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Sample records for allosteric communication occurs

  1. SPACER: server for predicting allosteric communication and effects of regulation

    PubMed Central

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Mitternacht, Simon; Yong, Taipang; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2013-01-01

    The SPACER server provides an interactive framework for exploring allosteric communication in proteins with different sizes, degrees of oligomerization and function. SPACER uses recently developed theoretical concepts based on the thermodynamic view of allostery. It proposes easily tractable and meaningful measures that allow users to analyze the effect of ligand binding on the intrinsic protein dynamics. The server shows potential allosteric sites and allows users to explore communication between the regulatory and functional sites. It is possible to explore, for instance, potential effector binding sites in a given structure as targets for allosteric drugs. As input, the server only requires a single structure. The server is freely available at http://allostery.bii.a-star.edu.sg/. PMID:23737445

  2. The allosteric communication pathways in KIX domain of CBP

    PubMed Central

    Palazzesi, Ferruccio; Barducci, Alessandro; Tollinger, Martin; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric regulation plays an important role in a myriad of biomacromolecular processes. Specifically, in a protein, the process of allostery refers to the transmission of a local perturbation, such as ligand binding, to a distant site. Decades after the discovery of this phenomenon, models built on static images of proteins are being reconsidered with the knowledge that protein dynamics plays an important role in its function. Molecular dynamics simulations are a valuable tool for studying complex biomolecular systems, providing an atomistic description of their structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, their predictive power has been limited by the complexity of the biomolecule free-energy surface and by the length of the allosteric timescale (in the order of milliseconds). In this work, we are able to probe the origins of the allosteric changes that transcription factor mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) causes to the interactions of KIX domain of CREB-binding protein (CBP) with phosphorylated kinase inducible domain (pKID), by combing all-atom molecular dynamics with enhanced sampling methods recently developed in our group. We discuss our results in relation to previous NMR studies. We also develop a general simulations protocol to study allosteric phenomena and many other biological processes that occur in the micro/milliseconds timescale. PMID:23940332

  3. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-07-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM-MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM-MS data.

  4. Mass spectrometry locates local and allosteric conformational changes that occur on cofactor binding

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Rebecca; Migas, Lukasz G.; Payne, Karl A. P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David; Barran, Perdita E.

    2016-01-01

    Fdc1 is a decarboxylase enzyme that requires the novel prenylated FMN cofactor for activity. Here, we use it as an exemplar system to show how native top-down and bottom-up mass spectrometry can measure the structural effect of cofactor binding by a protein. For Fdc1Ubix, the cofactor confers structural stability to the enzyme. IM–MS shows the holo protein to exist in four closely related conformational families, the populations of which differ in the apo form; the two smaller families are more populated in the presence of the cofactor and depopulated in its absence. These findings, supported by MD simulations, indicate a more open structure for the apo form. HDX-MS reveals that while the dominant structural changes occur proximal to the cofactor-binding site, rearrangements on cofactor binding are evident throughout the protein, predominantly attributable to allosteric conformational tightening, consistent with IM–MS data. PMID:27418477

  5. Structure-Based Statistical Mechanical Model Accounts for the Causality and Energetics of Allosteric Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guarnera, Enrico; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is one of the pervasive mechanisms through which proteins in living systems carry out enzymatic activity, cell signaling, and metabolism control. Effective modeling of the protein function regulation requires a synthesis of the thermodynamic and structural views of allostery. We present here a structure-based statistical mechanical model of allostery, allowing one to observe causality of communication between regulatory and functional sites, and to estimate per residue free energy changes. Based on the consideration of ligand free and ligand bound systems in the context of a harmonic model, corresponding sets of characteristic normal modes are obtained and used as inputs for an allosteric potential. This potential quantifies the mean work exerted on a residue due to the local motion of its neighbors. Subsequently, in a statistical mechanical framework the entropic contribution to allosteric free energy of a residue is directly calculated from the comparison of conformational ensembles in the ligand free and ligand bound systems. As a result, this method provides a systematic approach for analyzing the energetics of allosteric communication based on a single structure. The feasibility of the approach was tested on a variety of allosteric proteins, heterogeneous in terms of size, topology and degree of oligomerization. The allosteric free energy calculations show the diversity of ways and complexity of scenarios existing in the phenomenology of allosteric causality and communication. The presented model is a step forward in developing the computational techniques aimed at detecting allosteric sites and obtaining the discriminative power between agonistic and antagonistic effectors, which are among the major goals in allosteric drug design. PMID:26939022

  6. Structure-Based Statistical Mechanical Model Accounts for the Causality and Energetics of Allosteric Communication.

    PubMed

    Guarnera, Enrico; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-03-01

    Allostery is one of the pervasive mechanisms through which proteins in living systems carry out enzymatic activity, cell signaling, and metabolism control. Effective modeling of the protein function regulation requires a synthesis of the thermodynamic and structural views of allostery. We present here a structure-based statistical mechanical model of allostery, allowing one to observe causality of communication between regulatory and functional sites, and to estimate per residue free energy changes. Based on the consideration of ligand free and ligand bound systems in the context of a harmonic model, corresponding sets of characteristic normal modes are obtained and used as inputs for an allosteric potential. This potential quantifies the mean work exerted on a residue due to the local motion of its neighbors. Subsequently, in a statistical mechanical framework the entropic contribution to allosteric free energy of a residue is directly calculated from the comparison of conformational ensembles in the ligand free and ligand bound systems. As a result, this method provides a systematic approach for analyzing the energetics of allosteric communication based on a single structure. The feasibility of the approach was tested on a variety of allosteric proteins, heterogeneous in terms of size, topology and degree of oligomerization. The allosteric free energy calculations show the diversity of ways and complexity of scenarios existing in the phenomenology of allosteric causality and communication. The presented model is a step forward in developing the computational techniques aimed at detecting allosteric sites and obtaining the discriminative power between agonistic and antagonistic effectors, which are among the major goals in allosteric drug design. PMID:26939022

  7. Coherent Conformational Degrees of Freedom as a Structural Basis for Allosteric Communication

    PubMed Central

    Mitternacht, Simon; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational changes in allosteric regulation can to a large extent be described as motion along one or a few coherent degrees of freedom. The states involved are inherent to the protein, in the sense that they are visited by the protein also in the absence of effector ligands. Previously, we developed the measure binding leverage to find sites where ligand binding can shift the conformational equilibrium of a protein. Binding leverage is calculated for a set of motion vectors representing independent conformational degrees of freedom. In this paper, to analyze allosteric communication between binding sites, we introduce the concept of leverage coupling, based on the assumption that only pairs of sites that couple to the same conformational degrees of freedom can be allosterically connected. We demonstrate how leverage coupling can be used to analyze allosteric communication in a range of enzymes (regulated by both ligand binding and post-translational modifications) and huge molecular machines such as chaperones. Leverage coupling can be calculated for any protein structure to analyze both biological and latent catalytic and regulatory sites. PMID:22174669

  8. Allosteric communication pathways and thermal rectification in PDZ-2 protein: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Miño-Galaz, Germán A

    2015-05-21

    Allosteric communication in proteins is a fundamental and yet unresolved problem of structural biochemistry. Previous findings, from computational biology ( Ota, N.; Agard, D. A. J. Mol. Biol. 2005 , 351 , 345 - 354 ), have proposed that heat diffuses in a protein through cognate protein allosteric pathways. This work studied heat diffusion in the well-known PDZ-2 protein, and confirmed that this protein has two cognate allosteric pathways and that heat flows preferentially through these. Also, a new property was also observed for protein structures: heat diffuses asymmetrically through the structures. The underling structure of this asymmetrical heat flow was a normal length hydrogen bond (∼2.85 Å) that acted as a thermal rectifier. In contrast, thermal rectification was compromised in short hydrogen bonds (∼2.60 Å), giving rise to symmetrical thermal diffusion. Asymmetrical heat diffusion was due, on a higher scale, to the local, structural organization of residues that, in turn, was also mediated by hydrogen bonds. This asymmetrical/symmetrical energy flow may be relevant for allosteric signal communication directionality in proteins and for the control of heat flow in materials science. PMID:25933631

  9. Modular architecture of protein structures and allosteric communications: potential implications for signaling proteins and regulatory linkages

    PubMed Central

    del Sol, Antonio; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Amoros, Dolors; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Background Allosteric communications are vital for cellular signaling. Here we explore a relationship between protein architectural organization and shortcuts in signaling pathways. Results We show that protein domains consist of modules interconnected by residues that mediate signaling through the shortest pathways. These mediating residues tend to be located at the inter-modular boundaries, which are more rigid and display a larger number of long-range interactions than intra-modular regions. The inter-modular boundaries contain most of the residues centrally conserved in the protein fold, which may be crucial for information transfer between amino acids. Our approach to modular decomposition relies on a representation of protein structures as residue-interacting networks, and removal of the most central residue contacts, which are assumed to be crucial for allosteric communications. The modular decomposition of 100 multi-domain protein structures indicates that modules constitute the building blocks of domains. The analysis of 13 allosteric proteins revealed that modules characterize experimentally identified functional regions. Based on the study of an additional functionally annotated dataset of 115 proteins, we propose that high-modularity modules include functional sites and are the basic functional units. We provide examples (the Gαs subunit and P450 cytochromes) to illustrate that the modular architecture of active sites is linked to their functional specialization. Conclusion Our method decomposes protein structures into modules, allowing the study of signal transmission between functional sites. A modular configuration might be advantageous: it allows signaling proteins to expand their regulatory linkages and may elicit a broader range of control mechanisms either via modular combinations or through modulation of inter-modular linkages. PMID:17531094

  10. Identifying paths of allosteric communication in the protein BirA through simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Gregory; Beckett, Dorothy; Matysiak, Silvina

    Biotin ligase/repressor (BirA) is a bifunctional enzyme which adenylates biotin and transfers the product, biotinyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP) to biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP). In the absence of BCCP, bio-5'-AMP promotes the dimerization of BirA. In dimer form, the BirA.bio-5'-AMP complex is able to bind to the biotin operator and prevents further synthesis of biotin. The bio-5'-AMP binds away from the dimer interface, so it is acting as an allosteric activator. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with BirA to look at fluctuations within the protein at equilibrium. We simulate apoBirA, liganded BirA, as well as two mutants, M211A and V219A. In agreement with experimental observations, several loops of the protein become stabilized for the liganded BirA when compared to the apo protein. In addition, changes in the dimer interface are observed for the M211A and V219A mutations, which are located in the ligand binding region. Using inter-residue correlation coefficients and pair energies a communication network through the protein is constructed. With this network we have identified paths which have the potential to be important in allosteric activation of BirA. These paths and the methods we use to identify them will be presented.

  11. GSATools: analysis of allosteric communication and functional local motions using a structural alphabet

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: GSATools is a free software package to analyze conformational ensembles and to detect functional motions in proteins by means of a structural alphabet. The software integrates with the widely used GROMACS simulation package and can generate a range of graphical outputs. Three applications can be supported: (i) investigation of the conformational variability of local structures; (ii) detection of allosteric communication; and (iii) identification of local regions that are critical for global functional motions. These analyses provide insights into the dynamics of proteins and allow for targeted design of functional mutants in theoretical and experimental studies. Availability: The C source code of the GSATools, along with a set of pre-compiled binaries, is freely available under GNU General Public License from http://mathbio.nimr.mrc.ac.uk/wiki/GSATools. Contact: alessandro.pandini@kcl.ac.uk or jkleinj@nimr.mrc.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23740748

  12. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D.; Rodriguez, Gustavo J.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues. PMID:26979958

  13. Intramolecular allosteric communication in dopamine D2 receptor revealed by evolutionary amino acid covariation.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yun-Min; Wilkins, Angela D; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Wensel, Theodore G; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-03-29

    The structural basis of allosteric signaling in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is important in guiding design of therapeutics and understanding phenotypic consequences of genetic variation. The Evolutionary Trace (ET) algorithm previously proved effective in redesigning receptors to mimic the ligand specificities of functionally distinct homologs. We now expand ET to consider mutual information, with validation in GPCR structure and dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) function. The new algorithm, called ET-MIp, identifies evolutionarily relevant patterns of amino acid covariations. The improved predictions of structural proximity and D2R mutagenesis demonstrate that ET-MIp predicts functional interactions between residue pairs, particularly potency and efficacy of activation by dopamine. Remarkably, although most of the residue pairs chosen for mutagenesis are neither in the binding pocket nor in contact with each other, many exhibited functional interactions, implying at-a-distance coupling. The functional interaction between the coupled pairs correlated best with the evolutionary coupling potential derived from dopamine receptor sequences rather than with broader sets of GPCR sequences. These data suggest that the allosteric communication responsible for dopamine responses is resolved by ET-MIp and best discerned within a short evolutionary distance. Most double mutants restored dopamine response to wild-type levels, also suggesting that tight regulation of the response to dopamine drove the coevolution and intramolecular communications between coupled residues. Our approach provides a general tool to identify evolutionary covariation patterns in small sets of close sequence homologs and to translate them into functional linkages between residues. PMID:26979958

  14. Allosteric communication in myosin V: from small conformational changes to large directed movements.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, M; Houdusse, A; Karplus, M

    2008-01-01

    The rigor to post-rigor transition in myosin, a consequence of ATP binding, plays an essential role in the Lymn-Taylor functional cycle because it results in the dissociation of the actomyosin complex after the powerstroke. On the basis of the X-ray structures of myosin V, we have developed a new normal mode superposition model for the transition path between the two states. Rigid-body motions of the various subdomains and specific residues at the subdomain interfaces are key elements in the transition. The allosteric communication between the nucleotide binding site and the U50/L50 cleft is shown to result from local changes due to ATP binding, which induce large amplitude motions that are encoded in the structure of the protein. The triggering event is the change in the interaction of switch I and the P-loop, which is stabilized by ATP binding. The motion of switch I, which is a relatively rigid element of the U50 subdomain, leads directly to a partial opening of the U50/L50 cleft; the latter is expected to weaken the binding of myosin to actin. The calculated transition path demonstrates the nature of the subdomain coupling and offers an explanation for the mutual exclusion of ATP and actin binding. The mechanism of the uncoupling of the converter from the motor head, an essential part of the transition, is elucidated. The origin of the partial untwisting of the central beta-sheet in the rigor to post-rigor transition is described. PMID:18704171

  15. A conserved activation cluster is required for allosteric communication in HtrA-family proteases.

    PubMed

    de Regt, Anna K; Kim, Seokhee; Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-03-01

    In E. coli, outer-membrane stress causes a transcriptional response through a signaling cascade initiated by DegS cleavage of a transmembrane antisigma factor. Each subunit of DegS, an HtrA-family protease, contains a protease domain and a PDZ domain. The trimeric protease domain is autoinhibited by the unliganded PDZ domains. Allosteric activation requires binding of unassembled outer-membrane proteins (OMPs) to the PDZ domains and protein substrate binding. Here, we identify a set of DegS residues that cluster together at subunit-subunit interfaces in the trimer, link the active sites and substrate binding sites, and are crucial for stabilizing the active enzyme conformation in response to OMP signaling. These residues are conserved across the HtrA-protease family, including orthologs linked to human disease, supporting a common mechanism of allosteric activation. Indeed, mutation of residues at homologous positions in the DegP quality-control protease also eliminates allosteric activation. PMID:25703375

  16. Discovery of naturally occurring aurones that are potent allosteric inhibitors of hepatitis C virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Haudecoeur, Romain; Ahmed-Belkacem, Abdelhakim; Yi, Wei; Fortuné, Antoine; Brillet, Rozenn; Belle, Catherine; Nicolle, Edwige; Pallier, Coralie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2011-01-01

    We have identified naturally occurring 2-benzylidenebenzofuran-3-ones (aurones) as new templates for non-nucleoside hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) inhibitors. The aurone target site, identified by site-directed mutagenesis, is located in Thumb Pocket I of HCV RdRp. The RdRp inhibitory activity of 42 aurones was rationally explored in an enzyme assay. Molecular docking studies were used to determine how aurones bind to HCV RdRp and to predict their range of inhibitory activity. Seven aurone derivatives were found to have potent inhibitory effects on HCV RdRp, with IC50s below 5 μM and excellent selectivity. The most active aurone analogue was (Z)-2-((1-butyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-4,6-dihydroxybenzofuran-3(2H)-one (compound 51), with an IC50 of 2.2 μM. Their potent RdRp inhibitory activity, together with their low toxicity, make these molecules attractive candidate direct-acting anti-HCV agents. PMID:21699179

  17. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G.; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes’ light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical ‘aureo box’, TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  18. Allosteric communication between DNA-binding and light-responsive domains of diatom class I aureochromes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ankan; Herman, Elena; Serif, Manuel; Maestre-Reyna, Manuel; Hepp, Sebastian; Pokorny, Richard; Kroth, Peter G; Essen, Lars-Oliver; Kottke, Tilman

    2016-07-01

    The modular architecture of aureochrome blue light receptors, found in several algal groups including diatoms, is unique by having the LOV-type photoreceptor domain fused to the C-terminus of its putative effector, an N-terminal DNA-binding bZIP module. The structural and functional understanding of aureochromes' light-dependent signaling mechanism is limited, despite their promise as an optogenetic tool. We show that class I aureochromes 1a and 1c from the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum are regulated in a light-independent circadian rhythm. These aureochromes are capable to form functional homo- and heterodimers, which recognize the ACGT core sequence within the canonical 'aureo box', TGACGT, in a light-independent manner. The bZIP domain holds a more folded and less flexible but extended conformation in the duplex DNA-bound state. FT-IR spectroscopy in the absence and the presence of DNA shows light-dependent helix unfolding in the LOV domain, which leads to conformational changes in the bZIP region. The solution structure of DNA bound to aureochrome points to a tilted orientation that was further validated by molecular dynamics simulations. We propose that aureochrome signaling relies on an allosteric pathway from LOV to bZIP that results in conformational changes near the bZIP-DNA interface without major effects on the binding affinity. PMID:27179025

  19. Allosteric Mechanisms in Chaperonin Machines.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ranit; Horovitz, Amnon

    2016-06-01

    Chaperonins are nanomachines that facilitate protein folding by undergoing energy (ATP)-dependent movements that are coordinated in time and space owing to complex allosteric regulation. They consist of two back-to-back stacked oligomeric rings with a cavity at each end where protein substrate folding can take place. Here, we focus on the GroEL/GroES chaperonin system from Escherichia coli and, to a lesser extent, on the more poorly characterized eukaryotic chaperonin CCT/TRiC. We describe their various functional (allosteric) states and how they are affected by substrates and allosteric effectors that include ATP, ADP, nonfolded protein substrates, potassium ions, and GroES (in the case of GroEL). We also discuss the pathways of intra- and inter-ring allosteric communication by which they interconvert and the coupling between allosteric transitions and protein folding reactions. PMID:26726755

  20. Allosteric modulation of caspases.

    PubMed

    Häcker, Hans-Georg; Sisay, Mihiret Tekeste; Gütschow, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Caspases are proteolytic enzymes mainly involved in the induction and execution phases of apoptosis. This type of programmed cell death is an essential regulatory process required to maintain the integrity and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. Inappropriate apoptosis is attributed a key role in many human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, ischemic damage, autoimmune diseases and cancer. Allosteric modulation of the function of a protein occurs when the regulatory trigger, such as the binding of a small effector or inhibitor molecule, takes place some distance from the protein's active site. In recent years, several caspases have been identified that possess allosteric sites and binding of small molecule to these sites resulted in the modulation of enzyme activities. Regulation of caspase activity by small molecule allosteric modulators is believed to be of great therapeutic importance. In this review we give brief highlights on recent developments in identifying and characterizing natural and synthetic allosteric inhibitors as well as activators of caspases and discuss their potential in drug discovery and protein engineering. PMID:21807025

  1. Enhancing allosteric inhibition in Thermus thermophilus Phosphofructokinase.

    PubMed

    McGresham, Maria S; Reinhart, Gregory D

    2015-01-27

    The coupling between the binding of the substrate Fru-6-P and the inhibitor phospho(enol)pyruvate (PEP) in phosphofructokinase (PFK) from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus is much weaker than that seen in a PFK from Bacillus stearothermophilus. From the crystal structures of Bacillus stearothermophilus PFK (BsPFK) the residues at positions 59, 158, and 215 in BsPFK are located on the path leading from the allosteric site to the nearest active site and are part of the intricate hydrogen-bonding network connecting the two sites. Substituting the corresponding residues in Thermus thermophilus PFK (TtPFK) with the amino acids found at these positions in BsPFK allowed us to enhance the allosteric inhibition by PEP by nearly 3 kcal mol(-1) (50-fold) to a value greater than or equal to the coupling observed in BsPFK. Interestingly, each single variant N59D, A158T, and S215H produced a roughly 1 kcal mol(-1) increase in coupling free energy of inhibition. The effects of these variants were essentially additive in the three combinations of double variants N59D/A158T, N59D/S215H, and A158T/S215H as well as in the triple variant N59D/A158T/S215H. Consequently, while the hydrogen-bonding network identified is likely involved in the inhibitory allosteric communication, a model requiring a linked chain of interactions connecting the sites is not supported by these data. Despite the fact that the allosteric activator of the bacterial PFK, MgADP, binds at the same allosteric site, the substitutions at positions 59, 158, and 215 do not have an equally dramatic effect on the binding affinity and the allosteric activation by MgADP. The effect of the S215H and N59D/A158T/S215H substitutions on the activation by MgADP could not be determined because of a dramatic drop in MgADP binding affinity that resulted from the S215H substitution. The single variants N59D and A158T supported binding but showed little change in the free energy of activation by MgADP compared to the wild

  2. Insights into protein -- DNA interactions, stability and allosteric communications: A computational study of MutS-DNA recognition complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negureanu, Lacramioara; Salsbury, Freddie

    2012-02-01

    DNA mismatch repair proteins (MMR) maintain genetic stability by recognizing and repairing mismatched bases and insertion/deletion loops mistakenly incorporated during DNA replication, and initiate cellular response to certain types of DNA damage. The most abundant MMR mismatch-binding factor in eukaryotes, MutS, recognizes and initiates the repair of base-base mismatches and small insertion/deletions. We performed molecular dynamics simulations on mismatched and damaged MutS-DNA complexes. A comprehensive DNA binding site analysis of relevant conformations shows that MutS proteins recognize the mismatched and platinum cross-linked DNA substrates in significantly different modes. Distinctive conformational changes associated with MutS binding to mismatched and damaged DNA have been identified and they provide insight into the involvement of MMR proteins in DNA-repair and DNA-damage pathways. Stability and allosteric interactions at the heterodimer interface associated with the mismatch and damage recognition step allow for prediction of key residues in MMR cancer-causing mutations. A rigorous hydrogen bonding analysis for ADP molecules at the ATPase binding sites is also presented. A large number of known MMR cancer causing mutations among the residues were found.

  3. Dancing through Life: Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Network-Centric Modeling of Allosteric Mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 Chaperone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones play an important role in regulating cellular processes that involve protein folding and stabilization, which are essential for the integrity of signaling networks. Although many aspects of allosteric regulatory mechanisms in Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones have been extensively studied and significantly advanced in recent experimental studies, the atomistic picture of signal propagation and energetics of dynamics-based communication still remain unresolved. In this work, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and protein stability analysis of the chaperone structures with the network modeling of residue interaction networks to characterize molecular determinants of allosteric mechanisms. We have shown that allosteric mechanisms of Hsp70 and Hsp110 chaperones may be primarily determined by nucleotide-induced redistribution of local conformational ensembles in the inter-domain regions and the substrate binding domain. Conformational dynamics and energetics of the peptide substrate binding with the Hsp70 structures has been analyzed using free energy calculations, revealing allosteric hotspots that control negative cooperativity between regulatory sites. The results have indicated that cooperative interactions may promote a population-shift mechanism in Hsp70, in which functional residues are organized in a broad and robust allosteric network that can link the nucleotide-binding site and the substrate-binding regions. A smaller allosteric network in Hsp110 structures may elicit an entropy-driven allostery that occurs in the absence of global structural changes. We have found that global mediating residues with high network centrality may be organized in stable local communities that are indispensable for structural stability and efficient allosteric communications. The network-centric analysis of allosteric interactions has also established that centrality of functional residues could correlate with their sensitivity to mutations

  4. The structural basis of ATP as an allosteric modulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  5. The Structural Basis of ATP as an Allosteric Modulator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qi; Shen, Qiancheng; Li, Shuai; Nussinov, Ruth; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-triphosphate (ATP) is generally regarded as a substrate for energy currency and protein modification. Recent findings uncovered the allosteric function of ATP in cellular signal transduction but little is understood about this critical behavior of ATP. Through extensive analysis of ATP in solution and proteins, we found that the free ATP can exist in the compact and extended conformations in solution, and the two different conformational characteristics may be responsible for ATP to exert distinct biological functions: ATP molecules adopt both compact and extended conformations in the allosteric binding sites but conserve extended conformations in the substrate binding sites. Nudged elastic band simulations unveiled the distinct dynamic processes of ATP binding to the corresponding allosteric and substrate binding sites of uridine monophosphate kinase, and suggested that in solution ATP preferentially binds to the substrate binding sites of proteins. When the ATP molecules occupy the allosteric binding sites, the allosteric trigger from ATP to fuel allosteric communication between allosteric and functional sites is stemmed mainly from the triphosphate part of ATP, with a small number from the adenine part of ATP. Taken together, our results provide overall understanding of ATP allosteric functions responsible for regulation in biological systems. PMID:25211773

  6. Links between Co-Occurring Social-Communication and Hyperactive-Inattentive Trait Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Pourcain, Beate; Mandy, William P.; Heron, Jon; Golding, Jean; Smith, George Davey; Skuse, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is overlap between an autistic and hyperactive-inattentive symptomatology when studied cross-sectionally. This study is the first to examine the longitudinal pattern of association between social-communication deficits and hyperactive-inattentive symptoms in the general population, from childhood through adolescence. We explored…

  7. The allosteric switching mechanism in bacteriophage MS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkett, Matthew R.; Mirijanian, Dina T.; Hagan, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    We use all-atom simulations to elucidate the mechanisms underlying conformational switching and allostery within the coat protein of the bacteriophage MS2. Assembly of most icosahedral virus capsids requires that the capsid protein adopts different conformations at precise locations within the capsid. It has been shown that a 19 nucleotide stem loop (TR) from the MS2 genome acts as an allosteric effector, guiding conformational switching of the coat protein during capsid assembly. Since the principal conformational changes occur far from the TR binding site, it is important to understand the molecular mechanism underlying this allosteric communication. To this end, we use all-atom simulations with explicit water combined with a path sampling technique to sample the MS2 coat protein conformational transition, in the presence and absence of TR-binding. The calculations find that TR binding strongly alters the transition free energy profile, leading to a switch in the favored conformation. We discuss changes in molecular interactions responsible for this shift. We then identify networks of amino acids with correlated motions to reveal the mechanism by which effects of TR binding span the protein. We find that TR binding strongly affects residues located at the 5-fold and quasi-sixfold interfaces in the assembled capsid, suggesting a mechanism by which the TR binding could direct formation of the native capsid geometry. The analysis predicts amino acids whose substitution by mutagenesis could alter populations of the conformational substates or their transition rates.

  8. Evaluation of multiple schedules with naturally occurring and therapist-arranged discriminative stimuli following functional communication training.

    PubMed

    Shamlian, Kenneth D; Fisher, Wayne W; Steege, Mark W; Cavanaugh, Brenna M; Samour, Kristina; Querim, Angie C

    2016-06-01

    Many studies have shown that (a) functional communication training (FCT) is effective for reducing problem behavior, and (b) multiple schedules can facilitate reinforcer schedule thinning during FCT. Most studies tha have used multiple schedules with FCT have included therapist-arranged stimuli (e.g., colored cards) as the discriminative stimuli (S(D) s), but recently, researchers have evaluated similar multiple-schedule training procedures with naturally occurring S(D) s (e.g., overt therapist behavior). The purposes of the current study were to compare the effects of arranged and naturally occurring S(D) s directly during (a) acquisition of discriminated functional communication responses (FCRs) and (b) generalization of discriminated FCRs when we introduced the multiple schedules in novel contexts in which the naturally occurring stimuli were either relatively easy or difficult to discriminate. Results showed that (a) 2 of 3 participants acquired discriminated responding of the FCR more rapidly with arranged than with naturally occurring stimuli, (b) 2 of 3 participants showed resurgence of problem behavior , and (c) 2 of 3 participants showed greater generalization of discriminated responding to novel contexts with arranged stimuli than with naturally occurring stimuli. We discuss these results relative to the conditions under which naturally occurring and arranged S(D) s may promote rapid and generalized treatment gains. PMID:26790565

  9. Controlling allosteric networks in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokholyan, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    We present a novel methodology based on graph theory and discrete molecular dynamics simulations for delineating allosteric pathways in proteins. We use this methodology to uncover the structural mechanisms responsible for coupling of distal sites on proteins and utilize it for allosteric modulation of proteins. We will present examples where inference of allosteric networks and its rewiring allows us to ``rescue'' cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a protein associated with fatal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. We also use our methodology to control protein function allosterically. We design a novel protein domain that can be inserted into identified allosteric site of target protein. Using a drug that binds to our domain, we alter the function of the target protein. We successfully tested this methodology in vitro, in living cells and in zebrafish. We further demonstrate transferability of our allosteric modulation methodology to other systems and extend it to become ligh-activatable.

  10. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Thomas L; Townsend, Philip D; Burnell, David; Jones, Matthew L; Richards, Shane A; McLeish, Tom C B; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R; Cann, Martin J

    2013-09-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have been selected to

  11. Modulation of Global Low-Frequency Motions Underlies Allosteric Regulation: Demonstration in CRP/FNR Family Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Burnell, David; Jones, Matthew L.; Richards, Shane A.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Cann, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein “design space” that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have been selected to

  12. Allosteric Motions in Structures of Yeast NAD+-Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor,A.; Hu, G.; Hart, P.; McAlister-Henn, L.

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) are key regulators of flux through biosynthetic and oxidative pathways in response to cellular energy levels. Here we present the first structures of a eukaryotic member of this enzyme family, the allosteric, hetero-octameric, NAD+-specific IDH from yeast in three forms: (1) without ligands, (2) with bound analog citrate, and (3) with bound citrate + AMP. The structures reveal the molecular basis for ligand binding to homologous but distinct regulatory and catalytic sites positioned at the interfaces between IDH1 and IDH2 subunits and define pathways of communication between heterodimers and heterotetramers in the hetero-octamer. Disulfide bonds observed at the heterotetrameric interfaces in the unliganded IDH hetero-octamer are reduced in the ligand-bound forms, suggesting a redox regulatory mechanism that may be analogous to the 'on-off' regulation of non-allosteric bacterial IDHs via phosphorylation. The results strongly suggest that eukaryotic IDH enzymes are exquisitely tuned to ensure that allosteric activation occurs only when concentrations of isocitrate are elevated.

  13. Probability-dependent H ∞ filtering for nonlinear stochastic systems with missing measurements and randomly occurring communication delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Yan; Shu, Huisheng; Yang, Hua; Ding, Derui

    2013-07-01

    In this article, the H ∞ filtering problem is investigated for a class of nonlinear stochastic systems with incomplete measurements. The considered incomplete measurements include both the missing measurements and the randomly occurring communication delays. By using a set of Kronecker delta functions, a unified measurement model is employed to describe the phenomena of random communication delays and missing measurements. The purpose of the problem addressed is to design an H ∞ filter such that, for all nonlinearities, incomplete measurements and external disturbances, the filtering error dynamics is exponentially mean-square stable and the H ∞-norm requirement is satisfied. A sufficient condition for the existence of the desired filter is established in terms of certain linear matrix inequalities. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filter scheme.

  14. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  15. Allosterism at muscarinic receptors: ligands and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J M; Lazareno, S

    2005-06-01

    The evaluation of allosteric ligands at muscarinic receptors is discussed in terms of the ability of the experimental data to be interpreted by the allosteric ternary complex model. The compilation of useful SAR information of allosteric ligands is not simple, especially for muscarinic receptors, where there are multiple allosteric sites and complex interactions. PMID:15974931

  16. Pathways of allosteric regulation in Hsp70 chaperones.

    PubMed

    Kityk, Roman; Vogel, Markus; Schlecht, Rainer; Bukau, Bernd; Mayer, Matthias P

    2015-01-01

    Central to the protein folding activity of Hsp70 chaperones is their ability to interact with protein substrates in an ATP-controlled manner, which relies on allosteric regulation between their nucleotide-binding (NBD) and substrate-binding domains (SBD). Here we dissect this mechanism by analysing mutant variants of the Escherichia coli Hsp70 DnaK blocked at distinct steps of allosteric communication. We show that the SBD inhibits ATPase activity by interacting with the NBD through a highly conserved hydrogen bond network, and define the signal transduction pathway that allows bound substrates to trigger ATP hydrolysis. We identify variants deficient in only one direction of allosteric control and demonstrate that ATP-induced substrate release is more important for chaperone activity than substrate-stimulated ATP hydrolysis. These findings provide evidence of an unexpected dichotomic allostery mechanism in Hsp70 chaperones and provide the basis for a comprehensive mechanical model of allostery in Hsp70s. PMID:26383706

  17. Allosteric control in a metalloprotein dramatically alters function

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Elizabeth Leigh; Zuris, John A.; Wang, Charles; Vo, Phu Luong T.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Paddock, Mark L.; Nechushtai, Rachel; Onuchic, Jose N.; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    Metalloproteins (MPs) comprise one-third of all known protein structures. This diverse set of proteins contain a plethora of unique inorganic moieties capable of performing chemistry that would otherwise be impossible using only the amino acids found in nature. Most of the well-studied MPs are generally viewed as being very rigid in structure, and it is widely thought that the properties of the metal centers are primarily determined by the small fraction of amino acids that make up the local environment. Here we examine both theoretically and experimentally whether distal regions can influence the metal center in the diabetes drug target mitoNEET. We demonstrate that a loop (L2) 20 Å away from the metal center exerts allosteric control over the cluster binding domain and regulates multiple properties of the metal center. Mutagenesis of L2 results in significant shifts in the redox potential of the [2Fe-2S] cluster and orders of magnitude effects on the rate of [2Fe-2S] cluster transfer to an apo-acceptor protein. These surprising effects occur in the absence of any structural changes. An examination of the native basin dynamics of the protein using all-atom simulations shows that twisting in L2 controls scissoring in the cluster binding domain and results in perturbations to one of the cluster-coordinating histidines. These allosteric effects are in agreement with previous folding simulations that predicted L2 could communicate with residues surrounding the metal center. Our findings suggest that long-range dynamical changes in the protein backbone can have a significant effect on the functional properties of MPs. PMID:23271805

  18. Allosteric proteins as logarithmic sensors

    PubMed Central

    Olsman, Noah; Goentoro, Lea

    2016-01-01

    Many sensory systems, from vision and hearing in animals to signal transduction in cells, respond to fold changes in signal relative to background. Responding to fold change requires that the system senses signal on a logarithmic scale, responding identically to a change in signal level from 1 to 3, or from 10 to 30. It is an ongoing search in the field to understand the ways in which a logarithmic sensor can be implemented at the molecular level. In this work, we present evidence that logarithmic sensing can be implemented with a single protein, by means of allosteric regulation. Specifically, we find that mathematical models show that allosteric proteins can respond to stimuli on a logarithmic scale. Next, we present evidence from measurements in the literature that some allosteric proteins do operate in a parameter regime that permits logarithmic sensing. Finally, we present examples suggesting that allosteric proteins are indeed used in this capacity: allosteric proteins play a prominent role in systems where fold-change detection has been proposed. This finding suggests a role as logarithmic sensors for the many allosteric proteins across diverse biological processes. PMID:27410043

  19. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  20. Doing justice to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Evelyn Fox

    2015-06-01

    Jacques Monod gave us not only our first regulatory system, but also our first smart molecules - i.e., he gave us allosteric proteins. But both of these contributions hung in a certain tension with his primary commitments. In particular, I focus here on the ways in which his ontological commitments constrained his thinking about the power of allostery. Although he wrote that "so far as regulation through allosteric interaction is concerned, everything is possible", for him, not everything was conceivable. In particular, what was not conceivable was a challenge to the primacy of DNA. PMID:25908117

  1. Functional anatomy of an allosteric protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Prasad; Gupta, Shaweta; Jadey, Snehal; Auerbach, Anthony

    2013-12-01

    Synaptic receptors are allosteric proteins that switch on and off to regulate cell signalling. Here, we use single-channel electrophysiology to measure and map energy changes in the gating conformational change of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Two separated regions in the α-subunits—the transmitter-binding sites and αM2-αM3 linkers in the membrane domain—have the highest ϕ-values (change conformation the earliest), followed by the extracellular domain, most of the membrane domain and the gate. Large gating-energy changes occur at the transmitter-binding sites, α-subunit interfaces, the αM1 helix and the gate. We hypothesize that rearrangements of the linkers trigger the global allosteric transition, and that the hydrophobic gate unlocks in three steps. The mostly local character of side-chain energy changes and the similarly high ϕ-values of separated domains, both with and without ligands, suggest that gating is not strictly a mechanical process initiated by the affinity change for the agonist.

  2. Contact rearrangements form coupled networks from local motions in allosteric proteins.

    PubMed

    Daily, Michael D; Upadhyaya, Tarak J; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2008-04-01

    Allosteric proteins bind an effector molecule at one site resulting in a functional change at a second site. We hypothesize that networks of contacts altered, formed, or broken are a significant contributor to allosteric communication in proteins. In this work, we identify which interactions change significantly between the residue-residue contact networks of two allosteric structures, and then organize these changes into graphs. We perform the analysis on 15 pairs of allosteric structures with effector and substrate each present in at least one of the two structures. Most proteins exhibit large, dense regions of contact rearrangement, and the graphs form connected paths between allosteric effector and substrate sites in five of these proteins. In the remaining 10 proteins, large-scale conformational changes such as rigid-body motions are likely required in addition to contact rearrangement networks to account for substrate-effector communication. On average, clusters which contain at least one substrate or effector molecule comprise 20% of the protein. These allosteric graphs are small worlds; that is, they typically have mean shortest path lengths comparable to those of corresponding random graphs and average clustering coefficients enhanced relative to those of random graphs. The networks capture 60-80% of known allostery-perturbing mutants in three proteins, and the metrics degree and closeness are statistically good discriminators of mutant residues from nonmutant residues within the networks in two of these three proteins. For two proteins, coevolving clusters of residues which have been hypothesized to be allosterically important differ from the regions with the most contact rearrangement. Residues and contacts which modulate normal mode fluctuations also often participate in the contact rearrangement networks. In summary, residue-residue contact rearrangement networks provide useful representations of the portions of allosteric pathways resulting from

  3. Allosteric Communication in the Dynein Motor Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bhabha, Gira; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Nan; Moeller, Arne; Liao, Maofu; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Cheng, Yifan; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dyneins power microtubule motility using ring-shaped, AAA-containing motor domains. Here, we report X-ray and electron microscopy (EM) structures of yeast dynein bound to different ATP analogs, which collectively provide insight into the roles of dynein’s two major ATPase sites, AAA1 and AAA3, in the conformational change mechanism. ATP binding to AAA1 triggers a cascade of conformational changes that propagate to all six AAA domains and cause a large movement of the “linker,” dynein’s mechanical element. In contrast to the role of AAA1 in driving motility, nucleotide transitions in AAA3 gate the transmission of conformational changes between AAA1 and the linker, suggesting that AAA3 acts as a regulatory switch. Further structural and mutational studies also uncover a role for the linker in regulating the catalytic cycle of AAA1. Together, these results reveal how dynein’s two major ATP-binding sites initiate and modulate conformational changes in the motor domain during motility. PMID:25417161

  4. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jakubík, Jan; El-Fakahany, Esam E.

    2010-01-01

    An allosteric modulator is a ligand that binds to an allosteric site on the receptor and changes receptor conformation to produce increase (positive cooperativity) or decrease (negative cooperativity) in the binding or action of an orthosteric agonist (e.g., acetylcholine). Since the identification of gallamine as the first allosteric modulator of muscarinic receptors in 1976, this unique mode of receptor modulation has been intensively studied by many groups. This review summarizes over 30 years of research on the molecular mechanisms of allosteric interactions of drugs with the receptor and for new allosteric modulators of muscarinic receptors with potential therapeutic use. Identification of positive modulators of acetylcholine binding and function that enhance neurotransmission and the discovery of highly selective allosteric modulators are mile-stones on the way to novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and other disorders involving impaired cognitive function.

  5. Allosteric regulation of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Taly, Antoine; Hénin, Jérôme; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Cecchini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger—a neurotransmitter—into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. They are oligomeric assemblies that provide prototypical examples of allosterically regulated integral membrane proteins. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism based on the X-ray structures of both prokaryotic and invertebrate eukaryotic pLGICs and on atomistic Molecular Dynamics simulations. The present results suggest that ion gating involves a large structural reorganization of the molecule mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions, a global twisting and the blooming of the extracellular domain, which can be modulated by ligand binding at the topographically distinct orthosteric and allosteric sites. The emerging model of gating is consistent with a wealth of functional studies and will boost the development of novel pharmacological strategies. PMID:25478624

  6. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Phillip C.; Martin, Bryan T.; Wright, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  7. NMR Characterization of Information Flow and Allosteric Communities in the MAP Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Aoto, Phillip C; Martin, Bryan T; Wright, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The intramolecular network structure of a protein provides valuable insights into allosteric sites and communication pathways. However, a straightforward method to comprehensively map and characterize these pathways is not currently available. Here we present an approach to characterize intramolecular network structure using NMR chemical shift perturbations. We apply the method to the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38γ. p38γ contains allosteric sites that are conserved among eukaryotic kinases as well as unique to the MAPK family. How these regulatory sites communicate with catalytic residues is not well understood. Using our method, we observe and characterize for the first time information flux between regulatory sites through a conserved kinase infrastructure. This network is accessed, reinforced, and broken in various states of p38γ, reflecting the functional state of the protein. We demonstrate that the approach detects critical junctions in the network corresponding to biologically significant allosteric sites and pathways. PMID:27353957

  8. Probing Allosteric Inhibition Mechanisms of the Hsp70 Chaperone Proteins Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Analysis of the Residue Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Stetz, Gabrielle; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2016-08-22

    Although molecular mechanisms of allosteric regulation in the Hsp70 chaperones have been extensively studied at both structural and functional levels, the current understanding of allosteric inhibition of chaperone activities by small molecules is still lacking. In the current study, using a battery of computational approaches, we probed allosteric inhibition mechanisms of E. coli Hsp70 (DnaK) and human Hsp70 proteins by small molecule inhibitors PET-16 and novolactone. Molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis were combined with network-based modeling of residue interactions and allosteric communications to systematically characterize and compare molecular signatures of the apo form, substrate-bound, and inhibitor-bound chaperone complexes. The results suggested a mechanism by which the allosteric inhibitors may leverage binding energy hotspots in the interaction networks to stabilize a specific conformational state and impair the interdomain allosteric control. Using the network-based centrality analysis and community detection, we demonstrated that substrate binding may strengthen the connectivity of local interaction communities, leading to a dense interaction network that can promote an efficient allosteric communication. In contrast, binding of PET-16 to DnaK may induce significant dynamic changes and lead to a fractured interaction network and impaired allosteric communications in the DnaK complex. By using a mechanistic-based analysis of distance fluctuation maps and allosteric propensities of protein residues, we determined that the allosteric network in the PET-16 complex may be small and localized due to the reduced communication and low cooperativity of the substrate binding loops, which may promote the higher rates of substrate dissociation and the decreased substrate affinity. In comparison with the significant effect of PET-16, binding of novolactone to HSPA1A may cause only moderate network changes and preserve allosteric

  9. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.

    2012-05-25

    Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the A{beta} peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  10. Identification of the Allosteric Regulatory Site of Insulysin

    SciTech Connect

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bhasin, Sonia K.; Song, Eun Suk; Scoggin, Kirsten E.; Juliano, Maria A.; Juliano, Luiz; Hersh, Louis B.; Rodgers, David W.; Gerrard, Juliet Ann

    2011-06-24

    Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) is responsible for the metabolism of insulin and plays a role in clearance of the Aβ peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease. Unlike most proteolytic enzymes, IDE, which consists of four structurally related domains and exists primarily as a dimer, exhibits allosteric kinetics, being activated by both small substrate peptides and polyphosphates such as ATP. Principal Findings The crystal structure of a catalytically compromised mutant of IDE has electron density for peptide ligands bound at the active site in domain 1 and a distal site in domain 2. Mutating residues in the distal site eliminates allosteric kinetics and activation by a small peptide, as well as greatly reducing activation by ATP, demonstrating that this site plays a key role in allostery. Comparison of the peptide bound IDE structure (using a low activity E111F IDE mutant) with unliganded wild type IDE shows a change in the interface between two halves of the clamshell-like molecule, which may enhance enzyme activity by altering the equilibrium between closed and open conformations. In addition, changes in the dimer interface suggest a basis for communication between subunits. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that a region remote from the active site mediates allosteric activation of insulysin by peptides. Activation may involve a small conformational change that weakens the interface between two halves of the enzyme.

  11. Allosteric function and dysfunction of the prion protein.

    PubMed

    Linden, Rafael; Cordeiro, Yraima; Lima, Luis Mauricio T R

    2012-04-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are neurodegenerative diseases associated with progressive oligo- and multimerization of the prion protein (PrP(C)), its conformational conversion, aggregation and precipitation. We recently proposed that PrP(C) serves as a cell surface scaffold protein for a variety of signaling modules, the effects of which translate into wide-range functional consequences. Here we review evidence for allosteric functions of PrP(C), which constitute a common property of scaffold proteins. The available data suggest that allosteric effects among PrP(C) and its partners are involved in the assembly of multi-component signaling modules at the cell surface, impose upon both physiological and pathological conformational responses of PrP(C), and that allosteric dysfunction of PrP(C) has the potential to entail progressive signal corruption. These properties may be germane both to physiological roles of PrP(C), as well as to the pathogenesis of the TSEs and other degenerative/non-communicable diseases. PMID:21984610

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are prototypical Family A G protein coupled-receptors. The five mAChR subtypes are widespread throughout the periphery and the central nervous system and, accordingly, are widely involved in a variety of both physiological and pathophysiological processes. There currently remains an unmet need for better therapeutic agents that can selectively target a given mAChR subtype to the relative exclusion of others. The main reason for the lack of such selective mAChR ligands is the high sequence homology within the acetylcholine-binding site (orthosteric site) across all mAChRs. However, the mAChRs possess at least one, and likely two, extracellular allosteric binding sites that can recognize small molecule allosteric modulators to regulate the binding and function of orthosteric ligands. Extensive studies of prototypical mAChR modulators, such as gallamine and alcuronium, have provided strong pharmacological evidence, and associated structure-activity relationships (SAR), for a “common” allosteric site on all five mAChRs. These studies are also supported by mutagenesis experiments implicating the second extracellular loop and the interface between the third extracellular loop and the top of transmembrane domain 7 as contributing to the common allosteric site. Other studies are also delineating the pharmacology of a second allosteric site, recognized by compounds such as staurosporine. In addition, allosteric agonists, such as McN-A-343, AC-42 and N-desmethylclozapine, have also been identified. Current challenges to the field include the ability to effectively detect and validate allosteric mechanisms, and to quantify allosteric effects on binding affinity and signaling efficacy to inform allosteric modulator SAR. PMID:19305798

  13. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel’s ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  14. Zinc as Allosteric Ion Channel Modulator: Ionotropic Receptors as Metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco Andrés; Huidobro-Toro, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential metal to life. This transition metal is a structural component of many proteins and is actively involved in the catalytic activity of cell enzymes. In either case, these zinc-containing proteins are metalloproteins. However, the amino acid residues that serve as ligands for metal coordination are not necessarily the same in structural proteins compared to enzymes. While crystals of structural proteins that bind zinc reveal a higher preference for cysteine sulfhydryls rather than histidine imidazole rings, catalytic enzymes reveal the opposite, i.e., a greater preference for the histidines over cysteines for catalysis, plus the influence of carboxylic acids. Based on this paradigm, we reviewed the putative ligands of zinc in ionotropic receptors, where zinc has been described as an allosteric modulator of channel receptors. Although these receptors do not strictly qualify as metalloproteins since they do not normally bind zinc in structural domains, they do transitorily bind zinc at allosteric sites, modifying transiently the receptor channel's ion permeability. The present contribution summarizes current information showing that zinc allosteric modulation of receptor channels occurs by the preferential metal coordination to imidazole rings as well as to the sulfhydryl groups of cysteine in addition to the carboxyl group of acid residues, as with enzymes and catalysis. It is remarkable that most channels, either voltage-sensitive or transmitter-gated receptor channels, are susceptible to zinc modulation either as positive or negative regulators. PMID:27384555

  15. In vitro selection of allosteric ribozymes that sense the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Gu, Hongzhou; Breaker, Ronald R

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a number of study have shown the ligand-dependent allosteric ribozymes can be harnessed as biosensors, high-throughput screening, and agents for the control of gene expression in vivo, called artificial riboswitches. In this chapter, we describe how in vitro selection can be used to create an allosteric ribozyme that senses bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP). A hammerhead ribozyme was joined to a natural c-di-GMP class I riboswitch aptamer via communication modules. Both c-di-GMP-activating and -inhibiting ribozyme can be obtained by this approach. PMID:24549622

  16. Capturing Earth Science Learning Dynamics: Communication Interactions of ESE Teachers and Children Occurring in Online, Classroom, and Small-Group Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, C. W.; Prince, B. L.

    2002-12-01

    While the processes of schooling in science are usually measured in the resulting skills and products that students acquire or generate, another way to understand science learning is to explore the interactions and discourse that occur during actual learning activities. To investigate the dynamics of inquiry-based learning of earth science, we have explored the patterns that emerge in several learning environments: when teachers create dialog with other teachers in online ESE courses; when they teach earth science lessons in their classrooms; when they discuss their teaching perspectives in interviews; and when small groups of children engage in learning earth science together. By observing and scoring lesson exchanges, preserving online discussions, and documenting words and interactions in audio or video recordings, we are able to distinguish communication configurations that occur when teachers and children engage in the learning of earth science that would otherwise be invisible.

  17. Dissecting Dynamic Allosteric Pathways Using Chemically Related Small-Molecule Activators.

    PubMed

    Lisi, George P; Manley, Gregory A; Hendrickson, Heidi; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S; Loria, J Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The allosteric mechanism of the heterodimeric enzyme imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase was studied in detail with solution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied IGPS in complex with a series of allosteric activators corresponding to a large range of catalytic rate enhancements (26- to 4,900-fold), in which ligand binding is entropically driven. Conformational flexibility on the millisecond timescale plays a crucial role in intersubunit communication. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments probing Ile, Leu, and Val methyl groups reveal that the apo- and glutamine-mimicked complexes are static on the millisecond timescale. Domain-wide motions are stimulated in the presence of the allosteric activators. These studies, in conjunction with ligand titrations, demonstrate that the allosteric network is widely dispersed and varies with the identity of the effector. Furthermore, we find that stronger allosteric ligands create more conformational flexibility on the millisecond timescale throughout HisF. This domain-wide loosening leads to maximum catalytic activity. PMID:27238967

  18. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins.—Pandini, A., Fornili, A., Fraternali, F., Kleinjung, J. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics. PMID:22071506

  19. Allosteric regulation of rhomboid intramembrane proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunova, Elena; Panwar, Pankaj; Skiba, Pauline M; Gale, Nicola; Mak, Michelle W; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Proteolysis within the lipid bilayer is poorly understood, in particular the regulation of substrate cleavage. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that harbour a buried active site and are known to cleave transmembrane substrates with broad specificity. In vitro gel and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based kinetic assays were developed to analyse cleavage of the transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii). We demonstrate significant differences in catalytic efficiency (kcat/K0.5) values for transmembrane substrate psTatA (TatA from Providencia stuartii) cleavage for three rhomboids: AarA from P. stuartii, ecGlpG from Escherichia coli and hiGlpG from Haemophilus influenzae demonstrating that rhomboids specifically recognize this substrate. Furthermore, binding of psTatA occurs with positive cooperativity. Competitive binding studies reveal an exosite-mediated mode of substrate binding, indicating allostery plays a role in substrate catalysis. We reveal that exosite formation is dependent on the oligomeric state of rhomboids, and when dimers are dissociated, allosteric substrate activation is not observed. We present a novel mechanism for specific substrate cleavage involving several dynamic processes including positive cooperativity and homotropic allostery for this interesting class of intramembrane proteases. PMID:25009246

  20. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strauss, Andre

    The following essays on communication are presented: communication as a condition of survival, communication for special purposes, the means of transmission of communication, communication within social and economic structures, the teaching of communication through the press, the teaching of modern languages, communication as a point of departure,…

  1. Bithionol Potently Inhibits Human Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase through Binding to the Allosteric Activator Site.

    PubMed

    Kleinboelting, Silke; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Buck, Hannes; Colis, Laureen; van den Heuvel, Joop; Glickman, J Fraser; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Steegborn, Clemens

    2016-04-29

    The signaling molecule cAMP regulates functions ranging from bacterial transcription to mammalian memory. In mammals, cAMP is synthesized by nine transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and one soluble AC (sAC). Despite similarities in their catalytic domains, these ACs differ in regulation. Transmembrane ACs respond to G proteins, whereas sAC is uniquely activated by bicarbonate. Via bicarbonate regulation, sAC acts as a physiological sensor for pH/bicarbonate/CO2, and it has been implicated as a therapeutic target, e.g. for diabetes, glaucoma, and a male contraceptive. Here we identify the bisphenols bithionol and hexachlorophene as potent, sAC-specific inhibitors. Inhibition appears mostly non-competitive with the substrate ATP, indicating that they act via an allosteric site. To analyze the interaction details, we solved a crystal structure of an sAC·bithionol complex. The structure reveals that the compounds are selective for sAC because they bind to the sAC-specific, allosteric binding site for the physiological activator bicarbonate. Structural comparison of the bithionol complex with apo-sAC and other sAC·ligand complexes along with mutagenesis experiments reveals an allosteric mechanism of inhibition; the compound induces rearrangements of substrate binding residues and of Arg(176), a trigger between the active site and allosteric site. Our results thus provide 1) novel insights into the communication between allosteric regulatory and active sites, 2) a novel mechanism for sAC inhibition, and 3) pharmacological compounds targeting this allosteric site and utilizing this mode of inhibition. These studies provide support for the future development of sAC-modulating drugs. PMID:26961873

  2. The Role of Protein-Ligand Contacts in Allosteric Regulation of the Escherichia coli Catabolite Activator Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Philip D.; Rodgers, Thomas L.; Glover, Laura C.; Korhonen, Heidi J.; Richards, Shane A.; Colwell, Lucy J.; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R.; Hodgson, David R. W.; McLeish, Tom C. B.; Cann, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distant site. Both experimental and theoretical evidence demonstrate that allostery can be communicated through altered slow relaxation protein dynamics without conformational change. The catabolite activator protein (CAP) of Escherichia coli is an exemplar for the analysis of such entropically driven allostery. Negative allostery in CAP occurs between identical cAMP binding sites. Changes to the cAMP-binding pocket can therefore impact the allosteric properties of CAP. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of coarse-grained modeling, isothermal calorimetry, and structural analysis, that decreasing the affinity of CAP for cAMP enhances negative cooperativity through an entropic penalty for ligand binding. The use of variant cAMP ligands indicates the data are not explained by structural heterogeneity between protein mutants. We observe computationally that altered interaction strength between CAP and cAMP variously modifies the change in allosteric cooperativity due to second site CAP mutations. As the degree of correlated motion between the cAMP-contacting site and a second site on CAP increases, there is a tendency for computed double mutations at these sites to drive CAP toward noncooperativity. Naturally occurring pairs of covarying residues in CAP do not display this tendency, suggesting a selection pressure to fine tune allostery on changes to the CAP ligand-binding pocket without a drive to a noncooperative state. In general, we hypothesize an evolutionary selection pressure to retain slow relaxation dynamics-induced allostery in proteins in which evolution of the ligand-binding site is occurring. PMID:26187469

  3. Study of Functional and Allosteric Sites in Protein Superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Suplatov, D.; Švedas, V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of proteins (enzymes) with a variety of low-molecular-weight compounds, as well as protein-protein interactions, is the most important factor in the regulation of their functional properties. To date, research effort has routinely focused on studying ligand binding to the functional sites of proteins (active sites of enzymes), whereas the molecular mechanisms of allosteric regulation, as well as binding to other pockets and cavities in protein structures, remained poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that allostery may be an intrinsic property of virtually all proteins. Novel approaches are needed to systematically analyze the architecture and role of various binding sites and establish the relationship between structure, function, and regulation. Computational biology, bioinformatics, and molecular modeling can be used to search for new regulatory centers, characterize their structural peculiarities, as well as compare different pockets in homologous proteins, study the molecular mechanisms of allostery, and understand the communication between topologically independent binding sites in protein structures. The establishment of an evolutionary relationship between different binding centers within protein superfamilies and the discovery of new functional and allosteric (regulatory) sites using computational approaches can improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship in proteins and provide new opportunities for drug design and enzyme engineering. PMID:26798490

  4. 50th anniversary of the word "allosteric".

    PubMed

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2011-07-01

    A brief historical account on the origin and meaning of the word "allosteric" is presented. The word was coined in an attempt to qualify the chemical mechanism of the feedback inhibition of bacterial enzymes by regulatory ligands. The data lead to the proposal that, at variance with the classical mechanism of mutual exclusion by steric hindrance, the inhibition takes place through an "allosteric" interaction between "no overlapping", stereospecifically distinct, sites for substrate and feedback inhibitor, mediated by a discrete reversible alteration of the molecular structure of the protein. PMID:21574197

  5. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

    PubMed Central

    Amor, B. R. C.; Schaub, M. T.; Yaliraki, S. N.; Barahona, M.

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  6. Detection of allosteric signal transmission by information-theoretic analysis of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pandini, Alessandro; Fornili, Arianna; Fraternali, Franca; Kleinjung, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Allostery offers a highly specific way to modulate protein function. Therefore, understanding this mechanism is of increasing interest for protein science and drug discovery. However, allosteric signal transmission is difficult to detect experimentally and to model because it is often mediated by local structural changes propagating along multiple pathways. To address this, we developed a method to identify communication pathways by an information-theoretical analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. Signal propagation was described as information exchange through a network of correlated local motions, modeled as transitions between canonical states of protein fragments. The method was used to describe allostery in two-component regulatory systems. In particular, the transmission from the allosteric site to the signaling surface of the receiver domain NtrC was shown to be mediated by a layer of hub residues. The location of hubs preferentially connected to the allosteric site was found in close agreement with key residues experimentally identified as involved in the signal transmission. The comparison with the networks of the homologues CheY and FixJ highlighted similarities in their dynamics. In particular, we showed that a preorganized network of fragment connections between the allosteric and functional sites exists already in the inactive state of all three proteins. PMID:22071506

  7. Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities.

    PubMed

    Amor, B R C; Schaub, M T; Yaliraki, S N; Barahona, M

    2016-01-01

    Allostery is a fundamental mechanism of biological regulation, in which binding of a molecule at a distant location affects the active site of a protein. Allosteric sites provide targets to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methodologies to predict them. Here we present an efficient graph-theoretical framework to reveal allosteric interactions (atoms and communication pathways strongly coupled to the active site) without a priori information of their location. Using an atomistic graph with energy-weighted covalent and weak bonds, we define a bond-to-bond propensity quantifying the non-local effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. Significant interactions are then identified using quantile regression. We exemplify our method with three biologically important proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting key allosteric interactions, whose significance is additionally confirmed against a reference set of 100 proteins. The almost-linear scaling of our method renders it suitable for high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites. PMID:27561351

  8. Differential Modulation of Functional Dynamics and Allosteric Interactions in the Hsp90-Cochaperone Complexes with p23 and Aha1: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Blacklock, Kristin; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2013-01-01

    Allosteric interactions of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with a large cohort of cochaperones and client proteins allow for molecular communication and event coupling in signal transduction networks. The integration of cochaperones into the Hsp90 system is driven by the regulatory mechanisms that modulate the progression of the ATPase cycle and control the recruitment of the Hsp90 clientele. In this work, we report the results of computational modeling of allosteric regulation in the Hsp90 complexes with the cochaperones p23 and Aha1. By integrating protein docking, biophysical simulations, modeling of allosteric communications, protein structure network analysis and the energy landscape theory we have investigated dynamics and stability of the Hsp90-p23 and Hsp90-Aha1 interactions in direct comparison with the extensive body of structural and functional experiments. The results have revealed that functional dynamics and allosteric interactions of Hsp90 can be selectively modulated by these cochaperones via specific targeting of the regulatory hinge regions that could restrict collective motions and stabilize specific chaperone conformations. The protein structure network parameters have quantified the effects of cochaperones on conformational stability of the Hsp90 complexes and identified dynamically stable communities of residues that can contribute to the strengthening of allosteric interactions. According to our results, p23-mediated changes in the Hsp90 interactions may provide “molecular brakes” that could slow down an efficient transmission of the inter-domain allosteric signals, consistent with the functional role of p23 in partially inhibiting the ATPase cycle. Unlike p23, Aha1-mediated acceleration of the Hsp90-ATPase cycle may be achieved via modulation of the equilibrium motions that facilitate allosteric changes favoring a closed dimerized form of Hsp90. The results of our study have shown that Aha1 and p23 can modulate the Hsp90-ATPase activity

  9. Global Low Frequency Protein Motions in Long-Range Allosteric Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeish, Tom; Rogers, Thomas; Townsend, Philip; Burnell, David; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark; Cann, Martin; Richards, Shane; Jones, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    We present a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low frequency dynamics without a change in protein structure. Elastic inhomogeneities allow entropic ``signalling at a distance.'' Remarkably, many globular proteins display just this class of elastic structure, in particular those that support allosteric binding of substrates (long-range co-operative effects between the binding sites of small molecules). Through multi-scale modelling of global normal modes we demonstrate negative co-operativity between the two cAMP ligands without change to the mean structure. Crucially, the value of the co-operativity is itself controlled by the interactions around a set of third allosteric ``control sites.'' The theory makes key experimental predictions, validated by analysis of variant proteins by a combination of structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. A quantitative description of allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein ``design space'' that identified the key inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, by analyzing naturally occurring CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. The methodology establishes the means to engineer allosteric mechanisms that are driven by low frequency dynamics.

  10. Allosteric Ligand Binding and Anisotropic Energy Flow in Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Protein allostery usually involves propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Coupling of structural changes at remote sites is thought to occur through anisotropic energy transport, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. We have studied the relationship between allosteric interactions of remote ligand binding sites of the protein and energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA). We applied ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites. We also observe anisotropic heat flow through the structure, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. We will discuss the implications of this efficient energy transport mechanism with regard to the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  11. Heat Capacity Changes and Disorder-to-Order Transitions in Allosteric Activation.

    PubMed

    Cressman, William J; Beckett, Dorothy

    2016-01-19

    Allosteric coupling in proteins is ubiquitous but incompletely understood, particularly in systems characterized by coupling over large distances. Binding of the allosteric effector, bio-5'-AMP, to the Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase, BirA, enhances the protein's dimerization free energy by -4 kcal/mol. Previous studies revealed that disorder-to-order transitions at the effector binding and dimerization sites, which are separated by 33 Å, are integral to functional coupling. Perturbations to the transition at the ligand binding site alter both ligand binding and coupled dimerization. Alanine substitutions in four loops on the dimerization surface yield a range of energetic effects on dimerization. A glycine to alanine substitution at position 142 in one of these loops results in a complete loss of allosteric coupling, disruption of the disorder-to-order transitions at both functional sites, and a decreased affinity for the effector. In this work, allosteric communication between the effector binding and dimerization surfaces in BirA was further investigated by performing isothermal titration calorimetry measurements on nine proteins with alanine substitutions in three dimerization surface loops. In contrast to BirAG142A, at 20 °C all variants bind to bio-5'-AMP with free energies indistinguishable from that measured for wild-type BirA. However, the majority of the variants exhibit altered heat capacity changes for effector binding. Moreover, the ΔCp values correlate with the dimerization free energies of the effector-bound proteins. These thermodynamic results, combined with structural information, indicate that allosteric activation of the BirA monomer involves formation of a network of intramolecular interactions on the dimerization surface in response to bio-5'-AMP binding at the distant effector binding site. PMID:26678378

  12. Coupled Dynamics and Entropic Contribution to the Allosteric Mechanism of Pin1.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Allosteric communication in proteins regulates a plethora of downstream processes in subcellular signaling pathways. Describing the effects of cooperative ligand binding on the atomic level is a key to understanding many regulatory processes involving biomolecules. Here, we use microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the allosteric mechanism of Pin1, a potential therapeutic target and a phosphorylated-Ser/Thr dependent peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that regulates several subcellular processes and has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. Experimental studies suggest that the catalytic domain and the noncatalytic WW domain are allosterically coupled; however, an atomic level description of the dynamics associated with the interdomain communication is lacking. We show that binding of the substrate to the WW domain is directly coupled to the dynamics of the catalytic domain, causing rearrangement of the residue-residue contact dynamics from the WW domain to the catalytic domain. The binding affinity of the substrate in the catalytic domain is also enhanced upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain. Modulation of the dynamics of the catalytic domain upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain leads to prepayment of the entropic cost of binding the substrate to the catalytic domain. This study shows that Ile 28 at the interfacial region between the catalytic and WW domains is certainly one of the residues responsible for bridging the communication between the two domains. The results complement previous experiments and provide valuable atomistic insights into the role of dynamics and possible entropic contribution to the allosteric mechanism of proteins. PMID:27077947

  13. Elucidation of direct competition and allosteric modulation of small-molecular-weight protein ligands using surface plasmon resonance methods.

    PubMed

    Huber, Walter; Sinopoli, Alessandro; Kohler, Josiane; Hug, Melanie; Ruf, Armin; Huber, Sylwia

    2015-08-01

    The present work introduces a surface plasmon resonance-based method for the discrimination of direct competition and allosteric effects that occur in ternary systems comprising a receptor protein and two small-molecular-weight ligands that bind to it. Fatty acid binding protein 4, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and human serum albumin were used as model receptor molecules to demonstrate the performance of the method. For each of the receptor molecules, pairs of ligand molecules were selected for which either direct competition or an allosteric effect had already been determined by other methods. The method of discrimination introduced here is based on the surface plasmon resonance responses observed at equilibrium when an immobilized receptor protein is brought into contact with binary mixtures of interacting ligands. These experimentally determined responses are compared with the responses calculated using a theoretical model that considers both direct competition and allosteric ligand interaction modes. This study demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model, which enables calculation of the fractional occupancy of the protein by each ligand in such ternary systems, is well suited for the theoretical calculation of these types of responses. For all of the ternary systems considered in this work, the experimental and calculated responses in the chosen concentration ratio range were identical within a five-σ confidence interval when the calculations considered the correct interaction mode of the ligands (direct competition or different types of allosteric regulation), and in case of allosteric modulation, also the correct strength of this effect. This study also demonstrates that the allosteric ternary complex model-based calculations are well suited to predict the ideal concentration ratio range or even single concentration ratios that can serve as hot spots for discrimination, and such hot spots can drastically reduce the numbers of measurements needed

  14. Allosteric Modulation of G Protein Coupled Receptors by Cytoplasmic, Transmembrane and Extracellular Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) bind diverse classes of ligands, and depending on the receptor, these may bind in their transmembrane or the extracellular domains, demonstrating the principal ability of GPCRs to bind ligand in either domains. Most recently, it was also observed that small molecule ligands can bind in the cytoplasmic domain, and modulate binding and response to extracellular or transmembrane ligands. Thus, all three domains in GPCRs are potential sites for allosteric ligands, and whether a ligand is allosteric or orthosteric depends on the receptor. Here, we will review the evidence supporting the presence of putative binding pockets in all three domains of GPCRs and discuss possible pathways of communication between these pockets. PMID:24009470

  15. Thrombin A-Chain: Activation Remnant or Allosteric Effector?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Isis S. R.; Vanden Hoek, Amanda L.; Pryzdial, Edward L. G.; MacGillivray, Ross T. A.

    2010-01-01

    Although prothrombin is one of the most widely studied enzymes in biology, the role of the thrombin A-chain has been neglected in comparison to the other domains. This paper summarizes the current data on the prothrombin catalytic domain A-chain region and the subsequent thrombin A-chain. Attention is given to biochemical characterization of naturally occurring prothrombin A-chain mutations and alanine scanning mutants in this region. While originally considered to be simply an activation remnant with little physiologic function, the thrombin A-chain is now thought to play a role as an allosteric effector in enzymatic reactions and may also be a structural scaffold to stabilize the protease domain. PMID:22084659

  16. Allosteric initiation and regulation of catalysis with a molecular knot.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Vanesa; Stephens, Alexander J; Jaramillo-Garcia, Javier; Nussbaumer, Alina L; Woltering, Steffen L; Valero, Alberto; Lemonnier, Jean-François; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J; Leigh, David A

    2016-06-24

    Molecular knots occur in DNA, proteins, and other macromolecules. However, the benefits that can potentially arise from tying molecules in knots are, for the most part, unclear. Here, we report on a synthetic molecular pentafoil knot that allosterically initiates or regulates catalyzed chemical reactions by controlling the in situ generation of a carbocation formed through the knot-promoted cleavage of a carbon-halogen bond. The knot architecture is crucial to this function because it restricts the conformations that the molecular chain can adopt and prevents the formation of catalytically inactive species upon metal ion binding. Unknotted analogs are not catalytically active. Our results suggest that knotting molecules may be a useful strategy for reducing the degrees of freedom of flexible chains, enabling them to adopt what are otherwise thermodynamically inaccessible functional conformations. PMID:27339983

  17. Multiple allosteric sites on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J; Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Saldanha, J

    2001-04-27

    Proteins and small molecules are capable of regulating the agonist binding and function of G-protein coupled receptors by multiple allosteric mechanisms. In the case of muscarinic receptors, there is the well-characterised allosteric site that binds, for example, gallamine and brucine. The protein kinase inhibitor, KT5720, has now been shown to bind to a second allosteric site and to regulate agonist and antagonist binding. The binding of brucine and gallamine does not affect KT5720 binding nor its effects on the dissociation of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine from M1 receptors. Therefore it is possible to have a muscarinic receptor with three small ligands bound simultaneously. A model of the M1 receptor, based on the recently determined structure of rhodopsin, has the residues that have been shown to be important for gallamine binding clustered within and to one side of a cleft in the extracellular face of the receptor. This cleft may represent the access route of acetylcholine to its binding site. PMID:11392621

  18. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  19. Exploiting protein flexibility to predict the location of allosteric sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Allostery is one of the most powerful and common ways of regulation of protein activity. However, for most allosteric proteins identified to date the mechanistic details of allosteric modulation are not yet well understood. Uncovering common mechanistic patterns underlying allostery would allow not only a better academic understanding of the phenomena, but it would also streamline the design of novel therapeutic solutions. This relatively unexplored therapeutic potential and the putative advantages of allosteric drugs over classical active-site inhibitors fuel the attention allosteric-drug research is receiving at present. A first step to harness the regulatory potential and versatility of allosteric sites, in the context of drug-discovery and design, would be to detect or predict their presence and location. In this article, we describe a simple computational approach, based on the effect allosteric ligands exert on protein flexibility upon binding, to predict the existence and position of allosteric sites on a given protein structure. Results By querying the literature and a recently available database of allosteric sites, we gathered 213 allosteric proteins with structural information that we further filtered into a non-redundant set of 91 proteins. We performed normal-mode analysis and observed significant changes in protein flexibility upon allosteric-ligand binding in 70% of the cases. These results agree with the current view that allosteric mechanisms are in many cases governed by changes in protein dynamics caused by ligand binding. Furthermore, we implemented an approach that achieves 65% positive predictive value in identifying allosteric sites within the set of predicted cavities of a protein (stricter parameters set, 0.22 sensitivity), by combining the current analysis on dynamics with previous results on structural conservation of allosteric sites. We also analyzed four biological examples in detail, revealing that this simple coarse

  20. Neurobiological Insights from mGlu Receptor Allosteric Modulation

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors offers a promising pharmacological approach to normalize neural circuit dysfunction associated with various psychiatric and neurological disorders. As mGlu receptor allosteric modulators progress through discovery and clinical development, both technical advances and novel tool compounds are providing opportunities to better understand mGlu receptor pharmacology and neurobiology. Recent advances in structural biology are elucidating the structural determinants of mGlu receptor–negative allosteric modulation and supplying the means to resolve active, allosteric modulator-bound mGlu receptors. The discovery and characterization of allosteric modulators with novel pharmacological profiles is uncovering the biological significance of their intrinsic agonist activity, biased mGlu receptor modulation, and novel mGlu receptor heterodimers. The development and exploitation of optogenetic and optopharmacological tools is permitting a refined spatial and temporal understanding of both mGlu receptor functions and their allosteric modulation in intact brain circuits. Together, these lines of research promise to provide a more refined understanding of mGlu receptors and their allosteric modulation that will inform the development of mGlu receptor allosteric modulators as neurotherapeutics in the years to come. PMID:26647381

  1. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue on communication includes annotated listings of Web sites, CD-ROM and computer software, videos, books, and professional resources that deal with various methods of communication. Sidebars discuss mythology, photojournalism, sharing ideas on the Web, and songs of protest. Suggestions for class activities are also included. (LRW)

  2. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  3. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-08-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin.

  4. Dissecting allosteric effects of activator–coactivator complexes using a covalent small molecule ligand

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ningkun; Lodge, Jean M.; Fierke, Carol A.; Mapp, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric binding events play a critical role in the formation and stability of transcriptional activator–coactivator complexes, perhaps in part due to the often intrinsically disordered nature of one or more of the constituent partners. The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the master coactivator CREB binding protein/p300 is a conformationally dynamic domain that complexes with transcriptional activators at two discrete binding sites in allosteric communication. The complexation of KIX with the transcriptional activation domain of mixed-lineage leukemia protein leads to an enhancement of binding by the activation domain of CREB (phosphorylated kinase-inducible domain of CREB) to the second site. A transient kinetic analysis of the ternary complex formation aided by small molecule ligands that induce positive or negative cooperative binding reveals that positive cooperativity is largely governed by stabilization of the bound complex as indicated by a decrease in koff. Thus, this suggests the increased binding affinity for the second ligand is not due to an allosteric creation of a more favorable binding interface by the first ligand. This is consistent with data from us and from others indicating that the on rates of conformationally dynamic proteins approach the limits of diffusion. In contrast, negative cooperativity is manifested by alterations in both kon and koff, suggesting stabilization of the binary complex. PMID:25049401

  5. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and its prokaryotic homologues: Structure, conformational transitions & allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Cecchini, Marco; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) play a central role in intercellular communications in the nervous system by converting the binding of a chemical messenger - a neurotransmitter - into an ion flux through the postsynaptic membrane. Here, we present an overview of the most recent advances on the signal transduction mechanism boosted by X-ray crystallography of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic homologues of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in conjunction with time-resolved analyses based on single-channel electrophysiology and Molecular Dynamics simulations. The available data consistently point to a global mechanism of gating that involves a large reorganization of the receptor mediated by two distinct quaternary transitions: a global twisting and a radial expansion/contraction of the extracellular domain. These transitions profoundly modify the organization of the interface between subunits, which host several sites for orthosteric and allosteric modulatory ligands. The same mechanism may thus mediate both positive and negative allosteric modulations of pLGICs ligand binding at topographically distinct sites. The emerging picture of signal transduction is expected to pave the way to new pharmacological strategies for the development of allosteric modulators of nAChR and pLGICs in general. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25529272

  6. Structural basis for drug-induced allosteric changes to human β-cardiac myosin motor activity

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Donald A.; Forgacs, Eva; Miller, Matthew T.; Stock, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Omecamtiv Mecarbil (OM) is a small molecule allosteric effector of cardiac myosin that is in clinical trials for treatment of systolic heart failure. A detailed kinetic analysis of cardiac myosin has shown that the drug accelerates phosphate release by shifting the equilibrium of the hydrolysis step towards products, leading to a faster transition from weak to strong actin-bound states. The structure of the human β-cardiac motor domain (cMD) with OM bound reveals a single OM-binding site nestled in a narrow cleft separating two domains of the human cMD where it interacts with the key residues that couple lever arm movement to the nucleotide state. In addition, OM induces allosteric changes in three strands of the β-sheet that provides the communication link between the actin-binding interface and the nucleotide pocket. The OM-binding interactions and allosteric changes form the structural basis for the kinetic and mechanical tuning of cardiac myosin. PMID:26246073

  7. Determination of multiple steady states in a family of allosteric models for glycolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hsing-Ya

    1998-11-01

    To predict glycolytic oscillations, Goldbeter and Lefever [Biophys. J. 12, 1302 (1972)] proposed a complex allosteric model, consisting of 14 species and 32 reactions. Under the usual assumption of a quasisteady state for all the enzymatic forms, they simplified it to a two-variable model and ruled out the possibility of multiple steady states. In this work, the original network is determined to admit multiplicity of steady states by a zero eigenvalue analysis. It is shown that the existence of the multiplicity in the original network can be determined by a subnetwork with five species and eight reactions. The fourteen-species network can be treated as containing four such subnetworks. The analysis is extended to a general modified allosteric model, consisting of n active subunits. It can be shown that the general network has no steady-state multiplicity if all the four subnetworks follow the case of n=1; otherwise, multiple steady states can occur.

  8. Allosteric Regulation of Unidirectional Spring-like Motion of Double-Stranded Helicates.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshimasa; Nakamura, Taiki; Iida, Hiroki; Ousaka, Naoki; Yashima, Eiji

    2016-04-13

    We report the unprecedented allosteric regulation of the extension and contraction motions of double-stranded spiroborate helicates composed of 4,4'-linked 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and its N,N'-dioxide units in the middle of ortho-linked tetraphenol strands. NMR and circular dichroism measurements and an X-ray crystallographic analysis along with theoretical calculations revealed that enantiomeric helicates contract and extend upon the binding and release of protons and/or metal ions at the covalently linked two binding bpy or N,N'-dioxide moieties without racemization, respectively, regulated by a cooperative anti-syn conformational change of the two bpy or N,N'-dioxide moieties. These anti-syn conformational changes that occurred at the linkages are amplified into a large-scale molecular motion of the helicates leading to reversible spring-like motions coupled with twisting in one direction in a highly homotropic allosteric fashion. PMID:26910831

  9. Chemical, target, and bioactive properties of allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    van Westen, Gerard J P; Gaulton, Anna; Overington, John P

    2014-04-01

    Allosteric modulators are ligands for proteins that exert their effects via a different binding site than the natural (orthosteric) ligand site and hence form a conceptually distinct class of ligands for a target of interest. Here, the physicochemical and structural features of a large set of allosteric and non-allosteric ligands from the ChEMBL database of bioactive molecules are analyzed. In general allosteric modulators are relatively smaller, more lipophilic and more rigid compounds, though large differences exist between different targets and target classes. Furthermore, there are differences in the distribution of targets that bind these allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators are over-represented in membrane receptors, ligand-gated ion channels and nuclear receptor targets, but are underrepresented in enzymes (primarily proteases and kinases). Moreover, allosteric modulators tend to bind to their targets with a slightly lower potency (5.96 log units versus 6.66 log units, p<0.01). However, this lower absolute affinity is compensated by their lower molecular weight and more lipophilic nature, leading to similar binding efficiency and surface efficiency indices. Subsequently a series of classifier models are trained, initially target class independent models followed by finer-grained target (architecture/functional class) based models using the target hierarchy of the ChEMBL database. Applications of these insights include the selection of likely allosteric modulators from existing compound collections, the design of novel chemical libraries biased towards allosteric regulators and the selection of targets potentially likely to yield allosteric modulators on screening. All data sets used in the paper are available for download. PMID:24699297

  10. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  11. Allosteric antibody inhibition of human hepsin protease.

    PubMed

    Koschubs, Tobias; Dengl, Stefan; Dürr, Harald; Kaluza, Klaus; Georges, Guy; Hartl, Christiane; Jennewein, Stefan; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Auer, Johannes; Stern, Alvin; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Packman, Kathryn; Gubler, Ueli; Kostrewa, Dirk; Ries, Stefan; Hansen, Silke; Kohnert, Ulrich; Cramer, Patrick; Mundigl, Olaf

    2012-03-15

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed in several human tissues. Overexpression of hepsin has been found to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis, which is so far best studied for prostate cancer, where more than 90% of such tumours show this characteristic. To enable improved future patient treatment, we have developed a monoclonal humanized antibody that selectively inhibits human hepsin and does not inhibit other related proteases. We found that our antibody, hH35, potently inhibits hepsin enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations. Kinetic characterization revealed non-linear, slow, tight-binding inhibition. This correlates with the crystal structure we obtained for the human hepsin-hH35 antibody Fab fragment complex, which showed that the antibody binds hepsin around α3-helix, located far from the active centre. The unique allosteric mode of inhibition of hH35 is distinct from the recently described HGFA (hepatocyte growth factor activator) allosteric antibody inhibition. We further explain how a small change in the antibody design induces dramatic structural rearrangements in the hepsin antigen upon binding, leading to complete enzyme inactivation. PMID:22132769

  12. Efficiency parameters in artificial allosteric systems.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2016-09-14

    It is shown that the until now largely overlooked change of the conformational energy ΔGC is the dominating factor for most synthetic allosteric complexes. Essential is the energy ΔGC required for the formation of a suitable geometry for ligand binding in the absence of an effector molecule E; ΔGC is usually dominated by an increase of strain and/or by high energy solvents in a cavity. The role of the effector molecule E in such systems is to generate a suitable conformation for binding the ligand A and thus to compensate the unfavourable conformational energy ΔGC. Positive cooperativity increases with ΔGC, and decreases with the ΔG0(A) value which reflects the binding energy of A in a strain-free host. As illustrated with a few examples ΔG0(A) cannot be measured directly but can eventually be estimated independently. Many artificial allosteric systems described in the literature, such as those based on ethylene glycol chains or bipyridyl units, lack significant strain differences, and are therefore less efficient. Negative cooperativity is determined only by the difference ΔΔGA,E between the binding energies at the two sites; it can be enhanced or lowered by concomitant changes in ΔGC. PMID:27431438

  13. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Lee, Christopher T; Durrant, Jacob D; Malmstrom, Robert D; Feher, Victoria A; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-06-01

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages. PMID:27074285

  14. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages. PMID:27074285

  15. Are AMPA receptor positive allosteric modulators potential pharmacotherapeutics for addiction?

    PubMed

    Watterson, Lucas R; Olive, M Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  16. Are AMPA Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators Potential Pharmacotherapeutics for Addiction?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, Lucas R.; Olive, M. Foster

    2013-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are a diverse class of compounds that increase fast excitatory transmission in the brain. AMPA PAMs have been shown to facilitate long-term potentiation, strengthen communication between various cortical and subcortical regions, and some of these compounds increase the production and release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in an activity-dependent manner. Through these mechanisms, AMPA PAMs have shown promise as broad spectrum pharmacotherapeutics in preclinical and clinical studies for various neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In recent years, a small collection of preclinical animal studies has also shown that AMPA PAMs may have potential as pharmacotherapeutic adjuncts to extinction-based or cue-exposure therapies for the treatment of drug addiction. The present paper will review this preclinical literature, discuss novel data collected in our laboratory, and recommend future research directions for the possible development of AMPA PAMs as anti-addiction medications. PMID:24380895

  17. Progress toward a high-affinity allosteric enhancer at muscarinic M1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, Sebastian; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2003-01-01

    Loss of forebrain acetylcholine is an early neurochemical lesion in Alzheimer's disease (AD). As muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in memory and cognition, a muscarinic agonist could therefore provide a "replacement therapy" in this disease. However, muscarinic receptors occur throughout the CNS and the periphery. A selective locus of action of a muscarinic agonist is therefore crucial in order to avoid intolerable side effects. The five subtypes of muscarinic receptors, M1-M5, have distinct regional distributions with M2 and M3 receptors mediating most of the peripheral effects. M1 receptors are the major receptor subtype in the cortex and hippocampus-the two brain regions most associated with memory and cognition. This localization has led to a, so far unsuccessful, search for a truly M1-selective muscarinic agonist. However, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, such as donepezil (Aricept), which potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission, do have a therapeutic role in the management of AD and so the M1 receptor remains a viable therapeutic target. Our approach is to develop muscarinic allosteric enhancers-compounds that bind to the receptor at an "allosteric" site, which is distinct from the "primary" site to which ACh binds, and which enhance ACh affinity (or efficacy). Having discovered that a commercially available compound, WIN 62577, is an allosteric enhancer with micromolar potency at M3 receptors, we report here some results of a chemical synthesis project to develop this hit. Modification of WIN 62577 has led to compounds with over 1000-fold increased affinity but, so far, none of these extremely potent compounds are allosteric enhancers. PMID:14501021

  18. Towards a high-affinity allosteric enhancer at muscarinic M1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, Sebastian; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2002-01-01

    Loss of forebrain acetylcholine (ACh) is an early neurochemical lesion in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and muscarinic receptors for ACh are involved in memory and cognition, so a muscarinic agonist could provide 'replacement therapy' in this disease. Muscarinic receptors, which couple to G-proteins, occur throughout the CNS, and in the periphery they mediate the responses of the parasympathetic nervous system, so selectivity is crucial. The five subtypes of muscarinic receptor, M1-M5, have a distinct regional distribution, with M2 and M3 mediating most of the peripheral effects, M2 predominating in hindbrain areas, and M1 predominating in the cortex and hippocampus--the brain regions most associated with memory and cognition, which has lead to a search for a truly M1-selective muscarinic agonist. That search has so far been unsuccessful, but acetylcholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept), which potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission, have a therapeutic role in the management of AD; so the M1 receptor remains a therapeutic target. Our approach is to develop allosteric enhancers--compounds which bind to the receptor at an 'allosteric' site which is distinct from the 'primary' site to which the endogenous ligand binds, and which enhance the affinity (or efficacy) of the endogenous ligand. We have developed radioligand binding assays and analyses for the detection and quantitatitation of allosteric interactions of a test agent with labelled and unlabelled 'primary' ligands, and we report here some results of the initial phase of a chemical synthesis project to develop potent and selective allosteric enhancers at muscarinic M1 receptors. PMID:12212769

  19. Allosteric inhibition of Epac: computational modeling and experimental validation to identify allosteric sites and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brown, Loren M; Rogers, Kathleen E; Aroonsakool, Nakon; McCammon, J Andrew; Insel, Paul A

    2014-10-17

    Epac, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the low molecular weight G protein Rap, is an effector of cAMP signaling and has been implicated to have roles in numerous diseases, including diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and cancer. We used a computational molecular modeling approach to predict potential binding sites for allosteric modulators of Epac and to identify molecules that might bind to these regions. This approach revealed that the conserved hinge region of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of Epac1 is a potentially druggable region of the protein. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay (CAMYEL, cAMP sensor using YFP-Epac-Rluc), we assessed the predicted compounds for their ability to bind Epac and modulate its activity. We identified a thiobarbituric acid derivative, 5376753, that allosterically inhibits Epac activity and used Swiss 3T3 and HEK293 cells to test the ability of this compound to modulate the activity of Epac and PKA, as determined by Rap1 activity and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation, respectively. Compound 5376753 selectively inhibited Epac in biochemical and cell migration studies. These results document the utility of a computational approach to identify a domain for allosteric regulation of Epac and a novel compound that prevents the activation of Epac1 by cAMP. PMID:25183009

  20. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  1. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathorn, S.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Thin Route satellite telecommunication project is presented. Thin Route employs applications technology satellites (ATS) in place of more costly commercial multi- transponder telecommunications satellites. This system allows remote and underdeveloped areas to communicate with the outside world for purposes of obtaining medical assistance among other things. The system represents a substantial cost saving over commercial systems.

  2. The kinetics of effector binding to phosphofructokinase. The influence of effectors on the allosteric conformational transition.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Kellett, G L

    1980-01-01

    1. The extent of the allosteric transition from the R into the T conformation of rabbit skeletal muscle phosphofructokinase induced by Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP was determined by stopped-flow fluorimetry from the amplitude of the slow phase of the Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP fluorescence enhancement [Roberts & Kellet (1979) Biochem. J. 183, 349--360]. 2. The amplitude of the slow phase was decreased by low concentrations of the activators cyclic AMP and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate, but increased in a complex manner by the inhibitor citrate. 3. Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP and Mg2+-ATP are unable to induce the T conformation to a detectable extent in the presence of saturating cyclic AMP, but can do so readily in the presence of saturating fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. 4. The conformational transitions induced in enzyme alone by different ligands were observed by changes in intrinsic protein fluorescence. In general, an R-type conformation has diminished protein fluorescence compared with a T-type conformation. 5. Mg2+-ATP exerts a complex effect on protein fluorescence; both the enhancement at low concentrations and the quenching at high concentrations of Mg2+-ATP result from the binding of Mg2+-ATP to the inhibitory site and the ensuing allosteric transition. Enhancement reflects the extent of the allosteric transition and involves both tyrosine and tryptophan, probably in the region of the active site; quenching reflects occupation of the inhibitory site and involves tyrosine at the inhibitory site. 6. The mechanism of the allosteric transition from the R into the T conformation induced by Mg2+-1,N6-etheno-ATP at low concentrations occurs predominantly by a 'prior-isomerization' pathway; at higher concentrations a limited contribution from a 'substrate-guided' pathway occurs. 7. The allosteric behaviour of phosphofructokinase with respect to Mg2+-ATP and Mg2+-1,N6-ethenol-ATP binding may be accounted for in terms of the simple, concerted model. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6260084

  3. Ligand Binding to Macromolecules: Allosteric and Sequential Models of Cooperativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, V. L.; Szabo, Attila

    1979-01-01

    A simple model is described for the binding of ligands to macromolecules. The model is applied to the cooperative binding by hemoglobin and aspartate transcarbamylase. The sequential and allosteric models of cooperative binding are considered. (BB)

  4. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Allosteric Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Topographically distinct, druggable, allosteric sites may be present on all G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As such, targeting these sites with synthetic small molecules offers an attractive approach to develop receptor-subtype selective chemical leads for the development of novel therapies. A crucial part of drug development is to understand the acute and chronic effects of such allosteric modulators at their corresponding GPCR target. Key regulatory processes including cell-surface delivery, endocytosis, recycling, and down-regulation tightly control the number of receptors at the surface of the cell. As many GPCR therapeutics will be administered chronically, understanding how such ligands modulate these regulatory pathways forms an essential part of the characterization of novel GPCR ligands. This is true for both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of GPCR regulatory processes with a particular focus on the effects and implications of allosteric targeting of GPCRs. PMID:23398684

  5. Positive allosteric action of eburnamonine on cardiac muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Proska, J; Tucek, S

    1996-06-01

    It was discovered recently that alcuronium and strychnine (which is a precursor of alcuronium) allosterically increase the affinity of cardiac muscarinic receptors for the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine. We have now investigated the effects of l-eburnamonine and vincamine, which are both closely related to strychnine. In experiments on rat heart atria, l-eburnamonine was found to increase the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine with Ehlert's cooperativity coefficient alpha = 0.35, which indicates that the strength of its allosteric action is close to that of alcuronium and strychnine (alpha = 0.31 and 0.44, respectively). However, the affinity of l-eburnamonine for the cardiac muscarinic receptors is lower than the affinities of alcuronium and strychnine (KAR = 22.6 microM, 0.15 microM, and 3.4 microM, respectively). In spite of its extremely close similarity to l-eburnamonine, vincamine has a negative allosteric effect on the binding of [3H]N-methylscopolamine (alpha = 4.1; KAR = 22.8 microM). It is likely that a systematic investigation of the allosteric effects of the analogues of strychnine will not only yield new allosteric effectors on muscarinic receptors, but also clarify the structural features responsible for the direction (positive or negative) of their allosteric effect. PMID:8813554

  6. Dynamical network of residue–residue contacts reveals coupled allosteric effects in recognition, catalysis, and mutation

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Urmi; Holliday, Michael J.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Detailed understanding of how conformational dynamics orchestrates function in allosteric regulation of recognition and catalysis remains ambiguous. Here, we simulate CypA using multiple-microsecond-long atomistic molecular dynamics in explicit solvent and carry out NMR experiments. We analyze a large amount of time-dependent multidimensional data with a coarse-grained approach and map key dynamical features within individual macrostates by defining dynamics in terms of residue–residue contacts. The effects of substrate binding are observed to be largely sensed at a location over 15 Å from the active site, implying its importance in allostery. Using NMR experiments, we confirm that a dynamic cluster of residues in this distal region is directly coupled to the active site. Furthermore, the dynamical network of interresidue contacts is found to be coupled and temporally dispersed, ranging over 4 to 5 orders of magnitude. Finally, using network centrality measures we demonstrate the changes in the communication network, connectivity, and influence of CypA residues upon substrate binding, mutation, and during catalysis. We identify key residues that potentially act as a bottleneck in the communication flow through the distinct regions in CypA and, therefore, as targets for future mutational studies. Mapping these dynamical features and the coupling of dynamics to function has crucial ramifications in understanding allosteric regulation in enzymes and proteins, in general. PMID:27071107

  7. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  8. Tunable Allosteric Behavior in Random Spring Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocks, Jason W.; Pashine, Nidhi; Bischofberger, Irmgard; Goodrich, Carl P.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Liu, Andrea J.

    Many proteins and other macromolecules exhibit allosteric behavior in which the binding of a ligand to one site affects the activity at a second distant site. Inspired by this biological process, we present an algorithm to tune disordered spring networks to exhibit allostery-like behavior. When the positions of a pair of nodes at one site in a network are perturbed, we can precisely tune the response of nodes located at another distant site in the system by removing only a small fraction of the bonds. This algorithm can be used to create a wide variety of different response types: response nodes can be located far away from each other, a large number of response sites can be simultaneously controlled, and even multiple independent responses can be tuned into the system. In addition, this algorithm can be generalized to account for bond bending, geometric nonlinearities and nonlinear bond potentials. However, even linear calculations match surprisingly well with macroscopic experimental realizations made by laser cutting or 3D printing.

  9. Allosteric inhibition of antiapoptotic MCL-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Susan; Wales, Thomas E; Escudero, Silvia; Cohen, Daniel T; Luccarelli, James; Gallagher, Catherine G; Cohen, Nicole A; Huhn, Annissa J; Bird, Gregory H; Engen, John R; Walensky, Loren D

    2016-06-01

    MCL-1 is an antiapoptotic BCL-2 family protein that has emerged as a major pathogenic factor in human cancer. Like BCL-2, MCL-1 bears a surface groove whose function is to sequester the BH3 killer domains of proapoptotic BCL-2 family members, a mechanism harnessed by cancer cells to establish formidable apoptotic blockades. Although drugging the BH3-binding groove has been achieved for BCL-2, translating this approach to MCL-1 has been challenging. Here, we report an alternative mechanism for MCL-1 inhibition by small-molecule covalent modification of C286 at a new interaction site distant from the BH3-binding groove. Our structure-function analyses revealed that the BH3 binding capacity of MCL-1 and its suppression of BAX are impaired by molecular engagement, a phenomenon recapitulated by C286W mutagenic mimicry in vitro and in mouse cells. Thus, we characterize an allosteric mechanism for disrupting the antiapoptotic BH3 binding activity of MCL-1, informing a new strategy for disarming MCL-1 in cancer. PMID:27159560

  10. Allosteric Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Integrase

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kushol; Brady, Troy; Dyer, Benjamin M.; Malani, Nirav; Hwang, Young; Male, Frances; Nolte, Robert T.; Wang, Liping; Velthuisen, Emile; Jeffrey, Jerry; Van Duyne, Gregory D.; Bushman, Frederic D.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 replication in the presence of antiviral agents results in evolution of drug-resistant variants, motivating the search for additional drug classes. Here we report studies of GSK1264, which was identified as a compound that disrupts the interaction between HIV-1 integrase (IN) and the cellular factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75. GSK1264 displayed potent antiviral activity and was found to bind at the site occupied by LEDGF/p75 on IN by x-ray crystallography. Assays of HIV replication in the presence of GSK1264 showed only modest inhibition of the early infection steps and little effect on integration targeting, which is guided by the LEDGF/p75·IN interaction. In contrast, inhibition of late replication steps was more potent. Particle production was normal, but particles showed reduced infectivity. GSK1264 promoted aggregation of IN and preformed LEDGF/p75·IN complexes, suggesting a mechanism of inhibition. LEDGF/p75 was not displaced from IN during aggregation, indicating trapping of LEDGF/p75 in aggregates. Aggregation assays with truncated IN variants revealed that a construct with catalytic and C-terminal domains of IN only formed an open polymer associated with efficient drug-induced aggregation. These data suggest that the allosteric inhibitors of IN are promising antiviral agents and provide new information on their mechanism of action. PMID:24904063

  11. Troponin-tropomyosin: an allosteric switch or a steric blocker?

    PubMed Central

    Resetar, Andrea M; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Chalovich, Joseph M

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) with actin-tropomyosin-troponin (regulated actin) is highly nucleotide dependent. The binding of S1 or S1-ADP (but not S1-ATP nor N,N'-rho-phenylenedimaleimide-modified S1-ATP) to regulated actin activates ATP hydrolysis even in the absence of Ca(2+). Investigations with S1 and S1-ADP have led to the idea that some actin sites are directly blocked toward the binding of S1 either by tropomyosin or troponin. The blocked state is thought to occur only at ionic strengths greater than 50 mM. The question is whether nonactivating S1 binding is blocked under the same conditions. We show that troponin inhibits binding of the nonactivating state, N,N'-rho-phenylenedimaleimide-S1-ATP, to actin but only when tropomyosin is absent. A lag in the rate of binding of activating S1 to actin (an indicator of the blocked state) occurs only in the presence of tropomyosin. Thus, tropomyosin inhibits binding of rigor S1 but not S1-ATP-like states. No evidence for an ionic strength-dependent change in the mechanism of regulation was observed either from measurements of the rate of activating S1 binding or from the equilibrium binding of nonactivating S1 to actin. At all conditions examined, N,N'-rho-phenylenedimaleimide-S1-ATP bound to regulated actin in the absence of Ca(2+). These results support the view of regulation in which tropomyosin movement is an allosteric switch that is modulated by activating myosin binding but that does not function solely by regulating myosin binding. PMID:12124285

  12. Entropic mechanism of large fluctuation in allosteric transition.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Sasai, Masaki

    2010-04-27

    A statistical mechanical model of allosteric transitions in proteins is developed by extending the structure-based model of protein folding to cases of multiple native conformations. The partition function is calculated exactly within the model and the free-energy surface reflecting allostery is derived. This approach is applied to an example protein, the receiver domain of the bacterial enhancer-binding protein NtrC. The model predicts the large entropy associated with a combinatorial number of preexisting transition routes. This large entropy lowers the free-energy barrier of the allosteric transition, which explains the large structural fluctuation observed in the NMR data of NtrC. The global allosteric transformation of NtrC is explained by the shift of preexisting distribution of conformations upon phosphorylation, but the local structural adjustment around the phosphorylation site is explained by the complementary induced-fit mechanism. Structural disordering accompanied by fluctuating interactions specific to two allosteric conformations underlies a large number of routes of allosteric transition. PMID:20385843

  13. Allosteric Coupling in the Bacterial Adhesive Protein FimH*

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Kidd, Brian A.; Interlandi, Gianluca; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2013-01-01

    The protein FimH is expressed by the majority of commensal and uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli on the tips of type 1 fimbriae and mediates adhesion via a catch bond to its ligand mannose. Crystal structures of FimH show an allosteric conformational change, but it remains unclear whether all of the observed structural differences are part of the allosteric mechanism. Here we use the protein structural analysis tool RosettaDesign combined with human insight to identify and synthesize 10 mutations in four regions that we predicted would stabilize one of the conformations of that region. The function of each variant was characterized by measuring binding to the ligand mannose, whereas the allosteric state was determined using a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrated that each region investigated was indeed part of the FimH allosteric mechanism. However, the studies strongly suggested that some regions were more tightly coupled to mannose binding and others to antibody binding. In addition, we identified many FimH variants that appear locked in the low affinity state. Knowledge of regulatory sites outside the active and effector sites as well as the ability to make FimH variants locked in the low affinity state may be crucial to the future development of novel antiadhesive and antimicrobial therapies using allosteric regulation to inhibit FimH. PMID:23821547

  14. From Protein Communication to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Persico, Marco; Di Dato, Antonio; Orteca, Nausicaa; Fattorusso, Caterina; Novellino, Ettore; Andreoli, Mirko; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    The majority of functionally important biological processes are regulated by allosteric communication within individual proteins and across protein complexes. The proteins controlling these communication networks respond to changes in the cellular environment by switching between different conformational states. Targeting the interface residues mediating these processes through the rational identification of molecules modulating or mimicking their effects holds great therapeutic potential. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) have shown to have a high degree of plasticity since they occur through small regions, called hot spots, which are included in binding surfaces or in binding clefts of the proteins and are characterized by a high degree of complementarity. This prompted several researchers to compare the protein structure to human grammar proposing terms like "protein language". The decoding of this language represent a new paradigm not only to clarify the dynamics of many biological processes but also to improve the opportunities in drug discovery. In this review, we try to give an overview on intra-molecular and inter-molecular protein communication mechanisms describing the protein interaction domains (PIDs) and short linear motifs (SLiMs), which delineate the authentic syntactic and semantic units in a protein. Moreover, we illustrate some novel approaches performed on natural compounds and on synthetic derivatives aimed at developing new classes of potential drugs able to interfere with intra-molecular and inter-molecular protein communication. PMID:25986690

  15. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures. PMID:24445265

  16. Current status of A1 adenosine receptor allosteric enhancers.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Romeo; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). Allosteric enhancers to A1ARs may represent novel therapeutic agents because they increase the activity of these receptors by mediating a shift to their active form in the A1AR-G protein ternary complex. In this manner, they are able to amplify the action of endogenous adenosine, which is produced in high concentrations under conditions of metabolic stress. A1AR allosteric enhancers could be used as a justifiable alternative to the exogenous agonists that are characterized by receptor desensitization and downregulation. In this review, an analysis of some of the most interesting allosteric modulators of A1ARs has been reported. PMID:26144263

  17. Development of indole sulfonamides as cannabinoid receptor negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Greig, Iain R; Baillie, Gemma L; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Trembleau, Laurent; Ross, Ruth A

    2016-09-15

    Existing CB1 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) fall into a limited range of structural classes. In spite of the theoretical potential of CB1 NAMs, published in vivo studies have generally not been able to demonstrate the expected therapeutically-relevant CB1-mediated effects. Thus, a greater range of molecular tools are required to allow definitive elucidation of the effects of CB1 allosteric modulation. In this study, we show a novel series of indole sulfonamides. Compounds 5e and 6c (ABD1075) had potencies of 4 and 3nM respectively, and showed good oral exposure and CNS penetration, making them highly versatile tools for investigating the therapeutic potential of allosteric modulation of the cannabinoid system. PMID:27542310

  18. Anisotropic energy flow and allosteric ligand binding in albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guifeng; Magana, Donny; Dyer, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric interactions in proteins generally involve propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Anisotropic energy transport is thought to couple the remote sites, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. Here, we report the relationship between energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin and allosteric interactions between remote ligand binding sites of the protein. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy is used to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic and anisotropic energy flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. This efficient energy transport mechanism enables the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  19. Shape shifting leads to small molecule allosteric drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Sarah H.; Ramirez, Ursula D.; Tang, Lei; Fazliyev, Farit; Kundrat, Lenka; Markham, George D.; Jaffe, Eileen K.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Enzymes that regulate their activity by modulating an equilibrium of alternate, non-additive, functionally distinct oligomeric assemblies (morpheeins) define a novel mode of allostery (Jaffe, TiBS 30:490-7, 2005). The oligomeric equilibrium for porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) consists of high-activity octamers, low-activity hexamers, and two dimer conformations. A phylogenetically diverse allosteric site specific to hexamers is proposed as an inhibitor binding site. Inhibitor binding is predicted to draw the oligomeric equilibrium toward the low-activity hexamer. In silico docking enriched a selection from a small molecule library for compounds predicted to bind to this allosteric site. In vitro testing of selected compounds identified one compound whose inhibition mechanism is species-specific conversion of PBGS octamers to hexamers. We propose that this novel strategy for inhibitor discovery can be applied to other proteins that use the morpheein model for allosteric regulation. PMID:18559269

  20. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Tirupula, Kalyan C; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%), the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%), the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86%) and 8/9 (89%) for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71%) and 7/9 (78%) for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by photochemical isomerization

  1. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  2. An atomistic view of Hsp70 allosteric crosstalk: from the nucleotide to the substrate binding domain and back

    PubMed Central

    Chiappori, Federica; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Colombo, Giorgio; Morra, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    The Hsp70 is an allosterically regulated family of molecular chaperones. They consist of two structural domains, NBD and SBD, connected by a flexible linker. ATP hydrolysis at the NBD modulates substrate recognition at the SBD, while peptide binding at the SBD enhances ATP hydrolysis. In this study we apply Molecular Dynamics (MD) to elucidate the molecular determinants underlying the allosteric communication from the NBD to the SBD and back. We observe that local structural and dynamical modulation can be coupled to large-scale rearrangements, and that different combinations of ligands at NBD and SBD differently affect the SBD domain mobility. Substituting ADP with ATP in the NBD induces specific structural changes involving the linker and the two NBD lobes. Also, a SBD-bound peptide drives the linker docking by increasing the local dynamical coordination of its C-terminal end: a partially docked DnaK structure is achieved by combining ATP in the NBD and peptide in the SBD. We propose that the MD-based analysis of the inter domain dynamics and structure modulation could be used as a tool to computationally predict the allosteric behaviour and functional response of Hsp70 upon introducing mutations or binding small molecules, with potential applications for drug discovery. PMID:27025773

  3. Structural dynamics and energetics underlying allosteric inactivation of the cannabinoid receptor CB1

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Jonathan F.; Farrens, David L.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are surprisingly flexible molecules that can do much more than simply turn on G proteins. Some even exhibit biased signaling, wherein the same receptor preferentially activates different G-protein or arrestin signaling pathways depending on the type of ligand bound. Why this behavior occurs is still unclear, but it can happen with both traditional ligands and ligands that bind allosterically outside the orthosteric receptor binding pocket. Here, we looked for structural mechanisms underlying these phenomena in the marijuana receptor CB1. Our work focused on the allosteric ligand Org 27569, which has an unusual effect on CB1—it simultaneously increases agonist binding, decreases G-protein activation, and induces biased signaling. Using classical pharmacological binding studies, we find that Org 27569 binds to a unique allosteric site on CB1 and show that it can act alone (without need for agonist cobinding). Through mutagenesis studies, we find that the ability of Org 27569 to bind is related to how much receptor is in an active conformation that can couple with G protein. Using these data, we estimated the energy differences between the inactive and active states. Finally, site-directed fluorescence labeling studies show the CB1 structure stabilized by Org 27569 is different and unique from that stabilized by antagonist or agonist. Specifically, transmembrane helix 6 (TM6) movements associated with G-protein activation are blocked, but at the same time, helix 8/TM7 movements are enhanced, suggesting a possible mechanism for the ability of Org 27569 to induce biased signaling. PMID:26100912

  4. Development of allosteric modulators of GPCRs for treatment of CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a promising new strategy with potential for developing novel treatments for a variety of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Traditional drug discovery efforts targeting GPCRs have focused on developing ligands for orthosteric sites which bind endogenous ligands. Allosteric modulators target a site separate from the orthosteric site to modulate receptor function. These allosteric agents can either potentiate (positive allosteric modulator, PAM) or inhibit (negative allosteric modulator, NAM) the receptor response and often provide much greater subtype selectivity than do orthosteric ligands for the same receptors. Experimental evidence has revealed more nuanced pharmacological modes of action of allosteric modulators, with some PAMs showing allosteric agonism in combination with positive allosteric modulation in response to endogenous ligand (ago-potentiators) as well as “bitopic” ligands that interact with both the allosteric and orthosteric sites. Drugs targeting the allosteric site allow for increased drug selectivity and potentially decreased adverse side effects. Promising evidence has demonstrated potential utility of a number of allosteric modulators of GPCRs in multiple CNS disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease, as well as psychiatric or neurobehavioral diseases such as anxiety, schizophrenia, and addiction. PMID:24076101

  5. Metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Many proteins need the help of cofactors for their successful folding and functioning. Metal ions, i.e., Zn2+, Ca2+, and Mg2+ etc., are typical biological cofactors. Binding of metal ions can reshape the energy landscapes of proteins, thereby modifying the folding and allosteric motions. For example, such binding may make the intrinsically disordered proteins have funneled energy landscapes, consequently, ensures their spontaneous folding. In addition, the binding may activate certain biological processes by inducing related conformational changes of regulation proteins. However, how the local interactions involving the metal ion binding can induce the global conformational motions of proteins remains elusive. Investigating such question requires multiple models with different details, including quantum mechanics, atomistic models, and coarse grained models. In our recent work, we have been developing such multiscale methods which can reasonably model the metal ion binding induced charge transfer, protonation/deprotonation, and large conformational motions of proteins. With such multiscale model, we elucidated the zinc-binding induced folding mechanism of classical zinc finger and the calcium-binding induced dynamic symmetry breaking in the allosteric motions of calmodulin. In addition, we studied the coupling of folding, calcium binding and allosteric motions of calmodulin domains. In this talk, I will introduce the above progresses on the metal ion coupled protein folding and allosteric motions. We thank the finacial support from NSFC and the 973 project.

  6. Allosteric regulation in phosphofructokinase from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    McGresham, Maria S; Lovingshimer, Michelle; Reinhart, Gregory D

    2014-01-14

    An investigation into the kinetics and regulatory properties of the type-1 phosphofructokinase (PFK) from the extreme thermophile Thermus thermophilus (TtPFK) reveals an enzyme that is inhibited by PEP and activated by ADP by modifying the affinity exhibited for the substrate fructose 6-phosphate (Fru-6-P) in a manner analogous to other prokaryotic PFKs. However, TtPFK binds both of these allosteric ligands significantly more tightly than other bacterial PFKs while effecting a substantially more modest extent of inhibition or activation at 25 °C, reinforcing the principle that binding affinity and effectiveness can be both independent and uncorrelated to one another. These properties have allowed us to establish rigorously that PEP only inhibits by antagonizing the binding of Fru-6-P and not by influencing turnover, a conclusion that requires kcat to be determined under conditions in which both inhibitor and substrate are saturating simultaneously. In addition, the temperature dependence of the allosteric effects on Fru-6-P binding indicate that the coupling free energies are entropy-dominated, as observed previously for PFK from Bacillus stearothermophilus but not for PFK from Escherichia coli , supporting the hypothesis that entropy-dominated allosteric effects may be a characteristic of enzymes derived from thermostable organisms. For such enzymes, the root cause of the allosteric effect may not be easily discerned from static structural information such as that obtained from X-ray crystallography. PMID:24328040

  7. Allosteric Modulators of Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Sam R.J

    2007-01-01

    Class B GPCR’s are activated by peptide ligands, typically 30-40 amino acid residues, that are involved in major physiological functions such as glucose homeostasis (glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1), calcium homeostasis and bone turnover (parathyroid hormone and calcitonin), and control of the stress axis (corticotropin-releasing factor). Peptide therapeutics have been developed targeting these receptors but development of nonpeptide ligands, enabling oral administration, has proved challenging. Allosteric modulation of these receptors provides a potential route to developing nonpeptide ligands that inhibit, activate, or potentiate activation of these receptors. Here the known mechanisms of allosteric modulators targeting Class B GPCR’s are reviewed, particularly nonpeptide antagonists of the corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor and allosteric enhancers of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor. Also discussed is the potential for antagonist ligands to operate by competitive inhibition of one of the peptide binding sites, analogous to the Charniere mechanism. These mechanisms are then used to discuss potential strategies and management of pharmacological complexity in the future development of allosteric modulators for Class B GPCR’s. PMID:19305799

  8. Allosteric mechanism of water channel gating by Ca2+–calmodulin

    PubMed Central

    Reichow, Steve L.; Clemens, Daniel M.; Freites, J. Alfredo; Németh-Cahalan, Karin L.; Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J.; Hall, James E.; Gonen, Tamir

    2013-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a universal regulatory protein that communicates the presence of calcium to its molecular targets and correspondingly modulates their function. This key signaling protein is important for controlling the activity of hundreds of membrane channels and transporters. However, our understanding of the structural mechanisms driving CaM regulation of full-length membrane proteins has remained elusive. In this study, we determined the pseudo-atomic structure of full-length mammalian aquaporin-0 (AQP0, Bos Taurus) in complex with CaM using electron microscopy to understand how this signaling protein modulates water channel function. Molecular dynamics and functional mutation studies reveal how CaM binding inhibits AQP0 water permeability by allosterically closing the cytoplasmic gate of AQP0. Our mechanistic model provides new insight, only possible in the context of the fully assembled channel, into how CaM regulates multimeric channels by facilitating cooperativity between adjacent subunits. PMID:23893133

  9. Allosteric role of the large-scale domain opening in biological catch-binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.

    2009-05-01

    The proposed model demonstrates the allosteric role of the two-domain region of the receptor protein in the increased lifetimes of biological receptor/ligand bonds subjected to an external force. The interaction between the domains is represented by a bounded potential, containing two minima corresponding to the attached and separated conformations of the two protein domains. The dissociative potential with a single minimum describing receptor/ligand binding fluctuates between deep and shallow states, depending on whether the domains are attached or separated. A number of valuable analytic expressions are derived and are used to interpret experimental data for two catch bonds. The P-selectin/P-selectin-glycoprotein-ligand-1 (PSGL-1) bond is controlled by the interface between the epidermal growth factor (EGF) and lectin domains of P-selectin, and the type 1 fimbrial adhesive protein (FimH)/mannose bond is governed by the interface between the lectin and pilin domains of FimH. Catch-binding occurs in these systems when the external force stretches the receptor proteins and increases the interdomain distance. The allosteric effect is supported by independent measurements, in which the domains are kept separated by attachment of another ligand. The proposed model accurately describes the experimentally observed anomalous behavior of the lifetimes of the P-selectin/PSGL-1 and FimH/mannose complexes as a function of applied force and provides valuable insights into the mechanism of catch-binding.

  10. Naturally occurring chemical carcinogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are chemicals found in nature which have unique pharmacological effects. Humans are exposed to many of these bioactive naturally occurring chemicals via the air breathed, the water drunk and the food eaten. Exposure also occurs in clinical settings. Naturally occurring chemicals ...

  11. Light-activated DNA binding in a designed allosteric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, Devin; Moffat, Keith; Sosnick, Tobin R.

    2008-09-03

    An understanding of how allostery, the conformational coupling of distant functional sites, arises in highly evolvable systems is of considerable interest in areas ranging from cell biology to protein design and signaling networks. We reasoned that the rigidity and defined geometry of an {alpha}-helical domain linker would make it effective as a conduit for allosteric signals. To test this idea, we rationally designed 12 fusions between the naturally photoactive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa phototropin 1 and the Escherichia coli trp repressor. When illuminated, one of the fusions selectively binds operator DNA and protects it from nuclease digestion. The ready success of our rational design strategy suggests that the helical 'allosteric lever arm' is a general scheme for coupling the function of two proteins.

  12. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  13. Ultrasensitive regulation of anapleurosis via allosteric activation of PEP carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yi-Fan; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Reaves, Marshall Louis; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.

    2012-01-01

    Anapleurosis is the filling of the TCA cycle with four-carbon units. The common substrate for both anapleurosis and glucose phosphorylation in bacteria is the terminal glycolytic metabolite, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP). Here we show that E. coli quickly and almost completely turns off PEP consumption upon glucose removal. The resulting build-up of PEP is used to quickly import glucose if it becomes re-available. The switch-like termination of anapleurosis results from depletion of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an ultrasensitive allosteric activator of PEP carboxylase. E. coli expressing an FBP-insensitive point mutant of PEP carboxylase grow normally on steady glucose. However, they fail to build-up PEP upon glucose removal, grow poorly on oscillating glucose, and suffer from futile cycling at the PEP node on gluconeogenic substrates. Thus, bacterial central carbon metabolism is intrinsically programmed with ultrasensitive allosteric regulation to enable rapid adaptation to changing environmental conditions. PMID:22522319

  14. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  15. Looking for the Origin of Allosteric Cooperativity in Metallopolymers.

    PubMed

    Babel, Lucille; Hoang, Thi Nhu Y; Guénée, Laure; Besnard, Céline; Wesolowski, Tomasz A; Humbert-Droz, Marie; Piguet, Claude

    2016-06-01

    The basic concept of allosteric cooperativity used in biology, chemistry and physics states that any change in the intermolecular host-guest interactions operating in multisite receptors can be assigned to intersite interactions. Using lanthanide metals as guests and linear multi-tridentate linear oligomers of variable lengths and geometries as hosts, this work shows that the quantitative modeling of metal loadings requires the consideration of a novel phenomenon originating from solvation processes. It stepwise modulates the intrinsic affinity of each isolated site in multisite receptors, and this without resorting to allosteric cooperativity. An easy-to-handle additive model predicts a negative power law dependence of the intrinsic affinity on the length of the linear metallopolymer. Applied to lanthanidopolymers, the latter common analysis overestimates cooperativity factors by more than two orders of magnitude. PMID:27142083

  16. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors. PMID:26823026

  17. Divergent allosteric patterns verify the regulatory paradigm for aspartate transcarbamylase.

    PubMed

    Wales, M E; Madison, L L; Glaser, S S; Wild, J R

    1999-12-17

    The native Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, E.C. 2.1.3.2) provides a classic allosteric model for the feedback inhibition of a biosynthetic pathway by its end products. Both E. coli and Erwinia herbicola possess ATCase holoenzymes which are dodecameric (2(c3):3(r2)) with 311 amino acid residues per catalytic monomer and 153 and 154 amino acid residues per regulatory (r) monomer, respectively. While the quaternary structures of the two enzymes are identical, the primary amino acid sequences have diverged by 14 % in the catalytic polypeptide and 20 % in the regulatory polypeptide. The amino acids proposed to be directly involved in the active site and nucleotide binding site are strictly conserved between the two enzymes; nonetheless, the two enzymes differ in their catalytic and regulatory characteristics. The E. coli enzyme has sigmoidal substrate binding with activation by ATP, and inhibition by CTP, while the E. herbicola enzyme has apparent first order kinetics at low substrate concentrations in the absence of allosteric ligands, no ATP activation and only slight CTP inhibition. In an apparently important and highly conserved characteristic, CTP and UTP impose strong synergistic inhibition on both enzymes. The co-operative binding of aspartate in the E. coli enzyme is correlated with a T-to-R conformational transition which appears to be greatly reduced in the E. herbicola enzyme, although the addition of inhibitory heterotropic ligands (CTP or CTP+UTP) re-establishes co-operative saturation kinetics. Hybrid holoenzymes assembled in vivo with catalytic subunits from E. herbicola and regulatory subunits from E. coli mimick the allosteric response of the native E. coli holoenzyme and exhibit ATP activation. The reverse hybrid, regulatory subunits from E. herbicola and catalytic subunits from E. coli, exhibited no response to ATP. The conserved structure and diverged functional characteristics of the E. herbicola enzyme provides an opportunity

  18. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2009-11-19

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as 'preproteins' carrying amino-terminal, cleavable signal peptides and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides and chaperones like SecB. Here we show that signal peptides have a new role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. On docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, 'triggering' that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; second, 'trapping' that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus; and third, 'secretion' during which trapped mature domains undergo several turnovers of translocation in segments. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  19. Allosteric indicator displacement enzyme assay for a cyanogenic glycoside.

    PubMed

    Jose, D Amilan; Elstner, Martin; Schiller, Alexander

    2013-10-18

    Indicator displacement assays (IDAs) represent an elegant approach in supramolecular analytical chemistry. Herein, we report a chemical biosensor for the selective detection of the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin in aqueous solution. The hybrid sensor consists of the enzyme β-glucosidase and a boronic acid appended viologen together with a fluorescent reporter dye. β-Glucosidase degrades the cyanogenic glycoside amygdalin into hydrogen cyanide, glucose, and benzaldehyde. Only the released cyanide binds at the allosteric site of the receptor (boronic acid) thereby inducing changes in the affinity of a formerly bound fluorescent indicator dye at the other side of the receptor. Thus, the sensing probe performs as allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) for cyanide in water. Interference studies with inorganic anions and glucose revealed that cyanide is solely responsible for the change in the fluorescent signal. DFT calculations on a model compound revealed a 1:1 binding ratio of the boronic acid and cyanide ion. The fluorescent enzyme assay for β-glucosidase uses amygdalin as natural substrate and allows measuring Michaelis-Menten kinetics in microtiter plates. The allosteric indicator displacement assay (AIDA) probe can also be used to detect cyanide traces in commercial amygdalin samples. PMID:24123550

  20. CGP7930: a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAB receptor.

    PubMed

    Adams, C L; Lawrence, A J

    2007-01-01

    CGP7930 (3-(3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxy)phenyl-2,2-dimethylpropanol) is a positive allosteric modulator of the metabotropic GABAB receptor. CGP7930 has been found to modulate the GABAB receptor in the open, or high affinity, state increasing agonist affinity for the receptor and signal transduction efficacy following agonist stimulation. The GABAB heteromeric subunit B2, involved in signal transduction but not ligand binding, seems to be the site of action of CGP7930 and similar allosteric modulators. When administered alone in naïve animals, CGP7930 acts as an anxiolytic in rodents without other overt behavioral effects and has also been demonstrated to reduce self-administration of nicotine, cocaine, or alcohol in rodents, suggesting that "fine tuning" of the GABAB receptor by positive allosteric modulators may be able to regulate abuse of these drugs. Baclofen, the GABAB agonist, is currently finding use in treating addiction and various other disorders, but this can result in off-target effects and tolerance. CGP7930 when co-administered with baclofen enhances its potency, which could in theory minimize deleterious effects. Further study of CGP7930 is required, but this compound, and others like it, holds potential in a clinical setting. PMID:17894647

  1. Enzyme Inhibition by Allosteric Capture of an Inactive Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gregory M.; Shahian, Tina; Baharuddin, Aida; Gable, Jonathan E.; Craik, Charles S.

    2011-01-01

    All members of the human herpesvirus protease family are active as weakly associating dimers, but inactive as monomers. A small molecule allosteric inhibitor of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) traps the enzyme in an inactive monomeric state where the C-terminal helices are unfolded and the hydrophobic dimer interface is exposed. NMR titration studies demonstrate that the inhibitor binds to KSHV Pr monomers with low μM affinity. A 2.0 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a C-terminal truncated KSHV Pr-inhibitor complex locates the binding pocket at the dimer interface and displays significant conformational perturbations at the active site, 15 Å from the allosteric site. NMR and CD data suggest that the small molecule inhibits human cytomegalovirus protease (HCMV Pr) via a similar mechanism. As all HHV proteases are functionally and structurally homologous, the inhibitor represents a class of compounds that may be developed into broad-spectrum therapeutics which allosterically regulate enzymatic activity by disrupting protein-protein interactions. PMID:21723875

  2. Computational approaches to detect allosteric pathways in transmembrane molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Michino, Mayako; LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel; Shi, Lei

    2016-07-01

    Many of the functions of transmembrane proteins involved in signal processing and transduction across the cell membrane are determined by allosteric couplings that propagate the functional effects well beyond the original site of activation. Data gathered from breakthroughs in biochemistry, crystallography, and single molecule fluorescence have established a rich basis of information for the study of molecular mechanisms in the allosteric couplings of such transmembrane proteins. The mechanistic details of these couplings, many of which have therapeutic implications, however, have only become accessible in synergy with molecular modeling and simulations. Here, we review some recent computational approaches that analyze allosteric coupling networks (ACNs) in transmembrane proteins, and in particular the recently developed Protein Interaction Analyzer (PIA) designed to study ACNs in the structural ensembles sampled by molecular dynamics simulations. The power of these computational approaches in interrogating the functional mechanisms of transmembrane proteins is illustrated with selected examples of recent experimental and computational studies pursued synergistically in the investigation of secondary active transporters and GPCRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26806157

  3. Conformationally selective RNA aptamers allosterically modulate the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Kahsai, Alem W; Wisler, James W; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill Iii, Thomas J; Dennison, S Moses; Staus, Dean P; Thomsen, Alex R B; Anasti, Kara M; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M; Strachan, Ryan T; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies the ability of 'biased agonists' to activate specific subsets of a given receptor's signaling profile. However, stabilizing distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor function through unique, previously unappreciated mechanisms. Here, using a highly diverse RNA library combined with advanced selection strategies involving state-of-the-art next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we identify RNA aptamers that bind a prototypical GPCR, the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR). Using biochemical, pharmacological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that these aptamers bind with nanomolar affinity at defined surfaces of the receptor, allosterically stabilizing active, inactive, and ligand-specific receptor conformations. The discovery of RNA aptamers as allosteric GPCR modulators significantly expands the diversity of ligands available to study the structural and functional regulation of GPCRs. PMID:27398998

  4. Prediction of allosteric sites on protein surfaces with an elastic-network-model-based thermodynamic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ji Guo; Qi, Li Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Zhu, Yan Ying; Du, Hui Jing; Hou, Yan Xue; Hao, Rui; Wang, Ji Hua

    2014-08-01

    Allostery is a rapid and efficient way in many biological processes to regulate protein functions, where binding of an effector at the allosteric site alters the activity and function at a distant active site. Allosteric regulation of protein biological functions provides a promising strategy for novel drug design. However, how to effectively identify the allosteric sites remains one of the major challenges for allosteric drug design. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model was proposed to predict the allosteric sites on the protein surface. In our method, the thermodynamic coupling between the allosteric and active sites was considered, and then the allosteric sites were identified as those where the binding of an effector molecule induces a large change in the binding free energy of the protein with its ligand. Using the proposed method, two proteins, i.e., the 70 kD heat shock protein (Hsp70) and GluA2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor, were studied and the allosteric sites on the protein surface were successfully identified. The predicted results are consistent with the available experimental data, which indicates that our method is a simple yet effective approach for the identification of allosteric sites on proteins.

  5. ASD v3.0: unraveling allosteric regulation with structural mechanisms and biological networks

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiancheng; Wang, Guanqiao; Li, Shuai; Liu, Xinyi; Lu, Shaoyong; Chen, Zhongjie; Song, Kun; Yan, Junhao; Geng, Lv; Huang, Zhimin; Huang, Wenkang; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation, the most direct and efficient way of regulating protein function, is induced by the binding of a ligand at one site that is topographically distinct from an orthosteric site. Allosteric Database (ASD, available online at http://mdl.shsmu.edu.cn/ASD) has been developed to provide comprehensive information featuring allosteric regulation. With increasing data, fundamental questions pertaining to allostery are currently receiving more attention from the mechanism of allosteric changes in an individual protein to the entire effect of the changes in the interconnected network in the cell. Thus, the following novel features were added to this updated version: (i) structural mechanisms of more than 1600 allosteric actions were elucidated by a comparison of site structures before and after the binding of an modulator; (ii) 261 allosteric networks were identified to unveil how the allosteric action in a single protein would propagate to affect downstream proteins; (iii) two of the largest human allosteromes, protein kinases and GPCRs, were thoroughly constructed; and (iv) web interface and data organization were completely redesigned for efficient access. In addition, allosteric data have largely expanded in this update. These updates are useful for facilitating the investigation of allosteric mechanisms, dynamic networks and drug discoveries. PMID:26365237

  6. Prediction of allosteric sites on protein surfaces with an elastic-network-model-based thermodynamic method.

    PubMed

    Su, Ji Guo; Qi, Li Sheng; Li, Chun Hua; Zhu, Yan Ying; Du, Hui Jing; Hou, Yan Xue; Hao, Rui; Wang, Ji Hua

    2014-08-01

    Allostery is a rapid and efficient way in many biological processes to regulate protein functions, where binding of an effector at the allosteric site alters the activity and function at a distant active site. Allosteric regulation of protein biological functions provides a promising strategy for novel drug design. However, how to effectively identify the allosteric sites remains one of the major challenges for allosteric drug design. In the present work, a thermodynamic method based on the elastic network model was proposed to predict the allosteric sites on the protein surface. In our method, the thermodynamic coupling between the allosteric and active sites was considered, and then the allosteric sites were identified as those where the binding of an effector molecule induces a large change in the binding free energy of the protein with its ligand. Using the proposed method, two proteins, i.e., the 70 kD heat shock protein (Hsp70) and GluA2 alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor, were studied and the allosteric sites on the protein surface were successfully identified. The predicted results are consistent with the available experimental data, which indicates that our method is a simple yet effective approach for the identification of allosteric sites on proteins. PMID:25215770

  7. ASD v3.0: unraveling allosteric regulation with structural mechanisms and biological networks.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiancheng; Wang, Guanqiao; Li, Shuai; Liu, Xinyi; Lu, Shaoyong; Chen, Zhongjie; Song, Kun; Yan, Junhao; Geng, Lv; Huang, Zhimin; Huang, Wenkang; Chen, Guoqiang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric regulation, the most direct and efficient way of regulating protein function, is induced by the binding of a ligand at one site that is topographically distinct from an orthosteric site. Allosteric Database (ASD, available online at http://mdl.shsmu.edu.cn/ASD) has been developed to provide comprehensive information featuring allosteric regulation. With increasing data, fundamental questions pertaining to allostery are currently receiving more attention from the mechanism of allosteric changes in an individual protein to the entire effect of the changes in the interconnected network in the cell. Thus, the following novel features were added to this updated version: (i) structural mechanisms of more than 1600 allosteric actions were elucidated by a comparison of site structures before and after the binding of an modulator; (ii) 261 allosteric networks were identified to unveil how the allosteric action in a single protein would propagate to affect downstream proteins; (iii) two of the largest human allosteromes, protein kinases and GPCRs, were thoroughly constructed; and (iv) web interface and data organization were completely redesigned for efficient access. In addition, allosteric data have largely expanded in this update. These updates are useful for facilitating the investigation of allosteric mechanisms, dynamic networks and drug discoveries. PMID:26365237

  8. Co-Occurring Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Care of You Top Ten Freshman Year Issues Alcohol, Substance Abuse and Depression Winter Break Survival Tips for College Students Implementing ... supporters and consumers in the mental health field. Alcohol and Drug Abuse, Addiction and Co-occurring Disorders: Co-occurring ... In Crisis? Call ...

  9. Studying allosteric regulation in metal sensor proteins using computational methods.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Dhruva K; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe advances made in understanding the mechanism of allosteric regulation of DNA operator binding in the ArsR/SmtB family of metal-sensing proteins using computational methods. The paradigm, zinc-sensing transcriptional repressor Staphylococcus aureus CzrA represents an excellent model system to understand how metal sensor proteins maintain cellular metal homeostasis. Here, we discuss studies that helped to characterize a metal ion-mediated hydrogen-bonding pathway (HBP) that plays a dominant role in the allosteric mechanism of DNA operator binding in these proteins. The chapter discusses computational methods used to provide a molecular basis for the large conformational motions and allosteric coupling free energy (~6kcal/mol) associated with Zn(II) binding in CzrA. We present an accurate and convenient means by which to include metal ions in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure determination process using molecular dynamics (MD) constrained by NMR-derived data. The method provides a realistic and physically viable description of the metal-binding site(s) and has potentially broad applicability in the structure determination of metal ion-bound proteins, protein folding, and metal template protein-design studies. Finally, our simulations provide strong support for a proposed HBP that physically connects the metal-binding residue, His97, to the DNA-binding interface through the αR helix that is present only in the Zn(II)-bound state. We find the interprotomer hydrogen bond interaction to be significantly stronger (~8kcal/mol) at functional allosteric metal-binding sites compared to the apo proteins. This interaction works to overcome the considerable disorder at these hydrogen-bonding sites in apo protein and functions as a "switch" to lock in a weak DNA-binding conformation once metal is bound. This interaction is found to be considerably weaker in nonresponsive metal-binding sites. These findings suggest a conserved functional

  10. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of a Mechanism of Allosteric Signal Transmission in Ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Makarov, G I; Golovin, A V; Sumbatyan, N V; Bogdanov, A A

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a molecular machine that synthesizes all cellular proteins via translation of genetic information encoded in polynucleotide chain of messenger RNA. Transition between different stages of the ribosome working cycle is strictly coordinated by changes in structure and mutual position both of subunits of the ribosome and its ligands. Therein, information regarding structural transformations is transmitted between functional centers of the ribosome through specific signals. Usually, functional centers of ribosomes are located at a distance reaching up to several tens of angstroms, and it is believed that such signals are transduced allosterically. In our study, we attempted to answer the question of how allosteric signal can be transmitted from one of the so-called sensory elements of ribosomal tunnel (RT) to the peptidyl transferase center (PTC). A segment of RT wall from the E. coli ribosome composed of nucleotide residues A2058, A2059, m(2)A2503, G2061, A2062, and C2063 of its 23S rRNA was examined by molecular dynamics simulations. It was found that a potential signal transduction pathway A2058-C2063 acted as a dynamic ensemble of interdependent conformational states, wherein cascade-like changes can occur. It was assumed that structural rearrangement in the A2058-C2063 RT segment results in reversible inactivation of PTC due to a strong stacking contact between functionally important U2585 residue of the PTC and nucleotide residue C2063. A potential role for the observed conformational transition in the A2058-C2063 segment for regulating ribosome activity is discussed. PMID:26547073

  11. Use of acetylcholine mustard to study allosteric interactions at the M2 muscarinic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hinako; Figueroa, Katherine W.; Ehlert, Frederick J.

    2008-01-01

    We explored the interaction of a nitrogen mustard derivative of acetylcholine with the human M2 muscarinic receptor expressed in CHO cells using the muscarinic radioligand, [3H]N-methylscopolamine. Acetylcholine mustard caused a concentration-dependent, first order loss of [3H]N-methylscopolamine binding at 37°C, with the half maximal rate constant occurring at 24 µM and a maximal rate constant of 0.16 min−1. We examined the effects of various ligands on the rate of alkylation of M2 receptors by acetylcholine mustard. N-methylscopolamine and McN-A-343 (4-(trimethylamino)-2-butynyl-(3-chlorophenyl)carbamate) competitively slowed the rate of alkylation, whereas the inhibition by gallamine reached a plateau at high concentrations, indicating allosteric inhibition. In contrast, WIN 51708 (17-β-hydroxy-17-α-ethynyl-5-α-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) had no effect. We also measured the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by acetylcholine mustard at 0°C, conditions under which there is little or no detectable covalent binding. In these experiments, the dissociation constant of the aziridinium ion of acetylcholine mustard was estimated to be 12.3 µM. In contrast, the parent mustard and alcoholic hydrolysis product of acetylcholine mustard were without effect. Our results show that measurement of the effects of ligands on the rate of inactivation of the orthosteric site by a small site-directed electrophile is a powerful method for discriminating competitive inhibition from allosterism. PMID:18682569

  12. The Second Extracellular Loop of the Adenosine A1 Receptor Mediates Activity of Allosteric Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Dylan P.; McRobb, Fiona M.; Leonhardt, Susan A.; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A.; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists. PMID:24217444

  13. A novel allosteric mechanism in the cysteine peptidase cathepsin K discovered by computational methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novinec, Marko; Korenč, Matevž; Caflisch, Amedeo; Ranganathan, Rama; Lenarčič, Brigita; Baici, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric modifiers have the potential to fine-tune enzyme activity. Therefore, targeting allosteric sites is gaining increasing recognition as a strategy in drug design. Here we report the use of computational methods for the discovery of the first small-molecule allosteric inhibitor of the collagenolytic cysteine peptidase cathepsin K, a major target for the treatment of osteoporosis. The molecule NSC13345 is identified by high-throughput docking of compound libraries to surface sites on the peptidase that are connected to the active site by an evolutionarily conserved network of residues (protein sector). The crystal structure of the complex shows that NSC13345 binds to a novel allosteric site on cathepsin K. The compound acts as a hyperbolic mixed modifier in the presence of a synthetic substrate, it completely inhibits collagen degradation and has good selectivity for cathepsin K over related enzymes. Altogether, these properties qualify our methodology and NSC13345 as promising candidates for allosteric drug design.

  14. Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Human μ Opioid Receptor in Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bartuzi, Damian; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2015-11-23

    Allosteric protein modulation has gained increasing attention in drug design. Its application as a mechanism of action could bring forth safer and more effective medicines. Targeting opioid receptors with allosteric modulators can result in better treatment of pain, depression, and respiratory and immune disorders. In this work we use recent reports on negative modulators of μ opioid receptor as a starting point for identification of allosteric sites and mechanisms of opioid receptor modulation using homology modeling and docking and molecular dynamics studies. An allosteric binding site description is presented. Results suggest a shared binding region for lipophilic allosteric ligands, reveal possible differences in the modulation mechanism between cannabinoids and salvinorin A, and show ambiguous properties of the latter. Also, they emphasize the importance of native-like environment in molecular dynamics simulations and uncover relationships between modulator and orthosteric ligand binding and receptor behavior. Relationships between ligands, transmission switch, and hydrophobic lock are analyzed. PMID:26517559

  15. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Pamela Y.; Johnson, Christian W.; Fang, Cong; Cao, Xiaoqing; Graeber, Thomas G.; Mattos, Carla; Colicelli, John

    2015-01-01

    RAS proteins are signal transduction gatekeepers that mediate cell growth, survival, and differentiation through interactions with multiple effector proteins. The RAS effector RAS- and RAB-interacting protein 1 (RIN1) activates its own downstream effectors, the small GTPase RAB5 and the tyrosine kinase Abelson tyrosine-protein kinase (ABL), to modulate endocytosis and cytoskeleton remodeling. To identify ABL substrates downstream of RAS-to-RIN1 signaling, we examined human HEK293T cells overexpressing components of this pathway. Proteomic analysis revealed several novel phosphotyrosine peptides, including Harvey rat sarcoma oncogene (HRAS)-pTyr137. Here we report that ABL phosphorylates tyrosine 137 of H-, K-, and NRAS. Increased RIN1 levels enhanced HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation by nearly 5-fold, suggesting that RAS-stimulated RIN1 can drive ABL-mediated RAS modification in a feedback circuit. Tyr137 is well conserved among RAS orthologs and is part of a transprotein H-bond network. Crystal structures of HRASY137F and HRASY137E revealed conformation changes radiating from the mutated residue. Although consistent with Tyr137 participation in allosteric control of HRAS function, the mutations did not alter intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates in vitro. HRAS-Tyr137 phosphorylation enhanced HRAS signaling capacity in cells, however, as reflected by a 4-fold increase in the association of phosphorylated HRASG12V with its effector protein RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine protein kinase 1 (RAF1). These data suggest that RAS phosphorylation at Tyr137 allosterically alters protein conformation and effector binding, providing a mechanism for effector-initiated modulation of RAS signaling.—Ting, P. Y., Johnson, C. W., Fang, C., Cao, X., Graeber, T. G., Mattos, C., Colicelli, J. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RAS by ABL allosterically enhances effector binding. PMID:25999467

  16. Antitumoral activity of allosteric inhibitors of protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    Sautel, Céline F.; Teillet, Florence; Barette, Caroline; Lafanechere, Laurence; Receveur-Brechot, Veronique; Cochet, Claude

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Due to its physiological role into promoting cell survival and its dysregulation in most cancer cells, protein kinase CK2 is a relevant physiopathological target for development of chemical inhibitors. We report the discovery of azonaphthalene derivatives, as a new family of highly specific CK2 inhibitors. First, we demonstrated that CK2 inhibition (IC50= 0.4 μM) was highly specific, reversible and non ATP-competitive. Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments showed that this inhibition was due to large conformational change of CK2α upon binding of these inhibitors. We showed that several compounds of the family were cell-potent CK2 inhibitors promoting cell cycle arrest of human glioblastoma U373 cells. Finally, in vitro and in vivo assays showed that these compounds could decrease U373 cell tumor mass by 83% emphasizing their efficacy against these apoptosis-resistant tumors. In contrast, Azonaphthalene derivatives inactive on CK2 activity showed no effect in colony formation and tumor regression assays. These findings illustrate the emergence of nonclassical CK2 inhibitors and provide exciting opportunities for the development of novel allosteric CK2 inhibitors. Background CK2 is an emerging therapeutic target and ATP-competitive inhibitors have been identified. CK2 is endowed with specific structural features providing alternative strategies for inhibition. Results Azonaphthalene compounds are allosteric CK2 inhibitors showing antitumor activity. Conclusion CK2 may be targeted allosterically. Significance These inhibitors provide a foundation for a new paradigm for specific CK2 inhibition. PMID:22184283

  17. ATP Is an Allosteric Inhibitor of Coxsackievirus B3 Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Karr, Jonathan P; Peersen, Olve B

    2016-07-19

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from positive-strand RNA viruses, such as picornaviruses and flaviviruses, close their active sites for catalysis via a unique NTP-induced conformational change in the palm domain. Combined with a fully prepositioned templating nucleotide, this mechanism is error-prone and results in a distribution of random mutations in the viral progeny often described as a quasi-species. Here we examine the extent to which noncognate NTPs competitively inhibit single-cycle elongation by coxsackievirus B3 3D(pol), a polymerase that generates three to four mutations per 10 kb of RNA synthesized during viral infection. Using an RNA with a templating guanosine combined with 2-aminopurine fluorescence as a reporter for elongation, we find that the cognate CTP has a Km of 24 μM and the three noncognate nucleotides competitively inhibit the reaction with Kic values of 500 μM for GTP, 1300 μM for ATP, and 3000 μM for UTP. Unexpectedly, ATP also acted as an uncompetitive inhibitor with a Kiu of 1800 μM, resulting in allosteric modulation of 3D(pol) that slowed the polymerase elongation rate ≈4-fold. ATP uncompetitive inhibition required the β- and γ-phosphates, and its extent was significantly diminished in two previously characterized low-fidelity polymerases. This led to further mutational analysis and the identification of a putative allosteric binding site below the NTP entry channel at the interface of conserved motifs A and D, although cocrystallization failed to reveal any density for bound ATP in this pocket. The potential role of an ATP allosteric effect during the virus life cycle is discussed. PMID:27319576

  18. Designing Allosteric Control into Enzymes by Chemical Rescue of Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Deckert, Katelyn; Budiardjo, S. Jimmy; Brunner, Luke C.; Lovell, Scott; Karanicolas, John

    2012-08-07

    Ligand-dependent activity has been engineered into enzymes for purposes ranging from controlling cell morphology to reprogramming cellular signaling pathways. Where these successes have typically fused a naturally allosteric domain to the enzyme of interest, here we instead demonstrate an approach for designing a de novo allosteric effector site directly into the catalytic domain of an enzyme. This approach is distinct from traditional chemical rescue of enzymes in that it relies on disruption and restoration of structure, rather than active site chemistry, as a means to achieve modulate function. We present two examples, W33G in a {beta}-glycosidase enzyme ({beta}-gly) and W492G in a {beta}-glucuronidase enzyme ({beta}-gluc), in which we engineer indole-dependent activity into enzymes by removing a buried tryptophan side chain that serves as a buttress for the active site architecture. In both cases, we observe a loss of function, and in both cases we find that the subsequent addition of indole can be used to restore activity. Through a detailed analysis of {beta}-gly W33G kinetics, we demonstrate that this rescued enzyme is fully functionally equivalent to the corresponding wild-type enzyme. We then present the apo and indole-bound crystal structures of {beta}-gly W33G, which together establish the structural basis for enzyme inactivation and rescue. Finally, we use this designed switch to modulate {beta}-glycosidase activity in living cells using indole. Disruption and recovery of protein structure may represent a general technique for introducing allosteric control into enzymes, and thus may serve as a starting point for building a variety of bioswitches and sensors.

  19. Nor-seco-cucurbit[10]uril exhibits homotropic allosterism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Hao; Liu, Simin; Zavalij, Peter Y; Isaacs, Lyle

    2006-11-22

    The condensation of glycoluril and formaldehyde in concentrated HCl at 50 degrees C delivers nor-seco-cucurbit[10]uril (ns-CB [10]). 1H NMR and X-ray crystallographic evidence indicates that the two cavities of ns-CB[10] accommodate guests that are typically bound within CB[6] or CB[7]. Several interesting types of selectivity are possible within these ternary complexes-top/center isomerism, diastereoselective complexation of chiral (but racemic) guest pairs, and guest size controlled homotropic allosterism. PMID:17105250

  20. Bioinformatic scaling of allosteric interactions in biomedical isozymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-09-01

    Allosteric (long-range) interactions can be surprisingly strong in proteins of biomedical interest. Here we use bioinformatic scaling to connect prior results on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to promising new drugs that inhibit cancer cell metabolism. Many parallel features are apparent, which explain how even one amino acid mutation, remote from active sites, can alter medical results. The enzyme twins involved are cyclooxygenase (aspirin) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH). The IDH results are accurate to 1% and are overdetermined by adjusting a single bioinformatic scaling parameter. It appears that the final stage in optimizing protein functionality may involve leveling of the hydrophobic limits of the arms of conformational hydrophilic hinges.

  1. The allosteric modulation of lipases and its possible biological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    Background During the development of an enantioselective synthesis using the lipase from Mucor miehei an unusual reaction course was observed, which was analyzed precisely. For the first time an allosteric modulation of a lipase changing its selectivity was shown. Theory Considering the biological relevance of the discovered regulation mechanism we developed a theory that describes the regulation of energy homeostasis and fat metabolism. Conclusion This theory represents a new approach to explain the cause of the metabolic syndrome and provides an innovative basis for further research activity. PMID:17825093

  2. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K{sup +} channel

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhiyi Klaasse, Elisabeth Heitman, Laura H. IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K{sup +} channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K{sup +} channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [{sup 3}H]astemizole and [{sup 3}H]dofetilide to the hERG K{sup +} channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC{sub 50} values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC{sub 50} values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K{sup +} channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. - Highlights: • Allosteric modulators on the hERG K{sup +} channel were evaluated in binding assays. • LUF6200 was identified as a potent allosteric inhibitor. • Potassium ions were found to behave as allosteric enhancers. • Positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them were proposed.

  3. X-ray crystallographic analyses of symmetrical allosteric effectors of hemoglobin: compounds designed to link primary and secondary binding sites.

    PubMed

    Safo, Martin K; Boyiri, Telih; Burnett, James C; Danso-Danquah, Richmond; Moure, Carmen M; Joshi, Gajanan S; Abraham, Donald J

    2002-04-01

    The rational design and X-ray crystallographic analyses of two symmetrical allosteric effectors of hemoglobin (Hb) are reported. Compound design was directed by the previously solved co-crystal structure of one of the most potent allosteric effectors of Hb, 2-[4-[(3,5-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)-methyl]-phenoxy]-2-methylpropionic acid (RSR4), which revealed two distinct binding sites for this compound in the Hb central water cavity. The primary binding site has been observed for all compounds of this structural class, which stabilize deoxy Hb by engaging in inter-dimer contacts with three of the four protein subunits. Interactions at the secondary binding site of RSR4 occur primarily between the beta(1) and beta(2) subunits and serve to further constrain the deoxy state. Based on these observations, it was hypothesized that compounds with the ability to simultaneously span and link both of these sites would possess increased potency, but at a lower molar concentration than RSR4. Two symmetrical compounds were designed and synthesized based on this hypothesis. The symmetrical effector approach was taken to minimize the number of compound orientations needed to successfully bind at either of the distinct allosteric sites. X-ray crystallographic analyses of these two effectors in complex with Hb revealed that they successfully spanned the RSR4 primary and secondary binding sites. However, the designed compounds interacted with the secondary binding site in such a way that intra-dimer, as opposed to inter-dimer, interactions were generated. In agreement with these observations, in vitro evaluation of the symmetrical effectors in Hb solution indicated that neither compound possessed the potency of RSR4. A detailed analysis of symmetrical effector-Hb contacts and comparisons with the binding contacts of RSR4 are discussed. PMID:11914488

  4. "Naturally occurring asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnard, F.; Lahondère, D.; Blein, O.; Lahfid, A.; Wille, G.

    2012-04-01

    The term asbestos refers to six silicate minerals from amphibole and serpentine groups. By definition, it consists in bundles of thin and flexible long fibers, with high-tensile strength, and chemical and heat resistance. In contrast to asbestos found within commercial products and mining, the specific term ''naturally occurring asbestos'' (NOA) refers to asbestiform minerals occurring within rocks or soils that can be released by human activities or weathering processes. The fact that the exposure to asbestos is related to lung pathologies is now widely demonstrated (e.g. asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer). However, if health risks associated with exposure to NOA exist, they are not yet well documented. The crystallization of natural asbestos occurs in specific Mg-rich lithologies associated with peculiar structural and metamorphic conditions. By recognizing and combining such specific geologic criteria, the presence or the absence of asbestos in bedrock terrains can be reasonably predicted and maps of NOA hazard can be drawn. We present here new results of geological mapping and petrological study concerning the evaluation of the NOA hazard in the Alps and Corsica, in France. The three folds approach consists in (1) a determination of lithologies with potential NOA from a bibliographic compilation and extraction of target zones from a geological geodatabase (2) a geological mapping of the target zones followed by a petrological characterization of sampled asbestiform minerals in the laboratory (optical microscopy, TEM, SEM, and Raman spectroscopy technics), and (3) the drawing of the final map of NOA hazard, at regional-scale. Occurrence criteria can be retained as follows: 1. NOA are abundant in the internal zones of the Alps and Corsica, especially within ophiolitic complexes. Natural asbestos are mostly concentrated within ultramafic rocks but can also occur within basic lithologies such as Mg-metagabbros, metabasalts and meta-pillow-lavas, 2. Asbestos

  5. Allosteric substrate switching in a voltage-sensing lipid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sasha S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-04-01

    Allostery provides a critical control over enzyme activity, biasing the catalytic site between inactive and active states. We found that the Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP), which modifies phosphoinositide signaling lipids (PIPs), has not one but two sequential active states with distinct substrate specificities, whose occupancy is allosterically controlled by sequential conformations of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD). Using fast fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) reporters of PIPs to monitor enzyme activity and voltage-clamp fluorometry to monitor conformational changes in the VSD, we found that Ci-VSP switches from inactive to a PIP3-preferring active state when the VSD undergoes an initial voltage-sensing motion and then into a second PIP2-preferring active state when the VSD activates fully. This two-step allosteric control over a dual-specificity enzyme enables voltage to shape PIP concentrations in time, and provides a mechanism for the complex modulation of PIP-regulated ion channels, transporters, cell motility, endocytosis and exocytosis. PMID:26878552

  6. Dynamics of allosteric action in multisite protein modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milotti, Edoardo; Del Fabbro, Alessio; Dalla Pellegrina, Chiara; Chignola, Roberto

    2007-06-01

    Protein functions in cells may be activated or modified by the attachment of several kinds of chemical groups. While protein phosphorylation, i.e., the attachment of a phosphoryl (PO3-) group, is the most studied form of protein modification, and is known to regulate the functions of many proteins, protein behavior can also be modified by nitrosylation, acetylation, methylation, etc. A protein can have multiple modification sites, and displays some form of transition only when enough sites are modified. In a previous paper we have modeled the generic equilibrium properties of multisite protein modification [R. Chignola, C. Dalla Pellegrina, A. Del Fabbro, E. Milotti, Physica A 371 (2006) 463] and we have shown that it can account both for sharp, robust thresholds and for information transfer between processes with widely separated timescales. Here we use the same concepts to expand that analysis starting from a dynamical description of multisite modification: we give analytical results for the basic dynamics and numerical results in an example where the modification chain is cascaded with a Michaelis-Menten step. We modify the dynamics and analyze an example with realistic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation steps, and give numerical evidence of the independence of the allosteric effect from the details of the attachment-detachment processes. We conclude that multisite protein modification is dynamically equivalent to the classic allosteric effect.

  7. Allosteric Inhibition of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Revealed by Ibudilast

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Y.; Crichlow, G; Vermeire, J; Leng, L; Du, X; Hodsdon, M; Bucala, R; Cappello, M; Gross, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    AV411 (ibudilast; 3-isobutyryl-2-isopropylpyrazolo-[1,5-a]pyridine) is an antiinflammatory drug that was initially developed for the treatment of bronchial asthma but which also has been used for cerebrovascular and ocular indications. It is a nonselective inhibitor of various phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and has varied antiinflammatory activity. More recently, AV411 has been studied as a possible therapeutic for the treatment of neuropathic pain and opioid withdrawal through its actions on glial cells. As described herein, the PDE inhibitor AV411 and its PDE-inhibition-compromised analog AV1013 inhibit the catalytic and chemotactic functions of the proinflammatory protein, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Enzymatic analysis indicates that these compounds are noncompetitive inhibitors of the p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) tautomerase activity of MIF and an allosteric binding site of AV411 and AV1013 is detected by NMR. The allosteric inhibition mechanism is further elucidated by X-ray crystallography based on the MIF/AV1013 binary and MIF/AV1013/HPP ternary complexes. In addition, our antibody experiments directed against MIF receptors indicate that CXCR2 is the major receptor for MIF-mediated chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  8. Allosterically controlled threading of polymers through macrocyclic dimers.

    PubMed

    Cantekin, Seda; Markvoort, Albert J; Elemans, Johannes A A W; Rowan, Alan E; Nolte, Roeland J M

    2015-03-25

    As part of an ongoing study to construct a molecular Turing machine in which a polymer chain is encoded via allosteric information transfer between macrocyclic complexes, we describe the thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of a multicomponent self-assembled system based on a zinc porphyrin macrocyclic compound, a bidentate ligand (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane, DABCO), and a viologen-substituted polymer guest. Initial addition of DABCO to the porphyrin macrocycle in chloroform solution leads to the formation of a stable 2:1 (porphyrin:DABCO) dimeric complex, even under dilute conditions, by means of strong cooperative interactions involving hydrogen and metal-ligand bonds. Further titration of the porphyrin-DABCO mixtures with the polymer gives rise to a complex array of species in the solution. The system is analyzed in detail by a combination of spectroscopic measurements and computational modeling. Each association constant in the binding scheme and the fraction of each individual complex that is formed in solution are determined precisely using a mass-balance model. Kinetic studies revealed that the rates of the polymer threading and dethreading in and out of the dimeric system are remarkably slow, indicating that the polymer is locked inside the cavity of the stable 2:1 dimeric complex as a result of strong allosteric interactions. PMID:25734357

  9. A Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 selective allosteric agonist

    PubMed Central

    Satsu, Hideo; Schaeffer, Marie-Therese; Guerrero, Miguel; Saldana, Adrian; Eberhart, Christina; Hodder, Peter; Cayanan, Charmagne; Schürer, Stephan; Bhhatarai, Barun; Roberts, Ed; Rosen, Hugh; Brown, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular probe tool compounds for the Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) are important for investigating the multiple biological processes in which the S1PR2 receptor has been implicated. Amongst these are NF-κB-mediated tumor cell survival and fibroblast chemotaxis to fibronectin. Here we report our efforts to identify selective chemical probes for S1PR2 and their characterization. We employed high throughput screening to identify two compounds which activate the S1PR2 receptor. SAR optimization led to compounds with high nanomolar potency. These compounds, XAX-162 and CYM-5520, are highly selective and do not activate other S1P receptors. Binding of CYM-5520 is not competitive with the antagonist JTE-013. Mutation of receptor residues responsible for binding to the zwitterionic headgroup of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) abolishes S1P activation of the receptor, but not activation by CYM-5520. Competitive binding experiments with radiolabeled S1P demonstrate that CYM-5520 is an allosteric agonist and does not displace the native ligand. Computational modeling suggests that CYM-5520 binds lower in the orthosteric binding pocket, and that co-binding with S1P is energetically well tolerated. In summary, we have identified an allosteric S1PR2 selective agonist compound. PMID:23849205

  10. Broad-Spectrum Allosteric Inhibition of Herpesvirus Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses rely on a homodimeric protease for viral capsid maturation. A small molecule, DD2, previously shown to disrupt dimerization of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus protease (KSHV Pr) by trapping an inactive monomeric conformation and two analogues generated through carboxylate bioisosteric replacement (compounds 2 and 3) were shown to inhibit the associated proteases of all three human herpesvirus (HHV) subfamilies (α, β, and γ). Inhibition data reveal that compound 2 has potency comparable to or better than that of DD2 against the tested proteases. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and a new application of the kinetic analysis developed by Zhang and Poorman [Zhang, Z. Y., Poorman, R. A., et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15591–15594] show DD2, compound 2, and compound 3 inhibit HHV proteases by dimer disruption. All three compounds bind the dimer interface of other HHV proteases in a manner analogous to binding of DD2 to KSHV protease. The determination and analysis of cocrystal structures of both analogues with the KSHV Pr monomer verify and elaborate on the mode of binding for this chemical scaffold, explaining a newly observed critical structure–activity relationship. These results reveal a prototypical chemical scaffold for broad-spectrum allosteric inhibition of human herpesvirus proteases and an approach for the identification of small molecules that allosterically regulate protein activity by targeting protein–protein interactions. PMID:24977643

  11. An allosteric photoredox catalyst inspired by photosynthetic machinery

    PubMed Central

    Lifschitz, Alejo M.; Young, Ryan M.; Mendez-Arroyo, Jose; Stern, Charlotte L.; McGuirk, C. Michael; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Biological photosynthetic machinery allosterically regulate light harvesting via conformational and electronic changes at the antenna protein complexes as a response to specific chemical inputs. Fundamental limitations in current approaches to regulating inorganic light-harvesting mimics prevent their use in catalysis. Here we show that a light-harvesting antenna/reaction centre mimic can be regulated by utilizing a coordination framework incorporating antenna hemilabile ligands and assembled via a high-yielding, modular approach. As in nature, allosteric regulation is afforded by coupling the conformational changes to the disruptions in the electrochemical landscape of the framework upon recognition of specific coordinating analytes. The hemilabile ligands enable switching using remarkably mild and redox-inactive inputs, allowing one to regulate the photoredox catalytic activity of the photosynthetic mimic reversibly and in situ. Thus, we demonstrate that bioinspired regulatory mechanisms can be applied to inorganic light-harvesting arrays displaying switchable catalytic properties and with potential uses in solar energy conversion and photonic devices. PMID:25817586

  12. Functional Consequences of GPCR Heterodimerization: GPCRs as Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Karla K.V.; McCarty, Nael A.

    2011-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome, are the targets of approximately 25% of all marketed pharmaceuticals, and the focus of intensive research worldwide given that this superfamily of receptors is as varied in function as it is ubiquitously expressed among all cell types. Increasing evidence has shown that the classical two part model of GPCR signaling (one GPCR, one type of heterotrimeric G protein) is grossly oversimplified as many GPCRs can couple to more than one type of G protein, each subunit of the heterotrimeric G protein can activate different downstream effectors, and, surprisingly, other GPCRs can affect receptor behavior in G protein-independent ways. The concept of GPCR heterodimerization, or the physical association of two different types of GPCRs, presents an unexpected mechanism for GPCR regulation and function, and provides a novel target for pharmaceuticals. Here we present a synopsis of the functional consequences of GPCR heterodimerization in both in vitro and in vivo studies, focusing on the concept of GPCRs as allosteric modulators. Typically, an allosteric modulator is a ligand or molecule that alters a receptor's innate functional properties, but here we propose that in the case of GPCR heterodimers, it is the physical coupling of two receptors that leads to changes in cognate receptor signaling.

  13. Allosteric activation of ADAMTS13 by von Willebrand factor

    PubMed Central

    Muia, Joshua; Zhu, Jian; Gupta, Garima; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Friedman, Kenneth D.; Feys, Hendrik B.; Deforche, Louis; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Westfield, Lisa A.; Roth, Robyn; Tolia, Niraj Harish; Heuser, John E.

    2014-01-01

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS13 cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) within endovascular platelet aggregates, and ADAMTS13 deficiency causes fatal microvascular thrombosis. The proximal metalloprotease (M), disintegrin-like (D), thrombospondin-1 (T), Cys-rich (C), and spacer (S) domains of ADAMTS13 recognize a cryptic site in VWF that is exposed by tensile force. Another seven T and two complement C1r/C1s, sea urchin epidermal growth factor, and bone morphogenetic protein (CUB) domains of uncertain function are C-terminal to the MDTCS domains. We find that the distal T8-CUB2 domains markedly inhibit substrate cleavage, and binding of VWF or monoclonal antibodies to distal ADAMTS13 domains relieves this autoinhibition. Small angle X-ray scattering data indicate that distal T-CUB domains interact with proximal MDTCS domains. Thus, ADAMTS13 is regulated by substrate-induced allosteric activation, which may optimize VWF cleavage under fluid shear stress in vivo. Distal domains of other ADAMTS proteases may have similar allosteric properties. PMID:25512528

  14. Evidence for allosteric regulation of succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Um, H D; Klein, C

    1993-01-01

    We have previously reported that distinctly different concentrations of GDP stimulate the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of p36, the alpha-subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) in Dictyostelium discoideum. In this present study, we have investigated the mechanism underlying these dual effects of GDP. Dephosphorylation of p36 is induced by relatively high levels of GDP and is coincident with the formation of GTP. This indicates that, at high concentrations, GDP serves as a substrate of SCS. However, 100-fold lower concentrations of GDP, which do not bind to the catalytic site to induce SCS dephosphorylation, stimulate p36 phosphorylation. This stimulation is not diminished by dilution of the sample, and is retained during purification of the protein. Gel-filtration analyses indicate that SCS in our system behaves as a non-interacting alpha beta dimer, the hydrodynamic behaviour of which is not altered by the presence of added GDP. The data indicate that altered protein-protein interactions do not account for the stimulation of p36 phosphorylation by low GDP concentrations. We propose that GDP functions as an allosteric regulator of SCS, and experiments using guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[S]) are shown to distinguish further the allosteric and catalytic binding sites. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8240297

  15. Evidence for allosteric regulation of succinyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Um, H D; Klein, C

    1993-11-01

    We have previously reported that distinctly different concentrations of GDP stimulate the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of p36, the alpha-subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) in Dictyostelium discoideum. In this present study, we have investigated the mechanism underlying these dual effects of GDP. Dephosphorylation of p36 is induced by relatively high levels of GDP and is coincident with the formation of GTP. This indicates that, at high concentrations, GDP serves as a substrate of SCS. However, 100-fold lower concentrations of GDP, which do not bind to the catalytic site to induce SCS dephosphorylation, stimulate p36 phosphorylation. This stimulation is not diminished by dilution of the sample, and is retained during purification of the protein. Gel-filtration analyses indicate that SCS in our system behaves as a non-interacting alpha beta dimer, the hydrodynamic behaviour of which is not altered by the presence of added GDP. The data indicate that altered protein-protein interactions do not account for the stimulation of p36 phosphorylation by low GDP concentrations. We propose that GDP functions as an allosteric regulator of SCS, and experiments using guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[S]) are shown to distinguish further the allosteric and catalytic binding sites. PMID:8240297

  16. Structural Analysis of Iac Repressor Bound to Allosteric Effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Daber,R.; Stayrook, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    The lac operon is a model system for understanding how effector molecules regulate transcription and are necessary for allosteric transitions. The crystal structures of the lac repressor bound to inducer and anti-inducer molecules provide a model for how these small molecules can modulate repressor function. The structures of the apo repressor and the repressor bound to effector molecules are compared in atomic detail. All effectors examined here bind to the repressor in the same location and are anchored to the repressor through hydrogen bonds to several hydroxyl groups of the sugar ring. Inducer molecules form a more extensive hydrogen-bonding network compared to anti-inducers and neutral effector molecules. The structures of these effector molecules suggest that the O6 hydroxyl on the galactoside is essential for establishing a water-mediated hydrogen bonding network that bridges the N-terminal and C-terminal sub-domains. The altered hydrogen bonding can account in part for the different structural conformations of the repressor, and is vital for the allosteric transition.

  17. Allosteric modulation in monomers and oligomers of a G protein-coupled receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shivnaraine, Rabindra V; Kelly, Brendan; Sankar, Krishana S; Redka, Dar'ya S; Han, Yi Rang; Huang, Fei; Elmslie, Gwendolynne; Pinto, Daniel; Li, Yuchong; Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Gradinaru, Claudiu C; Ellis, John; Wells, James W

    2016-01-01

    The M2 muscarinic receptor is the prototypic model of allostery in GPCRs, yet the molecular and the supramolecular determinants of such effects are unknown. Monomers and oligomers of the M2 muscarinic receptor therefore have been compared to identify those allosteric properties that are gained in oligomers. Allosteric interactions were monitored by means of a FRET-based sensor of conformation at the allosteric site and in pharmacological assays involving mutants engineered to preclude intramolecular effects. Electrostatic, steric, and conformational determinants of allostery at the atomic level were examined in molecular dynamics simulations. Allosteric effects in monomers were exclusively negative and derived primarily from intramolecular electrostatic repulsion between the allosteric and orthosteric ligands. Allosteric effects in oligomers could be positive or negative, depending upon the allosteric-orthosteric pair, and they arose from interactions within and between the constituent protomers. The complex behavior of oligomers is characteristic of muscarinic receptors in myocardial preparations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11685.001 PMID:27151542

  18. The Mechanism of Allosteric Inhibition of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shaoyong; Huang, Wenkang; Geng, Lv; Shen, Qiancheng; Zhang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    As the prototypical member of the PTP family, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is an attractive target for therapeutic interventions in type 2 diabetes. The extremely conserved catalytic site of PTP1B renders the design of selective PTP1B inhibitors intractable. Although discovered allosteric inhibitors containing a benzofuran sulfonamide scaffold offer fascinating opportunities to overcome selectivity issues, the allosteric inhibitory mechanism of PTP1B has remained elusive. Here, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, coupled with a dynamic weighted community analysis, were performed to unveil the potential allosteric signal propagation pathway from the allosteric site to the catalytic site in PTP1B. This result revealed that the allosteric inhibitor compound-3 induces a conformational rearrangement in helix α7, disrupting the triangular interaction among helix α7, helix α3, and loop11. Helix α7 then produces a force, pulling helix α3 outward, and promotes Ser190 to interact with Tyr176. As a result, the deviation of Tyr176 abrogates the hydrophobic interactions with Trp179 and leads to the downward movement of the WPD loop, which forms an H-bond between Asp181 and Glu115. The formation of this H-bond constrains the WPD loop to its open conformation and thus inactivates PTP1B. The discovery of this allosteric mechanism provides an overall view of the regulation of PTP1B, which is an important insight for the design of potent allosteric PTP1B inhibitors. PMID:24831294

  19. Allosteric Modulation of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Structural Insights and Therapeutic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represents a novel approach to the development of probes and therapeutics that is expected to enable subtype-specific regulation of central nervous system target receptors. The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) are class C GPCRs that play important neuromodulatory roles throughout the brain, as such they are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention for a number of psychiatric and neurological disorders including anxiety, depression, Fragile X Syndrome, Parkinson’s disease and schizophrenia. Over the last fifteen years, selective allosteric modulators have been identified for many members of the mGlu family. The vast majority of these allosteric modulators are thought to bind within the transmembrane-spanning domains of the receptors to enhance or inhibit functional responses. A combination of mutagenesis-based studies and pharmacological approaches are beginning to provide a better understanding of mGlu allosteric sites. Collectively, when mapped onto a homology model of the different mGlu subtypes based on the β2-adrenergic receptor, the previous mutagenesis studies suggest commonalities in the location of allosteric sites across different members of the mGlu family. In addition, there is evidence for multiple allosteric binding pockets within the transmembrane region that can interact to modulate one another. In the absence of a class C GPCR crystal structure, this approach has shown promise with respect to the interpretation of mutagenesis data and understanding structure-activity relationships of allosteric modulator pharmacophores. PMID:20637216

  20. Communicating up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Chief communicators at many U.S. institutions are interested in forging closer ties with governing boards. Proponents say such relationships can increase board trust and confidence in communicators before a crisis occurs, making it easier to manage the institution's reputation and limit negative publicity when one does. At some institutions, such…

  1. Interactions of orthosteric and allosteric ligands with [3H]dimethyl-W84 at the common allosteric site of muscarinic M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Tränkle, Christian; Weyand, Oliver; Voigtländer, Uta; Mynett, Anita; Lazareno, Sebastian; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Mohr, Klaus

    2003-07-01

    An optimized assay for the binding of [3H]dimethyl-W84 to its allosteric site on M2 muscarinic receptors has been used to directly measure the affinities of allosteric ligands. Their potencies agree with those deduced indirectly by their modulation of the equilibrium binding and kinetics of [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) binding to the orthosteric site. The affinities and cooperativities of orthosteric antagonists with [3H]dimethyl-W84 have also been quantitated. These affinities agree with those measured directly in a competition assay using [3H]NMS. All these data are compatible with the predictions of the allosteric ternary complex model. The association and dissociation kinetics of [3H]dimethyl-W84 are rapid but the estimate of its association rate constant is nevertheless comparable with that found for the orthosteric radioligand, [3H]NMS. This is unexpected, given that the allosteric site to which [3H]dimethyl-W84 binds is thought to be located on the external face of the receptor and above the [3H]NMS binding site that is buried within the transmembrane helices. The atypical allosteric ligands tacrine and 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bis-pyridinium dibromide (Duo3) inhibit [3H]dimethyl-W84 binding with the same potencies and comparably steep slope factors as found for inhibition of [3H]NMS binding. Tacrine and Duo3 decrease [3H]dimethyl-W84 affinity, not the number of binding sites. It is suggested that these atypical ligands either bind to the two known spatially separated allosteric sites on muscarinic receptors with positive cooperativity or their binding to the common allosteric site modulates receptor-receptor interactions such that homotropic positive cooperativity within a dimer or higher oligomer is generated. PMID:12815174

  2. Virus Assembly and Maturation: Auto-regulation Through Allosteric Molecular Switches

    PubMed Central

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Movahed, Navid; Brian, Bothner; Matsui, Tsutomu; Wang, Qiu; Doerschuk, Peter; Johnson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    We generalize the concept of allostery from the traditional non active-site control of enzymes to virus maturation. Virtually all animal viruses transition from a procapsid, non infectious state, to a mature infectious state. The procapsid contains an encoded chemical program that is executed following an environmental cue. We developed an exceptionally accessible virus system for the study of the activators of maturation and the down stream consequences that result in particle stability and infectivity. Nudaurelia Capensis Omegavirus (NωV) is a T=4 icosahedral virus that undergoes a dramatic maturation in which the 490Å spherical procapsid condenses to a 400Å icosahedral shaped capsid with associated specific auto-proteolysis and stabilization. Employing X-ray crystallography, time resolved electron cryo-microscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange as well as biochemistry it was possible to define the mechanisms of allosteric communication among the 4 quasi-equivalent subunits in the icosahedral asymmetric unit. These gene products undergo proteolysis at different rates, dependent on quaternary structure environment, while particle stability is conferred globally following only a few local subunit transitions. We show that there is a close similarity between the concepts of tensegrity, associated with geodesic domes and mechanical engineering, and allostery, associated with biochemical control mechanisms. PMID:23485419

  3. Virus assembly and maturation: auto-regulation through allosteric molecular switches.

    PubMed

    Domitrovic, Tatiana; Movahed, Navid; Bothner, Brian; Matsui, Tsutomu; Wang, Qiu; Doerschuk, Peter C; Johnson, John E

    2013-05-13

    We generalize the concept of allostery from the traditional non-active-site control of enzymes to virus maturation. Virtually, all animal viruses transition from a procapsid noninfectious state to a mature infectious state. The procapsid contains an encoded chemical program that is executed following an environmental cue. We developed an exceptionally accessible virus system for the study of the activators of maturation and the downstream consequences that result in particle stability and infectivity. Nudaurelia capensis omega virus (NωV) is a T=4 icosahedral virus that undergoes a dramatic maturation in which the 490-Å spherical procapsid condenses to a 400-Å icosahedral-shaped capsid with associated specific auto-proteolysis and stabilization. Employing X-ray crystallography, time-resolved electron cryo-microscopy and hydrogen/deuterium exchange as well as biochemistry, it was possible to define the mechanisms of allosteric communication among the four quasi-equivalent subunits in the icosahedral asymmetric unit. These gene products undergo proteolysis at different rates, dependent on quaternary structure environment, while particle stability is conferred globally following only a few local subunit transitions. We show that there is a close similarity between the concepts of tensegrity (associated with geodesic domes and mechanical engineering) and allostery (associated with biochemical control mechanisms). PMID:23485419

  4. Role of protein dynamics in ion selectivity and allosteric coupling in the NaK channel

    PubMed Central

    Brettmann, Joshua B.; Urusova, Darya; Tonelli, Marco; Silva, Jonathan R.; Henzler-Wildman, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Flux-dependent inactivation that arises from functional coupling between the inner gate and the selectivity filter is widespread in ion channels. The structural basis of this coupling has only been well characterized in KcsA. Here we present NMR data demonstrating structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and intracellular constriction point in the bacterial nonselective cation channel, NaK. This transmembrane allosteric communication must be structurally different from KcsA because the NaK selectivity filter does not collapse under low-cation conditions. Comparison of NMR spectra of the nonselective NaK and potassium-selective NaK2K indicates that the number of ion binding sites in the selectivity filter shifts the equilibrium distribution of structural states throughout the channel. This finding was unexpected given the nearly identical crystal structure of NaK and NaK2K outside the immediate vicinity of the selectivity filter. Our results highlight the tight structural and dynamic coupling between the selectivity filter and the channel scaffold, which has significant implications for channel function. NaK offers a distinct model to study the physiologically essential connection between ion conduction and channel gating. PMID:26621745

  5. Allosteric signalling in the outer membrane translocation domain of PapC usher

    PubMed Central

    Farabella, Irene; Pham, Thieng; Henderson, Nadine S; Geibel, Sebastian; Phan, Gilles; Thanassi, David G; Delcour, Anne H; Waksman, Gabriel; Topf, Maya

    2014-01-01

    PapC ushers are outer-membrane proteins enabling assembly and secretion of P pili in uropathogenic E. coli. Their translocation domain is a large β-barrel occluded by a plug domain, which is displaced to allow the translocation of pilus subunits across the membrane. Previous studies suggested that this gating mechanism is controlled by a β-hairpin and an α-helix. To investigate the role of these elements in allosteric signal communication, we developed a method combining evolutionary and molecular dynamics studies of the native translocation domain and mutants lacking the β-hairpin and/or the α-helix. Analysis of a hybrid residue interaction network suggests distinct regions (residue ‘communities’) within the translocation domain (especially around β12–β14) linking these elements, thereby modulating PapC gating. Antibiotic sensitivity and electrophysiology experiments on a set of alanine-substitution mutants confirmed functional roles for four of these communities. This study illuminates the gating mechanism of PapC ushers and its importance in maintaining outer-membrane permeability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03532.001 PMID:25271373

  6. The kinetics of effector binding to phosphofructokinase. The allosteric conformational transition induced by 1,N6-ethenoadenosine triphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Kellett, G L

    1979-01-01

    1. The fluorescent ATP analogue 1,N6-etheno-ATP is a good substrate and an efficient allosteric inhibitor of rabbit skeletal-muscle phosphofructokinase. 2. Fluorescence energy transfer occurs between bound 1,N6-etheno-ATP and phosphofructokinase. 1,N6-Etheno-ATP fluorescence is enhanced, intrinsic protein fluorescence is quenched, and the excitation spectrum of 1,N6-etheno-ATP fluorescence is characteristic of protein absorption. 3. The binding reaction of 1,N6-etheno-ATP observed by stopped-flow fluorimetry is biphasic. The fast phase results from binding to the catalytic site alone. The slow phase results from the allosteric transition of the R conformation into the T conformation induced by the binding of 1,N6-etheno-ATP to the regulatory site. 4. The fluorescence signal that allows the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation to be observed does not arise from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the regulatory site. It arises instead from 1,N6-etheno-ATP bound to the catalytic site as a consequence of changes at the catalytic site caused by the transition of the R conformation into the T conformation. 5. In the presence of excess of Mg2+, the affinity of 1,N6-etheno-ATP for the regulatory site is very much greater in the T state than in the R state. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 8. PMID:160791

  7. Interrogation of the intersubunit interface of the open Hv1 proton channel with a probe of allosteric coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Singh, Vikrant; Wulff, Heike; Tombola, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    The Hv1 voltage-gated proton channel is a dimeric complex consisting of two voltage-sensing domains (VSDs), each containing a gated proton permeation pathway. Dimerization is controlled by a cytoplasmic coiled-coil domain. The transitions from the closed to the open state in the two VSDs are known to occur cooperatively; however, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. Intersubunit interfaces play a critical role in allosteric processes; but, such interfaces have not been determined in the open Hv1 channel. Here we show that 2-guanidinothiazole derivatives block the two Hv1 VSDs in a cooperative way, and use one of the compounds as a probe of allosteric coupling between open subunits. We find that the extracellular ends of the first transmembrane segments of the VSDs form the intersubunit interface that mediates coupling between binding sites, while the coiled-coil domain does not directly participate in the process. We also find strong evidence that the channel’s proton selectivity filter controls blocker binding cooperativity. PMID:26365828

  8. Structural insights into Ca(2+)-activated long-range allosteric channel gating of RyR1.

    PubMed

    Wei, Risheng; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Yan; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Xinrui; Jing, Shan; Liu, Congcong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Guangyu; Xu, Yaofang; Zhu, Sujie; Williams, Alan J; Sun, Fei; Yin, Chang-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) are a class of giant ion channels with molecular mass over 2.2 mega-Daltons. These channels mediate calcium signaling in a variety of cells. Since more than 80% of the RyR protein is folded into the cytoplasmic assembly and the remaining residues form the transmembrane domain, it has been hypothesized that the activation and regulation of RyR channels occur through an as yet uncharacterized long-range allosteric mechanism. Here we report the characterization of a Ca(2+)-activated open-state RyR1 structure by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure has an overall resolution of 4.9 Å and a resolution of 4.2 Å for the core region. In comparison with the previously determined apo/closed-state structure, we observed long-range allosteric gating of the channel upon Ca(2+) activation. In-depth structural analyses elucidated a novel channel-gating mechanism and a novel ion selectivity mechanism of RyR1. Our work not only provides structural insights into the molecular mechanisms of channel gating and regulation of RyRs, but also sheds light on structural basis for channel-gating and ion selectivity mechanisms for the six-transmembrane-helix cation channel family. PMID:27573175

  9. Naturally occurring cardiac glycosides.

    PubMed

    Radford, D J; Gillies, A D; Hinds, J A; Duffy, P

    1986-05-12

    Cardiac glycoside poisoning from the ingestion of plants, particularly of oleanders, occurs with reasonable frequency in tropical and subtropical areas. We have assessed a variety of plant specimens for their cardiac glycoside content by means of radioimmunoassays with antibodies that differ in their specificity for cardiac glycosides. Significant amounts of immunoreactive cardiac glycoside were found to be present in the ornamental shrubs: yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana); oleander (Nerium oleander); wintersweet (Carissa spectabilis); bushman's poison (Carissa acokanthera); sea-mango (Cerbera manghas); and frangipani (Plumeria rubra); and in the milkweeds: redheaded cotton-bush (Asclepias curassavica); balloon cotton (Asclepias fruiticosa); king's crown (Calotropis procera); and rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandifolia). The venom gland of the cane toad (Bufo marinus) also contained large quantities of cardiac glycosides. The competitive immunoassay method permits the rapid screening of specimens that are suspected to contain cardiac glycosides. Awareness of the existence of these plant and animal toxins and their dangers allows them to be avoided and poisoning prevented. The method is also useful for the confirmation of the presence of cardiac glycosides in serum in cases of poisoning. PMID:3086679

  10. Naturally Occurring Food Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Laurie C.; Matulka, Ray A.; Burdock, George A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many foods contain toxins as a naturally-occurring constituent or, are formed as the result of handling or processing, the incidence of adverse reactions to food is relatively low. The low incidence of adverse effects is the result of some pragmatic solutions by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other regulatory agencies through the creative use of specifications, action levels, tolerances, warning labels and prohibitions. Manufacturers have also played a role by setting limits on certain substances and developing mitigation procedures for process-induced toxins. Regardless of measures taken by regulators and food producers to protect consumers from natural food toxins, consumption of small levels of these materials is unavoidable. Although the risk for toxicity due to consumption of food toxins is fairly low, there is always the possibility of toxicity due to contamination, overconsumption, allergy or an unpredictable idiosyncratic response. The purpose of this review is to provide a toxicological and regulatory overview of some of the toxins present in some commonly consumed foods, and where possible, discuss the steps that have been taken to reduce consumer exposure, many of which are possible because of the unique process of food regulation in the United States. PMID:22069686

  11. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; M Allewell, Norma; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-08-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  12. Structure of N-acetyl-L-glutamate synthase/kinase from Maricaulis maris with the allosteric inhibitor L-arginine bound

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gengxiang; Haskins, Nantaporn; Jin, Zhongmin; Allewell, Norma M.; Tuchman, Mendel; Shi, Dashuang

    2013-01-01

    Maricaulis maris N-acetylglutamate synthase/kinase (mmNAGS/K) catalyzes the first two steps in L-arginine biosynthesis and has a high degree of sequence and structural homology to human N-acetylglutamate synthase, a regulator of the urea cycle. The synthase activity of both mmNAGS/K and human NAGS are regulated by L-arginine, although L-arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of mmNAGS/K, but an activator of human NAGS. To investigate the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K by L-arginine, we have determined the structure of the mmNAGS/K complexed with L-arginine at 2.8 Å resolution. In contrast to the structure of mmNAGS/K in the absence of L-arginine where there are conformational differences between the four subunits in the asymmetric unit, all four subunits in the L-arginine liganded structure have very similar conformations. In this conformation, the AcCoA binding site in the N-acetyltransferase (NAT) domain is blocked by a loop from the amino acid kinase (AAK) domain, as a result of a domain rotation that occurs when L-arginine binds. This structural change provides an explanation for the allosteric inhibition of mmNAGS/K and related enzymes by L-arginine. The allosterically regulated mechanism for mmNAGS/K differs significantly from that for Neisseria gonorrhoeae NAGS (ngNAGS). To define the active site, several residues near the putative active site were mutated and their activities determined. These experiments identify roles for Lys356, Arg386, Asn391 and Tyr397 in the catalytic mechanism. PMID:23850694

  13. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol or sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  14. Engineering an allosteric transcription factor to respond to new ligands.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Noah D; Garruss, Alexander S; Moretti, Rocco; Chan, Sum; Arbing, Mark A; Cascio, Duilio; Rogers, Jameson K; Isaacs, Farren J; Kosuri, Sriram; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Church, George M; Raman, Srivatsan

    2016-02-01

    Genetic regulatory proteins inducible by small molecules are useful synthetic biology tools as sensors and switches. Bacterial allosteric transcription factors (aTFs) are a major class of regulatory proteins, but few aTFs have been redesigned to respond to new effectors beyond natural aTF-inducer pairs. Altering inducer specificity in these proteins is difficult because substitutions that affect inducer binding may also disrupt allostery. We engineered an aTF, the Escherichia coli lac repressor, LacI, to respond to one of four new inducer molecules: fucose, gentiobiose, lactitol and sucralose. Using computational protein design, single-residue saturation mutagenesis or random mutagenesis, along with multiplex assembly, we identified new variants comparable in specificity and induction to wild-type LacI with its inducer, isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). The ability to create designer aTFs will enable applications including dynamic control of cell metabolism, cell biology and synthetic gene circuits. PMID:26689263

  15. Structural Basis for Allosteric Regulation of GPCRs by Sodium Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene; Thompson, Aaron A.; Chubukov, Pavel; Xu, Fei; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Roth, Christopher B.; Heitman, Laura H.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2012-08-31

    Pharmacological responses of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be fine-tuned by allosteric modulators. Structural studies of such effects have been limited due to the medium resolution of GPCR structures. We reengineered the human A{sub 2A} adenosine receptor by replacing its third intracellular loop with apocytochrome b{sub 562}RIL and solved the structure at 1.8 angstrom resolution. The high-resolution structure allowed us to identify 57 ordered water molecules inside the receptor comprising three major clusters. The central cluster harbors a putative sodium ion bound to the highly conserved aspartate residue Asp{sup 2.50}. Additionally, two cholesterols stabilize the conformation of helix VI, and one of 23 ordered lipids intercalates inside the ligand-binding pocket. These high-resolution details shed light on the potential role of structured water molecules, sodium ions, and lipids/cholesterol in GPCR stabilization and function.

  16. Controlling mammalian gene expression by allosteric hepatitis delta virus ribozymes.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoko; Zhou, Linlin; Miu, Anh; Yokobayashi, Yohei

    2013-12-20

    We engineered small molecule responsive allosteric ribozymes based on the genomic hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme by replacing the P4-L4 stem-loop with an RNA aptamer through a connector stem. When embedded in the 3' untranslated region of a reporter gene mRNA, these RNA devices enabled regulation of cis-gene expression by theophylline and guanine by up to 29.5-fold in mammalian cell culture. Furthermore, a NOR logic gate device was constructed by placing two engineered ribozymes in tandem, demonstrating the modularity of the RNA devices. The significant improvement in the regulatory dynamic range (ON/OFF ratio) of the RNA devices based on the HDV ribozyme should provide new opportunities for practical applications. PMID:23697539

  17. Dynamic Modulation of DNA Hybridization Using Allosteric DNA Tetrahedral Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Song, Ping; Li, Min; Shen, Juwen; Pei, Hao; Chao, Jie; Su, Shao; Aldalbahi, Ali; Wang, Lihua; Shi, Jiye; Song, Shiping; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai; Zuo, Xiaolei

    2016-08-16

    The fixed dynamic range of traditional biosensors limits their utility in several real applications. For example, viral load monitoring requires the dynamic range spans several orders of magnitude; whereas, monitoring of drugs requires extremely narrow dynamic range. To overcome this limitation, here, we devised tunable biosensing interface using allosteric DNA tetrahedral bioprobes to tune the dynamic range of DNA biosensors. Our strategy takes the advantage of the readily and flexible structure design and predictable geometric reconfiguration of DNA nanotechnology. We reconfigured the DNA tetrahedral bioprobes by inserting the effector sequence into the DNA tetrahedron, through which, the binding affinity of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes can be tuned. As a result, the detection limit of DNA biosensors can be programmably regulated. The dynamic range of DNA biosensors can be tuned (narrowed or extended) for up to 100-fold. Using the regulation of binding affinity, we realized the capture and release of biomolecules by tuning the binding behavior of DNA tetrahedral bioprobes. PMID:27435955

  18. The Allosteric Binding Sites of Sulfotransferase 1A1

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ian; Wang, Ting; Falany, Charles N.

    2015-01-01

    Human sulfotransferases (SULTs) comprise a small, 13-member enzyme family that regulates the activities of thousands of compounds—endogenous metabolites, drugs, and other xenobiotics. SULTs transfer the sulfuryl-moiety (–SO3) from a nucleotide donor, PAPS (3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate), to the hydroxyls and primary amines of acceptors. SULT1A1, a progenitor of the family, has evolved to sulfonate compounds that are remarkably structurally diverse. SULT1A1, which is found in many tissues, is the predominant SULT in liver, where it is a major component of phase II metabolism. Early work demonstrated that catechins and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibit SULT1A1 and suggested that the inhibition was not competitive versus substrates. Here, the mechanism of inhibition of a single, high affinity representative from each class [epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and mefenamic acid] is determined using initial-rate and equilibrium-binding studies. The findings reveal that the inhibitors bind at sites separate from those of substrates, and at saturation turnover of the enzyme is reduced to a nonzero value. Further, the EGCG inhibition patterns suggest a molecular explanation for its isozyme specificity. Remarkably, the inhibitors bind at sites that are separate from one another, and binding at one site does not affect affinity at the other. For the first time, it is clear that SULT1A1 is allosterically regulated, and that it contains at least two, functionally distinct allosteric sites, each of which responds to a different class of compounds. PMID:25534770

  19. A Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF)*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Fengwei; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.; Cirillo, Pier; Ciustea, Mihai; Ledizet, Michel; Aristoff, Paul A.; Leng, Lin; Koski, Raymond A.; Powell, Thomas J.; Bucala, Richard; Anthony, Karen G.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a catalytic cytokine and an upstream mediator of the inflammatory pathway. MIF has broad regulatory properties, dysregulation of which has been implicated in the pathology of multiple immunological diseases. Inhibition of MIF activity with small molecules has proven beneficial in a number of disease models. Known small molecule MIF inhibitors typically bind in the tautomerase site of the MIF trimer, often covalently modifying the catalytic proline. Allosteric MIF inhibitors, particularly those that associate with the protein by noncovalent interactions, could reveal novel ways to block MIF activity for therapeutic benefit and serve as chemical probes to elucidate the structural basis for the diverse regulatory properties of MIF. In this study, we report the identification and functional characterization of a novel allosteric MIF inhibitor. Identified from a high throughput screening effort, this sulfonated azo compound termed p425 strongly inhibited the ability of MIF to tautomerize 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate. Furthermore, p425 blocked the interaction of MIF with its receptor, CD74, and interfered with the pro-inflammatory activities of the cytokine. Structural studies revealed a unique mode of binding for p425, with a single molecule of the inhibitor occupying the interface of two MIF trimers. The inhibitor binds MIF mainly on the protein surface through hydrophobic interactions that are stabilized by hydrogen bonding with four highly specific residues from three different monomers. The mode of p425 binding reveals a unique way to block the activity of the cytokine for potential therapeutic benefit in MIF-associated diseases. PMID:22782901

  20. GPCR heteromers and their allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Borroto-Escuela, D O; Marcellino, D; Romero-Fernandez, W; Frankowska, M; Guidolin, D; Filip, M; Ferraro, L; Woods, A S; Tarakanov, A; Ciruela, F; Agnati, L F; Tanganelli, S

    2012-01-01

    The concept of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions and evidence for their existences were introduced in the beginning of the 1980's, suggesting the existence of receptor heterodimerization. The discovery of GPCR heteromers and the receptor mosaic (higher order oligomers, more than two) has been related to the parallel development and application of a variety of resonance energy transfer techniques such as bioluminescence (BRET), fluorescence (FRET) and sequential energy transfer (SRET). The assembly of interacting GPCRs, heterodimers and receptor mosaic leads to changes in the agonist recognition, signaling, and trafficking of participating receptors via allosteric mechanisms, sometimes involving the appearance of cooperativity. The receptor interface in the GPCR heteromers is beginning to be characterized and the key role of electrostatic epitope-epitope interactions for the formation of the receptor heteromers will be discussed. Furthermore, a "guide-and-clasp" manner of receptor-receptor interactions has been proposed where the "adhesive guides" may be the triplet homologies. These interactions probably represent a general molecular mechanism for receptor-receptor interactions. It is proposed that changes in GPCR function (moonlighting) may develop through the intracellular loops and C-terminii of the GPCR heteromers as a result of dynamic allosteric interactions between different types of G proteins and other receptor interacting proteins in these domains of the receptors. The evidence for the existence of receptor heteromers opens up a new field for a better understanding of neurophysiology and neuropathology. Furthermore, novel therapeutic approaches could be possible based on the use of heteromers as targets for drug development based on their unique pharmacology. PMID:22335512

  1. Structure-Based Network Analysis of Activation Mechanisms in the ErbB Family of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: The Regulatory Spine Residues Are Global Mediators of Structural Stability and Allosteric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    James, Kevin A.; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2014-01-01

    The ErbB protein tyrosine kinases are among the most important cell signaling families and mutation-induced modulation of their activity is associated with diverse functions in biological networks and human disease. We have combined molecular dynamics simulations of the ErbB kinases with the protein structure network modeling to characterize the reorganization of the residue interaction networks during conformational equilibrium changes in the normal and oncogenic forms. Structural stability and network analyses have identified local communities integrated around high centrality sites that correspond to the regulatory spine residues. This analysis has provided a quantitative insight to the mechanism of mutation-induced “superacceptor” activity in oncogenic EGFR dimers. We have found that kinase activation may be determined by allosteric interactions between modules of structurally stable residues that synchronize the dynamics in the nucleotide binding site and the αC-helix with the collective motions of the integrating αF-helix and the substrate binding site. The results of this study have pointed to a central role of the conserved His-Arg-Asp (HRD) motif in the catalytic loop and the Asp-Phe-Gly (DFG) motif as key mediators of structural stability and allosteric communications in the ErbB kinases. We have determined that residues that are indispensable for kinase regulation and catalysis often corresponded to the high centrality nodes within the protein structure network and could be distinguished by their unique network signatures. The optimal communication pathways are also controlled by these nodes and may ensure efficient allosteric signaling in the functional kinase state. Structure-based network analysis has quantified subtle effects of ATP binding on conformational dynamics and stability of the EGFR structures. Consistent with the NMR studies, we have found that nucleotide-induced modulation of the residue interaction networks is not limited to the

  2. Biased signalling and allosteric machines: new vistas and challenges for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry P

    2012-03-01

    Seven transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are nature's prototype allosteric proteins made to bind molecules at one location to subsequently change their shape to affect the binding of another molecule at another location. This paper attempts to describe the divergent 7TMR behaviours (i.e. third party allostery, receptor oligomerization, biased agonism) observed in pharmacology in terms of a homogeneous group of allosteric behaviours. By considering the bodies involved as a vector defined by a modulator, conduit and guest, these activities can all be described by a simple model of functional allostery made up of the Ehlert allosteric model and the Black/Leff operational model. It will be shown how this model yields parameters that can be used to characterize the activity of any ligand or protein producing effect through allosteric interaction with a 7TMR. PMID:22023017

  3. Allosteric Optical Control of a Class B G-Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    PubMed

    Broichhagen, Johannes; Johnston, Natalie R; von Ohlen, Yorrick; Meyer-Berg, Helena; Jones, Ben J; Bloom, Stephen R; Rutter, Guy A; Trauner, Dirk; Hodson, David J

    2016-05-01

    Allosteric regulation promises to open up new therapeutic avenues by increasing drug specificity at G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). However, drug discovery efforts are at present hampered by an inability to precisely control the allosteric site. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and testing of PhotoETP, a light-activated positive allosteric modulator of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R), a class B GPCR involved in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis in humans. PhotoETP potentiates Ca(2+) , cAMP, and insulin responses to glucagon-like peptide-1 and its metabolites following illumination of cells with blue light. PhotoETP thus provides a blueprint for the production of small-molecule class B GPCR allosteric photoswitches, and may represent a useful tool for understanding positive cooperativity at the GLP-1R. PMID:27059784

  4. Allosteric Inhibitors at the Heterodimer Interface of Imidazole Glycerol Phosphate Synthase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeberger, Ning-Shiuan Nicole

    Imidazole glycerol phosphate synthase (IGPS) from Thermotoga maritima is a heterodimeric enzyme composed of the HisH and HisF proteins. It is attractive as a pathological target since it is absent in mammals but found in plant and opportunistic human pathogens. IGPS was experimentally determined to be a V-type allosteric enzyme that is involved in an essential biosynthetic pathway of microorganisms. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to form NH3 in the HisH protein, followed by cyclization of NH3 with N'-[(5'-phosphoribulosyl)imino]-5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide (PRFAR) in the HisF subunit, forming imidazole glycerol phosphate (IGP) and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribotide (AICAR) that enter the histidine and purine biosynthetic pathways. Allosteric motions induced upon the binding of the effector PRFAR to HisF propagate through the non-covalent HisH/HisF interface and synchronize catalytic activity at the two distant active sites. However, the nature of the allosteric pathway and the feasibility of manipulating signal transduction by using allosteric drug-like molecules remain to be established. Molecular docking studies of commercial drugs at the HisH/HisF interface were used to identify stable candidates with a potential allosteric effect on the reaction mechanism. Molecular dynamic simulations and calculations of NMR chemical shifts were combined to elucidate the allosteric pathway of IGPS.

  5. Oxygen-linked S-nitrosation in fish myoglobins: a cysteine-specific tertiary allosteric effect.

    PubMed

    Helbo, Signe; Gow, Andrew J; Jamil, Amna; Howes, Barry D; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fago, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that cysteine (Cys) S-nitrosation of trout myoglobin (Mb) increases heme O2 affinity has revealed a novel allosteric effect that may promote hypoxia-induced nitric oxide (NO) delivery in the trout heart and improve myocardial efficiency. To better understand this allosteric effect, we investigated the functional effects and structural origin of S-nitrosation in selected fish Mbs differing by content and position of reactive cysteine (Cys) residues. The Mbs from the Atlantic salmon and the yellowfin tuna, containing two and one reactive Cys, respectively, were S-nitrosated in vitro by reaction with Cys-NO to generate Mb-SNO to a similar yield (∼0.50 SH/heme), suggesting reaction at a specific Cys residue. As found for trout, salmon Mb showed a low O2 affinity (P50 = 2.7 torr) that was increased by S-nitrosation (P50 = 1.7 torr), whereas in tuna Mb, O2 affinity (P50 = 0.9 torr) was independent of S-nitrosation. O2 dissociation rates (koff) of trout and salmon Mbs were not altered when Cys were in the SNO or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) forms, suggesting that S-nitrosation should affect O2 affinity by raising the O2 association rate (kon). Taken together, these results indicate that O2-linked S-nitrosation may occur specifically at Cys107, present in salmon and trout Mb but not in tuna Mb, and that it may relieve protein constraints that limit O2 entry to the heme pocket of the unmodified Mb by a yet unknown mechanism. UV-Vis and resonance Raman spectra of the NEM-derivative of trout Mb (functionally equivalent to Mb-SNO and not photolabile) were identical to those of the unmodified Mb, indicating that S-nitrosation does not affect the extent or nature of heme-ligand stabilization of the fully ligated protein. The importance of S-nitrosation of Mb in vivo is confirmed by the observation that Mb-SNO is present in trout hearts and that its level can be significantly reduced by anoxic conditions. PMID:24879536

  6. Dissecting Enzyme Regulation by Multiple Allosteric Effectors: Nucleotide Regulation of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase†

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Hsiao, Jennifer J.; Gryncel, Kimberly R.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Genyuan; Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-01-01

    The enzyme aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase, EC 2.1.3.2 of Escherichia coli), which catalyzes the committed step of pyrimidine biosynthesis, is allosterically regulated by all four ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs) in a nonlinear manner. Here, we dissect this regulation using the recently developed approach of random sampling–high-dimensional model representation (RS–HDMR). ATCase activity was measured in vitro at 300 random NTP concentration combinations, each involving (consistent with in vivo conditions) all four NTPs being present. These data were then used to derive a RS–HDMR model of ATCase activity over the full four-dimensional NTP space. The model accounted for 90% of the variance in the experimental data. Its main elements were positive ATCase regulation by ATP and negative by CTP, with the negative effects of CTP dominating the positive ones of ATP when both regulators were abundant (i.e., a negative cooperative effect of ATP × CTP). Strong sensitivity to both ATP and CTP concentrations occurred in their physiological concentration ranges. UTP had only a slight effect, and GTP had almost none. These findings support a predominant role of CTP and ATP in ATCase regulation. The general approach provides a new paradigm for dissecting multifactorial regulation of biological molecules and processes. PMID:18454556

  7. Comparing allosteric transitions in the domains of calmodulin through coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous Ca2+-binding protein consisting of two structurally similar domains with distinct stabilities, binding affinities, and flexibilities. We present coarse grained simulations that suggest that the mechanism for the domain's allosteric transitions between the open and closed conformations depends on subtle differences in the folded state topology of the two domains. Throughout a wide temperature range, the simulated transition mechanism of the N-terminal domain (nCaM) follows a two-state transition mechanism while domain opening in the C-terminal domain (cCaM) involves unfolding and refolding of the tertiary structure. The appearance of the unfolded intermediate occurs at a higher temperature in nCaM than it does in cCaM consistent with nCaM's higher thermal stability. Under approximate physiological conditions, the simulated unfolded state population of cCaM accounts for 10% of the population with nearly all of the sampled transitions (approximately 95%) unfolding and refolding during the conformational change. Transient unfolding significantly slows the domain opening and closing rates of cCaM, which can potentially influence its Ca2+-binding mechanism.

  8. Allosteric action in real time: Time-resolved crystallographic studies of a cooperative dimeric hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, James E.; Pahl, Reinhard; Šrajer, Vukica; Royer, William E.

    2006-01-01

    Protein allostery provides mechanisms for regulation of biological function at the molecular level. We present here an investigation of global, ligand-induced allosteric transition in a protein by time-resolved x-ray diffraction. The study provides a view of structural changes in single crystals of Scapharca dimeric hemoglobin as they proceed in real time, from 5 ns to 80 μs after ligand photodissociation. A tertiary intermediate structure forms rapidly (<5 ns) as the protein responds to the presence of an unliganded heme within each R-state protein subunit, with key structural changes observed in the heme groups, neighboring residues, and interface water molecules. This intermediate lays a foundation for the concerted tertiary and quaternary structural changes that occur on a microsecond time scale and are associated with the transition to a low-affinity T-state structure. Reversal of these changes shows a considerable lag as a T-like structure persists well after ligand rebinding, suggesting a slow T-to-R transition. PMID:16684887

  9. In-vivo pharmacological evaluation of the CB1-receptor allosteric modulator Org-27569.

    PubMed

    Gamage, Thomas F; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Wiley, Jenny L; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Trembleau, Laurent; Greig, Iain R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Tichkule, Ritesh; Poklis, Justin; Ross, Ruth A; Pertwee, Roger G; Lichtman, Aron H

    2014-04-01

    Several allosteric modulators (AMs) of the CB1 receptor have been characterized in vitro, including Org27569, which enhances CB1-specific binding of [H]CP55,940, but behaves as an insurmountable CB1-receptor antagonist in several biochemical assays. Although a growing body of research has investigated the molecular actions of this unusual AM, it is unknown whether these actions translate to the whole animal. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether Org27569 would produce effects in well-established mouse behavioral assays sensitive to CB1 orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Similar to the orthosteric CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant, Org27569 reduced food intake; however, this anorectic effect occurred independently of the CB1 receptor. Org27569 did not elicit CB1-mediated effects alone and lacked efficacy in altering antinociceptive, cataleptic, and hypothermic actions of the orthosteric agonists anandamide, CP55,940, and Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol. Moreover, it did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of anandamide in FAAH-deficient mice or Δ-tetrahydrocannabinol in wild-type mice in the drug discrimination paradigm. These findings question the utility of Org27569 as a 'gold standard' CB1 AM and underscore the need for the development of CB1 AMs with pharmacology that translates from the molecular level to the whole animal. PMID:24603340

  10. Allosteric regulation of G protein-coupled receptor activity by phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Dawaliby, Rosie; Trubbia, Cataldo; Delporte, Cédric; Masureel, Matthieu; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kobilka, Brian K; Govaerts, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are emerging as key regulators of membrane protein structure and activity. These effects can be attributed either to the modification of bilayer properties (thickness, curvature and surface tension) or to the binding of specific lipids to the protein surface. For G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the effects of phospholipids on receptor structure and activity remain poorly understood. Here we reconstituted purified β2-adrenergic receptor (β2R) in high-density lipoparticles to systematically characterize the effect of biologically relevant phospholipids on receptor activity. We observed that the lipid headgroup type affected ligand binding (agonist and antagonist) and receptor activation. Specifically, phosphatidylgycerol markedly favored agonist binding and facilitated receptor activation, whereas phosphatidylethanolamine favored antagonist binding and stabilized the inactive state of the receptor. We then showed that these effects could be recapitulated with detergent-solubilized lipids, demonstrating that the functional modulation occurred in the absence of a bilayer. Our data suggest that phospholipids act as direct allosteric modulators of GPCR activity. PMID:26571351

  11. Structure-based discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Giulio; Anighoro, Andrew; Chripkova, Martina; Carrassa, Laura; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric targeting of protein kinases via displacement of the structural αC helix with type III allosteric inhibitors is currently gaining a foothold in drug discovery. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with an open allosteric pocket adjacent to the αC helix has been described, prospecting new opportunities to design more selective inhibitors, but the structure has not yet been exploited for the structure-based design of type III allosteric inhibitors. In this work we report the results of a virtual screening campaign that resulted in the discovery of the first-in-class type III allosteric ligands of CDK2. Using a combination of docking and post-docking analyses made with our tool BEAR, 7 allosteric ligands (hit rate of 20%) with micromolar affinity for CDK2 were identified, some of them inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the micromolar range. Competition experiments performed in the presence of the ATP-competitive inhibitor staurosporine confirmed that the 7 ligands are truly allosteric, in agreement with their design. Of these, compound 2 bound CDK2 with an EC50 value of 3 μM and inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB231 and ZR-75–1 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of approximately 20 μM, while compound 4 had an EC50 value of 71 μM and IC50 values around 4 μM. Remarkably, the most potent compound 4 was able to selectively inhibit CDK2-mediated Retinoblastoma phosphorylation, confirming that its mechanism of action is fully compatible with a selective inhibition of CDK2 phosphorylation in cells. Finally, hit expansion through analog search of the most potent inhibitor 4 revealed an additional ligand 4g with similar in vitro potency on breast cancer cells. PMID:24911186

  12. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    PubMed

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  13. Allosteric Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the AKT Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalafave, D. S.

    This research addresses computational design of small druglike molecules for possible anticancer applications. AKT and SGK are kinases that control important cellular functions. They are highly homologous, having similar activators and targets. Cancers with increased SGK activity may develop resistance to AKT-specific inhibitors. Our goal was to design new molecules that would bind both AKT and SGK, thus preventing the development of drug resistance. Most kinase inhibitors target the kinase ATP-binding site. However, the high similarity in this site among kinases makes it difficult to target specifically. Furthermore, mutations in this site can cause resistance to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. We used existing AKT inhibitors as initial templates to design molecules that could potentially bind the allosteric sites of both AKT and SGK. Molecules with no implicit toxicities and optimal drug-like properties were used for docking studies. Binding energies of the stable complexes that the designed molecules formed with AKT and SGK were calculated. Possible applications of the designed putative inhibitors against cancers with overexpressed AKT/SGK is discussed.

  14. Allosteric interaction of trimebutine maleate with dihydropyridine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kurosawa, H; Naito, K; Tamaki, H

    1990-07-31

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on [3H]nitrendipine binding to guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle membranes and Ca2(+)-induced contraction of the taenia cecum were studied. Specific binding of [3H]nitrendipine to smooth muscle membranes was saturable, with a KD value and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 0.16 nM and 1070 fmol/mg protein, respectively. Trimebutine inhibited [3H]nitrendipine binding in a concentration-dependent manner with a Ki value of 9.3 microM. In the presence of trimebutine (10 microM), Scatchard analysis indicated a competitive-like inhibition with a decrease in the binding affinity (0.31 nM) without a change in Bmax (1059 fmol/mg protein). However, a dissociation experiment using trimebutine (10 or 100 microM) showed that the decreased affinity was due to an increase of the dissociation rate constant of [3H]nitrendipine binding to the membrane. In mechanical experiments using the taenia cecum, trimebutine (3-30 microM) caused a parallel rightward shift of the dose-response curve for the contractile response to a higher concentration range of Ca2+ under high-K+ conditions in a noncompetitive manner. These results suggest that trimebutine has negative allosteric interactions with 1,4-dihydropyridine binding sites on voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and antagonizes Ca2+ influx, consequently inhibiting contractions of intestinal smooth muscle. PMID:2171963

  15. Coarse-grained molecular simulations of allosteric cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandigrami, Prithviraj; Portman, John J.

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between a protein and a ligand are often accompanied by a redistribution of the population of thermally accessible conformations. This dynamic response of the protein's functional energy landscape enables a protein to modulate binding affinities and control binding sensitivity to ligand concentration. In this paper, we investigate the structural origins of binding affinity and allosteric cooperativity of binding two Ca2+ ions to each domain of Calmodulin (CaM) through simulations of a simple coarse-grained model. In this model, the protein's conformational transitions between open and closed conformational ensembles are simulated explicitly and ligand binding and unbinding are treated implicitly within the grand canonical ensemble. Ligand binding is cooperative because the binding sites are coupled through a shift in the dominant conformational ensemble upon binding. The classic Monod-Wyman-Changeux model of allostery with appropriate binding free energies to the open and closed ensembles accurately describes the simulated binding thermodynamics. The simulations predict that the two domains of CaM have distinct binding affinity and cooperativity. In particular, the C-terminal domain binds Ca2+ with higher affinity and greater cooperativity than the N-terminal domain. From a structural point of view, the affinity of an individual binding loop depends sensitively on the loop's structural compatibility with the ligand in the bound ensemble, as well as the conformational flexibility of the binding site in the unbound ensemble.

  16. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Jessica R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Markus, Benedikt M; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7-kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  17. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jessica R.; Knockenhauer, Kevin E.; Markus, Benedikt M.; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E.; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7–kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes. PMID:26305940

  18. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules. PMID:26308901

  19. Allosteric regulation of focal adhesion kinase by PIP₂ and ATP.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Bronowska, Agnieszka; Le Coq, Johanne; Lietha, Daniel; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-02-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that regulates cell signaling, proliferation, migration, and development. A major mechanism of regulation of FAK activity is an intramolecular autoinhibitory interaction between two of its domains--the catalytic and FERM domains. Upon cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix, FAK is being translocated toward focal adhesion sites and activated. Interactions of FAK with phosphoinositide phosphatidylinsositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (PIP₂) are required to activate FAK. However, the molecular mechanism of the activation remains poorly understood. Recent fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments revealed a closure of the FERM-kinase interface upon ATP binding, which is reversed upon additional binding of PIP₂. Here, we addressed the allosteric regulation of FAK by performing all-atom molecular-dynamics simulations of a FAK fragment containing the catalytic and FERM domains, and comparing the dynamics in the absence or presence of ATP and PIP₂. As a major conformational change, we observe a closing and opening motion upon ATP and additional PIP₂ binding, respectively, in good agreement with the fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. To reveal how the binding of the regulatory PIP₂ to the FERM F2 lobe is transduced to the very distant F1/N-lobe interface, we employed force distribution analysis. We identified a network of mainly charged residue-residue interactions spanning from the PIP₂ binding site to the distant interface between the kinase and FERM domains, comprising candidate residues for mutagenesis to validate the predicted mechanism of FAK activation. PMID:25650936

  20. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  1. Impact of Quaternary Structure Dynamics on Allosteric Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Eileen K.

    2013-01-01

    The morpheein model of allosteric regulation draws attention to proteins that can exist as an equilibrium of functionally distinct assemblies where: one subunit conformation assembles into one multimer; a different subunit conformation assembles into a different multimer; and the various multimers are in a dynamic equilibrium whose position can be modulated by ligands that bind to a multimer-specific ligand binding site. The case study of porphobilinogen synthase (PBGS) illustrates how such an equilibrium holds lessons for disease mechanisms, drug discovery, understanding drug side effects, and identifying proteins wherein drug discovery efforts might focus on quaternary structure dynamics. The morpheein model of allostery has been proposed as applicable for a wide assortment of disease-associated proteins (Selwood, T., Jaffe, E., (2012) Arch. Bioch. Biophys, 519:131–143). Herein we discuss quaternary structure dynamics aspects to drug discovery for the disease-associated putative morpheeins phenylalanine hydroxylase, HIV integrase, pyruvate kinase, and tumor necrosis factor α. Also highlighted is the quaternary structure equilibrium of transthyretin and successful drug discovery efforts focused on controlling its quaternary structure dynamics. PMID:23409765

  2. Adenine nucleotides as allosteric effectors of PEA seed glutamine synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, P.J.; Knight, T.J.

    1986-05-01

    The energy charge in the plant cell has been proposed as a regulator of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. The authors have shown that 2.1 moles of ..gamma..(/sup 32/P)-ATP were bound/mole subunits of purified pea seed GS during complete inactivation with methionine sulfoximine. Since GS has one active site per subunit, the second binding site provides the potential for allosteric regulation of GS by adenine nucleotides. The authors have investigated the inhibition of the ATP-dependent synthetic activity by ADP and AMP. ADP and AMP cannot completely inhibit GS; but ATP does overcome the inhibition by ADP and AMP as shown by plots of % inhibition vs inhibitor concentration. This indicates that inhibition of GS by ADP or AMP is not completely due to competitive inhibition. In the absence of ADP or AMP, double reciprocal plots for ATP are linear below 10 mM; however, in the presence of either ADP or AMP these pots are curvilinear downwards. The ratio of Vm/asymptote is less than 1. The Hill number for ATP in the absence of ADP or AMP is 0.93 but decreases with increasing ADP or AMP to a value of 0.28 with 10 mM ADP. These data are consistent with negative cooperativity by ADP and AMP. Thus, as the ADP/ATP or AMP/ATP ratios are increased GS activity decreases. This is consistent with regulation of GS activity by energy charge in planta.

  3. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  4. Detection of DNA methyltransferase activity using allosteric molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiting; Zu, Xiaolong; Song, Yanling; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2016-01-21

    Abnormal DNA methylation patterns caused by altered DNA methyltransferase (MTase) activity are closely associated with cancer. Herein, using DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase) as a model analyte, we designed an allosteric molecular beacon (aMB) for sensitive detection of Dam MTase activity. When the specific site in an aMB is methylated by Dam MTase, the probe can be cut by the restriction nuclease DpnI to release a fluorophore labeled aptamer specific for streptavidin (SA) which will bind to SA beads to generate highly fluorescent beads for easy signal readout by a microscope or flow cytometer. However, aMBs maintain a hairpin structure without the binding ability to SA beads in the absence of Dam MTase, leading to weakly fluorescent SA beads. Unlike the existing signal amplified assays, our method is simpler and more convenient. The high performance of the aptamer and the easy bead separation process make this probe superior to other methods for the detection of MTase in complex biological systems. Overall, the proposed method with a detection limit of 0.57 U mL(-1) for Dam MTase shows great potential for further applications in the detection of other MTases, screening of MTase inhibitors, and early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:26478921

  5. Inversion of allosteric effect of arginine on N-acetylglutamate synthase, a molecular marker for evolution of tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Nantaporn; Panglao, Maria; Qu, Qiuhao; Majumdar, Himani; Cabrera-Luque, Juan; Morizono, Hiroki; Tuchman, Mendel; Caldovic, Ljubica

    2008-01-01

    Background The efficient conversion of ammonia, a potent neurotoxin, into non-toxic metabolites was an essential adaptation that allowed animals to move from the aquatic to terrestrial biosphere. The urea cycle converts ammonia into urea in mammals, amphibians, turtles, snails, worms and many aquatic animals and requires N-acetylglutamate (NAG), an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI) in mammals and amphibians, and carbamylphosphate synthetase III (CPSIII) in fish and invertebrates. NAG-dependent CPSI and CPSIII catalyze the formation of carbamylphosphate in the first and rate limiting step of ureagenesis. NAG is produced enzymatically by N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), which is also found in bacteria and plants as the first enzyme of arginine biosynthesis. Arginine is an allosteric inhibitor of microbial and plant NAGS, and allosteric activator of mammalian NAGS. Results Information from mutagenesis studies of E. coli and P. aeruginosa NAGS was combined with structural information from the related bacterial N-acetylglutamate kinases to identify four residues in mammalian NAGS that interact with arginine. Substitutions of these four residues were engineered in mouse NAGS and into the vertebrate-like N-acetylglutamate synthase-kinase (NAGS-K) of Xanthomonas campestris, which is inhibited by arginine. All mutations resulted in arginine losing the ability to activate mouse NAGS, and inhibit X. campestris NAGS-K. To examine at what point in evolution inversion of arginine effect on NAGS occur, we cloned NAGS from fish and frogs and examined the arginine response of their corresponding proteins. Fish NAGS were partially inhibited by arginine and frog NAGS were activated by arginine. Conclusion Difference in arginine effect on bacterial and mammalian NAGS most likely stems from the difference in the type of conformational change triggered by arginine binding to these proteins. The change from arginine inhibition of NAGS to activation

  6. Positive cooperativity of acetylcholine and other agonists with allosteric ligands on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Jakubík, J; Bacáková, L; El-Fakahany, E E; Tucek, S

    1997-07-01

    It is well known that allosteric modulators of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can both diminish and increase the affinity of receptors for their antagonists. We investigated whether the allosteric modulators can also increase the affinity of receptors for their agonists. Twelve agonists and five allosteric modulators were tested in experiments on membranes of CHO cells that had been stably transfected with genes for the M1-M4 receptor subtypes. Allosterically induced changes in the affinities for agonists were computed from changes in the ability of a fixed concentration of each agonist to compete with [3H]N-methylscopolamine for the binding to the receptors in the absence and the presence of varying concentrations of allosteric modulators. The effects of allosteric modulators varied greatly depending on the agonists and the subtypes of receptors. The affinity for acetylcholine was augmented by (-)-eburnamonine on the M2 and M4 receptors and by brucine on the M1 and M3 receptors. Brucine also enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pilocarpine, 3-(3-pentylthio-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1- methylpyridine (pentylthio-TZTP), oxotremorine-M, and McN-A-343 on the M1, M3, and M4 receptors, for pentylthio-TZTP on the M2 receptors, and for arecoline on the M3 receptors. (-)-Eburnamonine enhanced the affinities for carbachol, bethanechol, furmethide, methylfurmethide, pentylthio-TZTP, pilocarpine, oxotremorine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors and for pilocarpine on the M4 receptors. Vincamine, strychnine, and alcuronium displayed fewer positive allosteric interactions with the agonists, but each allosteric modulator displayed positive cooperativity with at least one agonist on at least one muscarinic receptor subtype. The highest degrees of positive cooperativity were observed between (-)-eburnamonine and pilocarpine and (-)-eburnamonine and oxotremorine-M on the M2 receptors (25- and 7-fold increases in

  7. Chemical shift imprint of intersubunit communication in a symmetric homodimer.

    PubMed

    Falk, Bradley T; Sapienza, Paul J; Lee, Andrew L

    2016-08-23

    Allosteric communication is critical for protein function and cellular homeostasis, and it can be exploited as a strategy for drug design. However, unlike many protein-ligand interactions, the structural basis for the long-range communication that underlies allostery is not well understood. This lack of understanding is most evident in the case of classical allostery, in which a binding event in one protomer is sensed by a second symmetric protomer. A primary reason why study of interdomain signaling is challenging in oligomeric proteins is the difficulty in characterizing intermediate, singly bound species. Here, we use an NMR approach to isolate and characterize a singly ligated state ("lig1") of a homodimeric enzyme that is otherwise obscured by rapid exchange with apo and saturated forms. Mixed labeled dimers were prepared that simultaneously permit full population of the lig1 state and isotopic labeling of either protomer. Direct visualization of peaks from lig1 yielded site-specific ligand-state multiplets that provide a convenient format for assessing mechanisms of intersubunit communication from a variety of NMR measurements. We demonstrate this approach on thymidylate synthase from Escherichia coli, a homodimeric enzyme known to be half-the-sites reactive. Resolving the dUMP1 state shows that active site communication occurs not upon the first dUMP binding, but upon the second. Surprisingly, for many sites, dUMP1 peaks are found beyond the limits set by apo and dUMP2 peaks, indicating that binding the first dUMP pushes the enzyme ensemble to further conformational extremes than the apo or saturated forms. The approach used here should be generally applicable to homodimers. PMID:27466406

  8. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Selena G; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David; Bayliss, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  9. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  10. Allosteric inhibition of Aurora-A kinase by a synthetic vNAR domain

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Selena G.; Oleksy, Arkadiusz; Cavazza, Tommaso; Richards, Mark W.; Vernos, Isabelle; Matthews, David

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of clinically approved protein kinase inhibitors target the ATP-binding pocket directly. Consequently, many inhibitors have broad selectivity profiles and most have significant off-target effects. Allosteric inhibitors are generally more selective, but are difficult to identify because allosteric binding sites are often unknown or poorly characterized. Aurora-A is activated through binding of TPX2 to an allosteric site on the kinase catalytic domain, and this knowledge could be exploited to generate an inhibitor. Here, we generated an allosteric inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase based on a synthetic, vNAR single domain scaffold, vNAR-D01. Biochemical studies and a crystal structure of the Aurora-A/vNAR-D01 complex show that the vNAR domain overlaps with the TPX2 binding site. In contrast with the binding of TPX2, which stabilizes an active conformation of the kinase, binding of the vNAR domain stabilizes an inactive conformation, in which the αC-helix is distorted, the canonical Lys-Glu salt bridge is broken and the regulatory (R-) spine is disrupted by an additional hydrophobic side chain from the activation loop. These studies illustrate how single domain antibodies can be used to characterize the regulatory mechanisms of kinases and provide a rational basis for structure-guided design of allosteric Aurora-A kinase inhibitors. PMID:27411893

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators. PMID:27032695

  13. Novel Electrophilic and Photoaffinity Covalent Probes for Mapping the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable side effects associated with orthosteric agonists/antagonists of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), a tractable target for treating several pathologies affecting humans, have greatly limited their translational potential. Recent discovery of CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has renewed interest in CB1R by offering a potentially safer therapeutic avenue. To elucidate the CB1R allosteric binding motif and thereby facilitate rational drug discovery, we report the synthesis and biochemical characterization of first covalent ligands designed to bind irreversibly to the CB1R allosteric site. Either an electrophilic or a photoactivatable group was introduced at key positions of two classical CB1R NAMs: Org27569 (1) and PSNCBAM-1 (2). Among these, 20 (GAT100) emerged as the most potent NAM in functional assays, did not exhibit inverse agonism, and behaved as a robust positive allosteric modulator of binding of orthosteric agonist CP55,940. This novel covalent probe can serve as a useful tool for characterizing CB1R allosteric ligand-binding motifs. PMID:26529344

  14. Novel Electrophilic and Photoaffinity Covalent Probes for Mapping the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Allosteric Site(s).

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Pushkar M; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Korde, Anisha; Tichkule, Ritesh B; Laprairie, Robert B; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Zhou, Han; Janero, David R; Zvonok, Nikolai; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Cascio, Maria G; Pertwee, Roger G; Thakur, Ganesh A

    2016-01-14

    Undesirable side effects associated with orthosteric agonists/antagonists of cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R), a tractable target for treating several pathologies affecting humans, have greatly limited their translational potential. Recent discovery of CB1R negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has renewed interest in CB1R by offering a potentially safer therapeutic avenue. To elucidate the CB1R allosteric binding motif and thereby facilitate rational drug discovery, we report the synthesis and biochemical characterization of first covalent ligands designed to bind irreversibly to the CB1R allosteric site. Either an electrophilic or a photoactivatable group was introduced at key positions of two classical CB1R NAMs: Org27569 (1) and PSNCBAM-1 (2). Among these, 20 (GAT100) emerged as the most potent NAM in functional assays, did not exhibit inverse agonism, and behaved as a robust positive allosteric modulator of binding of orthosteric agonist CP55,940. This novel covalent probe can serve as a useful tool for characterizing CB1R allosteric ligand-binding motifs. PMID:26529344

  15. The allosteric vestibule of a seven transmembrane helical receptor controls G-protein coupling

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Andreas; Merten, Nicole; Schrage, Ramona; Dallanoce, Clelia; Bätz, Julia; Klöckner, Jessica; Schmitz, Jens; Matera, Carlo; Simon, Katharina; Kebig, Anna; Peters, Lucas; Müller, Anke; Schrobang-Ley, Jasmin; Tränkle, Christian; Hoffmann, Carsten; De Amici, Marco; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Kostenis, Evi; Mohr, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Seven transmembrane helical receptors (7TMRs) modulate cell function via different types of G proteins, often in a ligand-specific manner. Class A 7TMRs harbour allosteric vestibules in the entrance of their ligand-binding cavities, which are in the focus of current drug discovery. However, their biological function remains enigmatic. Here we present a new strategy for probing and manipulating conformational transitions in the allosteric vestibule of label-free 7TMRs using the M2 acetylcholine receptor as a paradigm. We designed dualsteric agonists as 'tailor-made' chemical probes to trigger graded receptor activation from the acetylcholine-binding site while simultaneously restricting spatial flexibility of the receptor's allosteric vestibule. Our findings reveal for the first time that a 7TMR's allosteric vestibule controls the extent of receptor movement to govern a hierarchical order of G-protein coupling. This is a new concept assigning a biological role to the allosteric vestibule for controlling fidelity of 7TMR signalling. PMID:22948826

  16. Allosteric inhibition of the NS2B-NS3 protease from dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Muslum; Ghosh, Sumana; Bell, Jeffrey A; Sherman, Woody; Hardy, Jeanne A

    2013-12-20

    Dengue virus is the flavivirus that causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic disease, and dengue shock syndrome, which are currently increasing in incidence worldwide. Dengue virus protease (NS2B-NS3pro) is essential for dengue virus infection and is thus a target of therapeutic interest. To date, attention has focused on developing active-site inhibitors of NS2B-NS3pro. The flat and charged nature of the NS2B-NS3pro active site may contribute to difficulties in developing inhibitors and suggests that a strategy of identifying allosteric sites may be useful. We report an approach that allowed us to scan the NS2B-NS3pro surface by cysteine mutagenesis and use cysteine reactive probes to identify regions of the protein that are susceptible to allosteric inhibition. This method identified a new allosteric site utilizing a circumscribed panel of just eight cysteine variants and only five cysteine reactive probes. The allosterically sensitive site is centered at Ala125, between the 120s loop and the 150s loop. The crystal structures of WT and modified NS2B-NS3pro demonstrate that the 120s loop is flexible. Our work suggests that binding at this site prevents a conformational rearrangement of the NS2B region of the protein, which is required for activation. Preventing this movement locks the protein into the open, inactive conformation, suggesting that this site may be useful in the future development of therapeutic allosteric inhibitors. PMID:24164286

  17. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  18. Non-site-specific allosteric effect of oxygen on human hemoglobin under high oxygen partial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    Protein allostery is essential for vital activities. Allosteric regulation of human hemoglobin (HbA) with two quaternary states T and R has been a paradigm of allosteric structural regulation of proteins. It is widely accepted that oxygen molecules (O2) act as a “site-specific” homotropic effector, or the successive O2 binding to the heme brings about the quaternary regulation. However, here we show that the site-specific allosteric effect is not necessarily only a unique mechanism of O2 allostery. Our simulation results revealed that the solution environment of high O2 partial pressure enhances the quaternary change from T to R without binding to the heme, suggesting an additional “non-site-specific” allosteric effect of O2. The latter effect should play a complementary role in the quaternary change by affecting the intersubunit contacts. This analysis must become a milestone in comprehensive understanding of the allosteric regulation of HbA from the molecular point of view. PMID:24710521

  19. Proposed Mode of Binding and Action of Positive Allosteric Modulators at Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Yeatman, Holly R; Provasi, Davide; Alt, Andrew; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell; Filizola, Marta

    2016-05-20

    Available crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a high-resolution picture of ligand binding at the primary ("orthosteric") site, that is, the site targeted by endogenous ligands. Recently, positive allosteric modulators of opioid receptors have also been discovered, but their modes of binding and action remain unknown. Here, we use a metadynamics-based strategy to efficiently sample the binding process of a recently discovered positive allosteric modulator of the δ-opioid receptor, BMS-986187, in the presence of the orthosteric agonist SNC-80, and with the receptor embedded in an explicit lipid-water environment. The dynamics of BMS-986187 were enhanced by biasing the potential acting on the ligand-receptor distance and ligand-receptor interaction contacts. Representative lowest-energy structures from the reconstructed free-energy landscape revealed two alternative ligand binding poses at an allosteric site delineated by transmembrane (TM) helices TM1, TM2, and TM7, with some participation of TM6. Mutations of amino acid residues at these proposed allosteric sites were found to either affect the binding of BMS-986187 or its ability to modulate the affinity and/or efficacy of SNC-80. Taken together, these combined experimental and computational studies provide the first atomic-level insight into the modulation of opioid receptor binding and signaling by allosteric modulators. PMID:26841170

  20. Refined molecular hinge between allosteric and catalytic domain determines allosteric regulation and stability of fungal chorismate mutase

    PubMed Central

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Heinrich, Gabriele; Lipscomb, William N.; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2002-01-01

    The yeast chorismate mutase is regulated by tyrosine as feedback inhibitor and tryptophan as crosspathway activator. The monomer consists of a catalytic and a regulatory domain covalently linked by the loop L220s (212–226), which functions as a molecular hinge. Two monomers form the active dimeric enzyme stabilized by hydrophobic interactions in the vicinity of loop L220s. The role of loop L220s and its environment for enzyme regulation, dimerization, and stability was analyzed. Substitution of yeast loop L220s in place of the homologous loop from the corresponding and similarly regulated Aspergillus enzyme (and the reverse substitution) changed tyrosine inhibition to activation. Yeast loop L220s substituted into the Aspergillus enzyme resulted in a tryptophan-inhibitable enzyme. Monomeric yeast chorismate mutases could be generated by substituting two hydrophobic residues in and near the hinge region. The resulting Thr-212→Asp–Phe-28→Asp enzyme was as stable as wild type, but lost allosteric regulation and showed reduced catalytic activity. These results underline the crucial role of this molecular hinge for inhibition, activation, quaternary structure, and stability of yeast chorismate mutase. PMID:11997452

  1. The Concept of Allosteric Interaction and Its Consequences for the Chemistry of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Throughout this Reflections article, I have tried to follow up on the genesis in the 1960s and subsequent evolution of the concept of allosteric interaction and to examine its consequences within the past decades, essentially in the field of the neuroscience. The main conclusion is that allosteric mechanisms built on similar structural principles operate in bacterial regulatory enzymes, gene repressors (and the related nuclear receptors), rhodopsin, G-protein-coupled receptors, neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels, and so on from prokaryotes up to the human brain yet with important features of their own. Thus, future research on these basic cybernetic sensors is expected to develop in two major directions: at the elementary level, toward the atomic structure and molecular dynamics of the conformational changes involved in signal recognition and transduction, but also at a higher level of organization, the contribution of allosteric mechanisms to the modulation of brain functions. PMID:23878193

  2. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M; Revuelta, José L

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  3. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  4. Identifying Allosteric Hotspots with Dynamics: Application to Inter- and Intra-species Conservation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Declan; Sethi, Anurag; Li, Shantao; Kumar, Sushant; Chang, Richard W F; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2016-05-01

    The rapidly growing volume of data being produced by next-generation sequencing initiatives is enabling more in-depth analyses of conservation than previously possible. Deep sequencing is uncovering disease loci and regions under selective constraint, despite the fact that intuitive biophysical reasons for such constraint are sometimes absent. Allostery may often provide the missing explanatory link. We use models of protein conformational change to identify allosteric residues by finding essential surface pockets and information-flow bottlenecks, and we develop a software tool that enables users to perform this analysis on their own proteins of interest. Though fundamentally 3D-structural in nature, our analysis is computationally fast, thereby allowing us to run it across the PDB and to evaluate general properties of predicted allosteric residues. We find that these tend to be conserved over diverse evolutionary time scales. Finally, we highlight examples of allosteric residues that help explain poorly understood disease-associated variants. PMID:27066750

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  6. Towards the identification of the allosteric Phe-binding site in phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Carla; Fraternali, Franca; Salvatore, Francesco; Fornili, Arianna; Zagari, Adriana

    2016-03-01

    The enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) is defective in the inherited disorder phenylketonuria. PAH, a tetrameric enzyme, is highly regulated and displays positive cooperativity for its substrate, Phe. Whether Phe binds to an allosteric site is a matter of debate, despite several studies worldwide. To address this issue, we generated a dimeric model for Phe-PAH interactions, by performing molecular docking combined with molecular dynamics simulations on human and rat wild-type sequences and also on a human G46S mutant. Our results suggest that the allosteric Phe-binding site lies at the dimeric interface between the regulatory and the catalytic domains of two adjacent subunits. The structural and dynamical features of the site were characterized in depth and described. Interestingly, our findings provide evidence for lower allosteric Phe-binding ability of the G46S mutant than the human wild-type enzyme. This also explains the disease-causing nature of this mutant. PMID:26479306

  7. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity.

  8. Sulfated Pentagalloylglucoside is a Potent, Allosteric, and Selective Inhibitor of Factor XIa

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Ponnusamy, Pooja; Mehta, Akul Y.; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of factor XIa (FXIa) is a novel paradigm for developing anticoagulants without major bleeding consequences. We present the discovery of sulfated pentagalloylglucoside (6) as a highly selective inhibitor of human FXIa. Biochemical screening of a focused library led to the identification of 6, a sulfated aromatic mimetic of heparin. Inhibitor 6 displayed a potency of 551 nM against FXIa, which was at least 200-fold more selective than other relevant enzymes. It also prevented activation of factor IX and prolonged human plasma and whole blood clotting. Inhibitor 6 reduced VMAX of FXIa hydrolysis of chromogenic substrate without affecting the KM suggesting an allosteric mechanism. Competitive studies showed that 6 bound in the heparin-binding site of FXIa. No allosteric small molecule has been discovered to date that exhibits equivalent potency against FXIa. Inhibitor 6 is expected to open up a major route to allosteric FXIa anticoagulants with clinical relevance. PMID:23316863

  9. A HIGH THROUGHPUT MASS SPECTROMETRIC ASSAY FOR DISCOVERY OF HUMAN LIPOXYGENASE INHIBITORS AND ALLOSTERIC EFFECTORS

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, J. Brian; Kenyon, Victor; Holman, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) regulate inflammation through the production of a variety of molecules whose specific downstream effects are not entirely understood due to the complexity of the inflammation pathway. The generation of these biomolecules can potentially be inhibited and/or allosterically regulated by small synthetic molecules. The current work describes the first mass spectrometric, high throughput method for identifying small molecule LOX inhibitors and LOX allosteric effectors, which change the substrate preference of human lipoxygenase enzymes. Using a volatile buffer and an acid-labile detergent, enzymatic products can be directly detected using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), without the need of organic extraction. The method also reduces the required enzyme concentration compared to traditional UV absorbance methods by approximately 30-fold, allowing accurate binding affinity measurements for inhibitors with nanomolar affinity. The procedure was validated using known LOX inhibitors and the allosteric effector, 13(S)-hydroxy-9Z,11E-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). PMID:25712042

  10. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase

    PubMed Central

    Foda, Zachariah H.; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T.; Shaw, David E.; Seeliger, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  11. A dynamically coupled allosteric network underlies binding cooperativity in Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Foda, Zachariah H; Shan, Yibing; Kim, Eric T; Shaw, David E; Seeliger, Markus A

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases are attractive drug targets because many human diseases are associated with the deregulation of kinase activity. However, how the catalytic kinase domain integrates different signals and switches from an active to an inactive conformation remains incompletely understood. Here we identify an allosteric network of dynamically coupled amino acids in Src kinase that connects regulatory sites to the ATP- and substrate-binding sites. Surprisingly, reactants (ATP and peptide substrates) bind with negative cooperativity to Src kinase while products (ADP and phosphopeptide) bind with positive cooperativity. We confirm the molecular details of the signal relay through the allosteric network by biochemical studies. Experiments on two additional protein tyrosine kinases indicate that the allosteric network may be largely conserved among these enzymes. Our work provides new insights into the regulation of protein tyrosine kinases and establishes a potential conduit by which resistance mutations to ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors can affect their activity. PMID:25600932

  12. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of negative allosteric modulators of the Kv11.1(hERG) channel.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiyi; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; 't Hart, Ingrid M E; Kopf, Adrian H; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized and evaluated a series of compounds for their allosteric modulation at the Kv11.1 (hERG) channel. Most compounds were negative allosteric modulators of [(3)H]dofetilide binding to the channel, in particular 7f, 7h-j and 7p. Compounds 7f and 7p were the most potent negative allosteric modulators amongst all ligands, significantly increasing the dissociation rate of dofetilide in the radioligand kinetic binding assay, while remarkably reducing the affinities of dofetilide and astemizole in a competitive displacement assay. Additionally, both 7f and 7p displayed peculiar displacement characteristics with Hill coefficients significantly distinct from unity as shown by e.g., dofetilide, further indicative of their allosteric effects on dofetilide binding. Our findings in this investigation yielded several promising negative allosteric modulators for future functional and clinical research with respect to their antiarrhythmic propensities, either alone or in combination with known Kv11.1 blockers. PMID:26519929

  14. Hemoglobin and the origins of the concept of allosterism.

    PubMed

    Edsall, J T

    1980-02-01

    heterotropic interactions. Brief final comments relate to the evolution of the concept of reversible conformational transitions as the basis for both homotropic and heterotropic interactions in allosteric proteins. PMID:6986293

  15. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, A. Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M.; Ramsey, Kristen M.; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G.

    2015-01-01

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body’s primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme’s small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of 13C-Ile–labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the 1H-13C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems. PMID:26283387

  16. Structure-Based Ligand Discovery Targeting Orthosteric and Allosteric Pockets of Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lane, J. Robert; Chubukov, Pavel; Liu, Wei; Canals, Meritxell; Cherezov, Vadim; Abagyan, Ruben; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Small molecules targeting allosteric pockets of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) have a great therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurologic and other chronic disorders. Here we performed virtual screening for orthosteric and putative allosteric ligands of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) using two optimized crystal-structure–based models: the receptor with an empty binding pocket (D3RAPO), and the receptor complex with dopamine (D3RDopa). Subsequent biochemical and functional characterization revealed 14 novel ligands with a binding affinity of better than 10 μM in the D3RAPO candidate list (56% hit rate), and 8 novel ligands in the D3RDopa list (32% hit rate). Most ligands in the D3RAPO model span both orthosteric and extended pockets and behave as antagonists at D3R, with compound 7 showing the highest potency of dopamine inhibition (IC50 = 7 nM). In contrast, compounds identified by the D3RDopa model are predicted to occupy an allosteric site at the extracellular extension of the pocket, and they all lack the anchoring amino group. Compounds targeting the allosteric site display a variety of functional activity profiles, where behavior of at least two compounds (23 and 26) is consistent with noncompetitive allosteric modulation of dopamine signaling in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 phosphorylation and β-arrestin recruitment assays. The high affinity and ligand efficiency of the chemically diverse hits identified in this study suggest utility of structure-based screening targeting allosteric sites of GPCRs. PMID:24021214

  17. Agonist binding and function at the human alpha(2A)-adrenoceptor: allosteric modulation by amilorides.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-11-01

    It has been found previously that amilorides act via an allosteric site on the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor to strongly inhibit antagonist binding. In this study, allosteric modulation of agonist binding and function at the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor was explored. The dissociation rate of the agonist [(3)H]UK14304 from alpha(2A)-receptors was decreased by the amilorides in a concentration-dependent manner. This contrasts with the increases in (3)H-antagonist dissociation rate found previously. The agonist-amiloride analog interaction data could be fitted to equations derived from the ternary complex allosteric model. The calculated log affinities of the amilorides at the [(3)H]UK14304-occupied receptor increased with the size of the 5-N-alkyl side chain and ranged from 2.4 for amiloride to 4.2 for 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)-amiloride. The calculated negative cooperativities cover a narrow range, in sharp contrast to the broad range found for antagonist-amiloride analog interactions. The effects of the amilorides on the agonist actions of UK14304, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were explored using a [(35)S]GTPgammaS functional assay, and the parameters calculated for the cooperativities and affinities of the UK14304-amiloride analog interactions, using the equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, were in good agreement with those derived from the kinetic studies. Therefore both the binding and functional data provide further support for the existence of a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. The binding mode of the amilorides at the agonist-occupied and antagonist-occupied receptor differs markedly but, within each group, the structure of either the agonist or the antagonist examined has only a slight effect on the allosteric interactions. PMID:11040058

  18. Organism-Adapted Specificity of the Allosteric Regulation of Pyruvate Kinase in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Veith, Nadine; Feldman-Salit, Anna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Henrich, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Wade, Rebecca C.

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PYK) is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric activation may

  19. Clickable Photoaffinity Ligands for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Based on Select Acetylenic Negative Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Karen J; Velagaleti, Ranganadh; Thal, David M; Brady, Ryan M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lapinsky, David J

    2016-07-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest class of current drug targets. In particular, small-molecule allosteric modulators offer substantial potential for selectively "tuning" GPCR activity. However, there remains a critical need for experimental strategies that unambiguously determine direct allosteric ligand-GPCR interactions, to facilitate both chemical biology studies and rational structure-based drug design. We now report the development and use of first-in-class clickable allosteric photoprobes for a GPCR based on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) negative allosteric modulator (NAM) chemotypes. Select acetylenic mGlu5 NAM lead compounds were rationally modified to contain either a benzophenone or an aryl azide as a photoreactive functional group, enabling irreversible covalent attachment to mGlu5 via photoactivation. Additionally, a terminal alkyne or an aliphatic azide was incorporated as a click chemistry handle, allowing chemoselective attachment of fluorescent moieties to the irreversibly mGlu5-bound probe via tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation. These clickable photoprobes retained submicromolar affinity for mGlu5 and negative cooperativity with glutamate, interacted with the "common allosteric-binding site," displayed slow binding kinetics, and could irreversibly label mGlu5 following UV exposure. We depleted the number of functional mGlu5 receptors using an irreversibly bound NAM to elucidate and delineate orthosteric agonist affinity and efficacy. Finally, successful conjugation of fluorescent dyes via click chemistry was demonstrated for each photoprobe. In the future, these clickable photoprobes are expected to aid our understanding of the structural basis of mGlu5 allosteric modulation. Furthermore, tandem photoaffinity labeling-bioorthogonal conjugation is expected to be a broadly applicable experimental strategy across the entire GPCR superfamily. PMID:27115427

  20. Analogs of WIN 62,577 define a second allosteric site on muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2002-12-01

    WIN 51,708 (17-beta-hydroxy-17-alpha-ethynyl-5-alpha-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) and WIN 62,577 (17-beta-hydroxy- 17-alpha-ethynyl-delta(4)-androstano[3,2-b]pyrimido[1,2-a]benzimidazole) are potent and centrally active antagonists at rat, but not human, NK(1) receptors. The interactions of these compounds and some analogs with [(3)H]N-methyl scopolamine ([(3)H]NMS) and unlabeled acetylcholine (ACh) at M(1)-M(4) muscarinic receptors have been studied using equilibrium and nonequilibrium radioligand binding methods. The results are consistent with the predictions of the allosteric ternary complex model. The WIN compounds have log affinities for the unliganded receptor in the range 5 to 6.7, and exhibit positive, negative, or neutral cooperativity with [(3)H]NMS and ACh, depending on the receptor subtype and nature of the interacting ligands. WIN 62,577 is an allosteric enhancer of ACh affinity at M(3) receptors. Although interacting allosterically, WIN 62,577 and WIN 51,708 do not affect [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(3) receptors. Certain analogs have higher affinities than WIN 62,577, and truncated forms of WIN 62,577, including steroids, also act allosterically. One analog, 17-beta-hydroxy-17-alpha-Delta(4)-androstano[3,2-b]pyrido[2,3-b]indole (PG987), has the unique effect of speeding [(3)H]NMS dissociation; its largest effect, 2.5-fold, is at M(3) receptors. The interaction between PG987 and other allosteric agents on [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(3) receptors indicate that PG987 binds reversibly to a site distinct from that to which gallamine and strychnine bind: in contrast, PG987 seems to bind to the same site on M(3) receptors as KT5720, staurosporine, and WIN 51,708. Therefore, in addition to the allosteric site that binds strychnine (and probably chloromethyl brucine, another allosteric enhancer) there is a second, nonoverlapping, pharmacologically distinct allosteric site on M(3) receptors that also supports positive cooperativity with

  1. Optimization of a Dibenzodiazepine Hit to a Potent and Selective Allosteric PAK1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of inhibitors targeting novel allosteric kinase sites is very challenging. Such compounds, however, once identified could offer exquisite levels of selectivity across the kinome. Herein we report our structure-based optimization strategy of a dibenzodiazepine hit 1, discovered in a fragment-based screen, yielding highly potent and selective inhibitors of PAK1 such as 2 and 3. Compound 2 was cocrystallized with PAK1 to confirm binding to an allosteric site and to reveal novel key interactions. Compound 3 modulated PAK1 at the cellular level and due to its selectivity enabled valuable research to interrogate biological functions of the PAK1 kinase. PMID:26191365

  2. Opportunities and challenges in the discovery of allosteric modulators of GPCRs for treating CNS disorders

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Meiler, Jens; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Novel allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are providing fundamental advances in the development of GPCR ligands with high subtype selectivity and novel modes of efficacy that have not been possible with traditional approaches. As new allosteric modulators are advancing as drug candidates, we are developing an increased understanding of the major advantages and broad range of activities that can be achieved with these agents through selective modulation of specific signalling pathways, differential effects on GPCR homodimers versus heterodimers, and other properties. This understanding creates exciting opportunities, as well as unique challenges, in the optimization of novel therapeutic agents for disorders of the central nervous system. PMID:25176435

  3. A Novel Allosteric Insulin Receptor-Activating Antibody Reduces Hyperglycemia without Hypoglycemia in Diabetic Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bezwada, Padma; Zhao, Jingsong; Der, Ken; Shimizu, Bob; Cao, Liching; Ahene, Ago; Rubin, Paul; Johnson, Kirk

    2016-02-01

    XMetA is a fully human, allosteric monoclonal antibody that binds the insulin receptor with high affinity and mimics the glucoregulatory, but not the mitogenic, actions of insulin. Here we evaluated the efficacy of both single and repeat s.c. administrations of XMetA in reducing hyperglycemia in obese cynomolgus monkeys with naturally developed type 2 diabetes, a model that shares many features of human diabetes. The data show that a single s.c. administration of XMetA at dose levels ranging from 1.5 to 10 mg/kg markedly reduced fasting hyperglycemia, with a peak effect occurring 1 to 2 days after administration, and sustained for up to 1 week. XMetA's effect on hyperglycemia was observed without elevations in serum insulin and was concomitant with reduced serum C-peptide levels, even at the lowest dose. Subchronic effects were evaluated via once weekly s.c. administration of XMetA, 10 mg/kg, for 6 weeks. XMetA treatment resulted in robust weekly decreases in fasting glucose levels averaging approximately 30% throughout the study, along with a significant absolute reduction from the vehicle control baseline of 1.2% in hemoglobin A1c, a marker of long-term glycemic status. XMetA treatment was well tolerated with no injection-site reactions, no body weight gain, and no episodes of clinical hypoglycemia. Thus, XMetA shows acute and subchronic improvements in glycemic control in spontaneously diabetic cynomolgus monkeys with a broad safety margin. This profile supports the development of XMetA as a novel glucose-lowering therapeutic agent for the management of type 2 diabetes. PMID:26578267

  4. Structural Basis of the Lactate-dependent Allosteric Regulation of Oxygen Binding in Arthropod Hemocyanin

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, S.; Tanaka, N; Micetic, I; Di Muro, P; Nagao, S; Kitagishi, H; Magliozzo, R; Peisach, J; Beltramini, M; Bubacco, L

    2010-01-01

    Hemocyanin (Hc) is an oxygen carrier protein in which oxygen binding is regulated by allosteric effectors such as H{sup +} and L-lactate. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements showed that L-lactate binds to dodecameric and heterohexameric Hc and to the CaeSS3 homohexamer but not to the CaeSS2 monomer. The binding of lactate caused no change in the optical absorption and x-ray absorption spectra of either oxy- or deoxy-Hc, suggesting that no structural rearrangement of the active site occurred. At pH 6.5, the oxygen binding rate constant k{sub obs} obtained by flash photolysis showed a significant increase upon addition of L-lactate, whereas L-lactate addition had little effect at pH 8.3. Lactate binding caused a concentration-dependent shift in the interhexameric distances at pH 6.5 based on small angle x-ray scattering measurements. These results show that L-lactate affects oxygen affinity at pH 6.5 by modulating the global structure of Hc without affecting its binuclear copper center (the active site). In contrast to this, the active site structure of deoxy-Hc is affected by changes in pH (Hirota, S., Kawahara, T., Beltramini, M., Di Muro, P., Magliozzo, R. S., Peisach, J., Powers, L. S., Tanaka, N., Nagao, S., and Bubacco, L. (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 31941-31948). Upon addiction of lactate, the kinetic behavior of oxygen rebinding for Hc was heterogeneous under low oxygen concentrations at pH 6.5 due to changes in the T and R state populations, and the equilibrium was found to shift from the T toward the R state with addition of lactate.

  5. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1–50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed. PMID:25831539

  6. An Allosteric Pathway Revealed in the Ribosome Binding Stress Factor BipA

    SciTech Connect

    Makanji, H.; deLivron, M; Robinson, V

    2009-01-01

    BipA is a highly conserved prokaryotic GTPase that functions as a master regulator of stress and virulence processes in bacteria. It is a member of the translational factor family of GTPases along with EF-G, IF-2 and LepA. Structural and biochemical data suggest that ribosome binding specificity for each member of this family lies in an effector domain. As with other bacterial GTPases, the ribosome binding and GTPase activities of this protein are tightly coupled. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is still unknown. A series of experiments have been designed to probe structural features of the protein to see if we can pinpoint specific areas of BipA, perhaps even individual residues, which are important to its association with the ribosome. Included in the list are the C-terminal effector domain of the protein, which is distinct to the BipA family of proteins, and amino acid residues in the switch I and II regions of the G domain. Using sucrose density gradients, we have shown that the C-terminal domain is required in order for BipA to bind to the ribosome. Moreover, deletion of this domain increases the GTP hydrolysis rates of the protein, likely through relief of inhibitory contacts. Additional evidence has revealed an allosteric connection between the conformationally flexible switch II region and the C-terminal domain of BipA. Site directed mutagenesis, sucrose gradients and malachite green assays are being used to elucidate the details of this coupling.

  7. A Model of Intercultural and Interracial Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Andrea L.; Ogawa, Dennis M.

    Certain definitions and theoretical structures, accompanied by Venn diagrams, are used to distinguish several dimensions of international and interracial communication. International communication occurs on a political level between representatives of nations. Intercultural communication is communication between individuals of different cultures…

  8. Delineation of the functional properties and the mechanism of action of TMPPAA, an allosteric agonist and positive allosteric modulator of 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gasiorek, Agnes; Trattnig, Sarah M; Ahring, Philip K; Kristiansen, Uffe; Frølund, Bente; Frederiksen, Kristen; Jensen, Anders A

    2016-06-15

    We have previously identified a novel class of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor (5-HT3R) agonists sharing little structural similarity with orthosteric 5-HT3R ligands (Jørgensen et al., 2011). In the present study we have elucidated the functional characteristics and the mechanism of action of one of these compounds, trans-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(pentan-3-yl)acrylamide (TMPPAA). In electrophysiological recordings TMPPAA was found to be a highly-efficacious partial agonist equipotent with 5-HT at the 5-HT3A receptor (5-HT3AR) expressed in COS-7 cells and somewhat less potent at the receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The desensitization kinetics of TMPPAA-evoked currents were very different from those mediated by 5-HT. Moreover, repeated TMPPAA applications resulted in progressive current run-down and persistent non-responsiveness of the receptor to TMPPAA, but not to 5-HT. In addition to its direct activation, TMPPAA potentiated 5-HT-mediated 5-HT3AR signalling, and the allosteric link between the two binding sites was corroborated by the analogous ability of 5-HT to potentiate TMPPAA-evoked responses. The agonism and potentiation exerted by TMPPAA at a chimeric α7-nACh/5-HT3A receptor suggested that the ligand acts through the transmembrane domain of 5-HT3AR, a notion further substantiated by its functional properties at chimeric and mutant human/murine 5-HT3ARs. A residue in the transmembrane helix 4 of 5-HT3A was identified as an important molecular determinant for the different agonist potencies exhibited by TMPPAA at human and murine 5-HT3ARs. In conclusion, TMPPAA is a novel allosteric agonist and positive allosteric modulator of 5-HT3Rs, and its aberrant signalling characteristics compared to 5-HT at the 5-HT3AR underline the potential in Cys-loop receptor modulation and activation through allosteric sites. PMID:27086281

  9. Allosteric interactions of staurosporine and other indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine and acetylcholine at muscarinic receptor subtypes: identification of a second allosteric site.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-07-01

    We have studied the interactions of five indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine (NMS) and unlabeled acetylcholine at M(1)-M(4) muscarinic receptors, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium radioligand binding studies. The results are consistent with an allosteric model in which the primary and allosteric ligands bind simultaneously to the receptor and modify each other's affinities. The compounds were generally most active at M(1) receptors. [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by staurosporine, KT5720, and KT5823 at M(1) and M(2) receptors, and by K-252a at M(1) receptors. Gö 7874 reduced [(3)H]NMS affinity by up to threefold for all subtypes. A range of cooperative effects with acetylcholine was seen, and, at the M(1) receptor, KT5720 had a log affinity of 6.4 and enhanced acetylcholine affinity by 40%. The compounds inhibited the dissociation of [(3)H]NMS to different extents across the receptor subtypes, with the largest effects at M(1) receptors. In equilibrium binding studies the inhibitory potency of gallamine at M(1) receptors was not affected by KT5720, indicating that these agents bind to two distinct allosteric sites and have neutral cooperativity with each other. In contrast, gallamine and staurosporine had a negatively cooperative or competitive interaction at M(1) receptors. Similarly, the potency and relative effectiveness of KT5720 for inhibiting [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(1) receptors were not affected by gallamine or brucine, but were affected in a complex manner by staurosporine. These results demonstrate that there are at least two distinct allosteric sites on the M(1) receptor, both of which can support positive cooperativity with acetylcholine. PMID:10860942

  10. Molecular mechanism of allosteric modulation at GPCRs: insight from a binding kinetics study at the human A1 adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Venhorst, Suzanne N; Massink, Arnault; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Vauquelin, Georges; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many GPCRs can be allosterically modulated by small-molecule ligands. This modulation is best understood in terms of the kinetics of the ligand–receptor interaction. However, many current kinetic assays require at least the (radio)labelling of the orthosteric ligand, which is impractical for studying a range of ligands. Here, we describe the application of a so-called competition association assay at the adenosine A1 receptor for this purpose. Experimental Approach We used a competition association assay to examine the binding kinetics of several unlabelled orthosteric agonists of the A1 receptor in the absence or presence of two allosteric modulators. We also tested three bitopic ligands, in which an orthosteric and an allosteric pharmacophore were covalently linked with different spacer lengths. The relevance of the competition association assay for the binding kinetics of the bitopic ligands was also explored by analysing simulated data. Key Results The binding kinetics of an unlabelled orthosteric ligand were affected by the addition of an allosteric modulator and such effects were probe- and concentration-dependent. Covalently linking the orthosteric and allosteric pharmacophores into one bitopic molecule had a substantial effect on the overall on- or off-rate. Conclusion and Implications The competition association assay is a useful tool for exploring the allosteric modulation of the human adenosine A1 receptor. This assay may have general applicability to study allosteric modulation at other GPCRs as well. PMID:25040887

  11. Mutations in Antibody Fragments Modulate Allosteric Response Via Hydrogen-Bond Network Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit; Tracka, Malgorzata B; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Livesay, Dennis R; Jacobs, Donald J

    2016-05-10

    A mechanical perturbation method that locally restricts conformational entropy along the protein backbone is used to identify putative allosteric sites in a series of antibody fragments. The method is based on a distance constraint model that integrates mechanical and thermodynamic viewpoints of protein structure wherein mechanical clamps that mimic substrate or cosolute binding are introduced. Across a set of six single chain-Fv fragments of the anti-lymphotoxin-β receptor antibody, statistically significant responses are obtained by averaging over 10 representative structures sampled from a molecular dynamics simulation. As expected, the introduced clamps locally rigidify the protein, but long-ranged increases in both rigidity and flexibility are also frequently observed. Expanding our analysis to every molecular dynamics frame demonstrates that the allosteric responses are modulated by fluctuations within the hydrogen-bond network where the native ensemble is comprised of conformations that both are, and are not, affected by the perturbation in question. Population shifts induced by the mutations alter the allosteric response by adjusting which hydrogen-bond networks are the most probable. These effects are compared using response maps that track changes across each single chain-Fv fragment, thus providing valuable insight into how sensitive allosteric mechanisms are to mutations. PMID:27166802

  12. Rational design of allosteric regulation of homoserine dehydrogenase by a nonnatural inhibitor L-lysine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2015-02-20

    Allosteric proteins, which can sense different signals, are interesting biological parts for synthetic biology. In particular, the design of an artificial allosteric enzyme to sense an unnatural signal is both challenging and highly desired, for example, for a precise and dynamical control of fluxes of growth-essential but byproduct pathways in metabolic engineering of industrial microorganisms. In this work, we used homoserine dehydrogenase (HSDH) of Corynebacterium glutamicum, which is naturally allosterically regulated by threonine and isoleucine, as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of reengineering an allosteric enzyme to respond to an unnatural inhibitor L-lysine. For this purpose, the natural threonine binding sites of HSD were first predicted and verified by mutagenesis experiments. The threonine binding sites were then engineered to a lysine binding pocket. The reengineered HSD only responds to lysine inhibition but not to threonine. This is a significant step toward the construction of artificial molecular circuits for dynamic control of growth-essential byproduct formation pathway for lysine biosynthesis. PMID:24344690

  13. Allosteric modulation of M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor internalization and subcellular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Yeatman, Holly R; Lane, J Robert; Choy, Kwok Ho Christopher; Lambert, Nevin A; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell

    2014-05-30

    Allosteric modulators are an attractive approach to achieve receptor subtype-selective targeting of G protein-coupled receptors. Benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA) is an unprecedented example of a highly selective positive allosteric modulator of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). However, despite favorable pharmacological characteristics of BQCA in vitro and in vivo, there is limited evidence of the impact of allosteric modulation on receptor regulatory mechanisms such as β-arrestin recruitment or receptor internalization and endocytic trafficking. In the present study we investigated the impact of BQCA on M1 mAChR regulation. We show that BQCA potentiates agonist-induced β-arrestin recruitment to M1 mAChRs. Using a bioluminescence resonance energy transfer approach to monitor intracellular trafficking of M1 mAChRs, we show that once internalized, M1 mAChRs traffic to early endosomes, recycling endosomes and late endosomes. We also show that BQCA potentiates agonist-induced subcellular trafficking. M1 mAChR internalization is both β-arrestin and G protein-dependent, with the third intracellular loop playing an important role in the dynamics of β-arrestin recruitment. As the global effect of receptor activation ultimately depends on the levels of receptor expression at the cell surface, these results illustrate the need to extend the characterization of novel allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors to encapsulate the consequences of chronic exposure to this family of ligands. PMID:24753247

  14. Desformylflustrabromine: A Novel Positive Allosteric Modulator for beta2 Subunit Containing Nicotinic Receptor Sub-Types.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Anshul A

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated transmembrane ion channels that are present at the neuromuscular junction and in different locations in the nervous system. The different subtypes of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are found in the brain are thought to be involved in many neurological processes such as pain, cognitive function and depression, as well as in the pathophysiology of numerous neurological diseases and conditions. While the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is an endogenous agonist for all nicotinic receptors subtypes, many drugs that act as agonists and antagonists have also been identified or developed for these receptors. In addition, a novel class of compounds described as allosteric modulators have also been identified or developed for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Allosteric modulators are ligands that bind to nicotinic receptors at sites other than the orthosteric site where acetylcholine binds. One such allosteric modulator is desformylflustrabromine. Five chemical analogs along with desformylflustrabromine act as positive allosteric modulator for nAChRs that contain the beta2 subunit in their pentameric structure. Here the discovery and development, medicinal chemistry and pharmacological actions of desformylflustrabromine have been discussed. Desformylflustrabromine and its chemical analogs have the potential to develop into clinically used drugs for neurological diseases and conditions where nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved. PMID:26818864

  15. Coevolutionary analysis enabled rational deregulation of allosteric enzyme inhibition in Corynebacterium glutamicum for lysine production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Meyer, Weiqian; Rappert, Sugima; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2011-07-01

    Product feedback inhibition of allosteric enzymes is an essential issue for the development of highly efficient microbial strains for bioproduction. Here we used aspartokinase from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgAK), a key enzyme controlling the biosynthesis of industrially important aspartate family amino acids, as a model to demonstrate a fast and efficient approach to the deregulation of allostery. In the last 50 years many researchers and companies have made considerable efforts to deregulate this enzyme from allosteric inhibition by lysine and threonine. However, only a limited number of positive mutants have been identified so far, almost exclusively by random mutation and selection. In this study, we used statistical coupling analysis of protein sequences, a method based on coevolutionary analysis, to systematically clarify the interaction network within the regulatory domain of CgAK that is essential for allosteric inhibition. A cluster of interconnected residues linking different inhibitors' binding sites as well as other regions of the protein have been identified, including most of the previously reported positions of successful mutations. Beyond these mutation positions, we have created another 14 mutants that can partially or completely desensitize CgAK from allosteric inhibition, as shown by enzyme activity assays. The introduction of only one of the inhibition-insensitive CgAK mutations (here Q298G) into a wild-type C. glutamicum strain by homologous recombination resulted in an accumulation of 58 g/liter L-lysine within 30 h of fed-batch fermentation in a bioreactor. PMID:21531824

  16. Overlapping binding sites drive allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity in type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Xavier; Malhaire, Fanny; Scholler, Pauline; Rodrigo, Jordi; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Patricia; Llebaria, Amadeu; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Giraldo, Jesús; Goudet, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Type 4 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu4) receptors are emerging targets for the treatment of various disorders. Accordingly, numerous mGlu4-positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been identified, some of which also display agonist activity. To identify the structural bases for their allosteric action, we explored the relationship between the binding pockets of mGlu4 PAMs with different chemical scaffolds and their functional properties. By use of innovative mGlu4 biosensors and second-messenger assays, we show that all PAMs enhance agonist action on the receptor through different degrees of allosteric agonism and positive cooperativity. For example, whereas VU0155041 and VU0415374 display equivalent efficacies [log(τ(B)) = 1.15 ± 0.38 and 1.25 ± 0.44, respectively], they increase the ability of L-AP4 to stabilize the active conformation of the receptor by 4 and 39 times, respectively. Modeling and docking studies identify 2 overlapping binding pockets as follows: a first site homologous to the pocket of natural agonists of class A GPCRs linked to allosteric agonism and a second one pointing toward a site topographically homologous to the Na(+) binding pocket of class A GPCRs, occupied by PAMs exhibiting the strongest cooperativity. These results reveal that intrinsic efficacy and cooperativity of mGlu4 PAMs are correlated with their binding mode, and vice versa, integrating structural and functional knowledge from different GPCR classes. PMID:25342125

  17. Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate kinase: insights into the allosteric regulation†

    PubMed Central

    Labesse, Gilles; Benkali, Khaled; Salard-Arnaud, Isabelle; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoside Monophosphate Kinases (NMPKs) family are key enzymes in nucleotide metabolism. Bacterial UMPKs depart from the main superfamily of NMPKs. Having no eukaryotic counterparts they represent attractive therapeutic targets. They are regulated by GTP and UTP, while showing different mechanisms in Gram(+), Gram(–) and archaeal bacteria. In this work, we have characterized the mycobacterial UMPK (UMPKmt) combining enzymatic and structural investigations with site-directed mutagenesis. UMPKmt exhibits cooperativity toward ATP and an allosteric regulation by GTP and UTP. The crystal structure of the complex of UMPKmt with GTP solved at 2.5 Å, was merely identical to the modelled apo-form, in agreement with SAXS experiments. Only a small stretch of residues was affected upon nucleotide binding, pointing out the role of macromolecular dynamics rather than major structural changes in the allosteric regulation of bacterial UMPKs. We further probe allosteric regulation by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, a key residue involved in the allosteric regulation of this enzyme was identified. PMID:21149268

  18. The Promiscuity of Allosteric Regulation of Nuclear Receptors by Retinoid X Receptor.

    PubMed

    Clark, Alexander K; Wilder, J Heath; Grayson, Aaron W; Johnson, Quentin R; Lindsay, Richard J; Nellas, Ricky B; Fernandez, Elias J; Shen, Tongye

    2016-08-25

    The promiscuous protein retinoid X receptor (RXR) displays essential allosteric regulation of several members in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily via heterodimerization and (anti)cooperative binding of cognate ligands. Here, the structural basis of the positive allostery of RXR and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is revealed. In contrast, a similar computational approach had previously revealed the mechanism for negative allostery in the complex of RXR and thyroid receptor (TR). By comparing the positive and negative allostery of RXR complexed with CAR and TR respectively, we reported the promiscuous allosteric control involving RXR. We characterize the allosteric mechanism by expressing the correlated dynamics of selected residue-residue contacts which was extracted from atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and statistical analysis. While the same set of residues in the binding pocket of RXR may initiate the residue-residue interaction network, RXR uses largely different sets of contacts (only about one-third identical) and allosteric modes to regulate TR and CAR. The promiscuity of RXR control may originate from multiple factors, including (1) the frustrated fit of cognate ligand 9c to the RXR binding pocket and (2) the different ligand-binding features of TR (loose) versus CAR (tight) to their corresponding cognate ligands. PMID:27110634

  19. Kuwanon-L as a New Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor: Molecular Modeling and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Francesca; Tintori, Cristina; Martini, Riccardo; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferrarese, Roberto; Cabiddu, Gianluigi; Corona, Angela; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Calcaterra, Andrea; Iovine, Valentina; Botta, Bruno; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Botta, Maurizio; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) active site inhibitors are the latest class of drugs approved for HIV treatment. The selection of IN strand-transfer drug-resistant HIV strains in patients supports the development of new agents that are active as allosteric IN inhibitors. Here, a docking-based virtual screening has been applied to a small library of natural ligands to identify new allosteric IN inhibitors that target the sucrose binding pocket. From theoretical studies, kuwanon-L emerged as the most promising binder and was thus selected for biological studies. Biochemical studies showed that kuwanon-L is able to inhibit the HIV-1 IN catalytic activity in the absence and in the presence of LEDGF/p75 protein, the IN dimerization, and the IN/LEDGF binding. Kuwanon-L also inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell cultures. Overall, docking and biochemical results suggest that kuwanon-L binds to an allosteric binding pocket and can be considered an attractive lead for the development of new allosteric IN antiviral agents. PMID:26360521

  20. Allosteric interactions and the modular nature of the voltage- and Ca2+-activated (BK) channel

    PubMed Central

    Latorre, Ramon; Morera, Francisco J; Zaelzer, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    The high conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel is one of the most broadly expressed channels in mammals. This channel is named BK for ‘big K’ because of its single-channel conductance that can be as large as 250 pS in 100 mm symmetrical K+. BK channels increase their activity by membrane depolarization or an increase in cytosolic Ca2+. One of the key features that defines the behaviour of BK channels is that neither Ca2+ nor voltage is strictly necessary for channel activation. This and several other observations led to the idea that both Ca2+ and voltage increase the open probability by an allosteric mechanism. In this type of mechanism, the processes of voltage sensor displacement, Ca2+ binding and pore opening are independent equilibria that interact allosterically with each other. These allosteric interactions in BK channels reside in the structural characteristics of the BK channel in the sense that voltage and Ca2+ sensors and the pore need to be contained in different structures or ‘modules’. Through electrophysiological, mutagenesis, biochemical and fluorescence studies these modules have been identified and, more important, some of the interactions between them have been unveiled. In this review, we have covered the main advances achieved during the last few years in the elucidation of the structure of the BK channel and how this is related with its function as an allosteric protein. PMID:20603335

  1. Allosteric ligands for the pharmacologically dark receptors GPR68 and GPR65.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xi-Ping; Karpiak, Joel; Kroeze, Wesley K; Zhu, Hu; Chen, Xin; Moy, Sheryl S; Saddoris, Kara A; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Farrell, Martilias S; Wang, Sheng; Mangano, Thomas J; Deshpande, Deepak A; Jiang, Alice; Penn, Raymond B; Jin, Jian; Koller, Beverly H; Kenakin, Terry; Shoichet, Brian K; Roth, Bryan L

    2015-11-26

    At least 120 non-olfactory G-protein-coupled receptors in the human genome are 'orphans' for which endogenous ligands are unknown, and many have no selective ligands, hindering the determination of their biological functions and clinical relevance. Among these is GPR68, a proton receptor that lacks small molecule modulators for probing its biology. Using yeast-based screens against GPR68, here we identify the benzodiazepine drug lorazepam as a non-selective GPR68 positive allosteric modulator. More than 3,000 GPR68 homology models were refined to recognize lorazepam in a putative allosteric site. Docking 3.1 million molecules predicted new GPR68 modulators, many of which were confirmed in functional assays. One potent GPR68 modulator, ogerin, suppressed recall in fear conditioning in wild-type but not in GPR68-knockout mice. The same approach led to the discovery of allosteric agonists and negative allosteric modulators for GPR65. Combining physical and structure-based screening may be broadly useful for ligand discovery for understudied and orphan GPCRs. PMID:26550826

  2. 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship: Drug Discovery Targeting Allosteric Sites†

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The identification of sites on receptors topographically distinct from the orthosteric sites, so-called allosteric sites, has heralded novel approaches and modes of pharmacology for target modulation. Over the past 20 years, our understanding of allosteric modulation has grown significantly, and numerous advantages, as well as caveats (e.g., flat structure–activity relationships, species differences, “molecular switches”), have been identified. For multiple receptors and proteins, numerous examples have been described where unprecedented levels of selectivity are achieved along with improved physiochemical properties. While not a panacea, these novel approaches represent exciting opportunities for tool compound development to probe the pharmacology and therapeutic potential of discrete molecular targets, as well as new medicines. In this Perspective, in commemoration of the 2013 Philip S. Portoghese Medicinal Chemistry Lectureship (LindsleyC. W.Adventures in allosteric drug discovery. Presented at the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis, IN, September 10, 2013; The 2013 Portoghese Lectureship), several vignettes of drug discovery campaigns targeting novel allosteric mechanisms will be recounted, along with lessons learned and guidelines that have emerged for successful lead optimization. PMID:25180768

  3. Computational predictions suggest that structural similarity in viral polymerases may lead to comparable allosteric binding sites.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jodian A; Espiritu, Marie V; Abraham, Joel; Thorpe, Ian F

    2016-08-15

    The identification of ligand-binding sites is often the first step in drug targeting and design. To date there are numerous computational tools available to predict ligand binding sites. These tools can guide or mitigate the need for experimental methods to identify binding sites, which often require significant resources and time. Here, we evaluate four ligand-binding site predictor (LBSP) tools for their ability to predict allosteric sites within the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) polymerase. Our results show that the LISE LBSP is able to identify all three target allosteric sites within the HCV polymerase as well as a known allosteric site in the Coxsackievirus polymerase. LISE was then employed to identify novel binding sites within the polymerases of the Dengue, West Nile, and Foot-and-mouth Disease viruses. Our results suggest that all three viral polymerases have putative sites that share structural or chemical similarities with allosteric pockets of the HCV polymerase. Thus, these binding locations may represent an evolutionarily conserved structural feature of several viral polymerases that could be exploited for the development of small molecule therapeutics. PMID:27262620

  4. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition. PMID:20602244

  5. Allosteric transition and binding of small molecule effectors causes curvature change in central β-sheets of selected enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Ellen; Bueno, Brenda; Kulshreshta, Sanjeev; Cieplak, Piotr; Argáez, Miguel; Velázquez, Leticia; Stec, Boguslaw

    2011-04-01

    A quantitative description of allosteric transition remains a significant science challenge. Many allosteric enzymes contain a central β-sheet in their catalytic domain. When an allosteric protein undergoes the transition between T (tense) and R (relaxed) allosteric states, this central β-sheet undergoes a conformational change. A traditional method of measuring this change, the root mean square deviation (RMSD), appears to be inadequate to describe such changes in meaningful quantitative manner. We designed a novel quantitative method to demonstrate this conformational transition by measuring the change in curvature of the central β-sheet when enzymes transition between allosteric states. The curvature was established by calculating the semiaxes of a 3-D hyperboloid fitted by least squares to the Cα atomic positions of the β-sheet. The two enzymes selected for this study, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) from pig kidney and aspartate carbamoyltransferase (ATCase) from E. coli, showed while transitioning between the allosteric states (T ⇔ R) a notable change in β-sheet curvature (∼5%) that results in a large lateral shift at the sheet's edge, which is necessary to convey the signal. The results suggest that the β-sheet participates in storing elastic energy associated with the transition. Establishing a tentative link between the energetics of the β-sheet in different allosteric states provides a more objective basis for the naming convention of allosteric states (tense or relaxed), and provides insight into the hysteretic nature of the transition. The approach presented here allows for a better understanding of the internal dynamics of allosteric enzymes by defining the domains that directly participate in the transition. PMID:20602244

  6. Biased Agonism and Biased Allosteric Modulation at the CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Khajehali, Elham; Malone, Daniel T; Glass, Michelle; Sexton, Patrick M; Christopoulos, Arthur; Leach, Katie

    2015-08-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are attractive therapeutic targets for numerous central nervous system disorders. However, clinical application of cannabinoid ligands has been hampered owing to their adverse on-target effects. Ligand-biased signaling from, and allosteric modulation of, CB1Rs offer pharmacological approaches that may enable the development of improved CB1R drugs, through modulation of only therapeutically desirable CB1R signaling pathways. There is growing evidence that CB1Rs are subject to ligand-biased signaling and allosterism. Therefore, in the present study, we quantified ligand-biased signaling and allosteric modulation at CB1Rs. Cannabinoid agonists displayed distinct biased signaling profiles at CB1Rs. For instance, whereas 2-arachidonylglycerol and WIN55,212-2 [(R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-napthalenylmethanone] showed little preference for inhibition of cAMP and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), methanandamide, CP55940 [2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol], and HU-210 [11-hydroxy-Δ(8)-THC-dimethylheptyl] were biased toward cAMP inhibition. The small-molecule allosteric modulator Org27569 [5-chloro-3-ethyl-1H-indole-2-carboxylic acid [2-(4-piperidin-1-yl-phenyl)ethyl]amide] displayed biased allosteric effects by blocking cAMP inhibition mediated by all cannabinoid ligands tested, at the same time having little or no effect on ERK1/2 phosphorylation mediated by a subset of these ligands. Org27569 also displayed negative binding cooperativity with [(3)H]SR141716A [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichloro-phenyl)-4-methyl-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide]; however, it had minimal effects on binding of cannabinoid agonists. Furthermore, we highlight the need to validate the reported allosteric effects of the endogenous ligands lipoxin A4 and

  7. rRNA mutants in the yeast peptidyltransferase center reveal allosteric information networks and mechanisms of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Rakauskaitė, Rasa; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2008-01-01

    To ensure accurate and rapid protein synthesis, nearby and distantly located functional regions of the ribosome must dynamically communicate and coordinate with one another through a series of information exchange networks. The ribosome is ∼2/3 rRNA and information should pass mostly through this medium. Here, two viable mutants located in the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) of yeast ribosomes were created using a yeast genetic system that enables stable production of ribosomes containing only mutant rRNAs. The specific mutants were C2820U (Escherichia coli C2452) and Ψ2922C (E. coli U2554). Biochemical and genetic analyses of these mutants suggest that they may trap the PTC in the ‘open’ or aa-tRNA bound conformation, decreasing peptidyl-tRNA binding. We suggest that these structural changes are manifested at the biological level by affecting large ribosomal subunit biogenesis, ribosomal subunit joining during initiation, susceptibility/resistance to peptidyltransferase inhibitors, and the ability of ribosomes to properly decode termination codons. These studies also add to our understanding of how information is transmitted both locally and over long distances through allosteric networks of rRNA–rRNA and rRNA–protein interactions. PMID:18203742

  8. Allosteric vs. spontaneous exit-site (E-site) tRNA dissociation early in protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2011-01-01

    During protein synthesis, deacylated transfer RNAs leave the ribosome via an exit (E) site after mRNA translocation. How the ribosome regulates tRNA dissociation and whether functional linkages between the aminoacyl (A) and E sites modulate the dynamics of protein synthesis have long been debated. Using single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments, we find that, during early cycles of protein elongation, tRNAs are often held in the E site until being allosterically released when the next aminoacyl tRNA binds to the A site. This process is regulated by the length and sequence of the nascent peptide and by the conformational state, detected by tRNA proximity, prior to translocation. In later cycles, E-site tRNA dissociates spontaneously. Our results suggest that the distribution of pretranslocation tRNA states and posttranslocation pathways are correlated within each elongation cycle via communication between distant subdomains in the ribosome, but that this correlation between elongation cycle intermediates does not persist into succeeding cycles. PMID:21969541

  9. Using NMR to Develop New Allosteric and Allo-Network Drugs.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert E; Tran, Kevin; Richards, Kristy M; Luo, Rensheng

    2015-01-01

    NMR is becoming an important tool for developing new allosteric and allo-network drugs that bind to allosteric sites on enzymes, partially inhibiting them and causing fewer side effects than drugs already developed that target active sites. This is based on systems thinking, in which active enzymes and other proteins are known to be flexible and interact with each other. In other words, proteins can exist in an ensemble of different conformations whose populations are tunable. NMR is being used to find the pathways through which the effects of binding of an allosteric ligand propagate. There are NMR screening assays for studying ligand binding. This includes determining the changes in the spin lattice relaxation due to changes in the mobility of atoms involved in the binding, measuring magnetization transfer from the protein to the ligand by saturation difference transfer NMR (STD-NMR) and the transfer of bulk magnetization to the ligand by water-Ligand Observed via Gradient Spectroscopy, or waterLOGSY. The chemical shifts of (1)H and (15)N of some of the atoms in amino acids change when an allosteric ligand binds to a protein. So, (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra can be used to identify key amino acids and ligand binding sites. The NMR chemical shifts of amino acids affected by ligand binding form a network that can be characterized. Allosteric networks can be identified by chemical shift covariance analysis (CHESCA). This approach has been used recently to study the binding of new molecular entities (NMEs) to potentially therapeutic drug targets. PMID:26577663

  10. Allosteric and hyperekplexic mutant phenotypes investigated on an α1 glycine receptor transmembrane structure

    PubMed Central

    Moraga-Cid, Gustavo; Sauguet, Ludovic; Huon, Christèle; Malherbe, Laurie; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Murail, Samuel; Taly, Antoine; Baaden, Marc; Delarue, Marc; Corringer, Pierre-Jean

    2015-01-01

    The glycine receptor (GlyR) is a pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (pLGIC) mediating inhibitory transmission in the nervous system. Its transmembrane domain (TMD) is the target of allosteric modulators such as general anesthetics and ethanol and is a major locus for hyperekplexic congenital mutations altering the allosteric transitions of activation or desensitization. We previously showed that the TMD of the human α1GlyR could be fused to the extracellular domain of GLIC, a bacterial pLGIC, to form a functional chimera called Lily. Here, we overexpress Lily in Schneider 2 insect cells and solve its structure by X-ray crystallography at 3.5 Å resolution. The TMD of the α1GlyR adopts a closed-channel conformation involving a single ring of hydrophobic residues at the center of the pore. Electrophysiological recordings show that the phenotypes of key allosteric mutations of the α1GlyR, scattered all along the pore, are qualitatively preserved in this chimera, including those that confer decreased sensitivity to agonists, constitutive activity, decreased activation kinetics, or increased desensitization kinetics. Combined structural and functional data indicate a pore-opening mechanism for the α1GlyR, suggesting a structural explanation for the effect of some key hyperekplexic allosteric mutations. The first X-ray structure of the TMD of the α1GlyR solved here using GLIC as a scaffold paves the way for mechanistic investigation and design of allosteric modulators of a human receptor. PMID:25730860

  11. Probing allosteric binding sites of the maize endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Hannah, L Curtis; Stewart, Jon D

    2010-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a highly regulated enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis. Although the structure of the heterotetrameric maize endosperm AGPase remains unsolved, structures of a nonnative, low-activity form of the potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) AGPase (small subunit homotetramer) reported previously by others revealed that several sulfate ions bind to each enzyme. These sites are also believed to interact with allosteric regulators such as inorganic phosphate and 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA). Several arginine (Arg) side chains contact the bound sulfate ions in the potato structure and likely play important roles in allosteric effector binding. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was applied to the corresponding Arg residues in both the small and large subunits of maize endosperm AGPase to determine their roles in allosteric regulation and thermal stability. Steady-state kinetic and regulatory parameters were measured for each mutant. All of the Arg mutants examined--in both the small and large subunits--bound 3-PGA more weakly than the wild type (A(50) increased by 3.5- to 20-fold). By contrast, the binding of two other maize AGPase allosteric activators (fructose-6-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate) did not always mimic the changes observed for 3-PGA. In fact, compared to 3-PGA, fructose-6-phosphate is a more efficient activator in two of the Arg mutants. Phosphate binding was also affected by Arg substitutions. The combined data support a model for the binding interactions associated with 3-PGA in which allosteric activators and inorganic phosphate compete directly. PMID:19889875

  12. Characterization of Elements Involved in Allosteric Light Regulation of Phosphodiesterase Activity by Comparison of Different Functional BlrP1 States☆

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Andreas; Udvarhelyi, Anikó; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Reinstein, Jochen; Menzel, Andreas; Shoeman, Robert L.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved dedicated signaling mechanisms that enable the integration of a range of environmental stimuli and the accordant modulation of metabolic pathways. One central signaling molecule in bacteria is the second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP). Complex regulatory mechanisms for modulating c-di-GMP concentrations have evolved, in line with its importance for maintaining bacterial fitness under changing environmental conditions. One interesting example in this context is the blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase 1 (BlrP1) of Klebsiella pneumoniae. This covalently linked system of a sensor of blue light using FAD (BLUF) and an EAL phosphodiesterase domain orchestrates the light-dependent down-regulation of c-di-GMP levels. To reveal details of light-induced structural changes involved in EAL activity regulation, we extended previous crystallographic studies with hydrogen–deuterium exchange experiments and small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of different functional BlrP1 states. The combination of hydrogen–deuterium exchange and small-angle X-ray scattering allows the integration of local and global structural changes and provides an improved understanding of light signaling via an allosteric communication pathway between the BLUF and EAL domains. This model is supported by results from a mutational analysis of the EAL dimerization region and the analysis of metal-coordination effects of the EAL active site on the dark-state recovery kinetics of the BLUF domain. In combination with structural information from other EAL domains, the observed bidirectional communication points to a general mechanism of EAL activity regulation and suggests that a similar allosteric coupling is maintained in catalytically inactive EAL domains that retain a regulatory function. PMID:24291457

  13. A multi-pronged approach for compiling a global map of allosteric regulation in the apoptotic caspases

    PubMed Central

    Dagbay, Kevin; Eron, Scott J.; Serrano, Banyuhay P.; Velázquez-Delgado, Elih M.; Zhao, Yunlong; Lin, Di; Vaidya, Sravanti; Hardy, Jeanne A.

    2014-01-01

    One of the most promising and as yet underutilized means of regulating protein function is exploitation of allosteric sites. All caspases catalyze the same overall reaction, but they perform different biological roles and are differentially regulated. It is our hypothesis that many allosteric sites exist on various caspases and that understanding both the distinct and overlapping mechanisms by which each caspase can be allosterically controlled should ultimately enable caspase-specific inhibition. Here we describe the ongoing work and methods for compiling a comprehensive map of apoptotic caspase allostery. Central to this approach are the use of i) the embedded record of naturally evolved allosterically sites that are sensitive to zinc-medicated inhibition, phosphorylation and other post-translationally modifications, ii) structural and mutagenic approaches and iii) novel binding sites identified by both rationally-designed and screening-derived small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:24974292

  14. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J.; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  15. Probing the Sophisticated Synergistic Allosteric Regulation of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using ᴅ-Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Reichau, Sebastian; Blackmore, Nicola J; Jiao, Wanting; Parker, Emily J

    2016-01-01

    Chirality plays a major role in recognition and interaction of biologically important molecules. The enzyme 3-deoxy-d-arabino-heptulosonate 7-phosphate synthase (DAH7PS) is the first enzyme of the shikimate pathway, which is responsible for the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants, and a potential target for the development of antibiotics and herbicides. DAH7PS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtuDAH7PS) displays an unprecedented complexity of allosteric regulation, with three interdependent allosteric binding sites and a ternary allosteric response to combinations of the aromatic amino acids l-Trp, l-Phe and l-Tyr. In order to further investigate the intricacies of this system and identify key residues in the allosteric network of MtuDAH7PS, we studied the interaction of MtuDAH7PS with aromatic amino acids that bear the non-natural d-configuration, and showed that the d-amino acids do not elicit an allosteric response. We investigated the binding mode of d-amino acids using X-ray crystallography, site directed mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry. Key differences in the binding mode were identified: in the Phe site, a hydrogen bond between the amino group of the allosteric ligands to the side chain of Asn175 is not established due to the inverted configuration of the ligands. In the Trp site, d-Trp forms no interaction with the main chain carbonyl group of Thr240 and less favourable interactions with Asn237 when compared to the l-Trp binding mode. Investigation of the MtuDAH7PSN175A variant further supports the hypothesis that the lack of key interactions in the binding mode of the aromatic d-amino acids are responsible for the absence of an allosteric response, which gives further insight into which residues of MtuDAH7PS play a key role in the transduction of the allosteric signal. PMID:27128682

  16. Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the broad problems presented by Naturally Occuring Radioactive Materials (NORM). Technologically Enhanced naturally occuring radioactive material includes any radionuclides whose physical, chemical, radiological properties or radionuclide concentration have been altered from their natural state. With regard to NORM in particular, radioactive contamination is radioactive material in an undesired location. This is a concern in a range of industries: petroleum; uranium mining; phosphorus and phosphates; fertilizers; fossil fuels; forestry products; water treatment; metal mining and processing; geothermal energy. The author discusses in more detail the problem in the petroleum industry, including the isotopes of concern, the hazards they present, the contamination which they cause, ways to dispose of contaminated materials, and regulatory issues. He points out there are three key programs to reduce legal exposure and problems due to these contaminants: waste minimization; NORM assesment (surveys); NORM compliance (training).

  17. Insight into the structural mechanism for PKBα allosteric inhibition by molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi-Feng; Cao, Yang; Han, Shuang; Chen, Jian-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an attractive target for the treatment of tumor. Unlike PKB's ATP-competitive inhibitors, its allosteric inhibitors can maintain PKB's inactive state via its binding in a pocket between PH domain and kinase domain, which specifically inhibit PKB by preventing the phosphorylations of Thr308 and Ser473. In the present studies, MD simulations were performed on three allosteric inhibitors with different inhibitory potencies (IC50) to investigate the interaction modes between the inhibitors and PKBα. MM/GB(PB)SA were further applied to calculate the binding free energies of these inhibitors binding to PKBα. The computed binding free energies were consistent with the ranking of their experimental bioactivities. The key residues of PKBα interacting with the allosteric inhibitor were further discussed by analyzing the different interaction modes of these three inhibitors binding to PKBα and by calculating binding free energy contributions of corresponding residues around the binding pocket. The structural requirements were then summarized for the allosteric inhibitor binding to PKBα. A possible structural mechanism of PKBα inhibition induced by the binding of allosteric inhibitor was formulated. The current studies indicate that there should be an optimum balance between the van der Waals and total electrostatic interactions for further designing of PKBα allosteric inhibitors. PMID:24374242

  18. Speech Communication Skills for College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth A.; Melander, Lynn

    This paper defines communication assessment in terms of the four characteristics of communication identified by John Daly, which propose that: (1) communication is interactive and dialogic; (2) communication occurs in real time; (3) communication is inherently contextual; and (4) communication is personal as well as social. The paper then examines…

  19. Roles of the N domain of the AAA+ Lon protease in substrate recognition, allosteric regulation and chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Wohlever, Matthew L; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Degron binding regulates the activities of the AAA+ Lon protease in addition to targeting proteins for degradation. The sul20 degron from the cell-division inhibitor SulA is shown here to bind to the N domain of Escherichia coli Lon, and the recognition site is identified by cross-linking and scanning for mutations that prevent sul20-peptide binding. These N-domain mutations limit the rates of proteolysis of model sul20-tagged substrates and ATP hydrolysis by an allosteric mechanism. Lon inactivation of SulA in vivo requires binding to the N domain and robust ATP hydrolysis but does not require degradation or translocation into the proteolytic chamber. Lon-mediated relief of proteotoxic stress and protein aggregation in vivo can also occur without degradation but is not dependent on robust ATP hydrolysis. In combination, these results demonstrate that Lon can function as a protease or a chaperone and reveal that some of its ATP-dependent biological activities do not require translocation. PMID:24205897

  20. The lactose repressor system: paradigms for regulation, allosteric behavior and protein folding.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C J; Zhan, H; Swint-Kruse, L; Matthews, K S

    2007-01-01

    In 1961, Jacob and Monod proposed the operon model for gene regulation based on metabolism of lactose in Escherichia coli. This proposal was followed by an explication of allosteric behavior by Monod and colleagues. The operon model rationally depicted how genetic mechanisms can control metabolic events in response to environmental stimuli via coordinated transcription of a set of genes with related function (e.g. metabolism of lactose). The allosteric response found in the lactose repressor and many other proteins has been extended to a variety of cellular signaling pathways in all organisms. These two models have shaped our view of modern molecular biology and captivated the attention of a surprisingly broad range of scientists. More recently, the lactose repressor monomer was used as a model system for experimental and theoretical explorations of protein folding mechanisms. Thus, the lac system continues to advance our molecular understanding of genetic control and the relationship between sequence, structure and function. PMID:17103112

  1. Evolution of oligomeric state through allosteric pathways that mimic ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Perica, Tina; Kondo, Yasushi; Tiwari, Sandhya P.; McLaughlin, Stephen H.; Kemplen, Katherine R.; Zhang, Xiuwei; Steward, Annette; Reuter, Nathalie; Clarke, Jane; Teichmann, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolution and design of protein complexes is almost always viewed through the lens of amino acid mutations at protein interfaces. We showed previously that residues not involved in the physical interaction between proteins make important contributions to oligomerisation by acting indirectly or allosterically. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which allosteric mutations act using the example of the PyrR family of pyrimidine operon attenuators. In this family, a perfectly sequence-conserved helix that forms a tetrameric interface is exposed as solvent-accessible surface in dimeric orthologues. This means that mutations must be acting from a distance to destabilize the interface. We identified eleven key mutations controlling oligomeric state, all distant from the interfaces and outside ligand-binding pockets. Finally, we show that the key mutations introduce conformational changes equivalent to the conformational shift between the free versus the nucleotide-bound conformations of the proteins. PMID:25525255

  2. Structural Determinants Defining the Allosteric Inhibition of an Essential Antibiotic Target.

    PubMed

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Desbois, Sebastien; Dogovski, Con; Gorman, Michael A; Ketaren, Natalia E; Paxman, Jason J; Siddiqui, Tanzeela; Zammit, Leanne M; Abbott, Belinda M; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Parker, Michael W; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Hall, Nathan E; Panjikar, Santosh; Perugini, Matthew A

    2016-08-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) catalyzes the first committed step in the lysine biosynthesis pathway of bacteria. The pathway can be regulated by feedback inhibition of DHDPS through the allosteric binding of the end product, lysine. The current dogma states that DHDPS from Gram-negative bacteria are inhibited by lysine but orthologs from Gram-positive species are not. The 1.65-Å resolution structure of the Gram-negative Legionella pneumophila DHDPS and the 1.88-Å resolution structure of the Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae DHDPS bound to lysine, together with comprehensive functional analyses, show that this dogma is incorrect. We subsequently employed our crystallographic data with bioinformatics, mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and microscale thermophoresis to reveal that lysine-mediated inhibition is not defined by Gram staining, but by the presence of a His or Glu at position 56 (Escherichia coli numbering). This study has unveiled the molecular determinants defining lysine-mediated allosteric inhibition of bacterial DHDPS. PMID:27427481

  3. In vivo structure-activity relationship studies support allosteric targeting of a dual specificity phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Korotchenko, Vasiliy N; Saydmohammed, Manush; Vollmer, Laura L; Bakan, Ahmet; Sheetz, Kyle; Debiec, Karl T; Greene, Kristina A; Agliori, Christine S; Bahar, Ivet; Day, Billy W; Vogt, Andreas; Tsang, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) functions as a feedback attenuator of fibroblast growth factor signaling during development. In vitro high throughput chemical screening attempts to discover DUSP6 inhibitors have yielded limited success. However, in vivo whole-organism screens of zebrafish identified compound 1 (BCI) as an allosteric inhibitor of DUSP6. Here we designed and synthesized a panel of analogues to define the structure-activity relationship (SAR) of DUSP6 inhibition. In vivo high-content analysis in transgenic zebrafish, coupled with cell-based chemical complementation assays, identified structural features of the pharmacophore of 1 that were essential for biological activity. In vitro assays of DUSP hyperactivation corroborated the results from in vivo and cellular SAR. The results reinforce the notion that DUSPs are druggable through allosteric mechanisms and illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model organism for in vivo SAR analyses. PMID:24909879

  4. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  6. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Thomas T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  7. Atypical muscarinic allosteric modulation: cooperativity between modulators and their atypical binding topology in muscarinic M2 and M2/M5 chimeric receptors.

    PubMed

    Tränkle, Christian; Dittmann, Andreas; Schulz, Uwe; Weyand, Oliver; Buller, Stefan; Jöhren, Kirstin; Heller, Eberhard; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Ellis, John; Höltje, Hans Dieter; Mohr, Klaus

    2005-12-01

    The binding and function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors can be modulated allosterically. Some allosteric muscarinic ligands are "atypical", having steep concentration-effect curves and not interacting competitively with "typical" allosteric modulators. For atypical agents, a second allosteric site has been proposed. Different approaches have been used to gain further insight into the interaction with M2 receptors of two atypical agents, tacrine and the bispyridinium compound 4,4'-bis-[(2,6-dichloro-benzyloxy-imino)-methyl]-1,1'-propane-1,3-diyl-bispyridinium dibromide (Duo3). Interaction studies, using radioligand binding assays and the allosteric ligands obidoxime, Mg2+, and the new tool hexamethonium to antagonize the allosteric actions of the atypical ligands, showed different modes of interaction for tacrine and Duo3 at M2 receptors. A negatively cooperative interaction was observed between hexamethonium and tacrine (but not Duo3). A tacrine dimer that exhibited increased allosteric potency relative to tacrine but behaved like a typical allosteric modulator was competitively inhibited by hexamethonium. M2/M5-receptor mutants revealed a dependence of tacrine and Duo3 affinity on different receptor epitopes. This was confirmed by docking simulations using a three-dimensional model of the M2 receptor. These showed that the allosteric site could accommodate two molecules of tacrine simultaneously but only one molecule of Duo3, which binds in different mode from typical allosteric agents. Therefore, the atypical actions of tacrine and Duo3 involve different modes of receptor interaction, but their sites of attachment seem to be the "common" allosteric binding domain at the entrance to the orthosteric ligand binding pocket of the M2-receptor. Additional complex behavior may be rationalized by allosteric interactions transmitted within a receptor dimer. PMID:16157694

  8. MHC class II allosteric site drugs: new immunotherapeutics for malignant, infectious and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, M; Li, J; Gulfo, J V; Von Hofe, E; Humphreys, R E

    2001-01-01

    The discovery of the interactions of the 'Ii-Key' segment of the Ii protein with the major histocmpatibility complex (MHC) Class II allosteric site, which is adjacent to the antigenic peptide-binding site, creates therapeutic opportunities by regulating the antigenic peptide binding to MHC class II molecules. The binding of Ii-Key to the MHC class II allosteric site loosens the hold of the MHC Class II 'clamshell' on antigenic peptides and leads to highly efficient antigenic peptide charging to or releasing from the MHC class II antigenic peptide-binding groove. Ii-Key peptide-induced spilling of bound antigenic peptide, or replacement with inert blockers, leads to 'inert immunosuppression'. Highly efficient replacement of ambient with vaccine peptides by Ii-Key permits 'active immunosuppression' for antigen-specific control of autoimmune diseases in the absence of cytokines or adjuvants. On the other hand, active immunization against cancer or infectious disease can result from epitope replacement mediated by Ii-Key and accompanied by cytokines or other adjuvants. Finally, linking the Ii-Key peptide through a simple polymethylene bridge to an antigenic sequence vastly increases the potency of MHC Class II peptide vaccines. In summary, the discovery of the MHC class II allosteric site allows one to increase the efficiency of MHC class II-related, antigenic epitope-specific therapy for malignant, infectious, and autoimmune diseases. The focus of this review is on the mechanism and potential clinical use of such novel allosteric site-directed, Ii-key drugs. PMID:11439146

  9. Asymmetric processing of a substrate protein in sequential allosteric cycles of AAA+ nanomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravats, Andrea N.; Tonddast-Navaei, Sam; Bucher, Ryan J.; Stan, George

    2013-09-01

    Essential protein quality control includes mechanisms of substrate protein (SP) unfolding and translocation performed by powerful ring-shaped AAA+ (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) nanomachines. These SP remodeling actions are effected by mechanical forces imparted by AAA+ loops that protrude into the central channel. Sequential intra-ring allosteric motions, which underlie repetitive SP-loop interactions, have been proposed to comprise clockwise (CW), counterclockwise (CCW), or random (R) conformational transitions of individual AAA+ subunits. To probe the effect of these allosteric mechanisms on unfoldase and translocase functions, we perform Langevin dynamics simulations of a coarse-grained model of an all-alpha SP processed by the single-ring ClpY ATPase or by the double-ring p97 ATPase. We find that, in all three allosteric mechanisms, the SP undergoes conformational transitions along a common set of pathways, which reveals that the active work provided by the ClpY machine involves single loop-SP interactions. Nevertheless, the rates and yields of SP unfolding and translocation are controlled by mechanism-dependent loop-SP binding events, as illustrated by faster timescales of SP processing in CW allostery compared with CCW and R allostery. The distinct efficacy of allosteric mechanisms is due to the asymmetric collaboration of adjacent subunits, which involves CW-biased structural motions of AAA+ loops and results in CW-compatible torque applied onto the SP. Additional simulations of mutant ClpY rings, which render a subset of subunits catalytically-defective or reduce their SP binding affinity, reveal that subunit-based conformational transitions play the major role in SP remodeling. Based on these results we predict that the minimally functional AAA+ ring includes three active subunits, only two of which are adjacent.

  10. Discovery and Development of Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of Glycoprotein Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nataraja, Selvaraj G.; Yu, Henry N.; Palmer, Stephen S.

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein hormones, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are heterodimeric proteins with a common α-subunit and hormone-specific β-subunit. These hormones are dominant regulators of reproduction and metabolic processes. Receptors for the glycoprotein hormones belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. FSH receptor (FSHR) and LH receptor are primarily expressed in somatic cells in ovary and testis to promote egg and sperm production in women and men, respectively. TSH receptor is expressed in thyroid cells and regulates the secretion of T3 and T4. Glycoprotein hormones bind to the large extracellular domain of the receptor and cause a conformational change in the receptor that leads to activation of more than one intracellular signaling pathway. Several small molecules have been described to activate/inhibit glycoprotein hormone receptors through allosteric sites of the receptor. Small molecule allosteric modulators have the potential to be administered orally to patients, thus improving the convenience of treatment. It has been a challenge to develop a small molecule allosteric agonist for glycoprotein hormones that can mimic the agonistic effects of the large natural ligand to activate similar signaling pathways. However, in the past few years, there have been several promising reports describing distinct chemical series with improved potency in preclinical models. In parallel, proposal of new structural model for FSHR and in silico docking studies of small molecule ligands to glycoprotein hormone receptors provide a giant leap on the understanding of the mechanism of action of the natural ligands and new chemical entities on the receptors. This review will focus on the current status of small molecule allosteric modulators of glycoprotein hormone receptors, their effects on common signaling pathways in cells, their utility for clinical application as demonstrated in preclinical models

  11. The apelin receptor inhibits the angiotensin II type 1 receptor via allosteric trans-inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Siddiquee, K; Hampton, J; McAnally, D; May, LT; Smith, LH

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The apelin receptor (APJ) is often co-expressed with the angiotensin II type-1 receptor (AT1) and acts as an endogenous counter-regulator. Apelin antagonizes Ang II signalling, but the precise molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Understanding this interaction may lead to new therapies for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Experimental Approach The physical interaction of APJ and AT1 receptors was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET). Functional and pharmacological interactions were measured by G-protein-dependent signalling and recruitment of β-arrestin. Allosterism and cooperativity between APJ and AT1 were measured by radioligand binding assays. Key Results Apelin, but not Ang II, induced APJ : AT1 heterodimerization forced AT1 into a low-affinity state, reducing Ang II binding. Likewise, apelin mediated a concentration-dependent depression in the maximal production of inositol phosphate (IP1) and β-arrestin recruitment to AT1 in response to Ang II. The signal depression approached a limit, the magnitude of which was governed by the cooperativity indicative of a negative allosteric interaction. Fitting the data to an operational model of allosterism revealed that apelin-mediated heterodimerization significantly reduces Ang II signalling efficacy. These effects were not observed in the absence of apelin. Conclusions and Implications Apelin-dependent heterodimerization between APJ and AT1 causes negative allosteric regulation of AT1 function. As AT1 is significant in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, these findings suggest that impaired apelin and APJ function may be a common underlying aetiology. Linked Article This article is commented on by Goupil et al., pp. 1101–1103 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.12040 PMID:22935142

  12. Allosteric mechanisms within the adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Bonaventura, Jordi; Tomasi, Dardo; Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefanía; Cortés, Antonio; Lluís, Carme; Casadó, Vicent; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-05-01

    The structure constituted by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) homodimer and a G protein provides a main functional unit and oligomeric entities can be viewed as multiples of dimers. For GPCR heteromers, experimental evidence supports a tetrameric structure, comprised of two different homodimers, each able to signal with its preferred G protein. GPCR homomers and heteromers can act as the conduit of allosteric interactions between orthosteric ligands. The well-known agonist/agonist allosteric interaction in the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer, by which A2AR agonists decrease the affinity of D2R agonists, gave the first rationale for the use of A2AR antagonists in Parkinson's disease. We review new pharmacological findings that can be explained in the frame of a tetrameric structure of the A2AR-D2R heteromer: first, ligand-independent allosteric modulations by the D2R that result in changes of the binding properties of A2AR ligands; second, differential modulation of the intrinsic efficacy of D2R ligands for G protein-dependent and independent signaling; third, the canonical antagonistic Gs-Gi interaction within the frame of the heteromer; and fourth, the ability of A2AR antagonists, including caffeine, to also exert the same allosteric modulations of D2R ligands than A2AR agonists, while A2AR agonists and antagonists counteract each other's effects. These findings can have important clinical implications when evaluating the use of A2AR antagonists. They also call for the need of monitoring caffeine intake when evaluating the effect of D2R ligands, when used as therapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders or as probes in imaging studies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26051403

  13. Allosteric stabilization of the amyloid-β peptide hairpin by the fluctuating N-terminal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2016-01-28

    Immobilized ions modulate nearby hydrophobic interactions and influence molecular recognition and self-assembly. We simulated disulfide bond-locked double mutants (L17C/L34C) and observed allosteric modulation of the peptide's intra-molecular interactions by the N-terminal tail. We revealed that the non-contacting charged N-terminal residues help the transfer of entropy to the surrounding solvation shell and stabilizing β-hairpin. PMID:26666686

  14. Reciprocal Allosteric Modulation of Carbon Monoxide and Warfarin Binding to Ferrous Human Serum Heme-Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Bocedi, Alessio; De Sanctis, Giampiero; Ciaccio, Chiara; Tundo, Grazia R.; Di Masi, Alessandra; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P.; Fasano, Mauro; Smulevich, Giulietta; Ascenzi, Paolo; Coletta, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in human plasma, could be considered as a prototypic monomeric allosteric protein, since the ligand-dependent conformational adaptability of HSA spreads beyond the immediate proximity of the binding site(s). As a matter of fact, HSA is a major transport protein in the bloodstream and the regulation of the functional allosteric interrelationships between the different binding sites represents a fundamental information for the knowledge of its transport function. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of the allosteric modulation: (i) of carbon monoxide (CO) binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(II)) by warfarin (WF), and (ii) of WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II) by CO are reported. All data were obtained at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Kinetics of CO and WF binding to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(II), respectively, follows a multi-exponential behavior (with the same relative percentage for the two ligands). This can be accounted for by the existence of multiple conformations and/or heme-protein axial coordination forms of HSA-heme-Fe(II). The HSA-heme-Fe(II) populations have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, indicating the coexistence of different species characterized by four-, five- and six-coordination of the heme-Fe atom. As a whole, these results suggest that: (i) upon CO binding a conformational change of HSA-heme-Fe(II) takes place (likely reflecting the displacement of an endogenous ligand by CO), and (ii) CO and/or WF binding brings about a ligand-dependent variation of the HSA-heme-Fe(II) population distribution of the various coordinating species. The detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis here reported allows a quantitative description of the mutual allosteric effect of CO and WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II). PMID:23555601

  15. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A; Seager, Matthew; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R; Ray, William J

    2009-09-15

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M(1) muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M(1) receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M(1) mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M(1) up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 microM. Furthermore studies in M(1)(-/-) mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M(1) to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M(1) allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces beta-arrestin recruitment to M(1), suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M(1) receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  16. Selective activation of the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor achieved by allosteric potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Seager, Matthew A.; Wittmann, Marion; Jacobson, Marlene; Bickel, Denise; Burno, Maryann; Jones, Keith; Graufelds, Valerie Kuzmick; Xu, Guangping; Pearson, Michelle; McCampbell, Alexander; Gaspar, Renee; Shughrue, Paul; Danziger, Andrew; Regan, Christopher; Flick, Rose; Pascarella, Danette; Garson, Susan; Doran, Scott; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Veng, Lone; Lindsley, Craig W.; Shipe, William; Kuduk, Scott; Sur, Cyrille; Kinney, Gene; Seabrook, Guy R.; Ray, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The forebrain cholinergic system promotes higher brain function in part by signaling through the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR). During Alzheimer's disease (AD), these cholinergic neurons degenerate, therefore selectively activating M1 receptors could improve cognitive function in these patients while avoiding unwanted peripheral responses associated with non-selective muscarinic agonists. We describe here benzyl quinolone carboxylic acid (BQCA), a highly selective allosteric potentiator of the M1 mAChR. BQCA reduces the concentration of ACh required to activate M1 up to 129-fold with an inflection point value of 845 nM. No potentiation, agonism, or antagonism activity on other mAChRs is observed up to 100 μM. Furthermore studies in M1−/− mice demonstrates that BQCA requires M1 to promote inositol phosphate turnover in primary neurons and to increase c-fos and arc RNA expression and ERK phosphorylation in the brain. Radioligand-binding assays, molecular modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicate that BQCA acts at an allosteric site involving residues Y179 and W400. BQCA reverses scopolamine-induced memory deficits in contextual fear conditioning, increases blood flow to the cerebral cortex, and increases wakefulness while reducing delta sleep. In contrast to M1 allosteric agonists, which do not improve memory in scopolamine-challenged mice in contextual fear conditioning, BQCA induces β-arrestin recruitment to M1, suggesting a role for this signal transduction mechanism in the cholinergic modulation of memory. In summary, BQCA exploits an allosteric potentiation mechanism to provide selectivity for the M1 receptor and represents a promising therapeutic strategy for cognitive disorders. PMID:19717450

  17. Allosteric Modulation of SULT2A1 by Celecoxib and Nimesulide: Computational Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Emine Bihter; Struzik, Scott M.; King, Roberta S.

    2010-01-01

    We used protein-ligand docking and minimization to identify celecoxib as an allosteric modulator of SULT2A1-catalyzed estradiol sulfonation. Subsequent to celecoxib docking and complex minimization, conformational changes in SULT2A1 allowed estradiol docking to an alternative binding region with predicted preference for 17β-OH-E2 sulfonation over 3-OH-E2 sulfonation. PMID:19356094

  18. Antiangiogenic Activity of Alofanib, an Allosteric Inhibitor of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Khochenkov, D A; Solomko, E Sch; Peretolchina, N M; Ryabaya, O O; Stepanova, E V

    2015-11-01

    Alofanib is a potential allosteric inhibitor of FGFR2 used in oncology. The inhibitor blocks the extracellular part of the receptor and prevents its binding with the ligand. Alofanib suppressed proliferation of endothelial cells, their migration activity, and ability to form vessellike structures in vitro and significantly decreased the number of microvessels in Matrigel implant and in ovarian cancer (SKOV-3) xenograft in vivo. The results indicate that Alofanib can inhibit angiogenesis. PMID:26597690

  19. Development of Photoactivatable Allosteric Modulators for the Chemokine Receptor CXCR3.

    PubMed

    Admas, Tizita Haimanot; Bernat, Viachaslau; Heinrich, Markus R; Tschammer, Nuska

    2016-03-17

    The CXCR3 receptor, a class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is involved in the regulation and trafficking of various immune cells. CXCR3 antagonists have been proposed to be beneficial for the treatment of a wide range of disorders including but not limited to inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The structure-based design of CXCR3 ligands remains, however, hampered by a lack of structural information describing in detail the interactions between an allosteric ligand and the receptor. We designed and synthesized photoactivatable probes for the structural and functional characterization, using photoaffinity labeling followed by mass spectrometry, of the CXCR3 allosteric binding pocket of AMG 487 and RAMX3, two potent and selective CXCR3 negative allosteric modulators. Photoaffinity labeling is a common approach to elucidate binding modes of small-molecule ligands of GPCRs through the aid of photoactivatable probes that convert to extremely reactive intermediates upon photolysis. The photolabile probe N-[({1-[3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-3,4-dihydropyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-yl]ethyl}-2-[4-fluoro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-N-{1-[4-(3-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzyl}piperidin-4-yl)methyl]acetamide (10) showed significant labeling of the CXCR3 receptor (80 %) in a [(3) H]RAMX3 radioligand displacement assay. Compound 10 will serve as an important tool compound for the detailed investigation of the binding pocket of CXCR3 by mass spectrometry. PMID:26880380

  20. Discovery, synthesis, and molecular pharmacology of selective positive allosteric modulators of the δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Burford, Neil T; Livingston, Kathryn E; Canals, Meritxell; Ryan, Molly R; Budenholzer, Lauren M L; Han, Ying; Shang, Yi; Herbst, John J; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Zhang, Litao; Filizola, Marta; Bassoni, Daniel L; Wehrman, Tom S; Christopoulos, Arthur; Traynor, John R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Alt, Andrew

    2015-05-28

    Allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have a number of potential advantages compared to agonists or antagonists that bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor. These include the potential for receptor selectivity, maintenance of the temporal and spatial fidelity of signaling in vivo, the ceiling effect of the allosteric cooperativity which may prevent overdose issues, and engendering bias by differentially modulating distinct signaling pathways. Here we describe the discovery, synthesis, and molecular pharmacology of δ-opioid receptor-selective positive allosteric modulators (δ PAMs). These δ PAMs increase the affinity and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonists leu-enkephalin, SNC80 and TAN67, as measured by receptor binding, G protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment, adenylyl cyclase inhibition, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activation. As such, these compounds are useful pharmacological tools to probe the molecular pharmacology of the δ receptor and to explore the therapeutic potential of δ PAMs in diseases such as chronic pain and depression. PMID:25901762

  1. Identification of an allosteric binding site for RORγt inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Scheepstra, Marcel; Leysen, Seppe; van Almen, Geert C.; Miller, J. Richard; Piesvaux, Jennifer; Kutilek, Victoria; van Eenennaam, Hans; Zhang, Hongjun; Barr, Kenneth; Nagpal, Sunil; Soisson, Stephen M.; Kornienko, Maria; Wiley, Kristen; Elsen, Nathaniel; Sharma, Sujata; Correll, Craig C.; Trotter, B. Wesley; van der Stelt, Mario; Oubrie, Arthur; Ottmann, Christian; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    RORγt is critical for the differentiation and proliferation of Th17 cells associated with several chronic autoimmune diseases. We report the discovery of a novel allosteric binding site on the nuclear receptor RORγt. Co-crystallization of the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RORγt with a series of small-molecule antagonists demonstrates occupancy of a previously unreported allosteric binding pocket. Binding at this non-canonical site induces an unprecedented conformational reorientation of helix 12 in the RORγt LBD, which blocks cofactor binding. The functional consequence of this allosteric ligand-mediated conformation is inhibition of function as evidenced by both biochemical and cellular studies. RORγt function is thus antagonized in a manner molecularly distinct from that of previously described orthosteric RORγt ligands. This brings forward an approach to target RORγt for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of an unprecedented modality of pharmacological antagonism establishes a mechanism for modulation of nuclear receptors. PMID:26640126

  2. Extracellular allosteric Na(+) binding to the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Karimi, Keyvan; Liu, Chia-chi; Apell, Hans-Jürgen; Rasmussen, Helge H; Clarke, Ronald J

    2013-12-17

    Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements of the current, Ip, produced by the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase across the plasma membrane of rabbit cardiac myocytes show an increase in Ip over the extracellular Na(+) concentration range 0-50 mM. This is not predicted by the classical Albers-Post scheme of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase mechanism, where extracellular Na(+) should act as a competitive inhibitor of extracellular K(+) binding, which is necessary for the stimulation of enzyme dephosphorylation and the pumping of K(+) ions into the cytoplasm. The increase in Ip is consistent with Na(+) binding to an extracellular allosteric site, independent of the ion transport sites, and an increase in turnover via an acceleration of the rate-determining release of K(+) to the cytoplasm, E2(K(+))2 → E1 + 2K(+). At normal physiological concentrations of extracellular Na(+) of 140 mM, it is to be expected that binding of Na(+) to the allosteric site would be nearly saturated. Its purpose would seem to be simply to optimize the enzyme's ion pumping rate under its normal physiological conditions. Based on published crystal structures, a possible location of the allosteric site is within a cleft between the α- and β-subunits of the enzyme. PMID:24359741

  3. Allosteric modulation of the muscarinic M4 receptor as an approach to treating schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chan, W Y; McKinzie, D L; Bose, S; Mitchell, S N; Witkin, J M; Thompson, R C; Christopoulos, A; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J M; Bymaster, F P; Felder, C C

    2008-08-01

    Current antipsychotics provide symptomatic relief for patients suffering from schizophrenia and related psychoses; however, their effectiveness is variable and many patients discontinue treatment due to side effects. Although the etiology of schizophrenia is still unclear, a leading hypothesis implicates an imbalanced dopaminergic system. Muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptors regulate dopamine levels in key areas of the brain involved in psychosis, with the M(4) subtype emerging as a key regulator of dopaminergic hyperactivity. Unfortunately, no selective small molecule tools exist to provide pharmacological validation of this hypothesis. Here, we describe the discovery of a small molecule modulator, LY2033298, that is highly selective for human M(4) receptors by virtue of targeting an allosteric site on this receptor. Pharmacological assays confirmed the selectivity of LY2033298 for the M(4) receptor and revealed the highest degree of positive allosteric enhancement of ACh potency thus far identified. Radioligand binding assays also show this compound to directly potentiate agonist binding while having minimal effects on antagonist binding. Mutational analysis identified a key amino acid (D(432)) in the third extracellular loop of the human M(4) receptor to be critical for selectivity and agonist potentiation by LY2033298. Importantly, LY2033298 was active in animal models predictive of clinical antipsychotic drug efficacy indicating its potential use as a first-in-class, selective, allosteric muscarinic antipsychotic agent. PMID:18678919

  4. Geometrical Membrane Curvature as an Allosteric Regulator of Membrane Protein Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Tonnesen, Asger; Christensen, Sune M.; Tkach, Vadym; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane proteins are embedded in cellular membranes of varied lipid composition and geometrical curvature. Here, we studied for the first time the allosteric effect of geometrical membrane curvature on transmembrane protein structure and function. We used single-channel optical analysis of the prototypic transmembrane β-barrel α-hemolysin (α-HL) reconstituted on immobilized single small unilamellar liposomes of different diameter and therefore curvature. Our data demonstrate that physiologically abundant geometrical membrane curvatures can enforce a dramatic allosteric regulation (1000-fold inhibition) of α-HL permeability. High membrane curvatures (1/diameter ∼1/40 nm−1) compressed the effective pore diameter of α-HL from 14.2 ± 0.8 Å to 11.4 ± 0.6 Å. This reduction in effective pore area (∼40%) when combined with the area compressibility of α-HL revealed an effective membrane tension of ∼50 mN/m and a curvature-imposed protein deformation energy of ∼7 kBT. Such substantial energies have been shown to conformationally activate, or unfold, β-barrel and α-helical transmembrane proteins, suggesting that membrane curvature could likely regulate allosterically the structure and function of transmembrane proteins in general. PMID:24411252

  5. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site

    PubMed Central

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T.; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I. M.; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  6. Allosteric activation of the Par-6 PDZ via a partial unfolding transition

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Dustin S.; Peterson, Francis C.; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exist in a delicate balance between the native and unfolded states, where thermodynamic stability may be sacrificed to attain the flexibility required for efficient catalysis, binding or allosteric control. Par-6 regulates the Par polarity complex by transmitting a GTPase signal through the CRIB-PDZ module that alters PDZ lig-and binding. Allosteric activation of the PDZ is achieved by local rearrangement of the L164 and K165 side chains to stabilize the interdomain CRIB-PDZ interface and reposition a conserved element of the ligand binding pocket. However, microsecond to millisecond dynamics measurements revealed that L164/K165 exchange requires a larger rearrangement than expected. The margin of thermodynamic stability for the PDZ domain is modest (~3 kcal/mol) and further reduced by transient interactions with the disordered CRIB domain. Measurements of local structural stability revealed that tertiary contacts within the PDZ are disrupted by a partial unfolding transition that enables interconversion of the L/K switch. The unexpected participation of partial PDZ unfolding in the allosteric mechanism of Par-6 suggests that native-state unfolding may be essential for the function of other marginally stable proteins. PMID:23705660

  7. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes

    PubMed Central

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins—protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor—translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  8. Peptide- and proton-driven allosteric clamps catalyze anthrax toxin translocation across membranes.

    PubMed

    Das, Debasis; Krantz, Bryan A

    2016-08-23

    Anthrax toxin is an intracellularly acting toxin in which sufficient information is available regarding the structure of its transmembrane channel, allowing for detailed investigation of models of translocation. Anthrax toxin, comprising three proteins-protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF), and edema factor-translocates large proteins across membranes. Here we show that the PA translocase channel has a transport function in which its catalytic active sites operate allosterically. We find that the phenylalanine clamp (ϕ-clamp), the known conductance bottleneck in the PA translocase, gates as either a more closed state or a more dilated state. Thermodynamically, the two channel states have >300-fold different binding affinities for an LF-derived peptide. The change in clamp thermodynamics requires distant α-clamp and ϕ-clamp sites. Clamp allostery and translocation are more optimal for LF peptides with uniform stereochemistry, where the least allosteric and least efficiently translocated peptide had a mixed stereochemistry. Overall, the kinetic results are in less agreement with an extended-chain Brownian ratchet model but, instead, are more consistent with an allosteric helix-compression model that is dependent also on substrate peptide coil-to-helix/helix-to-coil cooperativity. PMID:27506790

  9. Selective small molecule inhibitor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase reveals an allosteric regulatory site.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, Monica; Fischer, Gerhard; Mott, Bryan T; Yasgar, Adam; Hyvönen, Marko; Boshoff, Helena I M; Abell, Chris; Barry, Clifton E; Thomas, Craig J

    2016-07-01

    Enzymes in essential metabolic pathways are attractive targets for the treatment of bacterial diseases, but in many cases, the presence of homologous human enzymes makes them impractical candidates for drug development. Fumarate hydratase, an essential enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, has been identified as one such potential therapeutic target in tuberculosis. We report the discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor, to our knowledge, of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis fumarate hydratase. A crystal structure at 2.0-Å resolution of the compound in complex with the protein establishes the existence of a previously unidentified allosteric regulatory site. This allosteric site allows for selective inhibition with respect to the homologous human enzyme. We observe a unique binding mode in which two inhibitor molecules interact within the allosteric site, driving significant conformational changes that preclude simultaneous substrate and inhibitor binding. Our results demonstrate the selective inhibition of a highly conserved metabolic enzyme that contains identical active site residues in both the host and the pathogen. PMID:27325754

  10. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E.; Leonidas, Demetres D.; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G.

    2007-01-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b–FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 Å resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45′ (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  11. FR258900, a potential anti-hyperglycemic drug, binds at the allosteric site of glycogen phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Tiraidis, Costas; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Gimisis, Thanasis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-08-01

    FR258900 has been discovered as a novel inhibitor of human liver glycogen phosphorylase a and proved to suppress hepatic glycogen breakdown and reduce plasma glucose concentrations in diabetic mice models. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the cocrystallized rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase b-FR258900 complex and refined it to 2.2 A resolution. The structure demonstrates that the inhibitor binds at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. The contacts from FR258900 to glycogen phosphorylase are dominated by nonpolar van der Waals interactions with Gln71, Gln72, Phe196, and Val45' (from the symmetry-related subunit), and also by ionic interactions from the carboxylate groups to the three arginine residues (Arg242, Arg309, and Arg310) that form the allosteric phosphate-recognition subsite. The binding of FR258900 to the protein promotes conformational changes that stabilize an inactive T-state quaternary conformation of the enzyme. The ligand-binding mode is different from those of the potent phenoxy-phthalate and acyl urea inhibitors, previously described, illustrating the broad specificity of the allosteric site. PMID:17600143

  12. Behavior change communication strategies.

    PubMed

    Aggleton, P

    1997-04-01

    Appropriate and effective communication is central to the success of interventions to reduce the risk of HIV infection. This paper reviews what has been learned about the nature of communication in the behavior change process. It examines the contexts in which communication occurs, as well as the contribution of communication theory, social marketing theory, and structural intervention theory to intervention development. Guidance is offered on the most appropriate ways in which to communicate with different groups and audiences, and future priorities for research and intervention are identified. PMID:9167797

  13. 5-Chloroindole: a potent allosteric modulator of the 5-HT3 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Amy S; Batis, Nikolaos; Grafton, Gillian; Caputo, Francesca; Brady, Catherine A; Lambert, Jeremy J; Peters, John A; Gordon, John; Brain, Keith L; Powell, Andrew D; Barnes, Nicholas M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is modulated allosterically by various compounds including colchicine, alcohols and volatile anaesthetics. However the positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) identified to date have low affinity, which hinders investigation because of non-selective effects at pharmacologically active concentrations. The present study identifies 5-chloroindole (Cl-indole) as a potent PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor. Experimental Approach 5-HT3 receptor function was assessed by the increase in intracellular calcium and single-cell electrophysiological recordings in HEK293 cells stably expressing the h5-HT3A receptor and also the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor that increases neuronal contraction of bladder smooth muscle. Key Results Cl-indole (1–100 μM) potentiated agonist (5-HT) and particularly partial agonist [(S)-zacopride, DDP733, RR210, quipazine, dopamine, 2-methyl-5-HT, SR57227A, meta chlorophenyl biguanide] induced h5-HT3A receptor-mediated responses. This effect of Cl-indole was also apparent at the mouse native 5-HT3 receptor. Radioligand-binding studies identified that Cl-indole induced a small (∼twofold) increase in the apparent affinity of 5-HT for the h5-HT3A receptor, whereas there was no effect upon the affinity of the antagonist, tropisetron. Cl-indole was able to reactivate desensitized 5-HT3 receptors. In contrast to its effect on the 5-HT3 receptor, Cl-indole did not alter human nicotinic α7 receptor responses. Conclusions and Implications The present study identifies Cl-indole as a relatively potent and selective PAM of the 5-HT3 receptor; such compounds will aid investigation of the molecular basis for allosteric modulation of the 5-HT3 receptor and may assist the discovery of novel therapeutic drugs targeting this receptor. Linked Articles Recent reviews on allosteric modulation can be found at: Kenakin, T (2013). New concepts in pharmacological efficacy at 7TM receptors: IUPHAR Review 2

  14. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  15. Allosteric interactions between the antagonist prazosin and amiloride analogs at the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Leppik, R A; Mynett, A; Lazareno, S; Birdsall, N J

    2000-03-01

    It has been demonstrated previously that amilorides can interact with a well defined allosteric site on the human alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. In this study, the question was explored as to whether the human alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor also possesses an equivalent allosteric site. The six amilorides examined strongly increased the dissociation rate of the antagonist [(3)H]prazosin from the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. With the parent amiloride, the dissociation data were well fitted by an equation derived from the ternary complex allosteric model, compatible with amiloride acting at a defined allosteric site on the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor. In contrast, the dissociation data for [(3)H]prazosin in the presence of the amiloride analogs were not compatible with the equation derived from a one-allosteric-site model, but could be fitted well by an equation derived from a two-allosteric-site model. However, certain individual parameters could not be resolved. The observed dissociation rate constants increased steeply with increasing amiloride analog concentration, and in some cases the data could be fitted with a logistic equation. The slope factors calculated from such fits were 1.2 to 2.1. It is concluded that the structure-binding relationships of the amilorides at the alpha(1A)- and alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors are different. The interactions of the five amiloride analogs, but not the parent amiloride, with the alpha(1A)-adrenergic receptor are compatible with the presence of two (but not one) allosteric sites, and is thus more complex than that found for the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor. PMID:10692482

  16. Modeling the Contribution of Allosteric Regulation for Flux Control in the Central Carbon Metabolism of E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel; Herrgård, Markus J.; Rocha, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cellular metabolism is fundamental for many biotechnological applications, including drug discovery and rational cell factory design. Central carbon metabolism (CCM) is particularly important as it provides the energy and precursors for other biological processes. However, the complex regulation of CCM pathways has still not been fully unraveled and recent studies have shown that CCM is mostly regulated at post-transcriptional levels. In order to better understand the role of allosteric regulation in controlling the metabolic phenotype, we expand the reconstruction of CCM in Escherichia coli with allosteric interactions obtained from relevant databases. This model is used to integrate multi-omics datasets and analyze the coordinated changes in enzyme, metabolite, and flux levels between multiple experimental conditions. We observe cases where allosteric interactions have a major contribution to the metabolic flux changes. Inspired by these results, we develop a constraint-based method (arFBA) for simulation of metabolic flux distributions that accounts for allosteric interactions. This method can be used for systematic prediction of potential allosteric regulation under the given experimental conditions based on experimental data. We show that arFBA allows predicting coordinated flux changes that would not be predicted without considering allosteric regulation. The results reveal the importance of key regulatory metabolites, such as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, in controlling the metabolic flux. Accounting for allosteric interactions in metabolic reconstructions reveals a hidden topology in metabolic networks, improving our understanding of cellular metabolism and fostering the development of novel simulation methods that account for this type of regulation. PMID:26501058

  17. Detecting change as it occurs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radok, Uwe; Brown, Timothy J.

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally climate changes have been detected from long series of observations and long after they have happened. Our 'inverse sequential' procedure, for detecting change as soon as it occurs, describes the existing or most recent data by their frequency distribution. Its parameter(s) are estimated both from the existing set of observations and from the same set augmented by 1,2,....j new observations. Individual-value probability products ('likelihoods') are used to form ratios which yield two probabilities for erroneously accepting the existing parameter(s) as valid for the augmented data set, and vice versa. A genuine parameter change is signaled when these probabilities (or a more stable compound probability) show a progressive decrease. New parameter values can then be estimated from the new observations alone using standard statistical techniques. The inverse sequential procedure will be illustrated for global annual mean temperatures (assumed normally distributed), and for annual numbers of North Atlantic hurricanes (assumed to represent Poisson distributions). The procedure was developed, but not yet tested, for linear or exponential trends, and for chi-squared means or degrees of freedom, a special measure of autocorrelation.

  18. mGlu2 Receptor Agonism, but Not Positive Allosteric Modulation, Elicits Rapid Tolerance towards Their Primary Efficacy on Sleep Measures in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahnaou, Abdallah; Lavreysen, Hilde; Tresadern, Gary; Cid, Jose M.; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H.

    2015-01-01

    homeostatic recovery sleep. From the translational perspective, the present rodent findings suggest that mGluR2 positive allosteric modulation has therapeutic potential based on its superior long term efficacy over agonists in psychiatric disorders, particularly of those commonly occurring with REM sleep overdrive. PMID:26658273

  19. AIM for Allostery: Using the Ising Model to Understand Information Processing and Transmission in Allosteric Biomolecular Systems

    PubMed Central

    LeVine, Michael V.; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    In performing their biological functions, molecular machines must process and transmit information with high fidelity. Information transmission requires dynamic coupling between the conformations of discrete structural components within the protein positioned far from one another on the molecular scale. This type of biomolecular “action at a distance” is termed allostery. Although allostery is ubiquitous in biological regulation and signal transduction, its treatment in theoretical models has mostly eschewed quantitative descriptions involving the system's underlying structural components and their interactions. Here, we show how Ising models can be used to formulate an approach to allostery in a structural context of interactions between the constitutive components by building simple allosteric constructs we termed Allosteric Ising Models (AIMs). We introduce the use of AIMs in analytical and numerical calculations that relate thermodynamic descriptions of allostery to the structural context, and then show that many fundamental properties of allostery, such as the multiplicative property of parallel allosteric channels, are revealed from the analysis of such models. The power of exploring mechanistic structural models of allosteric function in more complex systems by using AIMs is demonstrated by building a model of allosteric signaling for an experimentally well-characterized asymmetric homodimer of the dopamine D2 receptor. PMID:26594108

  20. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1. PMID:26887338

  1. Investigation of allosteric modulation mechanism of metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 by molecular dynamics simulations, free energy and weak interaction analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Qifeng; Yao, Xiaojun

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGlu1), which belongs to class C G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), can be coupled with G protein to transfer extracellular signal by dimerization and allosteric regulation. Unraveling the dimer packing and allosteric mechanism can be of great help for understanding specific regulatory mechanism and designing more potential negative allosteric modulator (NAM). Here, we report molecular dynamics simulation studies of the modulation mechanism of FITM on the wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1 through weak interaction analysis and free energy calculation. The weak interaction analysis demonstrates that van der Waals (vdW) and hydrogen bonding play an important role on the dimer packing between six cholesterol molecules and mGlu1 as well as the interaction between allosteric sites T815, Y805 and FITM in wild type, T815M and Y805A mutants of mGlu1. Besides, the results of free energy calculations indicate that secondary binding pocket is mainly formed by the residues Thr748, Cys746, Lys811 and Ser735 except for FITM-bound pocket in crystal structure. Our results can not only reveal the dimer packing and allosteric regulation mechanism, but also can supply useful information for the design of potential NAM of mGlu1.

  2. Optimization of Chemical Functionalities of Indole-2-carboxamides To Improve Allosteric Parameters for the Cannabinoid Receptor 1 (CB1)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    5-Chloro-3-ethyl-N-(4-(piperidin-1-yl)phenethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (1; ORG27569) is a prototypical allosteric modulator for the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1). Here, we reveal key structural requirements of indole-2-carboxamides for allosteric modulation of CB1: a critical chain length at the C3-position, an electron withdrawing group at the C5-position, the length of the linker between the amide bond and the phenyl ring B, and the amino substituent on the phenyl ring B. These significantly impact the binding affinity (KB) and the binding cooperativity (α). A potent CB1 allosteric modulator 5-chloro-N-(4-(dimethylamino)phenethyl)-3-propyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (12d) was identified. It exhibited a KB of 259.3 nM with a strikingly high binding α of 24.5. We also identified 5-chloro-N-(4-(dimethylamino)phenethyl)-3-hexyl-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (12f) with a KB of 89.1 nM, which is among the lowest KB values obtained for any allosteric modulator of CB1. These positive allosteric modulators of orthosteric agonist binding nonetheless antagonized the agonist-induced G-protein coupling to the CB1 receptor, yet induced β-arrestin mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. PMID:24635495

  3. Investigation of the Roles of Allosteric Domain Arginine, Aspartate, and Glutamate Residues of Rhizobium etli Pyruvate Carboxylase in Relation to Its Activation by Acetyl CoA.

    PubMed

    Sirithanakorn, Chaiyos; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Attwood, Paul V

    2016-08-01

    The mechanism of allosteric activation of pyruvate carboxylase by acetyl CoA is not fully understood. Here we have examined the roles of residues near the acetyl CoA binding site in the allosteric activation of Rhizobium etli pyruvate carboxylase using site-directed mutagenesis. Arg429 was found to be especially important for acetyl CoA binding as substitution with serine resulted in a 100-fold increase in the Ka of acetyl CoA activation and a large decrease in the cooperativity of this activation. Asp420 and Arg424, which do not make direct contact with bound acetyl CoA, were nonetheless found to affect acetyl CoA binding when mutated, probably through changed interactions with another acetyl CoA binding residue, Arg427. Thermodynamic activation parameters for the pyruvate carboxylation reaction were determined from modified Arrhenius plots and showed that acetyl CoA acts to decrease the activation free energy of the reaction by both increasing the activation entropy and decreasing the activation enthalpy. Most importantly, mutations of Asp420, Arg424, and Arg429 enhanced the activity of the enzyme in the absence of acetyl CoA. A main focus of this work was the detailed investigation of how this increase in activity occurred in the R424S mutant. This mutation decreased the activation enthalpy of the pyruvate carboxylation reaction by an amount consistent with removal of a single hydrogen bond. It is postulated that Arg424 forms a hydrogen bonding interaction with another residue that stabilizes the asymmetrical conformation of the R. etli pyruvate carboxylase tetramer, constraining its interconversion to the symmetrical conformer that is required for catalysis. PMID:27379711

  4. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 allosteric potentiators prevent sodium lactate-induced panic-like response in panic-vulnerable rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; Engleman, Eric A; Svensson, Kjell A; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-01-01

    Rats with chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis by infusion of l-allyglycine, a glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor, into their dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus are anxious and exhibit panic-like cardio-respiratory responses to treatment with intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate (NaLac) infusions, in a manner similar to what occurs in patients with panic disorder. We previously showed that either NMDA receptor antagonists or metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2/3 receptor agonists can block such a NaLac response, suggesting that a glutamate mechanism is contributing to this panic-like state. Using this animal model of panic, we tested the efficacy of CBiPES and THIIC, which are selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators (at 10–30mg/kg i.p.), in preventing NaLac-induced panic-like behavioral and cardiovascular responses. The positive control was alprazolam (3mg/kg i.p.), a clinically effective anti-panic benzodiazepine. As predicted, panic-prone rats given a NaLac challenge displayed NaLac-induced panic-like cardiovascular (i.e. tachycardia and hypertensive) responses and “anxiety” (i.e. decreased social interaction time) and “flight” (i.e. increased locomotion) -associated behaviors; however, systemic injection of the panic-prone rats with CBiPES, THIIC or alprazolam prior to the NaLac dose blocked all NaLac-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses. These data suggested that in a rat animal model, selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators show an anti-panic efficacy similar to alprazolam. PMID:22914798

  5. The Five-To-Six-Coordination Transition of Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin Is Allosterically-Modulated by Ibuprofen and Warfarin: A Combined XAS and MD Study

    PubMed Central

    Bionducci, Monica; Fanali, Gabriella; Meli, Massimiliano; Colombo, Giorgio; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo; Mobilio, Settimio

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is involved physiologically in heme scavenging; in turn, heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen and warfarin on the local atomic structure around the ferric heme-Fe (heme-Fe(III)) atom of HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been probed by Fe-K edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The quantitative analysis of the Fe-K edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) signals and modeling of the near edge (XANES) spectral features demonstrated that warfarin and ibuprofen binding modify the local structure of the heme-Fe(III). Combined XAS data analysis and targeted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provided atomic resolution insights of protein structural rearrangements required to accommodate the heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. In the absence of drugs, the heme-Fe(III) atom is penta-coordinated having distorted 4+1 configuration made by the nitrogen atoms of the porphyrin ring and the oxygen phenoxy atom of the Tyr161 residue. MD simulations show that ibuprofen and warfarin association to the secondary fatty acid (FA) binding site 2 (FA2) induces a reorientation of domain I of HSA-heme-Fe(III), this leads to the redirection of the His146 residue providing an additional bond to the heme-Fe(III) atom, providing the 5+1 configuration. The comparison of Fe-K edge XANES spectra calculated using MD structures with those obtained experimentally confirms the reliability of the proposed structural model. As a whole, combining XAS and MD simulations it has been possible to provide a reliable model of the heme-Fe(III) atom coordination state and to understand the complex allosteric transition occurring in HSA-heme-Fe(III) upon ibuprofen and warfarin binding. PMID:25153171

  6. Synthesis and biological evaluation of indole-2-carboxamides bearing photoactivatable functionalities as novel allosteric modulators for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chang-Jiang; Ali, Hamed I; Ahn, Kwang H; Kolluru, Srikanth; Kendall, Debra A; Lu, Dai

    2016-10-01

    5-Chloro-3-ethyl-N-(4-(piperidin-1-yl)phenethyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamide (ORG27569, 1) is a prototypical allosteric modulator for the cannabinoid CB1 receptor. Based on this indole-2-carboxamide scaffold, we designed and synthesized novel CB1 allosteric modulators that possess photoactivatable functionalities, which include benzophenone, phenyl azide, aliphatic azide and phenyltrifluoromethyldiazrine. To assess their allosteric effects, the dissociation constant (KB) and allosteric binding cooperativity factor (α) were determined and compared to their parent compounds. Within this series, benzophenone-containing compounds 26 and 27, phenylazide-containing compound 28, and the aliphatic azide containing compound 36b showed allosteric binding parameters (KB and α) comparable to their parent compound 1, 7, 8, and 9, respectively. We further assessed these modulators for their impact on G-protein coupling activity. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited negative allosteric modulator properties in a manner similar to their parent compounds, which antagonize agonist-induced G-protein coupling. These novel CB1 allosteric modulators, possessing photoactivatable functionalities, provide valuable tools for future photo-affinity labeling and mapping the CB1 allosteric binding site(s). PMID:27318976

  7. 12 CFR 133.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 133.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  8. 12 CFR 533.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 533.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  9. 12 CFR 533.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 533.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  10. 12 CFR 390.162 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Agreements § 390.162 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is any of... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  11. 12 CFR 390.162 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Agreements § 390.162 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is any of... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  12. 12 CFR 390.162 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements § 390.162 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is any of... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  13. 12 CFR 133.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 133.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  14. 12 CFR 133.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 133.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  15. 12 CFR 533.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 533.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  16. 12 CFR 533.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-RELATED AGREEMENTS § 533.3 CRA communications. (a) Definition of CRA communication. A CRA communication is... with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the agreement....

  17. Communication Graph Generator for Parallel Programs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-04-08

    Graphator is a collection of relatively simple sequential programs that generate communication graphs/matrices for commonly occurring patterns in parallel programs. Currently, there is support for five communication patterns: two-dimensional 4-point stencil, four-dimensional 8-point stencil, all-to-alls over sub-communicators, random near-neighbor communication, and near-neighbor communication.

  18. Targeting the Akt1 allosteric site to identify novel scaffolds through virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Oya Gursoy; Olmez, Elif Ozkirimli; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2014-02-01

    Preclinical data and tumor specimen studies report that AKT kinases are related to many human cancers. Therefore, identification and development of small molecule inhibitors targeting AKT and its signaling pathway can be therapeutic in treatment of cancer. Numerous studies report inhibitors that target the ATP-binding pocket in the kinase domains, but the similarity of this site, within the kinase family makes selectivity a major problem. The sequence identity amongst PH domains is significantly lower than that in kinase domains and developing more selective inhibitors is possible if PH domain is targeted. This in silico screening study is the first time report toward the identification of potential allosteric inhibitors expected to bind the cavity between kinase and PH domains of Akt1. Structural information of Akt1 was used to develop structure-based pharmacophore models comprising hydrophobic, acceptor, donor and ring features. The 3D structural information of previously identified allosteric Akt inhibitors obtained from literature was employed to develop a ligand-based pharmacophore model. Database was generated with drug like subset of ZINC and screening was performed based on 3D similarity to the selected pharmacophore hypotheses. Binding modes and affinities of the ligands were predicted by Glide software. Top scoring hits were further analyzed considering 2D similarity between the compounds, interactions with Akt1, fitness to pharmacophore models, ADME, druglikeness criteria and Induced-Fit docking. Using virtual screening methodologies, derivatives of 3-methyl-xanthine, quinoline-4-carboxamide and 2-[4-(cyclohexa-1,3-dien-1-yl)-1H-pyrazol-3-yl]phenol were proposed as potential leads for allosteric inhibition of Akt1. PMID:24291487

  19. A negative allosteric modulator modulates GABAB-receptor signalling through GB2 subunits.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Chen, Linhai; Liu, Lei; Xia, Zhixiong; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Nan, Fajun; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-15

    An γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB)-receptor mediates slow and prolonged synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system, which represents an interesting target for the treatment of various diseases and disorders of the central nervous system. To date, only one activator of the GABAB-receptor, baclofen, is on the market for the treatment of spasticity. Inhibitors of the GABAB-receptor, such as antagonists, show anti-absence seizure activity and pro-cognitive properties. In a search for allosteric compounds of the GABAB-receptor, although several positive allosteric modulators have been developed, it is only recently that the first negative allosteric modulator (NAM), CLH304a (also named Compound 14), has been reported. In the present study, we provide further information on the mechanism of action of CLH304a, and also show the possibility of designing more NAMs, such as CLH391 and CLH393, based on the structure of CLH304a. First we show that CLH304a inhibits native GABAB-receptor activity in cultured cerebellar granular neurons. We then show that CLH304a has inverse agonist properties and non-competitively inhibits the effect of agonists, indicating that it binds at a different site to GABA. The GABAB-receptor is a mandatory heterodimer made of GB1 subunits, in which agonists bind, and GB2 subunits, which activate G-proteins. By using various combinations made up of wild-type and/or mutated GB1 and GB2 subunits, we show that CLH304a acts on the heptahelical domain of GB2 subunits. These data revealed the possibility of designing innovative NAMs acting in the heptahelical domain of the GB2 subunits, offering novel possibilities for therapeutic intervention based on GABAB-receptor inhibition. PMID:26772870

  20. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  1. Activation of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors via an allosteric transmembrane site.

    PubMed

    Lansdell, Stuart J; Sathyaprakash, Chaitra; Doward, Anne; Millar, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    In common with other members of the Cys-loop family of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are activated by the binding of a neurotransmitter to an extracellular orthosteric site, located at the interface of two adjacent receptor subunits. In addition, a variety of compounds have been identified that modulate agonist-evoked responses of 5-HT3Rs, and other Cys-loop receptors, by binding to distinct allosteric sites. In this study, we examined the pharmacological effects of a group of monoterpene compounds on recombinant 5-HT3Rs expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Two phenolic monoterpenes (carvacrol and thymol) display allosteric agonist activity on human homomeric 5-HT3ARs (64 ± 7% and 80 ± 4% of the maximum response evoked by the endogenous orthosteric agonist 5-HT, respectively). In addition, at lower concentrations, where agonist effects are less apparent, carvacrol and thymol act as potentiators of responses evoked by submaximal concentrations of 5-HT. By contrast, carvacrol and thymol have no agonist or potentiating activity on the closely related mouse 5-HT3ARs. Using subunit chimeras containing regions of the human and mouse 5-HT3A subunits, and by use of site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified transmembrane amino acids that either abolish the agonist activity of carvacrol and thymol on human 5-HT3ARs or are able to confer this property on mouse 5-HT3ARs. By contrast, these mutations have no significant effect on orthosteric activation of 5-HT3ARs by 5-HT. We conclude that 5-HT3ARs can be activated by the binding of ligands to an allosteric transmembrane site, a conclusion that is supported by computer docking studies. PMID:25338672

  2. ATP-independent CFTR channel gating and allosteric modulation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Wu, Jianping; Bernard, Karen; Li, Ge; Wang, Guangyu; Bevensee, Mark O.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter. CFTR gating is linked to ATP binding and dimerization of its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Channel activation also requires phosphorylation of the R domain by poorly understood mechanisms. Unlike conventional ligand-gated channels, CFTR is an ATPase for which ligand (ATP) release typically involves nucleotide hydrolysis. The extent to which CFTR gating conforms to classic allosteric schemes of ligand activation is unclear. Here, we describe point mutations in the CFTR cytosolic loops that markedly increase ATP-independent (constitutive) channel activity. This finding is consistent with an allosteric gating mechanism in which ligand shifts the equilibrium between inactive and active states but is not essential for channel opening. Constitutive mutations mapped to the putative symmetry axis of CFTR based on the crystal structures of related ABC transporters, a common theme for activating mutations in ligand-gated channels. Furthermore, the ATP sensitivity of channel activation was strongly enhanced by these constitutive mutations, as predicted for an allosteric mechanism (reciprocity between protein activation and ligand occupancy). Introducing constitutive mutations into CFTR channels that cannot open in response to ATP (i.e., the G551D CF mutant and an NBD2-deletion mutant) substantially rescued their activities. Importantly, constitutive mutants that opened without ATP or NBD2 still required R domain phosphorylation for optimal activity. Our results confirm that (i) CFTR gating exhibits features of protein allostery that are shared with conventional ligand-gated channels and (ii) the R domain modulates CFTR activity independent of ATP-induced NBD dimerization. PMID:20133716

  3. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). PMID:26031312

  4. Behavioral effects of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor allosteric modulator ORG27569 in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuanyuan; Qiu, Yanyan; Jing, Li; Thorn, David A; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2014-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor system is involved in feeding behaviors and the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A is an effective antiobesity drug. However, SR141716A also has serious side effects, which prompted the exploration of alternative strategies to modulate this important drug target. Recently a CB1 receptor allosteric modulating site has been discovered and the allosteric modulating activity of several modulators including ORG27569 has been characterized in vitro. Yet, little is known of the in vivo pharmacological effects of ORG27569. This study examined the behavioral pharmacology of ORG27569 in rats. ORG27569 (3.2–10 mg/kg, i.p.) selectively attenuated the hypothermic effects of CB1 receptor agonists CP55940 (0.1–1 mg/kg) and anandamide (3.2–32 mg/kg). In contrast, SR141716A only attenuated the hypothermic effects of CP55940 but not anandamide. SR141716A but not ORG27569 blocked CP55940-induced catalepsy and antinociception. In addition, ORG27569 did not modify SR141716A-elicited grooming and scratching behaviors. In feeding studies, ORG27569 decreased palatable and plain food intake which was partially blocked by CP55940. The hypophagic effect of ORG27569 developed tolerance after 4 days of daily 5.6 mg/kg treatment; however, the effect on body weight gain outlasted the drug treatment for 10 days. These data suggest that ORG27569 may not function as a CB1 receptor allosteric modulator in vivo, although its hypophagic activity still has potential therapeutic utility. PMID:25431655

  5. Positive allosteric modulators of the μ-opioid receptor: a novel approach for future pain medications

    PubMed Central

    Burford, N T; Traynor, J R; Alt, A

    2015-01-01

    Morphine and other agonists of the μ-opioid receptor are used clinically for acute and chronic pain relief and are considered to be the gold standard for pain medication. However, these opioids also have significant side effects, which are also mediated via activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Since the latter half of the twentieth century, researchers have sought to tease apart the mechanisms underlying analgesia, tolerance and dependence, with the hope of designing drugs with fewer side effects. These efforts have revolved around the design of orthosteric agonists with differing pharmacokinetic properties and/or selectivity profiles for the different opioid receptor types. Recently, μ-opioid receptor-positive allosteric modulators (μ-PAMs) were identified, which bind to a (allosteric) site on the μ-opioid receptor separate from the orthosteric site that binds an endogenous agonist. These allosteric modulators have little or no detectable functional activity when bound to the receptor in the absence of orthosteric agonist, but can potentiate the activity of bound orthosteric agonist, seen as an increase in apparent potency and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonist. In this review, we describe the potential advantages that a μ-PAM approach might bring to the design of novel therapeutics for pain that may lack the side effects currently associated with opioid therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24460691

  6. Nucleation of an Allosteric Response via Ligand-induced Loop Folding

    PubMed Central

    Naganathan, Saranga; Beckett, Dorothy

    2009-01-01

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, BirA, is an allosteric transcription regulatory protein to which binding of the small ligand corepressor, biotinyl-5’-AMP, promotes homodimerization and subsequent DNA binding. Structural data indicate that the apo- or unliganded repressor is characterized by four partially disordered loops that are ordered in the ligand-bound dimer. While three of these loops participate directly in the dimerization, the fourth, consisting of residues 212-234 is distal to the interface. This loop, which is ordered around the adenine ring of the adenylate in the BirA adenylate structure, is referred to as the adenylate binding loop or ABL. Although residues in the loop do not directly interact with the ligand, a hydrophobic cluster consisting of a tryptophan and two valine side chains assembles over the adenine base. Results of previous measurements suggest that folding of the ABL is integral to the allosteric response. This idea and the role of the hydrophobic cluster in the process were investigated by systematic replacement of each side chain in the cluster with alanine and analysis of the variant proteins for small ligand binding and dimerization. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements indicate defects in adenylate binding for all ABL variants. Additionally, sedimentation equilibrium measurements reveal that coupling between adenylate binding and dimerization is compromised in each mutant. Partial proteolysis measurements indicate that the mutants are defective in ligand-linked folding of the ABL. These results indicate that the hydrophobic cluster is critical to the ligand-induced disorder-to-order transition in the ABL and that this transition is integral to the allosteric response in the biotin repressor. PMID:17765263

  7. Allosteric modulators of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Mony, Laetitia; Kew, James N C; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Paoletti, Pierre

    2009-08-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels gated by glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). They are widespread in the CNS and are involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes including synaptic plasticity, chronic pain and psychosis. Aberrant NMDAR activity also plays an important role in the neuronal loss associated with ischaemic insults and major degenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Agents that target and alter NMDAR function may, thus, have therapeutic benefit. Interestingly, NMDARs are endowed with multiple extracellular regulatory sites that recognize ions or small molecule ligands, some of which are likely to regulate receptor function in vivo. These allosteric sites, which differ from agonist-binding and channel-permeation sites, provide means to modulate, either positively or negatively, NMDAR activity. The present review focuses on allosteric modulation of NMDARs containing the NR2B subunit. Indeed, the NR2B subunit confers a particularly rich pharmacology with distinct recognition sites for exogenous and endogenous allosteric ligands. Moreover, NR2B-containing receptors, compared with other NMDAR subtypes, appear to contribute preferentially to pathological processes linked to overexcitation of glutamatergic pathways. The actions of extracellular H+, Mg2+, Zn2+, of polyamines and neurosteroids, and of the synthetic compounds ifenprodil and derivatives ('prodils') are presented. Particular emphasis is put upon the structural determinants and molecular mechanisms that underlie the effects exerted by these agents. A better understanding of how NR2B-containing NMDARs (and NMDARs in general) operate and how they can be modulated should help define new strategies to counteract the deleterious effects of dysregulated NMDAR activity. PMID:19594762

  8. Positive Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate 2 Receptors in Schizophrenia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ellaithy, Amr; Younkin, Jason; Gonzalez-Maeso, Javier; Logothetis, Diomedes E.

    2015-01-01

    The last two decades have witnessed a rise in the “NMDA receptor hypofunction” hypothesis for schizophrenia, a devastating disorder that affects around 1% of the population worldwide. A variety of presynaptic, postsynaptic and regulatory proteins involved in glutamatergic signaling have thus been proposed as potential therapeutic targets. This Review focuses on positive allosteric modulation of metabotropic glutamate 2 receptors (mGlu2Rs) and discusses how recent preclinical epigenetic data may provide a molecular explanation for the discrepant results of clinical studies, further stimulating the field to exploit the promise of mGlu2R as a target for schizophrenia treatment. PMID:26148747

  9. Allosterically Regulated Phosphatase Activity from Peptide-PNA Conjugates Folded Through Hybridization.

    PubMed

    Machida, Takuya; Dutt, Som; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-07-18

    The importance of spatial organization in short peptide catalysts is well recognized. We synthesized and screened a library of peptides flanked by peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) such that the peptide would be constrained in a hairpin loop upon hybridization. A screen for phosphatase activity led to the discovery of a catalyst with >25-fold rate acceleration over the linear peptide. We demonstrated that the hybridization-enforced folding of the peptide is necessary for activity, and designed a catalyst that is allosterically controlled using a complementary PNA sequence. PMID:27320214

  10. The crystal structure of allosteric chorismate mutase at 2.2-A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Y; Lipscomb, W N; Graf, R; Schnappauf, G; Braus, G

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of an allosteric chorismate mutase, the Thr-226-->Ile mutant, from yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined to 2.2-A resolution by using the multiple isomorphous replacement method. Solvent-flattening and electron-density modification were applied for phase improvement. The current crystallographic R factor is 0.196. The final model includes 504 of the 512 residues and 97 water molecules. In addition, two tryptophan molecules were identified in the interface between monomers. The overall structure is completely different from the reported structure of chorismate mutase from Bacillus subtilis. This structure showed 71% helices with essentially no beta-sheet structures. Images PMID:7971967

  11. Hydrogen-tritium exchange survey of allosteric effects in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Englander, J.J.; Englander, S.W.

    1987-04-07

    The oxy and deoxy forms of hemoglobin display major differences in H-exchange behavior. Hydrogen-tritium exchange experiments on hemoglobin were performed in the low-resolution mode to observe the dependence of these differences on pH (Bohr effect), organic phosphates, and salt. Unlike a prior report, increasing pH was found to decrease the oxy-deoxy difference monotonically, in general accordance with the alkaline Bohr effect. A prior report that the H-exchange difference between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin vanishes at pH 9, and thus appears to reflect the Bohr effect alone, was found to be due to the borate buffer used, which at high pH tends to abolish the oxy-deoxy difference in a limited region of the H-exchange curve. Effects on hemoglobin H exchange due to organic phosphates parallel the differential binding of these agents (inositol hexaphosphate more than diphosphoglycerate, deoxy more than oxy, at low pH more than at high pH). Added salt slows H exchange of deoxyhemoglobin and has no effect on the oxy form. These results display the sensitivity of simple H-exchange measurements for finding and characterizing effects on structure and dynamics that may occur anywhere in the protein and help to define conditions for higher resolution approaches that can localize the changes observed.

  12. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  13. Zinc enhancement of cytidine deaminase activity highlights a potential allosteric role of loop-3 in regulating APOBEC3 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Marx, Ailie; Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2015-01-01

    The strong association of APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases with somatic mutations leading to cancers accentuates the importance of their tight intracellular regulation to minimize cellular transformations. We reveal a novel allosteric regulatory mechanism of APOBEC3 enzymes showing that APOBEC3G and APOBEC3A coordination of a secondary zinc ion, reminiscent to ancestral deoxycytidylate deaminases, enhances deamination activity. Zinc binding is pinpointed to loop-3 which whilst highly variable harbors a catalytically essential and spatially conserved asparagine at its N-terminus. We suggest that loop-3 may play a general role in allosterically tuning the activity of zinc-dependent cytidine deaminase family members. PMID:26678087

  14. A Monoclonal Antibody (MCPR3-7) Interfering with the Activity of Proteinase 3 by an Allosteric Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Hinkofer, Lisa C.; Seidel, Susanne A. I.; Korkmaz, Brice; Silva, Francisco; Hummel, Amber M.; Braun, Dieter; Jenne, Dieter E.; Specks, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase 3 (PR3) is an abundant serine protease of neutrophil granules and a major target of autoantibodies (PR3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Some of the PR3 synthesized by promyelocytes in the bone marrow escapes the targeting to granules and occurs on the plasma membrane of naive and primed neutrophils. This membrane-associated PR3 antigen may represent pro-PR3, mature PR3, or both forms. To discriminate between mature PR3 and its inactive zymogen, which have different conformations, we generated and identified a monoclonal antibody called MCPR3-7. It bound much better to pro-PR3 than to mature PR3. This monoclonal antibody greatly reduced the catalytic activity of mature PR3 toward extended peptide substrates. Using diverse techniques and multiple recombinant PR3 variants, we characterized its binding properties and found that MCPR3-7 preferentially bound to the so-called activation domain of the zymogen and changed the conformation of mature PR3, resulting in impaired catalysis and inactivation by α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-antitrypsin). Noncovalent as well as covalent complexation between PR3 and α1-proteinase inhibitor was delayed in the presence of MCPR3-7, but cleavage of certain thioester and paranitroanilide substrates with small residues in the P1 position was not inhibited. We conclude that MCPR3-7 reduces PR3 activity by an allosteric mechanism affecting the S1′ pocket and further prime side interactions with substrates. In addition, MCPR3-7 prevents binding of PR3 to cellular membranes. Inhibitory antibodies targeting the activation domain of PR3 could be exploited as highly selective inhibitors of PR3, scavengers, and clearers of the PR3 autoantigen in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23902773

  15. ThermoTRP channels as modular proteins with allosteric gating.

    PubMed

    Latorre, Ramon; Brauchi, Sebastian; Orta, Gerardo; Zaelzer, Cristián; Vargas, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    Ion channels activate by sensing stimuli such as membrane voltage, ligand binding or temperature and transduce this information into conformational changes that open the channel pore. Thus, a key question in understanding ion channel function is how do the protein domains involved in sensing stimuli (sensors) and opening the pore (gates) communicate. In this regard, transient receptor potential (TRP) channels that confer thermosensation [A. Dhaka, V. Viswanath, A. Patapoutian, TRP ion channels and temperature sensation, Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 29 (2006) 135-161; I.S. Ramsey, M. Delling, D.E. Clapham, An introduction to TRP channels, Annu. Rev. Physiol. 68 (2006) 619-647] (thermoTRP; Q(10)>10) are unique to the extent that they integrate a variety of physical and chemical stimuli. In some cases such as, for example, the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 [M.J. Caterina, M.A. Schumacher, M. Tominaga, T.A. Rosen, J.D. Levine, D. Julius, The capsaicin receptor: a heat-activated ion channel in the pain pathway, Nature 389 (1997) 816-824] and TRPA1 [G.M. Story, A.M. Peier, A.J. Reeve, S.R. Eid, J. Mosbacher, T.R. Hricik, T.J. Earley, A.C. Hergarden, D.A. Andersson, S.W. Hwang, P. McIntyre, T. Jegla, S. Bevan, A. Patapoutian, ANKTM1, a TRP-like channel expressed in nociceptive neurons, is activated by cold temperatures, Cell 112 (2003) 819-829; S. Jordt, D. Julius, Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chilli peppers, Cell 108 (2002) 421-430] the integration of these stimuli elicit pain [M. Tominaga, M.J. Caterina, A.B. Malmberg, T.A. Rosen, H. Gilbert, K. Skinner, B.E. Raumann, A.I. Basbaum, D. Julius, The cloned capsaicin receptor integrates multiple pain-producing stimuli, Neuron 21 (1998) 531-543; M. Bandell, A. Dubin, M. Petrus, A. Orth, J. Mathur, S. Hwang, A. Patapoutian, High-throughput random mutagenesis screen reveals TRPM8 residues specifically required for activation by menthol, Nat. Neurosci. 9 (2006) 466-468; S. Zurborg, B. Yurgionas, JA. Jira, O

  16. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  17. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation.

    PubMed

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-09-18

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  18. Allosteric and Biased G Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling Regulation: Potentials for New Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Etienne; Clément, Stéphanie; Laporte, Stéphane A.

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that participate in many aspects of the endocrine function and are important targets for drug development. They transduce signals mainly, but not exclusively, via hetero-trimeric G proteins, leading to a diversity of intracellular signaling cascades. Ligands binding at the hormone orthosteric sites of receptors have been classified as agonists, antagonists, and/or inverse agonists based on their ability to mainly modulate G protein signaling. Accumulating evidence also indicates that such ligands, alone or in combination with other ones such as those acting outside the orthosteric hormone binding sites (e.g., allosteric modulators), have the ability to selectively engage subsets of signaling responses as compared to the natural endogenous ligands. Such modes of functioning have been variously referred to as “functional selectivity” or “ligand-biased signaling.” In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge regarding GPCR-biased signaling and their functional regulation with a focus on the evolving concept that receptor domains can also be targeted to allosterically bias signaling, and discuss the usefulness of such modes of regulation for the design of more efficient therapeutics. PMID:24847311

  19. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. PMID:26882503

  20. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  1. Two Pathways Mediate Inter-Domain Allosteric Regulation in Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jingjing; Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allostery is an essential means for regulating biomolecular functions and provides unique opportunities for drug design, yet our ability to elucidate allosteric mechanisms remains limited. Here, based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we present an atomistic picture of the pathways mediating the allosteric regulation of the PPIase domain of Pin1 by its WW domain. Two pathways jointly propagate the action of substrate-WW binding to produce closure and rigidification of three PPIase catalytic-site loops. One pathway preexists in the apo protein but remains dormant until substrate-WW binding completes the second. The reduction in conformational entropy and preorganization of the catalytic-site loops observed here may explain why substrate-WW binding enhances ligand affinity and catalytic activity of the PPIase domain, and suggest a combination drug therapy for Pin1-related diseases. Whereas the traditional view of allostery has emphasized conformational transition, our study uniquely identifies a distinct role of conformational dynamics in eliciting allostery. PMID:25543254

  2. Notes on stochastic (bio)-logic gates: computing with allosteric cooperativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliari, Elena; Altavilla, Matteo; Barra, Adriano; Dello Schiavo, Lorenzo; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-05-01

    Recent experimental breakthroughs have finally allowed to implement in-vitro reaction kinetics (the so called enzyme based logic) which code for two-inputs logic gates and mimic the stochastic AND (and NAND) as well as the stochastic OR (and NOR). This accomplishment, together with the already-known single-input gates (performing as YES and NOT), provides a logic base and paves the way to the development of powerful biotechnological devices. However, as biochemical systems are always affected by the presence of noise (e.g. thermal), standard logic is not the correct theoretical reference framework, rather we show that statistical mechanics can work for this scope: here we formulate a complete statistical mechanical description of the Monod-Wyman-Changeaux allosteric model for both single and double ligand systems, with the purpose of exploring their practical capabilities to express noisy logical operators and/or perform stochastic logical operations. Mixing statistical mechanics with logics, and testing quantitatively the resulting findings on the available biochemical data, we successfully revise the concept of cooperativity (and anti-cooperativity) for allosteric systems, with particular emphasis on its computational capabilities, the related ranges and scaling of the involved parameters and its differences with classical cooperativity (and anti-cooperativity).

  3. Allosteric modulation of ligand binding to [3H](+)pentazocine-defined sigma recognition sites by phenytoin.

    PubMed

    DeHaven-Hudkins, D L; Ford-Rice, F Y; Allen, J T; Hudkins, R L

    1993-01-01

    The allosteric modulation of sigma recognition sites by phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) has been demonstrated by the ability of phenytoin to stimulate binding of various [3H] sigma ligands, as well as to slow dissociation from sigma sites and to shift sigma sites from a low- to a high-affinity state. Phenytoin stimulated the binding of the sigma 1- selective ligand [3H](+)pentazocine in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of binding at a final concentration of 250 microM phenytoin was associated with a decrease in the KD. The affinities of the sigma reference compounds caramiphen, dextromethorphan, dextrophan, (+)3-PPP and (+)SKF-10,047 were three- to eight-fold higher, while the affinities of benzetimide, BMY-14802, carbetapentane, DTG and haloperidol were unchanged in the presence of 250 microM phenytoin. The relative sensitivity of sigma compounds to allosteric modulation by phenytoin is not a property of all sigma ligands, and may provide an in vitro basis for distinguishing actions of sigma compounds and predicting sigma effects in vivo. PMID:8515681

  4. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  5. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  6. Notes on stochastic (bio)-logic gates: computing with allosteric cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Agliari, Elena; Altavilla, Matteo; Barra, Adriano; Dello Schiavo, Lorenzo; Katz, Evgeny

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental breakthroughs have finally allowed to implement in-vitro reaction kinetics (the so called enzyme based logic) which code for two-inputs logic gates and mimic the stochastic AND (and NAND) as well as the stochastic OR (and NOR). This accomplishment, together with the already-known single-input gates (performing as YES and NOT), provides a logic base and paves the way to the development of powerful biotechnological devices. However, as biochemical systems are always affected by the presence of noise (e.g. thermal), standard logic is not the correct theoretical reference framework, rather we show that statistical mechanics can work for this scope: here we formulate a complete statistical mechanical description of the Monod-Wyman-Changeaux allosteric model for both single and double ligand systems, with the purpose of exploring their practical capabilities to express noisy logical operators and/or perform stochastic logical operations. Mixing statistical mechanics with logics, and testing quantitatively the resulting findings on the available biochemical data, we successfully revise the concept of cooperativity (and anti-cooperativity) for allosteric systems, with particular emphasis on its computational capabilities, the related ranges and scaling of the involved parameters and its differences with classical cooperativity (and anti-cooperativity). PMID:25976626

  7. Agonistic aptamer to the insulin receptor leads to biased signaling and functional selectivity through allosteric modulation

    PubMed Central

    Yunn, Na-Oh; Koh, Ara; Han, Seungmin; Lim, Jong Hun; Park, Sehoon; Lee, Jiyoun; Kim, Eui; Jang, Sung Key; Berggren, Per-Olof; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high affinity and specificity, aptamers have been widely used as effective inhibitors in clinical applications. However, the ability to activate protein function through aptamer-protein interaction has not been well-elucidated. To investigate their potential as target-specific agonists, we used SELEX to generate aptamers to the insulin receptor (IR) and identified an agonistic aptamer named IR-A48 that specifically binds to IR, but not to IGF-1 receptor. Despite its capacity to stimulate IR autophosphorylation, similar to insulin, we found that IR-A48 not only binds to an allosteric site distinct from the insulin binding site, but also preferentially induces Y1150 phosphorylation in the IR kinase domain. Moreover, Y1150-biased phosphorylation induced by IR-A48 selectively activates specific signaling pathways downstream of IR. In contrast to insulin-mediated activation of IR, IR-A48 binding has little effect on the MAPK pathway and proliferation of cancer cells. Instead, AKT S473 phosphorylation is highly stimulated by IR-A48, resulting in increased glucose uptake both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we present IR-A48 as a biased agonist able to selectively induce the metabolic activity of IR through allosteric binding. Furthermore, our study also suggests that aptamers can be a promising tool for developing artificial biased agonists to targeted receptors. PMID:26245346

  8. An allosteric model for heterogeneous receptor complexes: Understanding bacterial chemotaxis responses to multiple stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Bernardo A.; Tu, Yuhai

    2005-01-01

    The classical Monod-Wyman-Changeux model for homogeneous allosteric protein complex is generalized in this article to model the responses of heterogeneous receptor complexes to multiple types of ligand stimulus. We show that the recent in vivo experimental data of Escherichia coli chemotaxis responses for mutant strains with different expression levels of the chemo-receptors to different types of stimulus [Sourjik, V. & Berg, H. C. (2004) Nature 428, 437–441] all can be explained consistently within this generalized Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. Based on the model and the existing data, responses of all of the strains (studied in this article) to the presence of any combinations of ligand (Ser and MeAsp) concentrations are predicted quantitatively for future experimental verification. Through modeling the in vivo response data, our study reveals important information about the properties of different types of individual receptors, as well as the composition of the cluster. The energetic contribution of the nonligand binding, cytoplasmic parts of the cluster, such as CheA and CheW, is also discussed. The generalized allosteric model provides a consistent framework in understanding signal integration and differentiation in bacterial chemotaxis. It should also be useful for studying the functions of other heterogeneous receptor complexes. PMID:16293695

  9. Structure, Dynamics, and Allosteric Potential of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor N-Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Bahar, Ivet; Greger, Ingo H.

    2015-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are tetrameric cation channels that mediate synaptic transmission and plasticity. They have a unique modular architecture with four domains: the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) that is involved in synaptic targeting, the transmembrane domain (TMD) that forms the ion channel, the membrane-proximal ligand-binding domain (LBD) that binds agonists such as L-glutamate, and the distal N-terminal domain (NTD), whose function is the least clear. The extracellular portion, comprised of the LBD and NTD, is loosely arranged, mediating complex allosteric regulation and providing a rich target for drug development. Here, we briefly review recent work on iGluR NTD structure and dynamics, and further explore the allosteric potential for the NTD in AMPA-type iGluRs using coarse-grained simulations. We also investigate mechanisms underlying the established NTD allostery in NMDA-type iGluRs, as well as the fold-related metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors. We show that the clamshell motions intrinsically favored by the NTD bilobate fold are coupled to dimeric and higher-order rearrangements that impact the iGluR LBD and ultimately the TMD. Finally, we explore the dynamics of intact iGluRs and describe how it might affect receptor operation in a synaptic environment. PMID:26255587

  10. Allosteric Modification, the Primary ATP Activation Mechanism of ANF-RGC

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Yadav, Prem; Sharma, Rameshwar K.

    2011-01-01

    ANF-RGC is the prototype receptor membrane guanylate cyclase being both the receptor and the signal transducer of the most hypotensive hormones, ANF and BNP. It is a single transmembrane-spanning protein. After binding these hormones at the extracellular domain it at its intracellular domain signals activation of the C-terminal catalytic module and accelerates the production of its second messenger, cyclic GMP, which controls blood pressure, cardiac vasculature and fluid secretion. ATP is obligatory for the post-transmembrane dynamic events leading to ANF-RGC activation. It functions through the ATP regulated module, ARM (KHD) domain, of ANF-RGC. In the current over-a-decade-held-model “phosphorylation of the KHD is absolutely required for hormone-dependent activation of NPR-A” (Potter, L.R., and T. Hunter. 1998. Mol. Cell. Biol. 18: 2164–2172). The presented study challenges this concept. It demonstrates that, instead, ATP allosteric modification of ARM is the primary signaling step of ANF-GC activation. In this 2-step new dynamic model, ATP in the first step binds ARM. This triggers in it a chain of transduction events, which cause its allosteric modification. The modification partially activates (about 50%) ANF-RGC; and concomitantly also prepares the ARM for the second successive step. In this second step, ARM is phosphorylated and ANF-RGC achieves additional (~50%) full catalytic activation. The study defines a new paradigm of ANF-RGC signaling mechanism. PMID:21222471

  11. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  12. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of "preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching" is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  13. Allosteric effects of chromophore interaction with dimeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Olesya V; Baloban, Mikhail; Bublikov, Grigory S; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Stepanenko, Olga V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Kuznetsova, Irina M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes attract attention as probes for in vivo imaging due to their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and use of available in mammalian cells biliverdin (BV) as chromophore. We studied spectral properties of the iRFP670, iRFP682 and iRFP713 proteins and their mutants having Cys residues able to bind BV either in both PAS (Cys15) and GAF (Cys256) domains, in one of these domains, or without these Cys residues. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra and the chromophore binding depend on the location of the Cys residues. Compared with NIR FPs in which BV covalently binds to Cys15 or those that incorporate BV noncovalently, the proteins with BV covalently bound to Cys256 have blue-shifted spectra and higher quantum yield. In dimeric NIR FPs without Cys15, the covalent binding of BV to Сys256 in one monomer allosterically inhibits the covalent binding of BV to the other monomer, whereas the presence of Cys15 allosterically promotes BV binding to Cys256 in both monomers. The NIR FPs with both Cys residues have the narrowest blue-shifted spectra and the highest quantum yield. Our analysis resulted in the iRFP713/Val256Cys protein with the highest brightness in mammalian cells among available NIR FPs. PMID:26725513

  14. Structural Insights into the Allosteric Operation of the Lon AAA+ Protease.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chu; Su, Shih-Chieh; Su, Ming-Yuan; Liang, Pi-Hui; Feng, Chia-Cheng; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Chang, Chung-I

    2016-05-01

    The Lon AAA+ protease (LonA) is an evolutionarily conserved protease that couples the ATPase cycle into motion to drive substrate translocation and degradation. A hallmark feature shared by AAA+ proteases is the stimulation of ATPase activity by substrates. Here we report the structure of LonA bound to three ADPs, revealing the first AAA+ protease assembly where the six protomers are arranged alternately in nucleotide-free and bound states. Nucleotide binding induces large coordinated movements of conserved pore loops from two pairs of three non-adjacent protomers and shuttling of the proteolytic groove between the ATPase site and a previously unknown Arg paddle. Structural and biochemical evidence supports the roles of the substrate-bound proteolytic groove in allosteric stimulation of ATPase activity and the conserved Arg paddle in driving substrate degradation. Altogether, this work provides a molecular framework for understanding how ATP-dependent chemomechanical movements drive allosteric processes for substrate degradation in a major protein-destruction machine. PMID:27041592

  15. Allosteric Regulation of Catalytic Activity: Escherichia coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase versus Yeast Chorismate Mutase

    PubMed Central

    Helmstaedt, Kerstin; Krappmann, Sven; Braus, Gerhard H.

    2001-01-01

    Allosteric regulation of key metabolic enzymes is a fascinating field to study the structure-function relationship of induced conformational changes of proteins. In this review we compare the principles of allosteric transitions of the complex classical model aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from Escherichia coli, consisting of 12 polypeptides, and the less complicated chorismate mutase derived from baker's yeast, which functions as a homodimer. Chorismate mutase presumably represents the minimal oligomerization state of a cooperative enzyme which still can be either activated or inhibited by different heterotropic effectors. Detailed knowledge of the number of possible quaternary states and a description of molecular triggers for conformational changes of model enzymes such as ATCase and chorismate mutase shed more and more light on allostery as an important regulatory mechanism of any living cell. The comparison of wild-type and engineered mutant enzymes reveals that current textbook models for regulation do not cover the entire picture needed to describe the function of these enzymes in detail. PMID:11528003

  16. Mechanisms of allosteric gene regulation by NMR quantification of microsecond-millisecond protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kleckner, Ian R; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2012-01-13

    The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) is a paradigmatic allosteric protein that regulates the tryptophan biosynthetic genes associated with the trp operon in bacilli. The ring-shaped 11-mer TRAP is activated for recognition of a specific trp-mRNA target by binding up to 11 tryptophan molecules. To characterize the mechanisms of tryptophan-induced TRAP activation, we have performed methyl relaxation dispersion (MRD) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments that probe the time-dependent structure of TRAP in the microsecond-to-millisecond "chemical exchange" time window. We find significant side chain flexibility localized to the RNA and tryptophan binding sites of the apo protein and that these dynamics are dramatically reduced upon ligand binding. Analysis of the MRD NMR data provides insights into the structural nature of transiently populated conformations sampled in solution by apo TRAP. The MRD data are inconsistent with global two-state exchange, indicating that conformational sampling in apo TRAP is asynchronous. These findings imply a temporally heterogeneous population of structures that are incompatible with RNA binding and substantiate the study of TRAP as a paradigm for probing and understanding essential dynamics in allosteric, regulatory proteins. PMID:22115774

  17. Allosteric interactions of quaternary strychnine and brucine derivatives with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gharagozloo, P; Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    1999-02-11

    The affinity and allosteric properties of 22 quaternary derivatives of strychnine and brucine at the m1-m4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors have been analyzed and compared. The subtype selectivity, in terms of affinity, was in general m2 > m4 > m1 > m3. The highest affinities were found for N-benzyl, N-2-naphthylmethyl, and N-4-biphenylylmethyl strychnine (13, 14, and 18, respectively). All the strychnine and brucine derivatives were positively cooperative with the antagonist, N-methylscopolamine, at m2 receptors and, in the case of the strychnine analogues, were positively cooperative with N-methylscopolamine at least at one other subtype. The strychnine analogues were negatively cooperative with the neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, at all subtypes whereas brucine and five of the six derivatives examined were positively cooperative with acetylcholine at one or more subtypes (m1-m5) and exhibited different patterns of subtype selectivity. The ability to generate subtype-selective allosteric enhancers of acetylcholine binding and function may be of use in the development of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:9986715

  18. Substituted pentacyclic carbazolones as novel muscarinic allosteric agents: synthesis and structure-affinity and cooperativity relationships.

    PubMed

    Gharagozloo, Parviz; Lazareno, Sebastian; Miyauchi, Masao; Popham, Angela; Birdsall, Nigel J M

    2002-03-14

    Two series of pentacyclic carbazolones, 22 and 23, have been synthesized utilizing a facile intramolecular Dielsminus signAlder reaction and are allosteric modulators at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Their affinities and cooperativities with acetylcholine and the antagonist N-methylscopolamine (NMS) at M(1)minus signM(4) receptors have been analyzed and compared. All of the synthesized compounds are negatively cooperative with acetylcholine. In contrast, the majority of the compounds exhibit positive cooperativity with NMS, particularly at M(2) and M(4) receptors. The subtype selectivity, in terms of affinity, was in general M(2) > M(1) > M(4) > M(3). The largest increases in affinity produced by a single substitution of the core structure were given by the 1-OMe (22b) and 1-Cl (22d) derivatives. The position of the N in the ring did not appear to be important for binding affinity or cooperativity. Two compounds 22y and 23i, both trisubstituted analogues, were the most potent compounds synthesized, with dissociation constants of 30minus sign100 nM for the M(2) NMS-liganded and unliganded receptor, respectively. The results indicate that the allosteric site, like the primary binding site, is capable of high-affinity interactions with molecules of relatively low molecular weight. PMID:11881995

  19. Biomimetic Design Results in a Potent Allosteric Inhibitor of Dihydrodipicolinate Synthase from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Skovpen, Yulia V; Conly, Cuylar J T; Sanders, David A R; Palmer, David R J

    2016-02-17

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS), an enzyme required for bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis, catalyzes the condensation of pyruvate and β-aspartate semialdehyde (ASA) to form a cyclic product which dehydrates to form dihydrodipicolinate. DHDPS has, for several years, been considered a putative target for novel antibiotics. We have designed the first potent inhibitor of this enzyme by mimicking its natural allosteric regulation by lysine, and obtained a crystal structure of the protein-inhibitor complex at 2.2 Å resolution. This novel inhibitor, which we named "bislysine", resembles two lysine molecules linked by an ethylene bridge between the α-carbon atoms. Bislysine is a mixed partial inhibitor with respect to the first substrate, pyruvate, and a noncompetitive partial inhibitor with respect to ASA, and binds to all forms of the enzyme with a Ki near 200 nM, more than 300 times more tightly than lysine. Hill plots show that the inhibition is cooperative, indicating that the allosteric sites are not independent despite being located on opposite sides of the protein tetramer, separated by approximately 50 Å. A mutant enzyme resistant to lysine inhibition, Y110F, is strongly inhibited by this novel inhibitor, suggesting this may be a promising strategy for antibiotic development. PMID:26836694

  20. Engineering and optimization of an allosteric biosensor protein for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ ligands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Gierach, Izabela; Gillies, Alison R; Warden, Charles D; Wood, David W

    2011-11-15

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ or PPARG) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily, and is a potential drug target for a variety of diseases. In this work, we constructed a series of bacterial biosensors for the identification of functional PPARγ ligands. These sensors entail modified Escherichia coli cells carrying a four-domain fusion protein, comprised of the PPARγ ligand binding domain (LBD), an engineered mini-intein domain, the E. coli maltose binding protein (MBD), and a thymidylate synthase (TS) reporter enzyme. E. coli cells expressing this protein exhibit hormone ligand-dependent growth phenotypes. Unlike our published estrogen (ER) and thyroid receptor (TR) biosensors, the canonical PPARγ biosensor cells displayed pronounced growth in the absence of ligand. They were able to distinguish agonists and antagonists, however, even in the absence of agonist. To improve ligand sensitivity of this sensor, we attempted to engineer and optimize linker peptides flanking the PPARγ LBD insertion point. Truncation of the original linkers led to decreased basal growth and significantly enhanced ligand sensitivity of the PPARγ sensor, while substitution of the native linkers with optimized G(4)S (Gly-Gly-Gly-Gly-Ser) linkers further increased the sensitivity. Our studies demonstrate that the properties of linkers, especially the C-terminal linker, greatly influence the efficiency and fidelity of the allosteric signal induced by ligand binding. Our work also suggests an approach to increase allosteric behavior in this multidomain sensor protein, without modification of the functional LBD. PMID:21893405

  1. Aryloxyalkanoic Acids as Non-Covalent Modifiers of the Allosteric Properties of Hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Omar, Abdelsattar M; Mahran, Mona A; Ghatge, Mohini S; Bamane, Faida H A; Ahmed, Mostafa H; El-Araby, Moustafa E; Abdulmalik, Osheiza; Safo, Martin K

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) modifiers that stereospecifically inhibit sickle hemoglobin polymer formation and/or allosterically increase Hb affinity for oxygen have been shown to prevent the primary pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD), specifically, Hb polymerization and red blood cell sickling. Several such compounds are currently being clinically studied for the treatment of SCD. Based on the previously reported non-covalent Hb binding characteristics of substituted aryloxyalkanoic acids that exhibited antisickling properties, we designed, synthesized and evaluated 18 new compounds (KAUS II series) for enhanced antisickling activities. Surprisingly, select test compounds showed no antisickling effects or promoted erythrocyte sickling. Additionally, the compounds showed no significant effect on Hb oxygen affinity (or in some cases, even decreased the affinity for oxygen). The X-ray structure of deoxygenated Hb in complex with a prototype compound, KAUS-23, revealed that the effector bound in the central water cavity of the protein, providing atomic level explanations for the observed functional and biological activities. Although the structural modification did not lead to the anticipated biological effects, the findings provide important direction for designing candidate antisickling agents, as well as a framework for novel Hb allosteric effectors that conversely, decrease the protein affinity for oxygen for potential therapeutic use for hypoxic- and/or ischemic-related diseases. PMID:27529207

  2. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2008-01-01

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK (Angeles, T. S., Hunsley, J. R., and Viola, R. E. (1992) Biochemistry31 ,799 -8051731937). Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation. PMID:18334478

  3. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  4. A Conserved Motif Mediates both Multimer Formation and Allosteric Activation of Phosphoglycerate Mutase 5*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Jordan M.; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A.; Hannink, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  5. Allosteric effects of chromophore interaction with dimeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Baloban, Mikhail; Bublikov, Grigory S.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes attract attention as probes for in vivo imaging due to their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and use of available in mammalian cells biliverdin (BV) as chromophore. We studied spectral properties of the iRFP670, iRFP682 and iRFP713 proteins and their mutants having Cys residues able to bind BV either in both PAS (Cys15) and GAF (Cys256) domains, in one of these domains, or without these Cys residues. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra and the chromophore binding depend on the location of the Cys residues. Compared with NIR FPs in which BV covalently binds to Cys15 or those that incorporate BV noncovalently, the proteins with BV covalently bound to Cys256 have blue-shifted spectra and higher quantum yield. In dimeric NIR FPs without Cys15, the covalent binding of BV to Сys256 in one monomer allosterically inhibits the covalent binding of BV to the other monomer, whereas the presence of Cys15 allosterically promotes BV binding to Cys256 in both monomers. The NIR FPs with both Cys residues have the narrowest blue-shifted spectra and the highest quantum yield. Our analysis resulted in the iRFP713/Val256Cys protein with the highest brightness in mammalian cells among available NIR FPs. PMID:26725513

  6. Allosteric Activation of Bacterial Response Regulators: the Role of the Cognate Histidine Kinase Beyond Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Trajtenberg, Felipe; Albanesi, Daniela; Ruétalo, Natalia; Botti, Horacio; Mechaly, Ariel E.; Nieves, Marcos; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Cybulski, Larisa; Larrieux, Nicole; de Mendoza, Diego

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Response regulators are proteins that undergo transient phosphorylation, connecting specific signals to adaptive responses. Remarkably, the molecular mechanism of response regulator activation remains elusive, largely because of the scarcity of structural data on multidomain response regulators and histidine kinase/response regulator complexes. We now address this question by using a combination of crystallographic data and functional analyses in vitro and in vivo, studying DesR and its cognate sensor kinase DesK, a two-component system that controls membrane fluidity in Bacillus subtilis. We establish that phosphorylation of the receiver domain of DesR is allosterically coupled to two distinct exposed surfaces of the protein, controlling noncanonical dimerization/tetramerization, cooperative activation, and DesK binding. One of these surfaces is critical for both homodimerization- and kinase-triggered allosteric activations. Moreover, DesK induces a phosphorylation-independent activation of DesR in vivo, uncovering a novel and stringent level of specificity among kinases and regulators. Our results support a model that helps to explain how response regulators restrict phosphorylation by small-molecule phosphoryl donors, as well as cross talk with noncognate sensors. PMID:25406381

  7. Allosteric Mechanisms of Molecular Machines at the Membrane: Transport by Sodium-Coupled Symporters.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Michael V; Cuendet, Michel A; Khelashvili, George; Weinstein, Harel

    2016-06-01

    Solute transport across cell membranes is ubiquitous in biology as an essential physiological process. Secondary active transporters couple the unfavorable process of solute transport against its concentration gradient to the energetically favorable transport of one or several ions. The study of such transporters over several decades indicates that their function involves complex allosteric mechanisms that are progressively being revealed in atomistic detail. We focus on two well-characterized sodium-coupled symporters: the bacterial amino acid transporter LeuT, which is the prototype for the "gated pore" mechanism in the mammalian synaptic monoamine transporters, and the archaeal GltPh, which is the prototype for the "elevator" mechanism in the mammalian excitatory amino acid transporters. We present the evidence for the role of allostery in the context of a quantitative formalism that can reconcile biochemical and biophysical data and thereby connects directly to recent insights into the molecular structure and dynamics of these proteins. We demonstrate that, while the structures and mechanisms of these transporters are very different, the available data suggest a common role of specific models of allostery in their functions. We argue that such allosteric mechanisms appear essential not only for sodium-coupled symport in general but also for the function of other types of molecular machines in the membrane. PMID:26892914

  8. A Conserved Ectodomain-Transmembrane Domain Linker Motif Tunes the Allosteric Regulation of Cell Surface Receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Thomas; Ye, Feng; Situ, Alan J; An, Woojin; Ginsberg, Mark H; Ulmer, Tobias S

    2016-08-19

    In many families of cell surface receptors, a single transmembrane (TM) α-helix separates ecto- and cytosolic domains. A defined coupling of ecto- and TM domains must be essential to allosteric receptor regulation but remains little understood. Here, we characterize the linker structure, dynamics, and resulting ecto-TM domain coupling of integrin αIIb in model constructs and relate it to other integrin α subunits by mutagenesis. Cellular integrin activation assays subsequently validate the findings in intact receptors. Our results indicate a flexible yet carefully tuned ecto-TM coupling that modulates the signaling threshold of integrin receptors. Interestingly, a proline at the N-terminal TM helix border, termed NBP, is critical to linker flexibility in integrins. NBP is further predicted in 21% of human single-pass TM proteins and validated in cytokine receptors by the TM domain structure of the cytokine receptor common subunit β and its P441A-substituted variant. Thus, NBP is a conserved uncoupling motif of the ecto-TM domain transition and the degree of ecto-TM domain coupling represents an important parameter in the allosteric regulation of diverse cell surface receptors. PMID:27365391

  9. Allosteric drug discrimination is coupled to mechanochemical changes in the kinesin-5 motor core.

    PubMed

    Kim, Elizabeth D; Buckley, Rebecca; Learman, Sarah; Richard, Jessica; Parke, Courtney; Worthylake, David K; Wojcik, Edward J; Walker, Richard A; Kim, Sunyoung

    2010-06-11

    Essential in mitosis, the human Kinesin-5 protein is a target for >80 classes of allosteric compounds that bind to a surface-exposed site formed by the L5 loop. Not established is why there are differing efficacies in drug inhibition. Here we compare the ligand-bound states of two L5-directed inhibitors against 15 Kinesin-5 mutants by ATPase assays and IR spectroscopy. Biochemical kinetics uncovers functional differences between individual residues at the N or C termini of the L5 loop. Infrared evaluation of solution structures and multivariate analysis of the vibrational spectra reveal that mutation and/or ligand binding not only can remodel the allosteric binding surface but also can transmit long range effects. Changes in L5-localized 3(10) helix and disordered content, regardless of substitution or drug potency, are experimentally detected. Principal component analysis couples these local structural events to two types of rearrangements in beta-sheet hydrogen bonding. These transformations in beta-sheet contacts are correlated with inhibitory drug response and are corroborated by wild type Kinesin-5 crystal structures. Despite considerable evolutionary divergence, our data directly support a theorized conserved element for long distance mechanochemical coupling in kinesin, myosin, and F(1)-ATPase. These findings also suggest that these relatively rapid IR approaches can provide structural biomarkers for clinical determination of drug sensitivity and drug efficacy in nucleotide triphosphatases. PMID:20299460

  10. Neuroprotection by selective allosteric potentiators of the EP2 prostaglandin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Ganesh, Thota; Du, Yuhong; Thepchatri, Pahk; Rojas, Asheebo; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Li, Lian; Qui, Min; Serrano, Geidy; Shaw, Renee; Sun, Aiming; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the Gαs-coupled EP2 receptor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival in several models of tissue damage. To advance understanding of EP2 functions, we designed experiments to develop allosteric potentiators of this key prostaglandin receptor. Screens of 292,000 compounds identified 93 that at 20 μM (i) potentiated the cAMP response to a low concentration of PGE2 by > 50%; (ii) had no effect on EP4 or β2 adrenergic receptors, the cAMP assay itself, or the parent cell line; and (iii) increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors at least 3-fold. In aqueous solution, the active compounds are largely present as nanoparticles that appear to serve as active reservoirs for bioactive monomer. From 94 compounds synthesized or purchased, based on the modification of one hit compound, the most active increased the potency of PGE2 on EP2 receptors 4- to 5-fold at 10 to 20 μM and showed substantial neuroprotection in an excitotoxicity model. These small molecules represent previously undescribed allosteric modulators of a PGE2 receptor. Our results strongly reinforce the notion that activation of EP2 receptors by endogenous PGE2 released in a cell-injury setting is neuroprotective. PMID:20080612

  11. An allosteric inhibitor of substrate recognition by the SCF[superscript Cdc4] ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Orlicky, Stephen; Tang, Xiaojing; Neduva, Victor; Elowe, Nadine; Brown, Eric D.; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2010-09-17

    The specificity of SCF ubiquitin ligase-mediated protein degradation is determined by F-box proteins. We identified a biplanar dicarboxylic acid compound, called SCF-I2, as an inhibitor of substrate recognition by the yeast F-box protein Cdc4 using a fluorescence polarization screen to monitor the displacement of a fluorescein-labeled phosphodegron peptide. SCF-I2 inhibits the binding and ubiquitination of full-length phosphorylated substrates by SCF{sup Cdc4}. A co-crystal structure reveals that SCF-I2 inserts itself between the {beta}-strands of blades 5 and 6 of the WD40 propeller domain of Cdc4 at a site that is 25 {angstrom} away from the substrate binding site. Long-range transmission of SCF-I2 interactions distorts the substrate binding pocket and impedes recognition of key determinants in the Cdc4 phosphodegron. Mutation of the SCF-I2 binding site abrogates its inhibitory effect and explains specificity in the allosteric inhibition mechanism. Mammalian WD40 domain proteins may exhibit similar allosteric responsiveness and hence represent an extensive class of druggable target.

  12. Allosteric β-propeller signalling in TolB and its manipulation by translocating colicins

    PubMed Central

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Hecht, Oliver; Vankemmelbeke, Mireille; Sharma, Amit; Krachler, Anne Marie; Housden, Nicholas G; Lilly, Katie J; James, Richard; Moore, Geoffrey R; Kleanthous, Colin

    2009-01-01

    The Tol system is a five-protein assembly parasitized by colicins and bacteriophages that helps stabilize the Gram-negative outer membrane (OM). We show that allosteric signalling through the six-bladed β-propeller protein TolB is central to Tol function in Escherichia coli and that this is subverted by colicins such as ColE9 to initiate their OM translocation. Protein–protein interactions with the TolB β-propeller govern two conformational states that are adopted by the distal N-terminal 12 residues of TolB that bind TolA in the inner membrane. ColE9 promotes disorder of this ‘TolA box' and recruitment of TolA. In contrast to ColE9, binding of the OM lipoprotein Pal to the same site induces conformational changes that sequester the TolA box to the TolB surface in which it exhibits little or no TolA binding. Our data suggest that Pal is an OFF switch for the Tol assembly, whereas colicins promote an ON state even though mimicking Pal. Comparison of the TolB mechanism to that of vertebrate guanine nucleotide exchange factor RCC1 suggests that allosteric signalling may be more prevalent in β-propeller proteins than currently realized. PMID:19696740

  13. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides*

    PubMed Central

    DeBerg, Hannah A.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Flynn, Galen E.; Zagotta, William N.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  14. Structure and Energetics of Allosteric Regulation of HCN2 Ion Channels by Cyclic Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    DeBerg, Hannah A; Brzovic, Peter S; Flynn, Galen E; Zagotta, William N; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) ion channels play an important role in regulating electrical activity in the heart and brain. They are gated by the binding of cyclic nucleotides to a conserved, intracellular cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD), which is connected to the channel pore by a C-linker region. Binding of cyclic nucleotides increases the rate and extent of channel activation and shifts it to less hyperpolarized voltages. We probed the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotides on the CNBD and on channel gating. Electrophysiology experiments showed that cAMP, cGMP, and cCMP were effective agonists of the channel and produced similar increases in the extent of channel activation. In contrast, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) on the isolated CNBD indicated that the induced conformational changes and the degrees of stabilization of the active conformation differed for the three cyclic nucleotides. We explain these results with a model where different allosteric mechanisms in the CNBD all converge to have the same effect on the C-linker and render all three cyclic nucleotides similarly potent activators of the channel. PMID:26559974

  15. Dynamics Correlation Network for Allosteric Switching of PreQ1 Riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Jiang, Cheng; Zhang, Jinmai; Ye, Wei; Luo, Ray; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Riboswitches are a class of metabolism control elements mostly found in bacteria. Due to their fundamental importance in bacteria gene regulation, riboswitches have been proposed as antibacterial drug targets. Prequeuosine (preQ1) is the last free precursor in the biosynthetic pathway of queuosine that is crucial for translation efficiency and fidelity. However, the regulation mechanism for the preQ1 riboswitch remains unclear. Here we constructed fluctuation correlation network based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the regulation mechanism. The results suggest that the correlation network in the bound riboswitch is distinctly different from that in the apo riboswitch. The community network indicates that the information freely transfers from the binding site of preQ1 to the expression platform of the P3 helix in the bound riboswitch and the P3 helix is a bottleneck in the apo riboswitch. Thus, a hypothesis of “preQ1-binding induced allosteric switching” is proposed to link riboswitch and translation regulation. The community networks of mutants support this hypothesis. Finally, a possible allosteric pathway of A50-A51-A52-U10-A11-G12-G56 was also identified based on the shortest path algorithm and confirmed by mutations and network perturbation. The novel fluctuation network analysis method can be used as a general strategy in studies of riboswitch structure-function relationship. PMID:27484311

  16. Herbacetin Is a Novel Allosteric Inhibitor of Ornithine Decarboxylase with Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Joon; Roh, Eunmiri; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Oi, Naomi; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Pugliese, Angelo; Shim, Jung-Hyun; Chen, Hanyong; Cho, Eun Jin; Kim, Jong-Eun; Kang, Sun Chul; Paul, Souren; Kang, Hee Eun; Jung, Ji Won; Lee, Sung-Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Reddy, Kanamata; Yeom, Young Il; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2016-03-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the first step of polyamine biosynthesis that is associated with cell growth and tumor formation. Existing catalytic inhibitors of ODC have lacked efficacy in clinical testing or displayed unacceptable toxicity. In this study, we report the identification of an effective and nontoxic allosteric inhibitor of ODC. Using computer docking simulation and an in vitro ODC enzyme assay, we identified herbacetin, a natural compound found in flax and other plants, as a novel ODC inhibitor. Mechanistic investigations defined aspartate 44 in ODC as critical for binding. Herbacetin exhibited potent anticancer activity in colon cancer cell lines expressing high levels of ODC. Intraperitoneal or oral administration of herbacetin effectively suppressed HCT116 xenograft tumor growth and also reduced the number and size of polyps in a mouse model of APC-driven colon cancer (ApcMin/+). Unlike the well-established ODC inhibitor DFMO, herbacetin treatment was not associated with hearing loss. Taken together, our findings defined the natural product herbacetin as an allosteric inhibitor of ODC with chemopreventive and antitumor activity in preclinical models of colon cancer, prompting its further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:26676750

  17. The Structural Basis for Allosteric Inhibition of a Threonine-sensitive Aspartokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xuying; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.; Viola, Ronald E.

    2008-10-08

    The commitment step to the aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is the phosphorylation of aspartic acid catalyzed by aspartokinase (AK). Most microorganisms and plants have multiple forms of this enzyme, and many of these isofunctional enzymes are subject to feedback regulation by the end products of the pathway. However, the archeal species Methanococcus jannaschii has only a single, monofunctional form of AK. The substrate l-aspartate binds to this recombinant enzyme in two different orientations, providing the first structural evidence supporting the relaxed regiospecificity previously observed with several alternative substrates of Escherichia coli AK. Binding of the nucleotide substrate triggers significant domain movements that result in a more compact quaternary structure. In contrast, the highly cooperative binding of the allosteric regulator l-threonine to multiple sites on this dimer of dimers leads to an open enzyme structure. A comparison of these structures supports a mechanism for allosteric regulation in which the domain movements induced by threonine binding causes displacement of the substrates from the enzyme, resulting in a relaxed, inactive conformation.

  18. Selective binding modes and allosteric inhibitory effects of lupane triterpenes on protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Tiantian; Yu, Haibo; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) has been recognized as a promising therapeutic target for treating obesity, diabetes, and certain cancers for over a decade. Previous drug design has focused on inhibitors targeting the active site of PTP1B. However, this has not been successful because the active site is positively charged and conserved among the protein tyrosine phosphatases. Therefore, it is important to develop PTP1B inhibitors with alternative inhibitory strategies. Using computational studies including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy calculations, we found that lupane triterpenes selectively inhibited PTP1B by targeting its more hydrophobic and less conserved allosteric site. These findings were verified using two enzymatic assays. Furthermore, the cell culture studies showed that lupeol and betulinic acid inhibited the PTP1B activity stimulated by TNFα in neurons. Our study indicates that lupane triterpenes are selective PTP1B allosteric inhibitors with significant potential for treating those diseases with elevated PTP1B activity. PMID:26865097

  19. An external sodium ion binding site controls allosteric gating in TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andres; Bae, Chanhyung; Swartz, Kenton J

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 channels in sensory neurons are integrators of painful stimuli and heat, yet how they integrate diverse stimuli and sense temperature remains elusive. Here, we show that external sodium ions stabilize the TRPV1 channel in a closed state, such that removing the external ion leads to channel activation. In studying the underlying mechanism, we find that the temperature sensors in TRPV1 activate in two steps to favor opening, and that the binding of sodium to an extracellular site exerts allosteric control over temperature-sensor activation and opening of the pore. The binding of a tarantula toxin to the external pore also exerts control over temperature-sensor activation, whereas binding of vanilloids influences temperature-sensitivity by largely affecting the open/closed equilibrium. Our results reveal a fundamental role of the external pore in the allosteric control of TRPV1 channel gating and provide essential constraints for understanding how these channels can be tuned by diverse stimuli. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13356.001 PMID:26882503

  20. ROBUST PHOTO-REGULATION OF GABAA RECEPTORS BY ALLOSTERIC MODULATION WITH A PROPOFOL ANALOG

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Lan; Pawlowski, Michal; Dellal, Shlomo S.; Xie, An; Feng, Feng; Otis, Thomas S.; Bruzik, Karol S.; Qian, Haohua; Pepperberg, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Photochemical switches represent a powerful method for improving pharmacological therapies and controlling cellular physiology. Here we report the photo-regulation of GABAA receptors (GABAARs) by a derivative of propofol (2,6-diisopropylphenol), a GABAAR allosteric modulator, that we have modified to contain photo-isomerizable azobenzene. Using α1β2γ2 GABAARs expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and native GABAARs of isolated retinal ganglion cells, we show that the trans-azobenzene isomer of the new compound (trans-MPC088), generated by visible light (wavelengths ~440 nm), potentiates the GABA-elicited response and at higher concentrations directly activates the receptors. cis-MPC088, generated from trans-MPC088 by UV light (~365 nm), produces little if any receptor potentiation/activation. In cerebellar slices, MPC088 co-applied with GABA affords bidirectional photo-modulation of Purkinje cell membrane current and spike-firing rate. The findings demonstrate photo-control of GABAARs by an allosteric ligand and open new avenues for fundamental and clinically oriented research on GABAARs, a major class of neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system. PMID:23033071

  1. Diverse effects of two allosteric inhibitors on the phosphorylation state of glycogen phosphorylase in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Latsis, Theodore; Andersen, Birgitte; Agius, Loranne

    2002-01-01

    Two distinct allosteric inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase, 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and CP-91149 (an indole-2-carboxamide), were investigated for their effects on the phosphorylation state of the enzyme in hepatocytes in vitro. CP-91149 induced inactivation (dephosphorylation) of phosphorylase in the absence of hormones and partially counteracted the phosphorylation caused by glucagon. Inhibition of glycogenolysis by CP-91149 can be explained by dephosphorylation of phosphorylase a. This was associated with activation of glycogen synthase and stimulation of glycogen synthesis. DAB, in contrast, induced a small degree of phosphorylation of phosphorylase. This was associated with inactivation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen synthesis. Despite causing phosphorylation (activation) of phosphorylase, DAB is a very potent inhibitor of glycogenolysis in both the absence and presence of glucagon. This is explained by allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase a, which overrides the increase in activation state. In conclusion, two potent phosphorylase inhibitors exert different effects on glycogen metabolism in intact hepatocytes as a result of opposite effects on the phosphorylation state of both phosphorylase and glycogen synthase. PMID:12186629

  2. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  3. 5'-Substituted Amiloride Derivatives as Allosteric Modulators Binding in the Sodium Ion Pocket of the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Massink, Arnault; Louvel, Julien; Adlere, Ilze; van Veen, Corine; Huisman, Berend J H; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; Guo, Dong; Lenselink, Eelke B; Buckley, Benjamin J; Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-26

    The sodium ion site is an allosteric site conserved among many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Amiloride 1 and 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride 2 (HMA) supposedly bind in this sodium ion site and can influence orthosteric ligand binding. The availability of a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the human adenosine A2A receptor (hA2AAR), in which the allosteric sodium ion site was elucidated, makes it an appropriate model receptor for investigating the allosteric site. In this study, we report the synthesis and evaluation of novel 5'-substituted amiloride derivatives as hA2AAR allosteric antagonists. The potency of the amiloride derivatives was assessed by their ability to displace orthosteric radioligand [(3)H]4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol ([(3)H]ZM-241,385) from both the wild-type and sodium ion site W246A mutant hA2AAR. 4-Ethoxyphenethyl-substituted amiloride 12l was found to be more potent than both amiloride and HMA, and the shift in potency between the wild-type and mutated receptor confirmed its likely binding to the sodium ion site. PMID:27124340

  4. Mapping of the Allosteric Site in Cholesterol Hydroxylase CYP46A1 for Efavirenz, a Drug That Stimulates Enzyme Activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle W; Mast, Natalia; Hudgens, Jeffrey W; Lin, Joseph B; Turko, Illarion V; Pikuleva, Irina A

    2016-05-27

    Cytochrome P450 46A1 (CYP46A1) is a microsomal enzyme and cholesterol 24-hydroxylase that controls cholesterol elimination from the brain. This P450 is also a potential target for Alzheimer disease because it can be activated pharmacologically by some marketed drugs, as exemplified by efavirenz, the anti-HIV medication. Previously, we suggested that pharmaceuticals activate CYP46A1 allosterically through binding to a site on the cytosolic protein surface, which is different from the enzyme active site facing the membrane. Here we identified this allosteric site for efavirenz on CYP46A1 by using a combination of hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to MS, computational modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and analysis of the CYP46A1 crystal structure. We also mapped the binding region for the CYP46A1 redox partner oxidoreductase and found that the allosteric and redox partner binding sites share a common border. On the basis of the data obtained, we propose the mechanism of CYP46A1 allostery and the pathway for the signal transmission from the P450 allosteric site to the active site. PMID:27056331

  5. Discovery of Potential Orthosteric and Allosteric Antagonists of P2Y1R from Chinese Herbs by Molecular Simulation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fang; Jiang, Lu-di; Qiao, Lian-sheng; Xiang, Yu-hong

    2016-01-01

    P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R), which belongs to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), is an important target in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The crystal structure of P2Y1R has been solved recently, which revealed orthosteric and allosteric ligand-binding sites with the details of ligand-protein binding modes. And it suggests that P2Y1R antagonists, which recognize two distinct sites, could potentially provide an efficacious and safe antithrombotic profile. In present paper, 2D similarity search, pharmacophore based screening, and molecular docking were used to explore the potential natural P2Y1R antagonists. 2D similarity search was used to classify orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of P2Y1R. Based on the result, pharmacophore models were constructed and validated by the test set. Optimal models were selected to discover potential P2Y1R antagonists of orthosteric and allosteric sites from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). And the hits were filtered by Lipinski's rule. Then molecular docking was used to refine the results of pharmacophore based screening and analyze the binding mode of the hits and P2Y1R. Finally, two orthosteric and one allosteric potential compounds were obtained, which might be used in future P2Y1R antagonists design. This work provides a reliable guide for discovering natural P2Y1R antagonists acting on two distinct sites from TCM.

  6. Modulation of Ultrafast Conformational Dynamics in Allosteric Interaction of Gal Repressor Protein with Different Operator DNA Sequences.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Susobhan; Naiya, Gitashri; Singh, Priya; Lemmens, Peter; Roy, Siddhartha; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Although all forms of dynamical behaviour of a protein under allosteric interaction with effectors are predicted, little evidence of ultrafast dynamics in the interaction has been reported. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of a combined approach involving picosecond-resolved FRET and polarisation-gated fluorescence for the exploration of ultrafast dynamics in the allosteric interaction of the Gal repressor (GalR) protein dimer with DNA operator sequences OE and OI . FRET from the single tryptophan residue to a covalently attached probe IAEDANS at a cysteine residue in the C-terminal domain of GalR shows structural perturbation and conformational dynamics during allosteric interaction. Polarisation-gated fluorescence spectroscopy of IAEDANS and another probe (FITC) covalently attached to the operator directly revealed the essential dynamics for cooperativity in the protein-protein interaction. The ultrafast resonance energy transfer from IAEDANS in the protein to FITC also revealed different dynamic flexibility in the allosteric interaction. An attempt was made to correlate the dynamic changes in the protein dimers with OE and OI with the consequent protein-protein interaction (tetramerisation) to form a DNA loop encompassing the promoter segment. PMID:26914958

  7. In silico-screening approaches for lead generation: identification of novel allosteric modulators of human-erythrocyte pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashutosh; Safo, Martin K

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allosteric binding site modulators have gained increased attention lately for their potential to be developed as selective agents with a novel chemotype and targeting perhaps a new and unique binding site with probable fewer side effects. Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (R-PK) is an important glycolytic enzyme that can be pharmacologically modulated through its allosteric effectors for the treatment of hemolytic anemia, sickle-cell anemia, hypoxia-related diseases, and other disorders arising from erythrocyte PK malfunction. An in-silico screening approach was applied to identify novel allosteric modulators of pyruvate kinase. A small-molecules database of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), was virtually screened based on structure/ligand-based pharmacophore. The virtual screening campaign led to the identification of several compounds with similar pharmacophoric features as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), the natural allosteric activator of the kinase. The compounds were subsequently docked into the FBP-binding site using the programs FlexX and GOLD, and their interactions with the protein were analyzed with the energy-scoring function of HINT. Seven promising candidates were obtained from the NCI and subjected to kinetics analysis, which revealed both activators and inhibitors of the R-isozyme of PK (R-PK). PMID:22052500

  8. A Structural Basis for the Allosteric Regulatin of Non-Hydrolysing UDP-G1cNAc 2-Epimerases

    SciTech Connect

    Velloso,L.; Bhaskaran, S.; Schuch, R.; Fischetti, V.; Stebbins, C.

    2008-01-01

    The non-hydrolysing bacterial UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase (UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase) catalyses the conversion of UDP-GlcNAc into UDP-N-acetylmannosamine, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of several cell-surface polysaccharides. This enzyme is allosterically regulated by its substrate UDP-GlcNAc. The structure of the ternary complex between the Bacillus anthracis UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, its substrate UDP-GlcNAc and the reaction intermediate UDP, showed direct interactions between UDP and its substrate, and between the complex and highly conserved enzyme residues, identifying the allosteric site of the enzyme. The binding of UDP-GlcNAc is associated with conformational changes in the active site of the enzyme. Kinetic data and mutagenesis of the highly conserved UDP-GlcNAc-interacting residues confirm their importance in the substrate binding and catalysis of the enzyme. This constitutes the first example to our knowledge, of an enzymatic allosteric activation by direct interaction between the substrate and the allosteric activator.

  9. Differential pathway coupling efficiency of the activated insulin receptor drives signaling selectivity by xmeta, an allosteric partial agonist antibody

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    XMetA, an anti-insulin receptor (IR) monoclonal antibody, is an allosteric partial agonist of the IR. We have previously reported that XMetA activates the “metabolic-biased” Akt kinase signaling pathway while having little or no effect on the “mitogenic” MAPK signaling pathwayof ERK 1/2. To inves...

  10. Allosteric modulation of Ras and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway: emerging therapeutic opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Paul A.; Moody, Colleen L.; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    GTPases and kinases are two predominant signaling modules that regulate cell fate. Dysregulation of Ras, a GTPase, and the three eponymous kinases that form key nodes of the associated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway have been implicated in many cancers, including pancreatic cancer, a disease noted for its current lack of effective therapeutics. The K-Ras isoform of Ras is mutated in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and there is growing evidence linking aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activity to PDAC. Although these observations suggest that targeting one of these nodes might lead to more effective treatment options for patients with pancreatic and other cancers, the complex regulatory mechanisms and the number of sequence-conserved isoforms of these proteins have been viewed as significant barriers in drug development. Emerging insights into the allosteric regulatory mechanisms of these proteins suggest novel opportunities for development of selective allosteric inhibitors with fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) helping make significant inroads. The fact that allosteric inhibitors of Ras and AKT are currently in pre-clinical development lends support to this approach. In this article, we will focus on the recent advances and merits of developing allosteric drugs targeting these two inter-related signaling pathways. PMID:25566081

  11. Allosteric modulation of Ras and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway: emerging therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Paul A; Moody, Colleen L; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    GTPases and kinases are two predominant signaling modules that regulate cell fate. Dysregulation of Ras, a GTPase, and the three eponymous kinases that form key nodes of the associated phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway have been implicated in many cancers, including pancreatic cancer, a disease noted for its current lack of effective therapeutics. The K-Ras isoform of Ras is mutated in over 90% of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) and there is growing evidence linking aberrant PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway activity to PDAC. Although these observations suggest that targeting one of these nodes might lead to more effective treatment options for patients with pancreatic and other cancers, the complex regulatory mechanisms and the number of sequence-conserved isoforms of these proteins have been viewed as significant barriers in drug development. Emerging insights into the allosteric regulatory mechanisms of these proteins suggest novel opportunities for development of selective allosteric inhibitors with fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) helping make significant inroads. The fact that allosteric inhibitors of Ras and AKT are currently in pre-clinical development lends support to this approach. In this article, we will focus on the recent advances and merits of developing allosteric drugs targeting these two inter-related signaling pathways. PMID:25566081

  12. NMR Mapping of the IFNAR1-EC binding site on IFNα2 reveals allosteric changes in the IFNAR2-EC binding site

    PubMed Central

    Akabayov, Sabine Ruth; Biron, Zohar; Lamken, Peter; Piehler, Jacob; Anglister, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    All type I interferons (IFNs) bind to a common cell-surface receptor consisting of two subunits. IFNs initiate intracellular signal transduction cascades by simultaneous interaction with the extracellular domains of its receptor subunits IFNAR1 and IFNAR2. In this study we mapped the surface of IFNα2 interacting with the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) by following changes in or the disappearance of the [1H,15N]-TROSY-HSQC cross peaks of IFNα2 caused by the binding of the extracellular domain of IFNAR1 (IFNAR1-EC) to the binary complex of IFNα2 with IFNAR2-EC. The NMR study on the 89 kDa complex was conducted at pH 8 and 308 K using an 800 MHz spectrometer. IFNAR1 binding affected a total of 47 out of 165 IFNα2 residues contained in two large patches on the face of the protein opposing the binding site for IFNAR2 and in a third patch located on the face containing the IFNAR2 binding site. The first two patches form the IFNAR1 binding site and one of these matches the IFNAR1 binding site previously identified by site-directed mutagenesis. The third patch partially matches the IFNα2 binding site for IFNAR2-EC indicating allosteric communication between the binding sites for the two receptor subunits. PMID:20047337

  13. Altering residues N125 and D149 impacts sugar effector binding and allosteric parameters in Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Liu, Shirley; Chen, Mingzhi; Ma, Jianpeng; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2011-10-25

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI), a negative transcriptional regulator in Escherichia coli, relies on an allosteric conformational change for its function. The LacI effector isopropyl-β,D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) promotes this allosteric response and engages the side chains of residues N125 and D149 based on the crystallographic structure of LacI·IPTG. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulations have indicated involvement of these side chains during the protein structural changes in response to inducer binding. To examine this region further, we applied stochastic boundary molecular dynamics (SBMD) simulation and identified a transient interaction between residues N125 and D149. On the basis of these data, we introduced substitutions for either/both residues and analyzed their impact on protein function. The substitutions utilized were alanine to preclude hydrogen bonding or cysteine to allow disulfide bond formation, which was not observed for N125C/D149C. Minimal impacts were observed on operator affinity for all substitutions, but D149C, N125A/D149A, and N125C/D149C bound to IPTG with 5-8-fold lower affinity than wild-type LacI, and exhibited decreased allosteric amplitude (K(RI/O)/K(R/O)). Of interest, the double mutants did not exhibit an allosteric response to an alternate inducer, 2-phenylethyl-β,D-galactoside (PhEG), despite demonstration of PhEG binding. Further, the presence of the anti-inducer, o-nitrophenyl-β,D-fucoside (ONPF), enhanced operator affinity for wild-type LacI and all other mutant proteins examined, but behaved as an inducer for N125A/D149A, decreasing operator binding affinity. These results confirm the role of residues 125 and 149 in ligand binding and allosteric response and illustrate how readily the function of a regulatory protein can be altered. PMID:21928765

  14. Allosteric Inhibition of Factor XIIIa. Non-Saccharide Glycosaminoglycan Mimetics, but Not Glycosaminoglycans, Exhibit Promising Inhibition Profile

    PubMed Central

    Al-Horani, Rami A.; Karuturi, Rajesh; Lee, Michael; Afosah, Daniel K.

    2016-01-01

    Factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is a transglutaminase that catalyzes the last step in the coagulation process. Orthostery is the only approach that has been exploited to design FXIIIa inhibitors. Yet, allosteric inhibition of FXIIIa is a paradigm that may offer a key advantage of controlled inhibition over orthosteric inhibition. Such an approach is likely to lead to novel FXIIIa inhibitors that do not carry bleeding risks. We reasoned that targeting a collection of basic amino acid residues distant from FXIIIa’s active site by using sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) or non-saccharide GAG mimetics (NSGMs) would lead to the discovery of the first allosteric FXIIIa inhibitors. We tested a library of 22 variably sulfated GAGs and NSGMs against human FXIIIa to discover promising hits. Interestingly, although some GAGs bound to FXIIIa better than NSGMs, no GAG displayed any inhibition. An undecasulfated quercetin analog was found to inhibit FXIIIa with reasonable potency (efficacy of 98%). Michaelis-Menten kinetic studies revealed an allosteric mechanism of inhibition. Fluorescence studies confirmed close correspondence between binding affinity and inhibition potency, as expected for an allosteric process. The inhibitor was reversible and at least 9-fold- and 26-fold selective over two GAG-binding proteins factor Xa (efficacy of 71%) and thrombin, respectively, and at least 27-fold selective over a cysteine protease papain. The inhibitor also inhibited the FXIIIa-mediated polymerization of fibrin in vitro. Overall, our work presents the proof-of-principle that FXIIIa can be allosterically modulated by sulfated non-saccharide agents much smaller than GAGs, which should enable the design of selective and safe anticoagulants. PMID:27467511

  15. Allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a using Quercetin 3-O-rutinoside and its combination.

    PubMed

    Rani, Nidhi; Vijayakumar, Saravanan; P T V, Lakshmi; Arunachalam, Annamalai

    2016-08-01

    Recent crystallographic study revealed the involvement of allosteric site in active site inhibition of penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), where one molecule of Ceftaroline (Cef) binds to the allosteric site of PBP2a and paved way for the other molecule (Cef) to bind at the active site. Though Cef has the potency to inhibit the PBP2a, its adverse side effects are of major concern. Previous studies have reported the antibacterial property of Quercetin derivatives, a group of natural compounds. Hence, the present study aims to evaluate the effect of Quercetin 3-o-rutinoside (Rut) in allosteric site-mediated active site inhibition of PBP2a. The molecular docking studies between allosteric site and ligands (Rut, Que, and Cef) revealed a better binding efficiency (G-score) of Rut (-7.790318) and Cef (-6.194946) with respect to Que (-5.079284). Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies showed significant changes at the active site in the presence of ligands (Rut and Cef) at allosteric site. Four different combinations of Rut and Cef were docked and their G-scores ranged between -6.320 and -8.623. MD studies revealed the stability of the key residue (Ser403) with Rut being at both sites, compared to other complexes. Morphological analysis through electron microscopy confirmed that combination of Rut and Cefixime was able to disturb the bacterial cell membrane in a similar fashion to that of Rut and Cefixime alone. The results of this study indicate that the affinity of Rut at both sites were equally good, with further validations Rut could be considered as an alternative for inhibiting MRSA growth. PMID:26360629

  16. Satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Philip A.

    A review of the economic and technological status of the satellite communications industry is presented. The history of satellite communications is outlined, focusing on the launching of Syncom III in 1963. The basic operation of communication satellites is explained. The differences between C and Ku frequency bands are examined. Economic issues related to satellite communications are discussed in detail.

  17. Satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, M. K.

    1982-11-01

    The paper describes the basic principles and the historial development of satellite communications. Various satellite systems for global communications are discused and compared. Some typical operational communication satellite systems summary including geostationary systems are presented. Considerations leading to the system design including the link design for various multiple access techniques and the future trends in satellite communications systems are also discussed.

  18. Transracial Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur L.

    This book explores and explains communication among different racial groups within the scope of existing communication theory. Following a brief introduction, chapters cover "Directions in Transracial Communication" (definitions, process, structurization, and purpose); "Culture and Transracial Communication" (a viewpoint on culture, time, family,…

  19. Exploring the allosteric mechanism of dihydrodipicolinate synthase by reverse engineering of the allosteric inhibitor binding sites and its application for lysine production.

    PubMed

    Geng, Feng; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-03-01

    Dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS, EC 4.2.1.52) catalyzes the first committed reaction of L-lysine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants and is allosterically regulated by L-lysine. In previous studies, DHDPSs from different species were proved to have different sensitivity to L-lysine inhibition. In this study, we investigated the key determinants of feedback regulation between two industrially important DHDPSs, the L-lysine-sensitive DHDPS from Escherichia coli and L-lysine-insensitive DHDPS from Corynebacterium glutamicum, by sequence and structure comparisons and site-directed mutation. Feedback inhibition of E. coli DHDPS was successfully alleviated after substitution of the residues around the inhibitor's binding sites with those of C. glutamicum DHDPS. Interestingly, mutagenesis of the lysine binding sites of C. glutamicum DHDPS according to E. coli DHDPS did not recover the expected feedback inhibition but an activation of DHDPS by L-lysine, probably due to differences in the allosteic signal transduction in the DHDPS of these two organisms. Overexpression of L-lysine-insensitive E. coli DHDPS mutants in E. coli MG1655 resulted in an improvement of L-lysine production yield by 46 %. PMID:22644522

  20. Ibuprofen Impairs Allosterically Peroxynitrite Isomerization by Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 105 and 4.5 × 105 m−1 s−1, respectively. Moreover, HSA-heme-Fe(III) prevents peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of free added l-tyrosine. The pH dependence of kon (pKa = 6.9) suggests that peroxynitrous acid reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom, in the absence and presence of CO2. The HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite has been ascribed to the reactive pentacoordinated heme-Fe(III) atom. In the absence and presence of CO2, ibuprofen impairs dose-dependently peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III) and facilitates the nitration of free added l-tyrosine; the value of the dissociation equilibrium constant for ibuprofen binding to HSA-heme-Fe(III) (L) ranges between 7.7 × 10−4 and 9.7 × 10−4 m. Under conditions where [ibuprofen] is ≫L, the kinetics of HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite is superimposable to that obtained in the absence of HSA-heme-Fe(III) or in the presence of non-catalytic HSA-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex and HSA. Ibuprofen binding impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), inducing the hexacoordination of the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results represent the first evidence for peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), highlighting the allosteric modulation of HSA-heme-Fe(III) reactivity by heterotropic interaction(s), and outlining the role of drugs in modulating HSA functions. The present results could be relevant for the drug-dependent protective role

  1. Extracellular Calcium Modulates Actions of Orthosteric and Allosteric Ligands on Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 1α*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jason Y.; Nagaraju, Mulpuri; Meyer, Rebecca C.; Zhang, Li; Hamelberg, Donald; Hall, Randy A.; Brown, Edward M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Yang, Jenny J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α), a member of the family C G protein-coupled receptors, is emerging as a potential drug target for various disorders, including chronic neuronal degenerative diseases. In addition to being activated by glutamate, mGluR1α is also modulated by extracellular Ca2+. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Moreover, it has long been challenging to develop receptor-specific agonists due to homologies within the mGluR family, and the Ca2+-binding site(s) on mGluR1α may provide an opportunity for receptor-selective targeting by therapeutics. In the present study, we show that our previously predicted Ca2+-binding site in the hinge region of mGluR1α is adjacent to the site where orthosteric agonists and antagonists bind on the extracellular domain of the receptor. Moreover, we found that extracellular Ca2+ enhanced mGluR1α-mediated intracellular Ca2+ responses evoked by the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate. Conversely, extracellular Ca2+ diminished the inhibitory effect of the mGluR1α orthosteric antagonist (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine. In addition, selective positive (Ro 67-4853) and negative (7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester) allosteric modulators of mGluR1α potentiated and inhibited responses to extracellular Ca2+, respectively, in a manner similar to their effects on the response of mGluR1α to glutamate. Mutations at residues predicted to be involved in Ca2+ binding, including E325I, had significant effects on the modulation of responses to the orthosteric agonist l-quisqualate and the allosteric modulator Ro 67-4853 by extracellular Ca2+. These studies reveal that binding of extracellular Ca2+ to the predicted Ca2+-binding site in the extracellular domain of mGluR1α modulates not only glutamate-evoked signaling but also the actions of both orthosteric ligands and allosteric modulators on mGluR1α. PMID:24280223

  2. Information Needs While A Disaster Is Occurring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, S. C.

    2010-12-01

    Evidence from recent earthquakes, wildfires, and debris flows in southern California indicates that many people - local officials as well as residents and visitors - lack important understanding during the time that a disaster is unfolding, a time of uncertainty and confusion. While some of the uncertainty is inherent, some could be alleviated. Physical scientists and engineers know what to expect as the event unfolds. Social scientists know how humans will react during a disaster, and how to effectively communicate the warnings or evacuation orders that may precede it. Such knowledge can improve public safety. As just a few of many examples: - Based on questions posed at numerous public talks, many individuals who practice "Drop Cover and Hold" during earthquake drills do not understand what they are protecting themselves against, and thus cannot determine what to do when an earthquake strikes and they have no cover available. Similarly, they do not know how to act during the aftershocks that follow. - The 2009 Station Fire in the San Gabriel Mountains put foothills communities at risk, first from the wildfire and then from debris flows. Some neighborhoods received multiple evacuation notices during a few days or months. Local officials have expressed frustration and concern about an evacuation compliance rate that is steadily dropping and is now below 50%. The debris flow danger will persist over the next 2-4 winters yet evacuation compliance may drop lower still. - On February 6, 2010, a significant rainstorm brought the threat of imminent debris flows to areas burned by the Station Fire. In one neighborhood, residents loaded their cars with important belongings then waited for indications that they should evacuate. Powerful debris flows suddenly appeared, sweeping the cars downhill and destroying both cars and belongings. Some residents did understand that rainfall intensity would control the generation of debris flows in that storm. But they didn't understand

  3. Aviation Communications Emulation Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehe, Charles; Mulkerin, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Aviation related applications that rely upon datalink for information exchange are increasingly being developed and deployed. The increase in the quantity of applications and associated data communications will expose problems and issues to resolve. NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared to study the communications issues that will arise as datalink applications are employed within the National Airspace System (NAS) by developing a aviation communications emulation testbed. The Testbed is evolving and currently provides the hardware and software needed to study the communications impact of Air Traffic Control (ATC) and surveillance applications in a densely populated environment. The communications load associated with up to 160 aircraft transmitting and receiving ATC and surveillance data can be generated in real time in a sequence similar to what would occur in the NAS.

  4. 12 CFR 207.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  5. 12 CFR 207.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  6. 12 CFR 346.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  7. 12 CFR 207.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  8. 12 CFR 207.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  9. 12 CFR 346.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  10. 12 CFR 346.3 - CRA communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... communication. A CRA communication is any of the following— (1) Any written or oral comment or testimony... contacts with a Federal banking agency. An oral or written communication with a Federal banking agency is not a CRA communication if it occurred more than 3 years before the parties entered into the...

  11. Effect of viscogens on the kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldauer, Steven A.; Stucki-Buchli, Brigitte; Frey, Lukas; Hamm, Peter

    2014-12-01

    By covalently binding a photoswitchable linker across the binding groove of the PDZ2 domain, a small conformational change can be photo-initiated that mimics the allosteric transition of the protein. The response of its binding groove is investigated with the help of ultrafast pump-probe IR spectroscopy from picoseconds to tens of microseconds. The temperature dependence of that response is compatible with diffusive dynamics on a rugged energy landscape without any prominent energy barrier. Furthermore, the dependence of the kinetics on the concentration of certain viscogens, sucrose, and glycerol, has been investigated. A pronounced viscosity dependence is observed that can be best fit by a power law, i.e., a fractional viscosity dependence. The change of kinetics when comparing sucrose with glycerol as viscogen, however, provides strong evidence that direct interactions of the viscogen molecule with the protein do play a role as well. This conclusion is supported by accompanying molecular dynamics simulations.

  12. Dual Allosteric Effect in Glycine/NMDA Receptor Antagonism: A Comparative QSAR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Manish; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2010-01-01

    A comparative Hansch type QSAR study was conducted using multiple regression analysis on various sets of quinoxalines, quinoxalin-4-ones, quinazoline-2-carboxylates, 4-hydroxyquinolin-2(1H)-ones, 2-carboxytetrahydroquinolines, phenyl-hydroxy-quinolones, nitroquinolones and 4-substituted-3-phenylquinolin-2(1H)-ones as selective glycine/NMDA site antagonists. Ten statistically validated equations were developed, which indicated the importance of CMR, Verloop’s sterimol L1 and ClogP parameters in contributing towards biological activity. Interestingly, normal and inverse parabolic relationships were found with CMR in different series, indicating a dual allosteric binding mode in glycine/NMDA antagonism. Equations reveal an optimum CMR of 10 ± 10% is required for good potency of antagonists. Other equations indicate the presence of anionic functionality at 4-position of quinoline/quinolone ring system is not absolutely required for effective binding. The observations are laterally validated and in accordance with previous studies.

  13. Small Molecule-Induced Allosteric Activation of the Vibrio Cholerae RTX Cysteine Protease Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lupardus, P.J.; Shen, A.; Bogyo, M.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-19

    Vibrio cholerae RTX (repeats in toxin) is an actin-disrupting toxin that is autoprocessed by an internal cysteine protease domain (CPD). The RTX CPD is efficiently activated by the eukaryote-specific small molecule inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP{sub 6}), and we present the 2.1 angstrom structure of the RTX CPD in complex with InsP{sub 6}. InsP{sub 6} binds to a conserved basic cleft that is distant from the protease active site. Biochemical and kinetic analyses of CPD mutants indicate that InsP{sub 6} binding induces an allosteric switch that leads to the autoprocessing and intracellular release of toxin-effector domains.

  14. Allosteric inhibitors of plasma membrane Ca pumps: Invention and applications of caloxins.

    PubMed

    Pande, Jyoti; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Grover, Ashok K

    2011-03-26

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps (PMCA) play a major role in Ca(2+) homeostasis and signaling by extruding cellular Ca(2+) with high affinity. PMCA isoforms are encoded by four genes which are expressed differentially in various cell types in normal and disease states. Therefore, PMCA isoform selective inhibitors would aid in delineating their role in physiology and pathophysiology. We are testing the hypothesis that extracellular domains of PMCA can be used as allosteric targets to obtain a novel class of PMCA-specific inhibitors termed caloxins. This review presents the concepts behind the invention of caloxins and our progress in this area. A section is also devoted to the applications of caloxins in literature. We anticipate that isoform-selective caloxins will aid in understanding PMCA physiology in health and disease. With strategies to develop therapeutics from bioactive peptides, caloxins may become clinically useful in cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, retinopathy, cancer and contraception. PMID:21537489

  15. Targeting a Rate-Promoting Vibration with an Allosteric Mediator in Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dzierlenga, Michael W; Schwartz, Steven D

    2016-07-01

    We present a new type of allosteric modulation in which a molecule bound outside the active site modifies the chemistry of an enzymatic reaction through rapid protein dynamics. As a test case for this type of allostery, we chose an enzyme with a well-characterized rate-promoting vibration, lactate dehydrogenase; identified a suitable small molecule for binding; and used transition path sampling to obtain ensembles of reactive trajectories. We found that the small molecule significantly affected the reaction by changing the position of the transition state and, through applying committor distribution analysis, showed that it removed the protein component from the reaction coordinate. The ability of a small-molecule to disrupt enzymatic reactions through alteration of subpicosecond protein motion opens the door for new experimental studies on protein motion coupled to enzymatic reactions and possibly the design of drugs to target these enzymes. PMID:27327209

  16. Allosteric Transcriptional Regulation via changes in the Overall Topology of the Core Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Steven J.; Canalizo-Hernandez, Monica; Yildirim, Ilyas; Schatz, George C.; Mondragón, Alfonso; O’Halloran, Thomas V.

    2015-01-01

    Many transcriptional activators act at a distance from core promoter elements and work by recruiting RNA polymerase through protein-protein interactions. We show here how the prokaryotic regulatory protein CueR both represses and activates transcription by differentially modulating local DNA structure within the promoter. Structural studies reveal that the repressor state slightly bends the promoter DNA, precluding optimal RNA polymerase-promoter recognition. Upon binding a metal ion in the allosteric site, CueR switches into an activator conformation. It maintains all protein-DNA contacts but introduces torsional stresses that kink and undertwist the promoter, stabilizing an A-DNA-like conformation. These factors switch on and off transcription by exerting dynamic control of DNA stereochemistry, reshaping the core promoter and making it a better or worse substrate for polymerase. PMID:26293965

  17. A Derived Allosteric Switch Underlies the Evolution of Conditional Cooperativity between HOXA11 and FOXO1.

    PubMed

    Nnamani, Mauris C; Ganguly, Soumya; Erkenbrack, Eric M; Lynch, Vincent J; Mizoue, Laura S; Tong, Yingchun; Darling, Heather L; Fuxreiter, Monika; Meiler, Jens; Wagner, Günter P

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play multiple roles in development. Given this multifunctionality, it has been assumed that TFs are evolutionarily highly constrained. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanisms for the origin of a derived functional interaction between two TFs, HOXA11 and FOXO1. We have previously shown that the regulatory role of HOXA11 in mammalian endometrial stromal cells requires interaction with FOXO1, and that the physical interaction between these proteins evolved before their functional cooperativity. Here, we demonstrate that the derived functional cooperativity between HOXA11 and FOXO1 is due to derived allosteric regulation of HOXA11 by FOXO1. This study shows that TF function can evolve through changes affecting the functional output of a pre-existing protein complex. PMID:27239043

  18. Allosteric modifiers of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: new methods, new opportunities.

    PubMed

    Moaddel, Ruin; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Wainer, Irving W

    2007-09-01

    Allosteric, non-competitive inhibitors (NCIs) of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been shown to produce a wide variety of clinically relevant responses. Many of the observed effects are desired as the nAChR is the therapeutic target, while others are undesired consequences due to off-target binding at the nAChR. Thus, the determination of whether or not a lead drug candidate is an NCI should play an important role in drug discovery programs. However, the current experimental techniques used to identify NCIs are challenging, expensive, and time consuming. This review focuses on an alternative approach to the investigation of interactions between test compounds and nAChRs based upon liquid chromatographic stationary phases containing cellular fragments from cell lines expressing nAChRs. The development and validation of these phases as well as their use in drug discovery and pharmacophore modeling are discussed. PMID:17238157

  19. Experiments on Hemoglobin in Single Crystals and Silica Gels Distinguish among Allosteric Models.

    PubMed

    Henry, Eric R; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Viappiani, Cristiano; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Bettati, Stefano; Ronda, Luca; Bruno, Stefano; Eaton, William A

    2015-09-15

    Trapping quaternary structures of hemoglobin in single crystals or by encapsulation in silica gels has provided a demanding set of data to test statistical mechanical models of allostery. In this work, we compare the results of those experiments with predictions of the four major allosteric models for hemoglobin: the quaternary two-state model of Monod, Wyman, and Changeux; the tertiary two-state model of Henry et al., which is the simplest extension of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model to include pre-equilibria of tertiary as well as quaternary conformations; the structure-based model of Szabo and Karplus; and the modification of the latter model by Lee and Karplus. We show that only the tertiary two-state model can provide a near quantitative explanation of the single-crystal and gel experimental results. PMID:26038112

  20. Intrinsic Enzyme Dynamics in the Unbound State and Relation to Allosteric Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ivet; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Tobi, Dror

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a surge in the number of studies exploring the relationship between proteins’ equilibrium dynamics and structural changes involved in function. An emerging concept, supported by both theory and experiments, is that under native state conditions proteins have an intrinsic ability to sample conformations that meet functional requirements. A typical example is the ability of enzymes to sample open and closed forms, irrespective of substrate, succeeded by the stabilization of one form (usually closed) upon substrate binding. This ability is structure-encoded, and plays a key role in facilitating allosteric regulation, which suggests complementing the sequence-encodes-structure paradigm of protein science by structure-encodes-dynamics-encodes-function. The emerging connection implies an evolutionary role in selecting/conserving structures based on their ability to achieve functional dynamics, and in turn, selecting sequences that fold into such ‘apt’ structures. PMID:18024008

  1. An Allosteric Mechanism Inferred from Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Phospholamban Pentamer in Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Peng; Wei, Dong-Qing; Wang, Jing-Fang; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2011-01-01

    Phospholamban functions as a regulator of Ca2+ concentration of cardiac muscle cells by triggering the bioactivity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. In order to understand its dynamic mechanism in the environment of bilayer surroundings, we performed long time-scale molecular dynamic simulations based on the high-resolution NMR structure of phospholamban pentamer. It was observed from the molecular dynamics trajectory analyses that the conformational transitions between the “bellflower” and “pinwheel” modes were detected for phospholamban. Particularly, the two modes became quite similar to each other after phospholamban was phosphorylated at Ser16. Based on these findings, an allosteric mechanism was proposed to elucidate the dynamic process of phospholamban interacting with Ca2+-ATPase. PMID:21525996

  2. Functional complementation of yeast phosphofructokinase mutants by the non-allosteric enzyme from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Estévez, A M; Heinisch, J J; Aragón, J J

    1995-10-23

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) from yeast has been replaced by the non-allosteric isozyme from the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This has been achieved by overexpression of the latter in a PFK-deficient strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under the control of the PFK2 promoter. Transformants complemented the glucose-negative growth phenotype exhibiting generation times on glucose-containing media similar to those of an untransformed strain being wild-type for yeast PFK genes. The PFK produced reacted with an antibody against D. discoideum PFK. It exhibited the same subunit size, quaternary structure and kinetic parameters than those of the wild-type enzyme, and was also devoid of specific regulatory properties. PMID:7589492

  3. Inhibition of yeast ribonucleotide reductase by Sml1 depends on the allosteric state of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Misko, Tessianna A; Wijerathna, Sanath R; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Berdis, Anthony J; Ahmad, Md Faiz; Harris, Michael E; Dealwis, Chris G

    2016-06-01

    Sml1 is an intrinsically disordered protein inhibitor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ribonucleotide reductase (ScRR1), but its inhibition mechanism is poorly understood. RR reduces ribonucleoside diphosphates to their deoxy forms, and balances the nucleotide pool. Multiple turnover kinetics show that Sml1 inhibition of dGTP/ADP- and ATP/CDP-bound ScRR follows a mixed inhibition mechanism. However, Sml1 cooperatively binds to the ES complex in the dGTP/ADP form, whereas with ATP/CDP, Sml1 binds weakly and noncooperatively. Gel filtration and mutagenesis studies indicate that Sml1 does not alter the oligomerization equilibrium and the CXXC motif is not involved in the inhibition. The data suggest that Sml1 is an allosteric inhibitor. PMID:27155231

  4. Structural Mechanism of Allosteric Activity Regulation in a Ribonucleotide Reductase with Double ATP Cones.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Renzo; Jonna, Venkateswara Rao; Kumar, Rohit; Nayeri, Niloofar; Lundin, Daniel; Sjöberg, Britt-Marie; Hofer, Anders; Logan, Derek T

    2016-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) reduce ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. Their overall activity is stimulated by ATP and downregulated by dATP via a genetically mobile ATP cone domain mediating the formation of oligomeric complexes with varying quaternary structures. The crystal structure and solution X-ray scattering data of a novel dATP-induced homotetramer of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa class I RNR reveal the structural bases for its unique properties, namely one ATP cone that binds two dATP molecules and a second one that is non-functional, binding no nucleotides. Mutations in the observed tetramer interface ablate oligomerization and dATP-induced inhibition but not the ability to bind dATP. Sequence analysis shows that the novel type of ATP cone may be widespread in RNRs. The present study supports a scenario in which diverse mechanisms for allosteric activity regulation are gained and lost through acquisition and evolutionary erosion of different types of ATP cone. PMID:27133024

  5. Functional plasticity and allosteric regulation of α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase in central mycobacterial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Tristan; Bellinzoni, Marco; Wehenkel, Annemarie; O'Hare, Helen M; Alzari, Pedro M

    2011-08-26

    The α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KDH) complex is a major regulatory point of aerobic energy metabolism. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was reported to lack KDH activity, and the putative KDH E1o component, α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase (KGD), was instead assigned as a decarboxylase or carboligase. Here, we show that this protein does in fact sustain KDH activity, as well as the additional two reactions, and these multifunctional properties are shared by the Escherichia coli homolog, SucA. We also show that the mycobacterial enzyme is finely regulated by an additional acyltransferase-like domain and by the action of acetyl-CoA, a powerful allosteric activator able to enhance the concerted protein motions observed during catalysis. Our results uncover the functional plasticity of a crucial node in bacterial metabolism, which may be important for M. tuberculosis during host infection. PMID:21867916

  6. mGluR5 Positive Allosteric Modulation Enhances Extinction Learning Following Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Cleva, Richard M.; Hicks, Megan P.; Gass, Justin T.; Wischerath, Kelly C.; Plasters, Elizabeth T.; Widholm, John J.; Olive, M. Foster

    2011-01-01

    Extinction of classically and instrumentally conditioned behaviors, such as conditioned fear and drug-seeking behavior, is a process of active learning, and recent studies indicate that potentiation of glutamatergic transmission facilitates extinction learning. In this study we investigated the effects of the type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) positive allosteric modulator 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB) on the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats with a history of intravenous cocaine self-administration. To assess its effects on acquisition and consolidation of extinction learning, CDPPB (60 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered either 20 min prior to, or immediately following, each of 10 extinction sessions, respectively. When administered prior to each extinction session, CDPPB produced a significant reduction in the number of active lever presses on all 10 days of extinction training as compared to vehicle-treated animals. When administered following each extinction session, a significant reduction in the number of active lever presses was observed on the 2nd through 10th day of extinction. Both treatment regimens also reduced the number of extinction training sessions required to meet extinction criteria. Pre- or post-extinction training administration of CDPPB did not alter responding on the inactive lever and had no effects on open field locomotor activity. These data indicate that positive allosteric modulation of mGluR5 receptors facilitates the acquisition and consolidation of extinction learning following cocaine self-administration, and may provide a novel pharmacological approach to enhancing extinction learning when combined with cue exposure therapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. PMID:21319882

  7. Allosteric Inhibitors of the NS3 Protease from the Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Abian, Olga; Vega, Sonia; Sancho, Javier; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    The nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) from the hepatitis C virus processes the non-structural region of the viral precursor polyprotein in infected hepatic cells. The NS3 protease activity has been considered a target for drug development since its identification two decades ago. Although specific inhibitors have been approved for clinical therapy very recently, resistance-associated mutations have already been reported for those drugs, compromising their long-term efficacy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for new anti-HCV agents with low susceptibility to resistance-associated mutations. Regarding NS3 protease, two strategies have been followed: competitive inhibitors blocking the active site and allosteric inhibitors blocking the binding of the accessory viral protein NS4A. In this work we exploit the intrinsic Zn+2-regulated plasticity of the protease to identify a new type of allosteric inhibitors. In the absence of Zn+2, the NS3 protease adopts a partially-folded inactive conformation. We found ligands binding to the Zn+2-free NS3 protease, trap the inactive protein, and block the viral life cycle. The efficacy of these compounds has been confirmed in replicon cell assays. Importantly, direct calorimetric assays reveal a low impact of known resistance-associated mutations, and enzymatic assays provide a direct evidence of their inhibitory activity. They constitute new low molecular-weight scaffolds for further optimization and provide several advantages: 1) new inhibition mechanism simultaneously blocking substrate and cofactor interactions in a non-competitive fashion, appropriate for combination therapy; 2) low impact of known resistance-associated mutations; 3) inhibition of NS4A binding, thus blocking its several effects on NS3 protease. PMID:23936097

  8. Identification of drugs competing with d-tubocurarine for an allosteric site on cardiac muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M

    1994-10-01

    d-Tubocurarine behaved as a weak allosteric inhibitor of N-[3H] methylscopolamine binding to cardiac M2 muscarinic receptors. In a low ionic strength buffer devoid of bivalent ions, d-tubocurarine recognized cardiac M2 receptors in the micromolar concentration range and decreased their affinity for N-[3H]methylscopolamine by at most 4-fold. To identify the compounds that preferentially recognize this accessory site (as opposed to the classical muscarinic binding site), we measured the inhibition by different drugs of N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding, in the absence or presence of d-tubocurarine. The effect of gallamine was competitively inhibited by d-tubocurarine; both drugs compete for the same accessory site on muscarinic receptors. The effects of dexetimide, levetimide, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-ethylpiperidine ethobromide, AF-DX 116, and telenzepine on N-[3H]methylscopolamine binding were not affected or were barely affected by d-tubocurarine; these compounds preferentially recognize another binding site (probably the muscarinic binding site). The dose-effect curves for pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine) bromide and methoctramine were shifted, but at most 10-fold, by d-tubocurarine. It is likely that (in this low ionic strength incubation buffer) methoctramine and pentamethylene-bis(4-diphenylacetoxymethylpiperidine)bromide had comparable affinities for the muscarinic site and the accessory site. d-Tubocurarine competitively inhibited their binding to the accessory site and allosterically inhibited their binding to the muscarinic site. This resulted in a large decrease (40-60-fold) of their overall affinity for muscarinic receptors. PMID:7969047

  9. Identification of a Highly Conserved Allosteric Binding Site on Mnk1 and Mnk2.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Sunita K C; Diab, Sarah; Schmid, Raffaella; Yu, Mingfeng; Yang, Yuchao; Gillam, Todd Alexander; Teo, Theodosia; Li, Peng; Peat, Tom; Albrecht, Hugo; Wang, Shudong

    2015-11-01

    Elevated levels of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) have been implicated in many tumor types, and mitogen activated protein kinase-interacting kinases (Mnks) are the only known kinases that phosphorylate eIF4E at Ser209. The phosphorylation of eIF4E is essential for oncogenic transformation but is of no significance to normal growth and development. Pharmacological inhibition of Mnks therefore provides a nontoxic and effective strategy for cancer therapy. However, a lack of specific Mnk inhibitors has confounded pharmacological target validation and clinical development. Herein, we report the identification of a novel series of Mnk inhibitors and their binding modes. A systematic workflow has been established to distinguish between type III and type I/II inhibitors. A selection of 66 compounds was tested for Mnk1 and Mnk2 inhibition, and 9 out of 20 active compounds showed type III interaction with an allosteric site of the proteins. Most of the type III inhibitors exhibited dual Mnk1 and Mnk2 activities and demonstrated potent antiproliferative properties against the MV4-11 acute myeloid leukemia cell line. Interestingly, ATP-/substrate-competitive inhibitors were found to be highly selective for Mnk2, with little or no activity for Mnk1. Our study suggests that Mnk1 and Mnk2 share a common structure of the allosteric inhibitory binding site but possess different structural features of the ATP catalytic domain. The findings will assist in the future design and development of Mnk targeted anticancer therapeutics. PMID:26268528

  10. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias*

    PubMed Central

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E.; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U.; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M.; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11. Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  11. Identification and Pharmacological Characterization of Multiple Allosteric Binding Sites on the Free Fatty Acid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Daniel C.-H.; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J.; Brown, Sean P.; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  12. Identification and pharmacological characterization of multiple allosteric binding sites on the free fatty acid 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daniel C-H; Guo, Qi; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jane; Nguyen, Kathy; Chen, Michael; Tran, Thanh; Dransfield, Paul J; Brown, Sean P; Houze, Jonathan; Vimolratana, Marc; Jiao, Xian Yun; Wang, Yingcai; Birdsall, Nigel J M; Swaminath, Gayathri

    2012-11-01

    Activation of FFA1 (GPR40), a member of G protein-coupling receptor family A, is mediated by medium- and long-chain fatty acids and leads to amplification of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, suggesting a potential role for free fatty acid 1 (FFA1) as a target for type 2 diabetes. It was assumed previously that there is a single binding site for fatty acids and synthetic FFA1 agonists. However, using members of two chemical series of partial and full agonists that have been identified, radioligand binding interaction studies revealed that the full agonists do not bind to the same site as the partial agonists but exhibit positive heterotropic cooperativity. Analysis of functional data reveals positive functional cooperativity between the full agonists and partial agonists in various functional assays (in vitro and ex vivo) and also in vivo. Furthermore, the endogenous fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) shows negative or neutral cooperativity with members of both series of agonists in binding assays but displays positive cooperativity in functional assays. Another synthetic agonist is allosteric with members of both agonist series, but apparently competitive with DHA. Therefore, there appear to be three allosterically linked binding sites on FFA1 with agonists specific for each of these sites. Activation of free fatty acid 1 receptor (FFAR1) by each of these agonists is differentially affected by mutations of two arginine residues, previously found to be important for FFAR1 binding and activation. These ligands with their high potencies and strong positive functional cooperativity with endogenous fatty acids, demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, have the potential to deliver therapeutic benefits. PMID:22859723

  13. Dual-cavity basket promotes encapsulation in water in an allosteric fashion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shigui; Yamasaki, Makoto; Polen, Shane; Gallucci, Judith; Hadad, Christopher M; Badjić, Jovica D

    2015-09-30

    We prepared dual-cavity basket 1 to carry six (S)-alanine residues at the entrance of its two juxtaposed cavities (289 Å(3)). With the assistance of (1)H NMR spectroscopy and calorimetry, we found that 1 could trap a single molecule of 4 (K1 = 1.45 ± 0.40 × 10(4) M(-1), ITC), akin in size (241 Å(3)) and polar characteristics to nerve agent VX (289 Å(3)). The results of density functional theory calculations (DFT, M06-2X/6-31G*) and experiments ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) suggest that the negative homotropic allosterism arises from the guest forming C-H···π contacts with all three of the aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity. In response, the other cavity increases its size and turns rigid to prevent the formation of the ternary complex. A smaller guest 6 (180 Å(3)), akin in size and polar characteristics to soman (186 Å(3)), was also found to bind to dual-cavity 1, although giving both binary [1⊂6] and ternary [1⊂62] complexes (K1 = 7910 M(-1) and K2 = 2374 M(-1), (1)H NMR spectroscopy). In this case, the computational and experimental ((1)H NMR spectroscopy) results suggest that only two aromatic walls of the occupied basket's cavity form C-H···π contacts with the guest to render the singly occupied host flexible enough to undergo additional structural changes necessary for receiving another guest molecule. The structural adaptivity of dual-cavity baskets of type 1 is unique and important for designing multivalent hosts capable of effectively sequestering targeted guests in an allosteric manner to give stable supramolecular polymers. PMID:26348904

  14. Positive allosteric modulators as an approach to nicotinic acetylcholine receptor- targeted therapeutics: advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Dustin K.; Wang, Jingyi; Papke, Roger L.

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR), recognized targets for drug development in cognitive and neuro-degenerative disorders, are allosteric proteins with dynamic interconversions between multiple functional states. Activation of the nAChR ion channel is primarily controlled by the binding of ligands (agonists, partial agonists, competitive antagonists) at conventional agonist binding sites, but is also regulated in either negative or positive ways by the binding of ligands to other modulatory sites. In this review, we discuss models for the activation and desensitization of nAChR, and the discovery of multiple types of ligands that influence those processes in both heteromeric nAChR, such as the high affinity nicotine receptors of the brain, and homomeric α7-type receptors. In recent years, α7 nAChRs have been identified as a potential target for therapeutic indications leading to the development of α7-selective agonists and partial agonists. However, unique properties of α7 nAChR, including low probability of channel opening and rapid desensitization, may limit the therapeutic usefulness of ligands binding exclusively to conventional agonist binding sites. New enthusiasm for the therapeutic targeting of α7 has come from the identification of α7-selective positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) that work effectively on the intrinsic factors that limit α7 ion channel activation. While these new drugs appear promising for therapeutic development, we also consider potential caveats and possible limitations for their use, including PAM-insensitive forms of desensitization and cytotoxicity issues. PMID:21575610

  15. Fluorescence Polarization Screening Assays for Small Molecule Allosteric Modulators of ABL Kinase Function

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Prerna; Shi, Haibin; Baumgartner, Matthew; Camacho, Carlos J.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The ABL protein-tyrosine kinase regulates intracellular signaling pathways controlling diverse cellular processes and contributes to several forms of cancer. The kinase activity of ABL is repressed by intramolecular interactions involving its regulatory Ncap, SH3 and SH2 domains. Small molecules that allosterically regulate ABL kinase activity through its non-catalytic domains may represent selective probes of ABL function. Here we report a screening assay for chemical modulators of ABL kinase activity that target the regulatory interaction of the SH3 domain with the SH2-kinase linker. This fluorescence polarization (FP) assay is based on a purified recombinant ABL protein consisting of the N-cap, SH3 and SH2 domains plus the SH2-kinase linker (N32L protein) and a short fluorescein-labeled probe peptide that binds to the SH3 domain. In assay development experiments, we found that the probe peptide binds to the recombinant ABL N32L protein in vitro, producing a robust FP signal that can be competed with an excess of unlabeled peptide. The FP signal is not observed with control N32L proteins bearing either an inactivating mutation in the SH3 domain or enhanced SH3:linker interaction. A pilot screen of 1200 FDA-approved drugs identified four compounds that specifically reduced the FP signal by at least three standard deviations from the untreated controls. Secondary assays showed that one of these hit compounds, the antithrombotic drug dipyridamole, enhances ABL kinase activity in vitro to a greater extent than the previously described ABL agonist, DPH. Docking studies predicted that this compound binds to a pocket formed at the interface of the SH3 domain and the linker, suggesting that it activates ABL by disrupting this regulatory interaction. These results show that screening assays based on the non-catalytic domains of ABL can identify allosteric small molecule regulators of kinase function, providing a new approach to selective drug discovery for this important

  16. Assessment of direct gating and allosteric modulatory effects of meprobamate in recombinant GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Dillon, Glenn H

    2016-03-15

    Meprobamate is a schedule IV anxiolytic and the primary metabolite of the muscle relaxant carisoprodol. Meprobamate modulates GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid Type A) receptors, and has barbiturate-like activity. To gain insight into its actions, we have conducted a series of studies using recombinant GABAA receptors. In αxβzγ2 GABAA receptors (where x=1-6 and z=1-3), the ability to enhance GABA-mediated current was evident for all α subunit isoforms, with the largest effect observed in α5-expressing receptors. Direct gating was present with all α subunits, although attenuated in α3-expressing receptors. Allosteric and direct effects were comparable in α1β1γ2 and α1β2γ2 receptors, whereas allosteric effects were enhanced in α1β2 compared to α1β2γ2 receptors. In "extrasynaptic" (α1β3δ and α4β3δ) receptors, meprobamate enhanced EC20 and saturating GABA currents, and directly activated these receptors. The barbiturate antagonist bemegride attenuated direct effects of meprobamate. Whereas pentobarbital directly gated homomeric β3 receptors, meprobamate did not, and instead blocked the spontaneously open current present in these receptors. In wild type homomeric ρ1 receptors, pentobarbital and meprobamate were ineffective in direct gating; a mutation known to confer sensitivity to pentobarbital did not confer sensitivity to meprobamate. Our results provide insight into the actions of meprobamate and parent therapeutic agents such as carisoprodol. Whereas in general actions of meprobamate were comparable to those of carisoprodol, differential effects of meprobamate at some receptor subtypes suggest potential advantages of meprobamate may be exploited. A re-assessment of previously synthesized meprobamate-related carbamate molecules for myorelaxant and other therapeutic indications is warranted. PMID:26872987

  17. Allosteric inhibition of factor XIa. Sulfated non-saccharide glycosaminoglycan mimetics as promising anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Al-Horani, Rami A; Gailani, David; Desai, Umesh R

    2015-08-01

    Recent development of sulfated non-saccharide glycosaminoglycan mimetics, especially sulfated pentagalloyl glucopyranoside (SPGG), as potent inhibitors of factor XIa (FXIa) (J. Med. Chem. 2013; 56:867-878 and J. Med. Chem. 2014; 57:4805-4818) has led to a strong possibility of developing a new line of factor XIa-based anticoagulants. In fact, SPGG represents the first synthetic, small molecule inhibitor that appears to bind in site remote from the active site. Considering that allosteric inhibition of FXIa is a new mechanism for developing a distinct line of anticoagulants, we have studied SPGG's interaction with FXIa with a goal of evaluating its pre-clinical relevance. Comparative inhibition studies with several glycosaminoglycans revealed the importance of SPGG's non-saccharide backbone. SPGG did not affect the activity of plasma kallikrein, activated protein C and factor XIIIa suggesting that SPGG-based anticoagulation is unlikely to affect other pathways connected with coagulation factors. SPGG's effect on APTT of citrated human plasma was also not dependent on antithrombin or heparin cofactor II. Interestingly, SPGG's anticoagulant potential was diminished by serum albumin as well as factor XI, while it could be reversed by protamine or polybrene, which implies possible avenues for developing antidote strategy. Studies with FXIa mutants indicated that SPGG engages Lys529, Arg530 and Arg532, but not Arg250, Lys252, Lys253 and Lys255. Finally, SPGG competes with unfractionated heparin, but not with polyphosphates and/or glycoprotein Ibα, for binding to FXIa. These studies enhance understanding on the first allosteric inhibitor of FXIa and highlight its value as a promising anticoagulant. PMID:25935648

  18. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S.; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3–5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  19. Robust Stimulation of W1282X-CFTR Channel Activity by a Combination of Allosteric Modulators.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Hong, Jeong S; Rab, Andras; Sorscher, Eric J; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    W1282X is a common nonsense mutation among cystic fibrosis patients that results in the production of a truncated Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) channel. Here we show that the channel activity of the W1282X-CFTR polypeptide is exceptionally low in excised membrane patches at normally saturating doses of ATP and PKA (single channel open probability (PO) < 0.01). However, W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by two CFTR modulators, the FDA-approved VX-770 and the dietary compound curcumin. Each of these compounds is an allosteric modulator of CFTR gating that promotes channel activity in the absence of the native ligand, ATP. Although W1282X-CFTR channels were stimulated by VX-770 in the absence of ATP their activities remained dependent on PKA phosphorylation. Thus, activated W1282X-CFTR channels should remain under physiologic control by cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways in vivo. VX-770 and curcumin exerted additive effects on W1282X-CFTR channel gating (opening/closing) in excised patches such that the Po of the truncated channel approached unity (> 0.9) when treated with both modulators. VX-770 and curcumin also additively stimulated W1282X-CFTR mediated currents in polarized FRT epithelial monolayers. In this setting, however, the stimulated W1282X-CFTR currents were smaller than those mediated by wild type CFTR (3-5%) due presumably to lower expression levels or cell surface targeting of the truncated protein. Combining allosteric modulators of different mechanistic classes is worth considering as a treatment option for W1282X CF patients perhaps when coupled with maneuvers to increase expression of the truncated protein. PMID:27007499

  20. A Novel Allosteric Activator of Free Fatty Acid 2 Receptor Displays Unique Gi-functional Bias.

    PubMed

    Bolognini, Daniele; Moss, Catherine E; Nilsson, Karolina; Petersson, Annika U; Donnelly, Iona; Sergeev, Eugenia; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Kurowska-Stolarska, Mariola; Miller, Ashley; Dekker, Niek; Tobin, Andrew B; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-09-01

    The short chain fatty acid receptor FFA2 is able to stimulate signaling via both Gi- and Gq/G11-promoted pathways. These pathways are believed to control distinct physiological end points but FFA2 receptor ligands appropriate to test this hypothesis have been lacking. Herein, we characterize AZ1729, a novel FFA2 regulator that acts as a direct allosteric agonist and as a positive allosteric modulator, increasing the activity of the endogenously produced short chain fatty acid propionate in Gi-mediated pathways, but not at those transduced by Gq/G11 Using AZ1729 in combination with direct inhibitors of Gi and Gq/G11 family G proteins demonstrated that although both arms contribute to propionate-mediated regulation of phospho-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling in FFA2-expressing 293 cells, the Gq/G11-mediated pathway is predominant. We extend these studies by employing AZ1729 to dissect physiological FFA2 signaling pathways. The capacity of AZ1729 to act at FFA2 receptors to inhibit β-adrenoreceptor agonist-promoted lipolysis in primary mouse adipocytes and to promote chemotaxis of isolated human neutrophils confirmed these as FFA2 processes mediated by Gi signaling, whereas, in concert with blockade by the Gq/G11 inhibitor FR900359, the inability of AZ1729 to mimic or regulate propionate-mediated release of GLP-1 from mouse colonic preparations defined this physiological response as an end point transduced via activation of Gq/G11. PMID:27385588

  1. Agonists and allosteric modulators of the calcium-sensing receptor and their therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Saidak, Zuzana; Brazier, Michel; Kamel, Saïd; Mentaverri, Romuald

    2009-12-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, with a characteristic structure consisting of seven transmembrane helices, an intracellular C-terminal and an extracellular N terminal domain. The primary physiological function of the CaR is the maintenance of constant blood Ca2+ levels, as a result of its ability to sense very small changes in extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+(o)). Nevertheless, in addition to being expressed in tissues involved in Ca2+(o) homeostasis, the CaR is also expressed in tissues not involved in mineral homeostasis, suggestive of additional physiological functions. Numerous agonists and modulators of the CaR are now known in addition to Ca2+(o), including various divalent and trivalent cations, aromatic l-amino acids, polyamines, and aminoglycoside antibiotics. The signaling of the CaR is also regulated by extracellular pH and ionic strength. The activated CaR couples mainly to the phospholipase Cbeta and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathways, and it decreases intracellular cAMP levels, leading to various physiological effects. The recent identification of synthetic allosteric modulators of the CaR has opened up a new field of research possibilities. Calcimimetics and calcilytics, which increase and decrease agonist signaling via the CaR, respectively, may facilitate the manipulation of the CaR and thus aid in further investigations of its precise signaling. These allosteric modulators, as well as strontium, have been demonstrated to have therapeutic potential for the treatment of disorders involving the CaR. This review discusses the various agonists and modulators of the CaR, differences in their binding and signaling, and their roles as therapeutics in various diseases. PMID:19779033

  2. Role of Arginine 293 and Glutamine 288 in Communication between Catalytic and Allosteric Sites in Yeast Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Md. Faiz; Kaushal, Prem Singh; Wan, Qun; Wijerathna, Sanath R.; An, Xiuxiang; Huang, Mingxia; Dealwis, Chris Godfrey

    2012-11-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RRs) catalyze the rate-limiting step of de novo deoxynucleotide (dNTP) synthesis. Eukaryotic RRs consist of two proteins, RR1 ({alpha}) that contains the catalytic site and RR2 ({beta}) that houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical essential for ribonucleoside diphosphate reduction. Biochemical analysis has been combined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), X-ray crystallography and yeast genetics to elucidate the roles of two loop 2 mutations R293A and Q288A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RR1 (ScRR1). These mutations, R293A and Q288A, cause lethality and severe S phase defects, respectively, in cells that use ScRR1 as the sole source of RR1 activity. Compared to the wild-type enzyme activity, R293A and Q288A mutants show 4% and 15%, respectively, for ADP reduction, whereas they are 20% and 23%, respectively, for CDP reduction. ITC data showed that R293A ScRR1 is unable to bind ADP and binds CDP with 2-fold lower affinity compared to wild-type ScRR1. With the Q288A ScRR1 mutant, there is a 6-fold loss of affinity for ADP binding and a 2-fold loss of affinity for CDP compared to the wild type. X-ray structures of R293A ScRR1 complexed with dGTP and AMPPNP-CDP [AMPPNP, adenosine 5-({beta},{gamma}-imido)triphosphate tetralithium salt] reveal that ADP is not bound at the catalytic site, and CDP binds farther from the catalytic site compared to wild type. Our in vivo functional analyses demonstrated that R293A cannot support mitotic growth, whereas Q288A can, albeit with a severe S phase defect. Taken together, our structure, activity, ITC and in vivo data reveal that the arginine 293 and glutamine 288 residues of ScRR1 are crucial in facilitating ADP and CDP substrate selection.

  3. Naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase: synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and X-ray crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiaoan; Sun, Hongbin; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Keguang; Zhang, Pu; Zhang, Liying; Hao, Jia; Zhang, Luyong; Ni, Peizhou; Zographos, Spyros E; Leonidas, Demetres D; Alexacou, Kyra-Melinda; Gimisis, Thanasis; Hayes, Joseph M; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2008-06-26

    Twenty-five naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenes, 15 of which were synthesized in this study, were biologically evaluated as inhibitors of rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa). From SAR studies, the presence of a sugar moiety in triterpene saponins resulted in a markedly decreased activity ( 7, 18- 20) or no activity ( 21, 22). These saponins, however, might find their value as potential natural prodrugs which are much more water-soluble than their corresponding aglycones. To elucidate the mechanism of GP inhibition, we have determined the crystal structures of the GPb-asiatic acid and GPb-maslinic acid complexes. The X-ray analysis indicates that the inhibitors bind at the allosteric activator site, where the physiological activator AMP binds. Pentacyclic triterpenes represent a promising class of multiple-target antidiabetic agents that exert hypoglycemic effects, at least in part, through GP inhibition. PMID:18517260

  4. Data communications

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability.

  5. Clear communication.

    PubMed

    Gurden, Dean

    2016-02-10

    In health care, effective communication can directly affect positive outcomes. Ineffective or poor communication can cost lives, be it by a missed diagnosis, a medication error or treatment delay. PMID:26860179

  6. Communicating Science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farris, Gaye S.

    2005-01-01

    For science to have an impact, it must be communicated and easily accessible. The USGS National Wetlands Research Center communicates its research findings through several ways: publishing, the Web, the library, and education and outreach.

  7. Lightwave Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheam, Harry

    1993-01-01

    Describes simple and inexpensive labs for introducing students to fiber optic communications. Students investigate light as a carrier wave; look into the difficulties associated with "light" communication; and learn about modulation, optical fibers, and critical angles. (PR)

  8. THE ATPase ACTIVITY OF BfpD IS GREATLY ENHANCED BY ZINC AND ALLOSTERIC INTERACTIONS WITH OTHER Bfp PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Lynette J.; Yamagata, Atsushi; Craig, Lisa; Tainer, John A.; Donnenberg, Michael S.

    2005-01-01

    Type IV pilus biogenesis, protein secretion, DNA transfer and filamentous phage morphogenesis systems are thought to possess similar architectures and mechanisms. These multiprotein complexes include members of the PulE superfamily of putative NTPases that have extensive sequence similarity and probably similar functions as the energizers of macromolecular transport. We purified the PulE homologue BfpD of the enteropathogenic Escherichia coli bundle-forming pilus (BFP) biogenesis machine and characterized its ATPase activity, providing new insights into its mode of action. Numerous techniques revealed that BfpD forms hexamers in the presence of nucleotide. Hexameric BfpD displayed weak ATPase activity. We previously demonstrated that the N-termini of membrane proteins BfpC and BfpE recruit BfpD to the cytoplasmic membrane. Here, we identified two BfpD-binding sites, BfpE39-76 and BfpE77-114, in the N-terminus of BfpE using a yeast two-hybrid system. Isothermal titration calorimetry and protease sensitivity assays showed that hexameric BfpD-ATP?S binds to BfpE77-114, while hexameric BfpD-ADP binds to BfpE39-76. Interestingly, the N-terminus of BfpC and BfpE77-114 together increased the ATPase activity of hexameric BfpD over 1200-fold to a Vmax of 75.3 μmol Pi min−1 mg−1, which exceeds by over 1200-fold the activity of other PulE family members. This augmented activity occurred only in the presence of Zn2+. We conclude that allosteric interactions between BfpD and BfpC and BfpE dramatically stimulate its ATPase activity. The differential nucleotide-dependent binding of hexameric BfpD to BfpE39-76 and BfpE77-114 suggests a model for the mechanism by which BfpD transduces mechanical energy to the biogenesis machine. PMID:15866879

  9. Communication, Communication, Communication! Growth through Laboratory Instructing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jamie J.; DeAngelo, Samantha; Mack, Nancy; Thompson, Claudia; Cooper, Jennifer; Sesma, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined gains undergraduate students made in their communication and collaboration skills when they served as peer teachers, i.e., laboratory instructors (LIs), for a General Psychology laboratory. Self-ratings of communication and collaboration skills were completed before and after teaching the laboratory. When compared to before the…

  10. Communication (action with communicative content).

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas. PMID:20499038

  11. Cultural Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  12. Communicating Effectively

    Cancer.gov

    The seventh module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores communication issues pertinent to African Americans with cancer and their health care providers, discusses strategies for culturally sensitive communication, and presents the SPIKES protocol, a practical framework for effective communication.

  13. Stereotypes Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Shuli; Deng, Dongyuan

    2009-01-01

    We live in a world, which is becoming a Global Village in which information and communication attract people's attention more than ever before. Our desire to communicate with strangers and our relationships with them depend on the degree to which we are effective in communicating with them. There are so many factors restricting or improving…

  14. Existential Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social setting, and…

  15. Exploration of Allosteric Agonism Structure-Activity Relationships within an Acetylene Series of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 (mGlu5) Positive Allosteric Modulators (PAMs): discovery of 5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)-N-(3-methyloxetan-3-yl)picolinamide (ML254)

    PubMed Central

    Turlington, Mark; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Chun, Aspen; Zhou, Ya; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Nguyen, Elizabeth D.; Gregory, Karen J.; Vinson, Paige N.; Rook, Jerri M.; Gogi, Kiran K.; Xiang, Zixiu; Bridges, Thomas M.; Daniels, J. Scott; Jones, Carrie; Niswender, Colleen M.; Meiler, Jens; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Stauffer, Shaun R.

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of schizophrenia. Both allosteric agonism and high glutamate fold-shift have been implicated in the neurotoxic profile of some mGlu5 PAMs; however, these hypotheses remain to be adequately addressed. To develop tool compounds to probe these hypotheses, the structure-activity relationship of allosteric agonism was examined within an acetylenic series of mGlu5 PAMs exhibiting allosteric agonism in addition to positive allosteric modulation (ago-PAMs). PAM 38t, a low glutamate fold-shift allosteric ligand (maximum fold-shift ~3.0), was selected as a potent PAM with no agonism in the in vitro system used for compound characterization and in two native electrophysiological systems using rat hippocampal slices. PAM 38t (ML254) will be useful to probe the relative contribution of cooperativity and allosteric agonism to the adverse effect liability and neurotoxicity associated with this class of mGlu5 PAMs. PMID:24050755

  16. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomakos, N. G.; Tsitsanou, K. E.; Zographos, S. E.; Skamnaki, V. T.; Goldmann, S.; Bischoff, H.

    1999-01-01

    -terminal tail occurs, while the loop of chain containing residues 192-196 and residues 43'-49' shift to accommodate the ligand. Structural comparisons show that the T-state GPa-glucose-W1807 structure is overall more similar to the T-state GPb-W1807 complex structure than to the GPa-glucose complex structure, indicating that W1807 is able to transform GPa to the T'-like state already observed with GPb. The structures provide a rational for the potency of the inhibitor and explain GPa allosteric inhibition of activity upon W1807 binding. PMID:10548038

  17. Allosteric inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase a by the potential antidiabetic drug 3-isopropyl 4-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,4-dihydro-1-ethyl-2-methyl-pyridine-3,5,6-tricarbo xylate.

    PubMed

    Oikonomakos, N G; Tsitsanou, K E; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Goldmann, S; Bischoff, H

    1999-10-01

    -terminal tail occurs, while the loop of chain containing residues 192-196 and residues 43'-49' shift to accommodate the ligand. Structural comparisons show that the T-state GPa-glucose-W1807 structure is overall more similar to the T-state GPb-W1807 complex structure than to the GPa-glucose complex structure, indicating that W1807 is able to transform GPa to the T'-like state already observed with GPb. The structures provide a rational for the potency of the inhibitor and explain GPa allosteric inhibition of activity upon W1807 binding. PMID:10548038

  18. Allosteric Activation of E2-RING Finger-Mediated Ubiquitylation by a Structurally Defined Specific E2-Binding Region of gp78

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Ranabir; Mariano, Jennifer; Tsai, Yien Che; Kalathur, Ravi C.; Kostova, Zlatka; Li, Jess; Tarasov, Sergey G.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Altieri, Amanda S.; Ji, Xinhua; Byrd, R. Andrew; Weissman, Allan M.

    2010-11-12

    The activity of RING finger ubiquitin ligases (E3) is dependent on their ability to facilitate transfer of ubiquitin from ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2) to substrates. The G2BR domain within the E3 gp78 binds selectively and with high affinity to the E2 Ube2g2. Through structural and functional analyses, we determine that this occurs on a region of Ube2g2 distinct from binding sites for ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1) and RING fingers. Binding to the G2BR results in conformational changes in Ube2g2 that affect ubiquitin loading. The Ube2g2:G2BR interaction also causes an 50-fold increase in affinity between the E2 and RING finger. This results in markedly increased ubiquitylation by Ube2g2 and the gp78 RING finger. The significance of this G2BR effect is underscored by enhanced ubiquitylation observed when Ube2g2 is paired with other RING finger E3s. These findings uncover a mechanism whereby allosteric effects on an E2 enhance E2-RING finger interactions and, consequently, ubiquitylation.

  19. Directed evolution of the tryptophan synthase β-subunit for stand-alone function recapitulates allosteric activation.

    PubMed

    Buller, Andrew R; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Romney, David K; Herger, Michael; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-24

    Enzymes in heteromeric, allosterically regulated complexes catalyze a rich array of chemical reactions. Separating the subunits of such complexes, however, often severely attenuates their catalytic activities, because they can no longer be activated by their protein partners. We used directed evolution to explore allosteric regulation as a source of latent catalytic potential using the β-subunit of tryptophan synthase from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTrpB). As part of its native αββα complex, TrpB efficiently produces tryptophan and tryptophan analogs; activity drops considerably when it is used as a stand-alone catalyst without the α-subunit. Kinetic, spectroscopic, and X-ray crystallographic data show that this lost activity can be recovered by mutations that reproduce the effects of complexation with the α-subunit. The engineered PfTrpB is a powerful platform for production of Trp analogs and for further directed evolution to expand substrate and reaction scope. PMID:26553994

  20. Chalcones as positive allosteric modulators of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: a new target for a privileged structure.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Beatriz; Mulet, José; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; de la Torre-Martínez, Roberto; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, José G; Estévez-Herrera, Judith; Borges, Ricardo; Freitas, Andiara E; López, Manuela G; García-López, M Teresa; González-Muñiz, Rosario; Pérez de Vega, María Jesús; Valor, Luis M; Svobodová, Lucie; Sala, Salvador; Sala, Francisco; Criado, Manuel

    2014-10-30

    The α7 acetylcholine nicotine receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that is involved in cognition disorders, schizophrenia, pain and inflammation among other diseases. Therefore, the development of new agents that target this receptor has great significance. Positive allosteric modulators might be advantageous, since they facilitate receptor responses without directly interacting with the agonist binding site. Here we report the search for and further design of new positive allosteric modulators having the relatively simple chalcone structure. From the natural product isoliquiritigenin as starting point, chalcones substituted with hydroxyl groups at defined locations were identified as optimal and specific promoters of α7 nicotinic function. The most potent compound (2,4,2',5'-tetrahydroxychalcone, 111) was further characterized showing its potential as neuroprotective, analgesic and cognitive enhancer, opening the way for future developments around the chalcone structure. PMID:25232969