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Sample records for alloy shrinkage factors

  1. Prediction of ALLOY SHRINKAGE FACTORS FOR THE INVESTMENT CASTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2006-01-01

    This study deals with the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of alloy shrinkage factors (SFs) related to the investment casting process. The dimensions of the A356 aluminum alloy casting were determined from the numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, fluid dynamics, and deformation phenomena. The investment casting process was carried out using wax patterns of unfilled wax and shell molds that were made of fused silica with a zircon prime coat. The dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured, in order to determine the actual tooling allowances. Several numerical simulations were carried out, to assess the level of accuracy for the casting shrinkage. The solid fraction threshold, at which the transition from the fluid dynamics to the solid dynamics occurs, was found to be important in predicting shrinkage factors (SFs). It was found that accurate predictions were obtained for all measued dimensions when the shell mold was considered a deformable material.

  2. Alloy Shrinkage factors for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Porter, Wallace D

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine. For all the properties, the experimental data available in the literature did not cover the entire temperature range necessary for process simulation. A comparison between the predicted material property data measured property data is made. It was found that most material properties were accurately predicted over the most of the temperature range of the process. Several assumptions were made in order to obtain a complete set of mechanical property data at high temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements for the 17-4PH alloy were conducted at heating and cooling. As a function of temperature, the thermal expansion for both the alloy and shell mold materials showed different evolution at heating and cooling. Thus, one generic simulation were performed with thermal expansion obtained at heating and another one with thermal expansion obtained at cooling. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. As compared with experimental results, the numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were slightly over-predicted.

  3. Factors affecting the shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridtirud, Charoenchai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2011-02-01

    The shrinkage of fly ash geopolymers was studied in the present study. Fly ash was used as the source material for making the geopolymers. The effects of the concentration of NaOH, sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio, liquid-to-ash ratio, curing temperature, and curing time on shrinkage were investigated. The geopolymers were cured at 25, 40, and 60°C, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of geopolymers is strongly dependent on curing temperature and liquid-to-ash ratio. The increase in shrinkage is associated with the low strength development of geopolymers. It is also found that NaOH concentration and sodium silicate-to-NaOH ratio also affect the shrinkage of geopolymers but to a lesser extent.

  4. Shrinkage Prediction for the Investment Casting of Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the alloy shrinkage factors were obtained for the investment casting of 17-4PH stainless steel parts. For the investment casting process, unfilled wax and fused silica with a zircon prime coat were used for patterns and shell molds, respectively. Dimensions of the die tooling, wax pattern, and casting were measured using a Coordinate Measurement Machine in order to obtain the actual tooling allowances. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulation results of solidification, heat transfer, and deformation phenomena. The numerical simulation results for the shrinkage factors were compared with experimental results.

  5. Influencing Factors for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Sac Shrinkage and Enlargement after EVAR: Clinical Reviews before Introduction of Preoperative Coil Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Arudo; Totsugawa, Toshinori; Tamura, Kentaro; Ishida, Atsuhisa; Sakaguchi, Taichi; Yoshitaka, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    Background: We previously reported effectiveness of coil embolization (CE) to aortic branched vessels before endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) because of significant shrinkage of aneurysmal sac. In this study, we investigated EVAR cases to clarify influential factors of aneurysmal shrinkage and enlargement. Methods: 148 consecutive cases before the introduction of CE were retrospectively reviewed based on the presence of PT2EL (persistent type 2 endoleak) and change in sac diameter after EVAR by multivariate analysis. Results: (A) PT2EL risk factors were patent inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and thinner mural thrombus inside aneurysmal sac. (B) Sac enlargement risk factors were antiplatelet intake, PT2EL, and female gender. (C) Sac shrinkage predictive factors were the absences of thoracic aortic aneurysm, antiplatelet intake, PT2EL, and coronary artery disease. Conclusion: CE to IMA was considered to be effective because patent IMA and antiplatelet intake were significant risk factors for sac enlargement. So, more meticulous therapeutic strategy, including treatment priority (AAA first or CAD first) and choice of treatment (EVAR vs. AAA) based on anatomical features of AAA was required to improve late outcomes. PMID:25298830

  6. Low shrinkage composite resins: influence on sealing ability in unfavorable C-factor cavities.

    PubMed

    Klautau, Eliza Burlamaqui; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Lobato, Marcelo Figueiredo; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Silva e Souza, Mário Honorato

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation observed the sealing ability of low shrinkage composite resins in large and deep cavities, placed and photocured in one increment. Large, deep cavities (5.0 mm diameter and 2.5 mm deep) surrounded by enamel were prepared in bovine teeth, which were then divided into five groups. Groups 1, 2, 3 and 4: acid conditioning + Adper Single Bond (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) and restoration with Aelite LS Posterior (BISCO Inc. Schaumburg, IL, USA) (G1); Filtek Z-350 (3M/ESPE,St Paul, MN, USA) (G2); Filtek Z-350 Flow (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) (G3); Premisa (KERR Corporation, Orange, CA, USA) (G4). Group 5: Silorane Adhesive system (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA) + restoration with Filtek Low Shrinkage Posterior P90 (3M/ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA). After polymerization, the teeth were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine solution and immediately washed. Using the Imagetool Software, the extent of dye along the margins was calculated as a percentage of total perimeter. The restorations were then transversally sectioned and the depth of dye penetration was calculated in mm, using the same software. Kruskal-Wallis analysis for all groups showed no statistical differences for extent (p = 0.54) or depth (p = 0.8364) of dye penetration. According to this methodology, the so-called low shrinkage composite resins had the same sealing ability compared to regular and flowable nanocomposite materials. PMID:21359445

  7. Many-Body Effects on Bandgap Shrinkage, Effective Masses, and Alpha Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jian-Zhong; Ning, C. Z.; Woo, Alex C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many-body Coulomb effects influence the operation of quantum-well (QW) laser diode (LD) strongly. In the present work, we study a two-band electron-hole plasma (EHP) within the Hatree-Fock approximation and the single plasmon pole approximation for static screening. Full inclusion of momentum dependence in the many-body effects is considered. An empirical expression for carrier density dependence of the bandgap renormalization (BGR) in an 8 nm GaAs/Al(0.3)G(4.7)As single QW will be given, which demonstrates a non-universal scaling behavior for quasi-two-dimension structures, due to size-dependent efficiency of screening. In addition, effective mass renormalization (EMR) due to momentum-dependent self-energy many-body correction, for both electrons and holes is studied and serves as another manifestation of the many-body effects. Finally, the effects on carrier density dependence of the alpha factor is evaluated to assess the sensitivity of the full inclusion of momentum dependence.

  8. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  9. State-dependent diffusion of actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin underlies the enlargement and shrinkage of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Jun; Hayama, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Ucar, Hasan; Yagishita, Sho; Takahashi, Noriko; Kasai, Haruo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the brain, and spine enlargement and shrinkage give rise to long-term potentiation and depression of synapses, respectively. Because spine structural plasticity is accompanied by remodeling of actin scaffolds, we hypothesized that the filamentous actin regulatory protein cofilin plays a crucial role in this process. Here we investigated the diffusional properties of cofilin, the actin-severing and depolymerizing actions of which are activated by dephosphorylation. Cofilin diffusion was measured using fluorescently labeled cofilin fusion proteins and two-photon imaging. We show that cofilins are highly diffusible along dendrites in the resting state. However, during spine enlargement, wild-type cofilin and a phosphomimetic cofilin mutant remain confined to the stimulated spine, whereas a nonphosphorylatable mutant does not. Moreover, inhibition of cofilin phosphorylation with a competitive peptide disables spine enlargement, suggesting that phosphorylated-cofilin accumulation is a key regulator of enlargement, which is localized to individual spines. Conversely, spine shrinkage spreads to neighboring spines, even though triggered by weaker stimuli than enlargement. Diffusion of exogenous cofilin injected into a pyramidal neuron soma causes spine shrinkage and reduced PSD95 in spines, suggesting that diffusion of dephosphorylated endogenous cofilin underlies the spreading of spine shrinkage and long-term depression. PMID:27595610

  10. Shrinkage Behavior of Polystyrene-based Foam Molded Parts Depending on Volatile Matter Content and Other Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafafian, Carineh

    Polymer foam materials play a large role in the modern world. Expanded polystyrene (EPS) bead foam is a lightweight, low density, and good thermal and acoustic insulating material whose properties make it attractive for a number of applications, especially as building insulation. However, EPS also experiences post-molding shrinkage; it shrinks dimensionally from its molded size after processing. This means parts must be stored in warehouses until they are considered stable by the industry standard, DIN EN 1603. This often takes 11--18 weeks and is thus very timely and expensive. This study aims to decrease the post-molding shrinkage time of EPS foam by understanding the mechanisms of shrinkage behavior. Samples were split into two groups based on their amount of initial volatile matter content and storage conditions, then compared to a control group. Based on thermogravimetric analysis and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry, the volatile matter content and composition was found to not be the sole contributor to EPS foam dimensional stability. Residual stress testing was done with the hole drilling method and Raman spectroscopy. As this type of testing has not been done with polymer foams before, the aim was to see if either method could reliably produce residual stress values. Both methods measured residual stress values with unknown accuracy. All samples stored at a higher temperature (60°C) reached dimensional stability by the end of this study. Thus, air diffusion into EPS foam, encouraged by the high temperature storage, was found to play a significant role in post-molding shrinkage.

  11. Cure shrinkage of thermoset composites

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.D. )

    1993-01-01

    The shrinkage of thermoset composites during cure was studied using a volumetric dilatometer. The material systems studied were AS4 carbon fiber/Hercules' 3501-6 epoxy, IM7 carbon fiber/Hercules 8551-7A toughened epoxy and IM7 carbon fiber/BASF's 5250-4 bismaleimide. Shrinkage of the samples due to both polymerization and thermal expansion effects was seen. The volume changes of the materials during cure were then compared to results from dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and dielectric cure monitoring. Maximums in volume corresponded to minimums in storage and loss modulus from DMA and maximums in the dielectric loss factor. Resin shrinkage during the 177 deg C (350 F) hold corresponded to the onset of polymerization seen by the rapid increase in the storage modulus and the decrease in the dielectric loss factor response due to reduced ion mobility. These results show that volumetric dilatometry can be an effective tool in the development of materials processing strategies and can be useful in studying residual stresses in composites. 9 refs.

  12. Spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Rossana; Pollock, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background: “Watch, wait, and rescan” (WWR) has an established place as a successful management option for a significant proportion of vestibular schwannomas (VS) as an alternative to microsurgical removal or stereotactic radiotherapy. VS may grow slowly and continuously, followed by stagnation or even shrinkage. We present two case reports of spontaneous shrinkage of VS along with a review of the literature. Case Description: A 29-year-old female presented with a progressive history of visual blurring and intermittent diplopia over 2 months. A 29 mm of maximum intracranial diameter (ICD) VS with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus was diagnosed. The patient underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt with resolution of her symptoms and opted for initial WWR management. Interval scanning between 2007 and 2014 showed progressive reduction in the maximum ICD together with reduction in the degree of central tumor enhancement. Maximum ICD at most recent follow up was 22 mm. A 28-year-old female was referred with right sensorineural deafness. A right VS of maximum ICD of 27 mm was diagnosed. Initial WWR management was planned after discussion. Serial imaging showed an initial increase in the size of the tumor followed by progressive reduction in size. The most recent follow up showed a maximum ICD of 20 mm. Conclusion: Early WWR management can be associated with spontaneous shrinkage of VS over time. Prospective clinical study of larger numbers of such cases using the UK VS database may help to identify predictive factors for the spontaneous regression of VS. PMID:27280055

  13. Roof System EPDM Shrinkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betker, Edward

    1998-01-01

    Looks at Ethylene Propylene Diene Terpolymer rubber roof membranes and the potential problems associated with this material's shrinkage. Discusses how long such a roof should perform and issues affecting repair or replacement. Recommends that a building's function be considered in any roofing decision. (RJM)

  14. Store Security: Internal Shrinkage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The document presents a 10-week training program designed to provide helpful and proven methods for controlling internal shrinkage in retail stores. Shrinkage includes the three problems of shoplifting, employee theft, and errors, each of which is addressed by the course. Ohio's laws are also discussed. The format for the course content section is…

  15. Regional brain shrinkage and change in cognitive performance over two years: The bidirectional influences of the brain and cognitive reserve factors.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ninni; Ghisletta, Paolo; Dahle, Cheryl L; Bender, Andrew R; Yang, Yiqin; Yuan, Peng; Daugherty, Ana M; Raz, Naftali

    2016-02-01

    We examined relationships between regional brain shrinkage and changes in cognitive performance, while taking into account the influence of chronological age, vascular risk, Apolipoprotein E variant and socioeconomic status. Regional brain volumes and cognitive performance were assessed in 167 healthy adults (age 19-79 at baseline), 90 of whom returned for the follow-up after two years. Brain volumes were measured in six regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC), and cognitive performance was evaluated in three domains: episodic memory (EM), fluid intelligence (Gf), and vocabulary (V). Average volume loss was observed in Hc, PhG and CbH, but reliable individual differences were noted in all examined ROIs. Average positive change was observed in EM and V performance but not in Gf scores, yet only the last evidenced individual differences in change. We observed reciprocal influences among neuroanatomical and cognitive variables. Larger brain volumes at baseline predicted greater individual gains in Gf, but differences in LPFC volume change were in part explained by baseline level of cognitive performance. In one region (PFw), individual change in volume was coupled with change in Gf. Larger initial brain volumes did not predict slower shrinkage. The results underscore the complex role of brain maintenance and cognitive reserve in adult development. PMID:26584866

  16. The measurement of polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhang; Yang, Guo Biao

    2008-09-01

    In the current study, we used the method of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) to measure polymerization shrinkage of composite resins. Standardized cavities were prepared and placed into the ESPI apparatus before the cavities were filled with composites (n=2) .The ESPI apparatus was constructed to measure the out-of-plane displacement of the resins surface during the polymerization. Experiments demonstrated that the ESPI technique was a viable method to measure the deformation of composite resins. It was responsive and sensitive to dimensional changes. We found that cavity shape, size and C- factor influenced the date of resins shrinkage. And the tooth deformation in response to polymerization of resins was measured by the ESPI too. We concluded that ESPI was a feasible method for assessing resins deformation induced by its polymerization shrinkage when it was bonded in tooth cavities. And the results were greatly influenced by the dimensions of cavities , or interface adhesive and so on. It could also measure the tooth deformation induced by shrinkage of bonded composite resins. We found that resins polymerization shrinkage date may overestimate shrinkage-induced tooth deformation.

  17. Shrinkage during holographic recording in photopolymer films determined by holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Bavigadda, Viswanath; Toal, Vincent; Naydenova, Izabela

    2013-12-10

    Shrinkage of photopolymer materials is an important factor for their use in holographic data storage and for fabrication of holographic optical elements. Dimensional change in the holographic element leads to a requirement for compensation in the reading angle and/or wavelength. Normally, shrinkage is studied at the end of the polymerization process and no information about the dynamics is obtained. The aim of this study was to use holographic interferometry to measure the shrinkage that occurs during holographic recording of transmission diffraction gratings in acrylamide photopolymer layers. Shrinkage in photopolymer layers can be measured over the whole recorded area by real-time capture of holographic interferograms at regular intervals during holographic recording using a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor camera. The optical path length change, and hence the shrinkage, are determined from the captured fringe patterns. Through analysis of the real-time shrinkage curves, it is possible to distinguish two processes that determine the value of shrinkage in the photopolymer layer. These processes are ascribed to monomer polymerization and crosslinking of polymer chains. The dependence of shrinkage of the layers on the conditions of recording such as recording intensity, single or double beam exposure, and the physical properties of the layers, such as thickness, were studied. Higher shrinkage was observed with recordings at lower intensities and in thinner layers. Increased shrinkage was also observed in the case of single beam polymerization in comparison to the case of double beam holographic exposure. PMID:24513896

  18. Factors affecting chromium carbide precipitate dissolution during alloy oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, R.N.; Gleeson, B.; Young, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    Ferrous alloys containing significant volume fractions of chromium carbides were formulated so as to contain an overall chromium level of 15% (by weight) but a nominal metal matrix chromium concentration of only 11%. Their oxidation at 850 C in pure oxygen led to either protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation accompanied by subsurface carbide dissolution or rapid growth of iron-rich oxide scales associated with rapid alloy surface recession, which engulfed the carbides before they could dissolve. Carbide size was important in austenitic alloys: an as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy contained relatively coarse carbides and failed to form a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, whereas the same alloy when hot-forged to produce very fine carbides oxidized protectively. In ferritic alloys, however, even coarse carbides dissolved sufficiently rapidly to provide the chromium flux necessary to form and maintain the growth of a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, a result attributed to the high diffusivity of the ferrite phase. Small additions of silicon to the as-cast Fe-15Cr-0.5C alloy rendered it ferritic and led to protective cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth. However, when the silicon-containing alloy was made austenitic (by the addition of nickel), it still formed a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale, showing that the principal function of silicon was in modifying the scale-alloy interface.

  19. Scale Shrinkage in Vertical Equating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Three potential causes of scale shrinkage (measurement error, restriction of range, and multidimensionality) in item response theory vertical equating are discussed, and a more comprehensive model-based approach to establishing vertical scales is described. Test data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress are used to illustrate the…

  20. Shrinkage estimators for covariance matrices.

    PubMed

    Daniels, M J; Kass, R E

    2001-12-01

    Estimation of covariance matrices in small samples has been studied by many authors. Standard estimators, like the unstructured maximum likelihood estimator (ML) or restricted maximum likelihood (REML) estimator, can be very unstable with the smallest estimated eigenvalues being too small and the largest too big. A standard approach to more stably estimating the matrix in small samples is to compute the ML or REML estimator under some simple structure that involves estimation of fewer parameters, such as compound symmetry or independence. However, these estimators will not be consistent unless the hypothesized structure is correct. If interest focuses on estimation of regression coefficients with correlated (or longitudinal) data, a sandwich estimator of the covariance matrix may be used to provide standard errors for the estimated coefficients that are robust in the sense that they remain consistent under misspecification of the covariance structure. With large matrices, however, the inefficiency of the sandwich estimator becomes worrisome. We consider here two general shrinkage approaches to estimating the covariance matrix and regression coefficients. The first involves shrinking the eigenvalues of the unstructured ML or REML estimator. The second involves shrinking an unstructured estimator toward a structured estimator. For both cases, the data determine the amount of shrinkage. These estimators are consistent and give consistent and asymptotically efficient estimates for regression coefficients. Simulations show the improved operating characteristics of the shrinkage estimators of the covariance matrix and the regression coefficients in finite samples. The final estimator chosen includes a combination of both shrinkage approaches, i.e., shrinking the eigenvalues and then shrinking toward structure. We illustrate our approach on a sleep EEG study that requires estimation of a 24 x 24 covariance matrix and for which inferences on mean parameters critically

  1. Study on effects of solar radiation and rain on shrinkage, shrinkage cracking and creep of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Asamoto, Shingo; Ohtsuka, Ayumu; Kuwahara, Yuta; Miura, Chikako

    2011-06-15

    In this paper, the effects of actual environmental actions on shrinkage, creep and shrinkage cracking of concrete are studied comprehensively. Prismatic specimens of plain concrete were exposed to three sets of artificial outdoor conditions with or without solar radiation and rain to examine the shrinkage. For the purpose of studying shrinkage cracking behavior, prismatic concrete specimens with reinforcing steel were also subjected to the above conditions at the same time. The shrinkage behavior is described focusing on the effects of solar radiation and rain based on the moisture loss. The significant environment actions to induce shrinkage cracks are investigated from viewpoints of the amount of the shrinkage and the tensile strength. Finally, specific compressive creep behavior according to solar radiation and rainfall is discussed. It is found that rain can greatly inhibit the progresses of concrete shrinkage and creep while solar radiation is likely to promote shrinkage cracking and creep.

  2. Polymerization shrinkage stress of composites photoactivated by different light sources.

    PubMed

    Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho Panzeri; Drubi Filho, Brahim; Casemiro, Luciana Assirati; Garcia, Lucas da Fonseca Roberti; Consani, Simonides

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the polymerization shrinkage stress of composite resins (microfilled, microhybrid and hybrid) photoactivated by quartz-tungsten halogen light (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED). Glass rods (5.0 mm x 5.0 cm) were fabricated and had one of the surfaces air-abraded with aluminum oxide and coated with a layer of an adhesive system, which was photoactivated with the QTH unit. The glass rods were vertically assembled, in pairs, to a universal testing machine and the composites were applied to the lower rod. The upper rod was placed closer, at 2 mm, and an extensometer was attached to the rods. The 20 composites were polymerized by either QTH (n=10) or LED (n=10) curing units. Polymerization was carried out using 2 devices positioned in opposite sides, which were simultaneously activated for 40 s. Shrinkage stress was analyzed twice: shortly after polymerization (t40s) and 10 min later (t10min). Data were analyzed statistically by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=5%). The shrinkage stress for all composites was higher at t10min than at t40s, regardless of the activation source. Microfilled composite resins showed lower shrinkage stress values compared to the other composite resins. For the hybrid and microhybrid composite resins, the light source had no influence on the shrinkage stress, except for microfilled composite at t10min. It may be concluded that the composition of composite resins is the factor with the strongest influence on shrinkage stress. PMID:20069256

  3. Effect of the Key Mixture Parameters on Shrinkage of Reactive Powder Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 33 factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  4. Effect of the key mixture parameters on shrinkage of reactive powder concrete.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Zubair, Ahmed; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Reactive powder concrete (RPC) mixtures are reported to have excellent mechanical and durability characteristics. However, such concrete mixtures having high amount of cementitious materials may have high early shrinkage causing cracking of concrete. In the present work, an attempt has been made to study the simultaneous effects of three key mixture parameters on shrinkage of the RPC mixtures. Considering three different levels of the three key mixture factors, a total of 27 mixtures of RPC were prepared according to 3(3) factorial experiment design. The specimens belonging to all 27 mixtures were monitored for shrinkage at different ages over a total period of 90 days. The test results were plotted to observe the variation of shrinkage with time and to see the effects of the key mixture factors. The experimental data pertaining to 90-day shrinkage were used to conduct analysis of variance to identify significance of each factor and to obtain an empirical equation correlating the shrinkage of RPC with the three key mixture factors. The rate of development of shrinkage at early ages was higher. The water to binder ratio was found to be the most prominent factor followed by cement content with the least effect of silica fume content. PMID:25050395

  5. Devitrification and shrinkage behavior of silica fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1972-01-01

    Devitrification and shrinkage of three batches of silica fibers were investigated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1350 C. Fibers with high water and impurity content devitrified rapidly to cristobalite and quartz and exhibited rapid, but the least amount of, shrinkage. A batch with low water and impurity content devitrified more slowly to cristobalite only and underwent severe shrinkage by the mechanism of viscous flow. A third batch of intermediate purity level and low water content devitrified at a moderate rate mainly to cristobalite but shrunk very rapidly. Completely devitrified silica fibers did not exhibit any further shrinkage.

  6. Factors affecting the optical properties of Pd-free Au-Pt-based dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Takanobu; Takuma, Yasuko; Miura, Eri; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hisatsune, Kunihiro

    2003-12-01

    The optical properties of experimental Au-Pt-based alloys containing a small amount of In, Sn, and Zn were investigated by spectrophotometric colorimetry to extract factors affecting color of Au-Pt-based high-karat dental alloys. It was found that the optical properties of Au-Pt-based alloys are strongly affected by the number of valence electrons per atom in an alloy, namely, the electron:atom ratio, e/a. That is, by increasing the e/a-value, activities of reflection in the long-wavelength range and absorption in the short-wavelength range in the visible spectrum apparently increased. As a result, the maximum slope of the spectral reflectance curve at the absorption edge, which is located near 515 nm (approximately 2.4 eV), apparently increased with e/a-value. Due to this effect, the b*-coordinate (yellow-blue) in the CIELAB color space considerably increased and the a*-coordinate (red-green) slightly increased with e/a-value. The addition of a third element with a higher number of valence electrons to the binary Au-Pt alloy is, therefore, effective in giving a gold tinge to the parent Au-Pt alloy. This information may be useful in controlling the color of Au-Pt-based dental alloys. PMID:15348493

  7. An important factor powerfully influencing the Al Ni-based alloys' glass-forming ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Zhang; Xiufang, Bian; Chunxia, Fu; Na, Han; Jiankun, Zhou; Weimin, Wang

    2005-12-01

    In order to get better glass-forming abilities (GFAs), Ni atoms are partially replaced by Cu and Co atoms in Al84Ni12Zr4 alloys. Thermal analysis shows that the reduced crystallization temperature Trx has no direct correlation with the GFA of the alloys. However, it is notable that prepeaks have been found in the total structure factors of the amorphous Al84Ni(12-x)Zr4Cux and Al84Ni(12-x)Zr4Cox alloys. In addition, the results prove that the intensity of the prepeaks influences the GFA powerfully. The amorphous alloys with larger intensity of the prepeak show better GFA. The influence of prepeaks on the GFA can be explained by the atomic configuration difference among the liquid, crystal and glass states.

  8. Compressed sensing recovery via nonconvex shrinkage penalties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodworth, Joseph; Chartrand, Rick

    2016-07-01

    The {{\\ell }}0 minimization of compressed sensing is often relaxed to {{\\ell }}1, which yields easy computation using the shrinkage mapping known as soft thresholding, and can be shown to recover the original solution under certain hypotheses. Recent work has derived a general class of shrinkages and associated nonconvex penalties that better approximate the original {{\\ell }}0 penalty and empirically can recover the original solution from fewer measurements. We specifically examine p-shrinkage and firm thresholding. In this work, we prove that given data and a measurement matrix from a broad class of matrices, one can choose parameters for these classes of shrinkages to guarantee exact recovery of the sparsest solution. We further prove convergence of the algorithm iterative p-shrinkage (IPS) for solving one such relaxed problem.

  9. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an AL-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Young, G A; Scully, J R

    2002-04-09

    Precipitation hardenable Al-Zn-Mg alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength but overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that overaging the copper bearing alloys both inhibits hydrogen ingress from oxide covered surfaces and decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusion rates in the metal.

  10. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  11. Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

    2001-09-12

    It is well established that Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) aluminum alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are commonly used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength. Overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). When freshly bared coupons of AA 7050 are exposed to 90 C, 90% RH air, hydrogen ingress follows inverse-logarithmic-type kinetics and is equivalent for underaged (HEAC susceptible) and overaged (HEAC resistant) tempers. However, when the native oxide is allowed to form (24 hrs in 25 C, 40% RH lab air) prior to exposure to 90 C, 90% RH air, underaged alloy shows significantly greater hydrogen ingress than the overaged alloy. Humid air is a very aggressive environment producing local ({approx}1{micro}m) hydrogen concentrations in excess of 10,000 wt. ppm at 90 C. In the copper bearing alloy, overaging also effects the apparent diffusivity of hydrogen. As AA 7050 is aged from underaged {yields} peak aged {yields} overaged, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion increases and the apparent diffusivity for hydrogen decreases, In the low copper alloy, overaging has little effect on hydrogen diffusion. Comparison of the apparent activation energies for hydrogen diffusion and for K independent (stage II) crack growth

  12. On the Approximations of the Factors of Surface Segregation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezey, L. Z.; Giber, J.

    1983-07-01

    A new "Complex Calculation of Surface Segregation" (CCSS) method (presented elsewhere in greater detail) is first outlined and the factors of surface segregation are identified. The approximate description of these by subsequent structure model refinements is then discussed. It is shown by some considerations and by numerical results on the AgPd alloy as well, that such refinements lead to consequent diminutions of the surface free enthalpy. On this basis optimal values of calculational parameters, characteristic of surface conditions, may be calculated.

  13. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujit K.; Chaki, T. K.; Tikku, V. K.; Pradhan, N. K.; Bhowmick, A. K.

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%.

  14. Correction of EB-induced shrinkage in contour measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Hotta, Shoji; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2014-04-01

    We have proposed a new method for correcting electron beam (EB)-induced photoresist shrinkage in two-dimensional pattern contours extracted from a scanning electron microscope image. This method restores the original shrinkage-free contour from the experimentally determined "shrunk contour", based on a shrinkage model which takes into account of the elastic nature of the shrinkage phenomena caused by the photoresist-volume reduction. Verification of this shrinkage model was demonstrated by using ArF resist patterns as follows. First, the model was calibrated with the shrinkage data of several line patters with different linewidth prior to the contour correction. Next, the amount of shrinkage of elbow patterns was measured by comparing its contours obtained with small and sufficiently large EB dosages. It was found that the shrinkage of the inner edge of the elbow corner was smaller than that of the outer edge, which can be interpreted as a result of the elastic deformation. Finally, validity of shrinkage correction was examined. The model calculation correctly reproduced the observed shrinkage including its dependence on the location in the pattern. The restored contour showed a good consistency with the experimental results and the total root-mean-square error of the shrinkage correction was 0.5 nm. This result confirmed that our shrinkage model adequately describes the shrinkage of two dimensional patterns. Consequently, proposed shrinkage correction method is expected to improve the accuracy of contour measurements by a critical dimension-scanning electron microscope.

  15. Factors affecting the strength of multipass low-alloy steel weld metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krantz, B. M.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical properties of multipass high-strength steel weld metals depend upon several factors, among the most important being: (1) The interaction between the alloy composition and weld metal cooling rate which determines the as-deposited microstructure; and (2) the thermal effects of subsequent passes on each underlying pass which alter the original microstructure. The bulk properties of a multipass weld are therefore governed by both the initial microstructure of each weld pass and its subsequent thermal history. Data obtained for a high strength low alloy steel weld metal confirmed that a simple correlation exists between mechanical properties and welding conditions if the latter are in turn correlated as weld cooling rate.

  16. Influence of archaeological environment factors in alteration processes of copper alloy artifacts.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Ioan Gabriel; Mircea, Otilia; Vasilache, Viorica; Sandu, Ion

    2012-12-01

    The article presents the experimental results obtained by combining noninvasive techniques (OM, SEM/EDX, XRF) to analyze three artifacts made of copper alloys discovered in a inhumation tomb (2) and in the soil profile (1) in archaeological sites from Neamt County Romania. To uncover the mechanism of alteration thereof during their longtime underground stay in specific chemical conditions and under the influence of other pedological factors, the corrosion products must be identified. The excess of the chloride ion, from burial site, disturbs the Liesegang effect, transforming the bulk in a stratified sponge structure with chlorapatite and hydroxyapatite. Some of the compounds from primary and secondary patina can be found on the surface of the bulk, as color stains. The presence of alloy components (Cu, Sn, Pb, Zn, Fe, etc.) and of the underground contamination components, allowed us to establish the origin of the ore, the manufacture technology and we identified other materials which affected the artifacts after abandonment. PMID:22865394

  17. Early sac shrinkage predicts a low risk of late complications after endovascular aortic aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Bastos Gonçalves, F; Baderkhan, H; Verhagen, H J M; Wanhainen, A; Björck, M; Stolker, R J; Hoeks, S E; Mani, K

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysm shrinkage has been proposed as a marker of successful endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). Patients with early postoperative shrinkage may experience fewer subsequent complications, and consequently require less intensive surveillance. Methods Patients undergoing EVAR from 2000 to 2011 at three vascular centres (in 2 countries), who had two imaging examinations (postoperative and after 6–18 months), were included. Maximum diameter, complications and secondary interventions during follow-up were registered. Patients were categorized according to early sac dynamics. The primary endpoint was freedom from late complications. Secondary endpoints were freedom from secondary intervention, postimplant rupture and direct (type I/III) endoleaks. Results Some 597 EVARs (71·1 per cent of all EVARs) were included. No shrinkage was observed in 284 patients (47·6 per cent), moderate shrinkage (5–9 mm) in 142 (23·8 per cent) and major shrinkage (at least 10 mm) in 171 patients (28·6 per cent). Four years after the index imaging, the rate of freedom from complications was 84·3 (95 per cent confidence interval 78·7 to 89·8), 88·1 (80·6 to 95·5) and 94·4 (90·1 to 98·7) per cent respectively. No shrinkage was an independent risk factor for late complications compared with major shrinkage (hazard ratio (HR) 3·11; P < 0·001). Moderate compared with major shrinkage (HR 2·10; P = 0·022), early postoperative complications (HR 3·34; P < 0·001) and increasing abdominal aortic aneurysm baseline diameter (HR 1·02; P = 0·001) were also risk factors for late complications. Freedom from secondary interventions and direct endoleaks was greater for patients with major sac shrinkage. Conclusion Early change in aneurysm sac diameter is a strong predictor of late complications after EVAR. Patients with major sac shrinkage have a very low risk of complications for up to 5 years. This parameter may be used to tailor postoperative surveillance. PMID:24752772

  18. Cross-Validation, Shrinkage, and Multiple Regression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hynes, Kevin

    One aspect of multiple regression--the shrinkage of the multiple correlation coefficient on cross-validation is reviewed. The paper consists of four sections. In section one, the distinction between a fixed and a random multiple regression model is made explicit. In section two, the cross-validation paradigm and an explanation for the occurrence…

  19. Compensating for Shrinkage in Machined Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, L.; Fitchett, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Technique insures machined ceramics shrink to correct dimensions after baked in kiln. New method automatically compensates during machining for shrinkage later, when part baked. Applicable to numerically controlled machines that include provision to adjust for variations in cuttingtool size, but do not provide for automatic verification of dimensions of machined parts.

  20. A Bayesian Shrinkage Approach for AMMI Models.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Pereira; de Oliveira, Luciano Antonio; Nuvunga, Joel Jorge; Pamplona, Andrezza Kéllen Alves; Balestre, Marcio

    2015-01-01

    Linear-bilinear models, especially the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model, are widely applicable to genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) studies in plant breeding programs. These models allow a parsimonious modeling of GE interactions, retaining a small number of principal components in the analysis. However, one aspect of the AMMI model that is still debated is the selection criteria for determining the number of multiplicative terms required to describe the GE interaction pattern. Shrinkage estimators have been proposed as selection criteria for the GE interaction components. In this study, a Bayesian approach was combined with the AMMI model with shrinkage estimators for the principal components. A total of 55 maize genotypes were evaluated in nine different environments using a complete blocks design with three replicates. The results show that the traditional Bayesian AMMI model produces low shrinkage of singular values but avoids the usual pitfalls in determining the credible intervals in the biplot. On the other hand, Bayesian shrinkage AMMI models have difficulty with the credible interval for model parameters, but produce stronger shrinkage of the principal components, converging to GE matrices that have more shrinkage than those obtained using mixed models. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen, and resulted in models being selected that were similar to those obtained by the Cornelius F-test (α = 0.05) in traditional AMMI models and cross validation based on leave-one-out. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen and more GEI pattern retained on the first two components. The resulting model chosen by posterior distribution of singular value was also similar to those produced by the cross-validation approach in traditional AMMI models. Our method enables the estimation of credible interval for AMMI biplot plus the choice of AMMI model based on direct posterior

  1. A Bayesian Shrinkage Approach for AMMI Models

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Luciano Antonio; Nuvunga, Joel Jorge; Pamplona, Andrezza Kéllen Alves

    2015-01-01

    Linear-bilinear models, especially the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) model, are widely applicable to genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI) studies in plant breeding programs. These models allow a parsimonious modeling of GE interactions, retaining a small number of principal components in the analysis. However, one aspect of the AMMI model that is still debated is the selection criteria for determining the number of multiplicative terms required to describe the GE interaction pattern. Shrinkage estimators have been proposed as selection criteria for the GE interaction components. In this study, a Bayesian approach was combined with the AMMI model with shrinkage estimators for the principal components. A total of 55 maize genotypes were evaluated in nine different environments using a complete blocks design with three replicates. The results show that the traditional Bayesian AMMI model produces low shrinkage of singular values but avoids the usual pitfalls in determining the credible intervals in the biplot. On the other hand, Bayesian shrinkage AMMI models have difficulty with the credible interval for model parameters, but produce stronger shrinkage of the principal components, converging to GE matrices that have more shrinkage than those obtained using mixed models. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen, and resulted in models being selected that were similar to those obtained by the Cornelius F-test (α = 0.05) in traditional AMMI models and cross validation based on leave-one-out. This characteristic allowed more parsimonious models to be chosen and more GEI pattern retained on the first two components. The resulting model chosen by posterior distribution of singular value was also similar to those produced by the cross-validation approach in traditional AMMI models. Our method enables the estimation of credible interval for AMMI biplot plus the choice of AMMI model based on direct posterior

  2. Exploiting tumor shrinkage through temporal optimization of radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Craft, David; Hong, Theodore; Papp, Dávid; Ramakrishnan, Jagdish; Salari, Ehsan; Wolfgang, John; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    In multi-stage radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated mostly by radiobiological considerations, but also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. The paper considers the optimal design of multi-stage treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of multi-stage radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the normal tissue is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one-third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of multi-stage treatments in terms of normal tissue sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large dose reductions by more than a factor of 2 for plausible model parameters. The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at multi-stage radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced target volumes.

  3. Polymerization shrinkage, flexural and compression properties of low-shrinkage dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Kil; Lee, Geun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Hwa; Park, Mi-Gyoung; Ko, Ching-Chang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the polymerization shrinkage, flexural and compressive properties of low-shrinkage resin composites. For the study, four methacrylate-based and one silorane-based resin composites were light cured using three different light-curing units (LCUs) and their polymerization shrinkage, flexural (strength (FS) and modulus (FM)) and compressive (strength (CS) and modulus (CM)) properties were evaluated. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey test. The polymerization shrinkage ranged approximately 7.6-14.2 μm for 2-mm thick specimens depending on the resin product and LCU. Filtek LS showed the least shrinkage while the rest shrank approximately 13.2-14.2 μm. However, Filtek LS showed the greatest shrinkage difference for the used LCUs. FS and CS of the tested specimens ranged 96.2-152.1 MPa and 239.2-288.4 MPa, respectively, depending on the resin product and LCU. The highest and lowest FS and FM were recorded for the methacrylate-based resin composites. Among the specimens, Filtek LS showed the lowest CS and CM. PMID:24492120

  4. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  5. Tool-to-tool matching issues due to photoresist shrinkage effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Hartig, Carsten; Allgair, John; Vaid, Alok; Solecky, Eric; Rana, Narender

    2011-03-01

    Photoresist shrinkage is an important systematic uncertainty source in critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) metrology of lithographic features. In terms of metrology gauge metrics, it influences both the precision and the accuracy of CD-SEM measurements, while locally damaging the sample. Minimization or elimination of shrinkage is desirable, yet elusive. Because this error source will furthermore be a factor in CD-SEM metrology on polymer materials, learning to work around this issue is necessary. Tool-to-tool matching is another important component of measurement uncertainty that metrologists must control in high volume manufacturing, and photoresist samples are a most difficult case due to shrinkage effects, as tool-to-tool biases can vary based on the sample or other parameters. In this work, we explore different shrinkage effects and their influence on matching. This will include an investigation of how the photoresist shrinkage rate varies with time from the chemical development of the photoresists, which necessitates that measurements on different tools within a group be performed in rapid succession to avoid additional error. The differences in shrinkage rates between static and dynamic load/unload cases will also be addressed, as these effects also influence matching. The results of these dynamic effect experiments will be shown to have far-reaching implications for the shrinkage phenomenon in general. Finally, various sampling schemes for matching will be explored, through both simulation and experiment, for use with shrinking materials. Included is a method whereby various fleet tools measure different locations, once per tool, within a uniform line/space grating. Finally, we will assess how well matching can be achieved using these techniques.

  6. Distinct spontaneous shrinkage of a sporadic vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowen; Caye-Thomasen, Per; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2013-04-01

    We present a case with outspoken spontaneous vestibular schwannoma shrinkage and review the related literature. The patient was initially diagnosed with a left-sided, intrameatal vestibular schwannoma, which subsequently grew into the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA), followed by total shrinkage of the CPA component without any intervention over a 12-year observation period. The literature on spontaneous tumor shrinkage was retrieved by searching the subject terms "vestibular schwannoma, conservative management" in PubMed/MEDLINE database, without a time limit. Of the published data, the articles on "shrinkage" or "negative growth" or "regression" or "involution" of the tumor were selected, and the contents on the rate, extent and mechanism of spontaneous tumor shrinkage were extracted and reviewed. The reported rate of spontaneous shrinkage of vestibular schwannoma is 5-10% of patients managed conservatively. Extreme shrinkage of the tumor may occur spontaneously. PMID:22858145

  7. Shrinkage and growth compensation in common sunflowers: refining estimates of damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Oldemeye, John L.; Swenson, Elizabeth L.

    1986-01-01

    Shrinkage and growth compensation of artificially damaged common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were studied in central North Dakota during 1981-1982 in an effort to increase accuracy of estimates of blackbird damage to sunflowers. In both years, as plants matured damaged areas on seedheads shrank at a greater rate than the sunflower heads themselves. This differential shrinkage resulted in an underestimation of the area damaged. Sunflower head and damaged-area shrinkage varied widely by time and degree of damage and by size of the seedhead damaged. Because variation in shrinkage by time of damage was so large, predicting when blackbird damage occurs may be the most important factor in estimating seed loss. Yield'occupied seed area was greater (P < 0.05) for damaged than undamaged heads and tended to increase as degree of damage inflicted increased, indicating growth compensation was occurring in response to lost seeds. Yields of undamaged seeds in seedheads damaged during early seed development were higher than those of heads damaged later. This suggested that there was a period of maximal response to damage when plants were best able to redirect growth to seeds remaining in the head. Sunflowers appear to be able to compensate for damage of ≤ 15% of the total hear area. Estimates of damage can be improved by applying empirical results of differential shrinkage and growth compensations.

  8. Shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudyakov, A. I.; Steshenko, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of research of dispersion-reinforced cement foam concrete with chrysotile asbestos fibers. The goal was to study the patterns of influence of chrysotile asbestos fibers on drying shrinkage deformation of cement foam concrete of natural hardening. The chrysotile asbestos fiber contains cylindrical fiber shaped particles with a diameter of 0.55 micron to 8 microns, which are composed of nanostructures of the same form with diameters up to 55 nm and length up to 22 microns. Taking into account the wall thickness, effective reinforcement can be achieved only by microtube foam materials, the so- called carbon nanotubes, the dimensions of which are of power less that the wall pore diameter. The presence of not reinforced foam concrete pores with perforated walls causes a decrease in its strength, decreases the mechanical properties of the investigated material and increases its shrinkage. The microstructure investigation results have shown that introduction of chrysotile asbestos fibers in an amount of 2 % by weight of cement provides the finely porous foam concrete structure with more uniform size closed pores, which are uniformly distributed over the volume. This reduces the shrinkage deformation of foam concrete by 50%.

  9. Silorane- and high filled-based "low-shrinkage" resin composites: shrinkage, flexural strength and modulus.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Cesar Augusto Galvão; Oliveira, Marcelo Tavares de; Mettenburg, Donald; Rueggeberg, Frederick Allen; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the volumetric shrinkage (VS), flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) properties of the low-shrinkage resin composite Aelite LS (Bisco) to those of Filtek LS (3M ESPE) and two regular dimethacrylate-based resin composites, the microfilled Heliomolar (Ivoclar Vivadent) and the microhybrid Aelite Universal (Bisco). The composites (n = 5) were placed on the Teflon pedestal of a video-imaging device, and VS was recorded every minute for 5 min after 40 s of light exposure. For the FS and FM tests, resin discs (0.6 mm in thickness and 6.0 mm in diameter) were obtained (n = 12) and submitted to a piston-ring biaxial test in a universal testing machine. VS, FS, and FM data were submitted to two-way repeated measures and one-way ANOVA, respectively, followed by Tukey's post-hoc test (a = 5%). Filtek LS showed lower VS than did Aelite LS, which in turn showed lower shrinkage than did the other composites. Aelite Universal and Filtek LS exhibited higher FS than did Heliomolar and Aelite LS, both of which exhibited the highest FM. No significant difference in FM was noted between Filtek LS and Aelite Universal, while Heliomolar exhibited the lowest values. Aelite LS was not as effective as Filtek LS regarding shrinkage, although both low-shrinkage composites showed lower VS than did the other composites. Only Filtek LS exhibited FS and FM comparable to those of the regular microhybrid dimethacrylate-based resin composite. PMID:23459774

  10. Do low-shrink composites reduce polymerization shrinkage effects?

    PubMed

    Tantbirojn, D; Pfeifer, C S; Braga, R R; Versluis, A

    2011-05-01

    Progress in polymer science has led to continuous reduction of polymerization shrinkage, exemplified by a new generation of "low-shrink composites". The common inference that shrinkage stress effects will be reduced in teeth restored with such restoratives with lower shrinkage was tested in extracted human premolars. Mesio-occluso-distal slot-shaped cavities were cut and restored with a conventional (SupremePlus) or low-shrink (RefleXions, Premise, Kalore, and LS) composite (N = 5). We digitized the coronal surfaces before and 10 min after restoration to determine cuspal deflection from the buccal and lingual volume change/area. We also determined the main properties involved (total shrinkage, post-gel shrinkage, degree of conversion, and elastic modulus), as well as microleakage, to verify adequate bonding. It was shown that, due to shrinkage stresses, buccal and lingual surfaces pulled inward after restoration (9-14 microns). Only Kalore and LS resulted in significantly lower tooth deformation (ANOVA/Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc, p = 0.05). The other two low-shrink composites, despite having the lowest and highest total shrinkage values, did not cause significant differences in cuspal deflection. Deflection seemed most related to the combination of post-gel shrinkage and elastic modulus. Therefore, even for significantly lower total shrinkage values, shrinkage stress is not necessarily reduced. PMID:21282725

  11. Properties of high-performance concrete containing shrinkage-reducing admixture

    SciTech Connect

    Folliard, K.J.; Berke, N.S.

    1997-09-01

    The effects of a recently developed shrinkage-reducing admixture on high-performance concrete properties are described. High-performance concrete mixtures containing silica fume were cast with and without shrinkage-reducing admixture. The mechanical properties, drying shrinkage, and resistance to restrained shrinkage cracking were investigated. The results show that the shrinkage-reducing admixture effectively reduced the shrinkage of high-performance concrete, and resulted in a significant decrease in restrained shrinkage cracking.

  12. Analysis of Factors Influencing Measurement Accuracy of Al Alloy Tensile Test Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgornik, Bojan; Žužek, Borut; Sedlaček, Marko; Kevorkijan, Varužan; Hostej, Boris

    2016-02-01

    In order to properly use materials in design, a complete understanding of and information on their mechanical properties, such as yield and ultimate tensile strength must be obtained. Furthermore, as the design of automotive parts is constantly pushed toward higher limits, excessive measuring uncertainty can lead to unexpected premature failure of the component, thus requiring reliable determination of material properties with low uncertainty. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of different metrology factors, including the number of tested samples, specimens machining and surface quality, specimens input diameter, type of testing and human error on the tensile test results and measurement uncertainty when performed on 2xxx series Al alloy. Results show that the most significant contribution to measurement uncertainty comes from the number of samples tested, which can even exceed 1 %. Furthermore, moving from experimental laboratory conditions to very intense industrial environment further amplifies measurement uncertainty, where even if using automated systems human error cannot be neglected.

  13. Factors Affecting Stable Planar Growth During the Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Aluminum-indium Alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Z.B.

    1994-01-01

    Immiscible (monotectic) alloy systems have become materials of interest due to their unique potential applications, which include bearing materials, catalysts, permanent magnets, and fine particle superconductors. For some of these applications, a microstructure containing continuous aligned fibers is desired. In-situ fibrous growth has been observed in directionally solidified alloys of monotectic composition. However, for the proposed applications, a greater volume fraction of the fibrous phase is needed than is available in alloys of monotectic composition. In order to obtain this greater volume fraction of the fibrous phase, alloys of hypermonotectic composition are necessary. However, when alloys of hypermonotectic composition are directionally solidified, there are two factors which can disrupt in-situ fibrous growth. These factors are buoyancy-driven convection and constitutional supercooling. A theoretical model containing the effects of both convection and constitutional supercooling has been developed and applied to the immiscible aluminum-indium system. The resulting stability limit diagram predicts the theoretical composition limits for stable growth as a function of solidification front velocity. This research has concentrated on experimentally verifying the theoretical limits of stable growth. By directionally solidifying samples over a range of compositions and growth rates, the region of stable growth was determined by examining both the microstructure and the composition profile developed in the samples. The results indicate that the theoretical limits of stable growth predicted by the stability limit diagram are a conservative estimate of the region of stable growth.

  14. Nanozeolites doped photopolymer layers with reduced shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Naydenova, Izabela; Mintova, Svetlana; Toal, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    An acrylamide based photopolymer doped with pure silica MFI-type zeolite (silicalite-1) nanoparticles has been characterized for holographic recording purposes. The concentrations of the silicalite-1 nanoparticles in the photopolymer layers were 1, 2.5, 5 and 7.5 wt. %. The inclusion of silicalite-1 nanoparticle in the photopolymer has resulted in an increase of the diffraction efficiency by up to 40%, and decrease of the shrinkage from 1.32% to 0.57%. The best results were obtained in layers doped with 5 wt. % silicalite-1 nanoparticles. PMID:22273971

  15. Shrinkage, stress, and modulus of dimethacrylate, ormocer, and silorane composites

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, Atais; Feitosa, Victor Pinheiro; da Silva Fonseca, Andrea Soares Quirino; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria Assad; Silikas, Nikolaos; Schneider, Luis Felipe Jochins

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the shrinkage, polymerization stress, elastic and bulk modulus resulting from composites formulated by siloranes, 2nd generation ormocers, and dimethacrylates. Materials and Methods: The bonded disc method was used to evaluate volumetric shrinkage. The polymerization stress was evaluated by mean of the Bioman. Cylindrical specimens (5 mm thickness and 6 mm diameter) were submitted to gradual loading. Young's and bulk modulus were obtained from the slope of the stress/strain curve. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%). Results: Grandio and ormocer showed significant higher elastic and bulk modulus. Silorane presented significant lowest bulk modulus and maximum shrinkage. Ormocer and silorane presented lower values for the maximum rate of shrinkage. Extra-low shrinkage (ELS) composite presented the greatest maximum shrinkage. The higher maximum rate of shrinkage was attained by Grandio and ELS, statistically similar from each other. The silorane showed lower values of maximum stress and maximum rate of stress. The higher values of maximum stress were presented by ELS and Grandio, statistical similar between them. Grandio showed the significantly greatest maximum rate of stress. Conclusion: Silorane showed to promote lower shrinkage/stress among the composites, with the lowest elastic modulus. Ormocer showed lower shrinkage/stress than methacrylates despite of its high modulus. PMID:26430302

  16. The influence of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements on bonding to metal.

    PubMed

    Verzijden, C W; Feilzer, A J; Creugers, N H; Davidson, C L

    1992-02-01

    During the setting of a resin composite cement (RCC) used as an adhesive between a resin-bonded bridge and tooth structure, the adhesion may be disrupted by the development of shrinkage stress. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the shrinkage stress of three different RCCs on their adhesive and cohesive qualities when bonded to metal surfaces in a rigid set-up. Two opposing parallel NiCr discs (Wiron 77) were mounted in a tensilometer at a mutual distance of 200 microns and cemented with Panavia Ex, Clearfil F2, or Microfill Pontic C. The alloy surfaces were treated by either electrolytic etching, sand-blasting, silane-coating, or tin-plating. During setting, the discs were kept at their original mutual distance to simulate the extreme clinical situation of "complete" rigidity, where the casting and the tooth cannot move toward each other. The developing shrinkage stress was recorded continuously. During setting, the adhesive strength of the RCCs to silane-coated surfaces was always higher than their early cohesive strength. Electrolytically-etched surfaces as well as sand-blasted surfaces showed, in almost all cases, adhesive failure. The tin-plated samples showed mainly adhesive failure at the metal/resin interface. The highest bond strength values were found for silane-coated surfaces in combination with Clearfil F2. PMID:1556300

  17. Experimental validation of 2D profile photoresist shrinkage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Self, Andy; Ferry, Lorena; Danilevsky, Alex

    2011-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in allowing the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. These smaller feature sizes will also require the use of thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in SEMATECH's CD-SEM Unified Specification. In other associated works, we first developed a 1-D model for resist shrinkage for the bottom linewidth and then a 2-D profile model that accounted for shrinkage of all aspects of a trapezoidal profile along a given linescan. A fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized and shaped features. In the 1-D case, calibration of the parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam was all that was required to fit the models to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. The later 2-D model included improvements for solving the CD shrinkage in thin photoresists, which is now of great interest for upcoming realistic lithographic processing to explore the change in resist profile with electron dose and to predict the influence of initial resist profile on shrinkage characteristics. The 2-D model also included shrinkage due to both the primary

  18. Influence of germanium nano-inclusions on the thermoelectric power factor of bulk bismuth telluride alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Satyala, Nikhil; Zamanipour, Zahra; Norouzzadeh, Payam; Krasinski, Jerzy S.; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Tahmasbi Rad, Armin; Tayebi, Lobat

    2014-05-28

    Nanocomposite thermoelectric compound of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with 5 at. % germanium nano-inclusions was prepared via mechanically alloying and sintering techniques. The influence of Ge nano-inclusions and long duration annealing on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} were investigated. It was found that annealing has significant effect on the carrier concentration, Seebeck coefficient, and the power factor of the thermoelectric compound. The systematic heat treatment also reduced the density of donor type defects thereby decreasing the electron concentration. While the as-pressed nanocomposite materials showed n-type properties, it was observed that with the increase of annealing time, the nanocomposite gradually transformed to an abundantly hole-dominated (p-type) sample. The long duration annealing (∼500 h) resulted in a significantly enhanced electrical conductivity pertaining to the augmentation in the density and the structural properties of the sample. Therefore, a simultaneous enhancement in both electrical and Seebeck coefficient characteristics resulted in a remarkable increase in the thermoelectric power factor.

  19. Porcine intestinal mast cells. Evaluation of different fixatives for histochemical staining techniques considering tissue shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Rieger, J; Twardziok, S; Huenigen, H; Hirschberg, R M; Plendl, J

    2013-01-01

    Staining of mast cells (MCs), including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF) has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkage-differences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from data using

  20. PLASTIC SHRINKAGE CONTROLLING EFFECT BY POLYPROPYLENE SHORT FIBER WITH HYDROPHILY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Akira; Sadatsuki, Yoshitomo; Oshima, Akihiro; Ishii, Akina; Tsubaki, Tatsuya

    The aim of this research is to clarify the mechanism of controlling plastic shrinkage crack by adding small amout of synthetic short fiber, and to propose optimum polypropylene short fiber to control plastic shrinkage crack. In this research, the effect of the hydrophily of polypropylene fiber was investigated in the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar, total area of plastic shrinkage crack, and bond properties between fiber and mortar. The plastic shrinkage test of morar was conducted under high temperature, low relative humidity, and constant wind velocity. When polypropylene fiber had hydrophily, the amount of plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained, which was because cement paste in morar was captured by hydrophilic fiber and then bleeding of mortar was restrained. With hydrophily, plastic shrinkage of mortar was restrained and bridging effect was improved due to better bond, which led to remarkable reduction of plastic shrinkage crack. Based on experimental results, the way of developing optimum polypropylene short fiber for actual construction was proposed. The fiber should have large hydrophily and small diameter, and should be used in as small amount as possible in order not to disturb workability of concrete.

  1. Dynamics of tissue shrinkage during ablative temperature exposures

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, Christian; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Rattay, Frank; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that examine dynamics of heat-induced shrinkage of organ tissues. Clinical procedures such as radiofrequency ablation, microwave ablation or high-intensity focused ultrasound, use heat to treat diseases such as cancer and cardiac arrhythmia. When heat is applied to tissues, shrinkage occurs due to protein denaturation, dehydration, and contraction of collagen at temperatures greater 50ºC. This is particularly relevant for image-guided procedures such as tumor ablation, where pre- and post-treatment images are compared and any changes in dimensions must be considered to avoid misinterpretations of the treatment outcome. We present data from ex vivo, isothermal shrinkage tests in porcine liver tissue, where axial changes in tissue length were recorded during 15 minutes of heating to temperatures between 60 and 95ºC. A mathematical model was developed to accurately describe the time and temperature-dependent shrinkage behavior. Shrinkage dynamics had same characteristics independent of temperature; the estimated relative shrinkage, adjusted for time since death, after 15 min heating to temperatures of 60, 65, 75, 85 and 95ºC, was 12.3, 13.8, 16.6, 19.2, and 21.7%, respectively. Our results demonstrate shrinkage dynamics of organ tissues, and suggest the importance of considering tissue shrinkage for thermal ablative treatments. PMID:24345880

  2. COMBINED BLEACHING, SHRINKAGE PREVENTION, AND BIOPOLISHING OF WOOL FABRICS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We had established that alkaline hydrogen peroxide systems that included dicyandiamide, gluconic acid, and Triton X surfactant, used alone or followed by enzyme treatments, controlled shrinkage in wool fabrics to 2.95% and 1.16%, respectively. We have perfected this system for complete shrinkage co...

  3. Plastic shrinkage of mortars with shrinkage reducing admixture and lightweight aggregates studied by neutron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Trtik, Pavel; Münch, Beat; Weiss, Jason; Vontobel, Peter; Lura, Pietro

    2015-07-15

    Water transport in fresh, highly permeable concrete and rapid water evaporation from the concrete surface during the first few hours after placement are the key parameters influencing plastic shrinkage cracking. In this work, neutron tomography was used to determine both the water loss from the concrete surface due to evaporation and the redistribution of fluid that occurs in fresh mortars exposed to external drying. In addition to the reference mortar with a water to cement ratio (w/c) of 0.30, a mortar with the addition of pre-wetted lightweight aggregates (LWA) and a mortar with a shrinkage reducing admixture (SRA) were tested. The addition of SRA reduced the evaporation rate from the mortar at the initial stages of drying and reduced the total water loss. The pre-wetted LWA released a large part of the absorbed water as a consequence of capillary pressure developing in the fresh mortar due to evaporation.

  4. Mechanisms for shrinkage fracturing at Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of water in fracturing at Meridiani Planum with the aim of shedding light on the history of densely-fractured outcroppings of light-toned rocks at low-latitudes on Mars. The fractures that occur throughout the inter-crater plains at Meridiani exhibit many characteristics of shrinkage cracks: they have significant width (i.e., not hairline), commonly connect in 90-degree and 120-degree junctions, and exhibit a "hierarchical" organization: i.e., the longest fractures are widest, and narrower fractures terminate against wider fractures at 90-degree junctions (T-shaped). Using the Pancam and Navcam stereo-pair images acquired by the Opportunity rover, we have measured the geometric scaling of fracture networks at Meridiani (e.g., fracture width vs. fracture separation) as well as the total volume change. We have also characterized the diversity of patterns in detail, as well as the modification of fractures and polygonal "tiles" by wind-blown sand abrasion. Identical observations were carried-out for an analogue site where similar fractures are ubiquitous in the playas of Death Valley, California, and where modification processes are also comparable. By also estimating the expected volume change and results from numerical models of shrinkage fracturing, we evaluate the likelihood of three candidate contraction mechanisms: loss of water bound in hydrated minerals (dehydration), loss of water from pore spaces (desiccation), and contraction from cooling (thermal fracturing). The evidence to date favors the second of these (desiccation); this result would have significant implications for the history of Meridiani since the time when sulfate-rich sediments were deposited.

  5. Effective Expansion: Balance between Shrinkage and Hygroscopic Expansion.

    PubMed

    Suiter, E A; Watson, L E; Tantbirojn, D; Lou, J S B; Versluis, A

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hygroscopic expansion and polymerization shrinkage for compensation of polymerization shrinkage stresses in a restored tooth. One resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) (Ketac Nano, 3M ESPE), 2 compomers (Dyract, Dentsply; Compoglass, Ivoclar), and a universal resin-based composite (Esthet•X HD, Dentsply) were tested. Volumetric change after polymerization ("total shrinkage") and during 4 wk of water storage at 37°C was measured using an optical method (n= 10). Post-gel shrinkage was measured during polymerization using a strain gauge method (n= 10). Extracted human molars with large mesio-occluso-distal slot preparations were restored with the tested restorative materials. Tooth surfaces at baseline (preparation), after restoration, and during 4 wk of 37°C water storage were scanned with an optical scanner to determine cuspal flexure (n= 8). Occlusal interface integrity was measured using dye penetration. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and post hoc tests (significance level 0.05). All tested materials shrunk after polymerization. RMGI had the highest total shrinkage (4.65%) but lowest post-gel shrinkage (0.35%). Shrinkage values dropped significantly during storage in water but had not completely compensated polymerization shrinkage after 4 wk. All restored teeth initially exhibited inward (negative) cuspal flexure due to polymerization shrinkage. Cuspal flexure with the RMGI restoration was significantly less (-6.4 µm) than with the other materials (-12.1 to -14.1 µm). After 1 d, cuspal flexure reversed to +5.0 µm cuspal expansion with the RMGI and increased to +9.3 µm at 4 wk. After 4 wk, hygroscopic expansion compensated cuspal flexure in a compomer (Compoglass) and reduced flexure with Dyract and resin-based composite. Marginal integrity (93.7% intact restoration wall) was best for the Compoglass restorations and lowest (73.1%) for the RMGI restorations. Hygroscopic

  6. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700–950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service. PMID:26537060

  7. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys bymore » illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.« less

  8. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  9. Cure shrinkage in epoxy grouts for grouted repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsuddoha, Md.; Islam, Md. Mainul; Aravinthan, Thiru; Manalo, Allan; Lau, Kin-tak

    2013-08-01

    Structures can go through harsh environmental adversity and can experience material loss and cracks during their service lives. Infill material is used to ensure a supporting bed for a grouted repair. Epoxy grouts are used for repairing and rehabilitating structures, such as foundations, bridges, piers, transportation pipelines, etc., because they are resistant to typical chemicals and possess superior mechanical properties than other grouts. The resin based infill used inside the void or cracked space of the repair is vulnerable to shrinkage. When these filled grouts have high resin content, cracks can develop from residual stresses, which can affect the load transfer performance. It follows that interlayer separation and cracking of infill layer can occur in a grouted repair. In this study, volumetric shrinkage of two epoxy grouts was measured over 28 days using a Pycnometer. The highest volumetric shrinkage measured after 7 days was found to be 2.72%. The results suggest that the volumetric shrinkage can be reduced to 1.1% after 7 days, through the introduction of a coarse aggregate filler; a 2.5 times reduction in shrinkage. About 98% and 92% of the total shrinkage over the 28 day period, of the unfilled and filled grouts respectively, was found to occur within 7 days of mixing. The gel-time shrinkages were also calculated, to determine the "postgel" part of the curing contraction which subsequently produces residual stresses in the hardened grout systems.

  10. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  11. Anisotropic shrinkage characteristics of tape cast alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Jaideep Suresh

    Dimensional control during sintering is a major issue in ceramics processing to avoid high post-sintering costs associated with machining of the fired ceramic part to desired tolerances and dimensions. Ceramic forming processes such as tape casting, injection molding, and extrusion involve shear of anisotropic particles resulting in preferential alignment of the particles in the green body. This preferential alignment causes directionality in mechanical, electrical, optical, and magnetic properties and most importantly warpage or distortion during sintering. A large effort has been devoted to synthesizing ceramic green bodies with minimal density gradients and uniform packing and modeling the sintering behavior evolution but little effort has been devoted to characterizing orientation of particles and the effect of preferential alignment on sintering shrinkage anisotropy. A systematic study was initiated to study the effect of processing variables such as shear rate, solids loading, temperature, and binder content on aqueous tape cast alumina. Three different alumina systems: A16-SG, Baikowski RC-UFX DBM and RC-LS DBM were investigated. Aqueous tapes of high solids loading alumina (56 vol. %) were tape cast at various speeds and thicknesses and assuming plane Couette flow a shear rate regime of 21--270 s-1 was investigated. Higher shear rates and high solids loading resulted in higher in-plane anisotropy whereas the anisotropy in the thickness direction was higher for low solids loading systems. The anisotropy was found to be fairly constant above a certain critical shear rate (˜100 s-1) irrespective of the temperature and the solids loading and this correlated with the viscosity-shear rate relationship of the cast slips. The higher shrinkage anisotropy in the thickness direction for the low solids loading systems (35 and 45 vol. %) was attributed to the higher amount of organics in the slip required to sustain the suitable viscosity for tape casting and

  12. Phenomenology of electron-beam-induced photoresist shrinkage trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Allgair, John; Tileli, Vasiliki; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-zvi, Maayan; Adan, Ofer; Cottrell, Eric; Hand, Sean

    2009-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 45 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques are being considered, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print 45 nm node (and beyond) feature widths and pitches. In a previous paper [1], we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in ISMI's CD-SEM Unified Specification [2]. A model for resist shrinkage, while derived elsewhere [3], was presented, that can be used to curve-fit to the shrinkage data resulting from multiple repeated measurements of resist features. Parameters in the curve-fit allow for metrics quantifying total shrinkage, shrinkage rate, and initial critical dimension (CD) from before e-beam exposure. The ability to know this original CD is the most desirable result; in this work, the ability to use extrapolation to solve for a given original CD value was also experimentally validated by CD-atomic force microscope (AFM) reference metrology. Historically, many different conflicting shrinkage results have been obtained among the many works generated through the litho-metrology community. This work, backed up by an exhaustive dataset, will present an explanation that makes sense of these apparent discrepancies. Past models for resist shrinkage inherently assumed that the photoresist line is wider than the region of the photoresist to be shrunk [3], or, in other words, the e-beam never penetrates enough to reach all material in the interior of a feature; consequently, not all photoresist

  13. Probing the origins and control of shrinkage stress in dental resin-composites: I. Shrinkage stress characterization technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Stansbury, J W; Dickens, S H; Eichmiller, F C; Bowman, C N

    2004-10-01

    The accurate and reliable characterization of the polymerization shrinkage stress is becoming increasingly important, as the shrinkage stress still is a major drawback of current dimethacrylate-based dental materials and restricts its range of applications. The purpose of this research is to develop a novel shrinkage stress measurement device to elucidate the shrinkage stress evolution of dental restorative composites while allowing for controlled sample deformation during the polymerization. Furthermore, the device is designed to mimic the clinically relevant cusp-to-cusp displacement by systematically adjusting the instrument compliance, the bonded surface area/unbonded area by sample geometry, and the total bonded area by sample diameter. The stress measurement device based on the cantilever beam deflection theory has been successfully developed and characterized using a commercial dental composite. It was shown that this device is a highly effective, practical and reliable shrinkage stress measurement tool, which enables its facile applications to the investigation of shrinkage stress kinetics of both commercial and experimental composites, as well as for probing various aspects that dictate shrinkage stress development. PMID:15516870

  14. Influence of Kinetic and Thermodynamic Factors on the Glass-Forming Ability of Zirconium-Based Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, S.; Johnson, W.L.; Rhim, W.-K.; Schroers, J.

    2005-06-24

    The time-temperature-transformation curves for three zirconium-based bulk amorphous alloys are measured to identify the primary factors influencing their glass-forming ability. The melt viscosity is found to have the most pronounced influence on the glass-forming ability compared to other thermodynamic factors. Surprisingly, it is found that the better glass former has a lower crystal-melt interfacial tension. This contradictory finding is explained by the icosahedral short-range order of the undercooled liquid, which on one hand reduces the interfacial tension, while on the other hand increases its viscosity.

  15. Straining Graphene Using Thin Film Shrinkage Methods

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  16. Straining graphene using thin film shrinkage methods.

    PubMed

    Shioya, Hiroki; Craciun, Monica F; Russo, Saverio; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Tarucha, Seigo

    2014-03-12

    Theoretical works suggest the possibility and usefulness of strain engineering of graphene by predicting remarkable properties, such as Dirac cone merging, bandgap opening and pseudo magnetic field generation. However, most of these predictions have not yet been confirmed because it is experimentally difficult to control the magnitude and type (e.g., uniaxial, biaxial, and so forth) of strain in graphene devices. Here we report two novel methods to apply strain without bending the substrate. We employ thin films of evaporated metal and organic insulator deposited on graphene, which shrink after electron beam irradiation or heat application. These methods make it possible to apply both biaxial strain and in-plane isotropic compressive strain in a well-controlled manner. Raman spectroscopy measurements show a clear splitting of the degenerate states of the G-band in the case of biaxial strain, and G-band blue shift without splitting in the case of in-plane isotropic compressive strain. In the case of biaxial strain application, we find out the ratio of the strain component perpendicular to the stretching direction is at least three times larger than what was previously observed, indicating that shrinkage of the metal or organic insulator deposited on graphene induces both tensile and compressive strain in this atomically thin material. Our studies present for the first time a viable way to apply strain to graphene without the need to bend the substrate. PMID:24490629

  17. Shrinkage covariance matrix approach for microarray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-04-01

    Microarray technology was developed for the purpose of monitoring the expression levels of thousands of genes. A microarray data set typically consists of tens of thousands of genes (variables) from just dozens of samples due to various constraints including the high cost of producing microarray chips. As a result, the widely used standard covariance estimator is not appropriate for this purpose. One such technique is the Hotelling's T2 statistic which is a multivariate test statistic for comparing means between two groups. It requires that the number of observations (n) exceeds the number of genes (p) in the set but in microarray studies it is common that n < p. This leads to a biased estimate of the covariance matrix. In this study, the Hotelling's T2 statistic with the shrinkage approach is proposed to estimate the covariance matrix for testing differential gene expression. The performance of this approach is then compared with other commonly used multivariate tests using a widely analysed diabetes data set as illustrations. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  18. Applying strain into graphene by SU-8 resist shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Makoto; Hibino, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Hideki

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the use of the shrinkage of SU-8 resist caused by thermal annealing to apply strain into graphene grown by the chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD) method. We demonstrate that the shrinkage of resist deposited on top of graphene on a substrate induces a local tensile strain within a distance of 1–2 μm from the edge of the resist. The thermal shrinkage of SU-8 will allow us to design the local strain in graphene on substrates. We also show that the shrinkage induces a large tensile strain in graphene suspended between two bars of SU-8. We expect that a much larger strain can be induced by suppressing defects in CVD-grown graphene.

  19. NSCLC tumor shrinkage prediction using quantitative image features.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Luke A; Chen, Yi Pei; Zhang, Lifei; Matney, Jason E; Choi, Haesun; Kry, Stephen F; Martel, Mary K; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Yang, Jinzhong; Court, Laurence E

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative image feature model to predict non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) volume shrinkage from pre-treatment CT images. 64 stage II-IIIB NSCLC patients with similar treatments were all imaged using the same CT scanner and protocol. For each patient, the planning gross tumor volume (GTV) was deformed onto the week 6 treatment image, and tumor shrinkage was quantified as the deformed GTV volume divided by the planning GTV volume. Geometric, intensity histogram, absolute gradient image, co-occurrence matrix, and run-length matrix image features were extracted from each planning GTV. Prediction models were generated using principal component regression with simulated annealing subset selection. Performance was quantified using the mean squared error (MSE) between the predicted and observed tumor shrinkages. Permutation tests were used to validate the results. The optimal prediction model gave a strong correlation between the observed and predicted tumor shrinkages with r=0.81 and MSE=8.60×10(-3). Compared to predictions based on the mean population shrinkage this resulted in a 2.92 fold reduction in MSE. In conclusion, this study indicated that quantitative image features extracted from existing pre-treatment CT images can successfully predict tumor shrinkage and provide additional information for clinical decisions regarding patient risk stratification, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:26878137

  20. Porcine Intestinal Mast Cells. Evaluation of Different Fixatives for Histochemical Staining Techniques Considering Tissue Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, J.; Twardziok, S.; Huenigen, H.; Hirschberg, R.M.; Plendl, J.

    2013-01-01

    Staining of mast cells (MCs), including porcine ones, is critically dependent upon the fixation and staining technique. In the pig, mucosal and submucosal MCs do not stain or stain only faintly after formalin fixation. Some fixation methods are particularly recommended for MC staining, for example the fixation with Carnoy or lead salts. Zinc salt fixation (ZSF) has been reported to work excellently for the preservation of fixation-sensitive antigens. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable histological method for counting of MCs in the porcine intestinum. For this purpose, different tissue fixation and staining methods that also allow potential subsequent immunohistochemical investigations were evaluated in the porcine mucosa, as well as submucosa of small and large intestine. Tissues were fixed in Carnoy, lead acetate, lead nitrate, Zamboni and ZSF and stained subsequently with either polychromatic methylene blue, alcian blue or toluidine blue. For the first time our study reveals that ZSF, a heavy metal fixative, preserves metachromatic staining of porcine MCs. Zamboni fixation was not suitable for histochemical visualization of MCs in the pig intestine. All other tested fixatives were suitable. Alcian blue and toluidine blue co-stained intestinal goblet cells which made a prima facie identification of MCs difficult. The polychromatic methylene blue proved to be the optimal staining. In order to compare MC counting results of the different fixation methods, tissue shrinkage was taken into account. As even the same fixation caused shrinkagedifferences between tissue from small and large intestine, different factors for each single fixation and intestinal localization had to be calculated. Tissue shrinkage varied between 19% and 57%, the highest tissue shrinkage was found after fixation with ZSF in the large intestine, the lowest one in the small intestine after lead acetate fixation. Our study emphasizes that MC counting results from data using different

  1. VERIFICATION OF 3-PHASES COMPOSITE MODEL FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE OF CONCRETE WITH DEFFERENT AGGREGATE PROPERTIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kie; Shima, Hiroshi

    Properties of aggregate are not taken into account in current codes for drying shrinkage of concrete although the drying shrinkage is affected by the properties of aggregate. Aggregate restrains cement paste from shrinkage so that the drying shrinkage of concrete is controlled by drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate itself. The effect of the aggregate properties on drying shrinkage of concrete can be calculated by composite model in which concrete consists of cement paste and aggregate. Several different kind of coarse aggregate were used in order to verify a 3-phases composite model for drying shrinkage. Drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of cement paste, aggregate and concrete were measured. It was verified that drying shrinkage of concrete can be estimated accurately by the composite model associating with both drying shrinkage and Young's modulus of aggregate.

  2. Monte Carlo Simulation Using Johnson Potential on Gd-Mg Alloy for Debye-Waller Factor and Debye Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitra, S.; Ramachandran, K.

    Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) on the thermal properties in Gd-Mg alloy becomes essential as there are only limited experiments available. A realistic Johnson potential is used to workout the specific heats for various temperatures and hence the Debye temperature. The results from the present simulation technique are very well compared with our shell model calculation. The need of better X-ray measurements for Debye-Waller factor and Debye temperature other than the measurements of Subadhra and Sirdeshmukh, is discussed in detail.

  3. Influence of light-curing protocols on polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage force of a dual-cured core build-up resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Attin, Thomas; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of time delay and duration of photo-activation on linear polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of a dual-cured core build-up resin composite. The test material (Rebilda DC) was light-cured for 20 or 60 s either early (2 min) or late (7 min) after the start of mixing. Non-irradiated self-cured specimens served as controls. Linear shrinkage and shrinkage force were measured for 60 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Self-cured controls, showing a linear shrinkage similar to that of specimens early light-cured for 20 s generated the lowest shrinkage force and hardness. A shorter light exposure time (20 s vs. 60 s) reduced linear shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardness when early light-curing was performed, but did not affect the three properties in specimens light-cured late after the start of mixing. Late photo-activation increased linear shrinkage, irrespective of irradiation time, and resulted in a higher shrinkage force and hardness for short light exposure time. A moderate correlation was found between the two shrinkage properties studied (r(2) = 0.65). In conclusion, improvements in shrinkage behavior of the tested core build-up material were associated with inferior hardening, making it important to adapt curing protocols to the clinical situation. PMID:20662918

  4. Precise control of critical dimension shrinkage and enlargement by in-situ polysilicon etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linliu, Kung; Kuo, Mai-Rue

    2000-07-01

    The control of critical dimension shrinkage and enlargement of polysilicon line or space obtained precisely using in- situ process with different ratio of gas combination is investigate din this paper. A polysilicon line could be etched down to 0.054 micrometers from 0.22 micrometers of the original critical dimension (CD). The CD shrinking rate of polysilicon line is 2.48 nm per second per side. On the other hand, the space can also be trimmed down to 0.03 micrometers from the original CD of 0.3 micrometers . The CD enlarging rate of polysilicon rate is 0.421 nm per second per side using the present polymer deposition method. The factors that cause shrinkage and enlargement of CD are the etching of photoresist and the deposition of polymer on the surface of photoresist, respectively. The oxygen-rich gas is used for the shrinkage of CD and the fluorocarbon-rich gas is used for the enlargement of CD. Therefore, a critical dimension could not afforded by the present existed optical photolithography tool or method might probably be solved by alternative innovation such as the plasma dry etching technology.

  5. Identification of signalling cascades involved in red blood cell shrinkage and vesiculation

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Elena B.; Beuger, Boukje M.; Klei, Thomas R.L.; Halonen, Pasi; Lieftink, Cor; Beijersbergen, Roderick; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Even though red blood cell (RBC) vesiculation is a well-documented phenomenon, notably in the context of RBC aging and blood transfusion, the exact signalling pathways and kinases involved in this process remain largely unknown. We have established a screening method for RBC vesicle shedding using the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin which is a rapid and efficient method to promote vesiculation. In order to identify novel pathways stimulating vesiculation in RBC, we screened two libraries: the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) and the Selleckchem Kinase Inhibitor Library for their effects on RBC from healthy donors. We investigated compounds triggering vesiculation and compounds inhibiting vesiculation induced by ionomycin. We identified 12 LOPAC compounds, nine kinase inhibitors and one kinase activator which induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. Thus, we discovered several novel pathways involved in vesiculation including G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signalling, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)–Akt (protein kinase B) pathway, the Jak–STAT (Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway and the Raf–MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase)–ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway. Moreover, we demonstrated a link between casein kinase 2 (CK2) and RBC shrinkage via regulation of the Gardos channel activity. In addition, our data showed that inhibition of several kinases with unknown functions in mature RBC, including Alk (anaplastic lymphoma kinase) kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), induced RBC shrinkage and vesiculation. PMID:25757360

  6. The shrinkage behavior and surface topographical investigation for micro metal injection molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, A.; Giannekas, N.; Marhöfer, D. M.; Tosello, G.; Hansen, H. N.

    2015-05-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) is a near net shape manufacturing technology that can produce highly complex and dimensionally stable parts for high end engineering applications. Despite the recent growth and industrial interest, micro metal molding is yet to be the field of extensive research especially when it is compared with micro molding of thermoplastics. The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of metal injection molding where it systematically characterizes the effects of important process conditions on the shrinkage and surface quality of molded parts with micro features. Effects of geometrical factors like feature dimensions and distance from the gate on the replication quality are studied. The influence of process conditions on the achievable roughness for the final metal parts is discussed based on the experimental findings. The test geometry is characterized by 2½D surface structures containing thin ribs of different aspect ratios and thicknesses in the sub-mm dimensional range. The test parts were molded from Catamold 316L with a conventional injection molding machine. Afterwards, the parts were de-binded and sintered to produce the final test samples. Among the different process parameters studied, the melt temperature was the most influential parameters for better replication and dimensional stability of the final part. The results presented in the paper clearly show that the shrinkage in metal part is not uniform in the micro scale. It depends on the feature dimensions and also on the process conditions. A thin section of the part exhibits higher relative shrinkage compared with a thicker section. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that a micro part molded by MIM process will have higher relative shrinkage compared to a macro part made with the same process.

  7. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    PubMed

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-04-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. PMID:24718363

  8. Comparative analysis of polymerization shrinkage of different resin composites.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Iana Coutinho; Pontes, Luana Farias; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Araujo, Jesuina Lamartine Nogueira; Ballester, Rafael Yague; Silva, Cecy Martins

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to compare the shrinkage of 3 resin composites after polymerization, using different curing modes and 2 methods of analysis, with 45 samples in each group. To evaluate free linear shrinkage, specimens were prepared in Teflon molds (8 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) with 1 of 2 methacrylate-based resins or a silorane-based resin. To evaluate wall-to-wall shrinkage, cavities (1.5 mm thick x 3 mm diameter) were prepared in 45 healthy bovine incisors and then restored. In both tests, the same curing lights were used: conventional quartz-tungsten-halogen, a conventional light-emitting diode (LED), and an exponential LED. Gaps were measured microscopically, and the gap percentage was calculated. The results were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Curing modes differed significantly in the free linear shrinkage test group, while resin composites did not. In the wall-to-wall shrinkage group, there were significant differences between the resin composites. PMID:25734285

  9. Factors which control the swelling of FeCrNi ternary austenitic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, F. A.; Black, C. A.; Edwards, D. J.

    1997-06-01

    In agreement with limited earlier studies, a comprehensive irradiation experiment conducted in both EBR-II and FFTF demonstrates that while cold-working usually decreases void swelling of ternary FeCrNi alloys at relatively low irradiation temperatures, it in general increases swelling at higher irradiation temperatures. Aging of cold-worked specimens to produce cellular dislocation networks tends to further increase swelling, especially at higher nickel levels. The swelling of ternary alloy at lower nickel levels also appears to be sensitive to details of the preirradiation annealing treatment. The differences in the details of reactor operating conditions also exert an influence on void nucleation and thereby on the duration of the transient regime of swelling. In the current irradiation series this leads to the swelling developed in EBR-II at ˜ 30 dpa being consistently larger than that in FFTF. All of these results confirm an earlier conclusion that the primary variability of void swelling of FeCrNi alloys lies in the incubation and transient regimes, rather than in the steady-state swelling rate regime. Under certain conditions, the transient regime can be made to approach 0 dpa.

  10. STUDY ON THE EVALUATION FOR DRYING SHRINKAGE PROPERTIES OF COARSE AGGREGATE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Katahira, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    Drying shrinkage of coarse aggregate is one of principal indexes to evaluate drying shrinkage of concrete. However, testing of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle has not been commonly conducted. We carried out measurement of drying shrinkage of a coarse aggregate particle using wire strain gauges and discussed the variation in the measurement. We found that variation among particles in drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate is intrinsic and much bigger than test result due to the simplified unidirectional strain measurement under the assumption of ignoring multi-axial strain field. Strong relationship between the mean value of drying shrinkage strain of coarse aggregate and drying shrinkage strain of concrete prism specimens was observed, which indicates that measured drying shrinkage strain of aggregate particles intrinsically contains large variation, however the mean value is an effective index to estimate drying shrinkage of concrete.

  11. Impact of Reaction Shrinkage on Stress in Semiconductor Packages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengel, Manfred; Mahler, Joachim

    2009-11-01

    The reliability of a semiconductor package is strongly influenced by the adhesion and temperature behavior of the package encapsulant. This study considers the effect of mold shrinkage during the encapsulation molding process. Four commercially available molds were investigated using warpage and thermomechanical analysis. It could be demonstrated that, for all four types, when molded on a silicon substrate, the temperature at which no stress occurred was in a range of 28-60°C above the molding temperature. This is caused by the shrinkage due to a crosslinking reaction of the mold polymer during the molding process. For a more precise understanding and simulation of the stress behavior inside a molded package, the effect of reaction shrinkage has to be considered.

  12. Shrinkage Stresses Generated during Resin-Composite Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Luis Felipe J.; Cavalcante, Larissa Maria; Silikas, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Many developments have been made in the field of resin composites for dental applications. However, the manifestation of shrinkage due to the polymerization process continues to be a major problem. The material's shrinkage, associated with dynamic development of elastic modulus, creates stresses within the material and its interface with the tooth structure. As a consequence, marginal failure and subsequent secondary caries, marginal staining, restoration displacement, tooth fracture, and/or post-operative sensitivity are clinical drawbacks of resin-composite applications. The aim of the current paper is to present an overview about the shrinkage stresses created during resin-composite applications, consequences, and advances. The paper is based on results of many researches that are available in the literature. PMID:20948573

  13. Bayesian Nonparametric Shrinkage Applied to Cepheid Star Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Berger, James; Jefferys, William; Müller, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Bayesian nonparametric regression with dependent wavelets has dual shrinkage properties: there is shrinkage through a dependent prior put on functional differences, and shrinkage through the setting of most of the wavelet coefficients to zero through Bayesian variable selection methods. The methodology can deal with unequally spaced data and is efficient because of the existence of fast moves in model space for the MCMC computation. The methodology is illustrated on the problem of modeling the oscillations of Cepheid variable stars; these are a class of pulsating variable stars with the useful property that their periods of variability are strongly correlated with their absolute luminosity. Once this relationship has been calibrated, knowledge of the period gives knowledge of the luminosity. This makes these stars useful as "standard candles" for estimating distances in the universe. PMID:24368873

  14. A shrinkage probability hypothesis density filter for multitarget tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huisi; Zhang, Hao; Meng, Huadong; Wang, Xiqin

    2011-12-01

    In radar systems, tracking targets in low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) environments is a very important task. There are some algorithms designed for multitarget tracking. Their performances, however, are not satisfactory in low SNR environments. Track-before-detect (TBD) algorithms have been developed as a class of improved methods for tracking in low SNR environments. However, multitarget TBD is still an open issue. In this article, multitarget TBD measurements are modeled, and a highly efficient filter in the framework of finite set statistics (FISST) is designed. Then, the probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter is applied to multitarget TBD. Indeed, to solve the problem of the target and noise not being separated correctly when the SNR is low, a shrinkage-PHD filter is derived, and the optimal parameter for shrinkage operation is obtained by certain optimization procedures. Through simulation results, it is shown that our method can track targets with high accuracy by taking advantage of shrinkage operations.

  15. Development and construction of low-cracking high-performance concrete (LC-HPC) bridge decks: Free shrinkage tests, restrained ring tests, construction experience, and crack survey results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiqiu

    2011-12-01

    specimens than those cured for a shorter period. The third portion of the study evaluates the cracking tendency of concrete mixtures using the restrained ring tests. Different concrete ring thicknesses and drying conditions have been tested. The results indicate that specimens with thinner concrete rings crack earlier than those with thicker concrete rings. Exposing specimens to severe drying conditions results in the earlier formation of cracks, although it does not result in increased crack width. Mixtures with a lower water-cement (w/c) ratio crack earlier than mixtures with a higher w/c ratio. Concretes with a higher paste content crack earlier than concretes with a lower paste content. The final portion of the study details the development, construction, and preliminary performance (with most bridges at three years of age) of LC-HPC and control bridge decks in Kansas. The results indicate that the techniques embodied in the LC-HPC bridge deck specifications are easy to learn. Contractor personnel can be trained in a relatively short time. The techniques used for LC-HPC bridge decks are effective in reducing bridge deck cracking. The crack surveys indicate that LC-HPC bridge decks are performing much better than the control decks, with average crack densities reduced by about seventy five percent at three years of age. The factors that may affect bridge deck cracking are analyzed. The analyses indicate that an increase in paste content, slump, compressive strength, maximum daily air temperature, and daily air temperature range causes increased crack densities. Contractor techniques influence cracking. Keywords: bridge construction, bridge deck, contractor, concrete mix design, compressive strength, cracking, curing, evaporable water, fly ash, free shrinkage, high-performance concrete, non-evaporable water, paste content, restrained shrinkage, restrained ring tests, shrinkage reducing admixture, slump

  16. Shrinkage stress development in dental composites—An analytical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fok, Alex S.L.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this paper is to develop a comprehensive mathematical model for shrinkage stress development in dental composites that can account for the combined effect of material properties, specimen geometry and external constraints. Methods A viscoelastic model that includes the composite’s elastic, creep and shrinkage strains, and their interaction with the sample’s dimensions and the external constraint is developed. The model contains two dimensionless parameters. The first one represents the compliance of the external constraint relative to that of the composite sample, and the second controls the rate of shrinkage stress decay through creep. The resulting differential equation is solved for two special cases: zero compliance and zero creep. Predictions for shrinkage stress measurements are then made using the analytical solutions for instruments with different compliances, samples with different thicknesses and composites with different filler fractions. Results The model correctly predicts how shrinkage stress increases with time, its dependence on the interaction between the entire system’s compliance and the material properties, and the effect of the filler fraction on its maximum value. Comparisons with reported shrinkage stress measurements have provided very good agreement between theory and experiments. Significance The results provided by the model can help to resolve most, if not all, of the seemingly conflicting experimental observations reported in the literature. They can also provide some useful guidelines for optimizing the mechanical performance of dental composite restorations. The compliance ratio, a new parameter derived from the model, represents a fuller description of the constraints of the system. PMID:24029101

  17. Model-based adhesive shrinkage compensation for increased bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Tobias; Schlette, Christian; Lakshmanan, Shunmuganathan; Haag, Sebastian; Zontar, Daniel; Sauer, Sebastian; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian; Roβmann, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    The assembly process of optical components consists of two phases - the alignment and the bonding phase. Precision - or better process repeatability - is limited by the latter one. The limitation of the alignment precision is given by the measurement equipment and the manipulation technology applied. Today's micromanipulators in combination with beam imaging setups allow for an alignment in the range of far below 100nm. However, once precisely aligned optics need to be fixed in their position. State o f the art in optics bonding for laser systems is adhesive bonding with UV-curing adhesives. Adhesive bonding is a multi-factorial process and thus subject to statistical process deviations. As a matter of fact, UV-curing adhesives inherit shrinkage effects during their curing process, making offsets for shrinkage compensation mandatory. Enhancing the process control of the adhesive bonding process is the major goal of the activities described in this paper. To improve the precision of shrinkage compensation a dynamic shrinkage prediction is envisioned by Fraunhofer IPT. Intense research activities are being practiced to gather a deeper understanding of the parameters influencing adhesive shrinkage behavior. These effects are of different nature - obviously being the raw adhesive material itself as well as its condition, the bonding geometry, environmental parameters like surrounding temperature and of course process parameters such as curing properties. Understanding the major parameters and linking them in a model-based shrinkage-prediction environment is the basis for improved process control. Results are being deployed by Fraunhofer in prototyping, as well as volume production solutions for laser systems.

  18. ACCELERATED MRI USING ITERATIVE NON-LOCAL SHRINKAGE

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Yasir Q.; Ongie, Gregory; Jacob, Mathews

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast iterative non-local shrinkage algorithm to recover MRI data from undersampled Fourier measurements. This approach is enabled by the reformulation of current non-local schemes as an alternating algorithm to minimize a global criterion. The proposed algorithm alternates between a non-local shrinkage step and a quadratic subproblem. The resulting algorithm is observed to be considerably faster than current alternating non-local algorithms. We use efficient continuation strategies to minimize local minima issues. The comparisons of the proposed scheme with state-of-the-art regularization schemes show a considerable reduction in alias artifacts and preservation of edges. PMID:25570265

  19. Water transfer properties and shrinkage in lime-based rendering mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizzi, A.; Cultrone, G.

    2012-04-01

    aspect to be considered in the evaluation of the decay caused by water is the high shrinkage suffered by renders when they are applied on an extended surface (i.e. a wall), especially when they are aerial lime-based mortars. The shrinkage causes the formation of fissures that become an easy way for water to entry and diffuse through the mortar pore system. This factor is rarely taken into consideration during the hydric assays performed in the laboratory, since mortar samples of 4x4x16 or 4x4x4 cm in size do not undergo to such degree of shrinkage. For this reason, we have also studied the shrinkage of these mortars and considered it in the final assessment of mortars hydric properties. The shrinkage was evaluated according to a non-standardized method, by means of a shrinkage-measuring device that measures the mortar dimensional variations over time. This measurement has shown that the highest the lime content the biggest the mortar shrinkage and, consequently, the strongest the decay due to water.

  20. In vitro and in vivo degradation and mechanical properties of ZEK100 magnesium alloy coated with alginate, chitosan and mechano-growth factor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Jin; Gao, Lilan; Li, Mingshuo

    2016-06-01

    The biocompatibility, ultimate loading capacity and biodegradability of magnesium alloy make it an ideal candidate in biomedical fields. Fabrications of multilayered coatings carrying sodium alginate (ALG), chitosan (CHI) and mechano-growth factor (MGF) on fluoride-pretreated ZEK100 magnesium alloy have been obtained via layer by layer (LBL) to reduce the degradation rate of magnesium alloy in this study. The modified surfaces of ZEK100 substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and CARE EUT-1020 tester. Results reveal that multilayer-coated magnesium alloy can be successfully obtained with smooth surface morphology, and the mechanical properties of coated samples are almost the same as those of uncoated samples. However, the fatigue life of coated ZEK100 is slightly larger than that of uncoated samples after 1 day of immersion. By comparing the degradation of uncoated and multilayer-coated ZEK100 samples in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it is found that the degradation rate of ZEK100 samples can be inhibited by LBL modification on the surface of the sample; and the corrosion rate in vivo is lower than that in vitro, which help solve the rapid degradation problem of magnesium alloy. In terms of the visible symptom of tissues in the left femur medullary cavity and material responses on the surface, multilayer-coated ZEK100 magnesium alloy has a good biocompatibility. These results indicate that multilayer-coated ZEK100 may be a promising material for bone tissue repair. PMID:27040239

  1. Validity Shrinkage in Ridge Regression: A Simulation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faden, Vivian; Bobko, Philip

    1982-01-01

    Ridge regression offers advantages over ordinary least squares estimation when a validity shrinkage criterion is considered. Comparisons of cross-validated multiple correlations indicate that ridge estimation is superior when the predictors are multicollinear, the number of predictors is large relative to sample size, and the population multiple…

  2. Scale Shrinkage and the Estimation of Latent Distribution Parameters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    1988-01-01

    The phenomenon of scale shrinkage is examined. Focus is on the pattern of decreasing variances in item response theory scale scores from fall to spring within a grade. It is demonstrated that questions concerning population distributions of true ability can be addressed with empirical Bayes techniques. (TJH)

  3. Shrinkage Estimation of Linear Combinations of True Scores.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longford, Nicholas T.

    1997-01-01

    It is demonstrated that, in the presence of population information, a linear combination of true scores can be estimated more efficiently than by the same linear combination of the observed scores. Three criteria for optimality are discussed, but they yield the same solution, described as a multivariate shrinkage estimator. (Author/SLD)

  4. Bayesian Shrinkage Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci for Dynamic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runqing; Xu, Shizhong

    2007-01-01

    Many quantitative traits are measured repeatedly during the life of an organism. Such traits are called dynamic traits. The pattern of the changes of a dynamic trait is called the growth trajectory. Studying the growth trajectory may enhance our understanding of the genetic architecture of the growth trajectory. Recently, we developed an interval-mapping procedure to map QTL for dynamic traits under the maximum-likelihood framework. We fit the growth trajectory by Legendre polynomials. The method intended to map one QTL at a time and the entire QTL analysis involved scanning the entire genome by fitting multiple single-QTL models. In this study, we propose a Bayesian shrinkage analysis for estimating and mapping multiple QTL in a single model. The method is a combination between the shrinkage mapping for individual quantitative traits and the Legendre polynomial analysis for dynamic traits. The multiple-QTL model is implemented in two ways: (1) a fixed-interval approach where a QTL is placed in each marker interval and (2) a moving-interval approach where the position of a QTL can be searched in a range that covers many marker intervals. Simulation study shows that the Bayesian shrinkage method generates much better signals for QTL than the interval-mapping approach. We propose several alternative methods to present the results of the Bayesian shrinkage analysis. In particular, we found that the Wald test-statistic profile can serve as a mechanism to test the significance of a putative QTL. PMID:17435239

  5. Effect of power density on shrinkage of dental resin materials.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, Roelof J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares volumetric changes and rates of shrinkage during different stages of polymerization of dental resin composites and compomers exposed to the same total energy by using two different combinations of power density and exposure duration. A hybrid composite and its equivalent flowable and a compomer and its equivalent flowable were exposed using a halogen curing unit set at 400 mW/cm2 for 40 seconds and 800 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds: delivering 16 J/cm2 in both cases. Volumetric changes were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a mercury dilatometer. Ten replications per test condition were performed and the data were subjected to ANOVA. Statistically significant differences in shrinkage values and rates among different power densities were determined by means of paired t-tests at a 95% confidence level. Significantly more shrinkage (p<0.05) was found for the higher filled materials, Z250 and Dyract AP, when higher power density was used. However, no significant differences were found between their flowable counterparts when exposed to various power densities. Of the four materials, only Dyract AP exhibited no significant difference in shrinkage rate when various power densities were used. All the other materials exhibited significantly higher rates (p<0.05) at the higher power density. PMID:14531610

  6. Are trees able to grow in periods of stem shrinkage?

    PubMed

    Zweifel, Roman; Haeni, Matthias; Buchmann, Nina; Eugster, Werner

    2016-08-01

    Separating continuously measured stem radius (SR) fluctuations into growth-induced irreversible stem expansion (GRO) and tree water deficit-induced reversible stem shrinkage (TWD) requires a conceptualization of potential growth processes that may occur during periods of shrinking and expanding SR below a precedent maximum. Here, we investigated two physiological concepts: the linear growth (LG) concept, assuming linear growth, versus the zero growth (ZG) concept, assuming no growth during periods of stem shrinkage. We evaluated the physiological mechanisms underlying these two concepts and assessed their respective plausibilities using SR data obtained from 15 deciduous and evergreen trees. The application of the LG concept produced steady growth rates, whereas growth rates varied strongly under the ZG concept, more in accordance with mechanistic expectations. Further, growth increased for a maximum of 120 min after periods of stem shrinkage, indicating limited growth activity during those periods. However, this extra growth was found to be a small fraction of total growth only. Furthermore, TWD under the ZG concept was better explained by a hydraulic plant model than TWD under the LG concept. We conclude that periods of stem shrinkage allow for very little growth in the four tree species investigated. However, further studies should focus on obtaining independent growth data to ultimately validate these findings. PMID:27189708

  7. Measurement Error, Multidimensionality, and Scale Shrinkage: A Reply to Yen and Burket.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camilli, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    Yen and Burket suggested that shrinkage in vertical equating cannot be understood apart from multidimensionality. Reviews research on reliability, multidimensionality, and scale shrinkage, and explores issues of practical importance to educators. (SLD)

  8. DETERMINATION OF IN-VITRO LUNG SOLUBILITY AND INTAKE-TO-DOSE CONVERSION FACTOR FOR TRITIATED LANTHANUM NICKEL ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect

    Farfan, E.; Labone, T.; Staack, G.; Cheng, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Varallo, T.

    2011-11-11

    A sample of tritiated lanthanum nickel aluminum alloy (LaNi4.25Al0.75 or LANA.75) similar to that used at the Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities was analyzed to estimate the particle size distribution of this metal tritide powder and the rate, at which this material dissolves in the human respiratory tract after it is inhaled. This information is used to calculate the committed effective dose received by a worker after inhaling the material. These doses, which were calculated using the same methodology given in the DOE Tritium Handbook, are presented as inhalation intake-to-dose conversion factors (DCF). The DCF for this metal tritide is less than the DCF for tritiated water and radiation worker bioassay programs designed for tritiated water are adequate to monitor for intakes of this material.

  9. Correction factors for on-line microprobe analysis of multielement alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Brewer, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line correction technique was developed for the conversion of electron probe X-ray intensities into concentrations of emitting elements. This technique consisted of off-line calculation and representation of binary interaction data which were read into an on-line minicomputer to calculate variable correction coefficients. These coefficients were used to correct the X-ray data without significantly increasing computer core requirements. The binary interaction data were obtained by running Colby's MAGIC 4 program in the reverse mode. The data for each binary interaction were represented by polynomial coefficients obtained by least-squares fitting a third-order polynomial. Polynomial coefficients were generated for most of the common binary interactions at different accelerating potentials and are included. Results are presented for the analyses of several alloy standards to demonstrate the applicability of this correction procedure.

  10. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  11. TH-E-BRF-01: Exploiting Tumor Shrinkage in Split-Course Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Unkelbach, J; Craft, D; Hong, T; Papp, D; Wolfgang, J; Bortfeld, T; Ramakrishnan, J; Salari, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In split-course radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated by radiobiological considerations. However, using modern image-guidance, it also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. In this work, we consider the optimal design of split-course treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. Methods: We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of splitcourse radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. Results: We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of split-course treatments in terms of liver sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large liver dose reductions by more than a factor of two for plausible model parameters. Conclusion: The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at split-course radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced

  12. A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Estimated Parameters of Five Shrinkage Estimate Formuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Isadore; And Others

    A Monte Carlo study was conducted to estimate the efficiency of and the relationship between five equations and the use of cross validation as methods for estimating shrinkage in multiple correlations. Two of the methods were intended to estimate shrinkage to population values and the other methods were intended to estimate shrinkage from sample…

  13. A Monte Carlo Evaluation of Estimated Parameters of Five Shrinkage Estimate Formuli.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Isadore; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation was employed to determine the accuracy with which the shrinkage in R squared can be estimated by five different shrinkage formulas. The study dealt with the use of shrinkage formulas for various sample sizes, different R squared values, and different degrees of multicollinearity. (Author/JKS)

  14. Shrinkage behavior of low profile unsaturated polyester resins at low temperature and low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Li; Lee, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    In order to achieve excellent surface quality and dimension control of molded polymer composites, low profile additives (LPA) are widely used in low shrinkage unsaturated polyester (UPE) molding compound. Although the detailed LPA mechanism is still a subject of controversy, it is now generally agreed that the most important factor for the low profile behavior is the strong phase separation between LPA and UPE resin during curing. Among the extensive studies of LPA mechanism, most of the work focused on the reaction at high temperatures, since LPAs found most of their applications in high temperature and high pressure processes like sheet molding compound (SMC) and bulk molding compound (BMC). Recently, because of the growing interests of new processes such as low pressure SMC and vacuum infusion resin transfer molding, low shrinkage molding compound with the ability to be processed at low temperature and low pressure have attracted considerable attention from the composite industry. Therefore, further understanding of the low profile mechanism at low temperature and low pressure cure is necessary. Moreover, the relatively long reaction time at low temperature cure provides an opportunity to decouple the factors such as phase separation and microvoid formation, which occur almost at the same time in high temperature cure. The objective of this study is to determine LPA performance as well as to provide a better understanding of low profile mechanism at low temperature and low pressure.

  15. Evaluation of shrinkage and cracking in concrete of ring test by acoustic emission method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Chikanori

    2015-03-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete is one of the typical problems related to reduce durability and defilation of concrete structures. Lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are used to reduce drying shrinkage in Japan. Drying shrinkage is commonly evaluated by methods of measurement for length change of mortar and concrete. In these methods, there is detected strain due to drying shrinkage of free body, although visible cracking does not occur. In this study, the ring test was employed to detect strain and age cracking of concrete. The acoustic emission (AE) method was adopted to detect micro cracking due to shrinkage. It was recognized that in concrete using lime stone, expansive additive and low-heat Portland cement are effective to decrease drying shrinkage and visible cracking. Micro cracking due to shrinkage of this concrete was detected and evaluated by the AE method.

  16. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE SHRINKAGE STRESS OF COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; de Araujo, Paulo Amarante; Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the shrinkage stress of composite resins by three methods. In the first method, composites were inserted between two stainless steel plates. One of the plates was connected to a 20 kgf load cell of a universal testing machine (EMIC-DL-500). In the second method, disk-shaped cavities were prepared in 2-mm-thick Teflon molds and filled with the different composites. Gaps between the composites and molds formed after polymerization were evaluated microscopically. In the third method, the wall-to-wall shrinkage stress of the resins that were placed in bovine dentin cavities was evaluated. The gaps were measured microscopically. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The obtained contraction forces were: Grandio = 12.18 ± 0.428N; Filtek Z 250 = 11.80 ± 0.760N; Filtek Supreme = 11.80 ± 0.707 N; and Admira = 11.89 ± 0.647 N. The gaps obtained between composites and Teflon molds were: Filtek Z 250 = 0.51 ± 0.0357%; Filtek Supreme = 0.36 ± 0.0438%; Admira = 0.25 ± 0.0346% and Grandio = 0.16 ± 0.008%. The gaps obtained in wall-to-wall contraction were: Filtek Z 250 = 11.33 ± 2.160 μm; Filtek Supreme = 10.66 ± 1.211μm; Admira = 11.16 ± 2.041 μm and Grandio = 10.50 ± 1.224 μm. There were no significant differences among the composite resins obtained with the first (shrinkage stress generated during polymerization) and third method (wall-to-wall shrinkage). The composite resins obtained with the second method (Teflon method) differed significantly regarding gap formation. PMID:19089286

  17. Simulation of shrinkage and warpage of semi-crystalline thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Borchmann, N.; Spekowius, M.; Weber, M.; Schöngart, M.

    2015-05-01

    Today, the simulation of the injection molding process is state of the art. Besides the simulation of the manufacturing process, commercial simulation tools allow a prediction of the structural properties of the final part. Especially the complex shrinkage and warpage behavior is of interest as it significantly influences the part quality. Although modern simulation tools provide qualitatively correct results for several materials and processing conditions, significant deviations from the real component's behavior can occur for semi-crystalline thermoplastics. One underlying reason is the description on the macro scale used in these simulation tools. However, in semi-crystalline materials significant effects take place on the micro scale, e.g. crystalline superstructures that cannot be neglected. As part of a research project at IKV, investigations are carried out to improve the simulation accuracy of shrinkage and warpage. To point out differences in the accuracy of commercially available simulation tools, a reference part is computed for the materials polypropylene and polyoxymethylene. The results are validated by injection molding experiments. The shrinkage and warpage behavior is characterized by optical measuring technology. In future, models for the description of the pvT behavior of semi-crystalline thermoplastics will be implemented into the software package SphäroSim which was developed at IKV. With this software, crystallization kinetics for semi-crystalline thermoplastics can be calculated on the micro scale. With the newly implemented pvT models the calculation of shrinkage and warpage for semi-crystalline thermoplastics will be enabled on the micro scale.

  18. Shrinkage regression-based methods for microarray missing value imputation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Missing values commonly occur in the microarray data, which usually contain more than 5% missing values with up to 90% of genes affected. Inaccurate missing value estimation results in reducing the power of downstream microarray data analyses. Many types of methods have been developed to estimate missing values. Among them, the regression-based methods are very popular and have been shown to perform better than the other types of methods in many testing microarray datasets. Results To further improve the performances of the regression-based methods, we propose shrinkage regression-based methods. Our methods take the advantage of the correlation structure in the microarray data and select similar genes for the target gene by Pearson correlation coefficients. Besides, our methods incorporate the least squares principle, utilize a shrinkage estimation approach to adjust the coefficients of the regression model, and then use the new coefficients to estimate missing values. Simulation results show that the proposed methods provide more accurate missing value estimation in six testing microarray datasets than the existing regression-based methods do. Conclusions Imputation of missing values is a very important aspect of microarray data analyses because most of the downstream analyses require a complete dataset. Therefore, exploring accurate and efficient methods for estimating missing values has become an essential issue. Since our proposed shrinkage regression-based methods can provide accurate missing value estimation, they are competitive alternatives to the existing regression-based methods. PMID:24565159

  19. Arthroscopic Thermal Capsular Shrinkage for Palmar Midcarpal Instability

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage has been previously used to stabilize major joints. This is the first series of its use in the wrist for palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI). Materials and Methods This is a medium-term retrospective review of 13 patients (15 wrists) at an average follow-up of 48 months postoperative. All patients were assessed with a functional questionnaire for instability and a Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score, as well as clinical examination. Description of Technique Arthroscopic capsular shrinkage was performed to the palmar and dorsal capsules of the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using a bipolar thermal probe. All wrists were immobilized for 6 weeks post operation. Results 100% follow-up was achieved . All cases had an improvement in the frequency and severity of instability symptoms. The average DASH score was significantly reduced. There were no complications. The average loss of movement following the procedure was 15%. Conclusions The medium-term results show that wrist instability due to PMCI can be improved significantly by thermal capsular shrinkage with only a minimal amount of secondary stiffness. PMID:25097808

  20. Shrinkage processes in standard-size Norway spruce wood specimens with different vulnerability to cavitation

    PubMed Central

    ROSNER, SABINE; KARLSSON, BO; KONNERTH, JOHANNES; HANSMANN, CHRISTIAN

    2011-01-01

    Summary The aim of this study was to observe the radial shrinkage of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.)] trunkwood specimens with different hydraulic vulnerability to cavitation from the fully saturated state until the overall shrinkage reaches a stable value, and to relate wood shrinkage and recovery from shrinkage to cavitations of the water column inside the tracheids. Radial shrinkage processes in standard-size sapwood specimens (6 mm × 6 mm × 100 mm; radial, tangential and longitudinal) obtained at different positions within the trunk, representing different ages of the cambium, were compared. Cavitation events were assessed by acoustic emission (AE) testing, hydraulic vulnerability by the AE feature analysis and shrinkage was calculated from the changes in contact pressure between the 150 kHz AE transducer and the wood specimen. Two shrinkage processes were observed in both juvenile (annual rings 1 and 2) and mature wood (annual rings 17–19), the first one termed tension shrinkage and the second one cell wall shrinkage process, which started when most of the tracheids reached relative water contents below fiber saturation. Maximum tension shrinkage coincided with high-energy AEs, and the periods of shrinkage recovery could be traced to tension release due to cavitation. Juvenile wood, which was less sensitive to cavitation, had lower earlywood tracheid diameters and was less prone to deformation due to tensile strain than mature wood, showed a lower cell wall shrinkage, and thus total shrinkage. Earlywood lumen diameters and maximum tension shrinkage were strongly positively related to each other, meaning that bigger tracheids are more prone to deformation at the same water tension than the smaller tracheids. PMID:19797244

  1. Analysis of the Influence of Thermal Treatment on the Dry Turning of Al-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salguero, J.; Carrilero, M. S.; Batista, M.; Álvarez, M.; Marcos, M.

    2009-11-01

    Manufacturing performance improvement must take into account economic, energetic and environmental considerations. Thus, when intermediate processes are avoided, manufacturing performance is improved from the three cited viewpoints. In the aerospace industry, pre-forms of UNS A92024 (Al-Cu) alloy-based structural elements are machined in T3 temper state previously to be thermally treated to reach O state, in order to facilitate its posterior plastic forming process. In this work, a comparative study of the dry turning of UNS A92024 alloy in both states has been carried out in order to eliminate the thermal treatment process. This study has been based on the finishing surface quality, cutting tool changes and chip arrangement. SOM/SEM/EDS analysis has shown that the main deviations are caused by secondary adhesion effects, which involve not only changes in the initial tool geometry but also a reduction of the chip shrinkage factor as a consequence of the lateral compression. However, the obtained results have revealed that alloy in O state can be dry-machined at cutting speeds higher than 120 m/min in order to reach similar quality levels as alloy in T3 state.

  2. Metallurgical factors on toughness in intercritically reheated HAZ of low-C low-alloy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shiwaku, Toyoaki; Kobayashi, Yoichiro; Shimizu, Masato; Toyoda, Masao; Minami, Fumiyoshi

    1994-12-31

    Metallurgical factors on toughness in heat affected zone (HAZ) intercritically reheated between Ac1 and Ac3 were studied by welding thermal cycle simulation, because intercritically reheated HAZ has been, in general, recognized to be especially embrittled region in a multi-pass welded joint. The toughness of intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) deteriorated with increasing cooling rate, while the toughness of intercritically reheated coarse grain HAZ (ICCGHAZ) deteriorated with decreasing cooling rate. It is found that the dominant metallurgical factor on toughness of ICHAZ is martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent, but those of ICCGHAZ are both M-A constituent and effective grain size depending on prior microstructure of ICCGHAZ.

  3. Optimal tumor shrinkage predicts long-term outcome in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with target therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Jianwei; Hong, Shaodong; Sheng, Jin; Zhang, Zhonghan; Yang, Yunpeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapies for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation positive. Because these targeted therapies could cause tumor necrosis and shrinkage, the purpose of the study is to search for a value of optimal tumor shrinkage as an appropriate indicator of outcome for advanced NSCLC. A total of 88 NSCLC enrollees of 3 clinical trials (IRESSA registration clinical trial, TRUST study and ZD6474 study), who received Gefitinib (250 mg, QD), Erlotinib (150 mg, QD), and ZD6474 (100 mg, QD), respectively, during December 2003 and October 2007, were retrospectively analyzed. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used to identify responders, who had complete response (CR) or partial responses (PR) and nonresponders who had stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to find the optimal tumor shrinkage as an indicator for tumor therapeutic outcome. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between responders and nonresponders stratified based on radiologic criteria. Among the 88 NSCLC patients, 26 were responders and 62 were nonresponders based on RECIST 1.0. ROC indicated that 8.32% tumor diameter shrinkage in the sum of the longest tumor diameter (SLD) was the cutoff point of tumor shrinkage outcomes, resulting in 46 responders (≤8.32%) and 42 nonresponders (≥8.32%). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicated that (1) the responders (≤8.32%) and nonresponders (≥ −8.32%) were significantly different in median PFS (13.40 vs 1.17 months, P < 0.001) and OS (19.80 vs 7.90 months, P < 0.001) and (2) –8.32% in SLD could be used as the optimal threshold for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 8.11, 95% CI, 3.75 to 17.51, P < 0.001) and OS

  4. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    PubMed

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. PMID:25039287

  5. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  6. Factors contributing to plastic strain amplification in slip dominated deformation of magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, C. W.; Martin, G.; Lebensohn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    While plastic strains are never distributed uniformly in polycrystals, it has recently been shown experimentally that the distribution can be extremely heterogeneous in magnesium polycrystals even when the deformation is dominated by slip. Here, we attempt to provide insight into the (macroscopic) factors that contribute to this strain amplification and to explain, from a local perspective, the origins of this strain amplification. To do this, full field VPFFT crystal plasticity simulations have been performed under the simplifying assumption that twinning is inoperative. It is shown that the experimentally observed heterogeneity can be reproduced when a sufficiently high anisotropy in slip system strength is assumed. This can be further accentuated by a weakening of the texture.

  7. Development of shrinkage resistant microfibre-reinforced cement-based composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedanimojarrad, P.; Adam, G.; Ray, A.; Thomas, P.; Vessalas, K.

    2012-06-01

    Different shrinkage types may cause serious durability dilemma on restrained concrete parts due to crack formation and propagation. Several classes of fibres are used by concrete industry in order to reduce crack size and crack number. In previous studies, most of these fibre types were found to be effective in reducing the number and sizes of the cracks, but not in shrinkage strain reduction. This study deals with the influence of a newly introduced type of polyethylene fibre on drying shrinkage reduction. The novel fibre is a polyethylene microfibre in a new geometry, which is proved to reduce the amount of total shrinkage in mortars. This special hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre also reduces moisture loss of mortar samples. The experimental results on short and long-term drying shrinkage as well as on several other properties are reported. The hydrophobic polyethylene microfibre showed promising improvement in shrinkage reduction even at very low concentrations (0.1% of cement weight).

  8. Shrinkage and microstructural development during drying of organically modified silica xerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, N.K.; Wallace, S.; Brinker, C.J. |

    1996-07-01

    We have studied the different driving forces behind syneresis in MTES/TEOS gels by aging them in different H{sub 2}O/EtOH pore fluids. We show using shrinkage, density, contact angle, and N{sub 2} sorption measurements, the influence of gel/solvent interactions on the microstructural evolution during drying. Competing effects of syneresis (that occurs during aging) and drying shrinkage resulted in the overall linear shrinkage of the organically modified gels to be constant at {approximately}50%. Increasing the hydrophobicity of the gels caused the driving force for syneresis to change from primarily condensation reactions to a combination of condensation and solid/liquid interfacial energy. In addition the condensation driven shrinkage was observed to be irreversible, whereas the interfacial free energy driven shrinkage was observed to be partially reversible. Nitrogen sorption experiments show that xerogels with the same overall extent of shrinkage can have vastly different microstructures due to the effects of microphase separation.

  9. Effect of a weightlifting belt on spinal shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Bourne, N D; Reilly, T

    1991-12-01

    Spinal loading during weightlifting results in a loss of stature which has been attributed to a decrease in height of the intervertebral discs--so-called 'spinal shrinkage'. Belts are often used during the lifting of heavy weights, purportedly to support, stabilize and thereby attenuate the load on the spine. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a standard weightlifting belt in attenuating spinal shrinkage. Eight male subjects with a mean age of 24.8 years performed two sequences of circuit weight-training, one without a belt and on a separate occasion with a belt. The circuit training regimen consisted of six common weight-training exercises. These were performed in three sets of ten with a change of exercise after each set of ten repetitions. A stadiometer sensitive to within 0.01 mm was used to record alterations in stature. Measurements of stature were taken before and after completion of the circuit. The absolute visual analogue scale (AVAS) was used to measure the discomfort and pain intensity resulting from each of the two conditions. The circuit weight-training caused stature losses of 3.59mm without the belt and 2.87 mm with the belt (P greater than 0.05). The subjects complained of significantly less discomfort when the belt was worn (P less than 0.05). The degree of shrinkage was significantly correlated (r = 0.752, P less than 0.05) with perceived discomfort but only when the belt was not worn. These results suggest the potential benefits of wearing a weightlifting belt and support the hypothesis that the belt can help in stabilizing the trunk. PMID:1810615

  10. Dynamic Void Growth and Shrinkage in Mg under Electron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, W. Z.; Zhang, Y. F.; Cheng, G. M.; Jian, W. W.; Millett, P. C.; Koch, C. C.; Mathaudhu, S. N.; Zhu, Y. T.

    2014-04-30

    We report in-situ atomic-scale investigation of void evolution, including growth, coalescence and shrinkage, under electron irradiation. With increasing irradiation dose, the total volume of voids increased linearly, while nucleation rate of new voids decreased slightly, and the total number of voids decreased. Some voids continued to grow while others shrank to disappear, depending on the nature of their interactions with nearby self-interstitial loops. For the first time, surface diffusion of adatoms was observed largely responsible for the void coalescence and thickening. These findings provide fundamental understanding to help with the design and modeling of irradiation-resistant materials.

  11. Photoelastic study of shrinkage fitted components for a gasturbine engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, T. V.; Maheshappa, H.; Govindaraju, N.; Gargesa, G.

    A 3D photoelastic model of shrink-fitted components of a gas turbine engine such as low-pressure main shaft and compressor adopter shaft (or hub) are used to perform a photo-elastic investigation of shrink-fitted components for different relative thickness ratio and different contact length ratio. The relative rigidity of the hub is found to increase as the relative thickness ratio increases, and the relative rigidity is found to increase as the contact length ratio decreases. An optimization of the geometry of the shrinkage-fitted components is also obtained.

  12. A new method to measure the polymerization shrinkage kinetics of light cured composites.

    PubMed

    Lee, I B; Cho, B H; Son, H H; Um, C M

    2005-04-01

    This study was undertaken to develop a new measurement method to determine the initial dynamic volumetric shrinkage of composite resins during polymerization, and to investigate the effect of curing light intensity on the polymerization shrinkage kinetics. The instrument was basically an electromagnetic balance that was constructed with a force transducer using a position sensitive photo detector (PSPD) and a negative feedback servo amplifier. The volumetric change of composites during polymerization was detected continuously as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes' principle. Using this new instrument, the dynamic patterns of the polymerization shrinkage of seven commercial composite resins were measured. The polymerization shrinkage of the composites was 1.92 approximately 4.05 volume %. The shrinkage of a packable composite was the lowest, and that of a flowable composite was the highest. The maximum rate of polymerization shrinkage increased with increasing light intensity but the peak shrinkage rate time decreased with increasing light intensity. A strong positive relationship was observed between the square root of the light intensity and the maximum shrinkage rate. The shrinkage rate per unit time, dVol%/dt, showed that the instrument can be a valuable research method for investigating the polymerization reaction kinetics. This new shrinkage-measuring instrument has some advantages that it was insensitive to temperature changes and could measure the dynamic volumetric shrinkage in real time without complicated processes. Therefore, it can be used to characterize the shrinkage kinetics in a wide range of commercial and experimental visible-light-cure materials in relation to their composition and chemistry. PMID:15790386

  13. A physical resist shrinkage model for full-chip lithography simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zheng, Leiwu; Ma, Maggie; Zhao, Qian; Fan, Yongfa; Zhang, Qiang; Feng, Mu; Guo, Xin; Wallow, Tom; Gronlund, Keith; Goossens, Ronald; Zhang, Gary; Lu, Yenwen

    2016-03-01

    Strong resist shrinkage effects have been widely observed in resist profiles after negative tone development (NTD) and therefore must be taken into account in computational lithography applications. However, existing lithography simulation tools, especially those designed for full-chip applications, lack resist shrinkage modeling capabilities because they are not needed until only recently when NTD processes begin to replace the conventional positive tone development (PTD) processes where resist shrinkage effects are negligible. In this work we describe the development of a physical resist shrinkage (PRS) model for full-chip lithography simulations and present its accuracy evaluation against experimental data.

  14. Controlling and understanding the polymerization shrinkage-induced stresses in light-cured composites.

    PubMed

    Suh, B I

    1999-01-01

    The shrinkage of composites induces stress in the final restoration when the composite is bonded to the tooth surface. The amount of stress can be controlled by the method of pulse-delay cure used. The development of new composites has changed the energy requirements for obtaining polymerization. The total energy required for optimal polymerization has been reduced and the rate at which the energy is delivered can have a strong effect on the final properties of the restoration. Newer composites may employ different photoinitiators, making the spectral emission from the curing light an important factor for properties of the final restoration. It is proposed that labels for composites carry: (1) indications for the total energy required; (2) specification of the pulse-delay cure if applicable; and (3) the required spectral bandwidth of the curing lamp light emission. PMID:11908394

  15. Shrinkage of the human core microbiome and a proposal for launching microbiome biobanks.

    PubMed

    Barzegari, Abolfazl; Saeedi, Nazli; Saei, Amir Ata

    2014-01-01

    The Human Microbiome Project (HMP) revealed the significance of the gut microbiome in promoting health. Disruptions in microbiome composition are associated with the pathogenesis of numerous diseases. The indigenous microflora has co-evolved with humans for millions of years and humans have preserved the inherited microbiomes through consumption of fermented foods and interactions with environmental microbes. Through modernization, traditional foods were abandoned, native food starters were substituted with industrial products, vaccines and antibiotics were used, extreme hygiene measures were taken, the rate of cesarean section increased, and breast feeding changed into formula. These factors have reduced human exposure to microbial symbionts and led to shrinkage of the core microbiome. Reduction in microbiome biodiversity can compromise the human immune system and predispose individuals to several modern diseases. This article suggests launching microbiome biobanks for archiving native microbiomes, supervising antibiotic use, probiotic design and native starter production, as well as advertising a revisit to native lifestyles. PMID:24957091

  16. Shrinkage Estimation of Varying Covariate Effects Based On Quantile Regression

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Limin; Xu, Jinfeng; Kutner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Varying covariate effects often manifest meaningful heterogeneity in covariate-response associations. In this paper, we adopt a quantile regression model that assumes linearity at a continuous range of quantile levels as a tool to explore such data dynamics. The consideration of potential non-constancy of covariate effects necessitates a new perspective for variable selection, which, under the assumed quantile regression model, is to retain variables that have effects on all quantiles of interest as well as those that influence only part of quantiles considered. Current work on l1-penalized quantile regression either does not concern varying covariate effects or may not produce consistent variable selection in the presence of covariates with partial effects, a practical scenario of interest. In this work, we propose a shrinkage approach by adopting a novel uniform adaptive LASSO penalty. The new approach enjoys easy implementation without requiring smoothing. Moreover, it can consistently identify the true model (uniformly across quantiles) and achieve the oracle estimation efficiency. We further extend the proposed shrinkage method to the case where responses are subject to random right censoring. Numerical studies confirm the theoretical results and support the utility of our proposals. PMID:25332515

  17. Response Predicting LTCC Firing Shrinkage: A Response Surface Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    Girardi, Michael; Barner, Gregg; Lopez, Cristie; Duncan, Brent; Zawicki, Larry

    2009-02-25

    The Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) technology is used in a variety of applications including military/space electronics, wireless communication, MEMS, medical and automotive electronics. The use of LTCC is growing due to the low cost of investment, short development time, good electrical and mechanical properties, high reliability, and flexibility in design integration (3 dimensional (3D) microstructures with cavities are possible)). The dimensional accuracy of the resulting x/y shrinkage of LTCC substrates is responsible for component assembly problems with the tolerance effect that increases in relation to the substrate size. Response Surface Analysis was used to predict product shrinkage based on specific process inputs (metal loading, layer count, lamination pressure, and tape thickness) with the ultimate goal to optimize manufacturing outputs (NC files, stencils, and screens) in achieving the final product design the first time. Three (3) regression models were developed for the DuPont 951 tape system with DuPont 5734 gold metallization based on green tape thickness.

  18. Increasing the life of molds for casting copper and its alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. N.; Spiridonov, D. V.

    2010-12-01

    The work of the molds intended for casting copper and copper alloys in semicontinuous casters for producing flat billets is considered. It is shown that, to increase the resistance of mold plates, the inner space of the mold should have a taper shape toward the casting direction and take into account the shrinkage of the linear dimensions of the ingot during its motion in the mold. The taper shape increases the intensity and uniformity of heat removal due to close contact between the ingot and the mold inner surface. Testing of new design molds under industrial conditions demonstrates that their resistance increases by a factor of 4.0-4.5. The taper effect of the mold plates is much more pronounced in their narrow faces.

  19. Shrinkage of renal tissue after impregnation via the cold Biodur plastination technique.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Sampaio, Marco A; Marques-Sampaio, Beatriz P S; Sampaio, Francisco J B; Henry, Robert W

    2011-08-01

    Thorough dehydration is a key for good plastination and invariably it leads to shrinkage. Shrinkage during plastination has been studied to lesser extent. Shrinkage was studied in 10 pig kidneys including regional shrinkage (cortex, medulla, sinus) and at which stages of the process (dehydration, impregnation, curing) shrinkage occurred. Kidneys were fixation by perfusion of 10% neutral buffered formalin solution via the renal artery. The vessels and ureter were filled with colored silicone (Dow Corning, Silastic E RTV Silicone Rubber) and the kidneys were cut into one centimeter transverse slices. Two slices of each kidney were plastinated via the classic von Hagens' method. Slices were photographed at the same focal length after preparation and at the end of each stage of plastination. Slice surface area was determined by a point-counting planimetry method. Post dehydration shrinkage of the kidney was 10.21% while post impregnation 10.11%. After completion of plastination, total area of kidney slice shrinkage was 19.72%. Cortical area shrunk 12.81% after dehydration and 13.16% after impregnation. After plastination, cortical area had shrunk 24.28%. No significant shrinkage occurred in the medulla and sinus. Results demonstrate that kidney shrinkage during impregnation is as intense as during dehydration. Significant shrinkage occurred in the renal cortex but not in the medulla and sinus. This demonstrates that different tissue types, even in the same specimen, have different rates of shrinkage during dehydration and impregnation. Therefore, plastinated specimens should be used carefully in research where obtaining measures is important. PMID:21714112

  20. The Effects of Metallurgical Factors on PWSCC Crack Growth Rates in TT Alloy 690 in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Watanabe, Masashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking growth rates (PWSCCGRs) in highly cold-worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 have been recently reported as exhibiting significant heat-to-heat variability. Authors hypothesized that these significant differences could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of each heat. In order to confirm this hypothesis, the effect of fundamental metallurgical characteristics on PWSCCGR measurements in cold-worked TT Alloy 690 has been investigated. The following new observations were made in this study: (1) Microcracks and voids were observed in or near eutectic crystals of grain boundary (GB) M23C6 carbides (primary carbides) after cold rolling, but were not observed before cold rolling. These primary carbides with microcracks and voids were observed in both lightly forged and as-cast and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat A) as well as in a cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat Y) that simulated the chemical composition and carbide banded structure of the material previously tested by Paraventi and Moshier. However, this was not observed in precipitated (secondary) M23C6 GB carbides in heavily forged and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 heat A and a cold-rolled commercial TT Alloy 690. (2) From microstructural analyses carried out on the various TT Alloy 690 test materials before and after cold rolling, the amount of eutectic crystals (primary carbides and nitrides) M23C6 and TiN depended on the chemical composition. In particular, the amount of M23C6 depended on the fabrication process. Microcracks and voids in or near the M23C6 and TiN precipitates were generated by the cold rolling process. (3) The PWSCCGRs observed in TT Alloy 690 were different for each heat and fabrication process. The PWSCCGR decreased with increasing Vickers hardness of each heat. However, for the same heats and fabrication processes, the PWSCCGR increased with increasing Vickers hardness due to cold work. Thus, the PWSCCGR must be affected not only by hardness (or

  1. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  2. Microstructurally based mechanisms for modeling shrinkage of cement paste at multiple levels

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Yunping

    1993-07-15

    Shrinkage of cement paste is controlled by a number of mechanisms that operate in various parts of the microstructure and at various length scales. A model for creep and shrinkage can be developed by combining several models that describe phenomena at each of several length scales, ranging from the nanometer to the meter. This model is described and preliminary results are discussed.

  3. Random effects and shrinkage estimation in capture-recapture models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Link, W.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the analysis of random effects in capture-recapture models, and outline Bayesian and frequentists approaches to their analysis. Under a normal model, random effects estimators derived from Bayesian or frequentist considerations have a common form as shrinkage estimators. We discuss some of the difficulties of analysing random effects using traditional methods, and argue that a Bayesian formulation provides a rigorous framework for dealing with these difficulties. In capture-recapture models, random effects may provide a parsimonious compromise between constant and completely time-dependent models for the parameters (e.g. survival probability). We consider application of random effects to band-recovery models, although the principles apply to more general situations, such as Cormack-Jolly-Seber models. We illustrate these ideas using a commonly analysed band recovery data set.

  4. BAYESIAN SHRINKAGE METHODS FOR PARTIALLY OBSERVED DATA WITH MANY PREDICTORS*

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Philip S.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy MG

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the increasing use of and rapid changes in array technologies, we consider the prediction problem of fitting a linear regression relating a continuous outcome Y to a large number of covariates X, eg measurements from current, state-of-the-art technology. For most of the samples, only the outcome Y and surrogate covariates, W, are available. These surrogates may be data from prior studies using older technologies. Owing to the dimension of the problem and the large fraction of missing information, a critical issue is appropriate shrinkage of model parameters for an optimal bias-variance tradeoff. We discuss a variety of fully Bayesian and Empirical Bayes algorithms which account for uncertainty in the missing data and adaptively shrink parameter estimates for superior prediction. These methods are evaluated via a comprehensive simulation study. In addition, we apply our methods to a lung cancer dataset, predicting survival time (Y) using qRT-PCR (X) and microarray (W) measurements. PMID:24436727

  5. Crosslink-induced shrinkage of grafted Gaussian chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetatos, Panayotis

    2014-04-01

    The statistical mechanics of polymers grafted on surfaces has been the subject of intense research activity because of many potential applications. In this paper, we analytically investigate the conformational changes caused by a single crosslink on two ideal (Gaussian) chains grafted onto a rigid planar surface. Both the crosslink and the surface reduce the number of allowed configurations. In the absence of the hard substrate, the sole effect of the crosslink is a reduction in the effective Kuhn length of a tethered chain. The crosslink-induced shrinkage (collapse) of the grafted chains (mushrooms) turns out to be a reduction in the variance of the distribution of the height of the chain rather than a reduction of the height itself.

  6. Sonar target enhancement by shrinkage of incoherent wavelet coefficients.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alan J; van Vossen, Robbert

    2014-01-01

    Background reverberation can obscure useful features of the target echo response in broadband low-frequency sonar images, adversely affecting detection and classification performance. This paper describes a resolution and phase-preserving means of separating the target response from the background reverberation noise using a coherence-based wavelet shrinkage method proposed recently for de-noising magnetic resonance images. The algorithm weights the image wavelet coefficients in proportion to their coherence between different looks under the assumption that the target response is more coherent than the background. The algorithm is demonstrated successfully on experimental synthetic aperture sonar data from a broadband low-frequency sonar developed for buried object detection. PMID:24437766

  7. Analysis of gene set using shrinkage covariance matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karjanto, Suryaefiza; Aripin, Rasimah

    2013-09-01

    Microarray methodology has been exploited for different applications such as gene discovery and disease diagnosis. This technology is also used for quantitative and highly parallel measurements of gene expression. Recently, microarrays have been one of main interests of statisticians because they provide a perfect example of the paradigms of modern statistics. In this study, the alternative approach to estimate the covariance matrix has been proposed to solve the high dimensionality problem in microarrays. The extension of traditional Hotelling's T2 statistic is constructed for determining the significant gene sets across experimental conditions using shrinkage approach. Real data sets were used as illustrations to compare the performance of the proposed methods with other methods. The results across the methods are consistent, implying that this approach provides an alternative to existing techniques.

  8. Improvement in thermoelectric power factor of mechanically alloyed p-type SiGe by incorporation of TiB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Sajid; Dubey, K.; Bhattacharya, Shovit; Basu, Ranita; Bhatt, Ranu; Bohra, A. K.; Singh, Ajay; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Nearly 60% of the world's useful energy is wasted as heat and recovering a fraction of this waste heat by converting it as useful electrical power is an important area of research[1]. Thermoelectric power generators (TEG) are solid state devices which converts heat into electricity. TEG consists of n and p-type thermoelements connected electrically in series and thermally in parallel[2]. Silicon germanium (SiGe) alloy is one of the conventional high temperature thermoelectric materials and is being used in radio-isotopes based thermoelectric power generators for deep space exploration programs.Temperature (T) dependence of thermoelectric (TE) properties of p-type SiGe and p-type SiGe-x wt.%TiB2 (x=6,8,10%) nanocomposite materials has been studied with in the temperature range of 300 K to 1100 K. It is observed that there is an improvement in the power factor (α2/ρ) of SiGe alloy on addition of TiB2 upto 8 wt.% that is mainly due to increase in the Seebeck coefficient (α) and electrical conductivity (σ) of the alloy.

  9. Ensemble Kalman filter implementations based on shrinkage covariance matrix estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino-Ruiz, Elias D.; Sandu, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    This paper develops efficient ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) implementations based on shrinkage covariance estimation. The forecast ensemble members at each step are used to estimate the background error covariance matrix via the Rao-Blackwell Ledoit and Wolf estimator, which has been specifically developed to approximate high-dimensional covariance matrices using a small number of samples. Two implementations are considered: in the EnKF full-space (EnKF-FS) approach, the assimilation process is performed in the model space, while the EnKF reduce-space (EnKF-RS) formulation performs the analysis in the subspace spanned by the ensemble members. In the context of EnKF-RS, additional samples are taken from the normal distribution described by the background ensemble mean and the estimated background covariance matrix, in order to increase the size of the ensemble and reduce the sampling error of the filter. This increase in the size of the ensemble is obtained without running the forward model. After the assimilation step, the additional samples are discarded and only the model-based ensemble members are propagated further. Methodologies to reduce the impact of spurious correlations and under-estimation of sample variances in the context of the EnKF-FS and EnKF-RS implementations are discussed. An adjoint-free four-dimensional extension of EnKF-RS is also discussed. Numerical experiments carried out with the Lorenz-96 model and a quasi-geostrophic model show that the use of shrinkage covariance matrix estimation can mitigate the impact of spurious correlations during the assimilation process.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of La-Ga-Al and U-Ga-Al alloys and the separation factor of U/La couple in the molten salt-liquid metal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, A.; Smolenski, V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Ivanov, A. B.; Osipenko, A.; Griffiths, T. R.

    2015-11-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of lanthanum and uranium was studied in fused 3LiCl-2KCl eutectic and Ga-Al eutectic liquid metal alloy between 723 and 823 K. Electrode potentials were recorded vs. Cl-/Cl2 reference electrode and the temperature dependencies of the apparent standard potentials of La-(Ga-Al) and U-(Ga-Al) alloys were determined. Lanthanum and uranium activity coefficients and U/La couple separation factor were calculated. Partial excess free Gibbs energy, partial enthalpy of mixing and partial excess entropy of La-(Ga-Al) and U-(Ga-Al) alloys were estimated.

  11. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  12. Hot tearing evaluation for aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brůna, Marek

    2016-06-01

    Hot tearing during solidification of aluminium alloys castings can be a serious problem. This phenomenon is well known but still insufficiently investigated. Hot tearing occurs in form of irregular cracks in metal castings that develop during solidification and cooling. The cause of hot tearing is generally attributed to the development of thermally induced tensile stresses and strains in a casting as the molten metal contracts during solidification and solid state shrinkage. Submited paper consists of two parts. The first part introduces the reader to the phenomenon of hot tearing. The second part describes newly developed method for assessing hot tearing susceptibility of aluminium alloys, and also gives the results on hot tearing for various aluminium alloys.

  13. Effect of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting.

    PubMed

    Inoue, K; Howashi, G; Kanetou, T; Masumi, S; Ueno, O; Fujii, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of light intensity on linear shrinkage of photo-activated composite resins during setting. The materials used were four commercially available photo-activated composite resins. Three light-irradiation instruments were selected and prepared so as to obtain four light intensities (200, 480, 800 and 1600 mW cm(-2)). The linear shrinkage during setting was examined 10 min after light irradiation using a trial balance plastometer, and the specimen thickness was 2.0 mm for all materials. The depth of cure was examined according to the test method described in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO/FDIS 4049: 2000(E)). In measuring the linear shrinkage 60 s from the start of light irradiation for 10 s, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.89-0.94) between the amount of linear shrinkage and the light intensity: an increase in light intensity produced a greater linear shrinkage. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation (r = 0.92-1.0) between the linear shrinkage and the irradiation time: an increase in irradiation time resulted in a greater linear shrinkage. Values of the depth of cure ranged from 1.69 to 3.75 mm. PMID:15634297

  14. Effect of plasma arc curing on polymerization shrinkage of orthodontic adhesive resins.

    PubMed

    Bang, H-C; Lim, B-S; Yoon, T-H; Lee, Y-K; Kim, C-W

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage of three orthodontic adhesive resins when polymerized with a high-energy plasma arc light (1340 mW cm(-2)) and a conventional halogen light (500 mW cm(-2)), and to correlate the polymerization shrinkage with the degree of conversion. To equalize the total light energy delivered to the adhesive resin, irradiation time was varied between 3 or 6 s for a plasma arc-curing unit, and 8 or 16 s for a halogen light-curing unit. The polymerization shrinkage of adhesive resins during the light-curing process was measured using a computer-controlled mercury dilatometer and the degree of conversion was measured using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A plasma arccuring unit produced significantly lower polymerization shrinkage than a halogen light-curing unit when the equivalent total light energy was irradiated to the orthodontic adhesive resins (P < 0.05). The magnitude of polymerization shrinkage was significantly different depending on the kind of adhesive resins (P < 0.05), but there was no significant correlation between the filler fraction and the polymerization shrinkage (r2 = 0.039). There was strong correlation (r2 = 0.787) between the polymerization shrinkage and the degree of conversion with a halogen light-curing unit, but poor correlation (r2 = 0.377) was observed with a plasma arc-curing unit. PMID:15265218

  15. Cure shrinkage measurement of nonconductive adhesives by means of a thermomechanical analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Mhaisalkar, S. G.; Wong, E. H.

    2005-08-01

    The conductivity of a nonconductive adhesive (NCA) flip chip interconnect is completely dependent on the direct mechanical contact between the integrated circuit (IC) bump and substrate pad. Cure shrinkage of NCA is critical for the formation of the final contact force in the contacts. However, measurement of the cure shrinkage during cross-linking reaction is fairly difficult. This paper introduces a new, yet simple, approach to measure cure shrinkage of adhesives using a thermo-mechanical analyzer. Isothermal studies of shrinkage change as a function of curing show four distinct regions. First, the thickness of the epoxy decreases due to decreasing viscosity and applied load, followed by a stage where the dimension change is constant as the cross-linking reaction is yet to set in. Once cross-linking begins, the shrinkage reaches a maximum followed by a plateau where the cross-linking reaction has completed. Sharp changes of the slope of cure shrinkage versus degree of cure were observed to coincide with gelation and vitrification. After gelation, a linear relationship between the cure shrinkage and degree of cure was observed to extend until the occurrence of vitrification, which quenches the cross-linking reaction. Applied load in the range of 0.05 N was found to be optimal to minimize measurement errors.

  16. Modeling of the factors contributing to the initiation and propagation of the crevice corrosion of alloy 625

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Scully, J.R. )

    1994-11-01

    Crevice corrosion of alloy 625 in both chlorinated and nonchlorinated American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) artificial ocean water was modeled. Secondary current and potential distributions as a function of crevice depth were obtained from the model using the following crevice initiation criteria (1) E < E[sub Flade], (2) i[sub diss] = 10 [mu]A/cm[sup 2], and (3) pH [approximately]0.46 at the site where the first two criteria are met. For alloy 625 in nonchlorinated ASTM artificial ocean water these criteria are satisfied at depths which are near the mouth of the crevice. These depths are incompatible with the mass-transport conditions governing the development of the critical crevice solution. In the chlorinated system the model predicts that initiation occurs at greater depths which are compatible with all the critical crevice solution. In the chlorinated system the model predicts that initiation occurs at greater depths which are compatible with all the criteria including mass-transport considerations. The model results are in agreement with remote crevice assembly experiments which show that crevice corrosion occurs more readily in the chlorinated ASTM artificial ocean water. Propagation of the crevice corrosion of alloy 625 is shown to be ohmically controlled by the resistance between the mouth of the crevice and the initiation site.

  17. Numerical and experimental studies of drying and shrinkage induced microcracking in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, D.

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate moisture flow in cement paste and Interface Transition Zone, around aggregate, as well as associated shrinkage induced strains, and subsequent microcracking. Two coupled methods are used: numerical simulations and experiments. The moisture flow is numerically simulated by Lattice Gas Automata, while drying experiments are performed in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (ESEM) in order to determine drying deformations and shrinkage coefficient. The moisture movement simulation by Lattice Gas Automata, a type of cellular automata, involves different drying collision rules, which results in different density (moisture content) at each node. Special attention is given to the effect of the presence of aggregate particles on the moisture flow in concrete, which are considered rigid obstacles. The shrinkage deformation is considered a linear function of the moisture content if the relative humidity, RH does not exceed 40%. The calculated moisture gradient from the numerical analysis and an assumed shrinkage coefficient are used to calculate drying shrinkage induced strains and stresses using the basic equations. To determine the drying shrinkage coefficient for the RH range 100% to 20%, new experimental techniques of drying in ESEM are used. Small paste samples are cast in a specially developed mould with 2 mm thickness and afterwards carefully grounded and polished to a thickness of required 1 mm. The used variables in the tests are: various cement types, w/c ratio, sample age and curing conditions. Drying shrinkage displacements and strains are determined in order to calculate the drying shrinkage coefficient. These experimentally obtained values of the coefficient are compared with the literature data and used in numerical simulations of shrinkage induced strains, stresses and cracking in drying concrete.

  18. Effects of drying conditions, admixtures and specimen size on shrinkage strains

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Saleh, Saleh A. . E-mail: alsaleh@dr.com; Al-Zaid, Rajeh Z.

    2006-10-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the effects of drying conditions, specimen size and presence of plasticizing admixture on the development of shrinkage strains. The measurements are taken in a harsh (50 deg. C and 5% R.H.) and a moderate environment (28 deg. C and 50% R.H.). The results include strain development at various levels of cross sections of concrete prisms. The drying conditions are found to be the dominant parameter affecting the shrinkage strain development particularly in specimens of smaller sizes. The effect of plasticizing admixture on shrinkage strains is negligible.

  19. Thermomechanical simulation of the selective laser melting process for PA12 including volumetric shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedlbauer, D.; Steinmann, P.; Mergheim, J.

    2015-05-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the finite element simulation of the thermomechanical material behavior in the selective laser melting process for PA12. In the process shrinkage of the powder material is observed when becoming melt, as the porous character of the powder vanishes due to the phase transition. A nonlinear thermomechanical finite element model is developed, which captures the shrinkage of the material and includes temperature dependent material parameters. The model is used to simulate the shrinkage of the material in the process, where an adaptive mesh refinement is applied for increasing the accuracy of the simulation. The results are qualitatively compared with experimental data and show a good agreement.

  20. Obligate Insect Endosymbionts Exhibit Increased Ortholog Length Variation and Loss of Large Accessory Proteins Concurrent with Genome Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Laura J.; Sabree, Zakee L.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme genome reduction has been observed in obligate intracellular insect mutualists and is an assumed consequence of fixed, long-term host isolation. Rapid accumulation of mutations and pseudogenization of genes no longer vital for an intracellular lifestyle, followed by deletion of many genes, are factors that lead to genome reduction. Size reductions in individual genes due to small-scale deletions have also been implicated in contributing to overall genome shrinkage. Conserved protein functional domains are expected to exhibit low tolerance for mutations and therefore remain relatively unchanged throughout protein length reduction while nondomain regions, presumably under less selective pressures, would shorten. This hypothesis was tested using orthologous protein sets from the Flavobacteriaceae (phylum: Bacteroidetes) and Enterobacteriaceae (subphylum: Gammaproteobacteria) families, each of which includes some of the smallest known genomes. Upon examination of protein, functional domain, and nondomain region lengths, we found that proteins were not uniformly shrinking with genome reduction, but instead increased length variability and variability was observed in both the functional domain and nondomain regions. Additionally, as complete gene loss also contributes to overall genome shrinkage, we found that the largest proteins in the proteomes of nonhost-restricted bacteroidetial and gammaproteobacterial species often were inferred to be involved in secondary metabolic processes, extracellular sensing, or of unknown function. These proteins were absent in the proteomes of obligate insect endosymbionts. Therefore, loss of genes encoding large proteins not required for host-restricted lifestyles in obligate endosymbiont proteomes likely contributes to extreme genome reduction to a greater degree than gene shrinkage. PMID:24671745

  1. Stabilization of vacuum arc remelting of steels and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyanchikov, L. N.

    2012-12-01

    The main cause of the electrode mass melting rate oscillations during vacuum arc remelting (VAR) of steels and alloys is shown to be the displacement of an arc into zones with different metallic vapor pressures. For the remelting process to be stabilized, the arc space length should be controlled as a function of the electrode melting rate and the shrinkage defects in cast electrodes should be removed by high-temperature gasostatic treatment.

  2. INTER-GROUP IMAGE REGISTRATION BY HIERARCHICAL GRAPH SHRINKAGE

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Shihui; Wu, Guorong; Liao, Shu; Shen, Dinggang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel inter-group image registration method to register different groups of images (e.g., young and elderly brains) simultaneously. Specifically, we use a hierarchical two-level graph to model the distribution of entire images on the manifold, with intra-graph representing the image distribution in each group and the inter-graph describing the relationship between two groups. Then the procedure of inter-group registration is formulated as a dynamic evolution of graph shrinkage. The advantage of our method is that the topology of entire image distribution is explored to guide the image registration. In this way, each image coordinates with its neighboring images on the manifold to deform towards the population center, by following the deformation pathway simultaneously optimized within the graph. Our proposed method has been also compared with other state-of-the-art inter-group registration methods, where our method achieves better registration results in terms of registration accuracy and robustness. PMID:24443692

  3. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-12-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems.

  4. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  5. Super-resolution optical telescopes with local light diffraction shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changtao; Tang, Dongliang; Wang, Yanqin; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Jiong; Pu, Mingbo; Zhang, Yudong; Yan, Wei; Gao, Ping; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Suffering from giant size of objective lenses and infeasible manipulations of distant targets, telescopes could not seek helps from present super-resolution imaging, such as scanning near-field optical microscopy, perfect lens and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. In this paper, local light diffraction shrinkage associated with optical super-oscillatory phenomenon is proposed for real-time and optically restoring super-resolution imaging information in a telescope system. It is found that fine target features concealed in diffraction-limited optical images of a telescope could be observed in a small local field of view, benefiting from a relayed metasurface-based super-oscillatory imaging optics in which some local Fourier components beyond the cut-off frequency of telescope could be restored. As experimental examples, a minimal resolution to 0.55 of Rayleigh criterion is obtained, and imaging complex targets and large targets by superimposing multiple local fields of views are demonstrated as well. This investigation provides an access for real-time, incoherent and super-resolution telescopes without the manipulation of distant targets. More importantly, it gives counterintuitive evidence to the common knowledge that relayed optics could not deliver more imaging details than objective systems. PMID:26677820

  6. Increasing Item Complexity: A Possible Cause of Scale Shrinkage for Unidimensional Item Response Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Wendy M.

    1985-01-01

    An approximate relationship is devised between the unidimensional model used in data analysis and a multidimensional model hypothesized to be generating the item responses. Scale shrinkage is successfully predicted for several sets of simulated data. (Author/LMO)

  7. Numerical Simulation on Open Wellbore Shrinkage and Casing Equivalent Stress in Bedded Salt Rock Stratum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Most salt rock has interbed of mudstone in China. Owing to the enormous difference of mechanical properties between the mudstone interbed and salt rock, the stress-strain and creep behaviors of salt rock are significantly influenced by neighboring mudstone interbed. In order to identify the rules of wellbore shrinkage and casings equivalent stress in bedded salt rock stratum, three-dimensional finite difference models were established. The effects of thickness and elasticity modulus of mudstone interbed on the open wellbore shrinkage and equivalent stress of casing after cementing operation were studied, respectively. The results indicate that the shrinkage of open wellbore and equivalent stress of casings decreases with the increase of mudstone interbed thickness. The increasing of elasticity modulus will reduce the shrinkage of open wellbore and casing equivalent stress. Research results can provide the scientific basis for the design of mud density and casing strength. PMID:24198726

  8. Electron-beam induced photoresist shrinkage influence on 2D profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunday, Benjamin; Cordes, Aaron; Allgair, John; Aguilar, Daniel Bellido; Tileli, Vasiliki; Thiel, Bradley; Avitan, Yohanan; Peltinov, Ram; Bar-Zvi, Mayaan; Adan, Ofer; Chirko, Konstantin

    2010-03-01

    For many years, lithographic resolution has been the main obstacle in keeping the pace of transistor densification to meet Moore's Law. For the 32 nm node and beyond, new lithography techniques will be used, including immersion ArF (iArF) lithography and extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). As in the past, these techniques will use new types of photoresists with the capability to print smaller feature widths and pitches. Also, such smaller feature sizes will require thinner layers of photoresists, such as under 100 nm. In previous papers, we focused on ArF and iArF photoresist shrinkage. We evaluated the magnitude of shrinkage for both R&D and mature resists as a function of chemical formulation, lithographic sensitivity, scanning electron microscope (SEM) beam condition, and feature size. Shrinkage results were determined by the well accepted methodology described in ISMI's CD-SEM Unified Specification. A model for resist shrinkage, while derived elsewhere, was presented, that can be used to curve-fit to the shrinkage data resulting from multiple repeated measurements of resist features. Parameters in the curve-fit allow for metrics quantifying total shrinkage, shrinkage rate, and initial critical dimension (CD) before e-beam exposure. With these parameters and exhaustive measurements, a fundamental understanding of the phenomenology of the shrinkage trends was achieved, including how the shrinkage behaves differently for different sized features. This work was extended in yet another paper in which we presented a 1-D model for resist shrinkage that can be used to curve-fit to shrinkage curves. Calibration of parameters to describe the photoresist material and the electron beam were all that were required to fit the model to real shrinkage data, as long as the photoresist was thick enough that the beam could not penetrate the entire layer of resist. In this paper, we extend this work yet again to a 2-D model of a trapezoidal photoresist profile. This model thus

  9. Mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of short fiber-reinforced resin composite.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of a short fiber-reinforced resin composite (SFRC) were investigated in this study and compared to both a bulk fill resin composite (BFRC) and conventional glass/ceramic-filled resin composite (CGRC). Fracture toughness, flexural properties, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure of the SFRC, BFRC and CGRC were measured. SFRC had significantly higher fracture toughness than BFRCs and CGRCs. The flexural properties of SFRC were comparable with BFRCs and CGRCs. SFRC showed significantly lower volumetric shrinkage than the other tested resin composites. The depth of cure of the SFRC was similar to BFRCs and higher than CGRCs. The data from this laboratory investigation suggests that SFRC exhibits improvements in fracture toughness, volumetric shrinkage and depth of cure when compared with CGRC, but depth of cure of SFRC was similar to BFRC. PMID:27251997

  10. Study of the Effect of Shrinkage Porosity on Strength Low Carbon Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ol'khovik, E.

    2015-09-01

    Today there are many computer systems for modeling of the casting technology processes. All of them allow calculating the availability and distribution of the shrinkage porosity in the test casting, but this information allows only making changes in existing casting technology. In this paper you obtain the information about changes in the local and structural mechanical properties of the casting in the presence of its volume shrinkage porosity. Article presents the results of direct experimental studies of technological defects (shrinkage and gas porosity) impact on the mechanical properties of low carbon steel castings. Methods of investigation are also disclosed, including the methods for producing of molded samples obtained at different process conditions and the crystallization apparatus which is described for the measuring of the density of the samples. There are the mathematical relationship for the elastic modulus, yield stress, elongation and fatigue characteristics fracture cast steel with low carbon content in the presence of the volumetric shrinkage porosity.

  11. The effect of solidification rate on the growth of small fatigue cracks in a cast 319-type aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, M. J.; Jones, J. Wayne; Boileau, J. M.; Allison, J. E.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of solidification rate on the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks in a 319-type aluminum alloy, a common Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive castings. Fatigue specimens were taken from cast material that underwent a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process in order to eliminate shrinkage pores and to facilitate the observation of surface-initiated cracks by replication. Naturally initiated surface cracks ranging in length from 17 µm to 2 mm were measured using a replication technique. Growth rates of the small cracks were calculated as a function of the elastic stress-intensity-factor range (Δ K). Long-crack growth-rate data (10 mm≤length≤25 mm) were obtained from compact-tension (CT) specimens, and comparison to the small-crack data indicates the existence of a significant small-crack effect in this alloy. The solidification rate is shown to have a significant influence on small-crack growth behavior, with faster solidification rates resulting in slower growth rates at equivalent Δ K levels. A stress-level effect is also observed for both solidification rates, with faster growth rates occurring at higher applied-stress amplitudes at a given Δ K. A crack-growth relation proposed by Nisitani and others is modified to give reasonable correlation of small-crack growth data to different solidification rates and stress levels.

  12. The effect of solidification rate on the growth of small fatigue cracks in a cast 319-type aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Caton, M.J.; Jones, J.W.; Boileau, J.M.; Allison, J.E.

    1999-12-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of solidification rate on the growth behavior of small fatigue cracks in a 319-type aluminum alloy, a common Al-Si-Cu alloy used in automotive castings. Fatigue specimens were taken from cast material that underwent a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) process in order to eliminate shrinkage pores and to facilitate the observation of surface-initiated cracks by replication. Naturally initiated surface cracks ranging in length from 17 {micro}m to 2 mm were measured using a replication technique. Growth rates of the small cracks were calculated as a function of the elastic stress-intensity-factor range ({Delta}K). Long-crack growth-rate data (10 mm {le} length {le} 25 mm) were obtained from compact-tension (CT) specimens, and comparison to the small-crack data indicates the existence of a significant small-crack effect in this alloy. The solidification rate is shown to have a significant influence on small-crack growth behavior, with faster solidification rates resulting in slower growth rates at equivalent {Delta}K levels. A stress-level effect is also observed for both solidification rates, with faster growth rates occurring at higher applied-stress amplitudes at a given {Delta}K. A crack-growth relation proposed by Nisitani and others is modified to give reasonable correlation of small-crack growth data to different solidification rates and stress levels.

  13. The effects of epoxy shrinkage on the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility Technology Mirror Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, L. M.

    1984-01-01

    A method is shown analytically which reduces the effects of epoxy shrinkage for an ultra-high precision X-ray telescope to within the system error budget. The three-dimensional shrinkage effects are discussed with reference to this telescope. The results of the analysis point to the use of an interrupted rather than continuous bond line as the best solution. Discussion of the finite element modelling techniques is included.

  14. Shrinkage stress in concrete under dry-wet cycles: an example with concrete column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Jun; Luosun, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    This paper focuses on the simulation of shrinkage stress in concrete structures under dry-wet environments. In the modeling, an integrative model for autogenous and drying shrinkage predictions of concrete under dry-wet cycles is introduced first. Second, a model taking both cement hydration and moisture diffusion into account synchronously is used to calculate the distribution of interior humidity in concrete. Using the above two models, the distributions of shrinkage strain and stress in concrete columns made by normal and high strength concrete respectively under dry-wet cycles are calculated. The model results show that shrinkage gradient along the radial direction of the column from the center to outer surface increases with age as the outer circumference suffers to dry. The maximum and minimum shrinkage occur at the outer surface and the center of the column, respectively, under drying condition. As wetting starts, the shrinkage strain decreases with increase of interior humidity. The closer to the wetting face, the higher the humidity and the lower the shrinkage strain, as well as the lower the shrinkage stress. As results of the dry-wet cycles acting on the outer circumference of the column, cyclic stress status is developed within the area close to the outer surface of the column. The depth of the influencing zone of dry-wet cyclic action is influenced by concrete strength and dry-wet regime. For low strength concrete, relatively deeper influencing zone is expected compared with that of high strength concrete. The models are verified by concrete-steel composite ring tests and a good agreement between model and test results is found.

  15. Reducing the drying shrinkage of cement paste by admixture surface treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Chung, D.D.L.

    2000-02-01

    The drying shrinkage of concrete during curing is a source of residual stress and cracks. The problem is particularly severe for a large structure, such as a large concrete floor. Surface treatment of carbon fibers and/or silica fume by silane prior to using these admixtures in cement paste increases the effectiveness of these admixtures for reducing the drying shrinkage. Silane treatment of fibers is more effective than dichromate treatment or ozone treatment.

  16. Predominant factor determining wear properties of β-type and (α+β)-type titanium alloys in metal-to-metal contact for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Niinomi, Mitsuo; Nakai, Masaaki; Narita, Kengo; Cho, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The predominant factor determining the wear properties of a new titanium alloy, Ti-29Nb-13Ta-4.6Zr (TNTZ) and a conventional titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V extra-low interstitial (Ti64) was investigated for TNTZ and Ti64 combinations in metal-to-metal contacting bio-implant applications. The worn surfaces, wear debris, and subsurface damages were analyzed using a scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron-back scattered diffraction analysis. The volume loss of TNTZ is found to be larger than that of Ti64, regardless of the mating material. The wear track of TNTZ exhibits the galled regions and severe plastic deformation with large flake-like debris, indicative of delamination wear, which strongly suggests the occurrence of adhesive wear. Whereas, the wear track of Ti64 have a large number of regular grooves and microcuttings with cutting chip-like wear debris and microfragmentation of fine oxide debris, indicative of abrasive wear combined with oxidative wear. This difference in the wear type is caused by severe and mild subsurface deformations of TNTZ and Ti64, respectively. The lower resistance to plastic shearing for TNTZ compared to that of Ti64 induces delamination, resulting in a higher wear rate. PMID:25460417

  17. Dental resins based on dimer acid dimethacrylates: a route to high conversion with low polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Ge, Junhao; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2010-05-01

    Incomplete polymerization, volumetric shrinkage, and shrinkage stress are among the primary disadvantages of current resin-based dental composites. Generally, any attempt to increase final double bond conversion only exacerbates polymerization shrinkage and stress. The use of dimer acid-derived dimethacrylate (DADMA) monomers in novel dental resin formulations is examined in this article as a potential means to address these disparate goals. A series of high molecular weight DADMA monomers with different functional groups used to connect the C36 dimer acid core and the methacrylates were formulated with urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and/or ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) at various compositions to manipulate comonomer compatibility and polymeric mechanical properties. Along with reaction kinetics, dynamic polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress were assessed. Specific DADMA monomers demonstrated limited miscibility with either Bis-EMA or UDMA. Appropriate ternary resin formulations produced homogeneous monomeric mixtures capable of controlled polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) to yield heterogeneous final polymers. Reduced polymerization shrinkage and stress along with higher conversion was observed for DADMA ternary systems compared with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin control. The PIPS process resulted in a modest volume recovery and stress relaxation in the later stages of polymerization. These results indicate that certain dimer acid-derived dimethacrylates possess the potential to replace TEGDMA as a reactive diluent in dental resins that display a favorable and unique combination of properties. PMID:20521567

  18. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    PubMed

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit. PMID:26132112

  19. Drying shrinkage of fibre-reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete containing fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Kayali, O.; Haque, M.N.; Zhu, B.

    1999-11-01

    Lightweight aggregate concretes containing fly ash with a compressive strength between 61 to 67 NPa were produced. The lightweight aggregate used was sintered fly ash. The concretes were reinforced with either polypropylene or steel fibres. The fibres did not affect the compressive strength, but did increase the tensile strength of these concretes. The modulus of elasticity of all the lightweight concretes tested was about 21 GPa, compared to 35 GPa for the normal-weight concrete. Fibre reinforcement did not affect the value of the elastic modulus. This type of lightweight concrete, containing fly ash as 23% of the total cementitious content, resulted in long-term shrinkage that is nearly twice as large as normal-weight concrete of somewhat similar strength. Polypropylene fibre reinforcement did not reduce drying shrinkage, while steel fibres did. Early shrinkage behavior of this type of lightweight concrete was similar to normal-weight concrete. However, the rate of shrinkage of the lightweight concrete remained constant until nearly 100 days of drying. This is different from normal-weight concrete that showed appreciably after 56 days. Shrinkage of normal-weight concrete stabilized after 400 days, which shrinkage of lightweight concrete did not appear to stabilize after a similar period of continuous drying.

  20. Development of a rapid cure polydimethylsiloxane replication process with near-zero shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badshah, Mohsin Ali; Jang, Hyungjun; Kim, Young Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Kim, Seok-min

    2014-07-01

    Replicated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro/nanostructures are widely used in various research fields due to their inexpensiveness, flexibility, low surface energy, good optical properties, biocompatibility, chemical inertness, high durability, and easy fabrication process. However, the application of PDMS micro/nanostructures is limited when an accurate pattern shape or position is required because of the shrinkage that occurs during the PDMS curing process. In this study, we analyzed the effects of processing parameters in the PDMS replication process on the shrinkage of the final structure. Although the shrinkage can be decreased by decreasing the curing temperature, this reduction also increases the unnecessary curing time. To minimize the inherent shrinkage in the PDMS replica without an accompanying curing time increase, we propose a PDMS replication process on a high modulus substrate (glass and polymer films) with compression pressure, in which the adhesion force between the substrate and the PDMS, and the compression pressure prevent shrinkage during the curing process. Using the proposed method, a PDMS replica with less than 0.1% in-plane and vertical shrinkage was obtained at a curing temperature of 150°C and a curing time of 10 min.

  1. Evaluating the geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the near-field host clay rock using a THC model and the diffuse double layer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; Liu, H.; Birkholzer, J. T.; Houseworth, J. E.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2011-12-01

    One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in a clay formation is the potential self-sealing capability due to clay swelling. The swelling properties of the near-field host clay rock can be altered due to geochemical factors, including changes in groundwater geochemistry, proportions of exchangeable cations, and swelling clay mineral abundances. The clay host rock can also undergo geochemical changes due to the interaction with the engineered barrier system (EBS) materials. In this paper, coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) models are linked with a swelling model based on diffuse double layer (DDL) theory and changes in the swelling properties of clay host rocks in the near field area are evaluated. Findings based on THC simulations using the reaction-transport code TOUGHREACT include: 1) Significant changes in the swelling pressure could be expected depending on various hydrogeologic and geochemical conditions. The change of hydration rate of the EBS (via the adjustment of tortuosity) could have significant effect on the swelling pressure. 2) Geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage only occurs in the near-field area, within a few meters from the EBS interface. 3) Swelling/shrinkage induced porosity change is generally much smaller than that caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution. 4) The geochemically-induced swelling/shrinkage of host clay rock is the combined effect of variation in the pore water geochemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three latter factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically-induced swelling pressure.

  2. Effectiveness of Shrinkage and Variable Selection Methods for the Prediction of Complex Human Traits using Data from Distantly Related Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Pérez‐Rodríguez, Paulino; Veturi, Yogasudha; Simianer, Henner; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genome‐wide association studies (GWAS) have detected large numbers of variants associated with complex human traits and diseases. However, the proportion of variance explained by GWAS‐significant single nucleotide polymorphisms has been usually small. This brought interest in the use of whole‐genome regression (WGR) methods. However, there has been limited research on the factors that affect prediction accuracy (PA) of WGRs when applied to human data of distantly related individuals. Here, we examine, using real human genotypes and simulated phenotypes, how trait complexity, marker‐quantitative trait loci (QTL) linkage disequilibrium (LD), and the model used affect the performance of WGRs. Our results indicated that the estimated rate of missing heritability is dependent on the extent of marker‐QTL LD. However, this parameter was not greatly affected by trait complexity. Regarding PA our results indicated that: (a) under perfect marker‐QTL LD WGR can achieve moderately high prediction accuracy, and with simple genetic architectures variable selection methods outperform shrinkage procedures and (b) under imperfect marker‐QTL LD, variable selection methods can achieved reasonably good PA with simple or moderately complex genetic architectures; however, the PA of these methods deteriorated as trait complexity increases and with highly complex traits variable selection and shrinkage methods both performed poorly. This was confirmed with an analysis of human height. PMID:25600682

  3. Effectiveness of shrinkage and variable selection methods for the prediction of complex human traits using data from distantly related individuals.

    PubMed

    Berger, Swetlana; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Veturi, Yogasudha; Simianer, Henner; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2015-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have detected large numbers of variants associated with complex human traits and diseases. However, the proportion of variance explained by GWAS-significant single nucleotide polymorphisms has been usually small. This brought interest in the use of whole-genome regression (WGR) methods. However, there has been limited research on the factors that affect prediction accuracy (PA) of WGRs when applied to human data of distantly related individuals. Here, we examine, using real human genotypes and simulated phenotypes, how trait complexity, marker-quantitative trait loci (QTL) linkage disequilibrium (LD), and the model used affect the performance of WGRs. Our results indicated that the estimated rate of missing heritability is dependent on the extent of marker-QTL LD. However, this parameter was not greatly affected by trait complexity. Regarding PA our results indicated that: (a) under perfect marker-QTL LD WGR can achieve moderately high prediction accuracy, and with simple genetic architectures variable selection methods outperform shrinkage procedures and (b) under imperfect marker-QTL LD, variable selection methods can achieved reasonably good PA with simple or moderately complex genetic architectures; however, the PA of these methods deteriorated as trait complexity increases and with highly complex traits variable selection and shrinkage methods both performed poorly. This was confirmed with an analysis of human height. PMID:25600682

  4. Testing Departure from Additivity in Tukey’s Model using Shrinkage: Application to a Longitudinal Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A.; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Allison, Matthew A.; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2014-01-01

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey’s one degree of freedom (df) model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Due to the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey’s model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey’s and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies — the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. PMID:25112650

  5. Modelling of micro- and macrosegregation for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, K.; Mortensen, D.; M'Hamdi, M.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic predictions of macrosegregation formation during casting of aluminium alloys requires an accurate modeling of solute microsegregation accounting for multicomponent phase diagrams and secondary phase formation. In the present work, the stand alone Alstruc model, a microsegregation model for industrial multicomponent aluminium alloys, is coupled with the continuum model ALSIM which calculates the macroscopic transport of mass, enthalpy, momentum, and solutes as well as stresses and deformation during solidification of aluminium. Alstruc deals with multicomponent alloys accounting for temperature dependent partition coefficients, liquidus slopes and the precipitation of secondary phases. The challenge associated with computation of microsegregation for multicomponent alloys is solved in Alstruc by approximating the phase diagram data by simple, analytical expressions which allows for a CPU-time efficient coupling with the macroscopic transport model. In the present work, the coupled model has been applied in a study of macrosegregation including thermal and solutal convection, solidification shrinkage and surface exudation on an industrial DC-cast billet.

  6. Improving Reliability of Subject-Level Resting-State fMRI Parcellation with Shrinkage Estimators

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Amanda F.; Nebel, Mary Beth; Shou, Haochang; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Pekar, James J.; Mostofsky, Stewart; Caffo, Brian; Lindquist, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent interest in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) lies in subdividing the human brain into anatomically and functionally distinct regions of interest. For example, brain parcellation is often a necessary step for defining the network nodes used in connectivity studies. While inference has traditionally been performed on group-level data, there is a growing interest in parcellating single subject data. However, this is difficult due to the inherent low signal-to-noise ratio of rsfMRI data, combined with typically short scan lengths. A large number of brain parcellation approaches employ clustering, which begins with a measure of similarity or distance between voxels. The goal of this work is to improve the reproducibility of single-subject parcellation using shrinkage-based estimators of such measures, allowing the noisy subject-specific estimator to “borrow strength” in a principled manner from a larger population of subjects. We present several empirical Bayes shrinkage estimators and outline methods for shrinkage when multiple scans are not available for each subject. We perform shrinkage on raw inter-voxel correlation estimates and use both raw and shrinkage estimates to produce parcellations by performing clustering on the voxels. While we employ a standard spectral clustering approach, our proposed method is agnostic to the choice of clustering method and can be used as a pre-processing step for any clustering algorithm. Using two datasets – a simulated dataset where the true parcellation is known and is subject-specific and a test-retest dataset consisting of two 7-minute resting-state fMRI scans from 20 subjects – we show that parcellations produced from shrinkage correlation estimates have higher reliability and validity than those produced from raw correlation estimates. Application to test-retest data shows that using shrinkage estimators increases the reproducibility of subject-specific parcellations of the motor

  7. Leaf Shrinkage with Dehydration: Coordination with Hydraulic Vulnerability and Drought Tolerance1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Scoffoni, Christine; Vuong, Christine; Diep, Steven; Cochard, Hervé; Sack, Lawren

    2014-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage with dehydration has attracted attention for over 100 years, especially as it becomes visibly extreme during drought. However, little has been known of its correlation with physiology. Computer simulations of the leaf hydraulic system showed that a reduction of hydraulic conductance of the mesophyll pathways outside the xylem would cause a strong decline of leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf). For 14 diverse species, we tested the hypothesis that shrinkage during dehydration (i.e. in whole leaf, cell and airspace thickness, and leaf area) is associated with reduction in Kleaf at declining leaf water potential (Ψleaf). We tested hypotheses for the linkage of leaf shrinkage with structural and physiological water relations parameters, including modulus of elasticity, osmotic pressure at full turgor, turgor loss point (TLP), and cuticular conductance. Species originating from moist habitats showed substantial shrinkage during dehydration before reaching TLP, in contrast with species originating from dry habitats. Across species, the decline of Kleaf with mild dehydration (i.e. the initial slope of the Kleaf versus Ψleaf curve) correlated with the decline of leaf thickness (the slope of the leaf thickness versus Ψleaf curve), as expected based on predictions from computer simulations. Leaf thickness shrinkage before TLP correlated across species with lower modulus of elasticity and with less negative osmotic pressure at full turgor, as did leaf area shrinkage between full turgor and oven desiccation. These findings point to a role for leaf shrinkage in hydraulic decline during mild dehydration, with potential impacts on drought adaptation for cells and leaves, influencing plant ecological distributions. PMID:24306532

  8. Improving reliability of subject-level resting-state fMRI parcellation with shrinkage estimators.

    PubMed

    Mejia, Amanda F; Nebel, Mary Beth; Shou, Haochang; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Pekar, James J; Mostofsky, Stewart; Caffo, Brian; Lindquist, Martin A

    2015-05-15

    A recent interest in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) lies in subdividing the human brain into anatomically and functionally distinct regions of interest. For example, brain parcellation is often a necessary step for defining the network nodes used in connectivity studies. While inference has traditionally been performed on group-level data, there is a growing interest in parcellating single subject data. However, this is difficult due to the inherent low signal-to-noise ratio of rsfMRI data, combined with typically short scan lengths. A large number of brain parcellation approaches employ clustering, which begins with a measure of similarity or distance between voxels. The goal of this work is to improve the reproducibility of single-subject parcellation using shrinkage-based estimators of such measures, allowing the noisy subject-specific estimator to "borrow strength" in a principled manner from a larger population of subjects. We present several empirical Bayes shrinkage estimators and outline methods for shrinkage when multiple scans are not available for each subject. We perform shrinkage on raw inter-voxel correlation estimates and use both raw and shrinkage estimates to produce parcellations by performing clustering on the voxels. While we employ a standard spectral clustering approach, our proposed method is agnostic to the choice of clustering method and can be used as a pre-processing step for any clustering algorithm. Using two datasets - a simulated dataset where the true parcellation is known and is subject-specific and a test-retest dataset consisting of two 7-minute resting-state fMRI scans from 20 subjects - we show that parcellations produced from shrinkage correlation estimates have higher reliability and validity than those produced from raw correlation estimates. Application to test-retest data shows that using shrinkage estimators increases the reproducibility of subject-specific parcellations of the motor cortex by

  9. Ni{sub 3}Al aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1993-10-01

    This paper provides a brief review of the recent progress in research and development of Ni{sub 3}Al and its alloys. Emphasis has been placed on understanding low ductility and brittle fracture of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys at ambient and elevated temperatures. Recent studies have resulted in identifying both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing the fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}Al alloys. Parallel efforts on alloy design using physical metallurgy principles have led to properties for structural use. Industrial interest in these alloys is high, and examples of industrial involvement in processing and utilization of these alloys are briefly mentioned.

  10. Casting Characteristics of Aluminum Die Casting Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Makhlouf M. Makhlouf; Diran Apelian

    2002-02-05

    The research program investigates the casting characteristics of selected aluminum die casting alloys. Specifically, the alloys' tendencies towards die soldering and sludge formation, and the alloys' fluidity and machinability are evaluated. It was found that: When the Fe and Mn contents of the alloy are low; caution has to be taken against possible die soldering. When the alloy has a high sludge factor, particularly a high level of Fe, measures must be taken to prevent the formation of large hardspots. For this kind of alloy, the Fe content should be kept at its lowest allowable level and the Mn content should be at its highest possible level. If there are problems in die filling, measures other than changing the alloy chemistry need to be considered first. In terms of alloy chemistry, the elements that form high temperature compounds must be kept at their lowest allowable levels. The alloys should not have machining problems when appropriate machining techniques and machining parameters are used.

  11. Correcting the Shrinkage Effects of Formalin Fixation and Tissue Processing for Renal Tumors: toward Standardization of Pathological Reporting of Tumor Size

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Thu; Sundaram, Chandru P.; Bahler, Clinton D.; Eble, John N.; Grignon, David J.; Monn, M. Francesca; Simper, Novae B.; Cheng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Given the importance of correctly staging renal cell carcinomas, specific guidelines should be in place for tumor size measurement. While a standard means of renal tumor measurement has not been established, intuitively, tumor size should be based on fresh measurements. We sought to assess the accuracy of postfixation and microscopic measurements of renal tumor size, as compared to fresh measurements and radiographic size. Thirty-four nephrectomy cases performed by a single surgeon were prospectively measured at different time points. The study cases included 23 clear cell renal cell carcinomas, 6 papillary renal cell carcinomas, and 5 other renal tumors. Radiologic tumors were 12.1% larger in diameter than fresh tumors (P<0.01). Furthermore, fresh specimens were 4.6% larger than formalin-fixed specimens (P<0.01), and postfixation measurements were 7.1% greater than microscopic measurements (P<0.01). The overall mean percentage of shrinkage between fresh and histological specimens was 11.4% (P<0.01). Histological processing would cause a tumor stage shift from pT1b to pT1a for two tumors in this study. The shrinkage effects of formalin fixation and histological processing may result in understaging of renal cell carcinomas. The shrinkage factor should be considered when reporting tumor size. PMID:26185538

  12. Survival Outcome Assessed According to Tumor Response and Shrinkage Pattern in Patients with EGFR Mutation–Positive Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Gefitinib or Erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Masayuki; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) are associated with a marked therapeutic response to EGFR–tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical indicators of the likely survival benefit of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations have not been identified, however. We therefore evaluated progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) according to tumor response and tumor shrinkage pattern in such patients. Methods: Among 145 EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs, 68 individuals were selected for analysis. Results: Of the 68 selected patients, 6 achieved a complete response (CR), 42 a partial response (PR), and 14 stable disease (SD). Both PFS and OS were significantly longer in patients who achieved a CR or PR than in those who experienced SD. Multivariate analysis showed that a response (CR or PR) to EGFR-TKIs was significantly associated with both PFS and OS. Among the CR/PR group, the median maximal tumor shrinkage relative to baseline was 56%, and the median time to response (TTR) was 4.2 weeks. The subsets of these patients who experienced rapid tumor regression (TTR of ≤4.2 weeks) or a high degree of tumor shrinkage (≥56%) did not show a more favorable PFS or OS compared with those who experienced slow tumor regression or a low degree of tumor shrinkage. Conclusion: Response (CR or PR) may represent the optimal surrogate for efficacy among EGFR mutation–positive NSCLC patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. PMID:24419417

  13. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, V.M. Jr.; Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures of tungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  14. Method of fabricating thin-walled articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hovis, Jr., Victor M.; Northcutt, Jr., Walter G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for fabricating thin-walled high-density structures oftungsten-nickel-iron alloys. A powdered blend of the selected alloy constituents is plasma sprayed onto a mandrel having the desired article configuration. The sprayed deposit is removed from the mandrel and subjected to liquid phase sintering to provide the alloyed structure. The formation of the thin-walled structure by plasma spraying significantly reduces shrinkage, and cracking while increasing physical properties of the structure over that obtainable by employing previously known powder metallurgical procedures.

  15. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ivar S.; Gray, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca2+ transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca2+ influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca2+ influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long

  16. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-03-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available for calculating long-term deflections. The drying shrinkage profile through the thickness of a composite slab is greatly affected by the impermeable steel deck at the slab soffit, and this has only recently been quantified. This paper presents the results of long-term laboratory tests on composite slabs subjected to both drying shrinkage and sustained loads. Based on laboratory measurements, a design model for the shrinkage strain profile through the thickness of a slab is proposed. The design model is based on some modifications to an existing creep and shrinkage prediction model B3. In addition, an analytical model is developed to calculate the time-dependent deflection of composite slabs taking into account the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage. The calculated deflections are shown to be in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  17. Effects of Prepolymerized Particle Size and Polymerization Kinetics on Volumetric Shrinkage of Dental Modeling Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Yun; Chun, Ju-Na; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2014-01-01

    Dental modeling resins have been developed for use in areas where highly precise resin structures are needed. The manufacturers claim that these polymethyl methacrylate/methyl methacrylate (PMMA/MMA) resins show little or no shrinkage after polymerization. This study examined the polymerization shrinkage of five dental modeling resins as well as one temporary PMMA/MMA resin (control). The morphology and the particle size of the prepolymerized PMMA powders were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction particle size analysis, respectively. Linear polymerization shrinkage strains of the resins were monitored for 20 minutes using a custom-made linometer, and the final values (at 20 minutes) were converted into volumetric shrinkages. The final volumetric shrinkage values for the modeling resins were statistically similar (P > 0.05) or significantly larger (P < 0.05) than that of the control resin and were related to the polymerization kinetics (P < 0.05) rather than the PMMA bead size (P = 0.335). Therefore, the optimal control of the polymerization kinetics seems to be more important for producing high-precision resin structures rather than the use of dental modeling resins. PMID:24779020

  18. A Shrinkage Method for Testing the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Yuan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Testing for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is often used as an initial step for checking the quality of genotyping. When testing the HWE for case-control data, the impact of a potential genetic association between the marker and the disease must be controlled for otherwise the results may be biased. Li and Li (2008) proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRT) that accounts for this potential genetic association and it is more powerful than the commonly used control-only χ2 test. However, the LRT is not efficient when the marker is independent of the disease, and also requires numerical optimization to calculate the test statistic. In this article, we propose a novel shrinkage test for assessing the HWE. The proposed shrinkage test yields higher statistical power than the LRT when the marker is independent of or weakly associated with the disease, and converges to the LRT when the marker is strongly associated with the disease. In addition, the proposed shrinkage test has a closed form and can be easily used to test the HWE for large datasets that result from genome-wide association studies. We compare the performance of the shrinkage test with existing methods using simulation studies, and apply the shrinkage test to a genome-wide association dataset for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23934751

  19. Perceptual shrinkage of a one-way motion path with high-speed motion.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Back-and-forth motion induces perceptual shrinkage of the motion path, but such shrinkage is hardly perceived for one-way motion. If the shrinkage is caused by temporal averaging of stimulus position around the endpoints, it should also be induced for one-way motion at higher motion speeds. In psychophysical experiments with a high-speed projector, we tested this conjecture for a one-way motion stimulus at various speeds (4-100 deg/s) along a straight path. Results showed that perceptual shrinkage of the motion path was robustly observed in higher-speed motion (faster than 66.7 deg/s). In addition, the amount of the forwards shift at the onset position was larger than that of the backwards shift at the offset position. These results demonstrate that high-speed motion can induce shrinkage, even for a one-way motion path. This can be explained by the view that perceptual position is represented by the integration of the temporal average of instantaneous position and the motion representation. PMID:27464844

  20. Control of polymerization shrinkage and stress in nanogel-modified monomer and composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Rafael R.; Garcia, Jeffrey W.; Barros, Matthew D.; Lewis, Steven H.; Pfeifer, Carmem S.; Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study demonstrates the effects of nano-scale prepolymer particles as additives to model dental monomer and composite formulations. Methods Discrete nanogel particles were prepared by solution photopolymerization of isobornyl methacrylate and urethane dimethacrylate in the presence of a chain transfer agent, which also provided a means to attach reactive groups to the prepolymer. Nanogel was added to triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) in increments between 5 and 40 wt% with resin viscosity, reaction kinetics, shrinkage, mechanical properties, stress and optical properties evaluated. Maximum loading of barium glass filler was determined as a function of nanogel content and composites with varied nanogel content but uniform filler loading were compared in terms of consistency, conversion, shrinkage and mechanical properties. Results High conversion, high molecular weight internally crosslinked and cyclized nanogel prepolymer was efficiently prepared and redispersed into TEGDMA with an exponential rise in viscosity accompanying nanogel content. Nanogel addition at any level produced no deleterious effects on reaction kinetics, conversion or mechanical properties, as long as reactive nanogels were used. A reduction in polymerization shrinkage and stress was achieved in proportion to nanogel content. Even at high nanogel concentrations, the maximum loading of glass filler was only marginally reduced relative to the control and high strength composite materials with low shrinkage were obtained. Significance The use of reactive nanogels offers a versatile platform from which resin and composite handling properties can be adjusted while the polymerization shrinkage and stress development that challenge the adhesive bonding of dental restoratives are controllably reduced. PMID:21388669

  1. Concentration-dependent specimen shrinkage in iodine-enhanced microCT

    PubMed Central

    Vickerton, Paula; Jarvis, Jonathan; Jeffery, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Iodine potassium iodide (I2KI) solution can be employed as a contrast agent for the visualisation of soft tissue structures in micro-computed tomography studies. This technique provides high resolution images of soft tissue non-destructively but initial studies suggest that the stain can cause substantial specimen shrinkage. The degree of specimen shrinkage, and potential deformation, is an important consideration when using the data for morphological studies. Here we quantify the macroscopic volume changes in mouse skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle and cerebellum as a result of immersion in the common fixatives 10% phosphate-buffered formal saline, 70% ethanol and 3% glutaraldehyde, compared with I2KI staining solution at concentrations of 2, 6, 10 and 20%. Immersion in the I2KI solution resulted in dramatic changes of tissue volume, which were far larger than the shrinkage from formalin fixation alone. The degree of macroscopic change was most dependent upon the I2KI concentration, with severe shrinkage of 70% seen in solutions of 20% I2KI after 14 days' incubation. When using this technique care needs to be taken to use the lowest concentration that will give adequate contrast to minimise artefacts due to shrinkage. PMID:23721431

  2. A novel two-dimensional method to measure surface shrinkage in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.C.; Ferraro, C.C.; Yin, W.Q.; Ishee, C.A.; Ifju, P.G.

    2010-05-15

    A novel experimental technique, Cure Reference Method (CRM), was developed for the measurement of surface shrinkage in cementitious materials. The technique combines the replication of diffraction grating on a specimen during the curing process and the use of high-sensitivity moire interferometry. Once demolded, the specimen was stored in an environmental chamber in order to establish specific curing conditions. Measurements were conducted on a daily basis for the duration of 7 days by recording a set of the consecutive phase shifted fringe patterns using the Portable Engineering Moire interferometer II (PEMI II). An automated fringe analysis system was developed and used to obtain displacement and strain information in two dimenzsions. Surface shrinkage behavior in both cement paste and mortar specimens was investigated by the use of the technique under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. Furthermore, an experimental control was developed in an effort to remove the effects of drying shrinkage on cementitious specimens at early ages. This was done in an effort to explore the relative contribution of autogenous shrinkage to the overall shrinkage in cementitious materials.

  3. Perceptual shrinkage of a one-way motion path with high-speed motion

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Yutaka; Sakaguchi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Back-and-forth motion induces perceptual shrinkage of the motion path, but such shrinkage is hardly perceived for one-way motion. If the shrinkage is caused by temporal averaging of stimulus position around the endpoints, it should also be induced for one-way motion at higher motion speeds. In psychophysical experiments with a high-speed projector, we tested this conjecture for a one-way motion stimulus at various speeds (4–100 deg/s) along a straight path. Results showed that perceptual shrinkage of the motion path was robustly observed in higher-speed motion (faster than 66.7 deg/s). In addition, the amount of the forwards shift at the onset position was larger than that of the backwards shift at the offset position. These results demonstrate that high-speed motion can induce shrinkage, even for a one-way motion path. This can be explained by the view that perceptual position is represented by the integration of the temporal average of instantaneous position and the motion representation. PMID:27464844

  4. Photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by scanning electron microscope-induced shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2015-07-01

    Change in the cross-sectional profile of a photoresist (PR) pattern due to shrinkage was evaluated to investigate the mechanism of electron beam-induced shrinkage. A scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) was used to observe the cross-sectional profiles of PR lines after atomic-layer deposition of metal oxide and carbon deposition on the sample surface. A HfO2 thin layer enhanced the profile contrast in the STEM measurements without blurring the edge, which enabled the precise cross-sectional measurement of the PR patterns. We found interesting features associated with shrinkage from the detailed profile change obtained using this method, such as a rounding of the pattern top, a necking of the sidewall profile, a rounding of the foot in the pattern on the organic underlying layer, and voltage-independent sidewall shrinkage under a large electron beam dose. These behaviors along with the results from a Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Consequently, these observations experimentally clarified that the elastic deformation effect and the impact of the secondary electrons emitted from the spaces around the pattern into the sidewall are important to interpret the change in the shape of the pattern induced by shrinkage.

  5. Polymerization shrinkage stress measurement for a UV-curable resist in nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirsadeghi, Alborz; Jong Lee, Jae; Park, Sunggook

    2011-11-01

    A simple method was developed to obtain the polymerization shrinkage stress exerted on the sidewalls of resist/stamp interface in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography. This method is based on the measurements of demolding force which is the sum of adhesion and friction forces. The mean polymerization shrinkage stress on the sidewalls can readily be decoupled from overall demolding force by independently measuring the friction coefficient, adhesion force and geometries of stamp structures. The polymerization shrinkage stress on the sidewalls is overall larger than adhesion and increases by adding more cross-linking agent to the resist composition. This indicates that in addition to lowering the adhesion at the resist/stamp interface, development of resists with low degrees of shrinkage during UV curing is critical to reducing demolding force. It was also found that the shrinkage stress depends not only on the resist composition but also the stamp structure. A pillar structured stamp leads to a larger stress than a stamp with gratings with identical depth and width.

  6. In situ investigation of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures: the effect of the drying process.

    PubMed

    Sun, Quan; Ueno, Kosei; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2012-02-15

    We report on experimental study of the shrinkage of photopolymerized micro/nanostructures fabricated by femtosecond direct laser writing in organic-inorganic resists. Blueshift of the stop-band positions of fabricated photonic crystals during the drying process, which follows the development and rinsing stages, indicates that the drying process plays an important role in the formation of the shrinkage. It is further confirmed that the shrinkage almost completely occurs during the drying process by in situ optical monitoring the structures. These findings will help to better understand, control, and even positively utilize the shrinkage in the applications of the photopolymerization-based direct laser writing technique. PMID:22344156

  7. Three-dimensional X-ray micro-computed tomography analysis of polymerization shrinkage vectors in flowable composite.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yukihiko; Hanaoka, Koji; Kawamata, Ryota; Sakurai, Takashi; Teranaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of flowable resin composites was evaluated using air bubbles as traceable markers. Three different surface treatments i.e. an adhesive silane coupling agent, a separating silane coupling agent, and a combination of both, were applied to standard cavities. Before and after polymerization, X-ray micro-computed tomography images were recorded. Their superimposition and comparison allowed position changes of the markers to be visualized as vectors. The movement of the markers in the resin composite was, therefore, quantitatively evaluated from the tomographic images. Adhesion was found to significantly influence shrinkage patterns. The method used here could be employed to visualize shrinkage vectors and shrinkage volume. PMID:24988881

  8. Measurement of polymerization-shrinkage evolution during curing in photopolymer with a white-light Fabry-Pérot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Kawana, Masaru; Takahashi, Jun-ichiro; Guo, Jinxin; Tomita, Yasuo

    2015-06-15

    We propose a simple method of measuring polymerization-shrinkage evolution during curing in photopolymer. The real-time spectral fringe analysis of a broadband beam transmitted through a Fabry-Pérot etalon supported by a photopolymer film provides the shrinkage evolution during curing. For the proof-of-principle demonstration a blue-sensitized nanoparticle-polymer composite material is used. It is shown that the measured shrinkage dynamics are well correlated with the photo-calorimetric conversion dynamics of monomer to polymer. We also discuss a discrepancy in steady-state shrinkage between our proposed and holographic Bragg-angle detuning measurements. PMID:26193515

  9. Temperature dependence of band gap ratio and Q-factor defect mode in a semiconductor quaternary alloy hexagonal photonic-crystal hole slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Cano, R.; Porras-Montenegro, N.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical predictions for the photonic TE-like band gap ratio and the quality factors of symmetric localized defect as a function of the thickness slab and temperature by the use of plane wave expansion and the finite-difference time-domain methods. The photonic-crystal hole slab is composed of a 2D hexagonal array with identical air holes and a circular cross section, embedded in a non-dispersive III-V semiconductor quaternary alloy slab, which has a high value of dielectric function in the near-infrared region, and the symmetric defect is formed by increasing the radius of a single hole in the 2D hexagonal lattice. We show that the band gap ratio depends linearly on the temperature in the range 150-400 K. Our results show a strong temperature dependence of the quality factor Q, the maximum (Q = 7000) is reached at T = 350 hbox {K}, but if the temperature continues to increase, the efficiency drops sharply. Furthermore, we present numerical predictions for the electromagnetic field distribution at T = 350 hbox {K}.

  10. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  11. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  12. Shrinkage control in a photopolymerizable hybrid solgel material for holographic recording.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Alvarez-Herrero, Alberto; Belenguer, Tomas; del Monte, Francisco; Levy, David

    2004-07-10

    We report the correction of the shrinkage observed during UV postrecording curing in a holographic solgel material that was recently achieved by the use of various chemical formulations for the composition of the hybrid supporting matrix. We found that a chemical modification of the matrix noticeably attenuates the shrinkage (from 1.3% to 0.4% of the material's initial thickness with the inclusion of just 20% tetramethylorthosilicate), providing a material with improved stability for permanent data storage applications. The holographic properties of samples with different binders are also reported. In addition, a theoretical study has revealed the way by which to compensate for angular deviation in the Bragg condition during UV postrecording by tailoring the binder shrinkage (s), the maximum refractive-index modulation capability of the photosensitive mixture (deltan), or both. PMID:15285093

  13. Hormone-dependent shrinkage of a sphenoid wing meningioma after pregnancy: case report.

    PubMed

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Freyschlag, Christian F; Stockhammer, Günter; Taucher, Susanne; Maier, Hans; Thomé, Claudius; Seiz-Rosenhagen, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Meningiomas are known to be associated with female sex hormones. Worsening neurological symptoms or newly diagnosed meningiomas have been described in the context of elevated levels of sex hormones, for example, in pregnancy. To the authors' knowledge, tumor shrinkage after the normalization of hormones has not been described, even if it is known that neurological deficits due to meningioma compression may improve after giving birth. A 32-year-old female patient presented with severe headache and vision disturbances at the end of her second pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an extended mass at the lateral left-sided sphenoid wing that was suspected to be a meningioma. After delivery, the patient's symptoms improved, and MRI obtained 2 months postpartum showed significant shrinkage of the lesion. Significant tumor shrinkage can occur after pregnancy. Thus, repeat imaging is indicated in these patients. PMID:26162042

  14. Shrinkage of polyurethane molecular stamp fixed on epoxy resin modified glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengchun; He, Quanguo; Xiao, Pengfeng; Tang, Jianxin; He, Nongyue; Lu, Zuhong

    2003-01-01

    The shrinkage of polyurethane stamps used for the in situ synthesis of DNA microarrays via molecular stamping method was studied with Micron XYZ Scope. It was found that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass strongly and showed minimum linear shrinkage. The linear shrinkage of the whole polyurethane stamp and that of each feature of polyurethane stamp were controlled within 0.0341% and 0.309%, respectively, which were due to the strong van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds between polyurethane and epoxy resin. It was also confirmed by scanning electron microscope that the polyurethane stamp fixed on the epoxy resin modified glass replicated the patterns of motherboard with a high fidelity. All these underlay the synthesis of DNA microarray through molecular stamping method.

  15. Fast approach to infrared image restoration based on shrinkage functions calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chengshuo; Shi, Zelin; Xu, Baoshu; Feng, Bin

    2016-05-01

    High-quality image restoration in real time is a challenge for infrared imaging systems. We present a fast approach to infrared image restoration based on shrinkage functions calibration. Rather than directly modeling the prior of sharp images to obtain the shrinkage functions, we calibrate them for restoration directly by using the acquirable sharp and blurred image pairs from the same infrared imaging system. The calibration method is employed to minimize the sum of squared errors between sharp images and restored images from the blurred images. Our restoration algorithm is noniterative and its shrinkage functions are stored in the look-up tables, so an architecture solution of pipeline structure can work in real time. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by testing its quantitative performance from simulation experiments and its qualitative performance from a developed wavefront coding infrared imaging system.

  16. Shrinkage of microstructures produced by two-photon polymerization of Zr-based hybrid photosensitive materials.

    PubMed

    Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Shizhou, Xiao; Farsari, Maria; Vamvakaki, Maria; Fotakis, Costas; Chichkov, Boris N

    2009-02-16

    An investigation of the shrinking behaviour of a zirconium-based sol-gel composite micro-structured by two-photon polymerization is presented and a simple, straightforward methodology allowing the evaluation of shrinkage is suggested. It is shown that volume reduction is directly related to the average laser power (irradiation dose) used for the microfabrication and becomes a critical issue near the polymerization threshold. It is demonstrated that this shrinkage can be employed beneficially to improve the structural resolution. This is demonstrated by the presence of stopbands in the photonic crystal nanostructures fabricated with controlled volume reduction. Well above the polymerization threshold, the studied material exhibits remarkably low shrinkage. Therefore, no additional effort for the pre-compensation of distortion and for the improvement of structural stability is required. PMID:19219118

  17. Numerical evaluation of angular multiplexing in reflection-type holographic data storage in photopolymer with shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yusuke; Nitta, Kouichi; Matoba, Osamu

    2010-02-01

    We evaluate numerically the effect of shrinkage of photopolymer on the bit error rate or signal-to-noise ratio in a reflection-type holographic data storage system with angular multiplexing. In the evaluation, we use a simple model where the material is divided into layered structures and then the shrinkage rate is proportional to the intensity in each layer. We present the effectiveness of the proposed model from the experimental results in the recording of the plane waves both in a transmission-type hologram and a reflection-type one. Several kinds of shrinkage rates are used to evaluate the characteristics of angular multiplexing in the reflection-type holographic memory. PMID:20119021

  18. Treatment of ligament laxity by electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication: a morphologic and mechanical comparison.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adam M; Jones, Ioan T; Hansen, Ulrich; Suri, Amrita; Sandison, Ann; Moss, Jill; Wallace, Andrew L

    2007-01-01

    Capsular plication or thermal shrinkage can be used to enhance surgical joint stabilization. We compared mechanical or morphologic properties of the medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee treated by either bipolar radiofrequency electrothermal shrinkage or surgical plication. After 12 weeks, the medial collateral ligaments were procured from treated and contralateral knees to undergo viscoelastic (creep) testing, quantitative transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Creep strain in thermal (1.85% +/- 0.32%) and plicated (1.92% +/- 0.36%) ligaments was almost twice that of the control group (1.04% +/- 0.15%), although there was no difference between treatment modalities. The morphologic parameters of all 3 groups were significantly different (P < .001). The thermal ligaments demonstrated predominantly small fibrils, whereas the plicated group displayed an intermediate distribution of heterogeneous fibrils, suggesting a different pattern of remodeling. Viscoelastic properties are similar after thermal shrinkage or plication, though inferior to those of intact ligaments. PMID:17030129

  19. Ultra low-K shrinkage behavior when under electron beam in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Lorut, F.; Imbert, G.; Roggero, A.

    2013-08-28

    In this paper, we investigate the tendency of porous low-K dielectrics (also named Ultra Low-K, ULK) behavior to shrink when exposed to the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope. Various experimental electron beam conditions have been used for irradiating ULK thin films, and the resulting shrinkage has been measured through use of an atomic force microscope tool. We report the shrinkage to be a fast, cumulative, and dose dependent effect. Correlation of the shrinkage with incident electron beam energy loss has also been evidenced. The chemical modification of the ULK films within the interaction volume has been demonstrated, with a densification of the layer and a loss of carbon and hydrogen elements being observed.

  20. Shrinkage of freeze-dried cryosections of cells: Investigations by EFTEM and cryo-CLEM.

    PubMed

    Casanova, G; Nolin, F; Wortham, L; Ploton, D; Banchet, V; Michel, J

    2016-09-01

    Freeze-drying of cryosections of cells or tissues is considered to be the most efficient preparation for microanalysis purpose related to transmission electron microscopy. It allows the measurements of ions and water contents at the ultrastructural level. However an important drawback is associated to freeze-drying: the shrinkage of the cryosections. The aim of this paper is the investigation of this phenomenon by means of three different methods applied to both hydrated and dehydrated cryosections: direct distance measurements on fiducial points, thickness measurements by energy filtered transmission microscopy (EFTEM) and cryo-correlative light electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM). Measurements in our experimental conditions reveal a lateral shrinkage around 10% but the most important result concerns the lack of differential shrinkage between most of the cellular compartments. PMID:27428286

  1. Polymerization shrinkage and contraction force of composite resin restorative inserted with "Megafiller".

    PubMed

    Tani, Y; Nambu, T; Ishikawa, A; Katsuyama, S

    1993-12-01

    This study quantified the contraction force and polymerization shrinkage of composite resins with/without beta-Quartz Glass Ceramic Inserts (BQCI) as "Megafiller". The materials used for the determination included a chemically cured composite and five light-cured composites. The system for measuring contraction force consisted of a transparent teflon tube for preparing the specimen, a small load cell, a dynamic strain gauge and a pen-recorder. After the composite was packed into the teflon mold, a BQCI (Type R3) was inserted through the opening and the specimen was cured. Linear polymerization shrinkage of the composites was measured every 10 seconds from the start of mixing or irradiation to 90 minutes by the mercury bath method. Three pieces each of BQCI (Type T3) were inserted in each specimen. The results suggested that BQCI was markedly effective in reducing polymerization shrinkage, but was not always effective in reducing the contraction force during polymerization. PMID:8004912

  2. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  3. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  4. Regional Brain Shrinkage over Two Years: Individual Differences and Effects of Pro-Inflammatory Genetic Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Persson, N.; Ghisletta, P.; Dahle, C.L.; Bender, A.R.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, P.; Daugherty, A.M.; Raz, N.

    2014-01-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N = 167, age 19-79 years at baseline; N = 90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (HC), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the HC, CbH, In, OF, and the PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants mediated shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1βC-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFRC677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan. PMID:25264227

  5. Shrinkage Study of Polypropylene Films Laminated on Steel-Influence of the Conformation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponçot, Marc; Martin, Julien; Dahoun, Abdesselam; Hiver, Jean-Marie; Bourson, Patrice; Verchère, Didier

    2011-05-01

    Nowadays, thermoplastic polymers do not cease to attract the interest of the industrialists as steel / polymer composites for various applications in several domains, such as the automotive and the packaging. The ratio between their wide range of thermo-mechanical properties and their low weight density make these materials a real alternative for the current solutions for the lightening and the reinforcement of structural pieces. Likewise, their working facility is a major asset for performing parts of complex geometry. In this paper, we highlight the narrow relationship between the microstructure of a small impact isotactic polypropylene film, either filled or not by mineral particles (calcite), and its behaviour towards shrinkage which can occur during thermal treatments above its melting temperature. This phenomenon of shrinkage is characterized by dimensional instabilities which can in particular, affect the life cycle of the material. Indeed, they may induce the partial delamination of the steel sheet which is consequently exposed to various environmental aggressions. Corrosive behaviour can occur and cause early breakdown of the material. Influences of the extrusion and stamping processes on the microstructure and the shrinkage are presented. The macromolecular chains orientation of the crystalline phase, the volume damage and the heating parameters are studied, and show a real impact on the phenomenon magnitude. An experimental setup was developed at the laboratory to measure in real-time and with good precision, the displacements induced by shrinkage and the microstructural evolution of the polymer film during different thermal cycles. Finally, an empirical law allowing the shrinkage prediction is presented, taking into account the deformation value and the initial degree of chains orientation. These studies and their results have led to the determination of the optimal parameters settings for the different conformation processes with the aim of reducing

  6. Precise measurement of photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by SEM-induced shrinkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern was obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on the sample patterns. Photoresist lines and spaces fabricated with positive-tone development and negative-tone development were exposed to an EB with much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation show that the shrinkage of the negative-tone-developed patterns is smaller than that of the positive-tone-developed patterns. This observation is explained by the fact that negative-tone-developed photoresist molecules do not contain protection groups, whose volatilization caused by EB irradiation is one of the origins of shrinkage. Another finding is that the EB irradiation causes top-rounding and necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. The rounding of the pattern top profile suggests that the pattern's shape was elastically deformed. In addition, EB irradiation only onto the spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and a necking profile, although no electrons were irradiated directly onto the pattern. These phenomena are considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation of electron scattering showed that the distribution of the deposited EB energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the above-described change in pattern shape. Consequently, these observations and simulation results clarify the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer onto the sidewall in the mechanism of photoresist shrinkage.

  7. Band-gap shrinkage calculations and analytic model for strained bulk InGaAsP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Band-gap shrinkage is an important effect in semiconductor lasers and optical amplifiers. In the former it leads to an increase in the lasing wavelength and in the latter an increase in the gain peak wavelength as the bias current is increased. The most common model used for carrier-density dependent band-gap shrinkage is a cube root dependency on carrier density, which is strictly only true for high carrier densities and low temperatures. This simple model, involves a material constant which is treated as a fitting parameter. Strained InGaAsP material is commonly used to fabricate polarization insensitive semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). Most mathematical models for SOAs use the cube root bandgap shrinkage model. However, because SOAs are often operated over a wide range of drive currents and input optical powers leading to large variations in carrier density along the amplifier length, for improved model accuracy it is preferable to use band-gap shrinkage calculated from knowledge of the material bandstructure. In this letter the carrier density dependent band-gap shrinkage for strained InGaAsP is calculated by using detailed non-parabolic conduction and valence band models. The shrinkage dependency on temperature and both tensile and compressive strain is investigated and compared to the cube root model, for which it shows significant deviation. A simple power model, showing an almost square-root dependency, is derived for carrier densities in the range usually encountered in InGaAsP laser diodes and SOAs.

  8. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo S.; Moro, André F.V.; Perez, Cesar R.; Pessôa, Bárbara M.; Dias, Katia R.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm2 light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm. Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p < 0.05) between different materials: non-flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p < 0.05). However, the values for low-shrinkage flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs. Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today’s dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable) and silorane-based composite—by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness—reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in this study

  9. OPTIMAL SHRINKAGE ESTIMATION OF MEAN PARAMETERS IN FAMILY OF DISTRIBUTIONS WITH QUADRATIC VARIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xianchao; Kou, S. C.; Brown, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the simultaneous inference of mean parameters in a family of distributions with quadratic variance function. We first introduce a class of semi-parametric/parametric shrinkage estimators and establish their asymptotic optimality properties. Two specific cases, the location-scale family and the natural exponential family with quadratic variance function, are then studied in detail. We conduct a comprehensive simulation study to compare the performance of the proposed methods with existing shrinkage estimators. We also apply the method to real data and obtain encouraging results. PMID:27041778

  10. Sparsity-based shrinkage approach for practicability improvement of H-LBP-based edge extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenyi; Qiao, Shuang; Sun, Jianing; Zhao, Ruikun; Wu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    The local binary pattern with H function (H-LBP) technique enables fast and efficient edge extraction in digital radiography. In this paper, we reformulate the model of H-LBP and propose a novel sparsity-based shrinkage approach, in which the threshold can be adapted to the data sparsity. Using this model, we upgrade fast H-LBP framework and apply it to real digital radiography. The experiments show that the method improved using the new shrinkage approach can avoid elaborately artificial modulation of parameters and possess greater robustness in edge extraction compared with the other current methods without increasing processing time.

  11. Compressible cake filtration: monitoring cake formation and shrinkage using synchrotron X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bierck, B.R.; Wells, S.A.; Dick, R.I.

    1988-05-01

    High energy, highly collimated X-rays produced at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Sources (CHESS) enabled real-time suspended solids concentration measurements each second with 0.5 mm vertical separation in a kaolin filter cake. Suspended solids concentration profiles reflected expected effects of cumulative fluid drag forces. Shrinkage caused a significant increase in average cake suspended solids concentration after expiration of the slurry, and the saturated cake ultimately formed was virtually homogeneous. Shrinkage is consolidation under compressive forces created when capillary menisci form at air/liquid interfaces, and has a significant effect on cake structure in latter stages of compressible cake filtration.

  12. Selected mechanical and physical properties and clinical application of a new low-shrinkage composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Sillas; Botta, Ana Carolina; Phark, Jin-Ho; Sadan, Avishai

    2009-09-01

    Polymerization shrinkage is a major concern for bonded direct posterior restorations. Recently, a new low-shrinkage composite resin restorative material was developed. However, few data are available regarding clinical manipulation of this composite. Silorane-based composites represent an alternative to conventional methacrylate-based composites for direct posterior restorations. This article critically discusses the latest peer-reviewed reports related to polymerization, bonding, polishing, and color stability of silorane composite, focusing on its clinical application. Initial evaluation of this new category of composite material shows acceptable mechanical and physical properties. PMID:19639087

  13. Visualization study of the shrinkage void distribution in thermal energy storage capsules of different geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Revankar, Shripad T.; Croy, Travis

    2007-01-15

    The presence of concentrated shrinkage voids in thermal energy storage systems employing encapsulated phase change material can cause serious problems when one attempts to melt the solidified phase change material for the next thermal cycle. Experiments were performed and void-formation phenomena with rectangular flat plate, spherical, and torus shape capsules were investigated. The initial void growth, distribution and the total void in the capsule were photographically studied from transparent capsules using cyclohexane, hexadecane, butanediol and octadecane as phase change materials. The observations on freezing process and the shrinkage void distribution are presented. (author)

  14. Determination of the dynamic stress intensity factors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy using the reflected caustic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukagoshi, Seiji; Takahashi, Susumu; Shimamoto, Akira

    1996-12-31

    Dynamic fracture initiation and propagation in Al 7075-T6 was investigated experimentally using the optical method of reflected caustics combined with a simplified high speed photography. A crack propagation testing configuration consisting of a three point bending specimen loaded In a drop weighting was used. It was found that prior to crack initiation the stress intensity factor time record calculated using the dynamic impact load and a static formula disagrees with the actual stress Intensity factor measured by caustics. The impact fracture tests are performed. With use of Al 7075-T6 band plate test specimens with a V-notch on their one side. The dynamic stress intensity factor K{sub id} are given. With this, the authors experimentally calculated the dynamic fracture toughness K{sub ID}.

  15. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  16. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  17. CD metrology for avoiding shrinkage of ArF resist patterns in 100 nm ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tae-Jun; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    ML 4689-80 CD Metrology for Avoiding Shrinkage of ArF Resist Patterns in 100nm ArF Lithography Tae-Jun You, Cheolkyu Bok, Ki-Soo Shin Hynix Semiconductor, San 136-1 Amiri, Bubal-eub, Ichon-si, Kyongki-do 467-701, Korea We have observed CD(Critical Dimension) shrinkage of acrylate type ArF resist patterns during SEM measurement. CD change was 30% shrinkage for line pattern and 10% expansion for contact hole patterns after 30 times measurement. CD shrinkage was proportion to line pattern size but no relation with LER(Line Edge Roughness). We confirm that CD shrinkage different from resist to resist and SEM measurement condition. CD shrinkage was bigger for acrylate type resist than COMA(Cyclo Olefin Maleic Anhydride) type resist and smaller at lower electron voltage and current conditions. In order to get the improvement of CD shrinkage, we performed electron-beam curing before SEM measurement. Above (see paper for formula) electron-beam dose condition, CD shrinkage improved from 10% to 3%. However, this method caused OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) issue as CD also changed after electron-beam curing. Therefore, we tried to develop a new measurement method instead of applying additional process technique. In this paper, we will describe our CD measurement method, Off-Site measurement technique, for 100nm DRAM lithography. The Off-Site CD measurement repeatability (formula available in paper) was controlled below (see paper).

  18. Experimental evaluation and simulation of volumetric shrinkage and warpage on polymeric composite reinforced with short natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Jonnathan D.; Fajardo, Jorge I.; Cuji, Alvaro R.; García, Jaime A.; Garzón, Luis E.; López, Luis M.

    2015-09-01

    A polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composite is developed by extrusion and injection molding process. The shrinkage and warpage of high-density polyethylene reinforced with short natural fibers of Guadua angustifolia Kunth are analyzed by experimental measurements and computer simulations. Autodesk Moldflow® and Solid Works® are employed to simulate both volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts at different configurations: 0 wt.%, 20 wt.%, 30 wt.% and 40 wt.% reinforcing on shrinkage and warpage behavior of polymer composite. Become evident the restrictive effect of reinforcing on the volumetric shrinkage and warpage of injected parts. The results indicate that volumetric shrinkage of natural composite is reduced up to 58% with fiber increasing, whereas the warpage shows a reduction form 79% to 86% with major fiber content. These results suggest that it is a highly beneficial use of natural fibers to improve the assembly properties of polymeric natural fiber-reinforced composites.

  19. Permeability Enhancement in Fine-Grained Sediments by Chemically Induced Clay Fabric Shrinkage

    SciTech Connect

    Wijesinghe, A M; Kansa, E J; Viani, B E; Blake, R G; Roberts, J J; Huber, R D

    2004-02-26

    ?'' To this end, we performed a crack propagation experiment under confining stress on an initially water-saturated bentonite clay layer that was exposed to pure ethanol on one surface and water on the other. We measured the rate of transport of ethanol across the clay layer and found that crack breakthrough across the clay layer was accompanied by a very large sudden increase in solvent flow through the layer. Although an experimental artifact prevented measurement of the exact breakthrough time, visual evidence indicates that the clay layer cracked rapidly in this experiment. Direct evidence of the cracks provided by X-ray tomographic images provide clear proof that an extensive array of cracks was created by the ethanol-induced shrinkage. Calculations based on measured fluid pressure and flow rates, and published permeabilities of unaltered calcium bentonite clays, show that the effective permeability of the clay layer increased by a factor of 10{sup 9}-10{sup 12}. Estimates of effective permeability based on crack dimensions measured from the X-ray tomographic images support these findings. Further detailed experiments and analyses are needed to develop a predictive theory and a quantitative design capability for this process. We have begun work on securing the necessary support for these studies, with the ultimate objective of developing and deploying this novel concept as a practical remediation technology in the field.

  20. Bayes and Empirical Bayes Shrinkage Estimation of Regression Coefficients: A Cross-Validation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebebe, Fassil; Stroud, T. W. F.

    1988-01-01

    Bayesian and empirical Bayes approaches to shrinkage estimation of regression coefficients and uses of these in prediction (i.e., analyzing intelligence test data of children with learning problems) are investigated. The two methods are consistently better at predicting response variables than are either least squares or least absolute deviations.…

  1. Use of Empirical Estimates of Shrinkage in Multiple Regression: A Caution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Hines, Constance V.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of four empirical techniques to estimate shrinkage in multiple regression was studied through Monte Carlo simulation. None of the techniques provided unbiased estimates of the population squared multiple correlation coefficient, but the normalized jackknife and bootstrap techniques demonstrated marginally acceptable performance with…

  2. Estimating R-squared Shrinkage in Multiple Regression: A Comparison of Different Analytical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Ping; Fan, Xitao

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effectiveness of various analytical formulas for estimating "R" squared shrinkage in multiple regression analysis, focusing on estimators of the squared population multiple correlation coefficient and the squared population cross validity coefficient. Simulation results suggest that the most widely used Wherry (R. Wherry, 1931) formula…

  3. [Shrinkage In the Squared Multiple Correlation Coefficient and Unbiased Estimates of Treatment Effects Using Omega Squared.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Starrett

    The amount of variance accounted for by treatment can be estimated with omega squared or with the squared multiple correlation coefficient. Monte Carlo methods were employed to compare omega squared, the squared multiple correlation coefficient, and the squared multiple correlation coefficient to which a shrinkage formula had been applied, in…

  4. Direct voxel-based comparisons between grey matter shrinkage and glucose hypometabolism in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Ludivine; Segobin, Shailendra; Lannuzel, Coralie; Boudehent, Céline; Vabret, François; Eustache, Francis; Beaunieux, Hélène; Pitel, Anne L

    2016-09-01

    Alcoholism is associated with widespread brain structural abnormalities affecting mainly the frontocerebellar and the Papez's circuits. Brain glucose metabolism has received limited attention, and few studies used regions of interest approach and showed reduced global brain metabolism predominantly in the frontal and parietal lobes. Even though these studies have examined the relationship between grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism, none has performed a direct voxel-by-voxel comparison between the degrees of structural and metabolic abnormalities. Seventeen alcoholic patients and 16 control subjects underwent both structural magnetic resonance imaging and (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography examinations. Structural abnormalities and hypometabolism were examined in alcoholic patients compared with control subjects using two-sample t-tests. Then, these two patterns of brain damage were directly compared with a paired t-test. Compared to controls, alcoholic patients had grey matter shrinkage and hypometabolism in the fronto-cerebellar circuit and several nodes of Papez's circuit. The direct comparison revealed greater shrinkage than hypometabolism in the cerebellum, cingulate cortex, thalamus and hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. Conversely, hypometabolism was more severe than shrinkage in the dorsolateral, premotor and parietal cortices. The distinct profiles of abnormalities found within the Papez's circuit, the fronto-cerebellar circuit and the parietal gyrus in chronic alcoholism suggest the involvement of different pathological mechanisms. PMID:26661206

  5. Reducing Shrinkage in Convenience Stores by the Use of the PSI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terris, William; Jones, John W.

    This bibliography contains over 1,200 behavioral and property is a rapidly growing problem. Successful strategies are needed to reduce employee theft; new loss prevention techniques need to be developed and evaluated. Two loss prevention programs aimed at reducing employees' theft were compared by the measures of shrinkage rates. Initially, a…

  6. Synthesis of a liquid-crystalline resin monomer with the property of low shrinkage polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenwen; Chen, Su; Liu, Yiran; Ma, Yuanping; Wang, Na; Zhang, Zhenting; Yang, Yuzhe

    2013-01-01

    To reduce the polymerization shrinkage of the dental resin composites, a new liquid-crystalline resin monomer was developed. The acrylate liquid crystalline resin monomer (ALCRM), (4-3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropoxy) phenyl 4-(3-(acryloyloxy)-2-hydroxypropoxy) benzoate, was synthesized by a three-step method. Using the ALCRM as the main monomer, the degree of conversion (DC) and the volume shrinkage of the resin matrix were compared with the traditional composite resin monomer (Bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxy-propoxy)-phenyl] propane. The new monomer showed liquid crystalline characteristics with a mesomorphic phasetransition temperature between 18ºC and 42ºC. When copolymerized with triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) at a weight ratio of 7:3, the DC of ALCRM was higher and the volume shrinkage was 3.62±0.26%, which was less than that of the Bis-GMA. The ALCRM exhibits promising potential for the development of superior dental resins with low volume shrinkage. PMID:23903635

  7. Comparative evaluation of residual monomer content and polymerization shrinkage of a packable composite and an ormocer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shalini; Padda, Bhupinder Kaur; Choudhary, Veena

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the residual monomer content and polymerization shrinkage of a packable composite (Surefil) and an ormocer (Admira). Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in two parts. In Part I, 10 samples of each material were prepared in a standardized split brass mould, using incremental curing technique. The residual monomer content was measured by observing change in weight before and after Soxhlet Extraction procedure. In part II, the volumetric polymerization shrinkage was calculated by measuring the difference in specific gravities of 10 uncured and 10 cured samples of each material using a modified version of ASTM D-792 method. The data obtained was put to statistical analysis using student's ‘t’ test. Results: Part I - The percentage change in weight for Surefil was 0.525% while that for Admira was 0.374%, which was found to be statistically significant. Part II - The volumetric percentage shrinkage for Surefil ranged between 1.04-3.42% and that for Admira between 1.01-2.31%, which was not found to be significant statistically. Conclusion: Admira may be considered more biocompatible than Surefil due to the lower residual monomer content in the former; however, both are comparable with regards to their polymerization shrinkage. PMID:22557816

  8. Low-shrinkage dental restorative composite: modeling viscoelastic behavior during setting.

    PubMed

    Dauvillier, Bibi S; Feilzer, Albert J

    2005-04-01

    Much attention has been directed toward developing dental direct restorative composites that generate less shrinkage stress during setting. The aim of this study was to explore the viscoelastic behavior of a new class of low-shrinkage dental restorative composite during setting. The setting behavior of an experimental oxirane composite has been investigated by analyzing stress-strain data with two-parametric mechanical models. Experimental data were obtained from a dynamic test method, in which the setting light-activated composite was continuously subjected to sinusoidal strain cycles. The material parameters and the model's predictive capacity were analyzed with validated modeling procedures. The light-activated oxirane composite exhibited shrinkage delay and low polymerization shrinkage strain and stresses when compared with conventional light-activated composite. Noise in the stress data restricted the predictive ability of the Maxwell model to the elastic modulus development of the composite only. Evaluation tests of their potential as restorative material are required, to examine if the biocompatibility and mechanical properties after setting of oxirane composites are acceptable for dental use. PMID:15685614

  9. Differential brain shrinkage over 6 months shows limited association with cognitive practice.

    PubMed

    Raz, Naftali; Schmiedek, Florian; Rodrigue, Karen M; Kennedy, Kristen M; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2013-07-01

    The brain shrinks with age, but the timing of this process and the extent of its malleability are unclear. We measured changes in regional brain volumes in younger (age 20-31) and older (age 65-80) adults twice over a 6 month period, and examined the association between changes in volume, history of hypertension, and cognitive training. Between two MRI scans, 49 participants underwent intensive practice in three cognitive domains for 100 consecutive days, whereas 23 control group members performed no laboratory cognitive tasks. Regional volumes of seven brain structures were measured manually and adjusted for intracranial volume. We observed significant mean shrinkage in the lateral prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus, the caudate nucleus, and the cerebellum, but no reliable mean change of the prefrontal white matter, orbital-frontal cortex, and the primary visual cortex. Individual differences in change were reliable in all regions. History of hypertension was associated with greater cerebellar shrinkage. The cerebellum was the only region in which significantly reduced shrinkage was apparent in the experimental group after completion of cognitive training. Thus, in healthy adults, differential brain shrinkage can be observed in a narrow time window, vascular risk may aggravate it, and intensive cognitive activity may have a limited effect on it. PMID:23665948

  10. Astrocytic Mechanisms Explaining Neural-Activity-Induced Shrinkage of Extraneuronal Space

    PubMed Central

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Nagelhus, Erlend A.; Plahte, Erik; Zeuthen, Thomas; Lloyd, Catherine M.; Ottersen, Ole P.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal stimulation causes ∼30% shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS) between neurons and surrounding astrocytes in grey and white matter under experimental conditions. Despite its possible implications for a proper understanding of basic aspects of potassium clearance and astrocyte function, the phenomenon remains unexplained. Here we present a dynamic model that accounts for current experimental data related to the shrinkage phenomenon in wild-type as well as in gene knockout individuals. We find that neuronal release of potassium and uptake of sodium during stimulation, astrocyte uptake of potassium, sodium, and chloride in passive channels, action of the Na/K/ATPase pump, and osmotically driven transport of water through the astrocyte membrane together seem sufficient for generating ECS shrinkage as such. However, when taking into account ECS and astrocyte ion concentrations observed in connection with neuronal stimulation, the actions of the Na+/K+/Cl− (NKCC1) and the Na+/HCO3− (NBC) cotransporters appear to be critical determinants for achieving observed quantitative levels of ECS shrinkage. Considering the current state of knowledge, the model framework appears sufficiently detailed and constrained to guide future key experiments and pave the way for more comprehensive astroglia–neuron interaction models for normal as well as pathophysiological situations. PMID:19165313