for immune hemolytic anemia, n = 20 (25%) for immune thrombocytopenia, and n = 2 (20%) for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome. Our analysis suggests that a substantial fraction of blood dyscrasias may be attributable to drug therapy. PMID:15495238

  4. Management of Thrombotic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemias with Therapeutic Plasma Exchange: When It Works and When It Does Not.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Tahir; Taylor, Michelle; Winters, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders sharing a common clinical presentation of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ damage. These disorders have been treated with plasma exchange (TPE) based on randomized controlled trials, which found this therapy to be effective in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). For the remaining disorders, low- to very low-quality evidence exists for the use of TPE. When TPE is applied, the treatment regimen used for TTP is usually applied. There is a need for further evaluation of the role of TPE in the treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies other than TTP. PMID:27113004

  5. Eltrombopag Use in Thrombocytopenia for Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection of a Gastric Carcinoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Tonya; Martin, Beth; Rouse, Robert V.; Soetikno, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Severe thrombocytopenia is a contraindication for therapeutic endoscopy due to the risk of bleeding. Platelet transfusions can temporarily increase platelet count, but are difficult to administer in the 2 weeks following endoscopic resection, during which the patient is at high risk for delayed bleeding. We present the use of a novel thrombopoietin receptor agonist, eltrombopag, to sustain platelet levels for the safe and complete endoscopic submucosal dissection of a gastric carcinoid in a patient with severe thrombocytopenia due to cirrhosis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. We performed complete and safe endoscopic removal of a gastric carcinoid after correcting the thrombocytopenia. PMID:26157896

  6. Autoimmune thrombocytopenia in a patient with small cell lung cancer developing after chemotherapy and resolving following autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Demirer, T; Celebi, H; Arat, M; Ustün, C; Demirer, S; Dilek, I; Ozcan, M; Ilhan, O; Akan, H; Gürman, G; Koç, H

    1999-08-01

    A 46-year-old white male with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) limited to the thorax developed autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), following a cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and G-CSF-containing regimen for peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization. AITP associated with small or non-small cell lung cancer has been reported. We considered that the AITP in this case may be a part of paraneoplastic syndrome, which is frequently seen in patients with SCLC. The patient received HDC and autologous PBSC transplantation (APBSCT) for SCLC and the AITP resolved following transplantation, thus supporting the concept of HDC + APBSCT for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:10455376

  7. Verotoxinogenic Citrobacter freundii associated with severe gastroenteritis and cases of haemolytic uraemic syndrome in a nursery school: green butter as the infection source.

    PubMed Central

    Tschape, H.; Prager, R.; Streckel, W.; Fruth, A.; Tietze, E.; Böhme, G.

    1995-01-01

    A summer outbreak of severe gastroenteritis followed by haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in a nursery school and kindergarten is described. Sandwiches prepared with green butter made with contaminated parsley were the likely vehicle of infection. The parsley originated from an organic garden in which manure of pig origin was used instead of artificial fertilizers. Clonally identical verotoxinogenic Citrobacter freundii were found as causative agents of HUS and gastroenteritis and were also detected on the parsley. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7781732

  8. Thrombocytopenia and Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Still an enigma?

    PubMed

    Cavalleri, Valeria; Bettini, Laura R; Barboni, Chiara; Cereda, Anna; Mariani, Milena; Spinelli, Marco; Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Biondi, Andrea; Jankovic, Momcilo; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cohesion complex and its regulators. The syndrome is characterized by multiple organ system abnormalities, pre- and post-natal growth retardation and typical facial features. Thrombocytopenia is a reduction in platelet count to <150 × 10(9)  L. It can be caused by congenital or acquired decreased production, increased destruction, or sequestration of platelets. In recent years, several papers reported thrombocytopenia and immune thrombocytopenia in patients affected by CdLS. In 2011, Lambert et al. estimated the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura in CdLS patients to be 31-633 times greater than in the general population. We describe the incidence of thrombocytopenia in 127 Italian CdLS patients, identifying patients with transient or persistent thrombocytopenia, but a lower incidence of true idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). PMID:26437745

  9. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women from Mumbai, Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, U Shankar; Ghosh, K; Gupte, S S; Gupte, S C; Mohanty, D

    2002-03-01

    Immunogenetic studies in various diseases provide potential genetic markers. We have studied the incidence of HLA A, B, C, DR and DQ loci antigen in Rh (D) antigen isoimmunized mothers compared to those nonimmunized isoimmunized Rh negative mothers. Seventy six mothers who were immunized to Rh (D) antigen due to pregnancy (responders) and fifty four mothers who did not develop Rh (D) isoimmunization despite positive pregnancies (nonresponders) were selected for the study. Standard methods of serological HLA typing, ABO and Rh (D) groups, and screening for Rh D antibodies were used. 392 unrelated individuals from the population were compared as controls. In addition 45 unrelated individuals from the same population were typed for HLA DRB and DQB gene using PCR-SSP kits. The genotype frequencies of HLA A2, A3, A28, B13, B17, B35, B52, B60, Cw2, Cw6, DR4, and DQ3 were significantly increased, while the frequencies of the HLA A11, A29, A31, B7, B37, B51, Cw1 and DR9 were decreased in the responder women when compared to the non-responder women. HLA A30 (19) split antigen was not identified in immunized women while HLA A23 (9) split antigen was not identified in non immunized women. HLA A3, B17, Cw2 and DR4 showed a significant relative risk among the immunized responder women. When compared with Rh immunized women (responders) reported from USA, England and Hungary the phenotype frequencies of HLA A11, A24, A28, B5, B17, B40, DR2 and DR5 were increased while HLA A23, B8, B18, and DR6 were decreased in the Indian Rh immunized women. Two locus haplotype frequency analysis observed among the responders women revealed that among the significant haplotypes expressed A2-B5, B7-Cw1, DR2-DQ1 were highly significant haplotypes in positive linkage, while A1-B5, and A1-B7 were in significant negative linkage disequilibrium. The haplotype frequencies were

  10. Anti-G antibody in alloimmunized pregnant women: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Kaul, Anita; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Agrawal, Soma; Singh, Chanchal; Karna, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Anti-G has been reported as a possible cause of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN), either independently or in association with anti-D, anti-C or both. The antibody mimics the pattern of anti-C and anti-D reactivity in the identification panel and is often present along with either or both of these antibodies. The differentiation of anti-D, -C and-G in routine pretransfusion workup is particularly essential in antenatal cases. We report two antenatal cases where anti-G was identified on advanced immunohematological workup, in addition to other alloantibodies. PMID:26420948

  11. Antigen and substrate withdrawal in the management of autoimmune thrombotic disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCrae, Keith R.; Zheng, X. Long; Sachais, Bruce S.; Luning Prak, Eline T.; Siegel, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    Prevailing approaches to manage autoimmune thrombotic disorders, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, include immunosuppression and systemic anticoagulation, though neither provides optimal outcome for many patients. A different approach is suggested by the concurrence of autoantibodies and their antigenic targets in the absence of clinical disease, such as platelet factor 4 in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and β2-glycoprotein-I (β2GPI) in antiphospholipid syndrome. The presence of autoantibodies in the absence of disease suggests that conformational changes or other alterations in endogenous protein autoantigens are required for recognition by pathogenic autoantibodies. In thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the clinical impact of ADAMTS13 deficiency caused by autoantibodies likely depends on the balance between residual antigen, that is, enzyme activity, and demand imposed by local genesis of ultralarge multimers of von Willebrand factor. A corollary of these concepts is that disrupting platelet factor 4 and β2GPI conformation (or ultralarge multimer of von Willebrand factor oligomerization or function) might provide a disease-targeted approach to prevent thrombosis without systemic anticoagulation or immunosuppression. Validation of this approach requires a deeper understanding of how seemingly normal host proteins become antigenic or undergo changes that increase antibody avidity, and how they can be altered to retain adaptive functions while shedding epitopes prone to elicit harmful autoimmunity. PMID:22966172

  12. Antigen and substrate withdrawal in the management of autoimmune thrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Cines, Douglas B; McCrae, Keith R; Zheng, X Long; Sachais, Bruce S; Luning Prak, Eline T; Siegel, Don L

    2012-11-15

    Prevailing approaches to manage autoimmune thrombotic disorders, such as heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, antiphospholipid syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, include immunosuppression and systemic anticoagulation, though neither provides optimal outcome for many patients. A different approach is suggested by the concurrence of autoantibodies and their antigenic targets in the absence of clinical disease, such as platelet factor 4 in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and β(2)-glycoprotein-I (β(2)GPI) in antiphospholipid syndrome. The presence of autoantibodies in the absence of disease suggests that conformational changes or other alterations in endogenous protein autoantigens are required for recognition by pathogenic autoantibodies. In thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, the clinical impact of ADAMTS13 deficiency caused by autoantibodies likely depends on the balance between residual antigen, that is, enzyme activity, and demand imposed by local genesis of ultralarge multimers of von Willebrand factor. A corollary of these concepts is that disrupting platelet factor 4 and β(2)GPI conformation (or ultralarge multimer of von Willebrand factor oligomerization or function) might provide a disease-targeted approach to prevent thrombosis without systemic anticoagulation or immunosuppression. Validation of this approach requires a deeper understanding of how seemingly normal host proteins become antigenic or undergo changes that increase antibody avidity, and how they can be altered to retain adaptive functions while shedding epitopes prone to elicit harmful autoimmunity. PMID:22966172

  13. Epitope specificity and isotype of monoclonal anti-D antibodies dictate their ability to inhibit phagocytosis of opsonized platelets.

    PubMed

    Kjaersgaard, Mimi; Aslam, Rukhsana; Kim, Michael; Speck, Edwin R; Freedman, John; Stewart, Donald I H; Wiersma, Erik J; Semple, John W

    2007-08-15

    Rh immune globulin (WinRho SDF; Cangene, Mississauga, ON, Canada) is an effective treatment for autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura; however, maintaining a sustained supply for its use in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura and its primary indication, hemolytic disease of the newborn, makes the development of alternative reagents desirable. We compared Rh immune globulin and 6 human monoclonal anti-D antibodies (MoAnti-D) with differing isotypes and specificities for their ability to opsonize erythrocytes and inhibit platelet phagocytosis in an in vitro assay. Results demonstrated that opsonization of erythrocytes with Rh immune globulin significantly (P < .001) reduced phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled opsonized platelets in an Fc-dependent manner. Of the MoAnti-D that shared specificity but differed in isotype, only IgG3 antibodies could significantly (P < .001) inhibit platelet phagocytosis. In contrast, 2 MoAnti-D shared isotypes and differed in specificity; however, only one could significantly (P < .001) inhibit platelet phagocytosis. The results suggest that MoAnti-D epitope specificity and isotypes are critical requirements for optimal inhibition of opsonized platelet phagocytosis. PMID:17456719

  14. Haematological manifestations of human immune deficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Vishnu, Prakash; Aboulafia, David M

    2015-12-01

    Early in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, infected patients presented to medical attention with striking abnormalities in each of the major blood cell lineages. The reasons for these derangements remain complex and multifactorial. HIV infects multipotent haematopoietic progenitor cells and establish latent cellular reservoirs, disturbs the bone marrow microenvironment and also causes immune dysregulation. These events lead to cytokine imbalances and disruption of other factors required for normal haematopoiesis. Activation of the reticulo-endothelial system can also result in increased blood cell destruction. The deleterious effects of medications, including first and second generation anti-retroviral agents, on haematopoiesis were well documented in the early years of HIV care; in the current era of HIV-care, the advent of newer and less toxic anti-retroviral drugs have had a more beneficial impact on haematopoiesis. Due to impaired regulation of the immune system and potential side effects of one or more anti-retroviral agents, there is also an increase in coagulation abnormalities such as thromboembolism, and less frequently, acquired disorders of coagulation including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, immune thrombocytopenic purpura and acquired inhibitors of coagulation. In this article we review the epidemiology and aetiology of select non-oncological haematological disorders commonly seen in people living with HIV-acquired immune deficiency syndrome. PMID:26452169

  15. Cure of alopecia areata after eradication of Helicobacter pylori: A new association?

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia areata is a disease of the hair follicles, with strong evidence supporting autoimmune etiology. Alopecia areata is frequently associated with immune-mediated diseases with skin manifestations such as psoriasis and lichen planus, or without skin manifestations such as autoimmune thyroiditis and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is present in around 50% of the world’s population and has been associated with a variety of immune-mediated extra-digestive disorders including autoimmune thyroiditis, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and psoriasis. A case of a 43-year old man with an 8-mo history of alopecia areata of the scalp and beard is presented. The patient was being treated by a dermatologist and had psychiatric support, without any improvement. He had a history of dyspepsia and the urea breath test confirmed H. pylori infection. The patient went into remission from alopecia areata after H. pylori eradication. If such an association is confirmed by epidemiological studies designed for this purpose, new therapeutic options could be available for these patients, especially in areas where infection with H. pylori is highly prevalent. PMID:21912461

  16. Femoral mycotic aneurysm presenting as arthritis and purpura.

    PubMed

    Feldman, C; Mason, P; Jones, R R; Kelley, C

    1985-11-01

    A case is described with recurrent arthritis and skin rash confined to the right lower limb and exacerbated on each occasion by exercise. Investigation established this to be due to a mycotic aneurysm of the right common femoral artery. Treatment with excision and grafting and antibiotics resulted in full recovery. Mycotic aneurysm and the unusual presenting features in this case are discussed. PMID:3840709

  17. Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, P.; Majoos, F.; Perrotta, A.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism and immune thrombocytopenia occurred concurrently in five patients; in a sixth, thyrotoxicosis developed after successful treatment of the thrombocytopenia. Correction of the hyperthyroidism was followed by a variable pattern of clinical response. In one case with mild asymptomatic thrombocytopenia spontaneous complete remission occurred. Two patients required adrenocorticosteroids to control severe thrombocytopenic purpura during the period of hyperthyroidism, after which complete remission occurred. Another patient with severe symptomatic thrombocytopenia remains with a partially compensated thrombocytolytic state but is without purpura and off all therapy. A fifth patient required splenectomy for drug-resistant thrombocytopenia and remains critically dependent on immunosuppressive therapy. The sixth patient had a relapse of immune thrombocytopenia with subsequent development of thyrotoxicosis but platelet count spontaneously returned to normal after correction of the hyperthyroidism. Pregnancy in two of these six patients was not associated with recurrence of either hyperthyroidism or thrombocytopenia. Management of symptomatic purpura in adults with co-existent hyperthyroidism may differ from that customarily employed since adrenocorticosteroid therapy may need to be extended until euthyroidism has been established before proceeding to splenectomy. When surgery is necessary, the risk of thyrotoxic storm should be anticipated, and the patient appropriately premedicated. PMID:6494085

  18. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  19. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26637747

  20. Marked Improvement in Refractory TTP Directly after H. pylori Eradication Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gringauz, Irina; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin Nard; Mangel, Tobin; Portnoy, Orith; Segal, Gad; Goren, Idan

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder involving thrombotic microangiopathy and is characterized by increased platelet aggregation throughout the body. Acquired TTP can be triggered by a variety of conditions including infections. We hereby describe a case report of an 81-year-old female presenting to the internal medicine department with TTP and active chronic gastritis, positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on biopsy. The TTP was highly resistant to medical therapy; however the patient underwent complete resolution of her TTP following H. pylori eradication. We conclude that acquired TTP may be triggered by H. pylori infection and that treating the underlying infection may play a role in improving TTP's outcome in some patients, especially when disease is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27127663