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Sample records for alloy oxidation behavior

  1. Oxidation Behavior of Glassy Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yurek, G.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of high temperature glassy alloys produced by rapid solidification processing is investigated and the effects of processing and composition on oxidation behavior is studied. Glassy Ta-44.5at%Ir, Ta-40at%Ir-10at%B and Nb-45at%Ir oxidized rapidly at 700 to 800 C at an oxygen partial pressure of .001 atm. The alloys were embrittled during the oxidation process. No apparent oxidation or embrittlement of the Ta-Ir alloy occurred after oxidation for 4h at 500 C at an oxygen partial pressure of .001 atm. Embrittlement occurred, however, after 100h of exposure under the latter conditions. Alloy embrittlement is associated with the partial or full conversion of the metallic glass to a mixture of crystalline beta-Ta2O5 and metallic iridium. Hot compaction of glassy alloys of this type must be limited to relatively low temperatures (approx. 500 C) and short times at the low temperatures unless extremely low oxygen partial pressures can be achieved during the compaction process.

  2. Oxidation Behavior of Binary Niobium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Corey, James L.

    1960-01-01

    This investigation concludes a study to determine the effects of up to 25 atomic percent of 55 alloying additions on the oxidation characteristics of niobium. The alloys were evaluated by oxidizing in an air atmosphere for 4 hours at 1000 C and 2 hours at 1200 C. Titanium and chromium improved oxidation resistance at both evaluation conditions. Vanadium and aluminum improved oxidation resistance at 1000 C, even though the V scale tended to liquefy and the Al specimens became brittle and the scale powdery. Copper, cobalt, iron, and iridium improved oxidation resistance at 1200 C. Other investigations report tungsten and molybdenum are protective up to about 1000 C, and tantalum at 1100 C. The most important factor influencing the rate of oxidation was the ion size of the alloy additions. Ions slightly smaller than the Nb(5+) ion are soluble in the oxide lattice and tend to lower the compressive stresses in the bulk scale that lead to cracking. The solubility of the alloying addition also depends on the valence to some extent. All of the elements mentioned that improve the oxidation resistance of Nb fit this size criterion with the possible exception of Al, whose extremely small size in large concentrations would probably lead to the formation of a powdery scale. Maintenance of a crack-free bulk scale for as long as possible may contribute to the formation of a dark subscale that ultimately is rate- controlling in the oxidation process. The platinum-group metals, especially Ir, appear to protect by entrapment of the finely dispersed alloying element by the incoming Nb2O5 metal-oxide interface. This inert metallic Ir when alloyed in a sufficient amount with Yb appears to give a ductile phase dispersed in the brittle oxide. This scale would then flow more easily to relieve the large compressive stresses to delay cracking. Complex oxide formation (which both Ti and Zr tend to initiate) and valence effects, which probably change the vacancy concentration in the scale

  3. Oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Yong; Tang, Huiping; Li, Weijie

    2015-09-15

    The oxidation behaviors of porous Haynes 214 alloy at temperatures from 850 to 1000 °C were investigated. The porous alloys before and after the oxidation were examined by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The oxidation kinetics of the porous alloy approximately follows a parabolic rate law and exhibits two stages controlled by different oxidation courses. Complex oxide scales composed of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are formed on the oxidized porous alloys, and the formation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its outer layer is promoted with the oxidation proceeding. The rough surface as well as the micropores in the microstructures of the porous alloy caused by the manufacturing process provides fast diffusion paths for oxygen so as to affect the formation of the oxide layers. Both the maximum pore size and the permeability of the porous alloys decrease with the increase of oxidation temperature and exposure time, which may limit its applications. - Highlights: • Two-stage oxidation kinetics controlled by different oxidation courses is showed. • Oxide scale mainly consists of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NiCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Rough surface and micropores lead to the formation of uneven oxide structure. • Content of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the outer layer of the scale increases with time at 1000 °C. • Maximum pore size and permeability decrease with increasing temperature and time.

  4. Microstructures and oxidation behavior of some Molybdenum based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Pratik Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The advent of Ni based superalloys revolutionized the high temperature alloy industry. These materials are capable of operating in extremely harsh environments, comprising of temperatures around 1050 C, under oxidative conditions. Demands for increased fuel efficiency, however, has highlighted the need for materials that can be used under oxidative conditions at temperatures in excess of 1200 C. The Ni based superalloys are restricted to lower temperatures due to the presence of a number of low melting phases that melt in the 1250 - 1450 C, resulting in softening of the alloys above 1000 C. Therefore, recent research directions have been skewed towards exploring and developing newer alloy systems. This thesis comprises a part of such an effort. Techniques for rapid thermodynamic assessments were developed and applied to two different systems - Mo-Si alloys with transition metal substitutions (and this forms the first part of the thesis) and Ni-Al alloys with added components for providing high temperature strength and ductility. A hierarchical approach towards alloy design indicated the Mo-Ni-Al system as a prospective candidate for high temperature applications. Investigations on microstructures and oxidation behavior, under both isothermal and cyclic conditions, of these alloys constitute the second part of this thesis. It was seen that refractory metal systems show a marked microstructure dependence of oxidation.

  5. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Iridium-Rhenium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.

    1995-01-01

    The life-limiting mechanism for radiation-cooled rockets made from iridium-coated rhenium (Ir/Re) is the diffusion of Re into the Ir layer and the subsequent oxidation of the resulting Ir-Re alloy from the inner surface. In a previous study, a life model for Ir/Re rockets was developed. It incorporated Ir-Re diffusion and oxidation data to predict chamber lifetimes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Oxidation testing at 1540 deg C suggested that a 20-wt percent Re concentration at the inner wall surface should be established as the failure criterion. The present study was performed to better define Ir-oxidation behavior as a function of Re concentration and to supplement the data base for the life model. Samples ranging from pure Ir to Ir-40 wt percent Re (Ir-40Re) were tested at 1500 deg C, in two different oxygen environments. There were indications that the oxidation rate of the Ir-Re alloy increased significantly when it went from a single-phase solid solution to a two-phase mixture, as was suggested in previous work. However, because of testing anomalies in this study, there were not enough dependable oxidation data to definitively raise the Ir/Re rocket failure criterion from 20-wt percent Re to a Re concentration corresponding to entry into the two-phase region.

  6. Oxidation behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.

    1996-12-31

    Oxidation of hypoeutectic Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys containing 6 and 12% Nb at 950 C resulted in formation of a multiproduct scale consisting of a continuous Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} outer layer and an inner region of discrete CrNbO{sub 4} products interspersed with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Overall oxidation behavior resembled that of Cr as reactions with the Cr-rich phase tended to dominate. Oxidation resistance, in terms of reaction kinetics and scale adherence, increased with increasing volume fraction of the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb eutectic phase. A model for the oxidation of these alloys based on the growth of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Cr-rich matrix regions and the formation of a slower growing CrNbO{sub 4} on the Cr{sub 2}Nb-enriched phase can qualitatively explain the development of the multiproduct scale and the observed gravimetric and spallation results. Possible microstructural/compositional modifications to improve oxidation resistance are suggested.

  7. Effect of oxidation on tensile behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Soppet, W.K.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the oxygen uptake behavior of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure in the exposure environment, (b) examine the microstructural characteristics of oxide scales and oxygen entrapped at the grain boundaries in the substrate alloy, (c) evaluate the influence of oxygen uptake on the tensile properties of the alloy at room and elevated temperatures, (d) evaluate oxidation kinetics of the alloy with the aluminum-enriched surface layers, and (e) determine the effect of oxygen uptake on tensile behavior of the alloy.

  8. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  9. Oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr steels alloyed with titanium at 1073 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, Asep Ridwan; Artono, Tri Juni

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the oxidation behavior of Fe-20 wt%Cr steels alloyed with different titanium contents: 0, 0.5, and 1 wt% are studied as a function of time in air atmosphere. The samples were isothermally oxidized at 1073 K for 86.4, 172.8, and 345.6 ks in a muffle furnace. The mass of specimen were recorded before and after oxidation. After the oxidation, phases in the oxide were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical microscopy observation on the chromium base alloys show that the microstructure consist only ferritic phases. The addition of titanium in the Fe-20Cr alloys does not alter the microstructure significantly. The oxidation behavior of Fe-20Cr, Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti were followed the classical parabolic relationship with time. XRD analysis indicated that the oxide scales developed on the Fe-20Cr alloys surface during oxidation tests consisted mainly of Cr2O3. On the other hand, the oxide scales developed on the surface of Fe-20Cr-0.5Ti and Fe-20Cr-1Ti alloys comprised of Cr2O3 and TiO2 oxide. The formation of TiO2 oxide in the Ti-containing alloys consequently increases the mass gain of the alloys during oxidation compared to that of Fe-20Cr alloys.

  10. Isothermal oxidation behavior of ternary Zr-Nb-Y alloys at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Soepriyanto, Syoni; Basuki, Eddy Agus; Wiryolukito, Slameto

    2014-03-24

    The effect of yttrium content on isothermal oxidation behavior of Zr-2,5%Nb-0,5%Y, Zr-2,5%Nb-1%Y Zr-2,5%Nb-1,5%Y alloy at high temperature has been studied. High temperature oxidation carried out at tube furnace in air at 600,700 and 800°C for 1 hour. Optical microscope is used for microstructure characterization of the alloy. Oxidized and un oxidized specimen was characterized by x-ray diffraction. In this study, kinetic oxidation of Zr-2,5%Nb with different Y content at high temperature has also been studied. Characterization by optical microscope showed that microstructure of Zr-Nb-Y alloys relatively unchanged and showed equiaxed microstructure. X-ray diffraction of the alloys depicted that the oxide scale formed during oxidation of zirconium alloys is monoclinic ZrO2 while unoxidised alloy showed two phase α and β phase. SEM-EDS examination shows that depletion of Zr composition took place under the oxide layer. Kinetic rate of oxidation of zirconium alloy showed that increasing oxidation temperature will increase oxidation rate but increasing yttrium content in the alloys will decrease oxidation rate.

  11. High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Fe-Si-Ce Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yong; Zhang, Shunke; Fu, Guangyan; Liu, Qun; Tang, Yuanze

    2016-02-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-Si-Ce alloys with different Ce content at 1,173 and 1,273 K has been studied by means of optical microscope (OM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results show that the Ce addition refines the grain size of Fe-Si alloys, and correspondingly the grain size of the oxides decreases, which increases the grain boundary concentration and promotes the short-path diffusion of the alloying elements and oxygen. During oxidation, the positive effect of the grain refinement on the oxidation behavior of the alloy is more obvious than negative effect, so the Ce addition improves the oxidation resistances of the Fe-3Si alloys. Compared to Fe-3Si-0.5Ce alloy, Fe-3Si-5.0Ce alloy has the larger mass gain for the preferential oxidation of the excessive content of Ce exceeding its beneficial effects. The rare earth Ce changes the oxidation mechanism of Fe-Si alloys. Oxygen penetrates the oxide scales and reacts preferentially with Ce-rich phases, which results in the pinning effect and improves the adhesion of the oxide scales.

  12. Air Oxidation Behavior of Two Ti-Base Alloys Synthesized by HIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Guo, Q. Q.; Liu, L. L.; Xu, L.; Liu, Y. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The oxidation behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and Ti-6Al-4V produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been studied at 650-850°C in air for 24 h. The oxidation kinetics of both alloys followed the parabolic law with good approximation, except for Ti-5Al-2.5Sn oxidized at 850°C. Multi-layered scales formed on both alloys at 750°C and 850°C. Ternary additions of Sn and V accounted for the different morphology of the scales formed on these two alloys. In addition, the oxidation behavior of HIP alloys is compared with that of the corresponding cast alloys and the scaling mechanism is discussed.

  13. High-temperature oxidation behavior of two-phase iron-manganese-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.Y.; Lee, C.L.; Kao, C.H.; Perng, T.P.

    2000-04-01

    Oxidation behavior of two series of two-phase Fe-Mn-Al alloys in air up to 800 C was investigated. For the first series of alloys with various ratios of ferrite-austenite, the oxidation resistance of these alloys increased as the ferrite content increased. Two layers of oxide were formed mainly on the austenite grains, and oxidation in the ferrite phase was much less severe. The other layer of the scale on austenite was enriched with Mn and Fe, while Al was concentrated in the inner layer. For the second series of alloys with nearly the same contents of ferrite and C but various contents of Cr, the addition of Cr changed the oxidation characteristics and increased the oxidation resistance. Cr assisted the formation of a dense film of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prevent further oxidation.

  14. Understanding organic film behavior on alloy and metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash; Gawalt, Ellen S

    2010-02-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides, namely nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron, and titanium, were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid, and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates were examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  15. Understanding Organic Film Behavior on Alloy and Metal Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Aparna; Quiñones, Rosalynn; Barriger, Lisa; Eastman, Rachel; Parsi, Arash

    2010-01-01

    Native oxide surfaces of stainless steel 316L and Nitinol alloys and their constituent metal oxides namely, nickel, chromium, molybdenum, manganese, iron and titanium were modified with long chain organic acids to better understand organic film formation. The adhesion and stability of films of octadecylphosphonic acid, octadecylhydroxamic acid, octadecylcarboxylic acid and octadecylsulfonic acid on these substrates was examined in this study. The films formed on these surfaces were analyzed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, atomic force microscopy and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. The effect of the acidity of the organic moiety and substrate composition on the film characteristics and stability is discussed. Interestingly, on the alloy surfaces, the presence of less reactive metal sites does not inhibit film formation. PMID:20039608

  16. A REVIEW OF THE OXIDATION BEHAVIOR OF STRUCTURAL ALLOYS IN STEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Ian G; Dooley, Barry

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this review is the state of knowledge of the oxidation behavior in steam of alloys with potential for use as pressure parts in steam boilers. Growth of steam-side oxides has implications for scale exfoliation, tube blockage and overheating, and turbine erosion. Mitigation of such problems requires mechanistic understanding of the influences of alloy composition and microstructure as well as time, temperature, and boiler operating parameters on the evolution of specific scale structures. The oxidation behavior in steam of three classes of alloys is addressed: ferritic steels (particularly the 9-12 wt% Cr alloys), austenitic steels, and high-temperature nickel-based alloys. Understanding the interplay among compositional and microstructural requirements for strengthening and oxidation resistance, and their influence on the rate and mode of scale evolution is key to the most effective application of these alloy classes. Underlying these interests is the apparently different mode of oxide growth in steam than in air, especially contributions from inward transport of oxidant species. The particular species involved and their roles in the oxidation process are expected to exert a large influence on the oxide morphologies developed, while the fate of any hydrogen released in the alloy is a further topic of particular interest.

  17. Oxidation Behavior and Chlorination Treatment to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vikas Behrani

    2004-12-19

    This thesis is written in an alternate format. The thesis is composed of a general introduction, two original manuscripts, and a general conclusion. References cited within each chapter are given at the end of each chapter. The general introduction starts with the driving force behind this research, and gives an overview of previous work on boron doped molybdenum silicides, Nb/Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} composites, boron modified niobium silicides and molybdenum niobium silicides. Chapter 2 focuses on the oxidation behavior of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 3 contains studies on a novel chlorination technique to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys. Chapter 4 summarizes the important results in this study.

  18. Oxidation Behavior of GRCop-84 Copper Alloy Assessed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Ogbuji, Linus U.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's goal of safe, affordable space transportation calls for increased reliability and lifetimes of launch vehicles, and significant reductions of launch costs. The areas targeted for enhanced performance in the next generation of reusable launch vehicles include combustion chambers and nozzle ramps; therefore, the search is on for suitable liner materials for these components. GRCop-84 (Cu-8Cr-4Nb), an advanced copper alloy developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center in conjunction with Case Western Reserve University, is a candidate. The current liner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine is another copper alloy, NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.1Zr). It provides a benchmark against which to compare the properties of candidate successors. The thermomechanical properties of GRCop-84 have been shown to be superior, and its physical properties comparable, to those of NARloy-Z. However, environmental durability issues control longevity in this application: because copper oxide scales are not highly protective, most copper alloys are quickly consumed in oxygen environments at elevated temperatures. In consequence, NARloy-Z and most other copper alloys are prone to blanching, a degradation process that occurs through cycles of oxidation-reduction as the oxide is repeatedly formed and removed because of microscale fluctuations in the oxygen-hydrogen fuel systems of rocket engines. The Space Shuttle Main Engine lining typically degraded by blanching-induced hot spots that lead to surface roughening, pore formation, and coolant leakage. Therefore, resistance to oxidation and blanching are key requirements for second-generation reusable launch vehicle liners. The rocket engine ambient includes H2 (fuel) and H2O (combustion product) and is, hence, under reduced oxygen partial pressures. Accordingly, our studies were expanded to include oxygen partial pressures as low as 322 parts per million (ppm) at the temperatures likely to be experienced in service. A comparison of 10-hr weight gains of

  19. In vitro corrosion behavior and cellular response of thermally oxidized Zr-3Sn alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F. Y.; Wang, B. L.; Qiu, K. J.; Li, H. F.; Li, L.; Zheng, Y. F.; Han, Y.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, ZrSn alloy was thermally oxidized at 600 °C for 3 h and its morphological and structural characteristics, corrosion behavior, ion release and in vitro cytocompatibility were studied to evaluate the feasibility of applying it as dental implant. After oxidation, a dense black oxide layer formed on ZrSn alloy surface, which consisted of predominant monoclinic zirconia and a few non-stoichiometric oxides. The scratching and water contact angle test results demonstrated that the oxide layer exhibited good adhesion strength and similar hydrophilicity to zirconia. The oxidized ZrSn alloy showed higher corrosion resistance, as indicated by far lower corrosion current density and passive current density compared to pure Ti and untreated ZrSn alloy in artificial saliva with and without H2O2. The amount of ions released from the oxidized ZrSn alloy was much lower than that dissolved from pure Ti in simulated corrosive oral mediums. Moreover, the oxidized ZrSn alloy did not present any significant toxic effect to both osteoblast-like cells and fibroblast cells, and osteoblast-like cells could adhere well onto the surface and exhibited a good proliferative pattern. The combination of improved surface properties, superior corrosion resistance and good biocompatibility made the oxidized ZrSn alloy promising for oral implantology application.

  20. Dynamic oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Tenney, D. R.; Herring, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation tests of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments were conducted in a Mach-5 arc-jet at 1200 C and 0.002 lb/sec flowing air environment. The mechanisms responsible for the observed oxidation behavior are examined. The presence of atomic oxygen in the air stream plays a significant role in determining the oxidation characteristic of the alloy. The rate of Cr2O3 vaporization by formation of volatile CrO3 is greatly enhanced by the flowing conditions. The typical microstructure of oxides formed in the dynamic tests consists of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom-type morphology, an intermediate layer of NiO and Cr2O3 oxide mixture, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the Cr-depleted alloy substrate. Three basic processes underlying the formation of mushroom-type NiO are identified and discussed. The oxidation rate is determined by the rate of vaporization of NiO. Surface pretreatment has a significant effect on the oxidation behavior of the alloy in the early stage of oxidation, but becomes less important as exposure time increases. Mechanical polishing induces surface recrystallization, but promotes the concurrence of external growth of NiO and internal oxidation of the alloy in the dynamic atmosphere.

  1. Creep Resistance and Oxidation Behavior of Novel Mo-Si-B-Ti Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azim, M. A.; Schliephake, D.; Hochmuth, C.; Gorr, B.; Christ, H.-J.; Glatzel, U.; Heilmaier, M.

    2015-11-01

    Mo-Si-B-alloys are promising materials for high-temperature applications because of their high melting point, excellent phase stability, large alloying capabilities, and reasonable mechanical as well as oxidative properties. A continuing alloy development is, however, required because of the catastrophic oxidation taking place at intermediate temperatures and the rather high density. The addition of Ti stabilizes a new ternary phase field including the Mo5Si3 (T1) phase instead of the Mo3Si (A15) phase. Alloys comprising the phases Moss, T1 and Mo5SiB2 (T2) show very high creep resistance, improved oxidation behavior and significantly reduced density. The new T1 phase seems to play a crucial role in the improved oxidation resistance of these new materials, since this phase exhibits excellent oxidation behavior at intermediate and high temperatures. The 4-component alloys possess superior creep behavior compared to Mo-Si-B alloys with the same microstructural phase arrangement and size or to the single crystal Ni-base superalloy CMSX-4. The main reason was found to be the formation of Ti-rich silicide precipitates during processing.

  2. The effect of Ti addition on oxidation behavior of FeAl intermetallic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Lin, D.

    1997-12-31

    The influence of Ti addition on the high temperature oxidation behaviors of FeAl intermetallic alloys in air at 1,000 C and 1,100 C have been investigated. The oxidation kinetics of FeAl alloys were examined by the weight gain method and oxide products were examined by XRD, SEM, EDS and EPMA. The results showed that the oxidation kinetic curves of both Ti-doped and binary Fe-36.5Al alloys were described as different parabolas followed the formula: ({Delta}W/S){sup 2} = K{sub p}t. The parabolic rate constant, K{sub p} values are about 2.4 and 3.3 mg{sup 2}cm{sup {minus}4}h{sup {minus}1} for Fe-36.5Al alloy and about 1.3 and 2.0 mg{sup 2}cm{sup {minus}4}h{sup {minus}1} for Fe-36.5Al-2Ti alloy when oxidizing at 1,000 C and 1,100 C respectively. The difference between Fe-36.5Al and Fe-36.5Al-2Ti alloy is not only in the surface morphology but also in the phase components. In the surface there is only {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide for the Fe-36.5Al alloy while there are {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO oxide for the Fe-36.5Al-2Ti alloy. The effects of Ti addition on the oxidation resistance of FeAl alloy were discussed based on the microstructural evidence.

  3. High temperature oxidation behavior of Zr-1Nb cladding alloy E110.

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Billone, M. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-09-15

    Oxidation experiments were conducted at 1000-1200 C in flowing steam with samples of as-received Zr-1Nb alloy E110 tubing and/or polished E110 tubing. The purpose was to determine the oxidation behavior of this alloy under postulated loss-of-coolant accident conditions in light water reactors. The as-received E110 tubing exhibited a high degree of susceptibility to nodular oxidation and breakaway oxidation at relatively low test times, as compared to other cladding alloys. The nodules grew much more rapidly at 1000 C than 1100 C, as did the associated hydrogen uptake. The oxidation behavior was strongly affected by the surface condition of the materials. Polishing to {approx}0.1 {micro}m roughness (the roughness of the as-received tubing was {approx}0.4 {micro}m) delayed breakaway oxidation. Polishing also removed surface impurities. For polished samples oxidized at 1100 C, no significant nodular oxidation appeared up to 1000 s. For polished samples oxidized at 1000 C, hydrogen uptake >100 wppm was delayed from {approx}300 s to >900 s. Weight-gain coefficients were determined for pre-breakaway oxidation of polished-only and machined-and-polished E110 tubing samples: 0.162 (mg/cm{sup 2})/s{sup 0.5} at 1000 C and 0.613 (mg/cm{sup 2})/s{sup 0.5} at 1100 C.

  4. Oxidation behavior of grain boundary engineered alloy 690 in supercritical water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, P.; Zhao, L. Y.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.

    2012-03-01

    Nickel-base alloy is an important structural material that is known for its exceptional high temperature oxidation resistance. Oxidation in this alloy at high temperatures occurs to a greater extent along the grain boundaries. Grain boundary engineering (GBE) was applied to modify the grain boundary characteristics of this alloy to affect its oxidation resistance. Specimens with both low level and high level cold works showed a high fraction of special grain boundaries, and were tested for supercritical water oxidation resistance at 500 °C and 24 MPa. Both GBE and as-received samples exhibited mass gain followed by mass loss during 10 weeks of exposure, but the normalized mass change was small and less than 0.12 mg/cm2. GBE samples showed better oxide layer retention compared to the as-received sample. XRD results indicate that nickel oxide, chromium oxide, and spinel oxide were the three main types of oxides that form on as-received and GBE alloy 690. Three distinct regions were identified on the oxidized surface: a flat region with oxide flakes aligning relatively parallel to the surface, a rough region with polygon-type oxide particles randomly distributed on the surface, and a region with aggregated oxide flakes perpendicular to the surface. The flat region of oxidation consisted of (1 1 1) orientated oxide spinel flakes formed on (1 1 1) oriented alloy 690 grains. The flat oxide region was thinner and showed better oxide adhesion compared to the rough region. Chromium oxidation was found only at random grain boundaries, leading to formation of thick Cr2O3 layer on the surface and chromium depletion underneath. None of this oxidation was found at low angle or special boundaries. The chromium oxidation was attributed to fast chromium diffusion through random boundaries and mechanically deformed regions such as scratches left after polishing. It is envisioned that the oxidation behavior of alloy 690 in supercritical water can be tailored by microstructure

  5. The effect of yttrium and thorium on the oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Nasrallah, M.; Douglass, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of quaternary additions of 0.5% Y, 0.5 and 1.0% Th to a base alloy of Ni-10CR-5Al on the oxidation behavior and mechanism was studied during oxidation in air over the range of 1000 to 1200 C. The presence of yttrium decreased the oxidation kinetics slightly, whereas, the addition of thorium caused a slight increase. Oxide scale adherence was markedly improved by the addition of the quaternary elements. Although a number of oxides formed on yttrium containing alloys, quantitative X-ray diffraction clearly showed that the rate-controlling step was the diffusion of aluminum through short circuit paths in a thin layer of alumina that formed parabolically with time. Although the scale adherence of the yttrium containing alloy was considerably better than the base alloys, spalling did occur that was attributed to the formation of the voluminous YAG particles which grew in a mushroom-like manner, lifting the protective scale off the subrate locally. The YAG particles formed primarily at grain boundaries in the substrate in which the yttrium originally existed as YNi9.

  6. Microstructure, oxidation behavior and mechanical behavior of lens deposited niobium-titanium-silicon and niobium-titanium-silicon based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehoff, Ryan Richard

    With current high temperature structural materials such as nickel based superalloys being pushed to the limits of suitable operating conditions, there comes a need for replacement materials with even higher temperature capabilities. Niobium silicon based systems have been shown to have superior density normalized strength at elevated temperatures when compared to currently used alloys. The drawbacks associated with the niobium silicon system are due to catastrophic oxidation behavior at elevated temperatures. Alloying addition have been shown to increase the oxidation resistance near suitable levels, but also decrease the high temperature strength and increases creep rates when compared to the binary alloy system. The microstructure of the material is similar to metal matrix composites in which high melting temperature silicides are dispersed in a niobium based matrix phase. The silicides produce high temperature strength while the niobium based matrix increases the room temperature properties such as fracture toughness. The bulk of the research has been conducted on directionally solidified material which has a coarse microstructure due to the slow cooling rates associated with the processing condition. The current research uses a powder metallurgy process termed Laser Engineered Net Shaping, or LENS, to produce material with a significantly refined microstructure due to fast cooling rates associated with the laser process. Several compositions of alloys were examined and the ideal processing parameters were determined for each alloy. The resulting microstructures show a refinement of the microstructure as expected with a fine scale distribution of Nb5Si3 and Nb3Si dispersed in a niobium based matrix phase. The high temperature oxidation behavior of the LENS deposited alloys was comparable to alloys produced using other techniques. A non protective oxide scale formed on samples exposed for only 0.5 hours but was not protective and showed large amounts of

  7. Oxidation behavior in reaction-bonded aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina powder compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, S.H.

    1992-12-01

    Goal of this research is to determine the feasibility of producing low-shrinkage mullite/alumina composites by applying the reaction-bonded alumina (RBAO) process to an aluminum-silicon alloy/alumina system. Mirostructural and compositional changes during heat treatment were studied by removing samples from the furnace at different steps in the heating schedule and then using optical and scanning electron microscopy, EDS and XRD to characterize the powder compacts. Results suggest that the oxidation behavior of the alloy compact is different from the model proposed for the pure Al/alumina system.

  8. Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kramer; A. Thom; O. Degirmen; V. Behrani; M. Akinc

    2002-04-22

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)- MoSi{sub 2}- MoB, Alloy 2 = T1- Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)- Mo{sub 3}Si, and Alloy 3 = Mo- T2- Mo{sub 3}Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H{sub 2}O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO{sub 3}. All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO{sub 2}. This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO{sub 2} that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air.

  9. The Surface Dynamics of the Initial Oxidation Behavior of CuNi Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemack, Steve; Sun, Li; Yang, Judith; Eastman, Jeff; Zhou, Guangwen

    2009-03-01

    As an extension of our previous work on the initial oxidation stages of pure Cu and CuAu alloy, we are currently visualizing the oxidation of CuNi alloys by in-situ ultra high vacuum transmission electron microscope (UHV-TEM) and X-ray diffraction. We investigated systematically a range of CuNi (001) compositions, including 2,8,15 and 24 at%Ni at P (O2) =5x10-4 torr and T=500-700^oC. The initial oxidation behavior is similar to that of Cu (001) AND CuAu (001), where oxide islands rapidly nucleate, grow and coalesce. However, remarkable differences exist: 1) a second rapid nucleation of compact and dense oxide islands occurred and 2) polycrystalline oxides formed, where only cube-on-cube epitaxial Cu2O islands nucleated on Cu (001) and CuAu (001) for all temperature and pressures studied. The surface segregation behavior of Cu and Ni may explain these surprising results.

  10. COREST: A FORTRAN computer program to analyze paralinear oxidation behavior and its application to chromic oxide forming alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. E.; Presler, A. F.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program (COREST) was developed to analyze the high-temperature paralinear oxidation behavior of metals. It is based on a mass-balance approach and uses typical gravimetric input data. COREST was applied to predominantly Cr2O3-forming alloys tested isothermally for long times. These alloys behaved paralinearly above 1100 C as a result of simultaneous scale formation and scale vaporization. Output includes the pertinent formation and vaporization constants and kinetic values of interest. COREST also estimates specific sample weight and specific scale weight as a function of time. Most importantly, from a corrosion standpoint, it estimates specific metal loss.

  11. Alloys for advanced steam turbines--Oxidation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.

    2007-10-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. Current research on the oxidation of candidate materials for advanced steam turbines is presented with a focus on a methodology for estimating chromium evaporation rates from protective chromia scales. The high velocities and pressures of advanced steam turbines lead to evaporation predictions as high as 5 × 10-8 kg m-2s-1 of CrO2(OH)2(g) at 760°C and 34.5 MPa. This is equivalent to 0.077 mm per year of solid Cr loss.

  12. Aqueous Corrosion Behavior of Micro Arc Oxidation (MAO)-Coated Magnesium Alloys: A Critical Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama Krishna, L.; Sundararajan, G.

    2014-06-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys, in the current era of persistently growing engineering demands, have become the most promising materials finding widespread industrial applications. Numerous processes are available for surface protection of Mg and its alloys to potentially minimize corrosion damage. The micro arc oxidation (MAO), a fairly recent and eco-friendly coating process, emerged as a novel means to provide an adherent, hard, scratch-resistant, wear-resistant, and corrosion-resistant coatings on Mg alloys. However, the successful utilization of such coatings demands a thorough understanding of the influence of a relatively large number of process parameters such as electrolytic composition, presence of insoluble additives in the electrolyte, electrical parameters employed, and the composition of the Mg alloy substrate on the corrosion resistance. The detailed influence of all the above parameters on the corrosion behavior of Mg alloys is critically reviewed and presented in this article. In addition, this article also reviews the recent trends in terms of duplexing the MAO process using different techniques/processes such that the composite coatings are produced with enhanced corrosion resistance.

  13. Oxidation behavior of cubic phases formed by alloying Al3Ti with Cr and Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, L. J.; Nic, J. P.; Mikkola, D. E.; Smialek, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric, SEM, and XRD data are presented which document the significant improvement obtainable in the oxidation resistance of Al3Ti-containing alloys through additions of Cr. The L1(2) Al(67)Cr(8)Ti25 alloy exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance at 1473 K, with the primary oxide formed being the ideally protective alpha-Al2O3. The Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(25) alloy also tested for comparison exhibited poor cyclic oxidation resistance, with substantial occurrence of TiO2 in the protective scales. Catastrophic oxidation was also encountered in the quaternary alloy Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(22)V(3).

  14. The effect of yttrium and thorium on the oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.; Douglass, D. L.; Nasrallah, M.

    1974-01-01

    The investigation reported included a determination of the optimum composition of a Ni-Cr-Al ternary alloy with respect to oxidation resistance and minimum film-spalling tendencies. Yttrium and thorium in small amounts were added to the ternary alloy and an investigation of the oxidation mechanism and the oxide scale adherence was conducted. It was found that the oxidation mechanism of Ni-Cr-Al ternary alloys depends upon the composition of the alloy as well as the time, oxygen pressure, and temperature of oxidation.

  15. Comparison of isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of twenty-five commercial sheet alloys at 1150 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.

    1974-01-01

    The cyclic and isothermal oxidation resistance of 25 high-temperature Ni-, Co-, and Fe-base sheet alloys after 100 hours in air at 1150 C was compared. The alloys were evaluated in terms of their oxidation, scaling, and vaporization rates and their tendency for scale spallation. These values were used to develop an oxidation rating parameter based on effective thickness change, as calculated from a mass balance. The calculated thicknesses generally agreed with the measured values, including grain boundary oxidation, to within a factor of 3. Oxidation behavior was related to composition, particularly Cr and Al content.

  16. Effect of Y2O3 content on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al-based ODS alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar

    2003-02-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the cyclic oxidation behavior of two oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-Cr-Al based alloys containing 0.17 wt.% and 0.7 wt.% Y2O3. The alloys were oxidized in air for 100 h at 1200°C based on a 24 h cycle period. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize the structure, morphology, and composition of the oxide scales. Both alloys formed highly adherent and continuous layers of α-Al2O3 exhibiting a morphology indicative of inward scale growth. The role of Y2O3 was to promote adherence by segregating to the grain boundaries within the oxide. Concurrently, Y2O3 generated micro-porosity resulting in a scale of comparatively higher thickness in the alloy with 0.7 wt.% Y2O3.

  17. Effect of Alloy Composition, Surface Preparation and Exposure Conditions on the Selective Oxidation Behavior of Ferritic Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-X Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G H; Mu, N; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Piron Abellan, J; Olszewski, T; Quadakkers, W J; Holcomb, G R

    2010-09-01

    Abstract Selective oxidation behavior of ferritic martensitic Fe–Cr base alloys, exposed in various atmospheres containing combinations of O2, CO2, and H2O, were studied at various temperatures relevant to oxy-fuel combustion. This paper begins with a discussion of the required Cr content to form a continuous external chromia scale on a simple binary Fe–Cr alloy exposed in oxygen or air based on experiments and calculations using the classic Wagner model. Then, the effects of the exposure environment and Cr content on the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys are evaluated. Finally, the effects produced by alloying additions of Si, commonly present in various groups of commercially available ferritic steels, are described. The discussion compares the oxide scale formation on simple binary and ternary Fe–Cr base model alloys with that on several commercially available ferritic steels.

  18. Investigation of the oxidation behavior of dispersion stabilized alloys when exposed to a dynamic high temperature environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenney, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr and TD-NiCrAlY alloys have been studied at 2000 and 2200 F in static and high speed flowing air environments. The TD-NiCrAlY alloys preoxidized to produce an Al2O3 scale on the surface showed good oxidation resistance in both types of environments. The TD-NiCr alloy which had a Cr2O3 oxide scale after preoxidation was found to oxidize more than an order of magnitude faster under the dynamic test conditions than at comparable static test conditions. Although Cr2O3 normally provides good oxidation protection, it was rapidly lost due to formation of volatile CrO3 when exposed to the high speed air stream. The preferred oxide arrangement for the dynamic test consisted of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom type morphology, an intermediate duplex layer of NiO and Cr2O3, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the alloy substrate. An oxidation model has been developed to explain the observed microstructure and overall oxidation behavior of all alloys.

  19. Cyclic oxidation behavior of beta+gamma overlay coatings on gamma and gamma+gamma-prime alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Pilsner, B. H.; Carol, L. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the cyclic oxidation behavior of low-pressure plasma sprayed beta+gamma coasting on gamma-phase Ni-Cr-Al alloys have shown the correlation of weight change, oxide type, and Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles as a function of oxidation time. Of special interest was the transition to breakway oxidation due to the loss of the Al flux to the oxide and the failure of the coated alloy to form an Al2O3-rich oxide scale. The experimental results on beta+gamma/gamma coating systems were used as the basis of a numerical model (ternary, semi-infinite, finite-difference analysis) which accurately predicted changes in Cr and Al concentration-distance profiles. The model was used to study parameters critical to enhancing the life of coatings which fail by a combination of Al loss in forming the oxide scale and Al loss via interdiffusion with the substrate alloy. Comparisons of beta+gamma/gamma coating behavior are made to the oxidation of coated gamma+gamma-prime substrates, both ternary Ni-Cr-Al alloys and Mar-M 247-type alloys.

  20. The role of Zr and Nb in oxidation/sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K. ); Baxter, D.J. INCO Alloy Ltd., Hereford, England )

    1990-11-01

    05Structural Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may undergo rapid degradation at elevated temperatures unless protective surface oxide scales are formed and maintained. The ability of alloys to resist rapid degradation strongly depends on their Cr content and the chemistry of the exposure environment. Normally, 20 wt % Cr is required for service at temperatures up to 1000{degree}C; the presence of sulfur, however, inhibits formation of a protective surface oxide scale. The oxidation and sulfidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys is examined over a wide temperature range (650 to 1000{degree}C), with particular emphasis on the effects of alloy Cr content and the radiation of reactive elements such as Nb and Zr. Both Nb and Zr are shown to promote protective oxidation behavior on the 12 wt % Cr alloy in oxidizing environments and to suppress sulfidation in mixed oxygen/sulfur environments. Additions of Nb and Zr at 3 wt % level resulted in stabilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale and led to a barrier layer of Nb- or Zr-rich oxide at the scale/metal interface, which acted to minimize the transport of base metal cations across the scale. Oxide scales were preformed in sulfur-free environments and subsequently exposed to oxygen/sulfur mixed-gas atmospheres. Preformed scales were found to delay the onset of breakaway corrosion. Corrosions test results obtained under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions are presented. 58 refs., 55 figs., 8 tabs.

  1. Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.

    2007-02-01

    Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000ºC in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

  2. A Study on the Oxidation Behavior of Nb Alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) and Silicide-Coated Nb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanadh, B.; Naina, R. H.; Majumdar, S.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G. K.

    2013-05-01

    In the current work, silicide coatings were produced on the Nb alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) using the halide activated pack cementation (HAPC) technique. Coating parameters (temperature and time) were optimized to produce a two-layer (Nb5Si3 and NbSi2) coating on the Nb alloy. Subsequently, the oxidation behavior of the Nb alloy (Nb-1 pct Zr-0.1 pct C) and silicide-coated Nb alloy was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and isothermal weight gain oxidation experiments. Phase identification and morphological examinations were carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. TGA showed that the Nb alloy started undergoing accelerated oxidation at and above 773 K (500 °C). Isothermal weight gain experiments carried out on the Nb alloy under air environment at 873 K (600 °C) up to a time period of 16 hours exhibited a linear growth rate law of oxidation. In the case of silicide-based coatings, TGA showed that oxidation resistance of silicide coatings was retained up to 1473 K (1200 °C). Isothermal weight gain experiments on the silicide coatings carried out at 1273 K (1000 °C) in air showed that initially up to 8 hours, the weight of the sample increased, and beyond 8 hours the weight of the sample remained constant. The oxide phases formed on the bare samples and on the coated samples during oxidation were found to be Nb2O5 and a mixture of SiO2 and Nb2O5 phases, respectively. SEM showed the formation of nonprotective oxide layer on the bare Nb alloy and a protective (adherent, nonporous) oxide layer on silicide-coated samples. The formation of protective SiO2 layer on the silicide-coated samples greatly improved the oxidation resistance at higher temperatures.

  3. The long-term, cyclic-oxidation behavior of selected chromia-forming alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, B.; Harper, M.A.

    1998-04-01

    Long-term, cyclic-oxidation testing in still air for about 2 years (720 days) at 982 C and 1 year (360 days) at 1093, 1149, and 1204 C has been conducted on the commercial, high-temperature chromia-forming HR-120, HR-160, and 230 alloys (all trademarks of Haynes International, Inc.). Each thermal cycle consisted of 30 days at temperature followed by about 4 hr at ambient. The results demonstrated the significant effects of alloy composition on long-term, cyclic-oxidation resistance. Each of the alloys exhibited scale spallation; however, the manner by which spallation occurred varied between the alloys. The 230 alloy, which contains 0.02 wt.% La, exhibited partial scale spallation, thus allowing for the easier formation of a protective or semiprotective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-rich scale during subsequent oxidation. The HR-160 alloy exhibited complete spallation owing largely to its relatively high silicon content (2.75 wt.%). However, the silicon was also beneficial in promoting protective or semiprotective scale formation when the exposed alloy was subsequently oxidized. The HR-120 alloy showed the poorest cyclic-oxidation resistance, due in part to poor scale adhesion and the tendency of the iron in this alloy (33 wt.%) to eventually oxidize and result in the formation of a less-protective scale. All of the alloys underwent internal attack in the form of internal oxidation and void formation. In most cases, the extent of internal attack was significantly greater than that of metal loss.

  4. Assessment of the Oxidation Behavior of a Pt-Based Alloy for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odusote, J. K.; Cornish, L. A.; Papo, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Pt-based alloys are being developed as a possible future replacement for Ni-based superalloy components in the hottest section of turbine engines. The critical properties of these alloys are their ability to withstand higher thermal and mechanical stresses as well as to resist aggressive corrosive and oxidizing environments in applications. Oxidation properties of these alloys were investigated between 1150 and 1350 °C. The surface roughness of the as-polished samples was determined using atomic force microscopy, while the microstructures of both the as-polished and oxidized samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy. The alloy was found to be composed of a two-phase gamma/gamma prime microstructure, while the average surface roughness decreased from 5.78 nm after 1 μm diamond paste polishing to 4.13 nm with 0.25 μm diamond paste polishing. Microstructure examination of the oxidized alloy samples revealed the formation of compact and protective external oxide scale composed of α-alumina, as confirmed by the XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The results also showed that the oxide scale thickens with increased exposure time and temperatures according to parabolic kinetics. It was concluded from the results that the Pt-based alloys possess good oxidation resistance and thus will be suitable for high temperature applications, such as turbine engines.

  5. High-Temperature Creep and Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys with High Ti Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schliephake, Daniel; Azim, Maria; von Klinski-Wetzel, Katharina; Gorr, Bronislava; Christ, Hans-Jürgen; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P.; Heilmaier, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Multiphase alloys in the Mo-Si-B system are potential high-temperature structural materials due to their good oxidation and creep resistance. Since they suffer from relatively high densities, the current study focuses on the influence of density-reducing Ti additions on creep and oxidation behavior at temperatures above 1273 K (1000 °C). Two alloys with compositions of Mo-12.5Si-8.5B-27.5Ti and Mo-9Si-8B-29Ti (in at. pct) were synthesized by arc melting and then homogenized by annealing in vacuum for 150 hours at 1873 K (1600 °C). Both alloys show similar creep behavior at stresses of 100 to 300 MPa and temperatures of 1473 K and 1573 K (1200 °C and 1300 °C), although they possess different intermetallic volume fractions. They exhibit superior creep resistance and lower density than a state-of-the-art Ni-base superalloy (single-crystalline CMSX-4) as well as other Mo-Si-B alloys. Solid solution strengthening due to Ti was confirmed by Vickers hardness measurements and is believed to be the reason for the significant increase in creep resistance compared to Mo-Si-B alloys without Ti, but with comparable microstructural length scales. The addition of Ti degrades oxidation resistance relative to a Mo-9Si-8B reference alloy due to the formation of a relatively porous duplex layer with titania matrix enabling easy inward diffusion of oxygen.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of Al2O3 Coating on Ti-25Al-12.5Nb Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Małecka, J.

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation behavior of Al2O3 coating deposited on Ti-25Al-12.5Nb alloy by sol-gel method was investigated at 700 and 800 °C under isothermal oxidation conditions in air. At both temperatures, the coated samples exhibited reduced mass gain compared to uncoated alloy; at 700 °C rather insignificant differences were observed; however, at the temperature of 800 °C, the deposited coating strongly limits the mass gain of the test material. As a consequence of the isothermal oxidation a scale forms containing mainly TiO2 on the alloy surface of the uncoated alloy, while during the oxidation of the coated alloy the surface coating of Al2O3 dissociated and the initially compact Al2O3 coating dissolved and its place was taken by a porous scale. These coated samples displayed good resistance to oxidation in set conditions and no zones of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen were recorded. No spallation of the coated samples was observed.

  7. Influence of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of NbAl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Stephens, J. R.; Smialek, J. L.; Barrett, C. A.; Fox, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    NbAl3 is one candidate material for advanced aeropropulsion systems because of its high melting point, low density, and good oxidation resistance. Although NbAl3 has the lowest oxidation rate among the binary Nb-Al alloys, it does not form exclusive layers of protective Al203 scales. Recently Perkin et al., have shown the feasibility of forming alumina scales on Nb-Al alloys at greatly reduced Al contents. However, the objective was to maintain the high Al content, and hence low density, while achieving the capability of growing protective alumina scales. Alloy development followed approaches similar to those used successfully for superalloys and oxidation resistant MCrAly coatings. Among the three elements examined (Ti, Si, and Cr) as ternary additions to Nb-Al3, Cr was the most effective in favoring the selective oxidation of Al. Nb-41Al-8Cr formed exclusive layers of alumina and had a k sub p value of 0.22 mg squared/cm (sup 4)/hr at 1200 C. The addition of 1 wt percent Y to this alloy was also beneficial, resulting in nearly an order of magnitude decrease in K sub p at 1200 C. Further improvements were achieved by adding about 1 wt percent Si to the quaternary alloy. The k sub p value of 0.012 mg squared/cm (sup 4)/hr for Nb-40Al-8Cr-1Y-1Si at 1200 C was identical to the best NiAl + Zr alloys. These NbAl3 alloys also exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance for 100 hr at 1200 C, being nearly equivalent to NiAl + Zr.

  8. Influence of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of NbAl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hebsur, M. G.; Stephens, J. R.; Smialek, J. L.; Barrett, C. A.; Fox, D. S.

    1988-01-01

    NbAL3 is one candidate material for advanced aeropropulsion systems because of its high melting point, low density, and good oxidation resistance. Although NbAl3 has the lowest oxidation rate among the binary Nb-Al alloys, it does not form exclusive layers of protective Al2O3 scales. Recently Perkin et al., have shown the feasibility of forming alumina scales on Nb-Al alloys at greatly reduced Al contents. However, the objective was to maintain the high Al content, and hence low density, while achieving the capability of growing protective alumina scales. Alloy development followed approaches similar to those used successfully for superalloys and oxidation resistant MCrAlY coatings. Among the three elements examined (Ti, Si, and Cr) as ternary additions to Nb-Al3, Cr was the most effective in favoring the selective oxidation of Al. Nb-41Al-8Cr formed exclusive layers of alumina and had a k sub p value of 0.22 mg squared/cm (sup 4)/hr at 1200 C. The addition of 1 wt percent Y to this alloy was also beneficial, resulting in nearly an order of magnitude decrease in K sub p at 1200 C. Further improvements were achieved by adding about 1 wt percent Si to the quaternary alloy. The k sub p value of 0.012 mg squared/cm (sup 4)/hr for Nb-40Al-8Cr-1Y-1Si at 1200 C was identical to the best NiAl + Zr alloys. These NbAl3 alloys also exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance for 100 hr at 1200 C, being nearly equivalent to NiAl + Zr.

  9. Effects of Wet Air and Synthetic Combustion Gas Atmospheres on the Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.J.; Thom, A.J.; Mandal, P.; Behrani, V.; Akinc, M.

    2003-04-24

    Continuing our work on understanding the oxidation behavior of multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system, we investigated three alloys in the Mo-Si-B system, designated as A1, A2, and A3. The nominal phase assemblages of these alloys are: A1 = Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (T1)-MoSi{sub 2}-MoB, A2 = T1-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} (T2)-Mo{sub 3}Si, and A3 = Mo-T2-Mo{sub 3}Si. Our previous work showed that for exposures to 1100 C, all alloys formed a protective oxide scale in dry air. Exposures to wet air containing about 150 Torr water promoted the formation of a multiphase layer near the scale/alloy interface composed of Mo and MoO{sub 2}. Interrupted mass loss measurements indicated a near zero mass change. In the present study, isothermal mass measurements were conducted in order to quantitatively determine the oxidation rate constants at 1000 C in both dry and wet air. These measurements are critical for understanding the nature of scale development during the initial exposure, as well as the nature of scale stability during the long-term exposure. Isothermal measurements were also conducted at 1600 C in dry air to make an initial determination of alloy stability with respect to Vision 21 goals. We also conducted alloy oxidation testing in a synthetic oxidizing combustion atmosphere. Alloys were exposed up to 300 hours at 1100 C to a gas mixture having an approximate gas composition of N{sub 2} - 13 CO{sub 2} - 10 H{sub 2}O - 4 O{sub 2}. This gas composition simulates oxidizing flue gas, but does not contain a sulfidizing agent that would also be present in flue gas. The oxidized samples were carefully analyzed by SEM/EDS. This analysis will be discussed to provide an understanding of the role of water vapor and the synthetic combustion atmosphere on the oxidative stability of Mo-Si-B alloys.

  10. Oxidation Behavior of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications (Technical Poster)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J.; Humphrey, Donald H.; Barrett, Charles A.; Greenbauer-Seng, Leslie (Technical Monitor); Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A rocket engine's combustion chamber is lined with material that is highly conductive to heat in order to dissipate the huge thermal load (evident in a white-hot exhaust plume). Because of its thermal conductivity copper is the best choice of liner material. However, the mechanical properties of pure copper are inadequate to withstand the high stresses, hence, copper alloys are needed in this application. But copper and its alloys are prone to oxidation and related damage, especially "blanching" (an oxidation-reduction mode of degradation). The space shuttle main engine combustion chamber is lined with a Cu-Ag-Zr alloy, "NARloy-Z", which exhibits blanching. A superior liner is being sought for the next generation of RLVs (Reusable Launch Vehicles) It should have improved mechanical properties and higher resistance to oxidation and blanching, but without substantial penalty in thermal conductivity. GRCop84, a Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy (Cr2Nb in Cu matrix), developed by NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and Case Western Reserve University, is a prime contender for RLV liner material. In this study, the oxidation resistance of GRCop-84 and other related/candidate copper alloys are investigated and compared

  11. Influence of Electrolytic Plasma Oxidation Coating on Tensile Behavior of Die-Cast AM50 Alloy Subjected to Salt Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Lihong; Nie, Xueyuan; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Qiang; Hu, Henry

    Three different thickness ceramic coatings were deposited on die-cast AM50 magnesium alloy in KOH and NaAlO2 solution using electrolytic plasma oxidation (EPO) technology for corrosion prevention. Immersion corrosion tests were carried out in 3.5% NaCl solution for 336 hours to investigate the effect of coating thicknesses on tensile and fracture behaviors of the coated AM50 alloys. The results show that the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the coated AM50 alloy subjected to immersion corrosion increase with an increase in coating thicknesses. Further analyses on stress and strain curves indicate that the coating enhances the strain-hardening rates of the corroded alloy during its plastic deformation. SEM examination on the fractured surface manifests that the substrate AM50 alloys exhibit characteristics of ductile deformation with deep dimples. However, brittle features prevail on the fractured surface of the mixed layer of coating plus oxidation corrosion product. Micro cracks were observed between the mixed layer and the AM50 alloy substrate induced by corrosion and within the mixed layer induced by EPO process, which could be responsible for the brittle fracture.

  12. Study of Coating Growth Behavior During the Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation of Magnesium Alloy ZK60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhaozhong; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Yushen; Qu, Yunfei; Wu, Xiaohong

    2015-04-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation technique was used to coat ZK60 magnesium alloy in a silicate-based electrolyte. Effects of oxidation time on the morphology, phase structure, and corrosion resistance of the resulting coatings were systematically investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiodynamic polarization. The main components of the inner and the outer coating layers were MgO and Mg2SiO4, respectively. It was also found that the oxidation time has a significant impact on the corrosion resistance properties of the coatings. The coating obtained within the oxidation time of 360 s exhibited a corrosion current of 7.6 × 10-8 A/cm2 in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, which decreased significantly when comparing with the pristine magnesium alloy.

  13. Thermal aging effects on the microstructure, oxidation behavior, and mechanical properties of as-cast nickel aluminide alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongyun

    The thermal aging effects on the microstructure, oxidation behavior at 900° and 1100°C, and mechanical properties of IC221M (Ni3Al based intermetallic alloy, ASTM A1002-99) were investigated. The microstructure consists of dendritic arms of the gamma (nickel solid solution) phase containing cube-shape gamma' (Ni3Al precipitates. The interdendritic regions are mostly gamma' (Ni3Al with up to 8 vol.% gamma + Ni5Zr eutectic constituents. Thermal aging effects on the microstructures and how microsegregation affects the oxidation behavior were examined. Four primary changes in the microstructures were observed: (1) there is considerable homogenization of the cast microstructures with aging, (2) the volume fraction of gamma' increases with aging time and temperature, (3) the gamma' phase coarsens, and (4) the volume fraction of the gamma + Ni5Zr eutectic constituents decreases. During the initial stages of oxidation at 900°C, surface oxides form along the microsegregation patterns, revealing the cast microstructures. The first oxide to form is mostly NiO with small amounts of Cr2O 3, ZrO2, NiCr2O4, and theta-Al 2O3. Initial oxidation occurs primarily in the interdendritic regions due to microsegregation of alloying elements during casting. With further aging, the predominant surface oxides become NiO and NiAl2O 4 spinel, with a continuous film of alpha-Al2O3 forming immediately beneath them. Although these oxides are constrained to the near surface region, other oxides penetrate to greater depths, facilitated by oxidation of the gamma + Ni5Zr eutectic constituents. These oxides appear in the microstructure as long, thin spikes of ZrO2 surrounded by a sheath of Al2O3. They can penetrate to depths greater than 10 times that of the continuous surface oxide. The oxidation behavior at 1100°C is similar to that at 900°C, but the oxidation kinetics are faster, NiO dominates at all aging periods, and the surface oxides do not adhere to the matrix meaning that a protective

  14. Oxidation and corrosion behavior of modified-composition, low-chromium 304 stainless steel alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of substituting less strategic elements than Cr on the oxidation and corrosion resistance of AISI 304 stainless steel were investigated. Cyclic oxidation resistance was evaluated at 870 C. Corrosion resistance was determined by exposure of specimens to a boiling copper-rich solution of copper sulfate and sulfuric acid. Alloy substitutes for Cr included Al, Mn, Mo, Si, Ti, V, Y, and misch metal. A level of about 12% Cr was the minimum amount of Cr required for adequate oxidation and corrosion resistance in the modified composition 304 stainless steels. This represents a Cr saving of at least 33%. Two alloys containing 12% Cr and 2% Al plus 2% Mo and 12% Cr plus 2.65% Si were identified as most promising for more detailed evaluation.

  15. High-temperature oxidation behavior of a wrought Ni-Cr-W-Mn-Si-La alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tawancy, H.M.

    1996-04-01

    An investigation was carried out to study the kinetics and products of oxidation of a wrought Ni-Cr-W-Mn-Si-La alloy at temperatures in the range of 950 to 1150{degrees}C. Oxidation kinetics were evaluated from measurements of weight change, metal loss, and internal penetration. Analytical electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the scale microstructure. Initially, La was observed to segregate within a surface layer of about 5 {mu}m thick, which promoted selective oxidation of Cr and Mn. Oxidation kinetics were found to follow a parabolic-rate law with an activation energy of about 232 kJ/mol. During steady-state oxidation, the scale consisted of an inner adherent layer of {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified by the presence of La and Si, and shielded by an outer layer of MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Most of the La was segregated to grain boundaries of the {alpha}-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, however, Si was homogeneously distributed. It was concluded that the characteristic oxidation resistance of the alloy was related to the synergistic effects of Ni and Cr and to the effective minor additions of La, Si, and Mn; however, the useful life of the scale was limited by rupture and surface depletion in Cr, leading to accelerated internal oxidation.

  16. Nonequilibrium synthesis of NbAl3 and Nb-Al-V alloys by laser cladding. II - Oxidation behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haasch, R. T.; Tewari, S. K.; Sircar, S.; Loxton, C. M.; Mazumder, J.

    1992-01-01

    Isothermal oxidation behaviors of NbAl3 alloy synthesized by laser cladding were investigated at temperatures between 800 and 1400 C, and the effect of vanadium microalloying on the oxidation of the laser-clad alloy was examined. The oxidation kinetics of the two alloys were monitored using thermal gravimetric weight gain data, and the bulk and surface chemistries were analyzed using XRD and XPS, respectively. It was found that NbAl3 did not form an exclusive layer of protective Al2O3. The oxidation products at 800 C were found to be a mixture of Nb2O5 and Al2O3. At 1200 C, a mixture of NbAlO4, Nb2O5, and Al2O3 formed; and at 1400 C, a mixture of NbAlO4, Al2O3, NbO2, NbO(2.432), and Nb2O5 formed. The addition of V led to a dramatic increase of the oxidation rate, which may be related to the formation of (Nb, V)2O5 and VO2, which grows in preference to protective Al2O3.

  17. Precipitation and growth study of intermetallics and their effect on oxidation behavior in Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, G.; Neogy, S.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Shah, B. K.

    2012-11-01

    Microstructural evolution of the second phase precipitates and their microchemistry in Zr-Sn-Fe-Cr alloy during various alpha annealing heat treatments have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer attached with scanning transmission microscopy. Two types of precipitates, namely, Zr - rich Zr2(FeCr) with aspect ratio one and Zr lean Zr(FeCr)2 with parallelepiped morphology were identified. Size distribution of the precipitates was estimated from small angle neutron scattering. The effect of precipitate size, its distribution and matrix microstructure on the oxidation behavior of the alloy was studied during accelerated autoclaving. The shorter duration annealing at 700 °C does not improve the oxidation resistance of the alloy as it would lead to formation of non uniform distribution of alloying elements and precipitates in the matrix. It is revealed that alpha annealing at 700 °C for 10 h imparts a significant resistance to oxidation as well as substantial formation of Zr(FeCr)2 precipitates.

  18. Effect of surface crystallographic orientation on the oxidation behavior of Ni-based alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Szpunar, J. A.; Zhang, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Dependence of initial oxidation behavior on crystalline orientation of Haynes 230 at 900 °C was investigated by a novel method. Analysis of oxidation rate reveals that the oxide thicknesses are different for grains having different orientations. Orientation mapping was performed on oxidized specimen and grains having near {1 1 1} were easily indexed by electron backscattered diffraction. We determined that planes with deviation angle lower than 20° were all well indexed after oxidation. Results demonstrate that substrate orientation plays an important role on oxidation rate during the initial stage.

  19. Oxidation Behavior of Germanium- and/or Silicon-Bearing Near-α Titanium Alloys in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitashima, Tomonori; Yamabe-Mitarai, Yoko

    2015-06-01

    The effect of germanium (Ge) and/or silicon (Si) addition on the oxidation behavior of the near-α alloy Ti-5Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo was investigated in air at 973 K (700 °C). Ge addition decreased the oxidation resistance because of the formation of a Ge-rich layer in the substrate at the TiO2/substrate interface, enhancing Sn segregation at the interface. In addition, a small amount of Ge dissolved in the external Al2O3 layer. These results reduced the aluminum activity at the interface, suppressed the formation of Al2O3, and increased the diffusivity of oxygen in the oxide scales. The addition of 0.2 and 0.9 wt pct Si was beneficial for improving oxidation resistance. The effect of germanide and silicide precipitates in the matrix on the oxide growth process was also discussed.

  20. Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Gussev, Maxim N; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

  1. Oxidation behavior of V-Cr-Ti alloys in low-partial-pressure oxygen environments

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Uz, M.

    1998-09-01

    A test program is in progress at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the effect of pO{sub 2} in the exposure environment on oxygen uptake, scaling kinetics, and scale microstructure in V-Cr-Ti alloys. The data indicate that the oxidation process follows parabolic kinetics in all of the environments used in the present study. From the weight change data, parabolic rate constants were evaluated as a function of temperature and exposure environment. The temperature dependence of the parabolic rate constants was described by an Arrhenius relationship. Activation energy for the oxidation process was fairly constant in the oxygen pressure range of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} torr for both the alloys. The activation energy for oxidation in air was significantly lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments, and for oxidation in pure O{sub 2} at 760 torr was much lower than in low-pO{sub 2} environments. X-ray diffraction analysis of the specimens showed that VO{sub 2} was the dominant phase in low-pO{sub 2} environments, while V{sub 2}O{sub 5} was dominant in air and in pure oxygen at 76f0 torr.

  2. Deformation behavior of laser welds in high temperature oxidation resistant Fe-Cr-Al alloys for fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Kevin G.; Gussev, Maxim N.; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Snead, Lance L.

    2014-11-01

    Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability and post-weld mechanical behavior of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al (wt.%) with a minor addition of yttrium using modern laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds using sub-sized, flat dog-bone tensile specimens and digital image correlation (DIC) has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. For all proposed alloys, laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions.

  3. Influence of Black Annealing Oxide Scale on the Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Etien, R A; Gordon, S R; Ilevbare, G O

    2005-10-09

    The resistance of Alloy 22 (N06022) to localized corrosion, mainly crevice corrosion, has been extensively investigated in the last few years. The effect of influencing variables such as temperature, applied potential, chloride concentration and nitrate inhibitor concentration have been addressed previously. At this time, it was important to address the effect an oxide film or scale that forms during the high temperature annealing process or solution heat treatment (SHT) and its subsequent water quenching. Electrochemical tests such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) have been carried out to determine the repassivation potential for localized corrosion and to assess the mode of attack on the specimens. Tests have been carried out in parallel using mill annealed (MA) specimens free from oxide on the surface. The comparative testing was carried out in six different electrolyte solutions at temperatures ranging from 60 to 100 C. Results show that the repassivation potential of the specimens containing the black anneal oxide film on the surface was practically the same as the repassivation potential for oxide-free specimens.

  4. Influence of Black Annealing Oxide Scale on the Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Etien, R A; Gordon, S R; Ilevbare, G O

    2006-05-22

    The resistance of Alloy 22 (N06022) to localized corrosion, mainly crevice corrosion, has been extensively investigated in the last few years. The effect of influencing variables such as temperature, applied potential, chloride concentration and nitrate inhibitor concentration have been addressed previously. At this time, it was important to address the effect an oxide film or scale that forms during the high temperature annealing process or solution heat treatment (SHT) and its subsequent water quenching. Electrochemical tests such as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) have been carried out to determine the repassivation potential for localized corrosion and to assess the mode of attack on the specimens. Tests have been carried out in parallel using mill annealed (MA) specimens free from oxide on the surface. The comparative testing was carried out in six different electrolyte solutions at temperatures ranging from 60 C to 100 C. Results show that the repassivation potential of the specimens containing the black anneal oxide film on the surface was practically the same or higher as the repassivation potential for oxide-free specimens.

  5. 10,000-Hour Cyclic Oxidation Behavior at 982 C (1800 F) of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1997-01-01

    Sixty-eight high temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base alloys were tested for 10-one thousand hour cycles in static air at 982 C (1800 F). The oxidation behavior of the test samples was evaluated by specific weight change/time data, x-ray diffraction of the post-test samples, and their final appearance. The gravimetric and appearance data were combined into a single modified oxidation parameter, KB4 to rank the cyclic oxidation resistance from excellent to catastrophic. The alloys showing the 'best' resistance with no significant oxidation attack were the alumina/aluminate spinel forming Ni-base turbine alloys: U-700, NASA-VIA and B-1900; the Fe-base ferritic alloys with Al: TRW-Valve, HOS-875, NASA-18T, Thermenol and 18SR; and the Ni-base superalloy IN-702.

  6. Water Vapor Effects on the Oxidation Behavior of Fe-Cr and Ni-Cr Alloys in Atmospheres Relevant to Oxy-fuel Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, N.; Jung, K. Y.; Yanar, N. M.; Meier, G. H.; Pettit, F. S.; Holcomb, G. R.

    2011-10-01

    The oxidation behavior of a number of Fe–Cr- and Ni–Cr-based alloys was studied in atmospheres relevant to oxyfuel combustion at 650 °C. Oxidation was greatly enhanced in ferritic model alloys exposed in low p(O{sub 2}) CO{sub 2} + 30%H{sub 2}O and Ar + 30%H{sub 2}O gases. Rapidly growing iron oxides appear to be porous and gas permeable. Transition from non-protective to protective oxidation occurs on alloys with higher Cr contents between 13.5 and 22 wt% in H{sub 2}O. Excess oxygen, usually found in the actual oxyfuel combustion environments, disrupts the selective oxidation of Fe–Cr alloys by accelerating vaporization of early-formed Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} in combination with accelerated chromia growth induced by the H{sub 2}O. Rapid Cr consumption leads to the nucleation and rapid growth of iron oxides. On the contrary, Ni–Cr alloys are less affected by the presence of H{sub 2}O and excess O{sub 2}. The difference between Fe–Cr and Ni–Cr alloys is not clear but is postulated to involve less acceleration of chromia growth by water vapor for the latter group of alloys.

  7. The 100,000-hour cyclic oxidation behavior at 815C (1500 F) of 33 high-temperature alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    Commercial high-temperature Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were oxidized in air at 815 deg C for ten 1000-hour cycles. Specific weight change versus time curves were derived and the 10,000-hour surface oxides were analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The alloys were ranked by a combination of appearance and metal loss estimates derived from gravimetric data.

  8. 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni- Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 deg. C (1800 deg. F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    Power systems with operating temperatures in the range of 815 to 982 C (1500 to 1800 F) frequently require alloys that can operate for long times at these temperatures. A critical requirement is that these alloys have adequate oxidation resistance. The alloys used in these power systems require thousands of hours of operating life with intermittent shutdown to room temperature. Intermittent power plant shutdowns, however, offer the possibility that the protective scale will tend to spall (i.e., crack and flake off) upon cooling, increasing the rate of oxidative attack in subsequent heating cycles. Thus, it is critical that candidate alloys be evaluated for cyclic oxidation behavior. It was determined that exposing test alloys to ten 1000-hr cycles in static air at 982 10 000-hr Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of 68 High-Temperature Co-, Fe-, and Ni-Base Alloys Evaluated at 982 C (1800 F) could give a reasonable simulation of long-time power plant operation. Iron- (Fe-), nickel- (Ni-), and cobalt- (Co-) based high-temperature alloys with sufficient chromium (Cr) and/or aluminum (Al) content can exhibit excellent oxidation resistance. The protective oxides formed by these classes of alloys are typically Cr2O3 and/or Al2O3, and are usually influenced by their Cr, or Cr and Al, content. Sixty-eight Co-, Fe-, and Ni-base high-temperature alloys, typical of those used at this temperature or higher, were used in this study. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, the alloys were tested and compared on the basis of their weight change as a function of time, x-ray diffraction of the protective scale composition, and the physical appearance of the exposed samples. Although final appearance and x-ray diffraction of the final scale products were two factors used to evaluate the oxidation resistance of each alloy, the main criterion was the oxidation kinetics inferred from the specific weight change versus time data. These data indicated a range of oxidation behavior including parabolic

  9. Comparison of the Oxidation Rates of Some New Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. J. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Copper alloys were studied for oxidation resistance and mechanisms between 550 and 700 C, in reduced-oxygen environments expected in rocket engines, and their oxidation behaviors compared to that of pure copper. They included two dispersion-strengthened alloys (precipitation-strengthened and oxide-dispersion strengthened, respectively) and one solution-strengthened alloy. In all cases the main reaction was oxidation of Cu into Cu2O and CuO. The dispersion-strengthened alloys were superior to both Cu and the solution-strengthened alloy in oxidation resistance. However, factors retarding oxidation rates seemed to be different for the two dispersion-strengthened alloys.

  10. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000°C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455°C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain beta-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used beta-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt+Hf-modified gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al 2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both gamma-Ni and gamma'-Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower temperatures (˜970°C) in the very early stage of oxidation. It

  11. Effect of water density on the oxidation behavior of alloy A-286 at 625 °C - A TEM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Li, J.; Amirkhiz, B. S.; Liu, P.

    2015-12-01

    In this study the effect of water pressure on oxidation behavior of Alloy A-286 is assessed at 625 °C for 1000 h. The pressure values selected are 0.1, 8 and 29 MPa, representing steam, subcritical and supercritical conditions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the oxide formation on the surface. A-286 sample exposed to supercritical water forms an oxide layer, about 1 μm, containing Fe2O3, spinel and Cr2O3. In addition, isolated internal oxidation, up to 10 μm, has taken place during the exposure. Recrystallization of substrate material is also observed. A-286 exposed to steam shows little oxidation. The oxide formed on the surface is only ∼200 nm thick and it is comprised of a top layer of Cr2O3 and a thin sub-layer of SiO2, as well as limited grain boundary oxidation in the form of spinel (Cr, Fe, Ti)3O4 and TiO2. In contrast, the sample tested under subcritical condition suffered from excessive external and internal oxidation, with about 20 μm of Fe2O3 on the external surface, followed by a partially oxidized zone (up to 20 μm) containing Cr2O3 on the prior grain boundaries and discrete Cr2O3 particles within the grain. The weight gain of A-286 exposed to subcritical condition is several orders of magnitude greater than that seen under steam condition.

  12. The effect of microstructure and temperature on the oxidation behavior of two-phase Cr-Cr{sub 2}X (X = Nb, Ta) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, M.P.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1998-11-01

    The oxidation behavior of Cr(X) solid solution (Cr{sub ss}) and Cr{sub 2}X Laves phases (X = Nb, Ta) was studied individually and in combination at 950--1,100 C in air. The Cr{sub ss} phase was significantly more oxidation resistant than the Cr{sub 2}X Laves phase. At 950 C, two-phase alloys of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb and Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta exhibited in-situ internal oxidation, in which remnants of the Cr{sub 2}X Laves phase were incorporated into a growing chromia scale. At 1,100 C, the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys continued to exhibit in-situ internal oxidation, which resulted in extensive O/N penetration into the alloy ahead of the alloy-scale interface and catastrophic failure during cyclic oxidation. IN contrast, the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Ta alloys exhibited a transition to selective Cr oxidation and the formation of a continuous chromia scale. The oxidation mechanism is interpreted in terms of multiphase oxidation theory.

  13. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  14. Microstructure of a complex Nb-Si-based alloy and its behavior during high-temperature oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leont'ev, L. I.; Udoeva, L. Yu.; Chumarev, V. M.; Gulyaeva, R. I.; Pankratov, A. A.; Sel'menskikh, N. I.; Zhidovinova, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    A in-situ composite Nb-Si-Ti-Hf-Cr-Mo-Al composite material alloyed with yttrium and zirconium is studied. The evolution of the structure-phase state of the alloy during oxidation under dynamic and isothermal conditions is considered on samples prepared by vacuum remelting and directional solidification. The phase composition and the microstructure of the alloy are examined by the methods of physico-chemical analysis, and the distribution of alloying elements in initial samples and the products of oxidation is estimated. Thermogravimetric experiments are performed on powders and compacted samples during continuous (in the range 25-1400°C) and isothermal (at 900 and 1100°C) heating in air. The directional solidification of an Nb-Si-Ti-Al-Hf-Cr-Mo-Zr-Y is found to cause the formation of an ultradispersed eutectic consisting of α-Nb ss and γ-Nb5Si3 ss cells. The as-cast sample prepared by vacuum remelting has a dendritic structure and contains Nb3Si apart from these phases. Oxidation leads to the formation of a double oxide layer and an inner oxidation zone, which retain the two-phase microstructure and the ratio of alloying elements that are characteristic of the initial alloy. Diffusion redistribution is only detected for molybdenum. The cyclicity of heating at the initial stage of oxidation weakly influences the oxidation resistance of the alloy.

  15. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Rebak; J.H. Payer

    2006-01-20

    Alloy 22 (NO6022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nano-meters per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  16. Passive Corrosion Behavior of Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Payer, J H

    2006-01-10

    Alloy 22 (N06022) was designed to stand the most aggressive industrial applications, including both reducing and oxidizing acids. Even in the most aggressive environments, if the temperature is lower than 150 F (66 C) Alloy 22 would remain in the passive state having particularly low corrosion rates. In multi-ionic solutions that may simulate the behavior of concentrated ground water, even at near boiling temperatures, the corrosion rate of Alloy 22 is only a few nanometers per year because the alloy is in the complete passive state. The corrosion rate of passive Alloy 22 decreases as the time increases. Immersion corrosion testing also show that the newer generation of Ni-Cr-Mo alloys may offer a better corrosion resistance than Alloy 22 only in some highly aggressive conditions such as in hot acids.

  17. Influence of a Cerium Surface Treatment on the Oxidation Behavior of Cr2O3-Forming Alloys (title on slides varies: Oxidation Behavior of Cerium Surface Treated Chromia Forming Alloys)

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Holcomb, G.R.; Adler, T.A.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This temperature will require the construction of boiler and turbine components from austenitic stainless steels and nickel alloys. Many of the alloys being considered for use are primarily Cr2O3 forming alloys [1-4]. It is well known that the addition of a small amount of reactive elements, such as the rare earths elements Ce, La, and Y, can significantly improve the high temperature oxidation resistance of both iron- and nickel- base alloys. A list of the benefits of the reactive element effect include: (i) slowing scale growth, (ii) enhancing scale adhesion; and (iii) stabilizing Cr2O3 formation at lower Cr levels. The incorporation of the reactive element can be made in the melt or through a surface infusion or surface coating. Surface modifications allow for the concentration of the reactive element at the surface where it can provide the most benefit. This paper will detail a Ce surface treatment developed at NETL that improves the high temperature oxidation resistance of Cr2O3 forming alloys. The treatment consists of painting, dip coating, or spraying the alloy surface with a slurry containing CeO2 and a halide activator followed by a thermal treatment in a mild (x10-3 Torr) vacuum. During treatment the CeO2 reacts with the alloy to for a thin CrCeO3-type scale on the alloy surface. Upon subsequent oxidation, scale growth occurs at a reduced rate on alloys in the surface treated condition compared to those in the untreated condition.

  18. Oxidation behavior of nickel-base superalloys and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talekar, Anjali S.

    Alloy C-22 (UNS N06022) and High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels are candidate materials for use in outer layer of waste storage packages and as rock bolts in the underground roof supports at Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository respectively. Oxidation kinetics of three Ni-base Superalloys and two HSLA Steels, Split Set Friction Rock Stabilizers (SS-46) and Swellex Mn-24, have been determined by isothermal high temperature continuous measurement thermogravimetry at temperatures ranging between 600°C to 1100°C in pure oxygen atmosphere for predetermined periods of exposures (48 hours for the Superalloys and 100 hours for HSLA steels). The two other Ni-base Superalloys selected were Alloy-263 (UNS N07263) and Alloy-282. These are similar in their Cr composition to Alloy C-22 and have variations in the contents of other alloying elements namely Co and Mo. The alloys were selected for comparison of their oxidation resistance with C-22 as a baseline material. All three Superalloys are known chromia formers. All the superalloys were evaluated for determining their kinetic parameters and the activation energies for the superalloys were also calculated. The activation energy for the parabolic regime of Alloy-282 is found to be 232 kJ/mol. The slope of the curves on a plot of kp as a function of (1/T) show Alloy-282 to have better oxidation resistance up to 980°C and thereafter the rate constants are similar for all three alloys, but when activation energies over the whole temperature range are calculated, Alloy-263 shows the best average oxidation resistance. Surface characterization by means of microscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the nature of oxides formed. Based on the kinetics and the characterization, proposed mechanisms for oxidation of these alloys at high temperatures are put forth. Temperature modulated thermogravimetry was used for studies on HSLA steels. The imposed sinusoidal temperature modulations on the isothermal temperature

  19. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  20. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  1. Oxidation Behavior and Electrical Properties of NiO- and Cr2O3- Forming Alloys for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Michael P; Pint, Bruce A; Lu, Z G; Zhu, Jiahong; Milliken, C; kreidler, E; Miller, Leslie S; Armstrong, Timothy R.; Walker, Larry R

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine if NiO-forming alloys are a viable alternative to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloys for solid-oxide fuel-cell (SOFC) metallic interconnects. The oxide-scale growth kinetics and electrical properties of a series of Li- and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-alloyed, NiO-forming Ni-base alloys and La-, Mn-, and Ti-alloyed Fe-18Cr-9W and Fe-25Cr base ferritic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloys were evaluated. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Li reduced the NiO scale growth rate and increased its electrical conductivity. The area-specific-resistance (ASR) values were comparable to those of the best (lowest ASR) ferritic alloys examined. Oxidation of the ferritic alloys at 800 C in air and air+10% H{sub 2}O (water vapor) indicated that Mn additions resulted in faster oxidation kinetics/thicker oxide scales, but also lower oxide scale ASRs. Relative in-cell performance in model SOFC stacks operated at 850 C indicated a 60-80% reduction in ASR by Ni+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Ni+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li, and Fe-25Cr+La,Mn,Ti interconnects over those made from a baseline, commercial Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-forming alloy. Collectively, these results indicate that NiO-forming alloys show potential for use as metallic interconnects.

  2. Anisotropy in Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of an Oxide Dispersion Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.

    2014-08-01

    Anisotropy of fracture toughness and fracture behavior of Fe20Cr5Al oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy has been investigated by means of compression tests, hardness tests, and wedge splitting test. The results show a small effect of the compression direction on yield strength (YS) and strain hardening. The YS is minimum for longitudinal direction and maximum for the tangential direction. The transverse plastic strain ratio is similar for tangential and longitudinal directions but very different from that in normal direction. Hardness depends on the indentation plane; it is lower for any plane parallel to the L-T plane and of similar magnitude for the other orthogonal planes, i.e., the L-S and T-S planes. Macroscopically, two failure modes have been observed after wedge-splitting tests, those of LS and TS specimens in which fracture deviates along one or two branches normal to the notch plane, and those of LT, TL, SL, and ST specimens in which fracture propagates along the notch plane. Besides LT and TL specimens present delaminations parallel to L-T plane. Both, the fracture surface of branching cracks and that of the delaminations, show an intergranular brittle fracture appearance. It is proposed that the main cause of the delamination and crack branching is the alignment in the mesoscopic scale of the ultrafine grains structure which is enhanced by the <110>-texture of the material and by the presence in the grain boundaries of both yttria dispersoids and impurity contaminations. An elastoplastic finite element analysis was performed to study what stress state is the cause of the branches and delaminations. It is concluded that the normal to the crack branches and/or the shear stress components could determine the crack bifurcation mechanism, whereas the delamination it seems that it is controlled by the magnitude of the stress component normal to the delamination plane.

  3. Notch Impact Behavior of Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.; Serrano, M.; Garcia-Junceda, A.; Jimenez, J. A.; Pimentel, G.; Urones-Garrote, E.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, tensile tests as well as LS and LT notched Charpy impact tests were performed at the temperature range between 77 K (-196 °C) and 473 K (200 °C) on an oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) Fe20Cr6Al0.5Y2O3 hot-rolled tube. The absorbed energy values in the range of high temperatures of LS notched specimens are considerably higher than those of LT notched specimens; however, such values tend to converge as temperature increases. Ductile fracture on the normal planes to RD with delaminations parallel to the tube surface was observed in the temperature range between room temperature (RT) and 473 K (200 °C). Delaminations of crack divider type were observed in LT specimens, whereas delaminations of crack arrester type were observed in LS specimens. The yttria particles in the grain boundaries and the transverse plastic anisotropy are the possible reasons why the delaminations were parallel to the tube surface.

  4. The oxidation behavior of a model molybdenum/tungsten-containing alloy in air alone and in air with trace levels of NaCl(g)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeggil, J. G.; Bornstein, N. S.

    1983-01-01

    Thermogravimetric, metallographic, and X-ray studies of a model alloy, Ni-(17 a/o)Al-(10 a/o)Mo+W, oxidized in dry air at 600-1200 C and in air with 10 ppm NaCl gas at 900 C, are reported. The alloy was melted under Ar and pretreated in flowing H2 for 24 h at 1300 C. Polished 1.3 x 1.3 x 0.2-cm specimens were washed and degreased prior to oxidation in a quartz tube within a furnace for up to 120 hr. The oxidation activation energy of the alloy is determined to be about 30 kcal/mole. The specimens oxidized at 900 C and hotter exhibited oxidized and nitrided phases covered by complex NiMoO4, NiWO4, and NiAl2O4 scales and a porous, nonprotective outer layer of NiO. The oxidation behavior is found to be determined by the formation and growth of the scale, especially the (Mo,W)O2 component. Al2O3 scale layers were not formed, and further runs with pure O2 or Ar-(20 percent)O2 ruled out an explanation of this phenomenon based on aluminum nitride formation. The oxidation was accelerated by the addition of NaCl gas, a finding attributed to the reaction of NaCl with external locally protective Al2O3 scales and with the internal(Mo, W)O2 layers.

  5. The oxidation behavior of Ni-Cr-Al-2ThO2 alloys at 1093 and 1204 C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wilcox, B. A.; Stringer, J.

    1972-01-01

    A pack diffusion process has been developed which permits the introduction of nearly 6 wt % Al into solid solution in the near surface region of TDNiCr (Ni-20 wt % Cr-2 vol % ThO2) and Ni-20Cr. Alumina scales, adherent under cyclic heating and cooling conditions, were produced on TDNiCr-5.86Al upon exposure to an environment of 1330 N/sq m (10 torr) or 101,000 N/sq m (760 torr) air at temperatures of 1093 and 1204 C. While the same oxidation kinetics were observed in isothermal tests for Ni-14.6Cr-5.86Al as were obtained for the TDNiCr-5.86Al, the dispersion-strengthened alloy exhibited superior oxide scale adhesion during cyclic testing. At 1204 C, continuous weight gains were observed under all test conditions for TDNiCr-5.86Al, in contrast to the weight loss with time which occurred several hours after exposure of TDNiCr to an oxidizing environment. TDNiCr with an initial aluminum surface concentration of 4.95 wt % has nearly comparable oxidation resistance to the TDNiCr-5.86Al alloy.

  6. Oxidation Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with a TiAl3 Bond Coat on γ-TiAl Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiqiang; Kong, Lingyan; Li, Tiefan; Xiong, Tianying

    2015-02-01

    The thermal barrier coatings investigated in this paper included a TiAl3 bond coat and a yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) layer. The TiAl3 bond coat was prepared by deposition of aluminum by cold spray, followed by a heat-treatment. The YSZ layer was prepared by air plasma spray. The isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests were conducted at 900 °C for 1000 h and 500 cycles to test the oxidation resistance of the thermal barrier coatings. The microstructure and composition of the γ-TiAl alloy with and without the thermal barrier coatings after oxidation were investigated. The results showed that a dense TGO layer about 5 μm had grown between the YSZ layer and the TiAl3 bond coat. The TGO had good adhesion to both the YSZ layer and the bond coat even after the TiAl3 bond coat entirely degraded into the TiAl2 phase, which decreased the inward oxygen diffusion. Thus, the thermal barrier coatings improved the oxidation resistance of γ-TiAl alloy effectively.

  7. Effect of oxide layer modification of CoCr stent alloys on blood activation and endothelial behavior.

    PubMed

    Milleret, Vincent; Ziogas, Algirdas; Buzzi, Stefano; Heuberger, Roman; Zucker, Arik; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-04-01

    CoCr alloys, in particular MP35N and L605, are extensively used in biomedical implants, for example for coronary stents. In practice, these alloys present a moderately hydrophobic surface which leads to significant platelet adhesion and consequently to risk of early thrombosis or in-stent restenosis. Surface modification of biomedical implants is known to alter their biological performances. In this study we focused on the alteration of in vitro biological responses of human cells contacting CoCr surfaces with engineered oxide layers. XPS analysis was performed to determine the composition of the oxide layer of differently treated CoCr while the bulk properties were not modified. An extensive characterization of the surfaces was performed looking at surface roughness, wettability and charge. After static exposure to blood, strongly reduced platelet and increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion were observed on treated versus untreated surfaces. Comparisons of treated and untreated samples provide evidence for wettability being an important player for platelet adhesion, although multiple factors including surface oxide chemistry and charge might control polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion. The differently treated surfaces were shown to be equally suitable for endothelial cell proliferation. We herein present a novel approach to steer biological properties of CoCr alloys. By adjusting their oxide layer composition, substrates were generated which are suitable for endothelial cell growth and at the same time show an altered (reduced) blood contact activation. Such treatments are expected to lead to stents of highly reproducible quality with minimal thrombogenicity and in-stent restenosis, while maintaining rapid re-endothelialization after coronary angioplasty. PMID:24964763

  8. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  9. The oxidation and corrosion of ODS alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, Carl E.; Barrett, Charles A.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation and hot corrosion of high temperature oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are reviewed. The environmental resistance of such alloys are classified by oxide growth rate, oxide volatility, oxide spalling, and hot corrosion limitations. Also discussed are environmentally resistant coatings for ODS materials. It is concluded that ODS NiCrAl and FeCrAl alloys are highly oxidation and corrosion resistant and can probably be used uncoated.

  10. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  11. High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al Alloys and Coatings Modified with Pt and Reactive Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Nan

    2007-12-01

    Materials for high-pressure turbine blades must be able to operate in the high-temperature gases (above 1000 C) emerging from the combustion chamber. Accordingly, the development of nickel-based superalloys has been constantly motivated by the need to have improved engine efficiency, reliability and service lifetime under the harsh conditions imposed by the turbine environment. However, the melting point of nickel (1455 C) provides a natural ceiling for the temperature capability of nickel-based superalloys. Thus, surface-engineered turbine components with modified diffusion coatings and overlay coatings are used. Theses coatings are capable of forming a compact and adherent oxide scale, which greatly impedes the further transport of reactants between the high-temperature gases and the underlying metal and thus reducing attack by the atmosphere. Typically, these coatings contain β-NiAl as a principal constituent phase in order to have sufficient aluminum content to form an Al2O3 scale at elevated temperatures. The drawbacks to the currently-used {beta}-based coatings, such as phase instabilities, associated stresses induced by such phase instabilities, and extensive coating/substrate interdiffusion, are major motivations in this study to seek next-generation coatings. The high-temperature oxidation resistance of novel Pt + Hf-modified γ-Ni + γ-Ni3Al-based alloys and coatings were investigated in this study. Both early-stage and 4-days isothermal oxidation behavior of single-phase γ-Ni and γ'-Ni3Al alloys were assessed by examining the weight changes, oxide-scale structures, and elemental concentration profiles through the scales and subsurface alloy regions. It was found that Pt promotes Al2O3 formation by suppressing the NiO growth on both γ-Ni and γ'Ni3Al single-phase alloys. This effect increases with increasing Pt content. Moreover, Pt exhibits this effect even at lower

  12. Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Asgharzadeh, H.; Kim, H.S.; Simchi, A.

    2013-01-15

    An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

  13. Corrosion behaviors and effects of corrosion products of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated AZ31 magnesium alloy under the salt spray corrosion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Huang, Zhiquan; Yan, Qin; Liu, Chen; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Changhong; Jiang, Guirong; Shen, Dejiu

    2016-08-01

    The effects of corrosion products on corrosion behaviors of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coating were investigated under the salt spray corrosion test (SSCT). The surface morphology, cross-sectional microstructure, chemical and phase compositions of the PEO coating were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. Further, the corrosion process of the samples under the SSCT was examined in a non-aqueous electrolyte (methanol) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) coupled with equivalent circuit. The results show that the inner layer of the coating was destroyed firstly and the corrosion products have significant effects on the corrosion behaviors of the coating. The results above are discussed and an electrochemical corrosion model is proposed in the paper.

  14. Corrosion behavior of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 in simulated nuclear high level waste medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samantaroy, Pradeep Kumar; Suresh, Girija; Paul, Ranita; Kamachi Mudali, U.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-11-01

    Nickel based alloys are candidate materials for the storage of high level waste (HLW) generated from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. In the present investigation Alloy 690 and Alloy 693 are assessed by potentiodynamic anodic polarization technique for their corrosion behavior in 3 M HNO 3, 3 M HNO 3 containing simulated HLW and in chloride medium. Both the alloys were found to possess good corrosion resistance in both the media at ambient condition. Microstructural examination was carried out by SEM for both the alloys after electrolytic etching. Compositional analysis of the passive film formed on the alloys in 3 M HNO 3 and 3 M HNO 3 with HLW was carried out by XPS. The surface of Alloy 690 and Alloy 693, both consists of a thin layer of oxide of Ni, Cr, and Fe under passivation in both the media. The results of investigation are presented in the paper.

  15. Oxidation Behavior and Cracking Susceptibility of Ni-Cr Alloys in Dry Steam and Inert Gas under Extremely-Low Oxygen Partial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroshi; Kenmoku, Yasuhiro; Endo, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Watanabe, Yutaka

    In order to investigate oxidation behavior and cracking susceptibility of the Ni-Cr alloys under extremely-low oxygen partial pressure, three Ni-Cr alloys (Ni-14Cr, Ni-22Cr and Ni-30Cr) were used as plate specimen and reverse U-bend specimen for oxidation experiments for 750 hours at 400 °C in two kinds of gas system (inert gas and dry steam) under various oxygen potential (Ni stable, Ni/NiO equilibrium and NiO stable). The Ni-Cr alloys cracked along grain boundary both in inert gas system (with trace O2, without H2O) and in hydrogenated steam. In the inert gas system, the cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near NiO stable condition. On the other hand, no crack was found in near Ni stable condition. In the dry steam system, the cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near Ni/NiO equilibrium. In contrast, no crack was found in near NiO stable condition. The cracking susceptibility was confirmed in near Ni/NiO equilibrium in hydrogenated steam as contrasted with higher oxygen potential in inert gas system. This result shows that potential range for the cracking susceptibility seemed to be different between the two kinds of gas system. Cracking severity was highest for Ni-14Cr and lowest for Ni-30Cr both in inert gas and steam; however, even Ni-30Cr was not immune to intergranular cracking in steam near Ni/NiO equilibrium.

  16. Fatigue behavior of titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, R.R.; Eylon, D.; Luetjering, G.

    1999-07-01

    This symposium was international in nature, with leaders in the fields of fatigue technology and the metallurgy of titanium from the US, Europe and Asia. It covered basic research, development, applications and modeling--life predictions and design of both fatigue crack initiation and propagation of titanium alloys. There were presentations on the full range of titanium alloy systems, from commercially pure and {alpha}-alloys, {alpha}/{beta}- and {beta}-alloys to the gamma titanium aluminides. The effects of processing/heat treatment/microstructure on the fatigue properties were discussed, and models proposed to correlate the microstructures to the observed fatigue performance. Test environments reported on included hard vacuum (and the effect of vacuum level), vacuums with partial pressures of miscellaneous gases, lab air and aqueous media. A session was devoted to the effects of environment and fatigue enhancement via surface treatments using techniques such as shot peening and roller burnishing. The effects of dwell on both S-N and crack growth rate behavior were covered. It was a very comprehensive symposium with presentations from academia, government laboratories and industry, with industrial participants ranging from the petroleum industry to medical and aerospace interests. This book has been separated into four sections, representing the technology areas covered in various sessions, namely Mechanisms of Fatigue crack Initiation and Propagation of Conventional Alloys, Fatigue in Intermetallics, Environmental and Surface Aspects of Fatigue, and Application, Life Prediction and Design. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  17. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation behavior of two nickel-aluminum alloys (Ni3AL and NiAl) with additions of chromium, silicon, and titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.; Santoro, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    The alloys Ni3Al and NiAl with and without 1 and 3 atomic percent chromium, silicon, and titanium replacing the aluminum were cyclically oxidized at 1200 C for times to 200 hours, and the results were compared with those obtained with the alloy B-1900 subjected to the same oxidation process. The evaluation was based on metal recession, specific weight change, metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al was improved by Si, unaffected by Ti, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of NiAl was slightly improved by Ti, unaffected by Si, and degraded by Cr. The oxidation resistance of Ni3Al with 1 atomic percent Si was nearly equal to that of NiAl. Alloy B-1900 exhibited oxidation resistance comparable to that of Ni3Al + Cr compositions.

  18. Oxidation characteristics of Ti-14Al-21Nb ingot alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Sankara N.; Clark, Ronald K.; Unnam, Jalaiah; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1990-01-01

    Static oxidation kinetics of Ti14Al21Nb (wt pct) ingot alloy were studied in air over the temperature interval of 649 to 1093 C in a thermogravimetric apparatus. The oxidation products were characterized by x ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, energy dispersive x ray analysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy. Cross-sections of the oxidized samples were also examined using light and scanning electron microscopy. The oxidation rate was substantially lower than the conventional alloys of titanium, but the kinetics displayed a complex behavior involving two or more oxidation rates depending on the temperature and duration of exposure. The primary oxide formed was TiO2, but this oxide was doped with Nb. Small amounts of Al2O3 and TiN were also present in the scale. Diffusion of oxygen into the alloy was observed and the diffusivity seemed to be dependent on the microstructure of the metal. A model was presented to explain the oxidation behavior of the alloy in terms of the reduction in the oxygen diffusivity in the oxide caused by the modification of the defect structure of TiO2 by Nb ions.

  19. Oxidation Behavior of Nb-20Mo-15Si-25Cr and Nb-20Mo-15Si-25Cr-5B Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillio, Benedict I.; Varma, Shailendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Nb-20Mo-15Si-25Cr (25Cr alloy) and Nb-20Mo-15Si-25Cr-5B (25Cr/5B alloy) alloys have been subjected to oxidation in air for 24 hours from 973 K to 1673 K (700 °C to 1400 °C). Even though B additions do not improve oxidation resistance at temperatures higher than 1473 K (1200 °C), the lower temperature oxidation resistance is superior with B by influencing the microstructure. Porous oxide scale development at lower temperatures has been attributed to the dominant growth of Nb2O5 and the vaporization of MoO3. An intermediate oxidation layer is developed between the scale and the metal for the 25Cr/5B alloy at temperatures above 1173 K (900 °C). Scale densification at elevated temperatures results in higher stress development as a result of the mismatch of coefficients of thermal expansion, ultimately resulting in oxide spallation.

  20. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation behavior at 1100 and 1200 C of Ni-20Cr, Ni-20Cr-3Mn, Ni-20Cr-3Si, and Ni-40Cr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowell, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Alloys of Ni-20Cr, Ni-20Cr-3Mn, Ni-20Cr-3Si, and Ni-40Cr were cyclically oxidized at 1100 and 1200 C for up to 100 hours. Oxidation behavior was judged by sample thickness and weight change, metallography, diffraction, and microprobe analysis. The least attacked were Ni-40Cr and Ni-20Cr-3Si. The alloy Ni-20Cr-3Mn was much less attacked than Ni-20Cr, but more than the other alloys. The formation of Cr2O3 accounted for the increased resistance of Ni-Cr and Ni-20Cr-3Si, and the formation of MnCr2O4 accounts for the improvement in Ni-20Cr-3mn over Ni-20Cr.

  1. Corrosion behavior of Ti-39Nb alloy for dentistry.

    PubMed

    Fojt, Jaroslav; Joska, Ludek; Malek, Jaroslav; Sefl, Vaclav

    2015-11-01

    To increase an orthopedic implant's lifetime, researchers are now concerned on the development of new titanium alloys with suitable mechanical properties (low elastic modulus-high fatigue strength), corrosion resistance and good workability. Corrosion resistance of the newly developed titanium alloys should be comparable with that of pure titanium. The effect of medical preparations containing fluoride ions represents a specific problem related to the use of titanium based materials in dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine the corrosion behavior of β titanium alloy Ti-39Nb in physiological saline solution and in physiological solution containing fluoride ions. Corrosion behavior was studied using standard electrochemical techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that corrosion properties of the studied alloy were comparable with the properties of titanium grade 2. The passive layer was based on the oxides of titanium and niobium in several oxidation states. Alloying with niobium, which was the important part of the alloy passive layer, resulted in no significant changes of corrosion behavior. In the presence of fluoride ions, the corrosion resistance was higher than the resistance of titanium. PMID:26249624

  2. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  3. Diffusional transport during the cyclic oxidation of gamma + beta, Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, J. A.; Heckel, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of several cast gamma + beta, Ni-Cr-Al(Y, Zr) alloys and one low-pressure plasma spraying gamma + beta, Ni-Co-Cr-Al(Y) alloy was studied. Cyclic oxidation was found to result in a decreasing Al concentration at the oxide-metal interface due to a high rate of Al consumption coupled with oxide scale cracking and spalling. Diffusion paths plotted on the ternary phase diagram showed higher Ni concentrations with increasing cyclic oxidation exposures. The alloy with the highest rate of Al consumption and the highest Al content underwent breakaway oxidation following 500 1-hr cycles at 1200 C.

  4. Transient oxidation of multiphase Ni-Cr base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, G.; Meraner, M.; Farrell, P.

    1988-06-01

    Four commercially available Ni-Cr-based alloys used with porcelain enamels were studied. Major alloying elements were Al, Be, Si, B, Nb, and Mo. All alloys were multiphase. During heat treatments simulating enameling conditions, phase changes occurred in most alloys and were detected using hardness testing, differential thermal analysis (DTA), and microscopy. Oxidation of these alloys at 1000/degrees/C for 10 min produced an oxide layer consisting principally of chromium oxide, but the oxide morphology varied with each alloy depending on the alloy microstructure. Controlling alloy microstructure while keeping the overall composition unchanged may be a means of preventing wrinkled poorly adherent scales from forming.

  5. Oxidation Behavior of a V-4Cr-4Ti Alloy During the Commercial Processing of Thin-Wall Tubing

    SciTech Connect

    Rowcliffe, Arthur F.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Young, Conrad M.

    2007-08-01

    The determination of the thermal and irradiation creep properties of V-4Cr-4Ti using the pressurized tube technique requires a supply of 4.57mm outside diameter tubing with a wall thickness of 0.250mm. Because of the high solubility and rapid mobility of oxygen in this material, maintaining the desired chemical and microstructural characteristics of the alloy during the fabrication of thin wall tubing presents a difficult technological challenge. In 1995, the US fusion program procured some 6 meters of tubing, using the US heat No.832665, utilizing commercial vendors [1].This effort, (Batch A), met with mixed success since a large fraction of the tubing developed cracks at both surfaces and during processing, the carbon concentration increased from 80 to 300wppm, oxygen increased from 310 to 700wppm, while nitrogen remained fairly constant. During the intermediate annealing cycles at 1000C for this batch the furnace vacuum was maintained in the 10-4 torr. range. In an effort to control oxygen pick-up during the intermediate annealing heat treatments, further processing of thin-wall tubing has been undertaken utilizing vacuum conditions in the 10-5 torr regime and in the 10-7 torr regime.

  6. Burn-resistant behavior and mechanism of Ti14 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong-nan; Huo, Ya-zhou; Song, Xu-ding; Bi, Zhao-zhao; Gao, Yang; Zhao, Yong-qing

    2016-02-01

    The direct-current simulation burning method was used to investigate the burn-resistant behavior of Ti14 titanium alloy. The results show that Ti14 alloy exhibits a better burn resistance than TC4 alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Cu is observed to preferentially migrate to the surface of Ti14 alloy during the burning reaction, and the burned product contains Cu, Cu2O, and TiO2. An oxide layer mainly comprising loose TiO2 is observed beneath the burned product. Meanwhile, Ti2Cu precipitates at grain boundaries near the interface of the oxide layer, preventing the contact between O2 and Ti and forming a rapid diffusion layer near the matrix interface. Consequently, a multiple-layer structure with a Cu-enriched layer (burned product)/Cu-lean layer (oxide layer)/Cu-enriched layer (rapid diffusion layer) configuration is formed in the burn heat-affected zone of Ti14 alloy; this multiple-layer structure is beneficial for preventing O2 diffusion. Furthermore, although Al can migrate to form Al2O3 on the surface of TC4 alloy, the burn-resistant ability of TC4 is unimproved because the Al2O3 is discontinuous and not present in sufficient quantity.

  7. Modeling Selective Intergranular Oxidation of Binary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-01-07

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 µm ahead of grain boundary crack tips were documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (~100s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner’s model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al.

  8. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  9. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  10. Development of Oxidation Protection Coatings for Gamma Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Bird, R. K.; Sankaran, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Metallic material systems play a key role in meeting the stringent weight and durability requirements for reusable launch vehicle (RLV) airframe hot structures. Gamma titanium aluminides (gamma-TiAl) have been identified as high-payoff materials for high-temperature applications. The low density and good elevated temperature mechanical properties of gamma-TiAl alloys make them attractive candidates for durable lightweight hot structure and thermal protection systems at temperatures as high as 871 C. However, oxidation significantly degrades gamma-TiAl alloys under the high-temperature service conditions associated with the RLV operating environment. This paper discusses ongoing efforts at NASA Langley Research Center to develop durable ultrathin coatings for protecting gamma-TiAl alloys from high-temperature oxidation environments. In addition to offering oxidation protection, these multifunctional coatings are being engineered to provide thermal control features to help minimize heat input into the hot structures. This paper describes the coating development effort and discusses the effects of long-term high-temperature exposures on the microstructure of coated and uncoated gamma-TiAl alloys. The alloy of primary consideration was the Plansee alloy gamma-Met, but limited studies of the newer alloy gamma-Met-PX were also included. The oxidation behavior of the uncoated materials was evaluated over the temperature range of 704 C to 871 C. Sol-gel-based coatings were applied to the gamma-TiAl samples by dipping and spraying, and the performance evaluated at 871 C. Results showed that the coatings improve the oxidation resistance, but that further development is necessary.

  11. Surface characterization and corrosion behavior of calcium phosphate-base composite layer on titanium and its alloys via plasma electrolytic oxidation: A review paper.

    PubMed

    Rafieerad, A R; Ashra, M R; Mahmoodian, R; Bushroa, A R

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, calcium phosphate-base composites, such as hydroxyapatite (HA) and carbonate apatite (CA) have been considered desirable and biocompatible coating layers in clinical and biomedical applications such as implants because of the high resistance of the composites. This review focuses on the effects of voltage, time and electrolytes on a calcium phosphate-base composite layer in case of pure titanium and other biomedical grade titanium alloys via the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. Remarkably, these parameters changed the structure, morphology, pH, thickness and crystallinity of the obtained coating for various engineering and biomedical applications. Hence, the structured layer caused improvement of the biocompatibility, corrosion resistance and assignment of extra benefits for Osseo integration. The fabricated layer with a thickness range of 10 to 20 μm was evaluated for physical, chemical, mechanical and tribological characteristics via XRD, FESEM, EDS, EIS and corrosion analysis respectively, to determine the effects of the applied parameters and various electrolytes on morphology and phase transition. Moreover, it was observed that during PEO, the concentration of calcium, phosphor and titanium shifts upward, which leads to an enhanced bioactivity by altering the thickness. The results confirm that the crystallinity, thickness and contents of composite layer can be changed by applying thermal treatments. The corrosion behavior was investigated via the potentiodynamic polarization test in a body-simulated environment. Here, the optimum corrosion resistance was obtained for the coating process condition at 500 V for 15 min in Ringer solution. This review has been summarized, aiming at the further development of PEO by producing more adequate titanium-base implants along with desired mechanical and biomedical features. PMID:26354281

  12. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. The most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.

  13. Cladding burst behavior of Fe-based alloys under LOCA

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Dryepondt, Sebastien N.; Pint, Bruce A.; Massey, Caleb P.

    2015-12-17

    Burst behavior of austenitic and ferritic Fe-based alloy tubes has been examined under a simulated large break loss of coolant accident. Specifically, type 304 stainless steel (304SS) and oxidation resistant FeCrAl tubes were studied alongside Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 that are considered reference fuel cladding materials. Following the burst test, characterization of the cladding materials was carried out to gain insights regarding the integral burst behavior. Given the widespread availability of a comprehensive set of thermo-mechanical data at elevated temperatures for 304SS, a modeling framework was implemented to simulate the various processes that affect burst behavior in this Fe-based alloy. Themore » most important conclusion is that cladding ballooning due to creep is negligible for Fe-based alloys. Thus, unlike Zr-based alloys, cladding cross-sectional area remains largely unchanged up to the point of burst. Furthermore, for a given rod internal pressure, the temperature onset of burst in Fe-based alloys appears to be simply a function of the alloy's ultimate tensile strength, particularly at high rod internal pressures.« less

  14. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  15. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  16. Effect of thermal oxidation on the surface characteristics and corrosion behavior of a Ta-implanted Ti-50.6Ni shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng-nan; Li, Yan; Zhao, Ting-ting

    2012-12-01

    A NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) modified by Ta ion implantation was subjected to oxidation treatment in air at 723 and 873 K. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) measurements were conducted to investigate the surface characteristics, including surface topography, elemental depth profiles, and surface phase structures. The surface roughness of the Ta-implanted NiTi increases after oxidation, and the higher the oxidation temperature is, the larger the value is. The surface of the Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 723 K is a nanolayer mainly composed of TiO2/Ta2O5 and TiO with depressed Ni content. The Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 873 K is mainly covered by rutile TiO2 in several micrometers of thickness. Potentiodynamic polarization tests indicated that the corrosion resistance of the Ta-implanted NiTi was improved after thermal oxidation at 723 K, but a negative impact was found for the Ta-implanted NiTi oxidized at 873 K.

  17. Oxide Film Aging on Alloy 22 in Halide Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Martin A.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Passive and corrosion behaviors of Alloy 22 in chloride and fluoride containing solutions, changing the heat treatment of the alloy, the halide concentration and the pH of the solutions at 90 deg. C, was investigated. The study was implemented using electrochemical techniques, which included open circuit potential monitoring over time, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out at open circuit and at passivity potentials. Corrosion rates obtained by EIS measurements after 24 h immersion in naturally aerated solutions were below 0.5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rates were practically independent of solution pH, alloy heat treatment and halide ion nature and concentration. EIS low frequency resistance values increased with applied potential in the passive domain and with polarization time in pH 6 - 1 M NaCl at 90 deg. C. This effect was attributed to an increase in the oxide film thickness and oxide film aging. High frequency capacitance measurements indicated that passive oxide on Alloy 22 presented a double n-type/p-type semiconductor behavior in the passive potential range. (authors)

  18. Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1994-09-01

    Alloying effects on the high-temperature oxidation resistance of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb were examined on the basis of isothermal exposures to air at 950 C. Additions of either Re and Al or Fe, Ni, and Al had relatively little effect on weight gains relative to the Cr-6% Nb binary alloy. One alloying element that improved the mechanical behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys substantially increased the oxidation rates and spallation susceptibilities of Cr-6 and -12% Nb alloys. However, the addition of another element completely offset these deleterious effects. The presence of this latter element resulted in the best overall oxidation behavior (in terms of both weight gains and spallation tendencies) of all Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb compositions. Its beneficial effect can be attributed to improvement in the oxidation resistance of the Cr-rich phase.

  19. Oxidation and corrosion resistance of candidate Stirling engine heater-head-tube alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Barrett, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Sixteen candidate iron base Stirling engine heater head tube alloys are evaluated in a diesel fuel fired simulator materials test rig to determine their oxidation and corrosion resistance. Sheet specimens are tested at 820 C for 3500 hr in 5 hr heating cycles. Specific weight change data and an attack parameter are used to categorize the alloys into four groups; 10 alloys show excellent for good oxidation and corrosion resistance and six alloys exhibit poor or catastrophic resistance. Metallographic, X-ray, and electron microprobe analyses aid in further characterizing the oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. Alloy compositions, expecially the reactive elements aluminum, titanium, and chromium, play a major role in the excellent oxidation and corrosion behavior of the alloys. The best oxidation resistance is associated with the formation of an iron nickel aluminum outer oxide scale, an intermediate oxide scale rich in chromium and titanium, and an aluminum outer oxide scale adjacent to the metallic substrate, which exhibits a zone of internal oxidation of aluminum and to some extent titanium.

  20. Modeling selective intergranular oxidation of binary alloys.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhijie; Li, Dongsheng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Intergranular attack of alloys under hydrothermal conditions is a complex problem that depends on metal and oxygen transport kinetics via solid-state and channel-like pathways to an advancing oxidation front. Experiments reveal very different rates of intergranular attack and minor element depletion distances ahead of the oxidation front for nickel-based binary alloys depending on the minor element. For example, a significant Cr depletion up to 9 μm ahead of grain boundary crack tips was documented for Ni-5Cr binary alloy, in contrast to relatively moderate Al depletion for Ni-5Al (∼100 s of nm). We present a mathematical kinetics model that adapts Wagner's model for thick film growth to intergranular attack of binary alloys. The transport coefficients of elements O, Ni, Cr, and Al in bulk alloys and along grain boundaries were estimated from the literature. For planar surface oxidation, a critical concentration of the minor element can be determined from the model where the oxide of minor element becomes dominant over the major element. This generic model for simple grain boundary oxidation can predict oxidation penetration velocities and minor element depletion distances ahead of the advancing front that are comparable to experimental data. The significant distance of depletion of Cr in Ni-5Cr in contrast to the localized Al depletion in Ni-5Al can be explained by the model due to the combination of the relatively faster diffusion of Cr along the grain boundary and slower diffusion in bulk grains, relative to Al. PMID:25573575

  1. Composition effects on the early-stage oxidation kinetics of (001) Cu-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, G.-W.; Eastman, J. A.; Birtcher, R. C.; Baldo, P. M.; Pearson, J. E.; Thompson, L. J.; Wang, L.; Yang, J. C.

    2007-02-01

    An in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy study of the nucleation and growth of oxide islands during the early-stage oxidation of (001) Cu1-xAux alloys (x⩽38at.%) was undertaken in order to investigate the effects of alloying on oxide island nucleation behavior and growth kinetics. The kinetic data reveal that Au enhances the nucleation density of oxide islands and suppresses their growth rate. Our results provide insight into reasons for the decreased passivation properties of Cu when alloyed with Au.

  2. Structure and corrosion behavior of sputter deposited cerium oxide based coatings with various thickness on Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Huang, Jiamu; Claypool, James B.; Castano, Carlos E.; O'Keefe, Matthew J.

    2015-11-01

    Cerium oxide based coatings from ∼100 to ∼1400 nm in thickness were deposited onto Al 2024-T3 alloy substrates by magnetron sputtering of a 99.99% pure CeO2 target. The crystallite size of CeO2 coatings increased from 15 nm to 46 nm as the coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼1400 nm. The inhomogeneous lattice strain increased from 0.36% to 0.91% for the ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm thick coatings and slightly decreased to 0.89% for the ∼1400 nm thick coating. The highest adhesion strength to Al alloy substrates was for the ∼210 nm thick coating, due to a continuous film coverage and low internal stress. Electrochemical measurements indicated that sputter deposited crystalline CeO2 coatings acted as physical barriers that provide good cathodic inhibition for Al alloys in saline solution. The ∼900 nm thick CeO2 coated sample had the best corrosion performance that increased the corrosion resistance by two orders magnitude and lowered the cathodic current density 30 times compared to bare Al 2024-T3 substrates. The reduced defects and exposed surface, along with suppressed charge mobility, likely accounts for the improved corrosion performance as coating thickness increased from ∼100 nm to ∼900 nm. The corrosion performance decreased for ∼1400 nm thick coatings due in part to an increase in coating defects and porosity along with a decrease in adhesion strength.

  3. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, Jr., R. William

    2000-01-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (a) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (b) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (c) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (d) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (e) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (f) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method. A preferred Mo--Re-ODS alloy contains 7-14 weight % rhenium and 2-4 volume % lanthanum oxide.

  4. Interfacial reactions and oxidation behavior of Al 2O 3 and Al 2O 3/Al coatings on an orthorhombic Ti 2AlNb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. Q.; Wang, Q. M.; Gong, J.; Sun, C.

    2011-02-01

    The uniform and dense Al2O3 and Al2O3/Al coatings were deposited on an orthorhombic Ti2AlNb alloy by filtered arc ion plating. The interfacial reactions of the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb and Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens after vacuum annealing at 750 °C were studied. In the Al2O3/Ti2AlNb specimens, the Al2O3 coating decomposed significantly due to reaction between the Al2O3 coating and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. In the Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens, a γ-TiAl layer and an Nb-rich zone came into being by interdiffusion between the Al layer and the O-Ti2AlNb substrate. The γ-TiAl layer is chemically compatible with Al2O3, with no decomposition of Al2O3 being detected. No internal oxidation or oxygen and nitrogen dissolution zone was observed in the O-Ti2AlNb alloy. The Al2O3/Al/Ti2AlNb specimens exhibited excellent oxidation resistance at 750 °C.

  5. The oxidation behavior and protection of niobium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Roger A.; Meier, Gerald H.

    1990-08-01

    Despite years of effort, researchers have been unable to develop a high-temperature niobium-base alloy with the ability to form a protective oxide scale. Although some of the alloys tested have potentially useful properties, the alloying elements usually act to the detriment of at least one property. Currently, niobium-base alloys are protected from high-temperature oxidation with a highly reliable silicide coating. This article reviews the efforts to develop oxidation-resistant alloys and summarizes the results of recent research on oxidation-resistant niobium-base intermetallics.

  6. Erosion behavior of Fe-Al intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Song, J.H.; Chang, Y.W.

    1997-04-01

    The Fe-rich Fe-Al intermetallics have generated some interest, especially during the last decade, due to their excellent resistance for oxidation and sulfidation, high specific strength, and low material cost. The aluminide is therefore considered as one of the promising candidates for high-temperature structural materials in a corrosive atmosphere. Research effort has been focused mainly on process, development, and enhancement of room-temperature ductility together with the characterization of physical properties such as mechanical properties, oxidation, corrosion, and abrasive wear behavior. However, there have been only a few works reported to date in regard to the erosion characteristics of the alloy, one of the most important material property of this ordered intermetallic alloy for the use in a fossil-fuel plant. In this study, the solid-particle erosion behavior of the Fe-Al intermetallic alloys containing the various aluminum contents ranging from 25 to 30 at.% has been investigated to clarify the effect of aluminum content and different ordered structures, viz. DO{sub 3} and B2, on the erosion behavior. An attempt has been made to correlate the erosion behavior of these intermetallics to their mechanical properties by carrying out tensile tests together with SEM observation of the eroded surfaces.

  7. [Studies on high temperature oxidation of noble metal alloys for dental use (I). Formation of oxide layers and oxidation rate (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ohno, H

    1976-11-01

    Eight commercial and two experimental alloys were examined. The cast specimens were polished metallographically and oxidized at 700 degrees and 800 degrees C in air. An electron probe X-ray microanalyser and a microthermobalance were employed to investigate the oxidation behavior of the alloys. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The copper in the alloys was selectively oxidized and the scales formed on the alloys consisted of two layers, CuO overlying Cu2O. 2. The oxide particles in the internal oxidation zone (subscale) on the alloys containing only Cu as the base metal were Cu2O and on the alloys containing Zn, Cd, and Ni with Cu were ZnO, CdO, and NiO, respectively. 3. The size of the ZnO and CdO particles in the subscale increased with the penetration into the specimen. 4. The ZnO particles in the metal-subscale interface showed preferential precipitation at the grain boundaries. 5. When the oxide particles in the subscale did not develop remarkably, the oxidation rate at constant temperature conformed with the parabolic law. 6. In the 18 carat gold alloy, the oxidation rate at 800 degrees C was about 10 times that at 700 degrees C. 7. Owing to preferential oxidation of the Cu in the alloys, Cu concentration in the outer layer of the metal decreased remarkably and Au, Pt, Ag and Pd concentration increased. PMID:1069823

  8. Effects of Grit Blasting and Annealing on the High-Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Austenitic and Ferritic Fe-Cr Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proy, M.; Utrilla, M. V.; Otero, E.; Bouchaud, B.; Pedraza, F.

    2014-08-01

    Grit blasting (corundum) of an austenitic AISI 304 stainless steel (18Cr-8Ni) and of a low-alloy SA213 T22 ferritic steel (2.25Cr-1Mo) followed by annealing in argon resulted in enhanced outward diffusion of Cr, Mn, and Fe. Whereas 3 bar of blasting pressure allowed to grow more Cr2O3 and Mn x Cr3- x O4 spinel-rich scales, higher pressures gave rise to Fe2O3-enriched layers and were therefore disregarded. The effect of annealing pre-oxidation treatment on the isothermal oxidation resistance was subsequently evaluated for 48 h for both steels and the results were compared with their polished counterparts. The change of oxidation kinetics of the pre-oxidized 18Cr-8Ni samples at 850 °C was ascribed to the growth of a duplex Cr2O3/Mn x Cr3- x O4 scale that remained adherent to the substrate. Such a positive effect was less marked when considering the oxidation kinetics of the 2.25Cr-1Mo steel but a more compact and thinner Fe x Cr3- x O4 subscale grew at 650 °C compared to that of the polished samples. It appeared that the beneficial effect is very sensitive to the experimental blasting conditions. The input of Raman micro-spectroscopy was shown to be of ground importance in the precise identification of multiple oxide phases grown under the different conditions investigated in this study.

  9. Microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the microstructure and surface chemistry of amorphous alloys, and their effects on tribological behavior. The results indicate that the surface oxide layers present on amorphous alloys are effective in providing low friction and a protective film against wear in air. Clustering and crystallization in amorphous alloys can be enhanced as a result of plastic flow during the sliding process at a low sliding velocity, at room temperature. Clusters or crystallines with sizes to 150 nm and a diffused honeycomb-shaped structure are produced on the wear surface. Temperature effects lead to drastic changes in surface chemistry and friction behavior of the alloys at temperatures to 750 C. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the alloys to the surface upon heating and impart to the surface oxides at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The oxides increase friction while the boron nitride reduces friction drastically in vacuum.

  10. Creep and stress rupture of oxide dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed Inconel alloy MA 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Stulga, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of the mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy MA 754 was studied at 760, 982 and 1093 C. Tensile specimens with a fine, highly elongated grain structure, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal grain direction were tested at various stresses in air under constant load. It was found that the apparent stress dependence was large, with power law exponents ranging from 19 to 33 over the temperature range studied. The creep activation energy, after correction for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, was close to but slightly larger than the activation energy for self diffusion. Rupture was intergranular and the rupture ductility as measured by percentage elongation was generally low, with values ranging from 0.5 to 16 pct. The creep properties are rationalized by describing the creep rates in terms of an effective stress which is the applied stress minus a resisting stress consistent with the alloy microstructure. Values of the resisting stress obtained through a curve fitting procedure are found to be close to the values of the particle by-pass stress for this oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, as calculated from the measured oxide particle distribution.

  11. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  12. Oxidation of Alloys for Advanced Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.E.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-09-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include power generation from coal at 60% efficiency, which requires steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steam oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  13. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study on the oxidation mechanism of binary and ternary alloy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shi-Yu; Liu, Shiyang; Li, De-Jun; Wang, Sanwu; Guo, Jing; Shen, Yaogen

    2015-02-01

    Utilizing a combination of ab initio density-functional theory and thermodynamics formalism, we have established the microscopic mechanisms for oxidation of the binary and ternary alloy surfaces and provided a clear explanation for the experimental results of the oxidation. We construct three-dimensional surface phase diagrams (SPDs) for oxygen adsorption on three different Nb-X(110) (X = Ti, Al or Si) binary alloy surfaces. On the basis of the obtained SPDs, we conclude a general microscopic mechanism for the thermodynamic oxidation, that is, under O-rich conditions, a uniform single-phase SPD (type I) and a nonuniform double-phase SPD (type II) correspond to the sustained complete selective oxidation and the non-sustained partial selective oxidation by adding the X element, respectively. Furthermore, by revealing the framework of thermodynamics for the oxidation mechanism of ternary alloys through the comparison of the surface energies of two separated binary alloys, we provide an understanding for the selective oxidation behavior of the Nb ternary alloy surfaces. Using these general microscopic mechanisms, one could predict the oxidation behavior of any binary and multi-component alloy surfaces based on thermodynamics considerations.

  14. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study on the oxidation mechanism of binary and ternary alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shi-Yu; Liu, Shiyang; Li, De-Jun; Wang, Sanwu; Guo, Jing; Shen, Yaogen

    2015-02-14

    Utilizing a combination of ab initio density-functional theory and thermodynamics formalism, we have established the microscopic mechanisms for oxidation of the binary and ternary alloy surfaces and provided a clear explanation for the experimental results of the oxidation. We construct three-dimensional surface phase diagrams (SPDs) for oxygen adsorption on three different Nb-X(110) (X = Ti, Al or Si) binary alloy surfaces. On the basis of the obtained SPDs, we conclude a general microscopic mechanism for the thermodynamic oxidation, that is, under O-rich conditions, a uniform single-phase SPD (type I) and a nonuniform double-phase SPD (type II) correspond to the sustained complete selective oxidation and the non-sustained partial selective oxidation by adding the X element, respectively. Furthermore, by revealing the framework of thermodynamics for the oxidation mechanism of ternary alloys through the comparison of the surface energies of two separated binary alloys, we provide an understanding for the selective oxidation behavior of the Nb ternary alloy surfaces. Using these general microscopic mechanisms, one could predict the oxidation behavior of any binary and multi-component alloy surfaces based on thermodynamics considerations.

  15. Oxide strengthened molybdenum-rhenium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, Robert; Buckman, William R. Jr.

    1998-12-01

    Provided is a method of making an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy which includes the steps of: (1) forming a slurry containing molybdenum oxide and a metal salt dispersed in an aqueous medium, the metal salt being selected from nitrates or acetates of lanthanum, cerium or thorium; (2) heating the slurry in the presence of hydrogen to form a molybdenum powder comprising molybdenum and an oxide of the metal salt; (3) mixing rhenium powder with the molybdenum powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium powder; (4) pressing the molybdenum-rhenium powder to form a molybdenum-rhenium compact; (5) sintering the molybdenum-rhenium compact in hydrogen or under a vacuum to form a molybdenum-rhenium ingot; and (6) compacting the molybdenum-rhenium ingot to reduce the cross-sectional area of the molybdenum-rhenium ingot and form a molybdenum-rhenium alloy containing said metal oxide. The present invention also provides an ODS molybdenum-rhenium alloy made by the method.

  16. Steam Oxidation of Advanced Steam Turbine Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2008-01-01

    Power generation from coal using ultra supercritical steam results in improved fuel efficiency and decreased greenhouse gas emissions. Results of ongoing research into the oxidation of candidate nickel-base alloys for ultra supercritical steam turbines are presented. Exposure conditions range from moist air at atmospheric pressure (650°C to 800°C) to steam at 34.5 MPa (650°C to 760°C). Parabolic scale growth coupled with internal oxidation and reactive evaporation of chromia are the primary corrosion mechanisms.

  17. Oxidation resistance of novel ferritic stainless steels alloyed with titanium for SOFC interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, P.D.; Alman, D.E.

    2008-05-15

    Chromia (Cr2O3) forming ferritic stainless steels are being developed for interconnect application in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). A problem with these alloys is that in the SOFC environment chrome in the surface oxide can evaporate and deposit on the electrochemically active sites within the fuel cell. This poisons and degrades the performance of the fuel cell. The development of steels that can form conductive outer protective oxide layers other than Cr2O3 or (CrMn)3O4 such as TiO2 may be attractive for SOFC application. This study was undertaken to assess the oxidation behavior of ferritic stainless steel containing 1 weight percent (wt.%) Ti, in an effort to develop alloys that form protective outer TiO2 scales. The effect of Cr content (6–22 wt.%) and the application of a Ce-based surface treatment on the oxidation behavior (at 800° C in air+3% H2O) of the alloys was investigated. The alloys themselves failed to form an outer TiO2 scale even though the large negative {delta}G of this compound favors its formation over other species. It was found that in conjunction with the Ce-surface treatment, a continuous outer TiO2 oxide layer could be formed on the alloys, and in fact the alloy with 12 wt.% Cr behaved in an identical manner as the alloy with 22 wt.% Cr.

  18. Observation of Oxide Formation for Molten Fe-Cr-C Alloy at a High Carbon Region by Oxygen Top Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihara, Ryosuke; Gao, Xu; Kaneko, Shigeru; Kim, Sunjoong; Ueda, Shigeru; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Seok, Min Oh; Kitamura, Shin-ya

    2016-04-01

    The oxide formation behavior during decarburization by top blowing for molten Fe-Cr-C alloy was directly observed. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1673 K to 1723 K (1400 °C to 1450 °C), as well as for 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1623 K to 1673 K (1350 °C to 1400 °C), oxide particles always formed within several minutes after decarburization started. Also, unstable oxide film followed by stable oxide film formed after C content was decreased to certain levels. For 11 mass pct Cr alloy at 1773 K (1500 °C) and 14 mass pct Cr alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), only the oxide particle and stable oxide film were observed. For 18 mass pct Cr-5 mass pct C alloy at 1723 K (1450 °C), stable oxide film formed twice. By comparing the critical C and Cr contents of alloy when oxides started to form with the equilibrium relation, the formation of the oxide particle and unstable oxide film was found to be under a nonequilibrium condition, whereas the stable oxide film that formed was near an equilibrium condition. For 11 and 14 mass pct Cr alloy, the decarburization rate stayed constant and was not affected by the formation of the oxide particle or unstable oxide film, but it started to decrease after the formation of the stable oxide film.

  19. Inhomogeneity of anodic oxide films of Al and Al alloys characterized by scanning electron microscopy observation and analysis of frequency response behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Majima, Teiji

    1999-02-01

    Inhomogeneity of anodic oxide films of pure Al, Al-0.42 at. % Ta, Al-1.1 at. % Ta, Al-0.5 at. % Ti, and Al-1.0 wt % Si formed in various electrolyte solutions has been investigated. Scanning electron microscopy observation of their cross sections revealed their structural inhomogeneity: they consist of an inner layer element with a smooth texture and an outer layer element distinguished by its textural properties such as roughness and macroscopic voids. An imaginary part of the impedance for those oxides revealed their electrical inhomogeneity: their impedance spectra were fitted by the summation of characteristic Debye functions, PC, PV1, and PV2, in the frequency regime where direct current conduction predominated. This indicates that three differing processes of charge transport coexist. Only PC which had the shortest conductivity relaxation time was manifested for the oxide, where a smooth texture was observed. PV1 which had the second shortest relaxation time was predominantly manifested for the oxide, where a rough texture indicating the existence of minute voids was observed. PV2 which had the longest relaxation time was predominantly manifested for the oxide, where macroscopic voids were observed. Based on the close correlation between the texture and the impedance spectra, PC, PV1, and PV2 were attributed to the traps induced at the microvoids, minute voids, and macroscopic voids. The temperature dependence of the conductivities, as derived from the Debye peaks, showed that oxides had a well-defined trap level 2.0±0.2 eV below the conduction band edge. The trap density was least for the oxide with a smooth texture and it was higher by more than an order of magnitude for the oxide with a rough texture. As regards the anodization behavior, it was shown that the oxidizing reactants migrating toward the matrix metal was OH- and that the reaction to produce H2 near the oxide-matrix metal interface was suppressed by the predominant reaction to form an Si-H bond

  20. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layermore » over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.« less

  1. New Creep-Resistant Cast Alloys with Improved Oxidation Resistance in Water Vapor at 650–800°C

    SciTech Connect

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce A.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2015-08-13

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700 C in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with, respectively, 21wt%Cr 15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr 17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behaviors in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. Also, at 650 C and 700 C, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750 C, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr 15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800 C, but that was not the case for the 22Cr 17.5Ni alloy. Thus, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of, respectively, 50 C and 100 C in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  2. New creep resistant cast alloys with improved oxidation resistance in water vapor at 650-800°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien; Pint, Bruce; Maziasz, Philip

    2015-08-01

    Cast stainless steel CF8C-Plus (19wt.%Cr/12%Ni) has excellent creep properties, but limited oxidation resistance above 700ºC in environments containing H2O. One strategy to improve the alloy oxidation performance is to increase the Cr and Ni concentration. Two new alloys, with respectively 21wt%Cr-15wt%Ni and 22wt%Cr-17.5wt%Ni were therefore developed and their long-term oxidation behavior in humid air were compared with the oxidation behavior of five other cast alloys. At 650 and 700ºC, all the alloys formed internal Cr-rich nodules, and outer nodules or layers rich in Fe and Ni, but they grew a protective Cr-rich inner layer over time. At 750ºC, the lower alloyed steels such as CF8C-Plus showed large metal losses, but the two new alloys still exhibited a protective oxidation behavior. The 21Cr-15Ni alloy was severely oxidized in locations at 800ºC, but that was not the case for the 22Cr-17.5Ni alloy. Therefore, the two new modified alloys represent a potential operating temperature gain of respectively 50 and 100ºC in aggressive environments compared with the CF8C-Plus alloy.

  3. Scale formation on Ni-based alloys in simulated solid oxide fuel cell interconnect environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Singh, P.; Windisch, C.F.; Johnson, C.D.; Schaeffer, C.

    2004-11-01

    Recent publications suggest that the environment on the fuel side of the bi-polar stainless steel SOFC interconnects changes the oxidation behavior and morphology of the scale formed on the air side. The U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center (ARC), has examined the role of such exposure conditions on advanced nickel base alloys. Alloy formulations developed at ARC and commercial alloys were studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrical property of oxide scales formed on selected alloys was determined in terms of areaspecific resistance (ASR). The corrosion behavior of ARC nickel-based alloys exposed to a dual environment of air/ H2 were compared to those of Crofer 22APU and Haynes 230.

  4. Superelastic behavior modeling in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab Chirani, S.; Aleong, D.; Dumont, C.; McDowell, D.; Patoor, E.

    2003-10-01

    The superelastic behavior of shape memory alloys is useful for several industrial applications. To dimension the SMA structures, the development of specified phenomenological constitutive models are necessary. In this case the identification of a transformation criterion is required. Unfortunately, accurate determination of the loading surface which characterizes the behavior during the martensitic transformation is experimentally difficult. A numerical simulation of this surface is proposed from a micromechanical model based on the self-consistent scale transition method. The effect of the various crystallographic textures on the shape of these surfaces is studied in CuZnAl alloys. The obtained results permit to choose the best texture according to the loading type. The validity of the normality law has been verified during the transformation procedure for studied textures.

  5. Oxidation of Fe-C alloys in the temperature range 600-852/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, A.U.; Whittle, D.P.

    1981-12-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-C alloys in the temperature range 600-850/sup 0/C has been studied. CO/sub 2/ evolved during oxidation was measured using an infrared gas analyzer. The presence of C lowers the oxidation rate relative to that of pure Fe and this has been related to the rejection of carbon at the alloy-scale interface causing poor contact between scale and alloy. As a result, the scale contains a higher proportion of magnetite, which reduces its overall growth rate. Very little carbon is lost to the atmosphere. The ease with which the rejected carbon is incorporated into the alloy depends on the alloy structure.

  6. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Garrard, W.N. )

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  7. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  8. Degradation behavior of biodegradable Fe35Mn alloy stents.

    PubMed

    Sing, N B; Mostavan, A; Hamzah, E; Mantovani, D; Hermawan, H

    2015-04-01

    This article reports a degradation study that was done on stent prototypes made of biodegradable Fe35Mn alloy in a simulated human coronary arterial condition. The stent degradation was observed for a short-term period from 0.5 to 168 h, which simulates the early period of stenting procedure. Potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to quantify degradation rate and surface property of the stents. Results showed that signs of degradation were visible on both crimped and expanded stents after 1 h of test, mostly located on the stent's curvatures. The degradation rate of stent was higher compared to that of the original alloy, indicating the surface altering effect of stent fabrication processing to degradation. A single oxide layer was formed and detected as a porous structure with capacitive behavior. Expanded stents exhibited lower polarization resistance compared to the nonexpanded ones, indicating the cold work effect of expansion procedure to degradation. PMID:24954069

  9. Oxidation of Copper Alloy Candidates for Rocket Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuji, Linus U. Thomas; Humphrey, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The gateway to affordable and reliable space transportation in the near future remains long-lived rocket-based propulsion systems; and because of their high conductivities, copper alloys remain the best materials for lining rocket engines and dissipating their enormous thermal loads. However, Cu and its alloys are prone to oxidative degradation -- especially via the ratcheting phenomenon of blanching, which occurs in situations where the local ambient can oscillate between oxidation and reduction, as it does in a H2/02- fuelled rocket engine. Accordingly, resistance to blanching degradation is one of the key requirements for the next generation of reusable launch vehicle (RLV) liner materials. Candidate copper alloys have been studied with a view to comparing their oxidation behavior, and hence resistance to blanching, in ambients corresponding to conditions expected in rocket engine service. These candidate materials include GRCop-84 and GRCop-42 (Cu - Cr-8 - Nb-4 and Cu - Cr-4 - Nb-2 respectively); NARloy-Z (Cu-3%Ag-0.5%Y), and GlidCop (Cu-O.l5%Al2O3 ODS alloy); they represent different approaches to improving the mechanical properties of Cu without incurring a large drop in thermal conductivity. Pure Cu (OFHC-Cu) was included in the study to provide a baseline for comparison. The samples were exposed for 10 hours in the TGA to oxygen partial pressures ranging from 322 ppm to 1.0 atmosphere and at temperatures of up to 700 C, and examined by SEM-EDS and other techniques of metallography. This paper will summarize the results obtained.

  10. Advanced oxidation-resistant iron-based alloys for LWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrani, K. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Snead, L. L.

    2014-05-01

    Application of advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as light water reactor fuel cladding is proposed. The motivations are based on specific limitations associated with zirconium alloys, currently used as fuel cladding, under design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident scenarios. Using a simplified methodology, gains in safety margins under severe accidents upon transition to advanced oxidation-resistant iron alloys as fuel cladding are showcased. Oxidation behavior, mechanical properties, and irradiation effects of advanced iron alloys are briefly reviewed and compared to zirconium alloys as well as historic austenitic stainless steel cladding materials. Neutronic characteristics of iron-alloy-clad fuel bundles are determined and fed into a simple economic model to estimate the impact on nuclear electricity production cost. Prior experience with steel cladding is combined with the current understanding of the mechanical properties and irradiation behavior of advanced iron alloys to identify a combination of cladding thickness reduction and fuel enrichment increase (∼0.5%) as an efficient route to offset any penalties in cycle length, due to higher neutron absorption in the iron alloy cladding, with modest impact on the economics.

  11. Creep behavior of niobium alloy PWC-11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Titran, R. H.; Moore, T. J.; Grobstein, T. L.

    1987-01-01

    The high vacuum creep and creep-rupture behavior of a Nb-1Zr-.1C alloy (PWC 11) was investigated at 1350 and 1400 K with an applied stress of 40 MPa. The material was tested in the following four conditions: annealed (1 hr 1755 K/2 hr 1475 K); annealed plus EB welded; annealed plus aged for 1000 hr at 1350 or 1400 K; and annealed, welded, and aged. It was found that the material in the annealed state was the most creep-resistant condition tested, and that aging the alloy for 1000 hr without an applied stress greatly reduced that strength; however, it was still approximately three times as creep resistant as Nb-1Zr. Additionally, the EB weld region was stronger than the base metal in each condition tested, and phase extraction of the dispersed precipitate revealed the presence of a 70%ZrC-30%NbC cubic monocarbide phase.

  12. Oxidation and sulfidation resistant alloys with silicon additions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.; Poston, J.A., Jr.; Siriwardane, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Albany Research Center (ARC) has considerable experience in developing lean chromium, austenitic stainless steels with improved high temperature oxidation resistance. Using basic alloy design principles, a baseline composition of Fe-16Cr-16Ni-2Mn-1Mo alloys with Si and Al addition at a maximum of 5 weight percent was selected for potential application at temperatures above 700ºC for supercritical and ultra-supercritical power plant application. The alloys were fully austenitic. Cyclic oxidation tests in air for 1000 hours were carried out on alloys with Si only or combined Si and Al additions in the temperature range 700ºC to 800ºC. Oxidation resistances of alloys with Si only additions were outstanding, particularly at 800ºC (i.e., these alloys possessed weight gains 4 times less than a standard type-304 alloy). In addition, Si alloys pre-oxidized at 800ºC, showed a zero weight gain in subsequent testing for 1000 hours at 700ºC. Similar improvements were observed for Si only alloy after H2S exposure at 700ºC compared with type 304 stainless steel. SEM and ESCA analysis of the oxide films and base material at the oxide/base metal interface were conducted to study potential rate controlling mechanisms at ARC. Depth profile analysis and element concentration profiles (argon ion etching/x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) were conducted on oxidized specimens and base material at the National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  13. Time-dependent crack growth behavior of alloy 617 and alloy 230 at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Shawoon Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Two Ni-base solid-solution-strengthened superalloys: INCONEL 617 and HAYNES 230 were studied to check sustained loading crack growth (SLCG) behavior at elevated temperatures appropriate for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) applictaions with constant stress intensity factor (Kmax= 27.75 MPa✓m) in air. The results indicate a time-dependent rate controlling process which can be characterized by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) parameter -- stress intensity factor (K). At elevated temperatures, the crack growth mechanism was best described using a damage zone concept. Based on results and study, SAGBOE (stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation embrittlement) is considered the primary reason for time-dependent SLCG. A thermodynamic equation was considered to correlate all the SLCG results to determine the thermal activation energy in the process. A phenomenological model based on a time-dependent factor was developed considering the previous researcher's time-dependent fatigue crack propagation (FCP) results and current SLCG results to relate cycle-dependent and time-dependent FCP for both alloys. Further study includes hold time (3+300s) fatigue testing and no hold (1s) fatigue testing with various load ratios (R) at 700°C with a Kmax of 27.75 MPa✓m. Study results suggest an interesting point: crack growth behavior is significantly affected with the change in R value in cycle-dependent process whereas in time-dependent process, change in R does not have any significant effect. Fractography study showed intergranular cracking mode for all time-dependent processes and transgranular cracking mode for cycle-dependent processes. In Alloy 230, SEM images display intergranular cracking with carbide particles, dense oxides and dimple mixed secondary cracks for time-dependent 3+300s FCP and SLCG test. In all cases, Alloy 230 shows better crack growth resistance compared to Alloy 617.

  14. On the corrosion behavior and biocompatibility of palladium-based dental alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Desheng

    Palladium-based alloys have been used as dental restorative materials for about two decades with good clinical history. But there have been clinical case reports showing possible allergy effects from these alloys. The aim of this study was to characterize the corrosion behavior and mechanisms of several palladium-based dental alloys by potentiodynamic polarization methods, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy/atomic force microscopy (SKPFM/AFM), and to evaluate their biocompatibility by a cell culture technique and an animal model. Using SKPFM/AFM and scanning electron microscopy, the Ru-enriched phase from the use of ruthenium as a grain-refining element was identified as being slightly more noble than the palladium solid solution matrix in a high-palladium alloy. Other secondary precipitates that exist in the microstructures of these high-palladium alloys have minimal differences in Volta potential compared to the matrix. For high-palladium alloys, corrosion is generally uniform due to the predominant palladium content in the different phases. Potentiodynamic polarization and EIS have shown that representative palladium-silver alloys have low corrosion tendency and high corrosion resistance, which are equivalent to a well-known high-noble gold-palladium alloy in simulated body fluid and oral environments. The palladium-silver alloys tested are resistant to chloride ion corrosion. Passivation and dealloying have been identified for all of the tested palladium-silver alloys. The great similarity in corrosion behavior among the palladium-silver alloys is attributed to their similar chemical compositions. The variation in microstructures of palladium-silver alloys tested does not cause significant difference in corrosion behavior. The corrosion resistance of these palladium-silver alloys at elevated potentials relevant to oral environment is still satisfactory. The release of elements from representative dental

  15. Evolution of oxide scale on a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy at 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, A. . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Mohammed, A.I.; Al-Jaroudi, S.S.; Tawancy, H.M.; Abbas, N.M.

    2007-01-15

    The cyclic oxidation behavior of a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy was studied in air at 900 deg. C for exposure periods of up to 1000 h. The morphology, microstructure and composition of the oxide scale was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Oxidation kinetics was determined by weight gain measurements. The results show that steady state oxidation was achieved within 1 h of exposure. During transient oxidation, the alloy grain boundaries intersecting the alloy surface became depleted in Ni and enriched in Mo and Cr. The scale initially formed at the surface was NiO which grew outwardly. However, a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer developed, rapidly retarding the rate of oxidation. Formation of NiMoO{sub 4} was also observed. The presence of Mo in the alloy facilitated the formation of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at an early stage of oxidation. The alloy exhibited considerable oxide spalling during prolonged exposure.

  16. Predicting fracture behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.T.; Cordes, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A computational method has been developed to predict the material fracture failure process in flawed or cracked specimens. This method does not require experimental material fracture data. Finite element technique is employed to model the physical shape of the specimen. Nonlinear spring elements are introduced to model the material damage behavior near a flaw or a crack tip. Crack initiation and crack propagation conditions are developed to predict the crack initiation load, the extent of material damage, and the crack growth behavior. The introduction of nonlinear spring elements and the development of crack initiation and crack growth conditions are unique features for fracture prediction with the development of this method. To prove the feasibility of the method, two types of specimen made by two aluminum alloys with similar material stress-strain data were studied. Fracture predictions by this method are comparable to experimental data.

  17. Effect of prior oxidation on the creep behavior of NiAl-hardened austenitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satyanarayana, D. V. V.; Malakondaiah, G.; Sarma, D. S.

    2003-11-01

    The effect of prior oxidation at 1473 K on the creep behavior of an Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy, hardened by ordered NiAl precipitates, has been investigated at 873 K over a stress range of 275 to 450 MPa. The alloy in the as-electroslag remelted (ESR) as well as the ESR-plus-hot-worked conditions was considered. Prior oxidation causes creep strengthening in the Fe-Ni-Cr-Al alloy, resulting in a decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in time to rupture, in contrast to the observations reported on nickel-based superalloys. Creep strengthening is, however, accompanied by a significant reduction in creep ductility. Oxidation-induced creep strengthening in the current alloy can be attributed to the improved adherence of surface oxide caused by the presence of yttrium. An effective stress that incorporates the contributions of load transfer as well as substructural strengthening is used to account for the observed oxidation-induced creep strengthening. While creep strengthening is more pronounced in the ESR cast alloy, the loss in creep ductility is more intense in the ESR wrought alloy. Increasing the oxidation time beyond 1 hour has a minimal effect on creep strengthening of both the alloys, though it lowers significantly the creep ductility of the wrought alloy. The observed differences in creep behavior of the alloy in the two different conditions could be attributed to the differences in grain size as well as morphology and related oxidation-induced damage.

  18. Oxide dispersion hardened mechanically alloyed materials for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, J. S.; Strassburg, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure of mechanical alloying makes it possible to obtain, with the aid of powder-metallurgy techniques, alloys that consist of a metallic matrix in which very fine oxide particles are dispersed. Mechanically alloyed compound powders can be used for making either forged or hot-rolled semifinished products. For these products, dispersion strengthening and precipitation hardening has been combined. At high temperatures, the strength characteristics of the alloy are determined by both dispersion hardening and by precipitation hardening processes. The effect produced by each process is independent of that due to the other. Attention is given to the principle of mechanical alloying developed by Benjamin (1970, 1976), the strength characteristics of mechanically alloyed materials, the corrosion resistance of mechanically alloyed material at high temperatures, and the preparation and characteristics of the alloy MA 6000 E.

  19. Oxidative Recession, Sulfur Release, and Al203 Spallation for Y-Doped Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2001-01-01

    Second-order spallation phenomena have been noted for Y-doped Rene'N5 after long term oxidation at 1150 degrees C. The reason for this behavior has not been conclusively identified. A mass equivalence analysis has shown that the surface recession resulting from oxidation has the potential of releasing about 0.15 monolayer of sulfur for every 1 mg/sq cm of oxygen reacted for an alloy containing 5 ppmw of sulfur. This amount is significant in comparison to levels that have been shown to result in first-order spallation behavior for undoped alloys. Oxidative recession is therefore speculated to be a contributing source of sulfur and second-order spallation for Y-doped alloys.

  20. Surface modification of alloys for improved oxidation resistance in SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Kung, S.C.

    2006-11-01

    This research is aimed at improving the oxidation behavior of metallic alloys for SOFC application, by the incorporation of rare earths through surface treatments. This paper details the effect of such surface modification on the behavior of Crofer 22 APU, a ferritic steel designed specifically for SOFC application, and Type 430 stainless steel. Two pack cementation like treatments were used to incorporate Ce into the surface of the alloys. After 4000 hours of exposure at 800oC to air+3%H2O, the weight gain of Crofer 22APU samples that were Ce surface modified were less than half that of an unmodified sample, revealing the effectiveness of the treatments on enhancing oxidation resistance. For Type-430, the treatment prevented scale spalling that occurred during oxidation of the unmodified alloy.

  1. Corrosion behavior of alloy 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni) in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Allen, Todd R.; Yang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    The effect of testing conditions (temperature, time, and oxygen content) and material's microstructure (the as-received and the grain boundary engineered conditions) on the corrosion behavior of alloy 800H in high-temperature pressurized water was studied using a variety of characterization techniques. Oxidation was observed as the primary corrosion behavior on the samples. Oxide exfoliation was significantly mitigated on the grain boundary engineered samples compared to the as-received ones. The oxide formation, including some 'mushroom-shaped oxidation', is predicted via a combination of thermodynamics and kinetics influenced by the preferential diffusion of specific species using short-cut diffusion paths.

  2. The solidification behavior of an Alloy 625/718 variant

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslak, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    The solidification behavior of Custom Age 625 PLUS{reg sign} is examined using an integrated analytical approach. Like its predecessors, Alloys 625 and 718, the solidification behavior of this new alloy is dominated by the presence and segregation of Nb, which gives rise to a {gamma}/Laves terminal solidification constituent. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Oxidation of 316 stainless steel and other alloys in prototypic GCFR environments

    SciTech Connect

    Acharya, R.T.

    1980-05-01

    The oxidation behavior of type 316 stainless steel and candidate advanced alloys for the gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) is being investigated at General Atomic Company. The test program consists of oxidation tests in prototypic GCFR environments. Two tests have been completed to date and a third test is under way. The first test was performed in an environment containing a hydrogen/water ratio of 10. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys was good to excellent in this environment. Preferential oxidation of chromium was responsible for this behavior. The second test was performed in an environment containing a hydrogen/water ratio of 0.25, where both chromium and iron oxides are thermodynamically stable. Some of the alloys and some of the ribbed type 316 stainless steel test specimens showed unacceptable oxidation resistance in this environment. In the third test, presently under way, two different pretreatment procedures are being used to control the poor oxidation behavior observed in the second test. Early results show some degree of success.

  4. Oxidation behavior of FeAl+Hf,Zr,B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Doychak, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of Fe-40Al-1Hf, Fe-40Al-1Hf-0.4B, and Fe-40Al-0.1Zr-0.4B (at. percent) alloys was characterized after 900, 1000, and 100 C exposures. Isothermal tests revealed parabolic kinetics after a period of transitional theta-alumina scale growth. The parabolic growth rates for the subsequent alpha-alumina scales were about five times higher than those for NiAl+0.1Zr alloys. The isothermally grown scales showed a propensity toward massive scale spallation due to both extensive rumpling from growth stresses and to an inner layer of HfO2. Cyclic oxidation for 200 1-hr cycles produced little degradation at 900 or 1000 C, but caused significant spallation at 1100 C in the form of small segments of the outer scale. The major difference in the cyclic oxidation of the three FeAl alloys was increased initial spallation for FeAl+Zr,B. Although these FeAl alloys showed many similarities to NiAl alloys, they were generally less oxidation resistant. It is believed that this resulted from nonoptimal levels of dopants and larger thermal expansion mismatch stresses.

  5. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-06-01

    Iron aluminides containing greater than about 20-25 @ % Al have oxidation/sulfidation resistance at temperatures well above those at which these alloys have adequate mechanical strength. In addition to alloying modifications for improved creep resistance of wrought material, this strength limitation is being addressed by development of oxide-dispersion- strengthened (ODS) iron aluminides and by evaluation of Fe{sub 3}Al alloy compositions as coatings or claddings on higher-strength, less corrosion-resistant materials. As part of these efforts, the high-temperature corrosion behavior of iron-aluminide weld overlays and ODS alloys is being characterized and compared to previous results for ingot-processed material.

  6. Oxidation-Reduction Resistance of Advanced Copper Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. (Technical Monitor); Thomas-Ogbuji, L.; Humphrey, D. L.; Setlock, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to oxidation and blanching is a key issue for advanced copper alloys under development for NASA's next generation of reusable launch vehicles. Candidate alloys, including dispersion-strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb, solution-strengthened Cu-Ag-Zr, and ODS Cu-Al2O3, are being evaluated for oxidation resistance by static TGA exposures in low-p(O2) and cyclic oxidation in air, and by cyclic oxidation-reduction exposures (using air for oxidation and CO/CO2 or H2/Ar for reduction) to simulate expected service environments. The test protocol and results are presented.

  7. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Sushko, Maria L; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K; Rosso, Kevin M; Bruemmer, Stephen M

    2015-06-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3-10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2-1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional pathway for oxygen

  8. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-01

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3-10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2-1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular direction providing an additional pathway for oxygen

  9. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L. Alexandrov, Vitaly; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} has a plate-like structure with 1.2–1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  10. Factors affecting chromium carbide precipitate dissolution during alloy oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, R.N.; Gleeson, B.; Young, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Ferrous alloys containing significant volume fractions of chromium carbides were formulated so as to contain an overall chromium level of 15% (by weight) but a nominal metal matrix chromium concentration of only 11%. Their oxidation at 850 C in pure oxygen led to either protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation accompanied by subsurface carbide dissolution or rapid growth of iron-rich oxide scales associated with rapid alloy surface recession, which engulfed the carbides before they could dissolve. Carbide size was important in austenitic alloys: an as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy contained relatively coarse carbides and failed to form a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, whereas the same alloy when hot-forged to produce very fine carbides oxidized protectively. In ferritic alloys, however, even coarse carbides dissolved sufficiently rapidly to provide the chromium flux necessary to form and maintain the growth of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, a result attributed to the high diffusivity of the ferrite phase. Small additions of silicon to the as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy rendered it ferritic and led to protective cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. However, when the silicon-containing alloy was made austenitic (by the addition of nickel), it still formed a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, showing that the principal function of silicon was in modifying the scale-alloy interface.

  11. High-temperature corrosion of metallic alloys in an oxidizing atmosphere containing NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Federer, J.I.

    1989-02-01

    A particular heat-exchanger application involved metallic alloys exposed to flue gases of an aluminum remelt furnace. Because the flue gases might contain NaCl and other halides, the corrosion behavior of the alloys was to be investigated. Planned direct exposure of candidate alloys to the flue gases, however, was not conducted because of premature termination of the project. Complementary laboratory testing was conducted on seven commercially available alloys and two nickel aluminides. These materials were exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere containing 0.06 wt % NaCl for 1100 h at 1000/degree/C. Most of the alloy exhibited grain-boundary attack, which resulted in complete oxidation of enveloped grains. The alloys Incoloy MA-956, Incoloy 800, Inconel 625, Inconel 601, Hastelloy X, Haynes 188, and nickel aluminide IC-50 were substantially more corroded than Alloy 214 and nickel aluminide IC-221. The latter two alloys, therefore, would probably be superior to the others in application involving flue gases containing NaCl. Strength fabricability, and weldability, which are briefly discussed, would also affect selection of materials. 8 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened turbine blade alloy by mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, H. F.; Curwick, L. R. R.; Kim, Y. G.

    1977-01-01

    There were three nickel-base alloys containing up to 18 wt. % of refractory metal examined initially for oxide dispersion strengthening. To provide greater processing freedom, however, a leaner alloy was finally selected. This base alloy, alloy D, contained 0.05C/15Cr / 2Mo/4W/2Ta/4.5Al/2.Ti/015Zr/0.01-B/Bal. Ni. Following alloy selection, the effect of extrusion, heat treatment, and oxide volume fraction and size on microstructure and properties were examined. The optimum structure was achieved in zone annealed alloy D which contained 2.5 vol. % of 35 mm Y2O3 and which was extruded 16:1 at 1038 C.

  13. The Effects of Water Vapor and Hydrogen on the High-Temperature Oxidation of Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, N; Jung, K; Yanar, N M; Pettit, F S; Holcomb, G R; Howard, B H; Meier, G H

    2013-06-01

    Essentially all alloys and coatings that are resistant to corrosion at high temperature require the formation of a protective (slowly-growing and adherent) oxide layer by a process known as selective oxidation. The fundamental understanding of this process has been developed over the years for exposure in pure oxygen or air. However, the atmospheres in most applications contain significant amounts of water vapor which can greatly modify the behavior of protective oxides. The development of oxy-fuel combustion systems in which fossil fuels are burned in a mixture of recirculated flue gas and oxygen, rather than in air, has caused renewed interest in the effects of water vapor and steam on alloy oxidation. The focus of this paper is on the ways the presence of water vapor can directly alter the selective oxidation process. The paper begins with a brief review of the fundamentals of selective oxidation followed by a description of recent experimental results regarding the effect of water vapor on the oxidation of a variety of chromia-forming alloys (Fe- and Ni-base) in the temperature range 600 to 700 °C. The atmospheres include air, air-H{sub 2}O, Ar-H{sub 2}O and Ar-H{sub 2}O-O{sub 2}. Then the behavior of alumina-forming alloys in H{sub 2}O-containing atmospheres is briefly described. As hydrogen is produced during oxidation of alloys in H{sub 2}O, it can be released back into the gas phase or injected into the metal (where it can diffuse through to the other side). Experiments in which hydrogen concentrations have been measured on both sides of thin specimens during oxidation by H{sub 2}O on only one side are described. Finally, it is attempted to catalogue the various experimental observations under a few general principles.

  14. Chlorination treatment to improve the oxidation resistance of Nb-Mo-Si-B alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrani, Vikas; Thom, Andrew J.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Akinc, Mufit

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quaternary Nb-Mo-Si-B system is not oxidation resistant. The difference in oxidation resistance between Mo-Si-B and Nb-Mo-Si-B may be interpreted in terms of the volatility of the metal oxide that forms. MoO3 evaporates from the surface scale at about 650 °C, leaving a porous borosilicate glassy scale. Nb2O5 persists as a rapidly growing condensed phase that overwhelms the ability of the borosilicate glass to form a protective layer. In the present work, a novel chlorination process was employed to selectively remove Nb2O5 from the scale of the quaternary alloy as volatile NbCl5. A Nb-Mo-Si-B alloy was studied with a nominal composition of 63(Nb,Mo)-30Si-7B (at. pct) with Nb/Mo = 1:1. The alloy consisted of a three-phase microstructure of (Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (T1)-(Nb,Mo)5(Si,B)3 (T2)-(Nb,Mo)5Si3B x (D88). The oxidation behavior of these alloys in air was studied both before and after chlorination. Results showed that Nb2O5 can be selectively removed from the scale to leave a borosilicate-rich scale, which then forms a dense scale after heat treatment at 1100 °C in argon. The oxidation rate of the chlorinated alloy was about one-third that of the unchlorinated alloy under identical conditions. Alloy oxidation during heating to the test temperature was studied, and a plausible mechanism for the formation of porosity in the oxide scale has been offered.

  15. Assessment of a High-Throughput Methodology for the Study of Alloy Oxidation using AlxFeyNi1-x-y Composition Gradient Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Payne, Matthew A; Miller, James B; Oliveros, Martin E; Perez, Geronimo; Gouvea, Cristol P; Archanjo, Bráulio S; Achete, Carlos A; Gellman, Andrew J

    2016-07-11

    The high-temperature oxidation of multicomponent metal alloys exhibits complex dependencies on composition, which are not fully understood for many systems. Combinatorial screening of the oxidation of many different compositions of a given alloy offers an ideal means for gaining fundamental insights into such systems. We have previously developed a high-throughput methodology for studying AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloy oxidation using ∼100 nm thick composition spread alloy films (CSAFs). In this work, we critically assess two aspects of this methodology: the sensitivity of CSAF oxidation behavior to variations in AlxFeyNi1-x-y composition and the differences between the oxidation behavior of ∼100 nm thick CSAFs and that of bulk AlxFeyNi1-x-y alloys. This was done by focusing specifically on AlxFe1-x and AlxNi1-x oxidation in dry air at 427 °C. Transitions between phenomenologically distinguishable types of oxidation behavior are found to occur over CSAF compositional ranges of <2 at. %. The oxidation of AlxFe1-x CSAFs is found to be very similar to that of bulk AlxFe1-x alloys, but some minor differences between CSAF and bulk behavior are observed for AlxNi1-x oxidation. On the basis of our assessment, high-throughput studies of CSAF oxidation appear to be an effective method for gaining fundamental insights into the composition dependence of the oxidation of bulk alloys. PMID:27224644

  16. Influence of the casting processing route on the corrosion behavior of dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Galo, Rodrigo; Rocha, Luis Augusto; Faria, Adriana Claudia; Silveira, Renata Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; de Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello

    2014-12-01

    Casting in the presence of oxygen may result in an improvement of the corrosion performance of most alloys. However, the effect of corrosion on the casting without oxygen for dental materials remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the casting technique and atmosphere (argon or oxygen) on the corrosion behavior response of six different dental casting alloys. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by electrochemical measurements performed in artificial saliva for the different alloys cast in two different conditions: arc melting in argon and oxygen-gas flame centrifugal casting. A slight decrease in open-circuit potential for most alloys was observed during immersion, meaning that the corrosion tendency of the materials increases due to the contact with the solution. Exceptions were the Co-based alloys prepared by plasma, and the Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-4Ti alloys processed by oxidized flame, in which an increase in potential was observed. The amount of metallic ions released into the artificial saliva solution during immersion was similar for all specimens. Considering the pitting potential, a parameter of high importance when considering the fluctuating conditions of the oral environment, Co-based alloys show the best performance in comparison with the Ni-based alloys, independent of the processing route. PMID:25491859

  17. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  18. Oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, William J. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Rouge, Carl J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An oxidation resistant coating for titanium alloys and titanium alloy matrix composites comprises an MCrAlX material. M is a metal selected from nickel, cobalt, and iron. X is an active element selected from Y, Yb, Zr, and Hf.

  19. Corrosion behavior of brass alloys in aqueous solutions of different pH

    SciTech Connect

    Badawy, W.A.; Al-Kharafi, F.M.

    1999-03-01

    Corrosion and passivation behaviors of three brass alloys, including selective leaching of the alloys in acidic, neutral, and basic solutions, were investigated in aqueous solutions of different pH. Open-circuit potential measurements, polarization data, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to obtain the corrosion current density, corrosion potential, and corrosion resistance of each alloy. results, especially for open-circuit potential behavior, were compared to those of the pure alloy constituents (i.e., copper, lead, and zinc). In aqueous solutions, the alloy surface was covered by a passive Cu(I) film, which was responsible for the passive behavior of the surface. The stability of such a passive film was dependent upon the solution pH and was affected by alloy composition. The presence of oxygen (O{sub 2}) or oxidizers such as dichromate (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 7}{sup 2{minus}}) in the solution or the increased ratio of active component in the alloy enhanced the disproportionation reactions, which led to breakdown of the passive film, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to explain and to confirm polarization and EIS results. A mechanism for the reactions taking place at the electrode/electrolyte interface was suggested.

  20. Multiscale model of metal alloy oxidation at grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Sushko, Maria L.; Alexandrov, Vitali Y.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2015-06-07

    High temperature intergranular oxidation and corrosion of metal alloys is one of the primary causes of materials degradation in nuclear systems. In order to gain insights into grain boundary oxidation processes, a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model at experimentally relevant length scales is established by combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) and mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT with predictions focused on Ni alloyed with either Cr or Al. Analysis of species and fluxes at steady-state conditions indicates that the oxidation process involves vacancy-mediated transport of Ni and the minor alloying element to the oxidation front and the formation of stable metal oxides. The simulations further demonstrate that the mechanism of oxidation for Ni-5Cr and Ni-4Al is qualitatively different. Intergranular oxidation of Ni-5Cr involves the selective oxidation of the minor element and not matrix Ni, due to slower diffusion of Ni relative to Cr in the alloy and due to the significantly smaller energy gain upon the formation of nickel oxide compared to that of Cr2O3. This essentially one-component oxidation process results in continuous oxide formation and a monotonic Cr vacancy distribution ahead of the oxidation front, peaking at alloy/oxide interface. In contrast, Ni and Al are both oxidized in Ni-4Al forming a mixed spinel NiAl2O4. Different diffusivities of Ni and Al give rise to a complex elemental distribution in the vicinity of the oxidation front. Slower diffusing Ni accumulates in the oxide and metal within 3 nm of the interface, while Al penetrates deeper into the oxide phase. Ni and Al are both depleted from the region 3–10 nm ahead of the oxidation front creating voids. The oxide microstructure is also different. Cr2O3 has a plate-like structure with 1.2 - 1.7 nm wide pores running along the grain boundary, while NiAl2O4 has 1.5 nm wide pores in the direction parallel to the grain boundary and 0.6 nm pores in the perpendicular

  1. Iron aluminide alloy container for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Judkins, Roddie Reagan; Singh, Prabhakar; Sikka, Vinod Kumar

    2000-01-01

    A container for fuel cells is made from an iron aluminide alloy. The container alloy preferably includes from about 13 to about 22 weight percent Al, from about 2 to about 8 weight percent Cr, from about 0.1 to about 4 weight percent M selected from Zr and Hf, from about 0.005 to about 0.5 weight percent B or from about 0.001 to about 1 weight percent C, and the balance Fe and incidental impurities. The iron aluminide container alloy is extremely resistant to corrosion and metal loss when exposed to dual reducing and oxidizing atmospheres at elevated temperatures. The alloy is particularly useful for containment vessels for solid oxide fuel cells, as a replacement for stainless steel alloys which are currently used.

  2. Experimental study on the dynamic mechanical properties of titanium alloy after thermal oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Yingjie; Ma, Lianhua; Chen, Liangbiao

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the dynamic compressive properties of thermally oxidized TC4 (Ti-6Al-4V) titanium alloys were studied with split Hopkinson pressure bar. The dynamic tests were conducted under multiple strain rates from 400 to 2000 s-1 and different testing temperatures from 25 to 200 °C. Data for the true stress-strain curves of thermally oxidized TC4 titanium alloy are presented. They show that the thermal oxidation increases both the dynamic compressive strength of TC4 titanium and the rate of strain hardening. Higher compressive strengths of the material were obtained by applying higher strain rates. Under a strain rate of 2000 s-1, the stress-strain curves of TC4 titanium alloys exhibit both strain-rate-hardening behavior and thermal softening behavior. The oxidation temperature has little effect on dynamic properties of TC4 titanium alloy, but choosing different holding time for oxidation could greatly affect the initiation of plastic deformation and thus might potentially improve the ductility of the treated material. Furthermore, the data show that the increase in the testing temperature results in much lower yield stresses of the treated material.

  3. Oxidation, carburization and/or sulfidation resistant iron aluminide alloy

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier S.; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton

    2003-08-19

    The invention relates generally to aluminum containing iron-base alloys useful as electrical resistance heating elements. The aluminum containing iron-base alloys have improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The alloy has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and includes, in weight %, over 4% Al, .ltoreq.1% Cr and either .gtoreq.0.05% Zr or Zro.sub.2 stringers extending perpendicular to an exposed surface of the heating element or .gtoreq.0.1% oxide dispersoid particles. The alloy can contain 14-32% Al, .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Zr, .ltoreq.1% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B. .ltoreq.30% oxide dispersoid and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, .ltoreq.1% oxygen, .ltoreq.3% Cu, balance Fe.

  4. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, J.E.; Kelly, T.F.

    1999-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains. 20 figs.

  5. Strengthening of metallic alloys with nanometer-size oxide dispersions

    DOEpatents

    Flinn, John E.; Kelly, Thomas F.

    1999-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels and nickel-base alloys containing, by wt. %, 0.1 to 3.0% V, 0.01 to 0.08% C, 0.01 to 0.5% N, 0.05% max. each of Al and Ti, and 0.005 to 0.10% O, are strengthened and ductility retained by atomization of a metal melt under cover of an inert gas with added oxygen to form approximately 8 nanometer-size hollow oxides within the alloy grains and, when the alloy is aged, strengthened by precipitation of carbides and nitrides nucleated by the hollow oxides. Added strengthening is achieved by nitrogen solid solution strengthening and by the effect of solid oxides precipitated along and pinning grain boundaries to provide temperature-stabilization and refinement of the alloy grains.

  6. Selective Internal Oxidation as a Mechanism for Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capell, Brent M.; Was, Gary S.

    2007-06-01

    The mechanism of selective internal oxidation (SIO) for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of nickel-base alloys has been investigated through a series of experiments using high-purity alloys and a steam environment to control the formation of NiO on the surface. Five alloys (Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, Ni-5Cr-9Fe, Ni-16Cr-9Fe, and Ni-30Cr-9Fe) were used to investigate oxidation and intergranular cracking behavior for hydrogen-to-water vapor partial pressure ratios (PPRs) between 0.001 and 0.9. The Ni-9Fe, Ni-5Cr, and Ni-5Cr-9Fe alloys formed a uniform Ni(OH)2 film at PPRs less than 0.09, and the higher chromium alloys formed chromium-rich oxide films over the entire PPR range studied. Corrosion coupon results show that grain boundary oxides extended for significant depths (>150 nm) below the sample surface for all but the highest Cr containing alloy. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) test results showed that intergranular cracking varied with PPR and cracking was more pronounced at a PPR value where nonprotective Ni(OH)2 was able to form and a link between the nonprotective Ni(OH)2 film and the formation of grain boundary oxides is suggested. The observation of grain boundary oxides in stressed and unstressed samples as well as the influence of alloy content on IG cracking and oxidation support SIO as a mechanism for IGSCC.

  7. Deformation behavior and microstructure evolution of wrought magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouren; Song, Linghui; Kang, Sukbong; Cho, Jaehyung; Wang, Yingzi

    2013-05-01

    There are many researches on the deformation behavior of wrought magnesium alloys, such as AZ31, AZ80, AZ91, and ZK60 magnesium alloys at different temperatures and strain rates, but few of them focuses on the deformation behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys, especially under the twin-roll casting (TRC) state. Meanwhile, the existing researches only focus on the grain refinement law of the magnesium alloys under deformation conditions, the deformation mechanism has not been revealed yet. The hot compression behavior of AZ41M and ZK60M magnesium alloys under the temperature and strain rate ranges of 250-400 °C and 0.001-1 s-1 are studied by thermal simulation methods using Gleeble 1500 machine and virtual simulation using finite element analysis software. Simulation results show that sine hyperbolic law is the most suitable flow stress model for wider deformation conditions. The most reasonable selected deformation conditions of ZK60M alloy is 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/1 s-1 for conventional casting (CC), while AZ41M alloy is 300 °C/0.01 s-1 for TRC and 350 °C/0.1 s-1 for CC. Deformation behavior and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) mechanism of them are analyzed at the same deformation conditions. The microstructures of AZ41M and ZK60M alloys are observed at different deformed conditions by optical microscopy (OM) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and it reveals the flow behavior and deformation mechanism of them. Working harden and work soften contribute to the activation of basal, non-basal slip systems which promote DRX. The proposed research reveals the deformation behavior and mechanism of the AZ41M and ZK 60M magnesium alloys and concludes their optimized deformation parameters and processes and provides a theory basis for their manufacturing and application.

  8. COMPARATIVE CORROSION BEHAVIOR OF TWO PALLADIUM CONTAINING TITANIUM ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lian, T. Yashiki, T. Nakayama, T. Nakanishi, R. B. Rebak

    2006-07-23

    The ASTM standard B 265 provides the requirements for the chemical composition of titanium (Ti) alloys. It is planned to use corrosion resistant and high strength titanium alloys to fabricate the drip shield at the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository. Titanium grade (Gr) 7 (R52400) and other Ti alloys are currently being characterized for this application. Ti Gr 7 contains 0.15% Palladium (Pd) to increase its corrosion performance. In this article we report results on the comparative short term corrosion behavior of Ti Gr 7 and a Ruthenium (Ru) containing alloy (Ti Gr 33). Ti Gr 33 also contains a small amount of Pd. Limited electrochemical testing such as polarization resistance and cyclic potentiodynamic curves showed that both alloys have a similar corrosion behavior in the tested environments.

  9. Alloying of aluminum and its influence on the properties of aluminide coatings: oxidation behavior and the chemical stability in Pb sbnd 17Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasbrenner, H.; Peric, Z.; Borgstedt, H. U.

    1996-10-01

    Electrical insulation of the structural material is necessary to reduce the MHD pressure drop in a self-cooled liquid metal blanket. This coating has to be compatible with liquid Pb sbnd 17Li up to 450°C. Specimens with different types of coatings were exposed to static Pb sbnd 17Li for 1200 h at 450°C in order to study their compatibility. Iron and a ferritic steel were coated with an aluminide layer by means of an aluminizing process. Iron metal plate was hot dip aluminized at Thyssen, Germany. The preheated sheet was coated for this purpose by exposing for a few seconds to a melt of Al with 10 wt% Si. The ferritic steel, MANET, was immersed into a melt of the same composition. In this case, cold specimens were dipped into the melt at 700°C for up to 10 min. The formation of the required oxide scale on top of the aluminide layer was performed by using two different methods: high temperature oxidation in air and anodic oxidation at room temperature. All the exposed specimens were examined before and after the corrosion experiments. The analytical method used is EDX measurements on the cut of the specimens and metallographical examinations.

  10. Thermogravimetric study of reduction of oxides present in oxidized nickel-base alloy powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon, hydrogen, and hydrogen plus carbon reduction of three oxidized nickel-base alloy powders (a solid solution strengthened alloy both with and without the gamma prime formers aluminum and titanium and the solid solution strengthened alloy NiCrAlY) were evaluated by thermogravimetry. Hydrogen and hydrogen plus carbon were completely effective in reducing an alloy containing chromium, columbium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. However, with aluminum and titanium present the reduction was limited to a weight loss of about 81 percent. Carbon alone was not effective in reducing any of the alloys, and none of the reducing conditions were effective for use with NiCrAlY.

  11. Effect of Micro Arc Oxidation Coatings on Corrosion Resistance of 6061-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Nitin P.; Jyothirmayi, A.; Rama Krishna, L.; Sundararajan, G.

    2008-10-01

    In the present study, the corrosion behavior of micro arc oxidation (MAO) coatings deposited at two current densities on 6061-Al alloy has been investigated. Corrosion in particular, simple immersion, and potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in 3.5% NaCl in order to evaluate the corrosion resistance of MAO coatings. The long duration (up to 600 h) immersion tests of coated samples illustrated negligible change in weight as compared to uncoated alloy. The anodic polarization curves were found to exhibit substantially lower corrosion current and more positive corrosion potential for MAO-coated specimens as compared to the uncoated alloy. The electrochemical response was also compared with SS-316 and the hard anodized coatings. The results indicate that the overall corrosion resistance of the MAO coatings is significantly superior as compared to SS316 and comparable to hard anodized coating deposited on 6061 Al alloy.

  12. Formation of multilayered scale during the oxidation of NiAl-Mo alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, P. K.; Akinc, M.; Kramer, M. J.

    2014-05-01

    We have studied the oxidation behavior of a hypereutectic NiAl-Mo alloy. This alloy showed an initial rapid mass loss followed by a relatively steady state behavior. The oxide scale formed during the oxidation process was seen to have a multilayered structure comprising of NiO, NiAl2O4, NiMoO4 and Al2O3 with minor amounts of MoO2 in the sub-scale region. The oxidation behavior is influenced significantly by the formation and stability of the constituent oxides, especially NiMoO4. Hence the decomposition behavior of NiMoO4 in the 1100-1200 °C was studied as well. The thermal decomposition of the NiMoO4 was slow at 1100 °C, but accelerated at 1200 °C, resulting in the formation of NiO, which remained in the oxide scale, and MoO3, which volatilized away.

  13. Formation of multilayered scale during the oxidation of NiAl–Mo alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, P K; Akinc, M; Kramer, M J

    2014-05-01

    We have studied the oxidation behavior of a hypereutectic NiAl-Mo alloy. This alloy showed an initial rapid mass loss followed by a relatively steady state behavior. The oxide scale formed during the oxidation process was seen to have a multilayered structure comprising of NiO, NiAl2O4, NiMoO4 and Al2O3 with minor amounts of MoO2 in the sub-scale region. The oxidation behavior is influenced significantly by the formation and stability of the constituent oxides, especially NiMoO4. Hence the decomposition behavior of NiMoO4 in the 1100-1200 degrees C was studied as well. The thermal decomposition of the NiMoO4 was slow at 1100 degrees C, but accelerated at 1200 degrees C, resulting in the formation of NiO, which remained in the oxide scale, and MoO3, which volatilized away. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidation- and Creep-Enhanced Fatigue of Haynes 188 Alloy-Oxide Scale System Under Simulated Pulse Detonation Engine Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of the pulse detonation engine (PDE) requires robust design of the engine components that are capable of enduring harsh detonation environments. In this study, a high cycle thermal fatigue test rig was developed for evaluating candidate PDE combustor materials using a CO2 laser. The high cycle thermal fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 alloy was investigated under an enhanced pulsed laser test condition of 30 Hz cycle frequency (33 ms pulse period, and 10 ms pulse width including 0.2 ms pulse spike). The temperature swings generated by the laser pulses near the specimen surface were characterized by using one-dimensional finite difference modeling combined with experimental measurements. The temperature swings resulted in significant thermal cyclic stresses in the oxide scale/alloy system, and induced extensive surface cracking. Striations of various sizes were observed at the cracked surfaces and oxide/alloy interfaces under the cyclic stresses. The test results indicated that oxidation and creep-enhanced fatigue at the oxide scale/alloy interface was an important mechanism for the surface crack initiation and propagation under the simulated PDE condition.

  15. Cyclic Oxidation of Single-Crystal NiAl-X Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Barrett, Charles A.; Darolia, Ram

    1999-01-01

    Several single-crystal NiAl-X alloys (X = Hf, Ti, Cr, Ga) were cyclically oxidized at 1000 C for up to 1000 1-hr cycles. The alloys all showed protective, adherent alpha-Al2O3 scale formation with positive weight change behavior throughout the test. There was no clear correlation between the composition of the various alloys and the specific weight gain although the ranking by weight change was relatively consistent for two duplicate series of samples. The presence of Hf (0.5 - 0.8 at.%) resulted in the internal formation of Al2O3/HfO2 "stringers." Diffusion of Hf to the growing oxide stringers resulted in the development of a near-surface layer depleted of these precipitates.

  16. Nicral ternary alloy having improved cyclic oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, C. A.; Lowell, C. E.; Khan, A. S.

    1982-01-01

    NiCrAl alloys are improved by the addition of zirconium. These alloys are in the Beta or gamma/gamma' + Beta region of the ternary system. Zirconium is added in a very low amount between 0.06 and 0.20 weight percent. There is a narrow optimum zirconium level at the low value of 0.13 weight percent. Maximum resistance to cyclic oxidation is achieved when the zirconium addition is at the optimum value.

  17. Fatigue properties of MA 6000E, a gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy. [Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ni-base alloy for gas turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. G.; Merrick, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    MA 6000E is a corrosion resistant, gamma-prime strengthened ODS alloy under development for advanced turbine blade applications. The high temperature, 1093 C, rupture strength is superior to conventional nickel-base alloys. This paper addresses the fatigue behavior of the alloy. Excellent properties are exhibited in low and high cycle fatigue and also thermal fatigue. This is attributed to a unique combination of microstructural features, i.e., a fine distribution of dispersed oxides and other nonmetallics, and the highly elongated grain structure which advantageously modify the deformation characteristics and crack initiation and propagation modes from that characteristic of conventional gamma-prime hardened superalloys.

  18. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien; Motta, Arthur T.; Comstock, Robert J.

    2014-08-01

    The optimization of zirconium-based alloys used for nuclear fuel cladding aims to reduce hydrogen pickup during operation, and the associated cladding degradation. The present study focuses on precisely and accurately measuring hydrogen pickup fraction for a set of alloys to specifically investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. To measure hydrogen concentrations in zirconium alloys two techniques have been used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results of both techniques show that hydrogen pickup fraction varies significantly with exposure time and between alloys. A possible interpretation of the results is that hydrogen pickup results from the need to balance charge. That is, the pickup of hydrogen shows an inverse relationship to oxidation kinetics, indicating that, if transport of charged species is rate limiting, oxide transport properties such as oxide electronic conductivity play a key role in the hydrogen pickup mechanism. Alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) would therefore impact the hydrogen pickup fraction by affecting charge transport.

  19. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tantalum Alloy During Air Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    2000-10-01

    Tantalum alloys are one of the refractory metals with renewed consideration for high temperatures in fusion reactor applications. Tantalum alloys perform well in protective environments but are oxidized readily in gases containing higher oxygen levels. In addition, the radioactive isotope Ta-182 would be produced in tantalum and could be a significant contributor to dose if mobilized. Other isotopes of importance are produced from tungsten and hafnium. Mobilization of activated products during an accident with air ingress is therefore a safety issue. In this study, we measured the extent of oxidation and mobilization from tantalum alloy T-222 oxidized in flowing air between 500 and 1200 degrees C. This alloy nominally contains 10 wt% tungsten, 2.5 wt% hafnium and 0.01 wt% carbon. We found that the mobilization of Ta and Hf was closely linked to the occurrence of oxide spalling. These elements showed no migration from the test chamber. Some W was mobilized by volatilization as evidenced by transport from the chamber. Tungsten volatilization could occur primarily during initial stages of oxidation before the formation of an oxide scale impedes the process. The mobilization of Ta and W are presented in terms of the mass flux (g/m2-h) as a function of test temperature. These measurements along with specific designs, activation calculations, and accident scenarios provide information useful for dose calculations of future fusion devices.

  20. Substrate Effects on the High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of a Gold-Based Braze Filler Metal

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Rice, Joseph P.

    2005-06-01

    Oxidation testing was conducted on a commercial gold-based braze alloy, Gold ABA®, and on zirconia/stainless steel couples joined using this filler metal. Preliminary results reveal that both substrates play a significant role in determining the overall oxidation behavior of the brazed joint.

  1. Model for nonprotective oxidation of Al-Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zayan, M.H. )

    1990-12-01

    The oxidation of Al-5Mg alloy has been studied at 550 C in dry air. Morphological details of the MgO layers which develop on this alloy during high-temperature oxidation have been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A localized detachment of the protective, adherent MgO layer was found, which is caused by voids formed by vacancy condensation at the metal-oxide interface. The source of these vacancies was the outward diffusion of Mg though the oxide layer. Continuing growth of these voids was responsible for cracking of oxide ridges and nodules, as well as the growth of new MgO having a cauliflower morphology. A model describing the process of the outward diffusion is given.

  2. Effect of Cr and Cu addition on corrosion behavior of Ni-Ti alloys.

    PubMed

    Iijima, M; Endo, K; Ohno, H; Mizoguchi, I

    1998-03-01

    The corrosion behavior of three Ni-Ti alloys with compositions as commercial super-elastic orthodontic wires was investigated using polished plate specimens. Corrosion resistance was estimated by potentiodynamic polarization measurement in 0.9% NaCl and 1% lactic acid solutions and analysis of released metals by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The influence of Cr and Cu addition on the structure of the surface oxide film was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Addition of 0.19 at% Cr had little effect on the structure of the oxide films and the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti alloys. For Ni-Ti-5Cu-0.3Cr alloy, the metallic Cu was enriched at the alloy/oxide film interface, resulting in increased susceptibility to pitting corrosion above +1000 mV. However, the passive current density and the amount of released Ni were not significantly increased by the addition of Cu. The study showed that small amounts of Cr and Cu added to change the super-elastic characteristics do not change the corrosion resistance of the Ni-Ti alloy freely immersed in simulated physiological environments. PMID:9663060

  3. Electrochemical behavior of lead alloys in sulfuric and phosphoric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleska, I.; Pruszkowska-Drachal, R.; Kotowski, J.; Dziudzi, A.; Milewski, J. D.; Kopczyk, M.; Czerwiński, A.

    The electrochemical behavior of lead, lead-antimony, and lead-calcium-aluminium-tin alloys has been studied in solutions containing various concentrations of sulfuric and phosphoric acids. The dependence of these electrode processes on some experimental conditions (mainly sweep rate and potential range) has been studied. The measurements were performed using a cyclic voltammetry technique. The study and the analysis of the morphology of alloys have been performed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cyclic voltammograms of the lead-antimony alloy electrodes, similarly to pure lead electrode, also show the "anodic excursion" peak under some experimental conditions. Well defined current waves, corresponding to the oxidation and reduction processes of Sb, are observed, if the alloy surface is freshly abraded. The oxidation of antimony starts at potentials at which the formation of PbO takes place. The peak current of Sb oxidation reaction decreases during successive cycles, suggesting that Sb dissolves from the alloy surface during the first CV sweeps. Another explanation for this effect might be the formation of a PbSO 4 selective membrane.

  4. Creep crack growth behavior of several structural alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadananda, K.; Shahinian, P.

    1983-07-01

    Creep crack growth behavior of several high temperature alloys, Inconel 600, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Hastelloy X, Nimonic PE-16, Incoloy 800, and Haynes 25 (HS-25) was examined at 540, 650, 760, and 870 °C. Crack growth rates were analyzed in terms of both linear elastic stress intensity factor and J*-integral parameter. Among the alloys Inconel 600 and Hastelloy X did not show any observable crack growth. Instead, they deformed at a rapid rate resulting in severe blunting of the crack tip. The other alloys, Inconel 625, Inconel X-750, Incoloy 800, HS-25, and PE-16 showed crack growth at one or two temperatures and deformed continuously at other temperatures. Crack growth rates of the above alloys in terms ofJ* parameter were compared with the growth rates of other alloys published in the literature. Alloys such as Inconel X-750, Alloy 718, and IN-100 show very high growth rates as a result of their sensitivity to an air environment. Based on detailed fracture surface analysis, it is proposed that creep crack growth occurs by the nucleation and growth of wedge-type cracks at triple point junctions due to grain boundary sliding or by the formation and growth of cavities at the boundaries. Crack growth in the above alloys occurs only in some critical range of strain rates or temperatures. Since the service conditions for these alloys usually fall within this critical range, knowledge and understanding of creep crack growth behavior of the structural alloys are important.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  6. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    A. MISRA; A. SHARIF; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the mechanical behavior of the following single-phase polycrystalline alloys with the MoSi{sub 2} body-center tetragonal structure: MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with {approximately}2.5 at.% Re, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 2 at.% Al, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Nb, and MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Re and 2 at.% Al. Several anomalies in the mechanical behavior of alloyed materials were observed. For example, (1) addition of only {approximately}2.5 at. % Re results in an order of magnitude increase in compressive strength at 1600 C, (2) additions of Nb and Al cause solution softening at near-ambient temperatures, and (3) quaternary MoSi{sub 2}-Re-Al alloys show strengthening at elevated temperatures and reduction in flow stress with enhanced plasticity at near-ambient temperatures in compression. The mechanisms of anomalous solution hardening and softening are discussed.

  7. Oxidation of Palladium-Chromium Alloys for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piltch, Nancy D.; Jih-Fen, Lei; Zeller, Mary V.

    1994-01-01

    An alloy consisting of Pd with 13 wt % Cr is a promising material for high temperature applications. High temperature performance is degraded by the oxidation of the material, which is more severe in the fine wires and thin films used for sensor applications than in the bulk. The present study was undertaken to improve our understanding of the physical and chemical changes occurring at these temperatures and to identify approaches to limit oxidation of the alloy. The alloy was studied in both ribbon and wire forms. Ribbon samples were chosen to examine the role of grain boundaries in the oxidation process because of the convenience of handling for the oxidation studies. Wire samples 25 microns in diameter which are used in resistance strain gages were studied to correlate chemical properties with observed electrical, physical, and structural properties. Overcoating the material with a metallic Cr film did prevent the segregation of Pd to the surface; however, it did not eliminate the oxidation of the alloy.

  8. Oxidation of Haynes 230 alloy in reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Li; Jian, Pu; Jianzhong, Xiao; Xiaoliang, Qian

    Haynes 230 alloy was exposed to reducing and oxidizing environments at 750 °C for 1000 h, simulating the conditions in a reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The oxidized specimens were characterized in terms of the oxide morphology, composition and crystal structure. The oxide scale in each environment was identified as Cr 2O 3 with the existence of Cr 2MnO 4. Ni remained metallic in the reducing atmosphere, and NiO was detected in the sample exposed to air. The oxide scale is around 1 μm thick after 1000 h of oxidation in both situations. The area specific resistance (ASR) contributed by the oxide scale is expected less than 0.1 Ω cm 2 after 40,000 h of exposure when a parabolic oxide growth rate is assumed, demonstrating the suitability of the interconnect application of this alloy in the reduced temperature SOFCs.

  9. Characterization of AZ31 magnesium alloy by duplex process combining laser surface melting and plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cancan; Liang, Jun; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Qingbiao; Wang, Lingqian

    2016-09-01

    Top ceramic coatings were fabricated on the laser surface melting (LSM) modified AZ31 alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in a phosphate electrolyte. The effect of LSM treatment on the microstructure and corrosion behavior of the bare and PEO treated AZ31 alloy was evaluated. Results showed that LSM treatment produced a homogeneous modified layer with redistributed intermetallic compounds, resulting in enhanced corrosion resistance of AZ31 alloy. The LSM treatment had no obvious influence on the surface and cross-sectional microstructures of the PEO coatings on AZ31 alloy. Besides, MgO was the main constituent for PEO coatings, regardless of LSM pretreatment. However, the long-term corrosion properties of the PEO coated AZ31 alloy with LSM pretreatment revealed large enhancement. Based on the analysis of microstructure and corrosion property, the corrosion mechanisms of the PEO and LSM-PEO coated AZ31 alloy were proposed.

  10. Transition Metal Oxide Alloys as Potential Solar Energy Conversion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-02-21

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are inexpensive potentia alternative materials for solar energy conversion devices. However, some TMOs, such as manganese(II) oxide, have band gaps that are too large for efficiently absorbing solar energy. Other TMOs, such as iron(II) oxide, have conduction and valence band edges with the same orbital character that may lead to unfavorably high electron–hole recombination rates. Another limitation of iron(II) oxide is that the calculated valence band edge is not positioned well for oxidizing water. We predict that key properties, including band gaps, band edge positions, and possibly electron–hole recombination rates, may be improved by alloying TMOs that have different band alignments. A new metric, the band gap center offset, is introduced for simple screening of potential parent materials. The concept is illustrated by calculating the electronic structure of binary oxide alloys that contain manganese, nickel, iron, zinc, and/or magnesium, within density functional theory (DFT)+U and hybrid DFT theories. We conclude that alloys of iron(II) oxide are worth evaluating further as solar energy conversion materials.

  11. Evidence of alloy formation during reduction of platinized tin oxide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Steven D.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Davidson, Mark R.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Ion scattering spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis have been used to examine a platinized tin oxide catalyst surface before, during, and after reduction by annealing under vacuum at 250 to 450 C. These techniques were then used to examine the reduced surface after a room-temperature, low-pressure oxygen exposure. The spectral results and the behavior of the reduced surface toward oxygen exposure both indicate that a Pt/Sn alloy is produced during reduction.

  12. Reduction of Oxidative Melt Loss of Aluminum and Its Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Subodh K. Das; Shridas Ningileri

    2006-03-17

    This project led to an improved understanding of the mechanisms of dross formation. The microstructural evolution in industrial dross samples was determined. Results suggested that dross that forms in layers with structure and composition determined by the local magnesium concentration alone. This finding is supported by fundamental studies of molten metal surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data revealed that only magnesium segregates to the molten aluminum alloy surface and reacts to form a growing oxide layer. X-ray diffraction techniques that were using to investigate an oxidizing molten aluminum alloy surface confirmed for the first time that magnesium oxide is the initial crystalline phase that forms during metal oxidation. The analytical techniques developed in this project are now available to investigate other molten metal surfaces. Based on the improved understanding of dross initiation, formation and growth, technology was developed to minimize melt loss. The concept is based on covering the molten metal surface with a reusable physical barrier. Tests in a laboratory-scale reverberatory furnace confirmed the results of bench-scale tests. The main highlights of the work done include: A clear understanding of the kinetics of dross formation and the effect of different alloying elements on dross formation was obtained. It was determined that the dross evolves in similar ways regardless of the aluminum alloy being melted and the results showed that amorphous aluminum nitride forms first, followed by amorphous magnesium oxide and crystalline magnesium oxide in all alloys that contain magnesium. Evaluation of the molten aluminum alloy surface during melting and holding indicated that magnesium oxide is the first crystalline phase to form during oxidation of a clean aluminum alloy surface. Based on dross evaluation and melt tests it became clear that the major contributing factor to aluminum alloy dross was in the alloys with Mg content. Mg was

  13. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an enlongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15% Cr-2% Mo-2% Ta-4% W-4.5% Al-2.5% Ti-0.15% Zr-0.05% C-0.01% B-1.1% Y2O3. It exhibits strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F, but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high-cycle, low-cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy micro-structure and properties is discussed.

  14. An oxide dispersion strengthened alloy for gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasgow, T. K.

    1979-01-01

    The strength of the newly developed alloy MA-6000E is derived from a nickel alloy base, an elongated grain structure, naturally occurring precipitates of gamma prime, and an artificial distribution of extremely fine, stable oxide particles. Its composition is Ni-15Cr-2Mo-2Ta-4W-4.5Al-2.5Ti-0.15Zr 0.05C-0.01B-1.1Y2O3. It exhibits the strength of a conventional nickel-base alloy at 1400 F but is quite superior at 2000 F. Its shear strength is relatively low, necessitating consideration of special joining procedures. Its high cycle, low cycle, and thermal fatigue properties are excellent. The relationship between alloy microstructure and properties is discussed.

  15. Corrosion behavior of Ni and Ni-based alloys in concentrated NaOH solutions at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Yasuda, M.; Fukumoto, K.; Ogata, Y.; Hine, F.

    1988-12-01

    Corrosion behavior of SUS 310S austenitic stainless steel, Alloy 600, Monel 400, and Ni 200 and NaOH solutions in the concentration range 30-60% at high temperatures up to 166/sup 0/C was studied. In solutions containing dissolved oxygen or under oxidizing conditions, all the specimens examined were corroded seriously due to oxygen diffusion through the porous oxide layer consisting of ..beta..-Ni(OH)/sub 2/. In hydrogen-saturated solutions, on the other hand, these Ni alloys were corrosion resistant because nickel in the alloys was active to oxidation of hydrogen. The specimens were corroded by deaerated solution at high temperatures in which hydrogen evolution took place as the counterreaction. The corrosion rate controlled by the hydrogen formation reaction increased exponentially with the decrease of the Ni content in the alloy.

  16. Atom probe tomography study of alloying element distributions in Zr alloys and their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yan; Motta, Arthur T.; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.

    2013-11-01

    A detailed study of alloying element distributions in the metal and oxygen rich regions of corroded Zr alloys and of the phases formed ahead of the oxide front was conducted using atom probe tomography (APT). A consistent sequence of sub-oxide phases is observed ahead of the ZrO2 oxide front, consisting of (i) a thin layer of equiatomic ZrO (occasionally slightly over and under stoichiometric) (ii) saturated solid solution Zr(O)sat, and (iii) a slowly decreasing oxygen profile into the metal. The results also show that the distribution of the alloying elements in the metal is more inhomogeneous than previously thought and that in the oxygen-rich phases enhanced segregation is observed, compared to the metal. the stable oxide ZrO2 (which is in contact with water), the equiatomic suboxide ZrO (both slightly sub and superstoichiometric, denoted here ZrO1+x and ZrO1-x), a saturated solution of constant oxygen content at about 30% O, denoted Zr(O)sat, and an undersaturated solid solution of O in Zr, denoted Zr(O), the oxygen content of which decreases with distance from the oxide-metal interface. As stated above, the field evaporation behavior of these phases is drastically different, resulting in characteristic ions being evaporated from each phase. As a result, the phases can be identified both by atomic concentrations and by the nature of the ionic species evaporating from each phase. The latter method was also used to visualize the distribution of phases within needles. For example, it was found in the present study that oxygen was evaporated as O+, O2+, ZrO2+, ZrO3+, ZrO2+,ZrO22+,ZrO3+ with occasional instances of ZrO23+ and ZrO33+ observed. Zr ions (Zr2+, Zr3+) become significant in the Zr(O)sat phase. O2+ is only observed in the oxide (ZrO2) phase, so it is considered a marker for that phase. ZrO2+ and ZrO22+ are present both in the ZrO2 and ZrO1+x phases but absent in the ZrO1-x, Zr(O)sat and Zr(O) phase. the equiatomic ZrO phase (observed as both ZrO1+x and Zr

  17. Tin oxidation mechanism in the Sn-Se alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhalde, S.; Arcondo, B.; Nassif, E.; Sirkin, H.

    1988-06-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies performed on powdered samples of Sn-Se alloys allowed us to determine the influence of the chalcogenide bonds in the tin oxidation mechanism. The weak bonds present in the SnSe2 compound increase the tin oxidation kinetics, an effect which is not found in pure tin samples maintained in the same conditions.

  18. High temperature, oxidation resistant noble metal-Al alloy thermocouple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Gedwill, Michael G. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A thermocouple is disclosed. The thermocouple is comprised of an electropositive leg formed of a noble metal-Al alloy and an electronegative leg electrically joined to form a thermocouple junction. The thermocouple provides for accurate and reproducible measurement of high temperatures (600 - 1300 C) in inert, oxidizing or reducing environments, gases, or vacuum. Furthermore, the thermocouple circumvents the need for expensive, strategic precious metals such as rhodium as a constituent component. Selective oxidation of rhodium is also thereby precluded.

  19. Thermal fatigue and oxidation data of oxide dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, K. E.; Hill, V. L.; Humphreys, V. E.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal fatigue and oxidation data were obtained 24 specimens representing 9 discrete oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy compositions or fabricating techniques. Double edge wedge specimens, both bare metal and coated for each systems, were cycled between fluidized beds maintained at 1130 C with a three minute immersion in each bed. The systems included alloys identified as 262 in hardness of HRC 38; 264 in hardness of HRC 38, 40 and 43; 265 HRC 39, 266 of HRC 37 and 40; 754; and 956. Specimens in the bare condition of 265 HRC 39 and 266 HRC 37 survived 6000 cycles without cracking on the small radius of the double edge wedge specimen. A coated specimen of 262 HRC 38, 266 HRC 37 and 266 HRC40 also survived 6000 cycles without cracking. A duplicate coated specimen of 262 HRC 38 alloy survived 5250 cycles before cracks appeared. All the alloys showed little weight change compared compared to alloys tested in prior programs.

  20. Oxidation resistant iron and nickel alloys for high temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, V. L.; Misra, S. K.; Wheaton, H. L.

    1970-01-01

    Iron-base and nickel-base alloys exhibit good oxidation resistance and improved ductility with addition of small amounts of yttrium, tantalum /or hafnium/, and thorium. They can be used in applications above the operating temperatures of the superalloys, if high strength materials are not required.

  1. Thermomechanical and Thermochemical Behavior of a Hafnium-20 Percent Tantalum Alloy. Ph.D. Thesis - North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the thermomechanical and thermochemical behavior of a high temperature, oxidation resistant, hafnium-20 percent tantalum alloy. The elastic and shear moduli of this alloy were determined in air up to 1000 C and in vacuum up to 2000 C using a mechanical resonance technique. The internal friction of the alloy was measured up to temperatures greater than 1400 C. Room temperature stress-strain behavior of the oxidized and unoxidized alloy was established. The effect of annealing on the elastic and shear moduli of the extruded rod material was investigated. The martensitic-type phase transformation occurring in the alloy was studied using hot stage metallography and electron microscopy. Static oxidation tests were conducted on the alloy at temperatures from 1000 C to 1700 C with weight gain measurements made as a function of time and temperatures. Surface morphology studies were conducted on the oxide coatings formed at the different temperatures using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  2. Interdiffusion Behavior in y-Phase U-Mo Alloy Versus Al-6061 Alloy Couples Fabricated by Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    To better understand interactions between fuel and cladding in research reactor fuels, diffusion couples between y-phase U-7 wt% Mo and U-10 wt% Mo alloy fuels and a Si-bearing, Al alloy were fabricated using a friction stir welding technique. The advantage of such a fabrication technique is that it can potentially reduce the amount of aluminum-oxide that might be present at the diffusion couple interface. The presence of oxides at the interface can affect the interdiffusion process. These couples were annealed and characterized using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive spectrometers. Images were taken of the developed diffusion structures; x-ray maps were generated to identify partitioning behavior of the various components; and, point-to-point analysis was employed to generate composition profiles and to determine phase compositions. To try and determine how the presence of Si in an Al alloy affects the interdiffusion behavior of fuel and cladding components in research reactor nuclear fuels, the results from this study were compared to those from earlier diffusion studies using U-Mo alloys and Al. The formed diffusion zones in some samples annealed for 30 minutes are comprised of Si-rich aluminide phases that appear to be (U,Mo)0.9(Al,Si)4 and (U,Mo)(Si,Al)2, based on composition. The diffusion rates observed and the types of phases that form can be correlated to the stability of the y-U phase, which is a metastable phase. For a sample annealed for a much longer time, large diffusion structures formed and no Si-rich phases were observed.

  3. The influence of Si content on the oxidation behavior of Type 430 stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    Trace “alloying” elements can significantly affect alloy performance. One example is the effect of residual Si content on the oxidation behavior of stainless steels. Small amounts of Si can form a continuous SiO2 layer at the metal-oxide scale interface. This is beneficial for enhancing oxidation resistance; however it is detrimental for fuel cell interconnect application, as SiO2 is an electrical insulator. In order to assess the effect of SiO2 on the performance of Type 430 ferritic steel, a potential interconnect alloy, a series of custom 430 alloys were melted and reduced to sheet with controlled Si contents (ranging from <0.01 to 0.1 wt% Si). Oxidation tests were conducted at 800oC in moist air. The behavior was compared to a commercial Type 430 alloy (with 0.4 wt%Si) and Crofer 22APU. It was found that for the 430 alloys, the oxidation rate increased with decreasing Si content. However, after 4000 hour of exposure, the mass gain for the low Si 430 alloys was comparable to Crofer 22APU.

  4. Casting behavior of titanium alloys in a centrifugal casting machine.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Miyakawa, O; Takada, Y; Okuno, O; Okabe, T

    2003-05-01

    Since dental casting requires replication of complex shapes with great accuracy, this study examined how well some commercial titanium alloys and experimental titanium-copper alloys filled a mold cavity. The metals examined were three types of commercial dental titanium [commercially pure titanium (hereinafter noted as CP-Ti), Ti-6Al-4V (T64) and Ti-6Al-7Nb (T67)], and experimental titanium-copper alloys [3%, 5% and 10% Cu (mass %)]. The volume percentage filling the cavity was evaluated in castings prepared in a very thin perforated sheet pattern and cast in a centrifugal casting machine. The flow behavior of the molten metal was also examined using a so-called "tracer element technique." The amounts of CP-Ti and all the Ti-Cu alloys filling the cavity were similar; less T64 and T67 filled the cavity. However, the Ti-Cu alloys failed to reach the end of the cavities due to a lower fluidity compared to the other metals. A mold prepared with specially designed perforated sheets was effective at differentiating the flow behavior of the metals tested. The present technique also revealed that the more viscous Ti-Cu alloys with a wide freezing range failed to sequentially flow to the end of the cavity. PMID:12593955

  5. Etching Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hanliang

    2014-11-01

    The etching treatment is an important process step in influencing the surface quality of anodized aluminum alloy extrusions. The aim of etching is to produce a homogeneously matte surface. However, in the etching process, further surface imperfections can be generated on the extrusion surface due to uneven materials loss from different microstructural components. These surface imperfections formed prior to anodizing can significantly influence the surface quality of the final anodized extrusion products. In this article, various factors that influence the materials loss during alkaline etching of aluminum alloy extrusions are investigated. The influencing variables considered include etching process parameters, Fe-rich particles, Mg-Si precipitates, and extrusion profiles. This study provides a basis for improving the surface quality in industrial extrusion products by optimizing various process parameters.

  6. Cyclic Oxidation of High-Temperature Alloy Wires in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.

    2004-01-01

    High-temperature alloy wires are proposed for use in seal applications for future re-useable space vehicles. These alloys offer the potential for improved wear resistance of the seals. The wires must withstand the high temperature environments the seals are subjected to as well as maintain their oxidation resistance during the heating and cooling cycles of vehicle re-entry. To model this, the wires were subjected to cyclic oxidation in stagnant air. of this layer formation is dependent on temperature. Slow growing oxides such as chromia and alumina are desirable. Once the oxide is formed it can prevent the metal from further reacting with its environment. Cyclic oxidation models the changes in temperature these wires will undergo in application. Cycling the temperature introduces thermal stresses which can cause the oxide layer to break off. Re-growth of the oxide layer consumes more metal and therefore reduces the properties and durability of the material. were used for cyclic oxidation testing. The baseline material, Haynes 188, has a Co base and is a chromia former while the other two alloys, Kanthal A1 and PM2000, both have a Fe base and are alumina formers. Haynes 188 and Kanthal A1 wires are 250 pm in diameter and PM2000 wires are 150 pm in diameter. The coiled wire has a total surface area of 3 to 5 sq cm. The wires were oxidized for 11 cycles at 1204 C, each cycle containing a 1 hour heating time and a minimum 20 minute cooling time. Weights were taken between cycles. After 11 cycles, one wire of each composition was removed for analysis. The other wire continued testing for 70 cycles. Post-test analysis includes X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for phase identification and morphology.

  7. High Temperature Oxidation of Silicon Carbide and Advanced Iron-Based Alloys in Steam-Hydrogen Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Terrani, Kurt A; Keiser, James R; Brady, Michael P; Cheng, Ting; Silva, G W Chinthaka M; Pint, Bruce A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2012-01-01

    A side by side comparison of the oxidation behavior of zirconium alloys with SiC materials and advanced iron-based alloys is provided. Oxidation tests were conducted in steam and steam-hydrogen environments at 800-1350 C and 0.34-2MPa for durations up to 48 hours. Monolithic SiC specimens as well as SiC/SiC composites were examined during the study where the material recession mechanism appeared to be governed by silica layer volatilization at the surface for CVD SiC. A wide set of austenitic and ferritic steels were also examined where a critical Cr content (>20 wt.%) was shown to be necessary to achieve oxidation resistance at high temperatures. SiC materials and alumina-forming ferritic steels exhibited slowest oxidation kinetics; roughly two orders of magnitude lower than zirconium alloys.

  8. Solid-particle erosion behavior of cast alloys used in the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atapek, Ş. Hakan; Fidan, Sinan

    2015-12-01

    The erosive-wear response of five commercial ferrous-based cast alloys used for crushing was examined in this study. The microstructures of the alloys were modified to elucidate the effect of microstructural features on wear. Erosion tests were conducted using aluminum oxide particles (90-125 μm) at 70 m/s and a normal impact angle (90°). The worn surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and 3D non-contact laser profilometry. It is found that (i) a pearlitic structure exhibiting a greater plastic deformation than both bainitic and martensitic structures shows the greatest resistance to erosive wear at normal impact and (ii) the fracture characteristics of carbide and graphite particles plays an important role in determining the erosion wear behavior of the cast alloy matrices.

  9. Recrystallization behavior of cold-rolled Zr-1Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Hang; Wang, Xitao; Gong, Weijia; Zhou, Jun; Zhang, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    The recrystallization behavior of cold-rolled Zr-1Nb alloy was investigated by measuring the micro-Vickers hardness of the specimens annealed for various times. Different deformation reductions and annealing temperatures were coupled to study the effects of deformation and temperature on the recrystallization behavior of Zr-1Nb alloy. The results show that both large deformation reduction and high annealing temperature accelerate the recrystallization process. The microstructural evolution during recrystallization was characterized by optical microscope (OM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) to correlate with the variation of Vickers hardness. The TEM observation also revealed the distribution of different types of Nb-containing precipitates during recrystallization. The Vickers hardness data were fitted by using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) equation to derive the activation energies for recrystallization, giving the corresponding recrystallization maps. This study provides useful guidelines for the processing of a broad family of zirconium alloys based on Zr-1Nb.

  10. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  11. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig Wojcik, C.

    1991-01-01

    Niobium alloys have been used for many years in rocket propulsion systems and afterburner sections of gas turbine engines. In these applications, adequate oxidation resistance is provided by protective silicide coatings. By utilizing these coatings and niobium powder metallurgy to produce porous wicks, it has been demonstrated that niobium alloy heat pipes can comfortably operate in flame temperatures exceeding 3000 K. Results of lithium corrosion tests on C-103 (Nb-10%Hf-1%Ti) up to 1477 K will be presented along with thermal performance data for specific heat pipe designs.

  12. Niobium alloy heat pipes for use in oxidizing environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, C. C.

    Nb-alloy heat pipes employing oxidation-protection silicide coatings in conjunction with P/M techniques for the production of porous wicks have been shown capable of comfortably operating in flame temperatures in excess of 3000 K. Attention is presently given to Li corrosion tests conducted with Nb-10Hf-1Ti alloy heat pipes at up to 1477 K, in conjunction with the thermal performance data derived for specific heat-pipe designs. An Hf-rich reaction was detected after 200 hrs of exposure.

  13. Solidification behavior and structure of Al-Cu alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J.A.; Li, M.; Yang, N.C.Y.

    1997-09-01

    The microsegregation behavior of electron beam (EB) and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds of Al-Cu alloys covering a range from 0.19 to 7.74 wt% Cu were characterized for dendrite core concentrations and fraction eutectic solidification. Although a single weld speed of 12.7 mm/sec was used, some differences were observed in the segregation behavior of the two weld types. The microsegregation behavior was also modeled using a finite differences technique considering dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling and solid state diffusion. Fairly good agreement was observed between measured and calculated segregation behavior although differences between the two weld types could not be completely accounted for. The concept of dendrite tip undercooling was used to explain the formation of a single through thickness centerline grain in the higher alloy content GTA welds.

  14. Hydrogen cracking behavior in an iron aluminide alloy weldment

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, A.A.; Edwards, G.R.; Ash, D.I.; David, S.A.

    1995-02-01

    Significant interest exists in developing polycrystalline, long-range ordered iron-aluminide alloys for high temperature applications because of their unique properties such as superior oxidation resistance. However, detrimental properties such as low room temperature ductility and poor weldability restrict the use of iron-aluminides in structural applications. This paper describes the results of hot dutility tests conducted on iron-aluminide alloy FA-129 to determine the effect of test temperature, grain size and atmosphere on the ductility. Also, a preliminary study was performed to determine the hydrogen cold cracking sensitivity of weldments produced in varying atmospheres of water vapor.

  15. Alloy composition dependency of plastic deformation behavior in biaxial compressions of Ti-Nb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Ichiro; Hisada, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Shinichi; Takemoto, Yoshito; Tada, Naoya

    2015-03-01

    Crystal structure of titanium alloy changes from alpha (hexagonal close-packed) to beta (body centered cubic) with increase of beta stabilizer content. This change of structure strongly influences on the plastic deformation behavior of titanium alloys, because it not only induces changes of slip systems but also activates martensitic transformation and deformation twinning. However, most of past studies on titanium alloys have been focused on the development of specific functionalities induced by alloy designing, and few research works have been reported on metal workability under multi-axial stress conditions, which is key factor to apply titanium alloys for engineering products. In this study, uniaxial and biaxial compression tests of titanium-niobium alloys with various niobium contents have been performed to clarify the influence of beta stabilizer content on the plastic behavior under compressive stress conditions. The titanium-niobium alloys were solution treated and then quenched from beta region to obtain metastable structures. The resultant stress-strain relations together with microscopic observations of texture revealed that the influence of niobium contents on the predominant plastic deformation mechanisms and thus on the hardening phenomena. The equi-plastic work contours obtained by uniaxial and biaxial compression tests also implied the crystal structure dependency of anisotropic hardening, which was evaluated quantitatively by means of Hill's anisotropic yield criterion. The results will provide information on the versatile constitutive relations of titanium alloys containing beta stabilizer elements, that is important to prove the performance of products manufactured by compressive metal working processes such as forging and extrusion.

  16. Shape Memory Behavior of Porous NiTi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Mehmet; Çakmak, Ömer

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory behavior of porous NiTi alloy is dependent on the phases, and mechanical or thermal background. The phases change with solution heat treatment and aging. Fully reversible shape memory behavior was observed during thermal cycling, and recoverable strains increased with the increasing stress from 2 to 50 MPa. The porous NiTi sample shows recoverable transformation strain response under lower constant load.

  17. Anticorrosion, antiscale coatings obtained on the surface of titanium alloys by microarc oxidation method and used in seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedenkov, S.V.; Gordienko, P.S.; Sinebrukhov, S.L.; Khrisanphova, O.A.; Skorobogatova, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    General information about microarc oxidation (MAO) process and the influence of MAO on mechanical and corrosion-mechanical properties of titanium alloys was presented. The formation conditions, compositions, and physical-chemical characteristics of anticorrosion, antiscale, wear-resistant, and antiscuff coatings were discussed. The interconnection between the semiconductive parameters, zonal structure, and electrochemical corrosion behavior of the coating material in seawater was given.

  18. Formation of Ha-Containing Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Micro-Arc Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hui; Li, Deyu; Chen, Xiuping; Wu, Chao; Wang, Fuping

    2013-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are potential biodegradable implant materials due to their attractive biological properties. But the use of magnesium is still hampered by its poor corrosion resistance in physiological fluids. In this study, a HA-containing coating was fabricated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The active plasma species of micro-discharge was studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The microstructure and composition were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The corrosion behavior and apatite-forming ability were studied by electrochemical tests and immersed samples in simulated body fluids (SBF). The results show that the microdischarge channel model is gas discharges and oxide layer discharges. The elements from the substrate and electrolyte take part in the formation of the coating. The MAO coating significantly improves the corrosion resistance of AZ31 magnesium alloy and enhances the apatite formation ability.

  19. Creep and residual mechanical properties of cast superalloys and oxide dispersion strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Tensile, stress-rupture, creep, and residual tensile properties after creep testing were determined for two typical cast superalloys and four advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys. The superalloys examined included the nickel-base alloy B-1900 and the cobalt-base alloy MAR-M509. The nickel-base ODS MA-757 (Ni-16CR-4Al-0.6Y2O3 and the iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 (Fe-20Cr-5Al-0.8Y2O3) were extensively studied, while limited testing was conducted on the ODS nickel-base alloys STCA (Ni-16Cr-4.5Al-2Y2O3) with a without Ta and YD-NiCrAl (Ni-16Cr-5Al-2Y2O3). Elevated temperature testing was conducted from 114 to 1477 K except for STCA and YD-NiCrAl alloys, which were only tested at 1366 K. The residual tensile properties of B-1900 and MAR-M509 are not reduced by prior creep testing (strains at least up to 1 percent), while the room temperature tensile properties of ODS nickel-base alloys can be reduced by small amounts of prior creep strain (less than 0.5 percent). The iron-base ODS alloy MA-956 does not appear to be susceptible to creep degradation at least up to strains of about 0.25 percent. However, MA-956 exhibits unusual creep behavior which apparently involves crack nucleation and growth.

  20. Molecular dynamics analysis of oxidation, segregation and stress corrosion failures of refractory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verners, Osvalds

    The focuses of the thesis are heating induced segregation/mixing of refractory alloys, along with oxidation and stress corrosion properties of selected fcc metals and thin oxide layers formed on the surfaces thereof. The particular studies include segregation and oxidation simulation of Mo3Ni alloy clusters. These reveal favorable stabilizing oxidation resistance properties due to the Ni component, which diffuses during annealing to the surface of the clusters. A comparative study has been done for different sized Al grains in Fe or Ni bulk matrices. Its results indicate that Ni matrix is favorable due to the grain dissolution and energetic stability properties upon heating and cooling of the structures. Oxidation simulation of the same structures in slab structures indicate that unmixed metals oxidize first and the alloy layer, which forms only for the Ni matrix, eventually segregates to single-metal layers, which oxidize subsequently. The stress corrosion properties of Al oxide slab/thin film structures in water, noble gas and vacuum environments have been studied with the aim of subsequent stress corrosion simulation of alloys or metals with protective surface oxide layers. The obtained results indicate brittle type failures, which involve shear deformation and localized amorphization. The plasticity enhancing fluid environment effects are found to be similar for both reactive and nonreactive species, which indicates significant pressure effects and passivated reactivity of surfaces. Parallel to the corrosion study, strain rate effects and cyclic loading behavior for slab structures in vacuum have been characterized and compared at different temperatures. These indicate time dependent deformation mechanisms including temperature enhanced local amorphization prior to crack formation. Complementary analyses include extended timescale crack behavior of a slab structure in vacuum using parallel replica dynamics and steady state analysis of a slab structure in water

  1. Effect of gold composition on the orientations of oxide nuclei during the early stage oxidation of Cu-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Langli; Zhou Guangwen; Kang Yihong; Yang, Judith C.

    2012-04-15

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy is employed to study the effect of Au composition in Cu-Au alloys on the orientations of oxide islands during the initial-stage oxidation of Cu-Au(100) alloys. An orientation transition from nucleating epitaxial Cu{sub 2}O islands to randomly oriented oxide islands is observed upon increasing the oxygen gas pressure. By increasing the Au composition in the Cu-Au alloys, both the oxide nucleation time and saturation density of oxide islands increase, but the critical oxygen pressure leading to nucleating randomly oriented Cu{sub 2}O islands decreases. It is shown by a kinetic model that such a dependence of the critical oxygen pressure on the alloy composition is related to its effect on two competing processes, the oxide-alloy structure match and the effective collision of oxygen atoms, in determining the overall nucleation rate of oxide islands during the oxidation.

  2. Surface oxidability of pure liquid metals and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arato, E.; Bernardi, M.; Giuranno, D.; Ricci, E.

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of the oxygen-liquid metal interaction is a topic of particular technological interest. A deep knowledge of the kinetics and transport mechanisms involved in the oxidation phenomena is necessary: the effect of oxidation reactions taking place in the gas phase and the evaporation of oxides must be considered. This paper aims to review our works in order to provide a systematic analysis of the oxidation of pure metals and determine the most likely to keeping oxygen-free the surface in a binary alloy. In addition, the upgrading of this theoretical approach, here briefly described, is addressed to give a contribution to a better understanding of the evolution of oxidation phenomena close to the solid-liquid-gas interfaces.

  3. Steam assisted oxide growth on aluminium alloys using oxidative chemistries: Part II corrosion performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Din, Rameez Ud; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-11-01

    Surface treatment of aluminium alloys using steam with oxidative chemistries, namely KMnO4 and HNO3 resulted in accelerated growth of oxide on aluminium alloys. Detailed investigation of the corrosion performance of the treated surfaces was carried out using potentiodynamic polarisation and standard industrial test methods such as acetic acid salt spray (AASS) and filiform corrosion on commercial AA6060 alloy. Barrier properties of the film including adhesion were evaluated using tape test under wet and dry conditions. Electrochemical results showed reduced cathodic and anodic activity, while the protection provided by steam treatment with HNO3 was a function of the concentration of NO3- ions. The coating generated by inclusion of KMnO4 showed highest resistance to filiform corrosion. Overall, the performance of the steam treated surfaces under filiform corrosion and AASS test was a result of the local coverage of the alloy microstructure resulting from steam containing with KMnO4 and HNO3.

  4. Alkaline oxide conversion coatings for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Three related conversion coating methods are described that are based on film formation which occurs when aluminum alloys are exposed to alkaline Li salt solutions. Representative examples of the processing methods, resulting coating structure, composition and morphology are presented. The corrosion resistance of these coatings to aerated 0.5 M NaCl solution has been evaluated as a function of total processing time using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). This evaluation shows that excellent corrosion resistance can be uniformly achieved using no more than 20 minutes of process time for 6061-T6. Using current methods a minimum of 80 minutes of process time is required to get marginally acceptable corrosion resistance for 2024-T3. Longer processing times are required to achieve uniformly good corrosion resistance.

  5. High-temperature corrosion behavior of coatings and ODS alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.; Wright, I.G.

    1996-08-01

    Iron-aluminide coatings were prepared by gas tungsten arc and gas metal arc weld-overlay techniques. All the weld overlays showed good oxidation/sulfidation behavior under isothermal conditions, including a gas metal arc deposit with only 21 at.% Al. A rapid degradation in corrosion resistance was observed under thermal cycling conditions when the initially grown scales spalled and the subsequent rate of reaction was not controlled by the formation of slowly growing aluminum oxides. Higher starting aluminum concentrations (>{approximately}25 at.%) are needed to assure adequate oxidation/sulfidation lifetimes of the weld overlays. A variety of stable oxides was added to a base Fe-28 at.% Al-2 % Cr alloy to assess the effect of these dopants on the oxidation behavior at 1200{degrees}C. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion improved the scale adhesion relative to a Zr alloy addition, but wasn`t as effective as it is in other alumina-forming alloys. Preliminary data for powder-processed Fe-28 at.% Al-2% Cr exposed to the H{sub 2}S-H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-Ar gas at 800{degrees}C showed that the oxidation/sulfidation rate was similar to that of many Fe{sub 3}Al alloys produced by ingot metallurgy routes.

  6. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  7. Creep degradation in oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened Ni-base alloys in wrought bar form are studied for creep degradation effects similar to those found in thin gage sheet. The bar products evaluated included ODS-Ni, ODS-NiCr, and three types of advanced ODS-NiCrAl alloys. Tensile test specimens were exposed to creep at various stress levels at 1365 K and then tensile tested at room temperature. Low residual tensile properties, change in fracture mode, the appearance of dispersoid-free bands, grain boundary cavitation, and internal oxidation in the microstructure were interpreted as creep degradation effects. This work showed that many ODS alloys are subject to creep damage. Degradation of tensile properties occurred after very small amounts of creep strain, ductility being the most sensitive property. All the ODS alloys which were creep damaged possessed a large grain size. Creep damage appears to have been due to diffusional creep which produced dispersoid-free bands around boundaries acting as vacancy sources. Low angle and possibly twin boundaries acted as vacancy sources.

  8. Low-pressure oxidation of Cb-1Zr alloy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, T. F.

    1971-01-01

    Resistively heated strip specimens of Cb-1Zr alloy were exposed at 927 C in a vacuum chamber at various levels of total pressure in the 1-microtorr range and at various oxygen partial pressures in the .1-microtorr range. Oxygen reaction rates (sticking probabilities) were found to depend on whether or not the specimens were annealed immediately before the test exposure. It is shown that a normally undetectable oxide film exists on the Cb-1Zr surface as a result of oxidation by ambient air, and this film reduces the sticking probability as compared with a clean metal surface. The alloy is considerably strengthened by addition of oxygen to a level of about 6000 ppm, while still maintaining reasonably good room temperature ductility.

  9. An Oxidation-Resistant Coating Alloy for Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, James L.; Brindley, William J.

    1997-01-01

    Titanium aluminides based on the g-phase (TiAl) offer the potential for component weight savings of up to 50 percent over conventional superalloys in 600 to 850 C aerospace applications. Extensive development efforts over the past 10 years have led to the identification of "engineering" gamma-alloys, which offer a balance of room-temperature mechanical properties and high-temperature strength retention. The gamma class of titanium aluminides also offers oxidation and interstitial (oxygen and nitrogen) embrittlement resistance superior to that of the alpha(sub 2) (Ti3Al) and orthorhombic (Ti2AlNb) classes of titanium aluminides. However, environmental durability is still a concern, especially at temperatures above 750 to 800 C. Recent work at the NASA Lewis Research Center led to the development of an oxidation-resistant coating alloy that shows great promise for the protection of gamma titanium aluminides.

  10. Evaluation of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    A series of fourteen (14) novel high-strength molybdenum alloy compositions containing a dispersion of very fine (< 1 {mu}m diameter) oxide particles were consolidated using two proprietary powder metallurgy techniques. The developmental compositions were evaluated to determine the microstructural stability and mechanical properties from cryogenic (-148{degrees}F) to elevated temperatures (4000{degrees}F) for material in the as-swaged (>98% cold work) condition and for as-swaged material in the heat treated condition. Extremely fine oxide particle sizes (<1000 {Angstrom}) were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for a number of the experimental compositions in the as-swaged condition. A one hour recrystallization temperature as high as 3990{degrees}F was measured and a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as low as {approximately}58{degrees}F for material in the recrystallized condition was determined. The preliminary results support the alloy design concept feasibility.