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Sample records for alloys fracture mechanics

  1. The microstructural, mechanical, and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steel alloyed with gallium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolman, D. G.; Bingert, J. F.; Field, R. D.

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical and fracture properties of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) alloyed with gallium require assessment in order to determine the likelihood of premature storage-container failure following Ga uptake. AISI 304 L SS was cast with 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 wt pct Ga. Increased Ga concentration promoted duplex microstructure formation with the ferritic phase having a nearly identical composition to the austenitic phase. Room-temperature tests indicated that small additions of Ga (less than 3 wt pct) were beneficial to the mechanical behavior of 304 L SS but that 12 wt pct Ga resulted in a 95 pct loss in ductility. Small additions of Ga are beneficial to the cracking resistance of stainless steel. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis indicated that 3 wt pct Ga alloys showed the greatest resistance to crack initiation and propagation as measured by fatigue crack growth rate, fracture toughness, and tearing modulus. The 12 wt pct Ga alloys were least resistant to crack initiation and propagation and these alloys primarily failed by transgranular cleavage. It is hypothesized that Ga metal embrittlement is partially responsible for increased embrittlement.

  2. Fracture toughness testing and toughening mechanisms of some commercial cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1998-04-27

    Hardfacing alloys are weld deposited to provide a wear resistant surface for structural base materials. Commercial low cobalt hardfacing alloys are being evaluated to reduce plant activation levels. Since hardfacing alloys typically must be resistant to cracking to assure adequate in service performance, fracture toughness is a critical material property. Fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) measurements of Fe base, Ni-base, and Co-base hardfacing were performed in accordance with ASTM E399-90 procedure in an effort to identify a tough cobalt-free alternative. Reduced scatter in K{sub IC} data was observed for the Fe base hardfacing, and the 95% lower bound K{sub IC} values were generally higher than the Ni-base Hardfacing alloys. Preliminary crack growth data obtained during precracking indicate that the Ni-base hardfacing possess better fatigue crack growth resistance. However, none of the Fe-base or Ni-base hardfacing have K{sub IC} values that are comparable to the reference Co-base hard facing. The test specimens were machined from thick (0.5 inches) weld deposits, and the microstructures of the test specimens are compared with the more prototypic, thinner deposits. Microstructural and fractographic examinations are used to characterize the fracture mechanisms and delineate the operative toughening mechanisms. Crack deflection and crack bridging toughening mechanisms are shown to be relevant for most of the commercial hardfacing.

  3. Elevated temperature fracture of RS/PM alloy 8009; Part 1: Fracture mechanics behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Porr, W.C. Jr. ); Gangloff, R.P. )

    1994-02-01

    Increasing temperature and decreasing loading rate degrade the planes strain initiation (K[sub ICi] from the J integral) and growth (tearing modulus, T[sub R]) fracture toughnesses of RS/PM 8009 (Al-8.5Fe-1.3V-1.7Si, wt pct). K[sub ICi] decreases with increasing temperature from 25[degree]C to 175[degree]C (33 to 15 MPa[radical]m at 316[degree]C) without a minimum. T[sub R] is greater than zero at all temperatures and is minimized at 200[degree]C. A four order-of-magnitude decrease in loading rate, at 175[degree]C, results in a 2.5-fold decrease in K[sub ICi] and a 5-fold reduction in T[sub R]. K[sub ICi] and T[sub R] are anisotropic for extruded 8009 but are isotropic for cross-rolled plate. Cross rolling does not improve the magnitude or adverse temperature dependence of toughness. Delamination occurs along oxide-decorated particle boundaries for extruded but not cross-rolled 8009. Delamination toughening plays no role in the temperature dependence of K[sub ICi], however, T[sub R] is increased by this mechanism. Macroscopic work softening and flow localization do not occur for notch-root deformation; such uniaxial tensile phenomena may not be directly relevant to crack-tip fracture. Micromechanical modeling, employing temperature-dependent flow strength, modulus, and constrained fracture strain, reasonably predicts the temperature dependencies of K[sub ICi] and T[sub R] for 8009.

  4. Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies of fatigue crack growth in an aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, R. P.; Pao, P. S.; Hart, R. G.; Weir, T. W.; Simmons, G. W.

    1980-12-01

    Fracture mechanics and surface chemistry studies were carried out to develop further understanding of the influence of water vapor on fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloys. The room temperature fatigue crack growth response was determined for 2219-T851 aluminum alloy exposed to water vapor at pressures from 1 to 30 Pa over a range of stress intensity factors ( K). Data were also obtained in vacuum (at < 0.50 μPa), and dehumidified argon. The test results showed that, at a frequency of 5 Hz, the rate of crack growth is essentially unaffected by water vapor until a threshold pressure is reached. Above this threshold, the rates increased, reaching a maximum within one order of magnitude increase in vapor pressure. This maximum crack growth rate is equal to that obtained in air (40 to 60 pct relative humidity), distilled water and 3.5 pct NaCl solution on the same material. Parallel studies of the reactions of water vapor with fresh alloy surfaces (produced either by in situ impact fracture or by ion etching) were made by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The extent of surface reaction was monitored by changes in the oxygen AES and XPS signals. Correlation between the fatigue crack growth response and the surface reaction kinetics has been made, and is consistent with a transport-limited model for crack growth. The results also suggest that enhancement of fatigue crack growth by water vapor in the aluminum alloys occurs through a “hydrogen embrittle ment” mechanism.

  5. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  6. Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys 7085-O and 7175-T7452 Hollow Cylinder Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Samuel G.; Chalivendra, Vijaya B.; Rice, Matthew A.; Doleski, Robert F.

    2016-06-01

    Microstructural, tensile, and fracture characterizations of cylindrically forged forms of aluminum alloys AA7085-O and AA7175-T7452 were performed. Mechanical and fracture properties were investigated along radial, circumferential, and longitudinal directions to determine directional dependency. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test methods (ASTM E8-04 and ASTM E1820) were employed for both the tensile and fracture characterizations, respectively. The tensile and fracture properties were related to microstructure in each direction. The strength, elongation at break, and ultimate tensile strength of AA7085-O were higher than those of AA7175-T7452. AA7175-T7452 alloy failed in a brittle manner during fracture studies. AA7085-O outperformed AA7175-T7452 on fracture energy in all of the orientations studied. Smaller grain sizes on the planes normal to circumferential and longitudinal directions showed improvement in both elongation at break and fracture energy values compared to those of radial direction. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated cleavage fracture in AA7175-T7452 and transgranular fracture in AA7085-O.

  7. Characterization of the Microstructure, Fracture, and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys 7085-O and 7175-T7452 Hollow Cylinder Extrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Samuel G.; Chalivendra, Vijaya B.; Rice, Matthew A.; Doleski, Robert F.

    2016-09-01

    Microstructural, tensile, and fracture characterizations of cylindrically forged forms of aluminum alloys AA7085-O and AA7175-T7452 were performed. Mechanical and fracture properties were investigated along radial, circumferential, and longitudinal directions to determine directional dependency. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) test methods (ASTM E8-04 and ASTM E1820) were employed for both the tensile and fracture characterizations, respectively. The tensile and fracture properties were related to microstructure in each direction. The strength, elongation at break, and ultimate tensile strength of AA7085-O were higher than those of AA7175-T7452. AA7175-T7452 alloy failed in a brittle manner during fracture studies. AA7085-O outperformed AA7175-T7452 on fracture energy in all of the orientations studied. Smaller grain sizes on the planes normal to circumferential and longitudinal directions showed improvement in both elongation at break and fracture energy values compared to those of radial direction. Scanning electron microscopy images demonstrated cleavage fracture in AA7175-T7452 and transgranular fracture in AA7085-O.

  8. Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility Using Fracture Mechanics Techniques, Part 1. [environmental tests of aluminum alloys, stainless steels, and titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprowls, D. O.; Shumaker, M. B.; Walsh, J. D.; Coursen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking (SSC) tests were performed on 13 aluminum alloys, 13 precipitation hardening stainless steels, and two titanium 6Al-4V alloy forgings to compare fracture mechanics techniques with the conventional smooth specimen procedures. Commercially fabricated plate and rolled or forged bars 2 to 2.5-in. thick were tested. Exposures were conducted outdoors in a seacoast atmosphere and in an inland industrial atmosphere to relate the accelerated tests with service type environments. With the fracture mechanics technique tests were made chiefly on bolt loaded fatigue precracked compact tension specimens of the type used for plane-strain fracture toughness tests. Additional tests of the aluminum alloy were performed on ring loaded compact tension specimens and on bolt loaded double cantilever beams. For the smooth specimen procedure 0.125-in. dia. tensile specimens were loaded axially in constant deformation type frames. For both aluminum and steel alloys comparative SCC growth rates obtained from tests of precracked specimens provide an additional useful characterization of the SCC behavior of an alloy.

  9. The Mechanisms of Dispersion Strengthening and Fracture in Al-based XD (TM) Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, R. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of reinforcement size, volume fraction, and matrix deformation behavior on room and elevated temperature strength, and the fracture toughness of metal matrix composites of both pure aluminum and Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg with 0 to 15 vol percent TiB2 were examined. Higher TiB2 volume fractions increased the tensile yield strength both at room and elevated temperatures, and reduced the elongation to fracture. Tensile tests also indicate that small particles provided a greater increase in strength for a given volume fraction than larger particles, whereas elongation to fracture appeared to be insensitive to reinforcement size. The fracture toughness of the Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys decreased rapidly with TiB2 additions of 0 to 5 vol percent and more slowly with TiB2 additions of 5 to 15 vol percent. Fracture toughness appears to be independent of TiB2 particle size. The isothermal-aging response of the precipitation strengthened Al(4 percent)Cu(1.5 percent)Mg alloys was not altered by the presence of TiB2.

  10. Development and fracture mechanics data for 6Al-6V-2 Sn titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiftal, C. F.; Beck, E. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fracture mechanics properties of 6Al-6V-2Sn titanium in the annealed, solution-treated, and aged condition are presented. Tensile, fracture toughness, cyclic flaw growth, and sustained-load threshold tests were conducted. Both surface flaw and compact tension-specimen geometries were employed. Temperatures and/or environments used were -65 F (220 K) air, ambient, 300 F (422 K) air, and room-temperature air containing 10 and 100% relative humidity.

  11. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1993-01-25

    Phase transformation and cracking during RT aging of charged, high-purity Fe18Cr12Ni alloy and commerical 304 ss were examined; results show that [epsilon]* (hcp) hydride formed on Fe18Cr12Ni upon charging, and it decomposed rapidly to form first [epsilon] and then [alpha]' martensite. Morphology of fracture surfaces of Fe18Cr12Ni produced by corrosion fatigue in NaCl solutions and in hydrogen was found to be identical. Effort was made to examine the approaches and methodologies used in service life predictions and reliability analyses.

  12. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1990-11-29

    Peak bare-surface current densities based on the scratched electrode test are seriously in error and repasivation rates grossly overestimated. Influences of potential and pH on reactions of bare surfaces are better understood. Correlation between charge transfer and corrosion fatigue crack growth response was established for Fe18Cr12Ni alloy in deaerated 0.6N NaCl at RT. Strong correlation was established between morphology of corrosion fatigue fracture surfaces and cracking in hydrogen charged samples. Attempts at growing bicrystals by strain annealing were not successful.

  13. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-08-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  14. Fracture of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1992-01-01

    Five heats of iron aluminide alloys have been prepared, and their impact fracture properties compared to FA-129 iron aluminide. The first was a simple ternary alloy of iron, aluminum, and chromium to match the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. The third alloy had zirconium, carbon, niobium and molybdenum. Two heats were produced produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. The impact properties, microstructures, and fractography of these alloys were compared to FA-129. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy. The reduced aluminum alloys had lower transition temperatures. The microstructures were, in general, coarse and anisotropic. The fracture processes were dominated by second-phase particles.

  15. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1992-01-29

    This progress report briefly summarizes the research performed under the referenced grant for the period from 1 December 1990 to 31 December 1991, and contains a cumulative listing of technical presentations and publications dating back to 1 June 1988. Under this grant, a multi-disciplinary research program is undertaken to address certain fundamental issues relating to corrosion fatigue crack growth in structurally important alloys in aqueous environments. The principal goal of the research is to develop and expand the scientific understanding of the processes that control corrosion fatigue crack growth, particularly for ferrous alloys in terms of the controlling mechanical and chemical/electrochemical processes and their interactions with the microstructure. Focus is placed upon the austenitic iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys because of the need to resolve certain mechanistic issues and because of extensive utilization of these alloys in the power generation and chemical industries. Emphasis is given to the growth of short (small) cracks at low growth rates because crack growth in this regime is expected to be more sensitive to changes in external chemical/electrochemical variables.

  16. Anisotropy in Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of an Oxide Dispersion Fe20Cr5Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Capdevila, C.

    2014-08-01

    Anisotropy of fracture toughness and fracture behavior of Fe20Cr5Al oxide dispersion-strengthened alloy has been investigated by means of compression tests, hardness tests, and wedge splitting test. The results show a small effect of the compression direction on yield strength (YS) and strain hardening. The YS is minimum for longitudinal direction and maximum for the tangential direction. The transverse plastic strain ratio is similar for tangential and longitudinal directions but very different from that in normal direction. Hardness depends on the indentation plane; it is lower for any plane parallel to the L-T plane and of similar magnitude for the other orthogonal planes, i.e., the L-S and T-S planes. Macroscopically, two failure modes have been observed after wedge-splitting tests, those of LS and TS specimens in which fracture deviates along one or two branches normal to the notch plane, and those of LT, TL, SL, and ST specimens in which fracture propagates along the notch plane. Besides LT and TL specimens present delaminations parallel to L-T plane. Both, the fracture surface of branching cracks and that of the delaminations, show an intergranular brittle fracture appearance. It is proposed that the main cause of the delamination and crack branching is the alignment in the mesoscopic scale of the ultrafine grains structure which is enhanced by the <110>-texture of the material and by the presence in the grain boundaries of both yttria dispersoids and impurity contaminations. An elastoplastic finite element analysis was performed to study what stress state is the cause of the branches and delaminations. It is concluded that the normal to the crack branches and/or the shear stress components could determine the crack bifurcation mechanism, whereas the delamination it seems that it is controlled by the magnitude of the stress component normal to the delamination plane.

  17. A fracture mechanics approach for estimating fatigue crack initiation in carbon and low-alloy steels in LWR coolant environments

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H. B.; Chopra, O. K.

    2000-04-10

    A fracture mechanics approach for elastic-plastic materials has been used to evaluate the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments on the fatigue lives of carbon and low-alloy steels. The fatigue life of such steel, defined as the number of cycles required to form an engineering-size crack, i.e., 3-mm deep, is considered to be composed of the growth of (a) microstructurally small cracks and (b) mechanically small cracks. The growth of the latter was characterized in terms of {Delta}J and crack growth rate (da/dN) data in air and LWR environments; in water, the growth rates from long crack tests had to be decreased to match the rates from fatigue S-N data. The growth of microstructurally small cracks was expressed by a modified Hobson relationship in air and by a slip dissolution/oxidation model in water. The crack length for transition from a microstructurally small crack to a mechanically small crack was based on studies on small crack growth. The estimated fatigue S-N curves show good agreement with the experimental data for these steels in air and water environments. At low strain amplitudes, the predicted lives in water can be significantly lower than the experimental values.

  18. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behaviors of the As-Extruded Mg-5Al-3Ca Alloys Containing Yttrium at Elevated Temperature.

    PubMed

    Son, Hyeon-Taek; Kim, Yong-Ho; Kim, Taek-Soo; Lee, Seong-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Effects of yttrium (Y) addition on mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of the as-extruded Mg-Al-Ca based alloys at elevated temperature were investigated by a tensile test. After hot extrusion, the average grain size was refined by Y addition and eutectic phases were broken down into fine particles. Y addition to Mg-5Al-3Ca based alloy resulted in the improvement of strength and ductility at elevated temperature due to fine grain and suppression of grain growth by formation of thermally stable Al2Y intermetallic compound. PMID:27433675

  19. The mechanisms of dispersion strengthening and fracture in Al-based XD(tm) alloys, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, R. M., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of reinforcement size, volume fraction, and matrix deformation behavior on room and elevated temperature strength; the fracture toughness; and the fatigue crack growth rate of metal matrix composites of Al-4(pct)Cu-1.5(pct)Mg with TiB2 were examined. The influence of reinforcement volume fraction was also examined for pure aluminum with TiB2. Higher TiB2 volume fractions increased the tensile yield strength at both room and elevated temperatures, and reduced the elongation to fracture. Tensile tests also indicate that small particles provided a greater increase in strength for a given volume fraction than larger particles, whereas elongation to fracture appeared to be insensitive to reinforcement size. Interparticle spacing appears to be the factor that controls the strength of these alloys, with the exact nature of the dependence relying on the nature of dislocation slip in the matrix (planar vs. diffuse). The isothermal aging response of the precipitation strengthened Al-4(pct)Cu-1.5(pct)Mg alloys was not accelerated by the presence of TiB2. Cold work prior to artificial aging created additional geometrically necessary dislocations which serve as heterogeneous nucleation sites leading to accelerated aging, a finer precipitate size, and an increase in the strength of the alloy.

  20. Micro-Mechanical Modeling of Ductile Fracture in Welded Aluminum-Lithium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed

    2002-01-01

    This computation model for microscopic crack growth in welded aluminum-lithium alloys consists of a cavity with initial volume specified by the fraction f(sub 0), i.e. the void volume relative to the cell volume. Thus, cell size D and initial porosity f(sub 0) defines the key parameters in this model. The choice of cell size requires: 1) D must be representative of the large inclusion spacing. 2) Predicted R-curves scale almost proportionally with D for fixed f(sub 0). 3) mapping of one finite element per cell must provide adequate resolution of the stress-strain fields in the active layer and the adjacent material. For the ferritic steels studied thus far with this model, calibrated cell sizes range from 50-200 microns with f(sub 0) in the 0.0001 to 0.004 micron range. This range of values for D and f (sub 0) satisfies issues 1) and 3). This computational model employs the Gurson and Tvergaard constitutive model for porous plastic materials to describe the progressive damage of cells due to the growth of pre-existing voids. The model derives from a rigid-plastic limit analysis of a solid having a volume fraction (f) of voids approximated by a homogenous spherical body containing a spherical void.

  1. Nonlinear fracture mechanics. Volume 1. Time-dependent fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, A.; Landes, J.D.; Bassani, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on time-dependent fracture in nonlinear fracture mechanics are presented. Individual subjects considered include: numerical study of non-steady-state creep at stationary crack tips, crack growth in small-scale creep, growth of macroscopic cracks by void coalescence under extensive creeping conditions, creep embrittlement susceptibility and creep crack growth behavior in low-alloy steels, and experimental determination of the high-temperature crack growth behavior of Incoloy 800H. Also discussed are: three-dimensional transient analysis of a dynamically loaded three-point-bend ductile fracture specimen, experimental study of the validity of a Delta J criterion for fatigue crack growth, combined-mode low-cycle fatigue crack growth under torsional loading, fatigue crack-tip mechanics in 7075-T6 aluminum alloy from high-sensitivity displacement field measurements, and nonlinear fracture of concrete and ceramics.

  2. Fracture mechanics: 26. volume

    SciTech Connect

    Reuter, W.G.; Underwood, J.H.; Newman, J.C. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The original objective of these symposia was to promote technical interchange between researchers from the US and worldwide in the field of fracture. This objective was recently expanded to promote technical interchange between researchers in the field of fatigue and fracture. The symposium began with the Swedlow Memorial Lecture entitled ``Patterns and Perspectives in Applied Fracture Mechanics.`` The remaining 42 papers are divided into the following topical sections: Constraint crack initiation; Constraint crack growth; Weldments; Engineered materials; Subcritical crack growth; Dynamic loading; and Applications. Papers within the scope of the Energy Data Base have been processed separately.

  3. Elevated temperature fracture of RS/PM aluminum alloy 8009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Yang, Leng; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The fracture behavior of advanced powder metallurgy Al-Fe-V-Si alloy 8009 (previously called FVS0812) is being characterized under monotonic loads, as a function of temperature. Particular attention is focused on contributions to the fracture mechanism from the fine grained dispersoid strengthened microstructure, dissolved solute from rapid solidification, and the moist air environment. Time-dependent crack growth is characterized in advanced aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures with the fracture mechanics approach, and cracking mechanisms are examined with a metallurgical approach. Specific tasks were to obtain standard load crack growth experimental information from a refined testing system; to correlate crack growth kinetics with the j-integral and time dependent C(sub t)(t); and to investigate the intermediate temperature embrittlement of 8009 alloy in order to understand crack growth mechanisms.

  4. Fracture Mechanism Maps in Unirradiated and Irradiated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Meimei; Zinkle, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for computing a fracture mechanism map in two-dimensional space of tensile stress and temperature using physically-based constitutive equations. Four principal fracture mechanisms were considered: cleavage fracture, low temperature ductile fracture, transgranular creep fracture, and intergranular creep fracture. The methodology was applied to calculate fracture mechanism maps for several selected reactor materials, CuCrZr, 316 type stainless steel, F82H ferritic-martensitic steel, V4Cr4Ti and Mo. The calculated fracture maps are in good agreement with empirical maps obtained from experimental observations. The fracture mechanism maps of unirradiated metals and alloys were modified to include radiation hardening effects on cleavage fracture and high temperature helium embrittlement. Future refinement of fracture mechanism maps is discussed.

  5. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  6. Fracture mechanics principles.

    PubMed

    Mecholsky, J J

    1995-03-01

    The principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) were developed in the 1950s by George Irwin (1957). This work was based on previous investigations of Griffith (1920) and Orowan (1944). Irwin (1957) demonstrated that a crack shape in a particular location with respect to the loading geometry had a stress intensity associated with it. He also demonstrated the equivalence between the stress intensity concept and the familiar Griffith criterion of failure. More importantly, he described the systematic and controlled evaluation of the toughness of a material. Toughness is defined as the resistance of a material to rapid crack propagation and can be characterized by one parameter, Kic. In contrast, the strength of a material is dependent on the size of the initiating crack present in that particular sample or component. The fracture toughness of a material is generally independent of the size of the initiating crack. The strength of any product is limited by the size of the cracks or defects during processing, production and handling. Thus, the application of fracture mechanics principles to dental biomaterials is invaluable in new material development, production control and failure analysis. This paper describes the most useful equations of fracture mechanics to be used in the failure analysis of dental biomaterials. PMID:8621030

  7. Cleavage fracture and irradiation embrittlement of fusion reactor alloys: mechanisms, multiscale models, toughness measurements and implications to structural integrity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Rathbun, H. J.; He, M. Y.; Hribernik, M. L.; Rensman, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    We describe the highly efficient master curves-shifts (MC-Δ T) method to measure and apply cleavage fracture toughness, KJc ( T), data and show that it is applicable to 9Cr martensitic steels. A reference temperature, T0, indexes the invariant MC shape on an absolute temperature scale. Then, T0 shifts (Δ T) are used to account for various effects of size and geometry, loading rate and irradiation embrittlement (Δ Ti). The paper outlines a multiscale model, relating atomic to structural scale fracture processes, that underpins the MC-Δ T method. At the atomic scale, we propose that the intrinsic microarrest toughness, Kμ( T), of the body-centered cubic ferrite lattice dictates an invariant shape of the macroscopic KJc ( T) curve. KJc ( T) can be modeled in terms of the true stress-strain ( σ- ɛ) constitutive law, σ ( T, ɛ), combined with a temperature-dependent critical local stress, σ*( T) and stressed volume, V*. The local fracture properties, σ*( T)- V*, are governed by coarse-scale brittle trigger particles and Kμ( T). Irradiation (and high strain rate) induced increases in the yield stress, Δ σy, lead to Δ Ti, with typical Δ Ti/Δ σy≈0.6±0.15 °C/MPa. However, Δ Ti associated with decreases in σ* and V* can result from a number of potential non-hardening embrittlement (NHE) mechanisms, including a large amount of He on grain boundaries. Estimates based on available data suggest that this occurs at >500-700 appm bulk He. Hardening and NHE are synergistic, and can lead to very large Δ Ti. NHE is signaled by large (>1 °C/MPa), or even negative, values of Δ Ti/Δ σy (for Δ σy<0), and is often coupled with increasing amounts of intergranular fracture. The measured and effective fracture toughness pertinent to structures almost always depends on the size and geometry of the cracked body, and is typically significantly greater than KJc . Size and geometry effects arise from both weakest link statistics, related to the volume under high

  8. Effects of alloying elements on mechanical and fracture properties of base metals and simulated heat-affected zones of SA 508 steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sangho; Lee, Sunghak; Im, Young-Roc; Lee, Hu-Chul; Oh, Yong Jun; Hong, Jun Hwa

    2001-04-01

    This study was aimed at developing low-alloy steels for nuclear reactor pressure vessels by investigating the effects of alloying elements on mechanical and fracture properties of base metals and heat-affected zones (HAZs). Four steels whose compositions were variations of the composition specification for SA 508 steel (class 3) were fabricated by vacuum-induction melting and heat treatment, and their tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. Microstructural analyses indicated that coarse M3C-type carbides and fine M2C-type carbides were precipitated along lath boundaries and inside laths, respectively. In the steels having decreased carbon content and increased molybdenum content, the amount of fine M2C carbides was greatly increased, while that of coarse M3C carbides was decreased, thereby leading to the improvement of tensile properties and impact toughness. Their simulated HAZs also had sufficient impact toughness after postweld heat treatment (PWHT). These findings suggested that the low-alloy steels with high strength and toughness could be processed by decreasing carbon and manganese contents and by increasing molybdenum content.

  9. Fracture mechanics validity limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Dennis M.; Ernst, Hugo A.

    1994-01-01

    Fracture behavior is characteristics of a dramatic loss of strength compared to elastic deformation behavior. Fracture parameters have been developed and exhibit a range within which each is valid for predicting growth. Each is limited by the assumptions made in its development: all are defined within a specific context. For example, the stress intensity parameters, K, and the crack driving force, G, are derived using an assumption of linear elasticity. To use K or G, the zone of plasticity must be small as compared to the physical dimensions of the object being loaded. This insures an elastic response, and in this context, K and G will work well. Rice's J-integral has been used beyond the limits imposed on K and G. J requires an assumption of nonlinear elasticity, which is not characteristic of real material behavior, but is thought to be a reasonable approximation if unloading is kept to a minimum. As well, the constraint cannot change dramatically (typically, the crack extension is limited to ten-percent of the initial remaining ligament length). Rice, et al investigated the properties required of J-type parameters, J(sub x), and showed that the time rate, dJ(sub x)/dt, must not be a function of the crack extension rate, da/dt. Ernst devised the modified-J parameter, J(sub M), that meets this criterion. J(sub M) correlates fracture data to much higher crack growth than does J. Ultimately, a limit of the validity of J(sub M) is anticipated, and this has been estimated to be at a crack extension of about 40-percent of the initial remaining ligament length. None of the various parameters can be expected to describe fracture in an environment of gross plasticity, in which case the process is better described by deformation parameters, e.g., stress and strain. In the current study, various schemes to identify the onset of the plasticity-dominated behavior, i.e., the end of fracture mechanics validity, are presented. Each validity limit parameter is developed in

  10. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-07-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  11. Linear elastic fracture mechanics primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1992-01-01

    This primer is intended to remove the blackbox perception of fracture mechanics computer software by structural engineers. The fundamental concepts of linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented with emphasis on the practical application of fracture mechanics to real problems. Numerous rules of thumb are provided. Recommended texts for additional reading, and a discussion of the significance of fracture mechanics in structural design are given. Griffith's criterion for crack extension, Irwin's elastic stress field near the crack tip, and the influence of small-scale plasticity are discussed. Common stress intensities factor solutions and methods for determining them are included. Fracture toughness and subcritical crack growth are discussed. The application of fracture mechanics to damage tolerance and fracture control is discussed. Several example problems and a practice set of problems are given.

  12. Fracture behavior of 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy with improved fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Wee, Sung Hun; Hoelzer, David T.; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have been considered as primary candidate materials for both fission and fusion reactors because of their excellent creep and irradiation resistances. It has been shown that high temperature fracture toughness could be significantly improved by appropriate thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This article focuses on the static fracture behaviors of newly developed 9Cr NFAs with improved toughness. Optimal TMTs resulted in high fracture toughness at room temperature (>250 MPa √m) and in retaining higher than 100 MPa √m over a wide temperature range of 22-700 °C. Significant differences were found in fracture surfaces and fracture resistance (J-R) curves after different TMTs. Unique fracture surface features such as shallow nanoscale facets decorated with shear lips and flake-like grains were observed in high toughness specimens.

  13. The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The high-strength titanium alloys are widely used in aircraft and aerospace structures due to their high strength to density ratios. In such applications, the fracture toughness rather than the strength is often the factor which requires larger size sections and lower useful payloads. The response of the strength and toughness of titanium alloys was analyzed generally without regard to the fracture mode or the effect of microstructure on the fracture mechanisms. Research on the fracture mechanisms in aluminum alloys and steels showed that the toughness may be improved by decreasing the sizes of inclusions and sub-micron precipitates. An investigation was conducted to study the fracture mechanisms in titanium alloys which may lead to suggestions for the improvement of the fracture toughness without a corresponding loss in strength.

  14. Fracture mechanics: Perspectives and directions

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    The present work includes twelve invited review papers with comprehensive descriptions of the challenges in six topical areas: analytical fracture mechanics, nonlinear and time-dependent fracture mechanics, microstructure and micromechanical modeling, fatigue crack propagation, environmentally assisted cracking, and fracture mechanics of nonmetals and new frontiers. Specific challenge areas include the analytical front, advanced heterogeneous materials, subcritical crack growth for both fatigue and sustained-load crack growth in deleterious environments at elevated temperatures, and problems of education. The book demonstrates that the existing fracture mechanics foundation is well positioned to meet these challenges over the next decades.

  15. Mechanics of Hydraulic Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fractures represent a particular class of tensile fractures that propagate in solid media under pre-existing compressive stresses as a result of internal pressurization by an injected viscous fluid. The main application of engineered hydraulic fractures is the stimulation of oil and gas wells to increase production. Several physical processes affect the propagation of these fractures, including the flow of viscous fluid, creation of solid surfaces, and leak-off of fracturing fluid. The interplay and the competition between these processes lead to multiple length scales and timescales in the system, which reveal the shifting influence of the far-field stress, viscous dissipation, fracture energy, and leak-off as the fracture propagates.

  16. Mechanisms and modeling of cleavage fracture in simulated heat-affected zone microstructures of a high-strength low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert-Perlade, A.; Sturel, T.; Gourgues, A. F.; Besson, J.; Pineau, A.

    2004-03-01

    The effect of the welding cycle on the fracture toughness properties of high-strength low alloy (HSLA) steels is examined by means of thermal simulation of heat-affected zone (HAZ) microstructures. Tensile tests on notched bars and fracture toughness tests at various temperatures are performed together with fracture surface observations and cross-sectional analyses. The influence of martensite-austenite (M-A) constituents and of “crystallographic” bainite packets on cleavage fracture micromechanisms is, thus, evidenced as a function of temperature. Three weakest-link probabilistic models (the “Master-curve” (MC) approach, the Beremin model, and a “double-barrier” (DB) model) are applied to account for the ductile-to-brittle transition (DBT) fracture toughness curve. Some analogy, but also differences, are found between the MC approach and the Beremin model. The DB model, having nonfitted, physically based scatter parameters, is applied to the martensite-containing HAZ microstructures and gives promising results.

  17. Predicting fracture behavior of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, A.T.; Cordes, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    A computational method has been developed to predict the material fracture failure process in flawed or cracked specimens. This method does not require experimental material fracture data. Finite element technique is employed to model the physical shape of the specimen. Nonlinear spring elements are introduced to model the material damage behavior near a flaw or a crack tip. Crack initiation and crack propagation conditions are developed to predict the crack initiation load, the extent of material damage, and the crack growth behavior. The introduction of nonlinear spring elements and the development of crack initiation and crack growth conditions are unique features for fracture prediction with the development of this method. To prove the feasibility of the method, two types of specimen made by two aluminum alloys with similar material stress-strain data were studied. Fracture predictions by this method are comparable to experimental data.

  18. Dynamic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, A. S.; Ramulu, M.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic fracture and crack propagation concepts for ductile materials are reviewed. The equations for calculating dynamic stress integrity and the dynamic energy release rate in order to study dynamic crack propagation are provided. The stress intensity factor versus crack velocity relation is investigated. The uses of optical experimental techniques and finite element methods for fracture analyses are described. The fracture criteria for a rapidly propagating crack under mixed mode conditions are discussed; crack extension and fracture criteria under combined tension and shear loading are based on maximum circumferential stress or energy criteria such as strain energy density. The development and use of a Dugdale model and finite element models to represent crack and fracture dynamics are examined.

  19. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J.; Ratka, J.O.

    1992-12-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  20. Fracture testing and performance of beryllium copper alloy C 17510

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, H.A.; Zatz, I.J. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ratka, J.O. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of test programs was undertaken on copper beryllium alloy C 17510 for several variations in material process and chemistry. These variations in C 17510 were primarily optimized for combinations of strength and conductivity. While originally intended for use as cyclically loaded high-field, high-strength conductors in fusion energy research, material testing of C 17510 has indicated that it is an attractive and economical alternative for a host of other structural, mechanical and electrical applications. ASTM tests performed on three variations of C 17510 alloys included both J-integral and plane strain fracture toughness testing (E813, E399) and fatigue crack growth rate tests (E647), as well as verifying tensile, hardness, Charpy, and other well defined mechanical properties. Fracture testing was performed at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures, which bound the thermal environment anticipated for the fusion components being designed. Fatigue crack propagation stress ratios ranged from nominal zero to minus one at each temperature.

  1. Small Crack Growth and Fatigue Life Predictions for High-Strength Aluminium Alloys. Part 1; Experimental and Fracture Mechanics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, X. R.; Newman, J. C.; Zhao, W.; Swain, M. H.; Ding, C. F.; Phillips, E. P.

    1998-01-01

    The small crack effect was investigated in two high-strength aluminium alloys: 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad alloy. Both experimental and analytical investigations were conducted to study crack initiation and growth of small cracks. In the experimental program, fatigue tests, small crack and large crack tests A,ere conducted under constant amplitude and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading conditions. A pronounced small crack effect was observed in both materials, especially for the negative stress ratios. For all loading conditions, most of the fatigue life of the SENT specimens was shown to be crack propagation from initial material defects or from the cladding layer. In the analysis program, three-dimensional finite element and A weight function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors and to develop SIF equations for surface and corner cracks at the notch in the SENT specimens. A plastisity-induced crack-closure model was used to correlate small and large crack data, and to make fatigue life predictions, Predicted crack-growth rates and fatigue lives agreed well with experiments. A total fatigue life prediction method for the aluminum alloys was developed and demonstrated using the crack-closure model.

  2. Geometrically Frustrated Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Noah; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    2015-03-01

    When a flat elastic sheet is forced to conform to a surface with Gaussian curvature, stresses arise in the sheet. The mismatch between initial and final metrics gives rise to new fracture behavior which cannot be achieved by boundary loading alone. Using experiments of PDMS sheets frustrated on 3D-printed surfaces and a linearized analytical model, we demonstrate the ability of curvature to govern the sheets' fracture phenomenology. In this talk, we first show that curvature can both stimulate and suppress fracture initiation, depending on the position and orientation of the initial slit. Secondly, we show that curvature can steer the path of a crack as it propagates through the material. Lastly, the curvature can arrest cracks which would otherwise continue to propagate.

  3. Fracturing behavior of aluminum alloys with welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Salita, D. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Lependin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys with welded joints are investigated. The joints are produced by the friction stir welding under various conditions. This fact is used for studying the principles and patterns of defect structure development. Mechanical properties are evaluated by static tension tests. The impact of welding process conditions on loading curves and strength properties is analysed. Fracture surface structures for samples with and without welded joints are studied, and results are compared. It is revealed, that differences in deformation behavior and mechanical properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys produced under different welding process conditions are caused by developing of structure defects in a welded joints, mostly, nonuniformities/discontinuities of various types. The obtained results can be used for improvement and development of new welding process conditions for aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  4. Mechanisms of Plastic and Fracture Instabilities for Alloy Development of Fusion Materials. Final Project Report for period July 15, 1998 - July 14, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoniem, N. M.

    2003-07-14

    The main objective of this research was to develop new computational tools for the simulation and analysis of plasticity and fracture mechanisms of fusion materials, and to assist in planning and assessment of corresponding radiation experiments.

  5. Use of fractography and sectioning techniques to study fracture mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Stone, R. H.; Cox, T. B.

    1976-01-01

    Recent investigations of the effect of microstructure on the fracture mechanisms and fracture toughness of steels, aluminum alloys, and titanium alloys have used standard fractographic techniques and a sectioning technique on specimens plastically deformed to various strains up to fracture. The specimens are prepared metallographically for observation in both optical and electron beam instruments. This permits observations to be made about the fracture mechanism as it occurs in thick sections and helps remove speculation from the interpretation of fractographic features. This technique may be used in conjunction with other standard techniques such as extraction replicas and microprobe analyses. Care must be taken to make sure that the microstructural features which are observed to play a role in the fracture process using the sectioning technique can be identified with fractography.

  6. EBSD and Nanoindentation-Correlated Study of Delamination Fracture in Al-Li Alloy 2090

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, Wesley A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer attractive combinations of high strength and low density. However, a tendency for delamination fracture has limited their use. A better understanding of the delamination mechanisms may identify methods to control delaminations through processing modifications. A combination of new techniques has been used to evaluate delamination fracture in Al-Li alloys. Both high quality electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) information and valid nanoindentation measurements were obtained from fractured test specimens. Correlations were drawn between nano-scale hardness variations and local texture along delaminating boundaries. Intriguing findings were observed for delamination fracture through the combined analysis of grain orientation, Taylor factor, and kernel average misorientation.

  7. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, J. D.; Williams, D. N.; Wood, R. A.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of alloy composition on the aqueous stress corrosion of titanium alloys were studied with emphasis on determining the interrelations among composition, phase structure, and deformation and fracture properties of the alpha phase in alpha-beta alloys. Accomplishments summarized include the effects of alloy composition on susceptibility, and metallurgical mechanisms of stress-corrosion cracking.

  8. (Fracture mechanics of porous materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.

    1989-09-15

    The primary subject of this trip was the development of a boundary element/finite element analysis system for computational fracture mechanics. The procedures for merging the ORNL/Cornell University boundary element fracture code with the finite element program SESAM were agreed upon, and are currently being implemented. The adopted algorithm relies on the superelement capabilities of the SESAM code. Discussions were held with scientists at the Bergen Scientific Centre on the modeling of fractured rock. A project to develop realistic computer models of naturally occurring fracture patterns is being carried out by a geologist and a physicist; it is expected that these models can be employed in future environmental modeling work. 6 refs.

  9. Some recent theoretical and experimental developments in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.; Hones, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental developments in four distinct areas of fracture mechanics research are described. These are as follows: experimental comparisons of different nonlinear fracture toughness measures, including the nonlinear energy, R curve, COD and J integral methods; the singular elastic crack-tip stress and displacement equations and the validity of the proposition of their general adequacy as indicated, for example, by the biaxially loaded infinite sheet with a flat crack; the thermodynamic nature of surface energy induced by propagating cracks in relation to a general continuum thermodynamic description of brittle fracture; and analytical and experimental aspects of Mode II fracture, with experimental data for certain aluminum, steel and titanium alloys.

  10. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry. Progress report, January 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1993-01-25

    Phase transformation and cracking during RT aging of charged, high-purity Fe18Cr12Ni alloy and commerical 304 ss were examined; results show that {epsilon}* (hcp) hydride formed on Fe18Cr12Ni upon charging, and it decomposed rapidly to form first {epsilon} and then {alpha}` martensite. Morphology of fracture surfaces of Fe18Cr12Ni produced by corrosion fatigue in NaCl solutions and in hydrogen was found to be identical. Effort was made to examine the approaches and methodologies used in service life predictions and reliability analyses.

  11. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics and chemistry. Progress report, 1 January 1990--30 November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1990-11-29

    Peak bare-surface current densities based on the scratched electrode test are seriously in error and repasivation rates grossly overestimated. Influences of potential and pH on reactions of bare surfaces are better understood. Correlation between charge transfer and corrosion fatigue crack growth response was established for Fe18Cr12Ni alloy in deaerated 0.6N NaCl at RT. Strong correlation was established between morphology of corrosion fatigue fracture surfaces and cracking in hydrogen charged samples. Attempts at growing bicrystals by strain annealing were not successful.

  12. Modelling the graphite fracture mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquemoud, C.; Marie, S.; Nedelec, M.

    2012-07-01

    In order to define a design criterion for graphite components, it is important to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the graphite fracture, to include them in a more effective modelling. In a first step, a large panel of experiments have been realised in order to build up an important database; results of tensile tests, 3 and 4 point bending tests on smooth and notched specimens have been analysed and have demonstrated an important geometry related effects on the behavior up to fracture. Then, first simulations with an elastic or an elastoplastic bilinear constitutive law have not made it possible to simulate the experimental fracture stress variations with the specimen geometry, the fracture mechanisms of the graphite being at the microstructural scale. That is the reason why a specific F.E. model of the graphite structure has been developed in which every graphite grain has been meshed independently, the crack initiation along the basal plane of the particles as well as the crack propagation and coalescence have been modelled too. This specific model has been used to test two different approaches for fracture initiation: a critical stress criterion and two criteria of fracture mechanic type. They are all based on crystallographic considerations as a global critical stress criterion gave unsatisfactory results. The criteria of fracture mechanic type being extremely unstable and unable to represent the graphite global behaviour up to the final collapse, the critical stress criterion has been preferred to predict the results of the large range of available experiments, on both smooth and notched specimens. In so doing, the experimental observations have been correctly simulated: the geometry related effects on the experimental fracture stress dispersion, the specimen volume effects on the macroscopic fracture stress and the crack propagation at a constant stress intensity factor. In addition, the parameters of the criterion have been related to

  13. Relationship between fracture toughness, fracture path, and microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. Part 1: Quantitative characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.U.; Gokhale, A.M.; Denzer, D.K.; Liu, J.

    1998-04-01

    The fracture toughness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-based 7XXX aluminum alloys decreases with an increase in the extent of recrystallization. In this contribution, the fracture path of plane-strain fracture-toughness specimens of 7050 alloy (a typical alloy of the 7XXX series) is quantitatively characterized as a function of degree of recrystallization, specimen orientation, and aging condition. The fracture path is quantitatively correlated to fracture toughness, and the bulk microstructural attributes estimated via sterological analysis. In the companion article, these quantitative data are used to develop and verify a multiple-fracture micromechanism-based model that relates the fracture toughness to a number of microstructural parameters of the partially recrystallized alloy plate.

  14. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  15. Structure, Mechanical Properties, and Fracture Behavior of a Fe-Cr-V Alloy Doped with Nitrogen by High-Temperature Gas-Phase Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Sergey A.; Khatkevich, Vladimir M.; Rogachev, Stanislav O.; Denisenko, Kristina S.

    2015-12-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and room-temperature mechanical properties of the corrosion-resistant Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy doped with nitrogen by high-temperature gas-phase nitriding under different conditions have been investigated. The nitriding of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at T = 1223 K to 1373 K (950 °C to 1100 °C) and subsequent annealing at T = 973 K (700 °C) lead to the precipitation of large vanadium nitride and disperse chromium nitride particles in the ferrite matrix. Such a treatment increases the strength of the Fe-20pctCr-5pctV alloy at room temperature by 1.6 times, while maintaining the adequate relative elongation. The alloy in the initial state and after nitriding is highly resistant to corrosion.

  16. Fracture mechanics and corrosion fatigue.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevily, A. J.; Wei, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the current state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics, particularly in relation to the study of problems in environment-enhanced fatigue crack growth. The usefulness of this approach in developing understanding of the mechanisms for environmental embrittlement and its engineering utility are discussed. After a brief review of the evolution of the fracture mechanics approach and the study of environmental effects on the fatigue behavior of materials, a study is made of the response of materials to fatigue and corrosion fatigue, the modeling of the mechanisms of the fatigue process is considered, and the application of knowledge of fatigue crack growth to the prediction of the high cycle life of unnotched specimens is illustrated.

  17. Cleavage mechanism in vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G.R.; Donahue, E.; Lucas, G.E.

    1997-12-31

    The effect specimen geometry, loading rate and irradiation on the ductile-to-brittle transition in a V-4Ti-4Cr alloy were evaluated and modeled. Confocal microscopy-fracture reconstruction and SEM were used to characterize the sequence-of-events leading to cleavage, as well as the CTOD at fracture initiation. This alloy undergoes normal stress-controlled transgranular cleavage below a transition temperature that depends primarily on the tensile properties and constraint. Thus an equivalent yield stress model is in good agreement with observed effects of loading rate and irradiation hardening. Predicted effects of specimen geometry based on a critical stress-area criteria and FEM simulations of crack tip fields were also found to be in agreement with experiment. Some interesting characteristics of the fracture process are also described.

  18. Deformation and fracture of thin sheet aluminum-lithium alloys: The effect of cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    The objective is to characterize the fracture behavior and to define the fracture mechanisms for new Al-Li-Cu alloys, with emphasis on the role of indium additions and cryogenic temperatures. Three alloys were investigated in rolled product form: 2090 baseline and 2090 + indium produced by Reynolds Metals, and commercial AA 2090-T81 produced by Alcoa. The experimental 2090 + In alloy exhibited increases in hardness and ultimate strength, but no change in tensile yield strength, compared to the baseline 2090 composition in the unstretched T6 condition. The reason for this behavior is not understood. Based on hardness and preliminary Kahn Tear fracture experiments, a nominally peak-aged condition was employed for detailed fracture studies. Crack initiation and growth fracture toughness were examined as a function of stress state and microstructure using J(delta a) methods applied to precracked compact tension specimens in the LT orientation. To date, J(delta a) experiments have been limited to 23 C. Alcoa 2090-T81 exhibited the highest toughness regardless of stress state. Fracture was accompanied by extensive delamination associated with high angle grain boundaries normal to the fatigue precrack surface and progressed microscopically by a transgranular shear mechanism. In contrast the two peak-aged Reynolds alloys had lower toughness and fracture was intersubgranular without substantial delamination. The influences of cryogenic temperature, microstructure, boundary precipitate structure, and deformation mode in governing the competing fracture mechanisms will be determined in future experiments. Results contribute to the development of predictive micromechanical models for fracture modes in Al-Li alloys, and to fracture resistant materials.

  19. High Temperature Fracture Characteristics of a Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy (NFA)

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, Jeoung H; Ji Hyun, Yoon; Hoelzer, David T

    2010-01-01

    High temperature fracture behavior has been investigated for the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10). The fracture toughness of the alloy was above 140 MPa m at low temperatures, room temperature (RT) and 200 C, but decreased to a low fracture toughness range of 52 82 MPa m at higher temperatures up to 700 C. This behavior was explained by the fractography results indicating that the unique nanostructure of 14YWT alloy produced shallow plasticity layers at high temperatures and a low-ductility grain boundary debonding occurred at 700 C.

  20. The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanstone, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.; Shannon, J. L., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The microstructure of the alpha titanium alloy Ti-5Al-2.5Sn and the metastable beta titanium alloy Beta 3 was examined. The material was from normal and extra low interstitial grade plates which were either air-cooled or furnace-cooled from an annealing treatment. Beta 3 was studied in alpha-aged and omega-aged plates which were heat treated to similar strength levels. Tensile and plane strain fracture toughness tests were conducted at room temperature on the alpha-aged material. The microstructure and fracture mechanisms of alloys were studied using optical metallography, electron microscopy, microprobe analyses, and texture pole figures. Future experiments are described.

  1. Theory of fracture mechanics based upon plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    A theory of fracture mechanics is formulated on the foundation of continuum mechanics. Fracture surface is introduced as an unknown quantity and is incorporated into boundary and initial conditions. Surface energy is included in the global form of energy conservation law and the dissipative mechanism is formulated into constitutive equations which indicate the thermodynamic irreversibility and the irreversibility of fracture process as well.

  2. Fracture mechanics parameters for small fatigue cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a review of some common small-crack test specimens, the underlying causes of the small-crack effect, and the fracture-mechanics parameters that have been used to correlate or predict their growth behavior. This review concentrates on continuum mechanics concepts and on the nonlinear behavior of small cracks. The paper reviews some stress-intensity factor solutions for small-crack test specimens and develops some simple elastic-plastic J integral and cyclic J integral expressions that include the influence of crack-closure. These parameters were applied to small-crack growth data on two aluminum alloys, and a fatigue life prediction methodology is demonstrated. For these materials, the crack-closure transient from the plastic wake was found to be the major factor in causing the small-crack effect.

  3. A nonlinear high temperature fracture mechanics basis for strainrange partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitamura, Takayuki; Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A direct link was established between Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) and high temperature fracture mechanics by deriving the general SRP inelastic strain range versus cyclic life relationships from high temperature, nonlinear, fracture mechanics considerations. The derived SRP life relationships are in reasonable agreement based on the experience of the SRP behavior of many high temperature alloys. In addition, fracture mechanics has served as a basis for derivation of the Ductility-Normalized SRP life equations, as well as for examination of SRP relations that are applicable to thermal fatigue life prediction. Areas of additional links between nonlinear fracture mechanics and SRP were identified for future exploration. These include effects of multiaxiality as well as low strain, nominally elastic, long life creep fatigue interaction.

  4. Fracture resistance and fatigue crack growth characteristics of two Al-Cu-Mg-Zr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Bhaskar; Lisagor, W. B.

    1992-01-01

    The dependence of strength, fracture resistance, and fatigue crack growth rate on the aging conditions of two alloy compositions based on Al-3.7Cu-1.85Mg-0.2Mn is investigated. Mechanical properties were evaluated in two heat treatment conditions and in two orientations (longitudinal and transverse). Compact tension specimens were used to determine fatigue crack growth characteristics and fracture resistance. The aging response was monitored on coupons using hardness measurements determined with a standard Rockwell hardness tester. Fracture resistance is found to increase with increasing yield strength during artificial aging of age-hardenable 2124-Zr alloys processed by powder metallurgy techniques. Fatigue crack growth rate increases with increasing strength. It is argued that these changes are related to deformation modes of the alloys; a homogeneous deformation mode tends to increase fracture resistance and to decrease the resistance to the fatigue crack propagation rate.

  5. Corrosion fatigue of iron-chromium-nickel alloys: Fracture mechanics, microstructure and chemistry. Progress report, December 1, 1990--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P.

    1992-01-29

    This progress report briefly summarizes the research performed under the referenced grant for the period from 1 December 1990 to 31 December 1991, and contains a cumulative listing of technical presentations and publications dating back to 1 June 1988. Under this grant, a multi-disciplinary research program is undertaken to address certain fundamental issues relating to corrosion fatigue crack growth in structurally important alloys in aqueous environments. The principal goal of the research is to develop and expand the scientific understanding of the processes that control corrosion fatigue crack growth, particularly for ferrous alloys in terms of the controlling mechanical and chemical/electrochemical processes and their interactions with the microstructure. Focus is placed upon the austenitic iron-chromium-nickel (FeCrNi) alloys because of the need to resolve certain mechanistic issues and because of extensive utilization of these alloys in the power generation and chemical industries. Emphasis is given to the growth of short (small) cracks at low growth rates because crack growth in this regime is expected to be more sensitive to changes in external chemical/electrochemical variables.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licavoli, Joseph J.; Gao, Michael C.; Sears, John S.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2015-10-01

    High-entropy alloys (HEAs) have generated interest in recent years due to their unique positioning within the alloy world. By incorporating a number of elements in high proportion, usually of equal atomic percent, they have high configurational entropy, and thus, they hold the promise of interesting and useful properties such as enhanced strength and alloy stability. The present study investigates the mechanical behavior, fracture characteristics, and microstructure of two single-phase FCC HEAs CoCrFeNi and CoCrFeNiMn with some detailed attention given to melting, homogenization, and thermo-mechanical processing. Ingots approaching 8 kg in mass were made by vacuum induction melting to avoid the extrinsic factors inherent to small-scale laboratory button samples. A computationally based homogenization heat treatment was given to both alloys in order to eliminate any solidification segregation. The alloys were then fabricated in the usual way (forging, followed by hot rolling) with typical thermo-mechanical processing parameters employed. Transmission electron microscopy was subsequently used to assess the single-phase nature of the alloys prior to mechanical testing. Tensile specimens (ASTM E8) were prepared with tensile mechanical properties obtained from room temperature through 800 °C. Material from the gage section of selected tensile specimens was extracted to document room and elevated temperature deformation within the HEAs. Fracture surfaces were also examined to note fracture failure modes. The tensile behavior and selected tensile properties were compared with results in the literature for similar alloys.

  7. (Fracture mechanics of inhomogeneous materials)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.

    1990-10-01

    Discussions were held with Japanese researchers concerning (1) the Elastic-Plastic Fracture Mechanics in Inhomogeneous Materials and Structures (EPI) Program, and (2) ongoing large-scale pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) experiments in Japan. In the EPI Program, major activities in the current fiscal year include round-robin analyses of measured data from inhomogeneous base metal/weld metal compact- tension (CT) specimens fabricated from welded plates of A533 grade B class 1 steel. The round-robin task involves participants from nine research organizations in Japan and is scheduled for completion by the end of 1990. Additional experiments will be performed on crack growth in inhomogeneous CT specimens and three-point bend (3PB) specimens 10 mm thick. The data will be compared with that generated previously from 19-mm-thick-specimens. A new type of inhomogeneous surface-cracked specimen will be tested this year, with ratio of crack depth to surface length (a/c) satisfying 0.2 {le} (a/c) {le} 0. 8 and using a 3PB type of applied load. Plans are under way to fabricate a new welded plate of A533 grade B class 1 steel (from a different heat than that currently being tested) in order to provide an expanded fracture-toughness data base. Other topics concerning fracture-prevention issues in reactor pressure vessels were discussed with each of the host organizations, including an overview of ongoing work in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program.

  8. An investigation of plastic fracture in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, J. R., Jr.; Vanstone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The brittle fracture of many high strength alloys such as steel, titanium, and aluminum was shown to occur by a process called plastic fracture. According to this process microscopic voids form at impurity particles, then grow and coalesce to cause the final rupture. To further understand the role of impurities, four aluminum alloys were investigated: 2024-T851, 2124-T851, 7075-T7351 and 7079-T651. Fractography, quantitative metallography, and microprobe studies assessed the roles of various impurity particles relative to these alloys.

  9. Mechanical Coal-Face Fracturer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, E. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Radial points on proposed drill bit take advantage of natural fracture planes of coal. Radial fracture points retracted during drilling and impacted by piston to fracture coal once drilling halts. Group of bits attached to array of pneumatic drivers to fracture large areas of coal face.

  10. Delayed fracture of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Moriyama, Keiji; Asaoka, Kenzo; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Nagumo, Michihiko

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen-related degradation of the mechanical properties of a Ni-Ti superelastic alloy has been examined by means of delayed fracture tests in acidic and neutral fluoride solutions and hydrogen thermal desorption analysis. Delayed fracture took place in both solutions; the time to fracture was shorter in the acidic solutions than in the neutral solutions with the same fluoride concentration. The time to fracture was reduced in both solutions when applied stress exceeded the critical stress for martensite transformation. In the acidic solutions, Ni-Ti superelastic alloy underwent general corrosion and absorbed substantial amounts of hydrogen. Fractographic features suggested that the delayed fracture in the acidic solutions was attributable to hydrogen embrittlement, whereas in the neutral solutions, a different fracture mode appeared associated with localized corrosion only in the vicinity of the fracture initiation area. In the neutral solutions, the amount of absorbed hydrogen was much less than that in the acidic solutions, and the delayed fracture was likely to be induced by active path corrosion accompanying hydrogen absorption. The results of the present study imply that the hydrogen-related degradation of performance of Ni-Ti superelastic alloys occurs in the presence of fluoride. PMID:14999757

  11. Microstructure and fracture of alloyed austempered ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Eric, Olivera; Rajnovic, Dragan; Zec, Slavica; Sidjanin, Leposava; Jovanovic, Milan T. . E-mail: tmsj@ptt.yu

    2006-12-15

    An investigation has been conducted on two austempered ductile irons alloyed with Cu and Cu + Ni, austenitized at 900 deg. C and austempered at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and fracture mode developed through these treatments have been identified by means of light and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Impact energy measurements were performed on un-notched Charpy specimens. The maximum value of retained austenite volume fraction observed in the material alloyed with Cu + Ni was higher than in that alloyed with Cu austenitized and austempered under the same conditions. This led to the material alloyed with Cu + Ni having higher impact energy and substantial plastic deformation.

  12. Compendium of fracture mechanics problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallworth, R.; Wilson, C.; Meyers, C.

    1990-01-01

    Fracture mechanics analysis results are presented from the following structures/components analyzed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) between 1982 and 1989: space shuttle main engine (SSME), Hubble Space Telescope (HST), external tank attach ring, B-1 stand LOX inner tank, and solid rocket booster (SRB). Results from the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) second stage blade parametric analysis determine a critical flaw size for a wide variety of stress intensity values. The engine 0212 failure analysis was a time dependent fracture life assessment. Results indicated that the disk ruptured due to an overspeed condition. Results also indicated that very small flaws in the curvic coupling area could propagate and lead to failure under normal operating conditions. It was strongly recommended that a nondestructive evaluation inspection schedule be implemented. The main ring of the HST, scheduled to launch in 1990, was analyzed by safe-life and fail-safe analyses. First safe-life inspection criteria curves for the ring inner and outer skins and the fore and aft channels were derived. Afterwards the skins and channels were determined to be fail-safe by analysis. A conservative safe-life analysis was done on the 270 redesign external tank attach ring. Results from the analysis were used to determine the nondestructive evaluation technique required.

  13. Modelling of Local Necking and Fracture in Aluminium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achani, D.; Eriksson, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O.-G.

    2007-05-01

    Non-linear Finite Element simulations are extensively used in forming and crashworthiness studies of automotive components and structures in which fracture need to be controlled. For thin-walled ductile materials, the fracture-related phenomena that must be properly represented are thinning instability, ductile fracture and through-thickness shear instability. Proper representation of the fracture process relies on the accuracy of constitutive and fracture models and their parameters that need to be calibrated through well defined experiments. The present study focuses on local necking and fracture which is of high industrial importance, and uses a phenomenological criterion for modelling fracture in aluminium alloys. As an accurate description of plastic anisotropy is important, advanced phenomenological constitutive equations based on the yield criterion YLD2000/YLD2003 are used. Uniaxial tensile tests and disc compression tests are performed for identification of the constitutive model parameters. Ductile fracture is described by the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion and an in-plane shear tests is performed to identify the fracture parameter. The reason is that in a well designed in-plane shear test no thinning instability should occur and it thus gives more direct information about the phenomenon of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations have been performed using a user-defined material model implemented in the general-purpose non-linear FE code LS-DYNA. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by correlating the predicted and experimental response in the in-plane shear tests and additional plane strain tension tests.

  14. Modelling of Local Necking and Fracture in Aluminium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Achani, D.; Eriksson, M.; Hopperstad, O. S.; Lademo, O.-G.

    2007-05-17

    Non-linear Finite Element simulations are extensively used in forming and crashworthiness studies of automotive components and structures in which fracture need to be controlled. For thin-walled ductile materials, the fracture-related phenomena that must be properly represented are thinning instability, ductile fracture and through-thickness shear instability. Proper representation of the fracture process relies on the accuracy of constitutive and fracture models and their parameters that need to be calibrated through well defined experiments. The present study focuses on local necking and fracture which is of high industrial importance, and uses a phenomenological criterion for modelling fracture in aluminium alloys. As an accurate description of plastic anisotropy is important, advanced phenomenological constitutive equations based on the yield criterion YLD2000/YLD2003 are used. Uniaxial tensile tests and disc compression tests are performed for identification of the constitutive model parameters. Ductile fracture is described by the Cockcroft-Latham fracture criterion and an in-plane shear tests is performed to identify the fracture parameter. The reason is that in a well designed in-plane shear test no thinning instability should occur and it thus gives more direct information about the phenomenon of ductile fracture. Numerical simulations have been performed using a user-defined material model implemented in the general-purpose non-linear FE code LS-DYNA. The applicability of the model is demonstrated by correlating the predicted and experimental response in the in-plane shear tests and additional plane strain tension tests.

  15. Fracture healing: mechanisms and interventions

    PubMed Central

    Einhorn, Thomas A.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.

    2015-01-01

    Fractures are the most common large-organ, traumatic injuries to humans. The repair of bone fractures is a postnatal regenerative process that recapitulates many of the ontological events of embryonic skeletal development. Although fracture repair usually restores the damaged skeletal organ to its pre-injury cellular composition, structure and biomechanical function, about 10% of fractures will not heal normally. This article reviews the developmental progression of fracture healing at the tissue, cellular and molecular levels. Innate and adaptive immune processes are discussed as a component of the injury response, as are environmental factors, such as the extent of injury to the bone and surrounding tissue, fixation and the contribution of vascular tissues. We also present strategies for fracture treatment that have been tested in animal models and in clinical trials or case series. The biophysical and biological basis of the molecular actions of various therapeutic approaches, including recombinant human bone morphogenetic proteins and parathyroid hormone therapy, are also discussed. PMID:25266456

  16. Fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and EN82H weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; Brown, C.M.

    1999-06-01

    The fracture toughness of Alloy 600 and its weld, EN82H, was characterized in 54 C to 338 C air and hydrogenated water. Elastic-plastic J{sub IC} testing was performed due to the inherent high toughness of these materials. Alloy 600 exhibited excellent fracture toughness under all test conditions. While EN82H welds displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, a dramatic toughness degradation occurred in water at temperatures below 149 C. Comparison of the cracking response in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that the loss in toughness is due to a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism. At loading rates about approx. 1000 MPa {radical}m/h, the toughness in low temperature water is improved because there is insufficient time for hydrogen to embrittle grain boundaries. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate macroscopic properties with key microstructural features and operative fracture mechanisms.

  17. Fracture mechanisms and fracture control in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wone-Chul

    Four basic failure modes--delamination, delamination buckling of composite sandwich panels, first-ply failure in cross-ply laminates, and compression failure--are analyzed using linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and the J-integral method. Structural failures, including those at the micromechanical level, are investigated with the aid of the models developed, and the critical strains for crack propagation for each mode are obtained. In the structural fracture analyses area, the fracture control schemes for delamination in a composite rib stiffener and delamination buckling in composite sandwich panels subjected to in-plane compression are determined. The critical fracture strains were predicted with the aid of LEFM for delamination and the J-integral method for delamination buckling. The use of toughened matrix systems has been recommended for improved damage tolerant design for delamination crack propagation. An experimental study was conducted to determine the onset of delamination buckling in composite sandwich panel containing flaws. The critical fracture loads computed using the proposed theoretical model and a numerical computational scheme closely followed the experimental measurements made on sandwich panel specimens of graphite/epoxy faceskins and aluminum honeycomb core with varying faceskin thicknesses and core sizes. Micromechanical models of fracture in composites are explored to predict transverse cracking of cross-ply laminates and compression fracture of unidirectional composites. A modified shear lag model which takes into account the important role of interlaminar shear zones between the 0 degree and 90 degree piles in cross-ply laminate is proposed and criteria for transverse cracking have been developed. For compressive failure of unidirectional composites, pre-existing defects play an important role. Using anisotropic elasticity, the stress state around a defect under a remotely applied compressive load is obtained. The experimentally

  18. Fracture mechanics evaluation of GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    A data base of mechanical and fracture properties for GaAs was generated. The data for single crystal GaAs will be used to design reusable GaAs solar modules. Database information includes; (1) physical property characterizations; (2) fracture behavior evaluations; and (3) strength of cells determined as a function of cell processing and material parameters.

  19. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  20. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Lambert, D. M.

    1994-08-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA which may contain flaws. The project is divided into three tasks that deal with (1) constraint and thickness effects, (2) three-dimensional cracks, and (3) the Leak-Before-Burst (LBB) criterion. This report period (March 1994 to August 1994) is a continuation of attempts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional' or planar configuration specimens (Chapter Two), especially, the determination of, and use of, crack face separation data. Also, included, are a variety of fracture resistance testing results (J(m)R-curve format) and a discussion regarding two materials of NASA interest (6061-T651 Aluminum alloy and 1N718-STA1 nickel-base super alloy) involving a bases for like constraint in terms of ligament dimensions, and their comparison to the resulting J(m)R-curves (Chapter Two).

  1. Mechanisms for shrinkage fracturing at Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watters, W. A.; Squyres, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the role of water in fracturing at Meridiani Planum with the aim of shedding light on the history of densely-fractured outcroppings of light-toned rocks at low-latitudes on Mars. The fractures that occur throughout the inter-crater plains at Meridiani exhibit many characteristics of shrinkage cracks: they have significant width (i.e., not hairline), commonly connect in 90-degree and 120-degree junctions, and exhibit a "hierarchical" organization: i.e., the longest fractures are widest, and narrower fractures terminate against wider fractures at 90-degree junctions (T-shaped). Using the Pancam and Navcam stereo-pair images acquired by the Opportunity rover, we have measured the geometric scaling of fracture networks at Meridiani (e.g., fracture width vs. fracture separation) as well as the total volume change. We have also characterized the diversity of patterns in detail, as well as the modification of fractures and polygonal "tiles" by wind-blown sand abrasion. Identical observations were carried-out for an analogue site where similar fractures are ubiquitous in the playas of Death Valley, California, and where modification processes are also comparable. By also estimating the expected volume change and results from numerical models of shrinkage fracturing, we evaluate the likelihood of three candidate contraction mechanisms: loss of water bound in hydrated minerals (dehydration), loss of water from pore spaces (desiccation), and contraction from cooling (thermal fracturing). The evidence to date favors the second of these (desiccation); this result would have significant implications for the history of Meridiani since the time when sulfate-rich sediments were deposited.

  2. Proceedings of the 20th symposium on fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, R.P. ); Gangloff, R.P. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the proceeding of the ASTM symposium on fracture mechanics. Topics covered include: Analytical fracture mechanics, Environmentally assisted cracking, and Microstructure and micromechanical modeling.

  3. Temperature effects on the deformation and fracture of Al-Li-Cu-In alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    The crack initiation and growth fracture resistance of Al-Cu-Li and Al-Cu-Li-In alloys were characterized and optimized for cryogenic tank applications. Presently, the effects of stress state and temperature is being determined on the fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms of commercially available Vintage 3 2090-T81 and experimental 2090+In-T6. Precracked J-integral specimens of both alloys were tested at ambient and cryogenic temperatures in the plane stress and plane strain conditions. Considering ambient temperature, results showed that 2090-T81 exhibited the highest toughness in both plane strain and plane stress conditions. For the plane strain condition, reasonable crack initiation and growth toughness of 1090-T81 are associated with a significant amount of delamination and transgranular fracture. Plane stress toughnesses were higher and fracture was characterized by shear cracking with minimal delaminations. In comparisons, the fracture behavior of 2090+In-T6 is significantly degraded by subgrain boundary precipitation. Toughness is low and characterized by intersubgranular fracture with no delamination in the plane stress or plane strain conditions. Intersubgranular cracking is a low energy event which presumably occurs prior to the onset of slip band cracking. Copious grain boundary precipitation is atypical of commercially available 2090. At cryogenic temperatures, both alloys exhibit increased yield strength, toughness, and amount of delamination and shear cracking. The change in fracture mode of 2090+In-T6 from intersubgranular cracking at ambient temperature to a combination of intersubgranular cracking, shear cracking, and delamination at cryogenic temperature is the subject of further investigation.

  4. Fracture characteristics of structural aerospace alloys containing deep surface flaws. [aluminum-titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, J. N.; Bixler, W. D.; Finger, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Conditions controlling the growth and fracture of deep surface flaws in aerospace alloys were investigated. Static fracture tests were performed on 7075-T651 and 2219-T87 aluminum, and 6Ai-4V STA titanium . Cyclic flaw growth tests were performed on the two latter alloys, and sustain load tests were performed on the titanium alloy. Both the cyclic and the sustain load tests were performed with and without a prior proof overload cycle to investigate possible growth retardation effects. Variables included in all test series were thickness, flaw depth-to-thickness ratio, and flaw shape. Results were analyzed and compared with previously developed data to determine the limits of applicability of available modified linear elastic fracture solutions.

  5. A Hierarchical Approach to Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saether, Erik; Taasan, Shlomo

    2004-01-01

    Recent research conducted under NASA LaRC's Creativity and Innovation Program has led to the development of an initial approach for a hierarchical fracture mechanics. This methodology unites failure mechanisms occurring at different length scales and provides a framework for a physics-based theory of fracture. At the nanoscale, parametric molecular dynamic simulations are used to compute the energy associated with atomic level failure mechanisms. This information is used in a mesoscale percolation model of defect coalescence to obtain statistics of fracture paths and energies through Monte Carlo simulations. The mathematical structure of predicted crack paths is described using concepts of fractal geometry. The non-integer fractal dimension relates geometric and energy measures between meso- and macroscales. For illustration, a fractal-based continuum strain energy release rate is derived for inter- and transgranular fracture in polycrystalline metals.

  6. Special Features of Fracture of a Solid-State Titanium Alloy - Nickel - Stainless Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazgaliev, R. G.; Mukhametrakhimov, M. Kh.; Imaev, M. F.; Shayakhmetov, R. U.; Mulyukov, R. R.

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, nanohardness, and special features of fracture of three-phase titanium alloy and stainless steel joint through a nanostructural nickel foil are investigated. Uniformly distributed microcracks are observed in Ti2Ni and TiN3 layers joined at temperatures above T = 700°C, whereas no microcracks are observed in the TiNi layer. This suggests that the reason for microcracking is an anomalously large change in the linear expansion coefficient of the TiNi layer during austenitic-martensitic transformation. Specimens subjected to mechanical tests at T = 20°C are fractured along different layers of the material, namely, in the central part of the specimen they are fractured along the Ti2Тi/TiNi interface, whereas at the edge they are fractured along the TiNi/TiNi3 interface.

  7. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the 22nd National Symposium, Atlanta, GA, June 26-28, 1990. Vols. 1 & 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A. (Editor); Saxena, Ashok (Editor); Mcdowell, David L. (Editor); Atluri, Satya N. (Editor); Newman, James C., Jr. (Editor); Raju, Ivatury S. (Editor); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Current research on fracture mechanics is reviewed, focusing on ductile fracture; high-temperature and time-dependent fracture; 3D problems; interface fracture; microstructural aspects of fatigue and fracture; and fracture predictions and applications. Particular attention is given to the determination and comparison of crack resistance curves from wide plates and fracture mechanics specimens; a relationship between R-curves in contained and uncontained yield; the creep crack growth behavior of titanium alloy Ti-6242; a crack growth response in three heat resistant materials at elevated temperature; a crack-surface-contact model for determining effective-stress-intensity factors; interfacial dislocations in anisotropic bimaterials; an effect of intergranular crack branching on fracture toughness evaluation; the fracture toughness behavior of exservice chromium-molybdenum steels; the application of fracture mechanics to assess the significance of proof loading; and a load ratio method for estimating crack extension.

  8. Process development for 9Cr nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) with high fracture toughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hoelzer, David T.; Lee, Yong Bok; Kang, Suk Hoon; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2014-06-01

    This article is to summarize the process development and key characterization results for the newly-developed Fe-9Cr based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) with high fracture toughness. One of the major drawbacks from pursuing ultra-high strength in the past development of NFAs is poor fracture toughness at high temperatures although a high fracture toughness is essential to prevent cracking during manufacturing and to mitigate or delay irradiation-induced embrittlement in irradiation environments. A study on fracture mechanism using the NFA 14YWT found that the low-energy grain boundary decohesion in fracture process at a high temperature (>200 °C) resulted in low fracture toughness. Lately, efforts have been devoted to explore an integrated process to enhance grain bonding. Two base materials were produced through mechanical milling and hot extrusion and designated as 9YWTV-PM1 and 9YWTV-PM2. Isothermal annealing (IA) and controlled rolling (CR) treatments in two phase region were used to enhance diffusion across the interfaces and boundaries. The PM2 alloy after CR treatments showed high fracture toughness (KJQ) at represented temperatures: 240-280 MPa √m at room temperature and 160-220 MPa √m at 500 °C, which indicates that the goal of 100 MPa √m over possible nuclear application temperature range has been well achieved. Furthermore, it is also confirmed by comparison that the CR treatments on 9YWTV-PM2 result in high fracture toughness similar to or higher than those of the conventional ferritic-martensitic steels such as HT9 and NF616.

  9. Fatigue and fracture mechanics: 27. volume

    SciTech Connect

    Piascik, R.S.; Newman, J.C. Jr.; Dowling, N.E.

    1997-12-01

    During the two and one-half day symposium, an international group of experts from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, Sweden, Germany, Austria, Japan, France, the Peoples Republic of China, India, and korea presented their research findings concerning issues relating to fatigue and fracture mechanics. Published herein are papers grouped in four technical categories relating to elastic-plastic fracture, fatigue, advanced materials and applications, and analytical methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  10. Fractal materials, beams, and fracture mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Li, Jun

    2009-11-01

    Continuing in the vein of a recently developed generalization of continuum thermomechanics, in this paper we extend fracture mechanics and beam mechanics to materials described by fractional integrals involving D, d and R. By introducing a product measure instead of a Riesz measure, so as to ensure that the mechanical approach to continuum mechanics is consistent with the energetic approach, specific forms of continuum-type equations are derived. On this basis we study the energy aspects of fracture and, as an example, a Timoshenko beam made of a fractal material; the local form of elastodynamic equations of that beam is derived. In particular, we review the crack driving force G stemming from the Griffith fracture criterion in fractal media, considering either dead-load or fixed-grip conditions and the effects of ensemble averaging over random fractal materials.

  11. Effect of si on Microstructure and Fracture Toughness of Directionally Solidified nb Silicide Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meiling; Wang, Yuye; Li, Shusuo; Jiang, Liwu; Han, Yafang

    Nb-xSi(x=3,9,16)-22Ti-3Cr-3Al-2Hf (at.%) have been successfully prepared by directional solidification in an optical floating zone furnace. Microstructure analysis and phases identification of the alloys were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Electro Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and Energy Disperse Spectroscopy (EDS). Fracture toughness specimens without pre-crack were prepared, room temperature fracture toughness of alloys was tested by three-point bending method, and fracture mechanism was studied. The results showed that with increasing Si content, Nb5Si3 phase gradually increased and the phase transformed from γ-Nb5Si3 to the stable α-Nb5Si3 phase and β-Nb5Si3 phase. There appeared the Ti-rich Nb5Si3 phase when the Si content is 16 at%. In addition, more micro-cracks generated in the Ti-rich Nb5Si3 phase, which seriously affected room temperature fracture toughness of the alloys.

  12. Fracture toughness of an Al-Li-Cu-In alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Gangloff, R.P. Virginia, University, Charlottesville )

    1992-06-01

    The crack initiation and growth fracture toughness of select AL-Li-Cu alloy variants are characterized and elucidated. Conventionally processed plates form large DC cast ingots are investigated to eliminate the variation in microstructure associated with laboratory scale and SPF-processed material. Fracture resistance is characterized using the J-integral method to establish crack initiation and growth behavior at 25 and -185 C. It is shown that state-of-the-art 2090-T81 has superior toughness compared to 2090 + In-T6 at both test temperatures, with the low toughness of 2090 + In-T6 associated with intersubgranular fracture attributed to a high density of subboundary precipitates. 21 refs.

  13. Fracture toughness of an Al-Li-Cu-In alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The crack initiation and growth fracture toughness of select AL-Li-Cu alloy variants are characterized and elucidated. Conventionally processed plates form large DC cast ingots are investigated to eliminate the variation in microstructure associated with laboratory scale and SPF-processed material. Fracture resistance is characterized using the J-integral method to establish crack initiation and growth behavior at 25 and -185 C. It is shown that state-of-the-art 2090-T81 has superior toughness compared to 2090 + In-T6 at both test temperatures, with the low toughness of 2090 + In-T6 associated with intersubgranular fracture attributed to a high density of subboundary precipitates.

  14. Influence of Cyclic Straining on Fatigue, Deformation, and Fracture Behavior of High-Strength Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Vasudevan, V. K.; Tammana, D.; Poorganji, B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a study on microstructural influences on mechanical behavior of the high-strength alloy steel Tenax™ 310 are presented and discussed. Under the influence of fully reversed strain cycling, the stress response of this alloy steel revealed softening from the onset of deformation. Cyclic strain resistance exhibited a linear trend for the variation of both elastic strain amplitude with reversals-to-failure, and plastic strain amplitude with reversals-to-failure. Fracture morphology was essentially the same at the macroscopic level over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. However, at the fine microscopic level, this high-strength alloy steel revealed fracture to be mixed-mode with features reminiscent of "locally" ductile and brittle mechanisms. The macroscopic mechanisms governing stress response at the fine microscopic level, resultant fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents during fully reversed strain cycling, cyclic strain amplitude, and resultant response stress.

  15. Role of Microstructure in Promoting Fracture and Fatigue Resistance in Mo-Si-B Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H

    2005-04-01

    An investigation of how microstructural features affect the fracture and fatigue properties of a promising class of high temperature Mo-Si-B based alloys is presented. Fracture toughness and fatigue-crack growth properties are measured at 25 and 1300 C for five Mo-Mo{sub 3}Si-Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2} containing alloys produced by powder metallurgy with {alpha}-Mo matrices. Results are compared with previous studies on intermetallic-matrix microstructures in alloys with similar compositions. It is found that increasing the {alpha}-Mo phase volume fraction (17-49%) or ductility (by increasing the temperature) benefits the fracture resistance; in addition, {alpha}-Mo matrix materials show significant improvements over intermetallic-matrix alloys. Fatigue thresholds were also increased with increasing {alpha}-Mo phase content, until a transition to more ductile fatigue behavior occurred with large amounts of {alpha}-Mo phase (49%) and ductility (i.e., at 1300 C). The beneficial role of such microstructural variables are attributed to the promotion of the observed toughening mechanisms of crack trapping and bridging by the relatively ductile {alpha}-Mo phase.

  16. Laser treatment of aluminum copper alloys: A mechanical enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    De Mol van Otterloo, J.L.; De Hosson, J.T. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1994-02-15

    Aluminum-copper alloys are commonly used as structural components for the car and aircraft industry. They combine low density, high strength, high fracture toughness and good machinability. Moreover, the strength and wear-resistance of the surface of alloys are improved by a high power laser beam. In this way the molten surface will be self-quenched by conduction of heat into the bulk. This technique ensures solidification velocities of 0.01--1 m/s. These high solidification velocities have a significant influence on the size and distribution of the morphology. This work concentrates on Al-Cu alloys, in which the Cu content ranges between 0--40 wt.%, and is aimed at describing the mechanical and microstructural properties of these alloys upon variation of the laser scan velocity in the range of 0.0125 to 0.125 m/s.

  17. A fracture-resistant high-entropy alloy for cryogenic applications.

    PubMed

    Gludovatz, Bernd; Hohenwarter, Anton; Catoor, Dhiraj; Chang, Edwin H; George, Easo P; Ritchie, Robert O

    2014-09-01

    High-entropy alloys are equiatomic, multi-element systems that can crystallize as a single phase, despite containing multiple elements with different crystal structures. A rationale for this is that the configurational entropy contribution to the total free energy in alloys with five or more major elements may stabilize the solid-solution state relative to multiphase microstructures. We examined a five-element high-entropy alloy, CrMnFeCoNi, which forms a single-phase face-centered cubic solid solution, and found it to have exceptional damage tolerance with tensile strengths above 1 GPa and fracture toughness values exceeding 200 MPa·m(1/2). Furthermore, its mechanical properties actually improve at cryogenic temperatures; we attribute this to a transition from planar-slip dislocation activity at room temperature to deformation by mechanical nanotwinning with decreasing temperature, which results in continuous steady strain hardening. PMID:25190791

  18. Intergranular fracture in an Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.; Lumsden, J.B.

    1985-02-01

    The intergranular fracture characteristics of the Al-Li-Cu-Mg-Zr alloy is studied for underaged (170 C/4 hr) and overaged (230 C/4 hr) conditions. In addition, extensive intergranular fracture parallel to the tensile axis (delamination) in longitudinal tensile specimens is found together with equal concentration of K on all intergranular fracture surfaces independent of aging treatment. K is believed to promote intergranular fracture in Al-Li alloys similarly to a Na presence. 7 references.

  19. Ductility and fracture in B2 FeAl alloys. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crimp, Martin A.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of B2FeAl alloys was studied. Stoichiometric Fe-50Al exhibits totally brittle behavior while iron-rich Fe-40Al yields and displays about 3% total strain. This change in behavior results from large decreases in the yield strength with iron-rich deviations from stoichiometry while the fracture stress remains essentially constant. Single crystal studies show that these yield strength decreases are directly related to decreases in the critical resolved shear stress for a group of zone axes /111/ set of (110) planes slip. This behavior is rationalized in terms of the decrease in antiphase boundary energy with decreasing aluminum content. The addition of boron results in improvements in the mechanical behavior of alloys on the iron-rich side of stoichiometry. These improvements are increased brittle fracture stresses of near-stoichiometric alloys, and enhanced ductility of up to 6% in Fe-40Al. These effects were attributed to increased grain boundary adhesion as reflected by changes in fracture mode from intergranular to transgranular failure. The increases in yield strength, which are observed in both polycrystals and single crystals, result from the quenching in of large numbers of thermal vacancies. Hall-Petch plots show that the cooling rate effects are a direct result of changes in the Hall-Petch intercept/lattice resistance flow.

  20. Relationship between fracture toughness, fracture path, and microstructure of 7050 aluminum alloy. Part 2: Multiple micromechanisms-based fracture toughness model

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, A.M.; Deshpande, N.U.; Denzer, D.K.; Liu, J.

    1998-04-01

    A multiple micromechanisms-based model is developed to quantitatively relate the fracture toughness of partially recrystallized 7XXX aluminum alloys to their fracture surface morphology. The model is verified using the experimental data on partially recrystallized 7050 alloy reported in the companion article. It is then used to obtain a quantitative relationship between the fracture toughness and microstructural attributes. The model relates fracture toughness to microstructural parameters such as degree of recrystallization, grain size of recrystallized grains, thickness of recrystallized regions, total surface area of the constituent particles per unit volume, and microstructural anisotropy. The model predicts the changes in the fracture toughness with the specimen orientation.

  1. Fracture assessment for electron beam welded damage tolerant Ti-6Al-4V alloy by the FITNET procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2013-09-01

    Fracture assessment of the cracked structures is essential to avoiding fracture failure. A number of fracture assessment procedures have been proposed for various steel structures. However, the studies about the application of available procedures for titanium alloy structures are scarcely reported. Fracture assessment for the electron beam(EB) welded thick-walled damage tolerant Ti-6Al-4V(TC4-DT) alloy is performed by the fitness-for-service(FFS) FITNET procedure. Uniaxial tensile tests and fracture assessment tests of the base metal and weld metal are carried out to obtain the input information of assessment. The standard options and advanced options of FITNET FFS procedure are used to the fracture assessment of the present material. Moreover, the predicted maximum loads of compact tensile specimen using FITNET FFS procedure are verified with the experimental data of fracture assessment tests. As a result, it is shown that the mechanical properties of weld metal are inhomogeneous along the weld depth. The mismatch ratio M is less than 10% at the weld top and middle, whereas more than 10% at the weld bottom. Failure assessment lines of standard options are close to that of advanced option, which means that the standard options are suitable for fracture assessment of the present welds. The accurate estimation of the maximum loads has been obtained by fracture assessment of standard options with error less than 6%. Furthermore, there are no potential advantages of applying higher options or mismatch options. Thus, the present welded joints can be treated as homogeneous material during the fracture assessment, and standard option 1 can be used to achieve accurate enough results. This research provides the engineering treatment methods for the fracture assessment of titanium alloy and its EB welds.

  2. HFIR vessel probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Dickson, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    The life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel is limited by a radiation induced reduction in the material`s fracture toughness. Hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are being used to meet the intent of the ASME Code, while extending the life of the vessel well beyond its original design value. The most recent probabilistic evaluation is more precise and accounts for the effects of gamma as well as neutron radiation embrittlement. This analysis confirms the earlier estimates of a permissible vessel lifetime of at least 50 EFPY (100 MW).

  3. Damage and fracture mechanics of composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdussalam, Saleh Ramadan

    The design of structural systems in the aerospace industry has been characterized by a continuing search for strong, yet lightweight, materials to achieve maximum payload capability for minimum weight. In recent years, this search has led to a wide use of fiber reinforced composites, such as carbon, glass and kevelar based composites. Comparison of these new materials with the traditional ones (metals) according to the basic properties, such as density, elastic modulus and also long-time and short-time strength, shows their superiority over traditional materials, when weight is a major design factor, like in the aerospace industry. Most composite materials of interest to aerospace applications have been adequately characterized under static loading conditions. Related work to study their fracture behaviour has been limited. Since most failure mechanisms involve crack growth and/or delamination, design of such components requires knowledge and understanding of their fracture properties. This thesis includes an experimental and analytical investigation of fracture characteristics of composite materials. The post-peak response of notched specimens subjected to uniaxial cyclic loading is established to evaluate the fracture energy associated with progressive matrix damage and subsequent crack growth. A total of 75 uniaxial tension specimens were tested. The experimental work consisted of first testing several un-notched specimens with different thickness (number of layers) to determine the initial and secondary elastic modulus as well as the tensile strength. The investigation studied the effect of the various fracture parameters, including thickness, fiber orientation, and crack width ratio (a/w) on the behaviour of crack propagation, peak load, and post-peak response. The specimens used in this research were prepared using the vacuum bagging technique, with a chosen number of fiber glass cloth layers and fiber orientation. The experimental results provided

  4. The fracture of boron fibre-reinforced 6061 aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. A.; Welch, D.; Jollay, J.

    1979-01-01

    The fracture of 6061 aluminium alloy reinforced with unidirectional and cross-plied 0/90 deg, 0/90/+ or - 45 deg boron fibres has been investigated. The results have been described in terms of a critical stress intensity, K(Q). Critical stress intensity factors were obtained by substituting the failure stress and the initial crack length into the appropriate expression for K(Q). Values were obtained that depended on the dimensions of the specimens. It was therefore concluded that, for the size of specimen tested, the values of K(Q) did not reflect any basic materials property.

  5. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. M.; Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.

    1985-01-01

    Current lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads was reviewed. The central objectives of the project were to report the current state of and recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling and forecasting subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest to NASA was the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. A survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology were conducted. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include: development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  6. A review of fracture mechanics life technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Besuner, P. M.; Harris, D. O.; Thomas, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Lifetime prediction technology for structural components subjected to cyclic loads is examined. The central objectives of the project are: (1) to report the current state of the art, and (2) recommend future development of fracture mechanics-based analytical tools for modeling subcritical fatigue crack growth in structures. Of special interest is the ability to apply these tools to practical engineering problems and the developmental steps necessary to bring vital technologies to this stage. The authors conducted a survey of published literature and numerous discussions with experts in the field of fracture mechanics life technology. One of the key points made is that fracture mechanics analyses of crack growth often involve consideration of fatigue and fracture under extreme conditions. Therefore, inaccuracies in predicting component lifetime will be dominated by inaccuracies in environment and fatigue crack growth relations, stress intensity factor solutions, and methods used to model given loads and stresses. Suggestions made for reducing these inaccuracies include development of improved models of subcritical crack growth, research efforts aimed at better characterizing residual and assembly stresses that can be introduced during fabrication, and more widespread and uniform use of the best existing methods.

  7. The effect of alloy composition on the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. N.

    1971-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed on determining the interrelations among the composition, phase structure, deformation, and fracture properties of the alpha phase in susceptible alpha-beta alloys. The program is divided into two parts: (1) evaluation of the aqueous stress corrosion susceptibility of a series of alloys that contain various alpha-soluble elements; and (2) investigations of the metallurgical aspects of the mechanism of aqueous stress corrosion cracking.

  8. Computational simulation methods for composite fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1988-01-01

    Structural integrity, durability, and damage tolerance of advanced composites are assessed by studying damage initiation at various scales (micro, macro, and global) and accumulation and growth leading to global failure, quantitatively and qualitatively. In addition, various fracture toughness parameters associated with a typical damage and its growth must be determined. Computational structural analysis codes to aid the composite design engineer in performing these tasks were developed. CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is used to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the progressive damage occurring in composite structures due to mechanical and environmental loads. Next, methods are covered that are currently being developed and used at Lewis to predict interlaminar fracture toughness and related parameters of fiber composites given a prescribed damage. The general purpose finite element code MSC/NASTRAN was used to simulate the interlaminar fracture and the associated individual as well as mixed-mode strain energy release rates in fiber composites.

  9. Development of digital image processing based methodology to study, quantify and correlate the microstructure and three dimensional fracture surface morphology of aluminum alloy 7050

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dighe, Manish Deepak

    2000-10-01

    7XXX series wrought aluminum alloys are extensively used for structural aerospace applications due to their high strength to weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and high fracture resistance. 7050 is an important alloy of this group, which is widely used for the applications such as aircraft wing skin structures, aircraft landing gear parts, and fuselage frame structure. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate the fracture behavior of 7050 aluminum alloy, which is a typical alloy of 7XXX series. The aim of this research is to quantitatively characterize and model the relationships among processing, microstructure, fracture surface morphology, and fracture toughness of hot-rolled partially recrystallized precipitation hardened 7050 alloy. A new technique is developed which permits simultaneous viewing of the fracture surface and the microstructure just below and above the fracture surface. This technique is then applied to identify, validate and quantify various fracture micro-mechanisms observed on the fracture surface. To get a better insight in to the shape and anisotropy of the recrystallized grains, the three-dimensional structure of the microstructure is reconstructed using serial sectioning. The gathered information is utilized to develop a mathematical model relating the various processing parameters and microstructural attributes to the fracture toughness.

  10. The effect of thermal treatment on the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, R.; Elliott, C.S.; Hwang, I.S.; Prybylowski, J.

    1993-05-01

    Alloy X-750 is a high strength, age hardenable nickel-base alloy used in light water nuclear reactors. The excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature strength of alloy X-750 make it suitable for use in a variety of structure components in both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. These applications involve exposure of highly stressed material to aqueous media. Operational stresses are subject to low frequency thermally induced fluctuations and high frequency flow induced fluctuations. In general, alloy X-750 has performed well in light water reactors. However, an economically significant number of components have failed unexpectedly due to localized forms of attack such as corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Thermal processing history is known to play a significant role in the fracture properties of alloy X-750 in aqueous environments. While thermal treatments have been developed recently to improve performance, in many cases the reason for improved performance remains unclear. Therefore, identification of the mechanisms responsible for the degradation of fracture properties in aqueous environments is necessary. As a corollary it is necessary to achieve an understanding of how thermal treatment influences microstructure and, in turn, how microstructure influences fracture properties in aqueous environments. This report discusses five thermal treatments which were studied: (1) SA-1 hr at 1093{degree}C, (2) AH - 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (3) HTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, (4) AHTH - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 24 hr at 885{degree}C + 20 hr at 704{degree}C, and (5) HOA - 1 hr at 1093{degree}C + 100 hrs at 760{degree}C. Microstructural characterization of these materials was accomplished through the use of optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy,scanning transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and x-ray diffractometry.

  11. Fracture toughness and corrosion resistance of semisolid AlSi5 alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pola, A.; Montesano, L.; Gelfi, M.; Roberti, R.

    2011-05-04

    The aim of this work was to investigate fracture toughness and corrosion resistance of semisolid AlSi5 castings, compared to samples obtained from conventional casting operations. In order to have a semisolid microstructure, the melt alloy was treated by means of ultrasound during solidification and then poured into permanent moulds. Mechanical properties of semisolid and conventional castings were compared by means of ultimate tensile strength (R{sub m}), yield stress (Rp{sub 02}) and hardness (HV) measurements. Fracture mechanics tests were carried out on Single Edge Notched Bend (SENB) specimens, machined from castings, and pre-cracked by fatigue. These tests were performed to determine the effect of the microstructure on the J-Integral resistance (J-R) behavior and to deeply understand the ductile fracture behaviour of semisolid parts. The J-Integral versus spaced crack extension (J-{Delta}a) curves showed an improved resistance of the semisolid microstructure, due to the higher ductility. Finally, the corrosion behaviour of semisolid samples was compared to that of castings coming from solidification of fully liquid alloy by means of electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization tests. It was observed that the globular microstructure offers better quality, in terms of higher mechanical properties, as a consequence of a more uniform distribution of the solute.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  13. Applications of memory alloy stent in vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yimin, Yang; Zhi, Zhang; ZhiWei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating vertebral compression fractures using an autonomously developed nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent. Material/Methods Thoracolumbar vertebral specimens from adult human cadavers were made into models of compression fractures. The models were divided into group A, which received percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP), balloon dilation, and nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent implantation (PKP + nitinol stent group); group B, which received percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and direct implantation of a nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent (PVP + nitinol stent group); and group C, which received PKP, balloon dilation, and bone cement vertebroplasty (PKP + polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) group). Vertebral heights were measured before and after the surgery and the water bath incubation to compare the impact of the 3 different surgical approaches on reducing vertebral compression. Results The 3 surgical groups could all significantly restore the heights of compressed vertebral bodies. The vertebral heights of the PKP + nitinol stent group, PVP + nitinol stent group, and PKP + PMMA group were changed from the preoperative levels of (1.59±0.08) cm, (1.68±0.08) cm, and (1.66±0.11) cm to the postoperative levels of (2.00±0.09) cm, (1.87±0.04) cm, and (1.99±0.09) cm, respectively. After the water bath, the vertebral heights of each group were changed to (2.10±0.07) cm, (1.98±0.09) cm, and (2.00±0.10) cm, respectively. Pairwise comparison of the differences between the preoperative and postoperative vertebral heights showed that group A and group B differed significantly (P=0.000); group B and group C differed significantly (P=0.003); and group A and group C had no significant difference (P=0.172). Pairwise comparison of the differences in the vertebral heights before and after the water bath showed that group A and group C differed significantly (P=0.000); group B and group C differed significantly

  14. Interrelation of material microstructure, ultrasonic factors, and fracture toughness of two phase titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    The pivotal role of an alpha-beta phase microstructure in governing fracture toughness in a titanium alloy, Ti-662, is demonstrated. The interrelation of microstructure and fracture toughness is demonstrated using ultrasonic measurement techniques originally developed for nondestructive evaluation and material property characterization. It is shown that the findings determined from ultrasonic measurements agree with conclusions based on metallurgical, metallographic, and fractographic observations concerning the importance of alpha-beta morphology in controlling fracture toughness in two phase titanium alloys.

  15. Effect of Heat Treatment, Pre-stress and Surface Hardening on Fracture Toughness of Micro-Alloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag Chaudhury, Joydeb

    2014-01-01

    Micro-alloyed steels are being increasingly accepted by industry in various fields of application and are available with a wide variety of microstructures. Extensive literature is available on their microstructure-property relationships. The superior mechanical properties of micro-alloyed steels are caused by fine-grained microstructures and precipitation of micro-alloying elements such as V, Ti and Nb that led to an improvement in yield strength, in the product of tensile strength and total elongation and in Charpy V-notch impact energy as well. The microstructural changes caused by heat treatment or residual stress state caused by surface hardening or mechanical means may influence the fracture toughness of these micro-alloyed steels. It is in this context that the present work begins with experimental determination of quasi-static initiation fracture toughness ( J 1c) of low carbon (0.19%) micro-alloyed steel in as-rolled condition without any heat treatment. The study further explores the effect of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening on fracture toughness of as-rolled steel under study. The normalizing heat treatment, shot-peening and cyaniding followed by shot-peening—each indicates a positive influence on initiation fracture toughness. Results, when compared, show that cyaniding followed by shot-peening have led to a 2.7 times increase in J 1c. Cyaniding followed by shot-peening may therefore be considered as having the most positive influence on initiation fracture toughness in as-rolled condition for the type of micro-alloyed steel under study. Although initiation fracture toughness is in general known to decrease with increase in yield strength in LEFM arena, the micro-alloyed steel under study when normalized displayed simultaneous improvement in yield strength and J 1c. All these observed effects of normalizing, shot-peening and cyaniding on initiation fracture toughness (elastic-plastic fracture mechanics) were explained

  16. Mechanical properties of cast Ti-6Al-4V-XCu alloys.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Okafor, I C I; Watanabe, I; Hattori, M; Oda, Y; Okabe, T

    2004-11-01

    The mechanical properties of Ti-6Al-4V-XCu (1, 4 and 10 wt% Cu) alloys were examined. The castings for each alloy were made in a centrifugal titanium casting machine. Two shapes of specimens were used: a dumbbell (20 mm gauge length x 2.8 mm diameter) for mechanical property studies, and a flat slab (2 mm x 10 mm x 10 mm) for metallography, microhardness determination and X-ray diffractometry. Tensile strength, yield strength, modulus of elasticity, elongation and microhardness were evaluated. After tensile testing, the fracture surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The tensile strengths of the quaternary alloys decreased from 1016 MPa for the 1% Cu alloy to 387 MPa for the 10% Cu alloy. Elongation decreased with an increase in the copper content. The 1% Cu alloy exhibited elongation similar to Ti-6Al-4V without copper (3.0%). The results also indicated that the copper additions increased the bulk hardness of the quaternary alloy. In particular, the 10% Cu alloy had the highest hardness and underwent the most brittle fracture. The mechanical properties of cast Ti-6Al-4V alloy with 1 and 4% Cu were well within the values for existing dental casting non-precious alloys. PMID:15525390

  17. Flow and fracture of particle hardened copper-titanium alloys: Interplay of slip and twinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radetic, Tamara

    The flow and fracture behavior of Cu-rich Cu-Ti alloys hardened by ordered, metastable, coherent betasp' precipitates (Cusb4Ti,\\ D1sb{a} superstructure) are particularly interesting because these alloys show an unusual propensity to twin profusely after small amounts of plastic flow by slip. The mechanical behavior was studied using standard tensile testing along with modern electron optical techniques including CTEM, SEM and HREM. The deformation substructure in the early stages of aging and in samples aged for longer times is characterized by the coupled motion of five dislocations of the same Burgers vector (superdislocations in the D1sb{a} structure) after small degrees of deformation. Characterization of the fine-scale structure of the mechanical twins which form in the particle hardened Cu-Ti alloys is also reported in this study. The growth of deformation twins occurs via the motion of so-called G-ledges at twin/matrix interfaces and via a coalescence of fine twins. The atomic structure of the coherent twin/matrix interfaces and associated single and multiple layer ledges are also elucidated. Incoherent interfaces at the tip of deformation twins generated by 90sp° and 30sp° twinning dislocations have been investigated. The twin/twin and slip/twin interactions have been studied and analyzed as well as the effect of grain boundaries on deformation twinning. Deformation twins appear to nucleate at dislocation pile-ups serving as a stress relaxation mechanism. Shear transfer through obstacle twins is effected by slip and twining. The dominant strengthening mechanism is concluded to be coherency strain hardening and the interplay of particle strengthening and grain size hardening is analyzed. The particle dispersion was found to influence the Hall-Petch factor but a detailed understanding of these synergetic effects was not established. The fracture mode of the underaged Cu-Ti alloys was found to be dimpled ductile tearing.

  18. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  19. Fracture Toughness Measurements and Assessment of Thin Walled Conduit Alloys in a Cicc Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-01

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  20. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS AND ASSESSMENT OF THIN WALLED CONDUIT ALLOYS IN A CICC APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, R. P.; Han, K.; Toplosky, V. J.

    2008-03-03

    The Series-Connected Hybrid Magnets under construction at the NHMFL use Cable-in-Conduct-Conductor (CICC) technology. The 4 K mechanical properties of the conduit are extremely important to the performance and reliability of the magnets. We have measured tensile and fracture toughness of two candidate conduit alloys (Haynes 242 and modified 316LN) in various metallurgical states, with emphasis on the final state of production. To assess the material in its final production state, non-standard specimens are removed directly from the round-corner rectangular conduit and tested after exposure to a simulated Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction heat treatment. Non-standard middle-tension (MT) fracture toughness specimens enable toughness evaluation of the base metal, welds and weld/base transitional region in the as-fabricated conduit with final dimensions not suitable for conventional fracture toughness specimens. Although fracture toughness tests of the thin walled conduit fail to meet ASTM test validity requirements they provide a qualitative evaluation and estimate of the fracture toughness of the conduit and the welds.

  1. Metallurgical and mechanical properties of thorium-doped Ir-0. 3% W alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Inouye, H.; Schaffhauser, A.C.

    1980-04-01

    Metallurgical and mechanical properties of Ir-0.3% W alloys have been studied as a function of thorium concentration in the range 0 to 1000 ppM by weight. The solubility limit of thorium in Ir-0.3% W is below 30 ppM. Above this limit, the excess thorium reacts with iridium to form second-phase particles. Thorium additions raise the recrystallization temperature and effectively retard grain growth at high temperatures. Tensile tests at 650/sup 0/C show that the alloy without thorium additions (undoped alloy) fractured by grainboundary (GB) separation, while the alloys doped with less than 500 ppM thorium failed mainly by transgranular fracture at 650/sup 0/C. Intergranular fracture in the doped alloys is suppressed by GB segregation of thorium, which improves the mechanical properties of the boundary. The impact properties of the alloys were correlated with test temperature, grain size, and heat treatment. The impact ductility increases with test temperature and decreases with grain size. For a given grain size, particularly in the fine-grain size range, the thorium-doped alloys are much more ductile and resistant to GB fracture. All of these results can be correlated on the basis of stress concentration on GBs by using a dislocation pileup model.

  2. Cyclic Strain Resistance, Stress Response, Fatigue Life, and Fracture Behavior of High Strength Low Alloy Steel 300 M

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.; Tammana, Deepthi; Poorgangi, Behrang; Vasudevan, Vijay K.

    2014-05-01

    The focus of this technical manuscript is a record of the specific role of microstructure and test specimen orientation on cyclic stress response, cyclic strain resistance, and cyclic stress versus strain response, deformation and fracture behavior of alloy steel 300 M. The cyclic strain amplitude-controlled fatigue properties of this ultra-high strength alloy steel revealed a linear trend for the variation of log elastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure, and log plastic strain amplitude with log reversals-to-failure for both longitudinal and transverse orientations. Test specimens of the longitudinal orientation showed only a marginal improvement over the transverse orientation at equivalent values of plastic strain amplitude. Cyclic stress response revealed a combination of initial hardening for the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for a large portion of fatigue life before culminating in rapid softening prior to catastrophic failure by fracture. Fracture characteristics of test specimens of this alloy steel were different at both the macroscopic and fine microscopic levels over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. Both macroscopic and fine microscopic observations revealed fracture to be a combination of both brittle and ductile mechanisms. The underlying mechanisms governing stress response, deformation characteristics, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the competing and mutually interactive influences of test specimen orientation, intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents, cyclic strain amplitude, and response stress.

  3. Mechanical properties of submicron-grained TiAl alloys prepared by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehring, M.; Appel, F.; Pfullmann, Th.; Bormann, R.

    1995-02-01

    Ti-48 at. % Al powders of the metastable hexagonal-closed-packed solid solution with a grain size of 15 nm were prepared by mechanical alloying. The powders were consolidated to a density of greater than 99.5% by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 800 °C. After HIP the material exhibits a globular microstructure of the equilibrium phases α2 and γ with a mean grain size of 150 nm. Microhardness measurements show a Hall-Petch type [E. O. Hall, Proc. Phys. Soc. B 64, 747 (1951); N. J. Petch, J. Iron Steel Inst. 174, 25 (1953)] dependence on grain size. Room temperature compression tests reveal low ductility, but high fracture strengths ≥1800 MPa. On increasing the test temperature the yield strength drops sharply in the temperature range 600-800 °C to very low values. The results indicate that submicron-grained TiAl alloys can be deformed at much lower temperatures than coarse-grained material, making them suitable as precursors for net shaping, in particular if high deformation ratios are required.

  4. EBSD characterization of low temperature deformation mechanisms in modern alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozmel, Thomas S., II

    For structural applications, grain refinement has been shown to enhance mechanical properties such as strength, fatigue resistance, and fracture toughness. Through control of the thermos-mechanical processing parameters, dynamic recrystallization mechanisms were used to produce microstructures consisting of sub-micron grains in 9310 steel, 4140 steel, and Ti-6Al-4V. In both 9310 and 4140 steel, the distribution of carbides throughout the microstructure affected the ability of the material to dynamically recrystallize and determined the size of the dynamically recrystallized grains. Processing the materials at lower temperatures and higher strain rates resulted in finer dynamically recrystallized grains. Microstructural process models that can be used to estimate the resulting microstructure based on the processing parameters were developed for both 9310 and 4140 steel. Heat treatment studies performed on 9310 steel showed that the sub-micron grain size obtained during deformation could not be retained due to the low equilibrium volume fraction of carbides. Commercially available aluminum alloys were investigated to explain their high strain rate deformation behavior. Alloys such as 2139, 2519, 5083, and 7039 exhibit strain softening after an ultimate strength is reached, followed by a rapid degradation of mechanical properties after a critical strain level has been reached. Microstructural analysis showed that the formation of shear bands typically preceded this rapid degradation in properties. Shear band boundary misorientations increased as a function of equivalent strain in all cases. Precipitation behavior was found to greatly influence the microstructural response of the alloys. Additionally, precipitation strengthened alloys were found to exhibit similar flow stress behavior, whereas solid solution strengthened alloys exhibited lower flow stresses but higher ductility during dynamic loading. Schmid factor maps demonstrated that shear band formation behavior

  5. Metallurgical characterization of the fracture of several high strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandarkar, M. D.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    The fracture behavior for structural aluminum alloys (2024, 6061, 7075, and 7178) was examined in selected heat treatments. The investigation included tensile, shear, and precracked notch-bend specimens fractured at ambient temperature under monotonic loading. Specimens were obtained from thin sheets and thick plates and were tested in longitudinal and transverse orientations at different strain rates. Microstructures of alloys were examined using the optical microscope and the scanning electron microscope with associated energy dispersive X ray chemical analysis. Several different types of second phase particles, some not reported by other investigators, were identified in the alloys. Fracture morphology was related to microstructural variables, test variables, and type of commercial product. Specimen orientation examined in the present investigation had little effect on fracture morphology. Test strain rate changes resulted in some change in shear fracture morphology, but not in fracture morphology of tensile specimens.

  6. Microstructural effects on the tensile and fracture behavior of aluminum casting alloys A356/357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. G.

    2003-12-01

    The tensile properties and fracture behavior of cast aluminum alloys A356 and A357 strongly depend on secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), Mg content, and, in particular, the size and shape of eutectic silicon particles and Fe-rich intermetallics. In the unmodified alloys, increasing the cooling rate during solidification refines both the dendrites and eutectic particles and increases ductility. Strontium modification reduces the size and aspect ratio of the eutectic silicon particles, leading to a fairly constant particle size and aspect ratio over the range of SDAS studied. In comparison with the unmodified alloys, the Sr-modified alloys show higher ductility, particularly the A356 alloy, but slightly lower yield strength. In the microstructures with large SDAS (>50 µm), the ductility of the Sr-modified alloys does not continuously decrease with SDAS as it does in the unmodified alloy. Increasing Mg content increases both the matrix strength and eutectic particle size. This decreases ductility in both the Sr-modified and unmodified alloys. The A356/357 alloys with large and elongated particles show higher strain hardening and, thus, have a higher damage accumulation rate by particle cracking. Compared to A356, the increased volume fraction and size of the Fe-rich intermetallics ( π phase) in the A357 alloy are responsible for the lower ductility, especially in the Sr-modified alloy. In alloys with large SDAS (>50 µm), final fracture occurs along the cell boundaries, and the fracture mode is transgranular. In the small SDAS (<30 µm) alloys, final fracture tends to concentrate along grain boundaries. The transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture mode is accompanied by an increase in the ductility of the alloys.

  7. Effects of irradiation to 4 dpa at 390 C on the fracture toughness of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Galvin, T.M.; Chopra, O.K.

    1998-09-01

    Fracture toughness J-R curve tests were conducted at room temperature on disk-shaped compact-tension DC(T) specimens of three vanadium alloys having a nominal composition of V-4Cr-4Ti. The alloys in the nonirradiated condition showed high fracture toughness; J{sub IC} could not be determined but is expected to be above 600 kJ/m{sup 2}. The alloys showed very poor fracture toughness after irradiation to 4 dpa at 390 C, e.g., J{sub IC} values of {approx}10 kJ/m{sup 2} or lower.

  8. Fracture mechanics of model fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Chi.

    1992-01-01

    Fracture of matrix material caused by a tensile break in a fiber was investigated. A model was constructed, consisting of two inextensible fibers touching end-to-end and embedded in an elastic block. Energy release rates were calculated by FEA for a circular crack growing outwards from the point where the fiber ends separated as they were pulled apart. The results are compared with experimental observations on steel rod/silicone resin systems. It is found that, when a fiber breaks, a circular crack grows outward in a stable way under increasing load. After the crack reaches a certain size, approximately halfway to the edge of the resin block, the strain energy release reaches a minimum value and then increases, and the crack accelerates. The force required to propagate a crack is predicted successfully by linear elastic fracture mechanics at all stages of crack growth. In particular, good agreement was obtained with the maximum force that the system could support - the breaking load. Fracture of fiber composites under shear deformation was simulated by applying a tension to the rod in a bush mounting.

  9. Spall fracture in aluminium alloy at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, K. D.; Rav, Amit; Sur, Amit; Kaushik, T. C.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2016-05-01

    Spall fracture strength and dynamic yield strength has been measured in 8mm thick target plates of aluminium alloy Al2024-T4 at high strain rates generated in three plate impact experiments carried out at impact velocities of 180 m/s, 370 m/s and 560m/s, respectively, using single stage gas gun facility. In each experiment, the free surface velocity history of the Al2024-T4 sample plate measured employing velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) is used to determine the spall strength and dynamic yield strength of this material. The spall strength of 1.11 GPa, 1.16 GPa and 1.43 GPa, determined from measured free surface velocity history of sample material in three experiments performed at impact velocity of 180 m/s, 370 m/s and 560 m/s, respectively, are higher than the quasi static value of 0.469 GPa and display almost linearly increasing trend with increasing impact velocity or equivalently with increasing strain rates. The average strain rates just ahead of the spall fracture are determined to be 1.9×10 4/s, 2.0×104/s and 2.5×104/s, respectively. The dynamic yield strength determined in the three experiments range from 0.383 GPa to 0.407 GPa, which is higher than the quasi static value of 0.324GPa.

  10. Strengthening of Aluminum Alloy 2219 by Thermo-mechanical Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xifeng; Lei, Kun; Song, Peng; Liu, Xinqin; Zhang, Fei; Li, Jianfei; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Strengthening of aluminum alloy 2219 by thermo-mechanical treatment has been compared with artificial aging. Three simple deformation modes including pre-stretching, compression, and rolling have been used in thermo-mechanical treatment. The tensile strength, elongation, fracture feature, and precipitated phase have been investigated. The results show that the strengthening effect of thermo-mechanical treatment is better than the one of artificial aging. Especially, the yield strength significantly increases with a small decrease of elongation. When the specimen is pre-stretched to 8.0%, the yield strength reaches 385.0 MPa and increases by 22.2% in comparison to the one obtained in aging condition. The maximum tensile strength of 472.4 MPa is achieved with 4.0% thickness reduction by compression. The fracture morphology reveals locally ductile and brittle failure mechanism, while the coarse second-phase particles distribute on the fracture surface. The intermediate phases θ″ or θ' orthogonally precipitate in the matrix after thermo-mechanical treatment. As compared to artificial aging, the cold plastic deformation increases distribution homogeneity and the volume fraction of θ'' or θ' precipitates. These result in a better strengthening effect.

  11. Mechanical properties of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened molybdenum, Mo-ODS, developed by a proprietary powder metallurgy process, exhibits a creep rupture life at 0.65T{sub m} (1,600 C) of three to five orders of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum, while maintaining ductile fracture behavior at temperatures significantly below room temperature. In comparison, the creep rupture life of the Mo-50Re solid solution strengthened alloy at 1,600 C is only an order of magnitude greater than unalloyed molybdenum. The results of microstructural characterization and thermal stability and mechanical property testing are discussed.

  12. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  13. A Study On Critical Thinning In Thin-walled Tube Bending Of Al-Alloy 5052O Via Coupled Ductile Fracture Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Yang He; Zhan Mei

    2010-06-15

    Thin-walled tube bending(TWTB) method of Al-alloy tube has attracted wide applications in aerospace, aviation and automobile,etc. While, under in-plane double tensile stress states at the extrados of bending tube, the over-thinning induced ductile fracture is one dominant defect in Al-alloy tube bending. The main objective of this study is to predict the critical wall-thinning of Al-alloy tube bending by coupling two ductile fracture criteria(DFCs) into FE simulation. The DFCs include Continuum Damage Mechanics(CDM)-based model and GTN porous model. Through the uniaxial tensile test of the curved specimen, the basic material properties of the Al-alloy 5052O tube is obtained; via the inverse problem solution, the damage parameters of both the two fracture criteria are interatively determined. Thus the application study of the above DFCs in the TWTB is performed, and the more reasonable one is selected to obtain the critical thinning of Al-alloy tube in bending. The virtual damage initiation and evolution (when and where the ductile fracture occurs) in TWTB are investigated, and the fracture mechanisms of the voided Al-alloy tube in tube bending are consequently discussed.

  14. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, Wayne; McGill, Preston

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation that details the fracture toughness of Aluminum-Beryllium Alloy for use in structures at cryogenic temperatures. Graphs and charts are presented in the presentation

  15. References and conference proceedings towards the understanding of fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toor, P. M.; Hudson, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    A list of books, reports, periodicals, and conference proceedings, as well as individual papers, centered on specific aspects of fracture phenomenon has been compiled by the ASTM Committee E-24 on Fracture Testing. A list of basic references includes the articles on the development of fracture toughness, evaluation of stress intensity factors, fatigue crack growth, fracture testing, fracture of brittle materials, and fractography. Special attention is given to the references on application of fracture mechanics to new designs and on reevaluation of failed designs, many of them concerned with naval and aircraft structures.

  16. An Experimental Evaluation of Material Properties and Fracture Simulation of Cryorolled 7075 Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Prosenjit; Singh, I. V.; Jayaganthan, R.

    2012-07-01

    This work presents an experimental evaluation of yield strength, tensile strength, and impact toughness of 7075 Al alloy. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has been chosen for quasi-static crack growth simulations using Charpy impact energy as the crack growth criterion for both Bulk and ultrafine-grained (UFG) 7075 Al alloy. The 7075 Al alloy is rolled for different thickness reductions (40 and 70%) at cryogenic (liquid nitrogen) temperature, and its mechanical properties are studied by performing the tensile and Charpy impact testing. The microstructural characterization of the alloy was carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The rolling of the Al alloy at cryogenic temperature suppresses dynamic recovery, and dislocation cells formed during processing, transformed into fully formed ultrafine-grains (600 nm) at 70% thickness reduction. The impact energy used as the crack growth criterion under quasi-static loading condition based on the Griffith energy concept. The elastic-plastic ductile fracture simulations are performed by XFEM using ABAQUS Software (Version 6.9). For crack modeling, two different types of functions are used to model a crack based on partition of unity concept. A discontinuous function is used to model the portion behind the crack tip, whereas crack tip is modeled by near-tip asymptotic functions. This permits the crack is to be represented explicitly without meshing the crack surfaces, thus crack propagation simulations can be carried out without a need of re-meshing. Strain energy release and stress distribution ahead of the crack tip is found for some practical crack problems. The numerical examples indicate a significant improvement in crack growth properties of UFG 7075 Al alloy as compared to its bulk form due to an effective grain refinement.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Nanoporous Au

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, J; Hodge, A M; Wang, Y M; Hayes, J R; Hamza, A V

    2005-06-16

    Nanoporous metals have recently attracted considerable interest fueled by potential sensor and actuator applications. From a material science point of view, one of the key issues in this context is the synthesis of nanoporous metals with both high tensile and compressive strength. Nanoporous gold (np-Au) has been suggested as a candidate material for this application due to its monolithic character. The material can be synthesized by electrochemically-driven dealloying of Ag-Au alloys, and exhibits an open sponge-like structure of interconnecting ligaments with a typical pore size distribution on the nanometer length scale. However, besides the observation of a ductile-brittle transition very little is known about the mechanical behavior of this material. Here, we present our results regarding the mechanical properties and the fracture behavior of np-Au. Depth-sensing nanoindentation reveals that the yield strength of np-Au is almost one order of magnitude higher than the value predicted by scaling laws developed for macroscopic open-cell foams. The unexpectedly high value of the yield strength indicates the presence of a distinct size effect of the mechanical properties due to the sub-micron dimensions of the ligaments, thus potentially opening a door to a new class of high yield strength--low density materials. The failure mechanism of np-Au under tensile stress was evaluated by microscopic examination of fracture surfaces using scanning electron microscopy. On a macroscopic level, np-Au is a very brittle material. However, microscopically np-Au is very ductile as ligaments strained by as much as 200% can be observed in the vicinity of crack tips. Cell-size effects on the microscopic failure mechanism were studied by annealing experiments whereby increasing the typical pore size/ligament diameter from {approx}100 nm to {approx}1{micro}m.

  18. Precipitation and fracture behaviour of Fe-Mn-Ni-Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Yoon-Uk; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2013-12-01

    The effects of Al addition on the precipitation and fracture behaviour of Fe-Mn-Ni alloys were investigated. With the increasing of Al concentration, the matrix and grain boundary precipitates changed from L10 θ-MnNi to B2 Ni2MnAl phase, which is coherent and in cube-to-cube orientation relationship with the α‧-matrix. Due to the suppression of the θ-MnNi precipitates at prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs), the fracture mode changed from intergranular to transgranular cleavage fracture. Further addition of Al resulted in the discontinuous growth of Ni2MnAl precipitates in the alloy containing 4.2 wt.% Al and fracture occurred by void growth and coalescence, i.e. by ductile dimple rupture. The transition of the fracture behaviour of the Fe-Mn-Ni-Al alloys is discussed in relation to the conversion of the precipitates and their discontinuous precipitation behaviour at PAGBs.

  19. Effect of laser peening with different energies on fatigue fracture evolution of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, J.; Huang, S.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Xu, S. Q.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-03-01

    To deeply understand the effect of laser peening (LP) with different laser pulse energies on 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, the fatigue fracture morphologies evolution process at various fatigue crack growth (FCG) stages and the corresponding strengthen mechanism were investigated. At the initial stage of FCG, more fatigue micro-cliffs were found after LP, while the fatigue striation spacing simultaneously reduced. A "stop-continue" phenomenon of crack propagation was discovered for laser peened samples. The fatigue striation spacing at the middle stage of FCG increased significantly while compared with that at the initial stage, in addition, the fatigue striation spacing decreased with an increase in laser pulse energy. Fracture morphologies in transition region of laser peened samples exhibit a mixing fracture characteristic of striations and dimples. The laser peened sample with laser pulse energy of 7 J presents more circuitous growing paths. Due to the complex stress state induced by LP, dimples with different sizes appeared in the final fracture region.

  20. Patterns and perspectives in applied fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    This lecture begins with a overview of applied fracture mechanics pertinent to safety of pressure vessels. It then progresses to a chronological panorama of experimental and analytical results. To be useful and dependable in safety analysis of real structures, new analysis developments must be physically realistic, which means that they must accurately describe physical cause and effect. Consequently, before mathematical modeling can begin, cause and effect must be established from experimental data. This can be difficult and time consuming, but worth the effort. Accordingly, the theme of this paper is that the search for patterns is constant and vital. This theme is illustrated by the development of small, single-specimen, fracture toughness testing techniques. It is also illustrated by the development, based on two different published large-strain, elastic-plastic, three-dimensional finite-element analyses, of a hypothesis concerning three-dimensional loss of constraint. When a generalization of Irwin`s thickness-normalized plastic-zone parameter, reaches a value close to 2{pi}, the through-thickness contraction strain at the apex of the near-tip logarithmic-spiral slip-line region becomes the dominant negative strain accommodating crack opening. Because slip lines passing from the midplane to the stress-free side surfaces do not have to curve, once these slip lines are established, stresses near the crack tip are only elevated by strain hardening and constraint becomes significantly relaxed. This hypothesis, based on published three-dimensional elastic-plastic analyses, provides a potentially valuable means for gaining additional insight into constraint effects on fracture toughness by considering the roles played by the plastic strains as well as the stresses that develop near a crack tip.

  1. Mechanics of fracture - Fundamentals and some recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Subramonian, N.; Lee, J. D.

    1979-01-01

    An overview is presented of the fundamental aspects of and recent developments in fracture mechanics. Reference is made to linear elastic fracture mechanics including the state of stresses and displacements in the vicinity of cracks, effects of crack geometry and orientation on stress intensity factors, energy balance of Griffith, Irwin's stress intensity concept, and linear elastic fracture mechanics testing for fracture toughness. Other aspects of this paper include the non-linear behavior of materials and their influence on fracture mechanics parameters, consideration of viscoelasticity and plasticity, non-linear fracture toughness parameters as C.O.D., R-curve and J-integral, and a non-linear energy method, proposed by Liebowitz. Finite element methods applied to fracture mechanics problems are indicated. Also, consideration has been given to slow crack growth, dynamic effects on K(IC), Sih's criterion for fracture, Lee and Liebowitz's criterion relating crack growth with plastic energy, and applications of fracture mechanics to aircraft design. Suggestions are offered for future research efforts to be undertaken in fracture mechanics.

  2. Fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and EN52 weld in air and water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.M.; Mills, W.J.

    1999-06-01

    The effect of low and high temperature water with high hydrogen on the fracture toughness of Alloy 690 and its weld, EN52, was characterized using elastic-plastic J{sub IC} methodology. While both materials display excellent fracture resistance in air and elevated temperature (>93 C) water, a dramatic degradation in toughness is observed in 54 C water. The loss of toughness is associated with a hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking mechanism where hydrogen is picked up from the water. Comparison of the cracking behavior in low temperature water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air indicates that the critical local hydrogen content required to cause low temperature embrittlement is on the order of 120 to 160 ppm. Loading rate studies show that the cracking resistance is significantly improved at rates above ca. 1000 MPa{radical}m/h because there is insufficient time to produce grain boundary embrittlement. Electron fractographic examinations were performed to correlate cracking behavior with microstructural features and operative fracture mechanics.

  3. Influence of dissolved hydrogen on aluminum-lithium alloy fracture behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivet, F. C.; Swanson, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the effects of dissolved hydrogen on the mechanical properties of 2090 and 2219 alloys. Prior to mechanical testing, potentiostatic and potentiodynamic tests were performed using NaCl/HCl solutions varying in pH from 1.5 to 7.5 (3.5 pct NaCl in deionized water). After analysis of the potentiodynamic curve for each solution, several potentiostatic experiments were conducted for various times (from 10 minutes to several hours) with a cathodic overpotential of 300 mV. These experiments were performed to select charging conditions. It is shown that the fracture of L-S and T-S orientations proceeds via slipping of layers in the S-T direction. The T-S and L-S orientations fractured with substantially higher propagation energy that the L-T and T-L orientations, due in large part to the extensive delamination propagation of the fracture.

  4. Dependence of the mechanical characteristics of fast-quenched amorphous Zr-Cu-Al alloys on their composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunyan, N. A.; Zaitsev, A. I.; Dunaev, S. F.; Kalmykov, K. B.; Plokhikh, A. I.; Fedotova, N. L.

    2016-06-01

    The thermal and mechanical characteristics of fast-quenched amorphous Zr-Cu-Al alloys with various concentrations of copper and aluminum are studied. It is shown that the crystallization temperature of glass-like compositions increases when copper is replaced with aluminum in concentrations of up to 10 at %, and that the hardness, Young's modulus, and fracture stress increase only at low concentrations of aluminum (no more than 6 at %). Upon a further increase in the concentration of the alloying element, fracture stress σf decreases because σf the change in the fracture mechanism, despite high hardness and Young's modulus.

  5. Numerical Fracture Analysis of Cryogenically Treated Alloy Steel Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasool Mohideen, S.; Thamizhmanii, S.; Fatah, M. M. Muhammed Abdul; Saidin, W. Najmuddin W.

    2016-02-01

    Cryogenic treatment is being used commercially in the industries in the last two decades for improving the life of many engineering component such as bearings and cutting tools. Though their influence in improving the wear resistance of tool materials is well established, the effect of treatment on weldments is not much investigated. In the present work, a two dimensional finite element analysis was carried out on the compact tension specimen model for simulating the treatment process and to study the fracture behaviour. The weldments were modelled by thermo- mechanical coupled field analysis for simulating he temperature distribution in the model during weld pool cooling and introducing thermal stresses due to uneven contraction and cooling. The model was subjected to cryogenic treatment by adopting radiation effect. The fracture analysis was carried out using Rice's J- Integral approach. The analysis produced a similar outcome of experimental results i.e. Increase in the fracture toughness of the specimen after cryogenic treatment in the heat affected zone of weldment.

  6. Stress Concentration and Fracture at Inter-variant Boundaries in an Al-Li Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooks, Roy; Tayon, Wes; Domack, Marcia; Wagner, John; Beaudoin, Armand

    2009-01-01

    Delamination fracture has limited the use of lightweight Al-Li alloys. Studies of secondary, delamination cracks in alloy 2090, L-T fracture toughness samples showed grain boundary failure between variants of the brass texture component. Although the adjacent texture variants, designated B(sub s1) and B(sub s2), behave similarly during rolling, their plastic responses to mechanical tests can be quite different. EBSD data from through-thickness scans were used to generate Taylor factor maps. When a combined boundary normal and shear tensor was used in the calculation, the delaminating grains showed the greatest Taylor Factor differences of any grain pairs. Kernel Average Misorientation (KAM) maps also showed damage accumulation on one side of the interface. Both of these are consistent with poor slip accommodation from a crystallographically softer grain to a harder one. Transmission electron microscopy was used to confirm the EBSD observations and to show the role of slip bands in the development of large, interfacial stress concentrations. A viewgraph presentation accompanies the provided abstract.

  7. Fracture toughness of V-5Cr-5Ti alloy at room temperature and 100{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jones, R.H.; Hirth, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    The critical mixed-mode I/III fracture toughness, J-integrals (J{sub MC}), at room temperature (RT) and 100{degrees}C were examined for a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Fracture toughness at 100{degrees}C was evaluated with a J-integral test and at RT with a K (the stress intensity factor) test. The determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 45 from the load line. Crack angles used in this study were 0, 15, and 45 degrees. A specimen with 0 degree crack angle is the same as a standard mode I compact tension specimen. In this limit, J{sub MC} becomes J{sub IC}. Specimens were annealed at 1125{degrees}C for 1 hour in a vacuum of 10{sup {minus}7} torr. J{sub MC} and mixed-mode tearing moduli (T{sub M}) were determined at 100{degrees}C with the single specimen technique. Crack lengths were calculated with partial unloading compliances. The J{sub MC} values at RT were calculated from critical stress intensity factors (K{sub C}). The results showed that at RT the V-5Cr-5Ti alloy was brittle and experienced unstable crack growth with a mixture of intergranular, cleavage and some microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture while at 100{degrees}C it exhibited high fracture toughness and fractured with a mixture of MVC and intergranular failure. SEM investigation showed that some cleavage facets initiated at grain boundaries. The results suggest a low intergranular fracture strength and tendency towards cleavage fracture at room temperature. Preliminary data from Auger electron microscopy showed significant sulfur segregation on grain boundaries. The possible mechanism which might reduce intergranular fracture strength is discussed.

  8. Study of Fatigue and Fracture Behavior of Cr-Based Alloys and Intermetallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    He, YH

    2001-01-31

    The microhardness, and tensile and fracture-toughness properties of drop-cast and directionally-solidified Cr-9.25 at.% (atomic percent) Ta alloys have been investigated. Directional solidification was found to soften the alloy, which could be related to the development of equilibrium and aligned microstructures. It was observed that the tensile properties of the Cr-Ta alloys at room and elevated temperatures could be improved by obtaining aligned microstructures. The directionally-solidified alloy also showed increased fracture toughness at room temperature. This trend is mainly associated with crack deflection and the formation of shear ribs in the samples with aligned microstructures. The sample with better-aligned lamellar exhibits greater fracture toughness.

  9. Effects of rhenium alloying on the microstructures and mechanical properties of directionally solidified NiAl-Mo eutectic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, A.; Wu, Z.L.; Gibala, R.

    1997-12-31

    Low ductility of the reinforcing bcc metal phase at room temperature and weak interfaces can limit the intrinsic toughness and ductility of NiAl-bcc metal eutectic composites. The potential of rhenium (Re) addition, which is known to solid solution soften and lower the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of various bcc metals, to enhance the ductility and toughness of a directionally solidified NiAl-9 at.% Mo eutectic alloy was investigated. Re partitioned to the bcc metal phase and formed a substitutional solid solution. The interface morphology was changed from a faceted to a non-faceted one. Re alloying caused softening of the Mo fibers, and as a result NiAl-Mo(Re) alloys were softer in compression and flexure and had {approximately}20% higher fracture toughness values as compared to the transverse orientation toughness of NiAl-9Mo alloy. The toughness of the NiAl-Mo(Re) alloys was lower than the longitudinal orientation toughness of the NiAl-9Mo alloy due to the poor alignment of the Mo(Re) phase with the growth direction. The toughening mechanisms have been evaluated and schemes for processing NiAl-Mo(Re) alloys for higher toughness in the longitudinal orientation are suggested. The role of the residual interstitial impurities and partitioning of Ni and Al to Mo fibers on the mechanical properties are highlighted.

  10. Interpretation of Fracture Toughness and R-Curve Behavior by Direct Observation of Microfracture Process in Ti-Based Dendrite-Containing Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Changwoo; Kim, Choongnyun Paul; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2015-04-01

    Fracture properties of Ti-based amorphous alloys containing ductile β dendrites were explained by directly observing microfracture processes. Three Ti-based amorphous alloys were fabricated by adding Ti, Zr, V, Ni, Al, and Be into a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by a vacuum arc melting method. The effective sizes of dendrites varied from 63 to 104 μm, while their volume fractions were almost constant within the range from 74 to 76 pct. The observation of the microfracture of the alloy containing coarse dendrites revealed that a microcrack initiated at the amorphous matrix of the notch tip and propagated along the amorphous matrix. In the alloy containing fine dendrites, the crack propagation was frequently blocked by dendrites, and many deformation bands were formed near or in front of the propagating crack, thereby resulting in a zig-zag fracture path. Crack initiation toughness was almost the same at 35 to 36 MPa√m within error ranges in the three alloys because it was heavily affected by the stress applied to the specimen at the time of crack initiation at the crack tip as well as strength levels of the alloys. According to the R-curve behavior, however, the best overall fracture properties in the alloy containing fine dendrites were explained by mechanisms of blocking of the crack growth and crack blunting and deformation band formation at dendrites.

  11. Deformation and fracture of a directionally solidified NiAl-28Cr-6Mo eutectic alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, X. F.; Johnson, D. R.; Noebe, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.

    1995-01-01

    A directionally solidified alloy based on the NiAl-(Cr, Mo) eutectic was examined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy to characterize the microstructure and room temperature deformation and fracture behavior. The microstructure consisted of a lamellar morphology with a group of zone axes (111) growth direction for both the NiAl and (Cr, Mo) phases. The interphase boundary between the eutectic phases was semicoherent and composed of a well-defined dislocation network. In addition, a fine array of coherent NiAl precipitates was dispersed throughout the (Cr, Mo) phase. The eutectic morphology was stable at 1300 K with only coarsening of the NiAl precipitates occurring after heat treatment for 1.8 ks (500 h). Fracture of the aligned eutectic is characterized primarily by a crack bridging/renucleation mechanism and is controlled by the strength of the semicoherent interface between the two phases. However, contributions to the toughness of the eutectic may arise from plastic deformation of the NiAl phase and the geometry associated with the fracture surface.

  12. Directionally Solidified NiAl-Based Alloys Studied for Improved Elevated-Temperature Strength and Room-Temperature Fracture Toughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Raj, Sai V.; Locci, Ivan E.; Salem, Jonathan A.

    2000-01-01

    Efforts are underway to replace superalloys used in the hot sections of gas turbine engines with materials possessing better mechanical and physical properties. Alloys based on the intermetallic NiAl have demonstrated potential; however, they generally suffer from low fracture resistance (toughness) at room temperature and from poor strength at elevated temperatures. Directional solidification of NiAl alloyed with both Cr and Mo has yielded materials with useful toughness and elevated-temperature strength values. The intermetallic alloy NiAl has been proposed as an advanced material to extend the maximum operational temperature of gas turbine engines by several hundred degrees centigrade. This intermetallic alloy displays a lower density (approximately 30-percent less) and a higher thermal conductivity (4 to 8 times greater) than conventional superalloys as well as good high-temperature oxidation resistance. Unfortunately, unalloyed NiAl has poor elevated temperature strength (approximately 50 MPa at 1027 C) and low room-temperature fracture toughness (about 5 MPa). Directionally solidified NiAl eutectic alloys are known to possess a combination of high elevated-temperature strength and good room-temperature fracture toughness. Research has demonstrated that a NiAl matrix containing a uniform distribution of very thin Cr plates alloyed with Mo possessed both increased fracture toughness and elevated-temperature creep strength. Although attractive properties were obtained, these alloys were formed at low growth rates (greater than 19 mm/hr), which are considered to be economically unviable. Hence, an investigation was warranted of the strength and toughness behavior of NiAl-(Cr,Mo) directionally solidified at faster growth rates. If the mechanical properties did not deteriorate with increased growth rates, directional solidification could offer an economical means to produce NiAl-based alloys commercially for gas turbine engines. An investigation at the NASA Glenn

  13. Plasticity and stress relaxation in fracture mechanics test of copper and cupronickel

    SciTech Connect

    James, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    Load relaxation tests were performed using precracked fracture mechanics specimens of annealed OFHC copper and as-received 90-10 cupronickel alloy. Test temperatures were 100/sup 0/, 150/sup 0/, and 250/sup 0/C with, in some cases, exposure times out to 2439 hours. Significant load relaxation was noted in some cases, and the applicability of using these specimens in such cases is discussed.

  14. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  15. Mechanical Alloying for Making Thermoelectric Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, Jeffrey; Blair, Richard; May, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    An economical room-temperature mechanical alloying process has been shown to be an effective means of making a homogeneous powder that can be hot-pressed to synthesize a thermoelectric material having reproducible chemical composition. The synthesis of a given material consists of the room temperature thermomechanical-alloying process followed b y a hot-pressing process. Relative to synthesis of nominally the same material by a traditional process that includes hot melting, this s ynthesis is simpler and yields a material having superior thermoelect ric properties.

  16. Mechanical properties of low tantalum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kortovich, C. S.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical property behavior of equiaxed cast B-1900 + Hf alloy as a function of tantalum content was studied. Tensile and stress rupture characterization was conducted on cast to size test bars containing tantalum at the 4.3% (standard level), 2.2% and 0% levels. Casting parameters were selected to duplicate conditions used to prepare test specimens for master metal heat qualification. The mechanical property results as well as results of microstructural/phase analysis of failed test bars are presented.

  17. Application of fracture mechanics on the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, R. G.; Hu, T.

    1984-01-01

    During the design stages of the shuttle orbiter, fracture-mechanics concepts were applied extensively to the highly stressed areas of the structure. This was the first space program to require a comprehensive fracture mechanics approach to prevent structural failures from crack or crack-like defects. As anticipated, some difficult problems were encountered. This paper briefly describes some of them together with the procedure used for fracture control on the orbiter. It is believed that the principles and methods as presented herein can serve as an example of fracture control for aerospace and other industries.

  18. Hydrogen pickup mechanism of zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couet, Adrien

    Although the optimization of zirconium based alloys has led to significant improvements in hydrogen pickup and corrosion resistance, the mechanisms by which such alloy improvements occur are still not well understood. In an effort to understand such mechanisms, a systematic study of the alloy effect on hydrogen pickup is conducted, using advanced characterization techniques to rationalize precise measurements of hydrogen pickup. The hydrogen pick-up fraction is accurately measured for a specially designed set of commercial and model alloys to investigate the effects of alloying elements, microstructure and corrosion kinetics on hydrogen uptake. Two different techniques to measure hydrogen concentrations were used: a destructive technique, Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis. The results indicate that hydrogen pickup varies not only from alloy to alloy but also during the corrosion process for a given alloy. For instance Zircaloy type alloys show high hydrogen pickup fraction and sub-parabolic oxidation kinetics whereas ZrNb alloys show lower hydrogen pickup fraction and close to parabolic oxidation kinetics. Hypothesis is made that hydrogen pickup result from the need to balance charge during the corrosion reaction, such that the pickup of hydrogen is directly related to (and indivisible of) the corrosion mechanism and decreases when the rate of electron transport or oxide electronic conductivity sigmao xe through the protective oxide increases. According to this hypothesis, alloying elements (either in solid solution or in precipitates) embedded in the oxide as well as space charge variations in the oxide would impact the hydrogen pick-up fraction by modifying sigmaox e, which drives oxidation and hydriding kinetics. Dedicated experiments and modelling were performed to assess and validate these hypotheses. In-situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) experiments were performed on Zircaloy-4 tubes

  19. Breakdown of Continuum Fracture Mechanics at the Nanoscale

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Takahiro; Ouchi, Kenji; Chihara, Yuu; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Materials fail by the nucleation and propagation of a crack, the critical condition of which is quantitatively described by fracture mechanics that uses an intensity of singular stress field characteristically formed near the crack-tip. However, the continuum assumption basing fracture mechanics obscures the prediction of failure of materials at the nanoscale due to discreteness of atoms. Here, we demonstrate the ultimate dimensional limit of fracture mechanics at the nanoscale, where only a small number of atoms are included in a singular field of continuum stress formed near a crack tip. Surprisingly, a singular stress field of only several nanometers still governs fracture as successfully as that at the macroscale, whereas both the stress intensity factor and the energy release rate fail to describe fracture below a critically confined singular field of 2–3 nm, i.e., breakdown of fracture mechanics within the framework of the continuum theory. We further propose an energy-based theory that explicitly accounts for the discrete nature of atoms, and demonstrate that our theory not only successfully describes fracture even below the critical size but also seamlessly connects the atomic to macroscales. It thus provides a more universal fracture criterion, and novel atomistic insights into fracture. PMID:25716684

  20. Breakdown of Continuum Fracture Mechanics at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takahiro; Ouchi, Kenji; Chihara, Yuu; Kitamura, Takayuki

    2015-02-01

    Materials fail by the nucleation and propagation of a crack, the critical condition of which is quantitatively described by fracture mechanics that uses an intensity of singular stress field characteristically formed near the crack-tip. However, the continuum assumption basing fracture mechanics obscures the prediction of failure of materials at the nanoscale due to discreteness of atoms. Here, we demonstrate the ultimate dimensional limit of fracture mechanics at the nanoscale, where only a small number of atoms are included in a singular field of continuum stress formed near a crack tip. Surprisingly, a singular stress field of only several nanometers still governs fracture as successfully as that at the macroscale, whereas both the stress intensity factor and the energy release rate fail to describe fracture below a critically confined singular field of 2-3 nm, i.e., breakdown of fracture mechanics within the framework of the continuum theory. We further propose an energy-based theory that explicitly accounts for the discrete nature of atoms, and demonstrate that our theory not only successfully describes fracture even below the critical size but also seamlessly connects the atomic to macroscales. It thus provides a more universal fracture criterion, and novel atomistic insights into fracture.

  1. Fracture toughness of stoichiometric, non-stoichiometric and ternary-alloyed Al{sub 2}Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.C.; Lukitsch, M.J.; Ambrow, C.E.; Benci, J.E.

    1997-12-31

    Polycrystalline stoichiometric Al{sub 2}Ti was produced via casting or powder metallurgy and further processed yielding material in six conditions. The fracture toughness of the six material conditions was determined from the critical load to initiate cracks with a Vickers indenter. The results show a strong dependence on material condition. Powder processed Al{sub 2}Ti exhibits the highest fracture toughness value among the material conditions studied. Polycrystalline non-stoichiometric Al{sub 2{+-}y}Ti{sub 1{+-}y} and ternary-alloyed Al{sub 2}Ti + X were prepared in as-cast and cast and annealed conditions. Each material condition exhibited a multiphase microstructure. The composition of the phases present in each alloy was analyzed with SEM/EDS. Fracture toughness values of cast and annealed stoichiometric and non-stoichiometric binary alloys are 20--30% greater than as-cast stoichiometric Al{sub 2}Ti. For the ternary alloys, the fracture toughness values show a strong dependence on the ternary element used and heat treatment condition. The fracture toughness values of three hot forged ternary alloys were also determined.

  2. Magnetic properties of metastable Fe Pd alloys by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Hiromasa; O'Handley, Robert C.; Kuji, Toshiro

    2007-03-01

    Metastable Fe-Pd powder samples with various Pd content were synthesized by mechanical alloying. Their fundamental properties, i.e., structure, magnetization and coercive fore are discussed. The saturation magnetizations of the metastable Fe-Pd powders gradually decreases with increasing Pd content. The coercive forces observed in as-milled samples are all less than 40 Oe. However, some of the heat-treated samples, notably, Pd content around 55 at% with L1 0 structure, shows Hc up to 1589 Oe.

  3. Compressive fracture morphology and mechanism of metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-11-01

    We quantitatively investigated the fracture morphologies of Zr52.5Cu17.9Ni14.6Al10Ti5 and Pd78Cu6Si16 metallic glasses (MGs) under compression. The characteristic features of the compressive fracture morphology were captured, and the shear vein patterns were found to be not a one-to-one correspondence between two opposing fracture surfaces in an identical sample. This finding experimentally confirms that the compressive failure behaves in a fracture mode of pure shear (mode II). Quantitative measurements show that a ˜1 μm thickness layer with materials not only inside but also adjacent to the major shear band contributes to the formation of shear vein patterns. The critical shear strain to break a shear band was found to be more than 105% and higher in more ductile MGs under compression than tension. Estimation on the temperature rise at the fracture moment indicates that only ˜5% of the total elastic energy stored in the sample converts into the heat required for melting the layer to form the vein patterns. The mode II fracture toughness was also estimated based on the quantitative measurements of shear vein pattern and found larger than the mode I fracture toughness. Finally, the deformation and fracture mechanisms of MGs under tension and compression were compared and discussed. These results may improve the understanding on the fracture behaviors and mechanisms of MGs and may provide instructions on future design for ductile MGs with high resistance for fracture.

  4. Integration of NDE Reliability and Fracture Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, F. L.; Doctor, S. R.; Heas!er, P. G.; Morris, C. J.; Pitman, S. G.; Selby, G. P.; Simonen, F. A.

    1981-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is conducting a four-phase program for measuring and evaluating the effectiveness and reliability of in-service inspection (lSI} performed on the primary system piping welds of commercial light water reactors (LWRs). Phase I of the program is complete. A survey was made of the state of practice for ultrasonic rsr of LWR primary system piping welds. Fracture mechanics calculations were made to establish required nondestrutive testing sensitivities. In general, it was found that fatigue flaws less than 25% of wall thickness would not grow to failure within an inspection interval of 10 years. However, in some cases failure could occur considerably faster. Statistical methods for predicting and measuring the effectiveness and reliability of lSI were developed and will be applied in the "Round Robin Inspections" of Phase II. Methods were also developed for the production of flaws typical of those found in service. Samples fabricated by these methods wilI be used in Phase II to test inspection effectiveness and reliability. Measurements were made of the influence of flaw characteristics {i.e., roughness, tightness, and orientation) on inspection reliability. These measurernents, as well as the predictions of a statistical model for inspection reliability, indicate that current reporting and recording sensitivities are inadequate.

  5. Chemical and Mechanical Alteration of Fractured Caprock Under Reactive Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Permeability evolution of fractures depends on chemical and mechanical processes. Stress perturbations lead to mechanical deformation and fracture propagation that can increase formation permeability. Chemical disequilibrium between fluids and resident minerals leads to dissolution and precipitation that further alter fracture porosity and permeability. The ability to predict whether these coupled chemical and mechanical processes will enhance or diminish fracture permeability remains elusive. Here, we present results from reactive-transport experiments in fractured anhydrite cores, with significant alteration of the rock matrix, where only the flow rate differed. For high flow rate, the transformation of anhydrite to gypsum occurred uniformly within the fracture leading to compaction and a two-order-of-magnitude decrease in permeability. For low flow rate, rock-fluid reactions proceeded to near equilibrium within the fracture with preferential flow paths persisting over the 6-month duration of the experiment and a negligible change in permeability. Anticipating such permeability evolution is critical for successful geologic CO2 sequestration and waste injection. Additionally, reactive alteration of the porous matrix bounding fractures will influence the strength of earthquake fault zones. Comparison of the aperture field before (a) and after (b) the reactive flow-through experiment at low flow rate. a) Aperture field from optical profilometry measurements of the fracture surfaces. b) Inferred aperture from x-ray computed tomography scans. Color scale I (blue) denotes mainly unaltered regions of the fracture and/or aperture < 200 μm. Color scale II (green/yellow) denotes reacted regions of the fracture surfaces and the matrix adjacent to the fracture. Persistent flow paths are clearly observed in panel (b) (color scale III corresponds to aperture > 200 μm) leading to negligible change in permeability after a 6-month run.

  6. Fracture Mechanics for Composites: State of the Art and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Krueger, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar fracture mechanics has proven useful for characterizing the onset of delaminations in composites and has been used with limited success primarily to investigate onset in fracture toughness specimens and laboratory size coupon type specimens. Future acceptance of the methodology by industry and certification authorities however, requires the successful demonstration of the methodology on the structural level. In this paper, the state-of-the-art in fracture toughness characterization, and interlaminar fracture mechanics analysis tools are described. To demonstrate the application on the structural level, a panel was selected which is reinforced with stringers. Full implementation of interlaminar fracture mechanics in design however remains a challenge and requires a continuing development effort of codes to calculate energy release rates and advancements in delamination onset and growth criteria under mixed mode conditions.

  7. On nonlinear effects in fracture mechanics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebowitz, H.; Eftis, J.

    1971-01-01

    Linear elastic treatment of fracture is considered applicable for net section stress up to about 0.8 the uniaxial tensile yield stress. Crack front plastic yield is still small enough to be viewed and treated as a small perturbation to the local crack front elastic stress field. Assuming these same circumstances and adopting the same point of view, an approach is presented for incorporating the nonlinear effects of small scale crack front plastic yield and slow crack extension in determination of the energy release rate and fracture toughness. Deviation from linearity of the load-displacement record in a fracture toughness test offers a quantifiable measure of these effects and is used to calculate the energy release rate. Fracture toughness values for one-eight inch thick 7075-T6 center cracked aluminum sheet are compared with uncorrected values and with values obtained by the Irwin method of plasticity correction.

  8. Fracture modes during severe plastic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, C. M.; Silva, R. J. C.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz

    2015-07-01

    The effects of severe plastic deformation on the surface micro-structural characteristics of NiTi shape memory alloys were observed after one single pass using the equal channel angular pressure technique. The analysis of the deformation and fracture showed distinct features related to the composition of the alloys, the temperature of the process, and the surface effects during the relative sliding in the die. In samples deformed at room temperature, the cracks initiated at the surface under tensile stress are amplified during the extrusion in the concurrent channel. The multiple cracks that develop during the friction process between the surfaces of the sample and channels of the die are the main cause for the fracture, even in materials that are less brittle, incorporating a smaller fraction of Ti2Ni precipitates and showing ductile fracture. A differential state of stress appears to exist in the deformed alloys starting from one surface to the other.

  9. Oxide dispersion hardened mechanically alloyed materials for high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, J. S.; Strassburg, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    The procedure of mechanical alloying makes it possible to obtain, with the aid of powder-metallurgy techniques, alloys that consist of a metallic matrix in which very fine oxide particles are dispersed. Mechanically alloyed compound powders can be used for making either forged or hot-rolled semifinished products. For these products, dispersion strengthening and precipitation hardening has been combined. At high temperatures, the strength characteristics of the alloy are determined by both dispersion hardening and by precipitation hardening processes. The effect produced by each process is independent of that due to the other. Attention is given to the principle of mechanical alloying developed by Benjamin (1970, 1976), the strength characteristics of mechanically alloyed materials, the corrosion resistance of mechanically alloyed material at high temperatures, and the preparation and characteristics of the alloy MA 6000 E.

  10. Intergranular fracture in some precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramoto, S.; Itoh, G.; Kanno, M.

    1996-10-01

    Intergranular fracture at low temperatures from room temperature down to 4.2 K has been studied in some precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys. Microscopic appearance of intergranular facets is revealed to be greatly affected by the microstructure adjacent to the grain boundaries (GBs). When large precipitates on GBs and wide precipitation-free zones (PFZs) are present, coalescence of microvoids initiated at the GB precipitates causes the intergranular fracture with dimples. This fracture process is found to be unaffected by deformation temperature. On the other hand, in the presence of fine precipitates on GBs and narrow PFZs, matrix slip localization exerts significant influence on the fracture behavior. At low temperatures, large stress concentration at GBs leads to intergranular fracture, forming sharp ledges on the fracture surfaces, while at room temperature, the dynamic recovery process is thought to relax such stress concentration, resulting in a transgranular ductile rupture.

  11. Effect of thermomechanical treatment on the resistance of low-carbon low-alloy steel to brittle fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Del'gado Reina, S. Yu.; Golosienko, S. A.; Pazilova, U. A.; Khlusova, E. I.

    2015-02-01

    Structure and mechanical properties of rolled plates (20-35 mm thick) of low-carbon low-alloy steel subjected to thermomechanical treatment (TMT) according to various regimes under laboratory and industrial conditions have been studied. Structural factors that favor obtaining high mechanical properties have been established. The retarding action of TMT on softening upon tempering has been revealed. The reasons for the decrease in the resistance to brittle fracture of the steel subjected to TMT, repeated quenching from the temperature of the furnace heating, and tempering have been determined.

  12. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Tainger, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit cast features. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. Tensile mechanical properties and microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains with interior dendritic structures, described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  13. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced By Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Taminger, Karen M. B.; Begley, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties have been demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys that are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit features more typical of cast material. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. In the current study, mechanical properties and resulting microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Material performance was evaluated based on tensile properties and results were compared with properties of Al 2219 wrought products. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains, typically with interior dendritic structures, which were described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  14. Investigation of the plastic fracture of high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Stone, R. H.; Merchant, R. H.; Low, J. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    In a study of plastic fracture in five high-strength aluminum alloys (2014, 2024, 2124, 7075, and 7079), it has been shown that fracture toughness is affected primarily by the size and volume fraction of the larger (2 to 10 microms) second-phase particles. Certain of these particles crack at small plastic strains, nucleating voids which, with further plastic strain, coalesce to cause fracture. Not all second-phase particles crack at small plastic strains, and qualitative analysis of those which are primarily responsible for void nucleation shows that they contain iron or silicon or both. This result suggests that a reduction in the iron and silicon impurity content of the alloys should improve fracture toughness without loss of strength.

  15. FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF ALLOY 600, ALLOY 690, EN82H WELDS AND EN52 WELDS IN WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J., Brown, C.M. and Burke, M.G.

    2000-01-11

    The cracking resistance of Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and their welds, EN82H and EN52, was characterized by conducting J{sub IC} rising load tests in air and hydrogenated water and cooldown testing in water under constant-displacement conditions. All test materials displayed excellent toughness in air and high temperature water, but Alloy 690 and the two welds were severely embrittled in low temperature water. In 54 C water with 150 cc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O, J{sub IC} values were reduced by 70% to 95%, relative to their air counterpart. The toughness degradation was associated with a fracture mechanism transition from microvoid coalescence to intergranular fracture. Comparison of the cracking response in water with that for hydrogen-precharged specimens tested in air demonstrated that susceptibility to low temperature crack propagation (LTCP) is due to hydrogen embrittlement of grain boundaries. The effects of water temperature, hydrogen content and loading rate on LTCP were studied. In addition, testing of specimens containing natural weld defects and as-machined notches was performed to determine if low temperature cracking can initiate at these features. Unlike the other materials, Alloy 600 is not susceptible to LTCP as the toughness in 54 C water remained high and a microvoid coalescence mechanism was operative in both air and water. Cooldown testing of EN82H welds under constant-displacement conditions was performed to determine if LTCP data from rising load J{sub IC}/K{sub Pmax} tests predict the onset of LTCP for other load paths. In these tests, bolt-loaded CT specimens were subjected to 288 C water for up to 1 week, cooled to 54 C and held in 54 C hydrogenated water for 1 week. This cycle was repeated up to 6 times. For two of the three welds tested, critical K{sub I} levels for LTCP under constant-displacement conditions were much higher than rising load K{sub Pmax} values. Bolt-loaded specimens from a third weld were found to exhibit LTCP at K{sub I} levels

  16. Fracture and fatigue resistance of Mo-Si-B alloys for ultrahigh-temperature structural applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzic, J.J.; Schneibel, J.H.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2003-08-29

    Fracture and fatigue-crack growth properties are examined for a series of Mo-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2 containing alloys, which utilize a continuous a-Mo matrix to achieve unprecedented room-temperature fracture resistance (>20 MPaAm). Mechanistically, these properties are explained in terms of toughening by crack trapping and crack bridging by the more ductile a-Mo phase.

  17. The effect of copper, chromium, and zirconium on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, John A.; Shenoy, R. N.

    1991-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of the systematic variation of copper, chromium, and zirconium contents on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 7000-type aluminum alloy. Fracture toughness and tensile properties are evaluated for each alloy in both the peak aging, T8, and the overaging, T73, conditions. Results show that dimpled rupture essentially characterize the fracture process in these alloys. In the T8 condition, a significant loss of toughness is observed for alloys containing 2.5 pct Cu due to the increase in the quantity of Al-Cu-Mg-rich S-phase particles. An examination of T8 alloys at constant Cu levels shows that Zr-bearing alloys exhibit higher strength and toughness than the Cr-bearing alloys. In the T73 condition, Cr-bearing alloys are inherently tougher than Zr-bearing alloys. A void nucleation and growth mechanism accounts for the loss of toughness in these alloys with increasing copper content.

  18. In vitro degradation and mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys in modified-simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Bobby; Raman, R K Singh

    2008-05-01

    The successful applications of magnesium-based alloys as degradable orthopaedic implants are mainly inhibited due to their high degradation rates in physiological environment and consequent loss in the mechanical integrity. This study examines the degradation behaviour and the mechanical integrity of calcium-containing magnesium alloys using electrochemical techniques and slow strain rate test (SSRT) method, respectively, in modified-simulated body fluid (m-SBF). Potentiodynamic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results showed that calcium addition enhances the general and pitting corrosion resistances of magnesium alloys significantly. The corrosion current was significantly lower in AZ91Ca alloy than that in AZ91 alloy. Furthermore, AZ91Ca alloy exhibited a five-fold increase in the surface film resistance than AZ91 alloy. The SSRT results showed that the ultimate tensile strength and elongation to fracture of AZ91Ca alloy in m-SBF decreased only marginally (approximately 15% and 20%, respectively) in comparison with these properties in air. The fracture morphologies of the failed samples are discussed in the paper. The in vitro study suggests that calcium-containing magnesium alloys to be a promising candidate for their applications in degradable orthopaedic implants, and it is worthwhile to further investigate the in vivo corrosion behaviour of these alloys. PMID:18313746

  19. Fatigue and fracture mechanics: 28. volume

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.H.; Macdonald, B.D.; Mitchell, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    The papers published here cover topics including general overview papers, constraint effects on fracture toughness, technology and applications of fatigue, weld applications, and analysis of fracture in various materials and components. These five topics were used to group the papers, but it is clear that there is considerable overlap of these topics in many of the papers. Many basic concepts and results in fatigue and fracture are well understood and have been documented in prior technical literature, so that the problems now being addressed are often the difficult and complex questions. Nearly every paper here addresses an unproven material or manufacturing process or a set of severe service conditions that requires very careful testing or analysis. To the extent that the problems and solutions are complex, this Symposium and its papers are intended for those who have some experience with the field of fatigue and fracture. Nevertheless, the introductory and reference materials contained in the papers can be used by those with less experience to gain some understanding of subtopics within the overall field. In addition, the three keynote papers and the many papers dealing with industrial applications will also be useful for those with limited experience in fatigue and fracture. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  20. Mechanisms affecting swelling in alloys with precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Mansur, L.K.; Haynes, M.R.; Lee, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    In alloys under irradiation many mechanisms exist that couple phase instability to cavity swelling. These are compounded with the more familiar mechanisms associated with point defect behavior and the evolution of microstructure. The mechanisms may be classified according to three modes of operation. Some affect cavity swelling directly by cavity-precipitate particle association, others operate indirectly by precipitate-induced changes in sinks other than cavities and finally there are mechanisms that are mediated by precipitate-induced changes in the host matrix. The physics of one mechanism of each type is developed in detail and the results compared where possible to experimental measurements. In particular, we develop the theory necessary to treat the effects on swelling of precipitation-induced changes in overall sink density; precipitation-induced changes in point defect trapping by solute depletion and creation of precipitate particle-matrix interfacial trap sites.

  1. Adaptive Finite-Element Computation In Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1995-01-01

    Report discusses recent progress in use of solution-adaptive finite-element computational methods to solve two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics. Method also shown extensible to three-dimensional problems.

  2. Fracture mechanics /Dryden Lecture/. [aerospace structural design applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardrath, H. F.

    1974-01-01

    A historical outline of the engineering discipline of fracture mechanics is presented, and current analytical procedures are summarized. The current status of the discipline is assessed, and engineering applications are discussed, along with recommended directions for future study.

  3. Mechanical and hardness evaluations of Fe-18Cr-18Mn alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rawers, J.C.; Duttlinger, N.W.

    2008-01-01

    A series of Fe-18Cr-18Mn-N-C alloys was produced and evaluated to determine their mechanical and hardness properties. In one group, different levels of nitrogen and carbon were added to a base composition of Fe-18Cr-18Mn. The base Fe-18Cr-18Mn alloy had a fcc-bcc duplex microstructure. The addition of nitrogen and carbon stabilised the fcc phase. These alloys had increasing room temperature hardness, strength, and failure energy with increasing interstitial concentrations. At cryogenic and elevated temperatures, these alloys had increasing hardness (and by implication, increased strength) with increasing interstitial concentrations. In a second group, different levels of nitrogen and carbon were added to the base Fe-18Cr-18Mn composition to which minor solid solution additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel had been added. Minor alloy additions made only nominal improvement to mechanical and hardness properties. Nitrogen remained interstitial. However, these minor solid solution additions reduced carbon solubility resulting in the formation of M23C6 precipitates that, while increasing alloy hardness and strength, greatly reduced fracture toughness. The present study suggests that replacing nickel with manganese in stainless steels results not only in more economical alloys but also in alloys with higher strength and hardness.

  4. Subtask 12D3: Fracture properties of V-5Cr-5Ti Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness of a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy in the range -50-100{degrees}C. Fracture toughness and impact tests were performed on a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Specimens annealed at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and furnace cooled in a vacuum of 1.33 x 10{sup -5} Pa were brittle at room temperature (RT) and experienced a mixture of intergranular and cleavage fracture. Fracture toughness (J{sub IQ}) at RT was 52 kJ/m{sup 2} and the impact fracture energy (IFE) was 6 J. The IFE at -100{degrees}C was only 1 J. While specimens exhibited high fracture toughness at 100{degrees}C (J{sub IQ} is 485 kj/m{sup 2}), fracture was a mixture of dimple and intergranular failure, with intergranular fracture making up 40% of the total fracture surface. The ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was estimated to be about 20{degrees}C. When some specimens were given an additional annealing at 890{degrees}C for 24 h, they became very ductile at RT and fractured by microvoid coalescence. The J{sub IQ} value increased from 52 kJ/m{sup 2} to {approximately}1100 kJ/m{sup 2}. The impact test failed to fracture specimens at RT due to a large amount of plastic deformation. 7 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  5. Fatigue and fracture mechanics: Twenty-ninth volume

    SciTech Connect

    Panontin, T.L. . Ames Research Center); Sheppard, S.D. )

    1999-01-01

    The twenty ninth National Symposium on Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics met at Stanford University in Stanford, California on June 24--25, 1997. Information was exchanged on recent developments on modeling and analyzing fatigue and fracture processes; on applications to real structures and new materials; and on directions for future research. Papers were presented on fracture mechanics with mathematical modeling and new materials, fatigue with crack growth models and improved fatigue test methods, and structural applications covering a variety of materials and their performance. Fifty papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  6. Preparation of TiMn alloy by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F.; Weidmann, A.; Nebe, B. J.; Burkel, E.

    2009-01-01

    TiMn alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique for exploration of biomedical applications. The microstructures, mechanical properties and cytotoxicity of the TiMn alloys were investigated in comparison with the pure Ti and Mn metals. Ti8Mn and Ti12Mn alloys with high relative density (99%) were prepared by mechanical alloying for 60 h and SPS at 700 °C for 5 min. The doping of Mn in Ti has decreased the transformation temperature from α to β phase, increased the relative density and enhanced the hardness of the Ti metal significantly. The Ti8Mn alloys showed 86% cell viability which was comparable to that of the pure Ti (93%). The Mn can be used as a good alloying element for biomedical Ti metal, and the Ti8Mn alloy could have a potential use as bone substitutes and dental implants.

  7. Prediction of Failure Due to Thermal Aging, Corrosion and Environmental Fracture in Amorphous and Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    2003-04-15

    DARPA is exploring a number of advanced materials for military applications, including amorphous metals and titanium-based alloys. Equipment made from these materials can undergo degradation due to thermal aging, uniform corrosion, pitting, crevice corrosion, denting, stress corrosion cracking, corrosion fatigue, hydrogen induced cracking and microbial influenced corrosion. Amorphous alloys have exceptional resistance to corrosion, due in part to the absence of grain boundaries, but can undergo crystallization and other phase instabilities during heating and welding. Titanium alloys are extremely corrosion resistant due to the formation of a tenacious passive film of titanium oxide, but is prone to hydrogen absorption in crevices, and hydrogen induced cracking after hydrogen absorption. Accurate predictions of equipment reliability, necessary for strategic planning, requires integrated models that account for all relevant modes of attack, and that can make probabilistic predictions. Once developed, model parameters must be determined experimentally, and the validity of models must be established through careful laboratory and field tests. Such validation testing requires state-of-the-art surface analytical techniques, as well as electrochemical and fracture mechanics tests. The interaction between those processes that perturb the local environment on a surface and those that alter metallurgical condition must be integrated in predictive models. The material and environment come together to drive various modes of corrosive attack (Figure 1). Models must be supported through comprehensive materials testing capabilities. Such capabilities are available at LLNL and include: the Long Term Corrosion Test Facility (LTCTF) where large numbers of standard samples can be exposed to realistic test media at several temperature levels; a reverse DC machine that can be used to monitor the propagation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in situ; and banks of potentiostats with

  8. A new insight into ductile fracture of ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloys

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Tieu, A. Kiet; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Xiong; Liu, Mao; Godbole, Ajit; Kong, Charlie; Qin, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that when coarse-grained metals undergo severe plastic deformation to be transformed into nano-grained metals, their ductility is reduced. However, there are no ductile fracture criteria developed based on grain refinement. In this paper, we propose a new relationship between ductile fracture and grain refinement during deformation, considering factors besides void nucleation and growth. Ultrafine-grained Al-Mg alloy sheets were fabricated using different rolling techniques at room and cryogenic temperatures. It is proposed for the first time that features of the microstructure near the fracture surface can be used to explain the ductile fracture post necking directly. We found that as grains are refined to a nano size which approaches the theoretical minimum achievable value, the material becomes brittle at the shear band zone. This may explain the tendency for ductile fracture in metals under plastic deformation. PMID:25851228

  9. Deformation and Fracture Mechanisms of Polymer-Silicate Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harcup, Jason; Yee, Albert

    1998-03-01

    The deformation and fracture behavior of a series of nanocomposites comprising polyamide, silicate and in some cases rubber has been studied. Mechanical properties including Young modulus and fracture toughness were measured and it was found that compared to conventional composites, the nanocomposites exhibited far greater improvement in properties over the neat matrix for a given silicate fraction. It was also found that the addition of the rubber phase produced an increase in toughness. The arrested crack tip process zone was obtained using the Double Notch Four Point Bend test geometry and the process zone morphology was studied using TEM and TOM. Fracture surfaces were probed with XEDS and SEM. The use of these techniques enabled the mechanisms which occur during fracture to be studied and related to the mechanical properties and toughening of these materials.

  10. Fracture mechanics for delamination problems in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A fracture mechanics approach to the well-known delamination problem in composite materials is presented. Based on the theory of anisotropic laminate elasticity and interlaminar fracture mechanics concepts, the composite delamination problem is formulated and solved. The exact order of the delamination crack-tip stress singularity is determined. Asymptotic stress and displacement fields for an interlaminar crack are obtained. Fracture mechanics parameters such as mixed-mode stress intensity factors, KI, KII, KIII, and the energy release rate, G, for composite delamination problems are defined. To illustrate the fundamental nature of the delamination crack behavior, solutions for edge-delaminated graphite-epoxy composites under uniform axial extension are presented. Effects of fiber orientation, ply thickness, and delamination length on the interlaminar fracture are examined.

  11. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    PubMed

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p < 0.05). The factors 'alloy" and 'casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property. PMID:22641437

  12. Fracture toughness of copper-base alloys for ITER applications: A preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Zinkle, S.J.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1997-04-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened copper alloys and a precipitation-hardened copper-nickel-beryllium alloy showed a significant reduction in toughness at elevated temperature (250{degrees}C). This decrease in toughness was much larger than would be expected from the relatively modest changes in the tensile properties over the same temperature range. However, a copper-chromium-zirconium alloy strengthened by precipitation showed only a small decrease in toughness at the higher temperatures. The embrittled alloys showed a transition in fracture mode, from transgranular microvoid coalescence at room temperature to intergranular with localized ductility at high temperatures. The Cu-Cr-Zr alloy maintained the ductile microvoid coalescence failure mode at all test temperatures.

  13. Material properties and fracture mechanics in relation to ceramic machining

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, L.V.

    1993-12-02

    Material removal rate, surface finish, and subsurface damage are largely governed by fracture mechanics and plastic deformation, when ceramics are machined using abrasive methods. A great deal of work was published on the fracture mechanics of ceramics in the late 1970s and early 1980s, although this work has never resulted in a comprehensive model of the fixed abrasive grinding process. However, a recently published model describes many of the most important features of the loose abrasive machining process, for example depth of damage, surface roughness, and material removal rate. Many of the relations in the loose abrasive machining model can be readily discerned from fracture mechanics models, in terms of material properties. By understanding the mechanisms of material removal, from a material properties perspective, we can better estimate how one material will machine in relation to another. Although the fracture mechanics models may have been developed for loose abrasive machining, the principles of crack initiation and propagation are equally valuable for fixed abrasive machining. This report provides a brief review of fracture in brittle materials, the stress distribution induced by abrasives, critical indenter loads, the extension of cracks, and the relation of the fracture process to material removal.

  14. In Vitro Fracture of Human Cortical Bone: Local Fracture Criteria and Toughening Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, R; Stolken, J; Kinney, J; Ritchie, R

    2004-08-18

    A micro-mechanistic understanding of bone fracture that encompasses how cracks interact with the underlying microstructure and defines their local failure mode is lacking, despite extensive research on the response of bone to a variety of factors like aging, loading, and/or disease. Micro-mechanical models for fracture incorporating such local failure criteria have been widely developed for metallic and ceramic materials systems; however, few such deliberations have been undertaken for the fracture of bone. In fact, although the fracture event in mineralized tissues such as bone is commonly believed to be locally strain controlled, until recently there has been little experimental evidence to support this widely held belief. In the present study, a series of in vitro experiments involving a double-notch bend test geometry are performed in order to shed further light on the nature of the local cracking events that precede catastrophic fracture in bone and to define their relationship to the microstructure. Specifically, crack-microstructure interactions are examined to determine the salient toughening mechanisms in human cortical bone and to characterize how these may affect the anisotropy in fracture properties. Based on preliminary micro-mechanical models of these processes, in particular crack deflection and uncracked ligament bridging, the relative importance of these toughening mechanisms is established.

  15. Work of fracture of a composite resin: fracture-toughening mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baudin, Carmen; Osorio, Raquel; Toledano, Manuel; de Aza, Salvador

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate those mechanical parameters able to describe the fracture behavior of dental composite resins. A commercially available fine-particle micro-hybrid resin composite was used. Classical parameters as Young's modulus, strength distribution, and critical stress intensity factor were considered. Strength values were determined using the diametrical compression of discs test and for the critical stress intensity factor both unstable and controlled fracture tests were used. Controlled fracture tests allowed determining the work of fracture. Microstructure was studied by optical and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The obtained properties have been Young's modulus, 17.7 +/- 0.6 GPa; Weibull modulus, m = 14 (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 17 and 10); characteristic strength 51 MPa (upper and lower limits for 90% confidence: 53 and 49 MPa); critical stress intensity factor in mode I, K(IC) = 1.3 +/- 0.1 and work of fracture, gamma(wof) = 8-9 J/m(2). Pores and bubbles formed during the packing of the composite were identified as critical defects in the tested specimens. Crack deflection and branching have been identified as toughening mechanisms. Classical mechanical parameters (Young's modulus, hardness...) are not able to efficiently predict the major clinical failure mode of composite resins by fatigue. Work of fracture analysis, which is dependant on microstructural parameters such as particle size and shape, have to be included when testing mechanical properties of dental composite resins in future research studies. PMID:18465813

  16. Effect of Alloying Elements in Hot-Rolled Metastable β-Titanium Alloys. Part II: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Premkumar; Chakkingal, Uday; Singh, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes the tensile properties, flow and work-hardening behavior of four metastable β-titanium alloys Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (A1), Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-7.2V-3Cr (A2), Ti-5Al-5Mo-8.6V-1.5Cr (A3), and Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-5V-3.94Cr (A4) in α+β hot-rolled condition. The decreasing order of average strength parameters ( σ YS and σ UTS) is A4, A2, A1, and A3. The maximum strength observed in alloy A4 is due to the presence of highest wt. fraction of Cr. The elongation is the maximum and minimum in alloys A3 and A4, respectively. These alloys display moderate to high percent in-plane anisotropy ( A IP) and reasonably low anisotropic index ( δ) values. Both the A IP and δ values are maximum and minimum in alloys A1 and A3, respectively. The yield locus plots also exhibit the presence of anisotropy due to relatively large differences in yield strength values along tension and compression directions. The flow behavior of alloys A1, A2, and A4 follows Swift equation, while the alloy A3 displays best fit with Holloman equation. The presence of prestrain ( ɛ 0) in hot-rolled materials before tensile testing has an important bearing on the flow curves of A1, A2, and A4 alloys. The instantaneous work-hardening rate curves of the alloys A1, A2, and A3 exhibit all the three typical stages (stage I, stage II, and stage III) in RD samples, while the alloy A4 shows the presence of only stage I and stage III. The 45 deg to RD and TD samples of alloys A1, A2, and A4 display only stage I. The stages I and III as well as I and II are present in alloy A3 in 45 deg to RD and TD samples, respectively. Dislocation-controlled strain hardening occurs in all the three stages of these alloys in the absence of stress-induced martensitic transformation (α″) and twinning. Slip is the predominant deformation mechanism during tensile testing. Three types of slip lines, i.e., planar, wavy, and intersecting have been observed close to fracture surfaces of post tensile-tested specimens.

  17. Effect of Alloying Elements in Hot-Rolled Metastable β-Titanium Alloys. Part II: Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Premkumar; Chakkingal, Uday; Singh, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the tensile properties, flow and work-hardening behavior of four metastable β-titanium alloys Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (A1), Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-7.2V-3Cr (A2), Ti-5Al-5Mo-8.6V-1.5Cr (A3), and Ti-5Al-3.5Mo-5V-3.94Cr (A4) in α+β hot-rolled condition. The decreasing order of average strength parameters (σ YS and σ UTS) is A4, A2, A1, and A3. The maximum strength observed in alloy A4 is due to the presence of highest wt. fraction of Cr. The elongation is the maximum and minimum in alloys A3 and A4, respectively. These alloys display moderate to high percent in-plane anisotropy (A IP) and reasonably low anisotropic index (δ) values. Both the A IP and δ values are maximum and minimum in alloys A1 and A3, respectively. The yield locus plots also exhibit the presence of anisotropy due to relatively large differences in yield strength values along tension and compression directions. The flow behavior of alloys A1, A2, and A4 follows Swift equation, while the alloy A3 displays best fit with Holloman equation. The presence of prestrain (ɛ 0) in hot-rolled materials before tensile testing has an important bearing on the flow curves of A1, A2, and A4 alloys. The instantaneous work-hardening rate curves of the alloys A1, A2, and A3 exhibit all the three typical stages (stage I, stage II, and stage III) in RD samples, while the alloy A4 shows the presence of only stage I and stage III. The 45 deg to RD and TD samples of alloys A1, A2, and A4 display only stage I. The stages I and III as well as I and II are present in alloy A3 in 45 deg to RD and TD samples, respectively. Dislocation-controlled strain hardening occurs in all the three stages of these alloys in the absence of stress-induced martensitic transformation (α″) and twinning. Slip is the predominant deformation mechanism during tensile testing. Three types of slip lines, i.e., planar, wavy, and intersecting have been observed close to fracture surfaces of post tensile-tested specimens.

  18. Mechanics of dynamic fracture in notched polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Anshul; Parmeswaran, Venkitanarayanan; Basu, Sumit

    2015-04-01

    Fracture toughness of brittle amorphous polymers (e.g. polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)) has been reported to decrease with loading rate at moderate rates and increase abruptly thereafter to close to 5 times the static value at very high loading rates. Dynamic fracture toughness that is much higher than the static values has attractive technological possibilities. However, the reasons for the sharp increase remain unclear. Motivated by these observations, the present work focuses on the dynamic fracture behavior of polycarbonate (PC), which is also an amorphous polymer but unlike PMMA, is ductile at room temperature. Towards this end, a combined experimental and numerical approach is adopted. Dynamic fracture experiments at various loading rates are conducted on single edge notched (SEN) specimens with a notch of radius 150 μm, using a Hopkinson bar setup equipped with ultra high-speed imaging (>105 fps) for real-time observation of dynamic processes during fracture. Concurrently, 3D dynamic finite element simulations are performed using a well calibrated material model for PC. Experimentally, we were able to clearly capture the intricate details of the process, for both slowly and dynamically loaded samples, of damage nucleation and growth ahead of the notch tip followed by unstable crack propagation. These observations coupled with fractography and computer simulations led us to conclude that in PC, the fracture toughness remains invariant with loading rate at Jfrac = 12 ± 3 kN / m for the entire range of loading rates (J ˙) from static to 1 ×106 kN / m - s. However, the damage initiation toughness is significantly higher in dynamic loading compared to static situations. In dynamic situations, damage nucleation is quickly followed by initiation of radial crazes from around the void periphery that initiate and quickly bridge the ligament between the initial damaged region and the notch. Thus for PC, two criteria for two major stages in the failure process emerge

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4. PMID:27258932

  20. Processing and Composition Effects on the Fracture Behavior of Spray-Formed 7XXX Series Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. M.; Ziemian, C. W.; Eden, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The fracture properties of high-strength spray-formed Al alloys were investigated, with consideration of the effects of elemental additions such as zinc, manganese, and chromium and the influence of the addition of SiC particulate. Fracture resistance values between 13.6 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2 were obtained for the monolithic alloys in the T6 and T7 conditions, respectively. The alloys with SiC particulate compared well and achieved fracture resistance values between 18.7 and 25.6 MPa (m)1/2. The spray-formed materials exhibited a loss in fracture resistance ( K I) compared to ingot metallurgy 7075 alloys but had an improved performance compared to high-solute powder metallurgy alloys of similar composition. Characterization of the fracture surfaces indicated a predominantly intergranular decohesion, possibly facilitated by the presence of incoherent particles at the grain boundary regions and by the large strength differential between the matrix and precipitate zone. It is believed that at the slip band-grain boundary intersection, particularly in the presence of large dispersoids and/or inclusions, microvoid nucleation would be significantly enhanced. Differences in fracture surfaces between the alloys in the T6 and T7 condition were observed and are attributed to inhomogeneous slip distribution, which results in strain localization at grain boundaries. The best overall combination of fracture resistance properties were obtained for alloys with minimum amounts of chromium and manganese additions.

  1. Identification of modes of fracture in a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy using stereophotogrammetry

    SciTech Connect

    Salas Zamarripa, A.; Mata, M.P. Guerrero; Morales, M. Castillo; Beber-Solano, T.P.

    2011-12-15

    The identification and the development of a quantification technique of the modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces of a 2618-T6 aluminum alloy were developed during this research. Fatigue tests at room and high temperature (230 Degree-Sign C) were carried out to be able to compare the microscopic fractographic features developed by this material under these testing conditions. The overall observations by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of the fracture surfaces showed a mixture of transgranular and ductile intergranular fracture. The ductile intergranular fracture contribution appears to be more significant at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. A quantitative methodology was developed to identify and to measure the contribution of these microscopic fractographic features. The technique consisted of a combination of stereophotogrammetry and image analysis. Stereo-pairs were randomly taken along the crack paths and were then analyzed using the profile module of MeX software. The analysis involved the 3-D surface reconstruction, the trace of primary profile lines in both vertical and horizontal directions within the stereo-pair area, the measurements of the contribution of the modes of fracture in each profile, and finally, the calculation of the average contribution in each stereo-pair. The technique results confirmed a higher contribution of ductile intergranular fracture at room temperature than at 230 Degree-Sign C. Moreover, there was no indication of a direct relationship between this contribution and the strain amplitudes range applied during the fatigue testing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stereophotogrammetry and image analysis as a measuring tool of modes of fracture in fatigue fracture surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A mixture of ductile intergranular and transgranular fracture was identified at room temperature and 230 Degree-Sign C testing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Development of a quantitative methodology to

  2. An empirical approach to strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys. [Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite steels

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Z.; Miodownik, A.P. )

    1993-04-15

    Two-ductile-phase alloys refer to the alloys comprising two phases which are plastically deformable under applied stress, for example, [alpha]-[beta] brasses, [alpha]-[beta] Ti-alloys and dual-phase steels. As a group, two-ductile-phase alloys offer an excellent combination of high strength, good ductility and promising fracture toughness. In this paper, the authors present an empirical approach to the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys, based on the microstructural characterization method developed by Fan et al. The proposed approach can predict the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys in terms of the strains to fracture of the constituent phases and the microstructural parameters, such as volume fraction, contiguity and grain size of each constituent phase. The predictions by the present approach will be compared with the experimental results in [alpha]-[beta] Ti-Mn alloys and ferrite-martensite dual-phase steels drawn from the literature. In addition, the effect of relative grain size (the grain size ratio) on the strain to fracture of two-ductile-phase alloys will be discussed.

  3. Adhesive fracture mechanics. [stress analysis for bond line interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. J.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    In studies of fracture mechanics the adhesive fracture energy is regarded as a fundamental property of the adhesive system. It is pointed out that the value of the adhesive fracture energy depends on surface preparation, curing conditions, and absorbed monolayers. A test method reported makes use of a disk whose peripheral part is bonded to a substrate material. Pressure is injected into the unbonded central part of the disk. At a certain critical pressure value adhesive failure can be observed. A numerical stress analysis involving arbitrary geometries is conducted.

  4. The relationship between observed stress corrosion cracking fracture morphology and microstructure in Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Symons, D.M.; Burke, M.G.; Foster, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    Microstructure is known to influence the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 600 in both hydrogenated water and steam environments. This study evaluated the relative SCC response of a single heat of Alloy 600 as a function of microstructure in a hydrogenated doped-steam environment. The 400 C doped-steam environment was selected for the SCC tests to accelerate cracking. The material was evaluated in three conditions: (1) as-received (2) as-annealed, and (3) as-annealed + 26% deformation. Microstructural characterization was performed using analytical electron microscopy (AEM) techniques for the evaluation of carbide type and morphology, and general structure. Constant displacement (bolt-loaded) compact tension specimens were used to induce SCC. The as-annealed and as-annealed plus cold worked samples had two fracture morphologies: a rough intergranular SCC fracture morphology and a smooth intergranular fracture morphology. The SCC fracture in the as-received specimens was characterized by a classic intergranular morphology at low magnification, consistent with the microstructural evaluation of cross-sectional metallographic samples. More detailed examination revealed a pseudo-intergranular fracture morphology. This pseudo-intergranular morphology appears to be comprised of very fine cleavage-like microfacets. These observations may assist in understanding the difference in SCC fracture morphologies as reported in the open literature.

  5. Mechanistic Study of Delamination Fracture in Al-Li Alloy C458 (2099)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, W. A.; Crooks, R. E.; Domack, M. S.; Wagner, J. A.; Beaudoin, A. J.; McDonald, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Delamination fracture has limited the use of lightweight Al-Li alloys. In the present study, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) methods were used to characterize crack paths in Al-Li alloy C458 (2099). Secondary delamination cracks in fracture toughness samples showed a pronounced tendency for fracture between grain variants of the same deformation texture component. These results were analyzed by EBSD mapping methods and simulated with finite element analyses. Simulation procedures include a description of material anisotropy, local grain orientations, and fracture utilizing crystal plasticity and cohesive zone elements. Taylor factors computed for each grain orientation subjected to normal and shear stresses indicated that grain pairs with the largest Taylor factor differences were adjacent to boundaries that failed by delamination. Examination of matching delamination fracture surface pairs revealed pronounced slip bands in only one of the grains bordering the delamination. These results, along with EBSD studies, plasticity simulations, and Auger electron spectroscopy observations support a hypothesis that delamination fracture occurs due to poor slip accommodation along boundaries between grains with greatly differing plastic response.

  6. Mechanical properties of iron-cobalt alloys for power applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fingers, R.T.; Coate, J.E.; Dowling, N.E.

    1997-12-31

    The United States Air Force is in the process of developing magnetic bearings as well as an aircraft Integrated Power Unit and an Internal Starter/Generator for main propulsion engines. These developments are the driving force for the new emphasis on high temperature, high strength magnetic materials for power applications. Analytical work, utilizing elasticity theory, in conjunction with design requirements, indicates a need for magnetic materials to have strengths in excess of 80 ksi up to about 1000 F. Two specific iron-cobalt alloys have been tested as part of a magnetic materials characterization program at Wright Laboratory. The first material is Hiperco{reg_sign} Alloy 50HS from Carpenter Technology Corporation and the second is HS50 from Carpenter Technology Corporation and the second is HS50 from Telcon Limited. Specimens of each alloy have been heat treated by various recipes ranging in temperature from 1300 F to 1350 F and times of one and two hours. Tensile testing was performed in accordance with ASTM Standard E-8 for the room temperature tests and ASTM Standard E-21 for the elevated temperature tests. The tests were performed at room temperature and at 900 F. Stress versus strain behavior was measured and analyzed. The curves clearly indicate: a yield point, a heterogeneous deformation described as Lueders elongation and most often a section of homogeneous deformation that concluded with necking and fracture. Limited creep testing was also conducted in accordance with ASTM Standard E-139 and time to one percent, two percent, and failure was measured and the behavior is discussed. The effect of composition and heat treatment of these two soft magnetic materials on mechanical behavior and the impact on potential aircraft power applications is discussed.

  7. Progress report on the influence of test temperature and grain boundary chemistry on the fracture behavior of ITER copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Stubbins, J.F.; Edwards, D.J.

    1998-09-01

    This collaborative study was initiated to determine mechanical properties at elevated temperatures of various copper alloys by University of Illinois and Pacific Northwestern National Lab (PNNL) with support of OMG Americas, Inc. and Brush Wellman, Inc. This report includes current experimental results on notch tensile tests and pre-cracked bend bar tests on these materials at room temperature, 200 and 300 C. The elevated temperature tests were performed in vacuum and indicate that a decrease in fracture resistance with increasing temperature, as seen in previous investigations. While the causes for the decreases in fracture resistance are still not clear, the current results indicate that environmental effects are likely less important in the process than formerly assumed.

  8. An evaluation of the fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness properties of beryllium-copper alloy CDA172

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Henkener, Julie A.

    1990-01-01

    A series of fracture mechanics tests, using the Be-Cu alloy CDA172 in the round rod product form, was conducted in a lab air environment at room temperature. Tensile data is presented in both the L and C directions and K sub Ic data in both the C-R and C-L orientations. Fracture toughness values were derived from M(T) (center cracked), PS(T) (surface cracked) and CC01 (corner cracked) specimens of varying thickness. Fatigue crack growth data were obtained for the C-R orientation at stress ratio of 0.1, 0.4, and 0.7 and for the C-L orientation at stress ratios of 0.1, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.7.

  9. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-Y2O3-Dispersed Ferritic Alloy Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Consolidated by High-Pressure Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Swapan Kumar; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Witczak, Zbigniew; Lojkowski, Witold; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Manna, Indranil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to synthesize 1.0 wt pct nano-Y2O3-dispersed ferritic alloys with nominal compositions: 83.0 Fe-13.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy A), 79.0 Fe-17.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy B), 75.0 Fe-21.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy C), and 71.0 Fe-25.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy D) steels (all in wt pct) by solid-state mechanical alloying route and consolidation the milled powder by high-pressure sintering at 873 K, 1073 K, and 1273 K (600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C) using 8 GPa uniaxial pressure for 3 minutes. Subsequently, an extensive effort has been undertaken to characterize the microstructural and phase evolution by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Mechanical properties including hardness, compressive strength, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were determined using micro/nano-indentation unit and universal testing machine. The present ferritic alloys record extraordinary levels of compressive strength (from 1150 to 2550 MPa), Young's modulus (from 200 to 240 GPa), indentation fracture toughness (from 3.6 to 15.4 MPa√m), and hardness (from13.5 to 18.5 GPa) and measure up to 1.5 through 2 times greater strength but with a lower density (~7.4 Mg/m3) than other oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels (<1200 MPa) or tungsten-based alloys (<2200 MPa). Besides superior mechanical strength, the novelty of these alloys lies in the unique microstructure comprising uniform distribution of either nanometric (~10 nm) oxide (Y2Ti2O7/Y2TiO5 or un-reacted Y2O3) or intermetallic (Fe11TiY and Al9.22Cr2.78Y) particles' ferritic matrix useful for grain boundary pinning and creep resistance.

  10. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT’s truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m0.5, typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  11. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-07-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  12. Toughness of carbon nanotubes conforms to classic fracture mechanics.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Greenfeld, Israel; Wagner, H Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Defects in crystalline structure are commonly believed to degrade the ideal strength of carbon nanotubes. However, the fracture mechanisms induced by such defects, as well as the validity of solid mechanics theories at the nanoscale, are still under debate. We show that the fracture toughness of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) conforms to the classic theory of fracture mechanics, even for the smallest possible vacancy defect (~2 Å). By simulating tension of SWNTs containing common types of defects, we demonstrate how stress concentration at the defect boundary leads to brittle (unstable) fracturing at a relatively low strain, degrading the ideal strength of SWNTs by up to 60%. We find that, owing to the SWNT's truss-like structure, defects at this scale are not sharp and stress concentrations are finite and low. Moreover, stress concentration, a geometric property at the macroscale, is interrelated with the SWNT fracture toughness, a material property. The resulting SWNT fracture toughness is 2.7 MPa m(0.5), typical of moderately brittle materials and applicable also to graphene. PMID:26989774

  13. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  14. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Directionally Solidified NiAl-V Eutectic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, Srdjan; Caram, Rubens

    2015-02-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys has been recognized as promising technique for producing in situ composite materials exhibiting balance of properties. Therefore, an in situ NiAl-V eutectic composite has been successfully directionally solidified using Bridgman technique. The mechanical behavior of the composite including fracture resistance, microhardness, and compressive properties at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. Damage evolution and fracture characteristics were also discussed. The obtained results indicate that the NiAl-V eutectic retains high yield strength up to 1073 K (800 °C), above which there is a rapid decrease in strength. Its yield strength is higher than that of binary NiAl and most of the NiAl-based eutectics. The exhibited fracture toughness of 28.5 MPa√m is the highest of all other NiAl-based systems investigated so far. The material exhibited brittle fracture behavior of transgranular type and all observations pointed out that the main fracture micromechanism was cleavage.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  16. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  17. Fracture mechanics life analytical methods verification testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favenesi, J. A.; Clemons, T. G.; Riddell, W. T.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1994-09-01

    The objective was to evaluate NASCRAC (trademark) version 2.0, a second generation fracture analysis code, for verification and validity. NASCRAC was evaluated using a combination of comparisons to the literature, closed-form solutions, numerical analyses, and tests. Several limitations and minor errors were detected. Additionally, a number of major flaws were discovered. These major flaws were generally due to application of a specific method or theory, not due to programming logic. Results are presented for the following program capabilities: K versus a, J versus a, crack opening area, life calculation due to fatigue crack growth, tolerable crack size, proof test logic, tearing instability, creep crack growth, crack transitioning, crack retardation due to overloads, and elastic-plastic stress redistribution. It is concluded that the code is an acceptable fracture tool for K solutions of simplified geometries, for a limited number of J and crack opening area solutions, and for fatigue crack propagation with the Paris equation and constant amplitude loads when the Paris equation is applicable.

  18. Fracture mechanics life analytical methods verification testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Favenesi, J. A.; Clemons, T. G.; Riddell, W. T.; Ingraffea, A. R.; Wawrzynek, P. A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate NASCRAC (trademark) version 2.0, a second generation fracture analysis code, for verification and validity. NASCRAC was evaluated using a combination of comparisons to the literature, closed-form solutions, numerical analyses, and tests. Several limitations and minor errors were detected. Additionally, a number of major flaws were discovered. These major flaws were generally due to application of a specific method or theory, not due to programming logic. Results are presented for the following program capabilities: K versus a, J versus a, crack opening area, life calculation due to fatigue crack growth, tolerable crack size, proof test logic, tearing instability, creep crack growth, crack transitioning, crack retardation due to overloads, and elastic-plastic stress redistribution. It is concluded that the code is an acceptable fracture tool for K solutions of simplified geometries, for a limited number of J and crack opening area solutions, and for fatigue crack propagation with the Paris equation and constant amplitude loads when the Paris equation is applicable.

  19. Fracture mechanism of amorphous polymers at strain fields.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lan; Yang, Xiaoping; Jia, Xiaolong; Cao, Dapeng

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the wide application of polymeric materials, understanding the fracture mechanism of amorphous polymers at strain fields is a fundamentally important challenge. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the uniaxial deformation of amorphous polyethylene and further monitor the polyethylene fracture process induced by stretching. Results indicate that the polyethylene systems with chain lengths of 600-800 united atoms exhibit the fracture behavior at a temperature T < 200 K and the strain of 1.0. Further study shows that in the stretching process, the disentanglement and orientation of chains lead to the formation of small cavities in the middle region of the system, and the small cavities subsequently form a large hole, causing the fracture of the whole system. Definitely, the fracture is determined by the two factors of mobility and entanglement of chains. The polyethylene systems with a high chain mobility or a high chain entanglement do not fracture. Finally, a schematic diagram is put forward to illustrate the fracture behavior. PMID:25322468

  20. Deformation and fracture of aluminum-lithium alloys: The effect of dissolved hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivet, F. C.; Swanson, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of dissolved hydrogen on the mechanical properties of 2090 and 2219 alloys are studied. The work done during this semi-annual period consists of the hydrogen charging study and some preliminary mechanical tests. Prior to SIMS analysis, several potentiostatic and galvanostatic experiments were performed for various times (going from 10 minutes to several hours) in the cathodic zone, and for the two aqueous solutions: 0.04N of HCl and 0.1N NaOH both combined with a small amount of As2O3. A study of the surface damage was conducted in parallel with the charging experiments. Those tests were performed to choose the best charging conditions without surface damage. Disk rupture tests and tensile tests are part of the study designed to investigate the effect of temperature, surface roughness, strain rate, and environment on the fracture behavior. The importance of the roughness and environment were shown using the disk rupture test as well as the importance of the strain rate under hydrogen environment. The tensile tests, without hydrogen effects, have not shown significant differences between low and room temperature.

  1. Application of dynamic fracture mechanics to the investigation of catastrophic failure in aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Benjamin Bin

    A dynamic fracture mechanics approach to the estimation of the residual strength of aircraft structures is presented. The dependence of the dynamic crack initiation toughness of aluminum 2024-T3 on loading rate is first studied experimentally. Based on the experimental results and on established dynamic fracture mechanic concepts, a fracture mechanics based failure model is established and is used to estimate the residual strength of aircraft structures. A methodology to determine residual strength of dynamically loaded structures based on global structural analysis coupled with local finite element analysis is introduced. Local finite element calculations were performed for different loading rates to simulate the conditions encountered in an explosively loaded aircraft fuselage. The results from the analyses were then used in conjunction with the experimental results for the dynamic fracture toughness of a 2024-T3 aluminum alloy as a function of loading rate, KdIC vs. K˙d(t), to determine the time to failure, tf, for a given loading rate. A failure envelope, sf vs. ṡ , based on the failure model and finite element analysis, is presented for the different cases and the implications for the residual strength of aircraft structures is discussed. Mixed mode dynamic crack initiation in aluminum 2024-T3 alloy is investigated by combining experiments with numerical simulations. The optical technique of coherent gradient sensing (CGS) and a strain gage method are employed to study the evolution of the mixed mode stress intensity factors. The dynamic mixed mode failure envelope is obtained using the crack initiation data from the experiments at a nominal loading rate of 7 x 105 MPam/s . Numerical simulations of the experiments are conducted to both help in designing the experiments and to validate the results of the experiments. The numerical simulations show good correlation with the experimental results.

  2. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  3. Meshfree simulations of thermo-mechanical ductile fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simkins, D. C.; Li, S.

    2006-08-01

    In this work, a meshfree method is used to simulate thermo-mechanical ductile fracture under finite deformation. A Galerkin meshfree formulation incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model is implemented in numerical computations. We are interested in the simulation of thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture under large scale yielding. A rate form adiabatic split is proposed in the constitutive update. Meshfree techniques, such as the visibility criterion, are used to modify the particle connectivity based on evolving crack surface morphology. The numerical results have shown that the proposed meshfree algorithm works well, the meshfree crack adaptivity and re-interpolation procedure is versatile in numerical simulations, and it enables us to predict thermo-mechanical effects on ductile fracture.

  4. Fracture mechanics criteria for turbine engine hot section components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of several fracture mechanics data correlation parameters to predicting the crack propagation life of turbine engine hot section components was evaluated. An engine survey was conducted to determine the locations where conventional fracture mechanics approaches may not be adequate to characterize cracking behavior. Both linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics analyses of a cracked annular combustor liner configuration were performed. Isothermal and variable temperature crack propagation tests were performed on Hastelloy X combustor liner material. The crack growth data was reduced using the stress intensity factor, the strain intensity factor, the J integral, crack opening displacement, and Tomkins' model. The parameter which showed the most effectiveness in correlation high temperature and variable temperature Hastelloy X crack growth data was crack opening displacement.

  5. Decomposition mechanism in supercooled liquid alloys.

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W. L.; Loffler, J. F.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1999-07-12

    The authors performed small-angle neutron scattering experiments on the bulk amorphous alloy Zr{sub 41.2}Ti{sub 13.8}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} (Vit1{reg_sign}) and on further alloys, where the ZrTi and CuBe content have been changed, following the tie-line in the direction of Zr{sub 46.8}Ti{sub 8.2}Cu{sub 7.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 27.5} (Vit4{reg_sign}). The SANS data of the samples, preannealed at temperatures between 330 C and 390 C, show interference peaks giving evidence for spatially correlated arrangements of inhomogeneities. The Q values of the interference peaks, Q{sub max}, decrease with increasing annealing temperature T{sub a} and, at a given annealing temperature, with composition following the tie-line from Vit1 to Vit4. They find that, in two distinguished regimes, the data follow a relation 1/L{sup 2} {proportional_to} T{sub a} as predicted by Cahn's theory (L = 2{pi}/Q{sub max} is the wavelength of the decomposition), with a crossover at the glass transition temperature T{sub g} = 350 C. The authors explain the crossover by different diffusion mechanisms below and above T{sub g}.

  6. Mechanical transport in two-dimensional networks of fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, H.K.

    1984-04-01

    The objectives of this research are to evaluate directional mechanical transport parameters for anisotropic fracture systems, and to determine if fracture systems behave like equivalent porous media. The tracer experiments used to measure directional tortuosity, longitudinal geometric dispersivity, and hydraulic effective porosity are conducted with a uniform flow field and measurements are made from the fluid flowing within a test section where linear length of travel is constant. Since fluid flow and mechanical transport are coupled processes, the directional variations of specific discharge and hydraulic effective porosity are measured in regions with constant hydraulic gradients to evaluate porous medium equivalence for the two processes, respectively. If the fracture region behaves like an equivalent porous medium, the system has the following stable properties: (1) specific discharge is uniform in any direction and can be predicted from a permeability tensor; and (2) hydraulic effective porosity is directionally stable. Fracture systems with two parallel sets of continuous fractures satisfy criterion 1. However, in these systems hydraulic effective porosity is directionally dependent, and thus, criterion 2 is violated. Thus, for some fracture systems, fluid flow can be predicted using porous media assumptions, but it may not be possible to predict transport using porous media assumptions. Two discontinuous fracture systems were studied which satisfied both criteria. Hydraulic effective porosity for both systems has a value between rock effective porosity and total porosity. A length-density analysis (LDS) of Canadian fracture data shows that porous media equivalence for fluid flow and transport is likely when systems have narrow aperture distributions. 54 references, 90 figures, 7 tables.

  7. An investigation on quench cracking behavior of superalloy Udimet 720LI using a fracture mechanics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, J.; Keefer, V.L.; Chang, K.M.; Furrer, D.

    2000-04-01

    Quench cracking can be a serious problem in the heat treatment of high strength superalloys. A new fracture mechanics approach, quench cracking toughness (K{sub Q}), was introduced to evaluate the on-cooling quench cracking resistance of superalloy Udimet 720LI. A fully automatic computer controlled data acquisition and processing system was set up to track the on-cooling quenching process and to simulate the quench cracking. The influences of grain size, cooling rate, solution temperature, and alloy processing routes on quench cracking resistance were investigated. Research results indicate that quench cracking revealed a typical brittle and intergranular failure at high temperatures, which causes a lower quench cracking toughness in comparison to fracture toughness at room temperature. Fine grain structures show the higher quench cracking resistance and lower failure temperatures than intermediate grain structures at the same cooling rates. Moreover, higher cooling rate results in lower cracking toughness under the same grain size structures. In comparison of processing routes, powder metallurgy (PM) alloys show higher cracking resistance than cast and wrought (CW) alloys for fine grain structures at the same cooling rates. However, for immediate grain structure, there is no obvious difference of K{sub Q} between the two processing route in this study.

  8. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gangloff, R.P.; Kim, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  9. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  10. The debonding and fracture of Si particles during the fatigue of a cast Al-Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gall, K.; Yang, N.; Horstemeyer, M.; McDowell, D.L.; Fan, J.

    1999-12-01

    Constant-amplitude high-cycle fatigue tests ({sigma}{sub max} = 133 MPa, {sigma}{sub max}/{sigma}{sub y} = 0.55, and R = 0.1) were conducted on a cylindrical samples machined from a cast A356-T6 aluminum plate: The fracture surface of the sample with the smallest fatigue-crack nucleating defect was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). For low crack-tip driving forces (fatigue-crack growth rates of da/dN {lt} 1 x 10{sup {minus}7} m/cycle), the authors discovered that a small semicircular surface fatigue crack propagated primarily through the Al-1% Si dendrite cells. The silicon particles in the eutectic remained intact and served as barriers at low fatigue-crack propagation rates. when the semicircular fatigue crack inevitably crossed the three-dimensional Al-Si eutectic network, it propagated primarily along the interface between the silicon particles and the Al-1% Si matrix. Furthermore, nearly all of the silicon particles were progressively debonded by the fatigue cracks propagating at low rates, with the exception of elongated particles with a major axis perpendicular to the crack plane, which were fractured. As the fatigue cracks grew with a high crack-tip driving force (fatigue-crack growth rates of da/dN {gt} 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} m/cycle), silicon particles ahead of the crack tip were fractured, and the crack subsequently propagated through the weakest distribution of prefractured particles in the Al-Si eutectic. Only small rounded silicon particles were observed to debond while the fatigue crack grew at high rates. Using fracture-surface markings and fracture mechanics, a macroscopic measure of the maximum critical driving force between particle debonding vs fracture during fatigue-crack growth was calculated to be approximately K{sub max}{sup tr} {approx} 6.0 MPa {radical}m for the present cast A356 alloy.

  11. Mechanical stability of propped hydraulic fractures: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Asgian, M.I.; Cundall, P.A.; Brady, B.H.

    1995-03-01

    Proppant is sometimes produced along with hydrocarbons in hydraulically fractured petroleum wells. Sometimes 10% to 20% of the proppant is backproduced, which can lead to damaged equipment and downtime. Furthermore, proppant flowback can lead to a substantial loss of fracture conductivity. A numerical study was conducted to help understand what conditions are likely to lead to proppant flowback. In the simulations, the mechanical interaction of a larger number (several thousand) individual proppant grains was modeled with a distinct-element-type code. The numerical simulations show that hydraulic fractures propped with cohesionless, unbonded proppant fail under closure stress at a critical ratio of mean grain diameter to fracture width. This is consistent with published laboratory studies. The simulations identify the mechanism (arch failure) that triggers the mechanical instability and also show that the primary way that drawdowns (less than {approx} 75 psi/ft) affect proppant flowback is to transport loose proppant grains in front of the stable arch to the wellbore. Drawdowns > 75 psi/ft are sufficient to destabilize the arch and to cause progressive failure of the propped fractures.

  12. The effect of hot isostatic pressing on crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, T.P.; Orbison, J.G.; Duncan, R.S.; Olivero, P.G.; Peterec, R.H.

    1999-06-01

    This article presents the results of an experimental materials testing program on the effect of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) on the crack initiation, fatigue, and mechanical properties of two cast aluminum alloys: AMS 4220 and 4225. These alloys are often used in castings for high temperature applications. Standard tensile and instrumented Charpy impact tests were performed at room and elevated temperatures. The resulting data quantify improvements in ultimate tensile strength, ductility, and Charpy impact toughness from the HIP process while indicating little change in yield strength for both alloys. In addition standard fracture mechanics fatigue tests along with a set of unique fatigue crack initiation tests were performed on the alloys. Hot isostatic pressing was shown to produce a significant increase in cycles to crack initiation for AMS 4225, while no change was evident in traditional da/dN fatigue crack growth. The data permits comparisons of the two alloys both with and without the HIP process.

  13. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Hill, Michael R; Nav Dalen, John E

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  14. Fracture mechanics evaluation for at typical PWR primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Shimizu, S.; Ogata, Y.

    1997-04-01

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years.

  15. Mechanical Properties of High Strength Al-Mg Alloy Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bong-Jae; Hong, Kyung-Eui; Kim, Young-Jig

    The aim of this research is to develop the high strength Al alloy sheet for the automotive body. For the fabrication Al-Mg alloy sheet, the composition of alloying elements was designed by the properties database and CALPHAD (Calculation Phase Diagram) approach which can predict the phases during solidification using thermodynamic database. Al-Mg alloys were designed using CALPHAD approach according to the high content of Mg with minor alloying elements. After phase predictions by CALPHAD, designed Al-Mg alloys were manufactured. Addition of Mg in Al melts were protected by dry air/Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) mixture gas which can control the severe Mg ignition and oxidation. After rolling procedure of manufactured Al-Mg alloys, mechanical properties were examined with the variation of the heat treatment conditions.

  16. Metallic Reinforcement of Direct Squeeze Die Casting Aluminum Alloys for Improved Strength and Fracture Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    D. Schwam: J.F. Wallace: Y. Zhu: J.W. Ki

    2004-10-01

    The utilization of aluminum die casting as enclosures where internal equipment is rotating inside of the casting and could fracture requires a strong housing to restrain the fractured parts. A typical example would be a supercharger. In case of a failure, unless adequately contained, fractured parts could injure people operating the equipment. A number of potential reinforcement materials were investigated. The initial work was conducted in sand molds to create experimental conditions that promote prolonged contact of the reinforcing material with molten aluminum. Bonding of Aluminum bronze, Cast iron, and Ni-resist inserts with various electroplated coatings and surface treatments were analyzed. Also toughening of A354 aluminum cast alloy by steel and stainless steel wire mesh with various conditions was analyzed. A practical approach to reinforcement of die cast aluminum components is to use a reinforcing steel preform. Such performs can be fabricated from steel wire mesh or perforated metal sheet by stamping or deep drawing. A hemispherical, dome shaped casting was selected in this investigation. A deep drawing die was used to fabricate the reinforcing performs. The tendency of aluminum cast enclosures to fracture could be significantly reduced by installing a wire mesh of austenitic stainless steel or a punched austenitic stainless steel sheet within the casting. The use of reinforcements made of austenitic stainless steel wire mesh or punched austenitic stainless steel sheet provided marked improvement in reducing the fragmentation of the casting. The best strengthening was obtained with austenitic stainless steel wire and with a punched stainless steel sheet without annealing this material. Somewhat lower results were obtained with the annealed punched stainless steel sheet. When the annealed 1020 steel wire mesh was used, the results were only slightly improved because of the lower mechanical properties of this unalloyed steel. The lowest results were

  17. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clougherty, E. V.; Pober, R. L.; Kaufman, L.

    1972-01-01

    Significant results were obtained in fabrication studies of the role of metallic additives of Zr, Ti, Ni, Fe and Cr on the densification of ZrB2. All elemental additions lower the processing temperatures required to effect full densification of ZrB2. Each addition effects enhanced densification by a clearly distinguishable and different mechanism and the resulting fabricated materials are different. A significant improvement in strength and fracture toughness was obtained for the ZrB2/Ti composition. Mechanical characterization studies for the ZrB2/SiC/C composites and the new ZrB2/Metal materials produced data relevant to the effect of impacting load on measured impact energies, a specimen configuration for which controlled fracture could occur in a suitably hard testing apparatus, and fracture strength data. Controlled fracture--indicative of measurable fracture toughness--was obtained for the ZrB2-SiC-C composite, and a ZrB2/Ti composite fabricated from ZrB2 with an addition of 30 weight per cent Ti. The increased strength and toughness of the ZrB2/Ti composite is consistent with the presence of a significantly large amount of a fine grained acicular phase formed by reaction of Ti with ZrB2 during processing.

  18. Determination of design allowable properties. Fracture of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engstrom, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to provide a comprehensive report of available valid data on tensile properties, fracture toughness, fatigue crack propagation, and sustained load behavior of 2219-T87 aluminum alloy base metal and weldments, as applicable to manned spacecraft tankage. Most of the data found were from tests conducted at room temperature, -320 F and -423 F. Data are presented in graphical and tabular form, and areas in which data are lacking are established.

  19. Wetting and Mechanical Performance of Zirconia Brazed with Silver/Copper Oxide and Silver/Vanadium Oxide Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnamon, Kathleen E.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-12-01

    The wetting behavior and mechanical strength of silver/copper oxide and silver/vanadium oxide braze alloys were investigated for both magnesia-stabilized and yttria-stabilized (Mg-PSZ and Y-TZP) transformation toughened zirconia substrates. The temperatures investigated were 1000 to 1100°C, with oxide additions of 1 to 10 weight percent V2O5 or CuO, and hold times of 0.9 to 3.6 ks. Increasing either the isothermal hold temperature or time had a distinctly negative effect on the joint strength. The maximum strengths for both braze alloys were obtained for 5 wt. % oxide additions at 1050°C with a hold time of 0.9 ks. The Mg-PSZ/Ag-CuO system exhibited a average fracture strength of 255 MPa (45% of the reported monolithic strength), and the Y-TZP/Ag-CuO system had an average fracture strength of 540 MPa (30% of the reported monolithic strength). The fracture strengths were lower for the Ag-V2O5 braze alloys, with fracture strengths of approximately 180 MPa (30% of the monolithic strength) for Mg-PSZ versus approximately 160 MPa (10% of the monolithic strength) for Y-TZP. No interfacial products were observed in low magnification SEM analysis for the brazing alloys containing V2O5 additions, while there were interfacial products present for brazes prepared with CuO additions in the braze alloy.

  20. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  1. Circumferential strut fracture as a mechanism of "crush" bifurcation restenosis.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Sulaiman; Ball, Timothy; Nakano, Masataka; Kaplan, Aaron; Virmani, Renu; Foerst, Jason

    2013-03-01

    The "Crush" procedure is a 2-stent technique for the treatment of bifurcation lesions with greater rates of in-stent restenosis than the Culotte technique. In conclusion, we report a possible mechanism for this discrepancy in the case of severe Crush stent fracture with associated focal restenosis identified by postmortem microcomputed tomography and histologic examination. PMID:23291090

  2. Thermo-Mechanical Processing Parameters for the INCONEL ALLOY 740

    SciTech Connect

    Ludtka, G.M.; Smith, G.

    2007-11-19

    In 2000, a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Special Metals Corporation (SMC) to determine the mechanical property response of the IN740 alloy to help establish thermo-mechanical processing parameters for the use of this alloy in supercritical and ultra-critical boiler tubes with the potential for other end uses. SMC had developed an alloy, commercially known as INCONEL alloy 740, which exhibited various beneficial physical, mechanical, and chemical properties. As part of SMC's on-going efforts to optimize this alloy for targeted boiler applications there was a need to develop an understanding of the thermo-mechanical response of the material, characterize the resulting microstructure from this processing, and possibly, utilize models to develop the appropriate processing scheme for this product.

  3. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L.; Clougherty, E. V.; Nesor, H.

    1971-01-01

    Fracture energies of WC-6Co, Boride 5 (ZrB2+SiC), Boride 8(ZrB2+SiC+C) and Boride 8-M2(ZrB2+SiC+C) were measured by slow bend and impact tests of notched charpy bars. Cobalt bonded tungsten carbide exhibited impact energies of 0.76 ft-lb or 73.9 in-lb/square inch. Boride 5 and the Boride 8 exhibit impact energies one third and one quarter of that observed for WC-6Co comparing favorably with measurements for SiC and Si3N4. Slow bend-notched bar-fracture energies for WC-6Co were near 2.6 in-lb/square inch or 1/20 the impact energies. Slow bend energies for Boride 8-M2, Boride 8 and Boride 5 were 58%, 42% and 25% of the value observed for WC-6Co. Fractograph showed differences for WC-6Co where slow bend testing resulted in smooth transgranular cleavage while samples broken by impact exhibited intergranular failures. By contrast the boride fractures showed no distinction based on testing method. Fabrication studies were conducted to effect alteration of the boride composites by alloying and introduction of graphite cloth.

  4. Deformation behavior and fracture of the ultrafine-grained titanium alloy of Ti-Al-V-Mo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabovetskaya, Galina; Mishin, Ivan; Zabudchenko, Olga

    2015-10-01

    Effect of prerecrystallization annealing on the evolution of structural and phase state, deformation and failure behavior of the ultrafine-grained structure of VT16 grade titanium alloy is studied. In the ultrafine-grained VT16 alloy during prerecrystallization annealing such processes as the β→α phase transformation and redistribution of alloying elements is found to take place along with defect structure relieving, leading to strength properties decrease. These processes promote retention of high level of alloy strength properties. Failure behavior of the alloy qualitatively is in agreement with the wave theory of fracture.

  5. Probabilistic fracture mechanics and optimum fracture control of the solid rocket motor case of the shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    Development of a procedure for the reliability analysis of the solid rocket motor case of the space shuttle is described. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and consideration of a probability distribution for the initial flaw sizes. The reliability analysis can be used to select design variables, such as the thickness of the SRM case, projected design life and proof factor, on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds. Effects of fracture control plans such as the non-destructive inspections and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed methodology for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be easily modified to consider other similar structures and different fracture control plans.

  6. Strength and fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, V. K.

    2012-08-01

    Results on studying the spall fracture of uranium, plutonium and several their alloys under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The problems of influence of initial temperature in a range of - 196 - 800∘C and loading time on the spall strength and failure character of uranium and two its alloys with molybdenum and both molybdenum and zirconium were studied. The results for plutonium and its alloy with gallium were obtained at a normal temperature and in a temperature range of 40-315∘C, respectively. The majority of tests were conducted with the samples in the form of disks 4 mm in thickness. They were loaded by the impact of aluminum plates 4 mm thick through a copper screen 12 mm thick serving as the cover or bottom part of a special container. The character of spall failure of materials and the damage degree of samples were observed on the longitudinal metallographic sections of recovered samples. For a concrete test temperature, the impact velocity was sequentially changed and therefore the loading conditions corresponding to the consecutive transition from microdamage nucleation up to complete macroscopic spall fracture were determined. The conditions of shock wave loading were calculated using an elastic-plastic computer program. The comparison of obtained results with the data of other researchers on the spall fracture of examined materials was conducted.

  7. The fracture resistance of 1420 and 1421 Al-Mg-Li alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birt, M. J.; Hafley, R. A.; Wagner, J. A.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    The resistance to stable crack growth in 1420-T6 (Al-5Mg-2.1Li-0.1Zr-0.01Sc, less than 0.06Fe, in wt pct) and 1421-T6 (Al-4.7Mg-1.9Li-0.09Zr-0.2Sc, less than 0.06Fe) Al-Mg-Li alloys was investigated, based on the R curves generated in accordance with ASTM E561-86 and fractography analyses. The crack resistance of 1420 and 1421 alloys was found to be comparable to that of the conventional Space Shuttle External Tank Al alloy, 2219-T87. The main differences in the fracture behaviors arose from differences in the alloys' microstructures. In the case of 1420 alloy, a slightly enhanced toughness behavior was observed, due to the T-phase precipitates, which may have promoted more homogeneous deformation and enhanced microvoid coalescence. In the case of 1421 alloy, the addition of Sc led to a refined grain size and resulted in slightly reduced toughness.

  8. Mechanical properties of iron-aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Sikka, V.K.

    1993-07-01

    Tensile and impact tests have been conducted on specimens for a series of five heats of iron-aluminum alloys. These results have been compared to data for the iron aluminide alloy FA-129. The first of the new alloys was a simple ternary alloy with iron, aluminum, and chromium contents that matched the FA-129 composition. The second was similar but with additions of zirconium and carbon. Three heats were produced with reduced aluminum contents so that a disordered body-centered cubic structure would be present. Additions of titanium or yttrium were included. The ductile-to brittle transition temperatures of all of the Fe{sub 3}Al alloys were similar, but the simple ternary alloy had a much higher upper-shelf energy levels than the Fe{sub 3}Al type alloys. The reduced aluminum alloy with the yttrium addition showed excellent tensile properties, with a room temperature total elongation of over 40%, and a very high upper-shelf energy level. Despite the high tensile ductility at room temperature, the transition temperature of the yttrium-containing alloy was still about 150{degrees}C, compared to approximately 300{degrees}C for FA-129.

  9. Effect of Y, Sr, and Nd additions on the microstructure and microfracture mechanism of squeeze-cast AZ91-X magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Lee, S.H.; Kim, D.H.

    1998-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of Y, Sr, and Nd additions on the microstructure and microfracture mechanism of the four squeeze-cast magnesium alloys based on the commercial AZ91 alloy. Microstructural observation, in situ fracture tests, fractographic observation were conducted on the alloys to clarify the microfracture process. Microstructural analyses indicated that grain refinement could be achieved by small additions of alloying elements, although the discontinuously precipitated Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases still existed on grain boundaries. From in situ fracture observation of an AZ91-Sr alloy, it was seen that coarse needle-shaped compound particles and Mg{sub 17}Al{sub 12} phases located on the grain boundary provided easy intergranular fracture sites under low stress intensity factor levels, resulting in the drop in toughness. On the other hand, the AZ91-Y and AZ91-Nd alloys showed improved fracture toughness, since deformation and fracture paths proceeded into grains rather than to grain boundaries, as the planar slip bands and twinnings actively developed inside the grains. These findings suggested, on the basis of the well-developed planar slip bands and twinnings, that the small addition of Y or Nd was very effective in improving fracture toughness.

  10. Mechanically alloyed Ni-base alloys for heat-resistant applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.K.; Fischer, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    INCONEL alloys MA 754 and MA 758 are nickel-base oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloys made by mechanical alloying (MA). Commercial use of Ma Ni-base alloys to date has been predominantly in aerospace applications of alloy MA 754 as turbine engine vanes. Both alloys are suitable for industrial heat treating components and other heat resistant alloy applications. Field trials and commercial experience in such applications of MA alloys are being gained while high temperature property characterization and new product form development continue. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the standard consolidation method for billets from which large bar and plate are produced for industrial applications of MA. This paper describes production of standard mill shapes from HIP billets, and it presents information on current and potential uses of MA alloys in applications such as: skid rails for use in high temperature walking beam furnaces, heat treating furnace components, components for handling molten glass, and furnace tubes. The paper includes comparison of the properties obtained in alloy MA 754 (20% Cr) and alloy MA 758 (30% Cr).

  11. Spall fracture and strength of uranium, plutonium and their alloys under shock wave loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubev, Vladimir

    2015-06-01

    Numerous results on studying the spall fracture phenomenon of uranium, two its alloys with molybdenum and zirconium, plutonium and its alloy with gallium under shock wave loading are presented in the paper. The majority of tests were conducted with the samples in the form of disks 4mm in thickness. They were loaded by the impact of aluminum plates 4mm thick through a copper screen serving as the cover or bottom part of a special container. The initial temperature of samples was changed in the range of -196 - 800 C degree for uranium and 40 - 315 C degree for plutonium. The character of spall failure of materials and the degree of damage for all tested samples were observed on the longitudinal metallographic sections of recovered samples. For a concrete test temperature, the impact velocity was sequentially changed and therefore the loading conditions corresponding to the consecutive transition from microdamage nucleation up to complete macroscopic spall fracture were determined. Numerical calculations of the conditions of shock wave loading and spall fracture of samples were performed in the elastoplastic approach. Several two- and three-dimensional effects of loading were taken into account. Some results obtained under conditions of intensive impulse irradiation and intensive explosive loading are presented too. The rather complete analysis and comparison of obtained results with the data of other researchers on the spall fracture of examined materials were conducted.

  12. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    SciTech Connect

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of temperature-dependent initiation fracture toughness in advanced aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, M.J.; Somerday, B.P.; Gangloff, R.P.; Lach, C.L.

    1997-12-31

    The temperature dependence of the plane-strain initiation fracture toughness (K{sub JICi}) is modeled micromechanically for a variety of advanced aluminum alloys that fail by microvoid processes. Materials include precipitation-hardened ingot metallurgy, spray formed, submicron-grain-size powder metallurgy, and metal-matrix composite alloys. A critical-plastic-strain-controlled model, employing tensile yield strength, elastic modulus, work hardening, and reduction of area measurements, successfully predicts K{sub JICi} versus temperature for eight alloys, providing a strong confirmation of this approach. Modeling shows that K{sub JICi} is controlled by the interplay between the temperature dependencies of the intrinsic failure locus {bar {var_epsilon}}{sub f}{sup p}({sigma}{sub m}/{sigma}{sub fl}) and the crack-tip stress/strain fields governed by alloy flow properties. Uncertainties in {bar {var_epsilon}}{sub f}{sup p}({sigma}{sub m}/{sigma}{sub fl}), as well as the critical distance (volume) for crack-tip damage evolution, hinder absolute predictions of K{sub JICi}. Critical distance (calculated from the model) correlates with the nearest-neighbor spacing of void-nucleating particles and with the extent of primary void growth determined from quantitative fractography. These correlations suggest a means to predict absolute plane-strain fracture toughness.

  14. Structure, mechanical properties, and fracture of 20GL cast steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schastlivtsev, V. M.; Tabatchikova, T. I.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Klyueva, S. Yu.

    2014-04-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of 20GL steel are studied. It is shown that a significant decrease in the ductility and impact toughness of the steel is caused by intercrystalline fracture, which is induced by a weakening of the intercrystallite bonds due to the existence of coarse lamellar pearlite and nonmetallic inclusions, namely, film inclusions and eutectic-type oxysulfides, at the boundaries of primary crystals. Annealing from a temperature in the intercritical range is found to improve the mechanical properties.

  15. Microstructure and mechanical properties of thermoelectric nanostructured n-type silicon-germanium alloys synthesized employing spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Bathula, Sivaiah; Gahtori, Bhasker; Tripathy, S. K.; Tyagi, Kriti; Srivastava, A. K.; Dhar, Ajay; Jayasimhadri, M.

    2014-08-11

    Owing to their high thermoelectric (TE) figure-of-merit, nanostructured Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} alloys are evolving as a potential replacement for their bulk counterparts in designing efficient radio-isotope TE generators. However, as the mechanical properties of these alloys are equally important in order to avoid in-service catastrophic failure of their TE modules, we report the strength, hardness, fracture toughness, and thermal shock resistance of nanostructured n-type Si{sub 80}Ge{sub 20} alloys synthesized employing spark plasma sintering of mechanically alloyed nanopowders of its constituent elements. These mechanical properties show a significant enhancement, which has been correlated with the microstructural features at nano-scale, delineated by transmission electron microscopy.

  16. Mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with different joint configurations

    PubMed Central

    Kokolis, John; Chakmakchi, Makdad; Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Prombonas, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with two different joint designs. MATERIALS AND METHODS Dumbbell cast specimens (n=30) were divided into 3 groups (R, I, K, n=10). Group R consisted of intact specimens, group I of specimens sectioned with a straight cut, and group K of specimens with a 45° bevel made at the one welding edge. The microstructure and the elemental distributions of alloy and welding regions were examined by an SEM/EDX analysis and then specimens were loaded in tension up to fracture. The tensile strength (TS) and elongation (ε) were determined and statistically compared among groups employing 1-way ANOVA, SNK multiple comparison test (α=.05) and Weibull analysis where Weibull modulus m and characteristic strength σο were identified. Fractured surfaces were imaged by a SEM. RESULTS SEM/EDX analysis showed that cast alloy consists of two phases with differences in mean atomic number contrast, while no mean atomic number was identified for welded regions. EDX analysis revealed an increased Cr and Mo content at the alloy-joint interface. All mechanical properties of group I (TS, ε, m and σο) were found inferior to R while group K showed intermediated values without significant differences to R and I, apart from elongation with group R. The fractured surfaces of all groups showed extensive dendritic pattern although with a finer structure in the case of welded groups. CONCLUSION The K shape joint configuration should be preferred over the I, as it demonstrates improved mechanical strength and survival probability. PMID:25722836

  17. Mechanical properties and microstructure of copper alloys and copper alloy-stainless steel laminates for fusion reactor high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leedy, Kevin Daniel

    plate showed the best overall mechanical properties of the studied bi-metallic bonded panels. Bond properties were nominally inferior to constituent bulk material properties and fracture toughness values, in particular, were quite low for all bonded laminates. Delamination near the copper alloy-stainless steel interface was the dominate failure mode in the bi-metallic panels. The joining processes caused microstructural alterations in the bond interfacial regions including: microporosity, new precipitate formation, existing precipitate morphology changes and interdiffusion of constituent elements.

  18. Amorphous powders of Al-Hf prepared by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Hannigan, J.W.; Sheinberg, H.; Tiainen, T.

    1988-01-01

    We synthesized amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ alloy powder by mechanically alloying an equimolar mixture of crystalline powders of Al and Hf using hexane as a dispersant. We characterized the powder as a function of mechanical-alloying time by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry. Amorphous Al/sub 50/Hf/sub 50/ powder heated at 10 K s/sup /minus/1/ crystallizes polymorphously at 1003 K into orthorhombic AlHf (CrB-type structure). During mechanical alloying, some hexane decomposes and hydrogen and carbon are incorporated into the amorphous alloy powder. The hydrogen can be removed by annealing the powder by hot pressing at a temperature approximately 30 K below the crystallization temperature. The amorphous compacts have a diamond pyramidal hardness of 1025 DPH. 24 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism and recent experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a low melting temperature alloy deployment mechanism, U.S. Patent 4,842,106. It begins with a brief history of conventional dimethyl-silicone fluid damped mechanisms. Design fundamentals of the new melting alloy mechanism are then introduced. Benefits of the new over the old are compared and contrasted. Recent experiments and lessons learned complete this paper.

  20. Effect of nano-additives on microstructure, mechanical properties and wear behaviour of Fe-Cr-B hardfacing alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Junfeng; Lu, Pengpeng; Wang, You; Liu, Saiyue; Zou, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    Fe-Cr-B hardfacing alloys with different nano-additives content were investigated. The effects of nano-additives on the microstructures of hardfacing alloy were studied by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffractometer. The hardness and the fracture toughness of hardfacing alloys were measured, respectively. The sliding wear tests were carried out using a ball-on-disc tribometer. The experimental results showed that primary carbide of hardfacing alloys was refined and its distribution became uniform with content of nano-additives increased. The hardfacing alloys are composed of Cr7C3, Fe7C3, α-Fe and Fe2B according to the results of X-ray diffraction. The hardness of hardfacing alloys increased linearly with the increase of nano-additives. The hardness of the hardfacing alloy with 1.5 wt.% nano-additives increased 54.8% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives and reached to 1011HV. The KIC of the hardfacing alloy with 0.65 wt.% nano-additives was 15.4 MPam1/2, which reached a maximum. The value increased 57.1% than that of the hardfacing alloy without nano-additives. The wear rates of the hardfacing layer with 0.65 wt.% and 1.0 wt.% nano-additives decreased about 88% than that of the hardfacing layer without nano-additives. The main wear mechanism was adhesion wear.

  1. Fracture testing of 2324-T39 aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.

    1995-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on middle crack tension (M(T)) and compact tension (C(T)) specimens of 7.6 mm-thick 2324-T39 aluminum in the L-T orientation. The configurations tested included 102 mm-wide M(T), 305 mm-wide M(T), 152 mm-wide C(T), and 102 mm-wide C(T) specimens. The measured critical crack-tip opening angle (CTOA) for the 102 mm-wide M(T) tests, the 305 mm-wide M(T) tests, and the 152 mm-wide C(T) tests, after a small amount of crack extension, were 4.4, 4.9, 5.1 degrees, respectively. The scatter involved with these measurements was about +/- 1 degree.

  2. Weldable aluminum alloy has improved mechanical properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westerlund, R. W.

    1966-01-01

    Weldable aluminum alloy has good resistance to stress-corrosion cracking, shows unchanged strength and formability after storage at room temperature, and can be pre-aged, stretched, and aged. Since toxic fumes of cadmium oxide are evolved when the new alloy is welded, adequate ventilation must be provided.

  3. Fracture mechanics analysis of composite microcracking - Experimental results in fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nairn, J. A.; Liu, S.

    1990-01-01

    The Nairn (1989) variational mechanics analysis, which yields the energy release rate of a microcrack's formation between two existing microcracks, has proven useful in the fracture mechanics interpretation of cross-ply laminates' microcracking. Attention is presently given to the application of this energy release rate analysis to a fracture mechanics-based interpretation of microcrack formation during fatigue loading, for the case of fatigue experiments on three layups of Avimid K/IM6 laminates and four layups of Fiberite 934/T300 laminates. The single master Paris-law plot onto which the data from all layups of a given material system fall is claimed to offer a complete characterization of that system's microcrack-formation resistance during fatigue loading.

  4. Hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale: reviewing influence factors and their mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  5. Hydraulic Fracture Extending into Network in Shale: Reviewing Influence Factors and Their Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lan; Zhao, Jinzhou; Hu, Yongquan

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracture in shale reservoir presents complex network propagation, which has essential difference with traditional plane biwing fracture at forming mechanism. Based on the research results of experiments, field fracturing practice, theory analysis, and numerical simulation, the influence factors and their mechanism of hydraulic fracture extending into network in shale have been systematically analyzed and discussed. Research results show that the fracture propagation in shale reservoir is influenced by the geological and the engineering factors, which includes rock mineral composition, rock mechanical properties, horizontal stress field, natural fractures, treating net pressure, fracturing fluid viscosity, and fracturing scale. This study has important theoretical value and practical significance to understand fracture network propagation mechanism in shale reservoir and contributes to improving the science and efficiency of shale reservoir fracturing design. PMID:25032240

  6. Physical and mechanical modelling of neutron irradiation effect on ductile fracture. Part 1. Prediction of fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margolin, Boris; Sorokin, Alexander; Smirnov, Valeriy; Potapova, Vera

    2014-09-01

    A physical-and-mechanical model of ductile fracture has been developed to predict fracture toughness and fracture strain of irradiated austenitic steels taking into account stress-state triaxiality and radiation swelling. The model is based on criterion of plastic collapse of a material unit cell controlled by strain hardening of a material and criterion of voids coalescence due to channel shearing of voids. The model takes into account deformation voids nucleation and growth of deformation and vacancy voids. For justification of the model experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness of austenitic steel 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade irradiated up to maximal dose 150 dpa with various swelling were used. Experimental data on fracture strain and fracture toughness were compared with the results predicted by the model. It has been shown that for prediction of the swelling effect on fracture toughness the dependence of process zone size on swelling should be taken into account.

  7. Mechanical properties of alloy Mg-Li rod in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Cao, Yang; Yue, Baocheng

    2009-12-01

    Light-weight metal or alloy was widespread in aerospace and aeronautical engineering. Alloy Li-Mg was the lightest metal structural materials. Focus was recently on this alloy. Static mechanical properties were important for materials before they were applied into practical use. Static Testing of a new alloy Li-Mg was accomplished in this paper by universal materials testing system Model INSTRON 5500R. Stress-strain curve was acquired. And ultimate stress, yield stress, elongation in percentage and reduce of area in percentage were measured in detail. The result showed that alloy had higher strength to 250MPa in tension. But the deformation was hardly changed in length or section before it cracked. All the experimental result proved that this material was typical brittle materials. Fractography had been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM Photos were also verified alloy Li-Mg was ductile material.

  8. Mechanical properties of alloy Mg-Li rod in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Cao, Yang; Yue, Baocheng

    2010-03-01

    Light-weight metal or alloy was widespread in aerospace and aeronautical engineering. Alloy Li-Mg was the lightest metal structural materials. Focus was recently on this alloy. Static mechanical properties were important for materials before they were applied into practical use. Static Testing of a new alloy Li-Mg was accomplished in this paper by universal materials testing system Model INSTRON 5500R. Stress-strain curve was acquired. And ultimate stress, yield stress, elongation in percentage and reduce of area in percentage were measured in detail. The result showed that alloy had higher strength to 250MPa in tension. But the deformation was hardly changed in length or section before it cracked. All the experimental result proved that this material was typical brittle materials. Fractography had been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM Photos were also verified alloy Li-Mg was ductile material.

  9. Deformation and fracture of Macadamia nuts Part 2: Microstructure and fracture mechanics analysis of nutshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chun-Hui; Mai, Yiu-Wing

    A study of the microstructure and mechanical properties of Macadamia nutshells subjected to various heat treatments is given in Part 2 of this paper. It is found that the nutshell has a three-dimensional, close-packed, cell structure. The cells have a diameter to length ratio of about 1 to 3, and the orientation of the cells is reasonably isotropic with no apparent variation with either position or direction. The material behaves in a very brittle manner under tension and compression. Based on the elastic stress analysis of a nut under diametrical compression and the mechanical properties of the shell, it is shown that cracks that cause the final fracture are initiated from the inner surface beneath the loading point. A theoretical model is proposed and predictions of the fracture load for Macadamia nuts are in good agreement with experimental results.

  10. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics with emphasis on layered rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kuruppu, M.D.; Cheng, K.P.; Edl, J.N. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Results are presented of a literature survey of over 70 pertinent publications and critical reviews of fracture mechanics emphasizing the fracture behavior of layered rocks. Historical perspective, fracture mechanisms, linear and nonlinear fracture mechanics, energy theories, ductile and brittle fractures, process regions, specific work of fracture, J-integrals, failure theories, static and dynamic fractures, rock fracture mechanics, fracture toughness of layered rocks (e.g., oil shale), experimental and numerical methods are reviewed and discussed. Innovative and promising methods tailored for the fracture mechanics of layered rocks are recommended.

  11. On the Specific Role of Microstructure in Governing Cyclic Fatigue, Deformation, and Fracture Behavior of a High-Strength Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manigandan, K.; Srivatsan, T. S.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, the results of an experimental study that focused on evaluating the conjoint influence of microstructure and test specimen orientation on fully reversed strain-controlled fatigue behavior of the high alloy steel X2M are presented and discussed. The cyclic stress response of this high-strength alloy steel revealed initial hardening during the first few cycles followed by gradual softening for most of fatigue life. Cyclic strain resistance exhibited a linear trend for the variation of elastic strain amplitude with reversals to failure, and plastic strain amplitude with reversals to failure. Fracture morphology was the same at the macroscopic level over the entire range of cyclic strain amplitudes examined. However, at the fine microscopic level, the alloy steel revealed fracture to be essentially ductile with features reminiscent of predominantly "locally" ductile and isolated brittle mechanisms. The mechanisms governing stress response at the fine microscopic level, fatigue life, and final fracture behavior are presented and discussed in light of the mutually interactive influences of intrinsic microstructural effects, deformation characteristics of the microstructural constituents during fully reversed strain cycling, cyclic strain amplitude, and resultant response stress.

  12. Fracture control methods for space vehicles. Volume 2: Assessment of fracture mechanics technology for space shuttle applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehret, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts explored in a state of the art review of those engineering fracture mechanics considered most applicable to the space shuttle vehicle include fracture toughness, precritical flaw growth, failure mechanisms, inspection methods (including proof test logic), and crack growth predictive analysis techniques.

  13. Strain hardening mechanisms in a Ni-Mo-Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dymek, S. ); Dollar, M. ); Klarstrom, D.L. )

    1991-01-01

    HAYNES 242 alloy has been recently developed for gas turbine components applications. This age-hardenable alloy, consisting essentially of Ni-25%Mo-8%Cr, utilizes a long-range-ordering reaction to form uniformly sized and distributed, extremely small (on the order of 10nm), ordered particles. Excellent strength and ductility at elevated temperatures, low thermal expansion characteristics and good oxidation resistance of Haynes 242 alloy has encouraged a number of studies designed to characterize its properties. What is lacking is an attempt to understand the fundamentals of the deformation and strengthening mechanisms in this alloy. This on-going research has been undertaken to explore deformation mechanisms in unaged and aged Haynes 242 alloy. The emphasis has been put on the effects of initial precipitation structure on the development of deformation structure and how it controls selected mechanical properties. This paper presents selected results and reports a change in the deformation mode from crystallographic glide in an unaged alloy into twinning in the presence of ordered particles. Deformation twinning in Ni-Mo and Ni-Mo-Cr alloys was reported earlier but was not discussed in detail. This research sheds light on possible origins of particle-induced twinning in alloys strengthened by small ordered particles.

  14. Deformation and fracture behavior of composite structured Ti-Nb-Al-Co(-Ni) alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Okulov, I. V. Marr, T.; Schultz, L.; Eckert, J.; Kühn, U.; Freudenberger, J.; Oertel, C.-G.; Skrotzki, W.

    2014-02-17

    Tensile ductility of the Ti-based composites, which consist of a β-Ti phase surrounded by ultrafine structured intermetallics, is tunable through the control of intermetallics. The two Ti-based alloys studied exhibit similar compressive yield strength (about 1000 MPa) and strain (about 35%–40%) but show a distinct difference in their tensile plasticity. The alloy Ti{sub 71.8}Nb{sub 14.1}Ni{sub 7.4}Al{sub 6.7} fractures at the yield stress while the alloy Ti{sub 71.8}Nb{sub 14.1}Co{sub 7.4}Al{sub 6.7} exhibits about 4.5% of tensile plastic deformation. To clarify the effect of microstructure on the deformation behavior of these alloys, tensile tests were carried out in the scanning electron microscope. It is shown that the distribution as well as the type of intermetallics affects the tensile ductility of the alloys.

  15. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z.

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  16. Fracture development and mechanical stratigraphy of Austin Chalk, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Corbett, K.; Friedman, M.; Spang, J.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanical stratigraphy of the Upper Cretaceous Austin Chalk is established from study of fracture intensity along its outcrop trend from Dallas to San Antonio and westward to Langtry, Texas, and in the subsurface from study of cores and/or fracture identification logs from 30 wells. Three mechanical-stratigraphic units are recognized. Representative samples from the three mechanical-stratigraphic units were experimentally shortened, dry, at 10, 17, 34, and 70 MPa confining pressure, at 24/sup 0/C, and at a strain rate of 2.5 x 10/sup -4/ sec/sup -1/ to determine if the relative mechanical behavior observed at the surface could be extrapolated into the subsurface at different simulated burial depths. SEM photomicrographs of undeformed specimens show that smectite and other clays are distributed as large (30 ..mu..m), discrete, amorphous, concentrated masses throughout the chalk. They are comminuted along the induced fracture surfaces where their grain size is 0.5 ..mu..m or less. These observations suggest that smectite acts as a soft-inclusion, localizing shear failure and corresponding weakening the material. 9 figures, 5 tables.

  17. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of electroslag refined iron alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, G. K.

    1976-01-01

    Nitronic 40 (21Cr-6N-9Mn), HY-130, 9Ni-4Co, and D-6 alloys were prepared and evaluated in the form of 15.2 mm thick plates. Smooth bar tensile tests, double-edge sharp notch fracture toughness tests Charpy V-notch impact tests were conducted on appropriate heat treated specimens of the four steel plates at 22 C, -50 C, -100 C, -150 C, and -196 C. Similar material characterization, including metallographic evaluation studies on air melt and vacuum arc melt grades of same four alloy steels were conducted for comparative purposes. A cost analysis of manufacturing plates of air melt, electroslag remelt and vacuum arc remelt grades was performed. The results of both material characterization and cost analyses pointed out certain special benefits of electroslag processing iron base alloys.

  18. Extrinsic fracture mechanisms in two laminated metal composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lesuer, D.; Syn, C.; Riddle, R.; Sherby, O.

    1994-11-29

    The crack growth behavior and fracture toughness of two laminated metal composites (6090/SiC/25p laminated with 5182 and ultrahigh-carbon steel laminated with brass) have been studied in both ``crack arrester`` and ``crack divider`` orientations. The mechanisms of crack growth were analyzed and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were found to contribute significantly to the toughness. The influence of laminate architecture (layer thickness and component volume function), component material properties and residual stress on these mechanisms and the resulting crack growth resistance are discussed.

  19. Enhancement of Apoptosis by Titanium Alloy Internal Fixations during Microwave Treatments for Fractures: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lina; Ye, Dongmei; Feng, Xianxuan; Fu, Tengfei; Bai, Yuehong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Microwaves are used in one method of physical therapy and can increase muscle tissue temperature which is useful for improving muscle, tendon and bone injuries. In the study, we sought to determine whether titanium alloy internal fixations influence apoptosis in tissues subjected to microwave treatments at 2,450 MHz and 40 W during the healing of fractures because this issue is not yet fully understood. Methods In this study, titanium alloy internal fixations were used to treat 3.0-mm transverse osteotomies in the middle of New Zealand rabbits’ femurs. After the operation, 30-day microwave treatments were applied to the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies 3 days after the operation. The changes in the temperatures of the muscle tissues in front of the implants or the 3.0 mm transverse osteotomies were measured during the microwave treatments. To characterize the effects of titanium alloy internal fixations on apoptosis in the muscles after microwave treatment, we performed TUNEL assays, fluorescent real-time (quantitative) PCR, western blotting analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) detection and transmission electron microscopy examinations. Results The temperatures were markedly increased in the animals with the titanium alloy implants. Apoptosis in the muscle cells of the implanted group was significantly more extensive than that in the non-implanted control group at different time points. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of the skeletal muscles of the implanted groups revealed muscular mitochondrial swelling, vacuolization. ROS, Bax and Hsp70 were up-regulated, and Bcl-2 was down-regulated in the implanted group. Conclusion Our results suggest that titanium alloy internal fixations caused greater muscular tissue cell apoptosis following 2,450 MHz, 40 W microwave treatments in this rabbit femur fracture models. PMID:26132082

  20. Investigation of crystallization of a mechanically alloyed Sm-Fe alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, M.Q.; Wang, K.Y.; Miao, W.F.; Song, Q.H.; Sun, W.S.; Wei, W.D.; Wang, L.B. )

    1992-06-15

    The crystallization of a mechanically alloyed Sm-Fe alloy was investigated. The results show that the Sm-Fe alloy prepared by mechanical alloying consists of amorphous Sm-Fe phase and crystalline {alpha}-Fe phase. The composition of the alloy is inhomogeneous, i.e., the surface of the as-milled powder is relatively poor in iron. The crystallization process involves the long-range diffusion of iron atoms and solid state reaction. After proper crystallization, the as-milled powder transforms into a Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} phase completely; no distinguishable crystalline {alpha}-Fe phase can be found. A metastable phase, which may be a Sm{sub 2}Fe{sub 17} phase with the structure of hexagonal Th{sub 2}Ni{sub 17} type, appears during the crystallization process.

  1. Mechanical properties of Li-Sn alloys for Li-ion battery anodes: A first-principles perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Panpan; Ma, Zengsheng; Jiang, Wenjuan; Wang, Yan; Pan, Yong; Lu, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Fracture and pulverization induced by large stress during charging and discharging may lead to the loss of electrical contact and capacity fading in Sn anode materials. A good understanding of mechanical properties is necessary for their optimal design under different lithiation states. On the basis of first-principles calculations, we investigate the stress-strain relationships of Li-Sn alloys under tension. The results show that the ideal tensile strengths of Li-Sn alloys vary as a function of Li concentration, and with the increase of Li+ concentration, the lowest tensile strength decreases from 4.51 GPa (Sn) to 1.27 GPa (Li7Sn2). This implies that lithiation weakens the fracture resistance of Li-Sn alloys.

  2. Discrete fracture patterns of virus shells reveal mechanical building blocks.

    PubMed

    Ivanovska, Irena L; Miranda, Roberto; Carrascosa, Jose L; Wuite, Gijs J L; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2011-08-01

    Viral shells are self-assembled protein nanocontainers with remarkable material properties. They combine simplicity of construction with toughness and complex functionality. These properties make them interesting for bionanotechnology. To date we know little about how virus structure determines assembly pathways and shell mechanics. We have here used atomic force microscopy to study structural failure of the shells of the bacteriophage Φ29. We observed rigidity patterns following the symmetry of the capsid proteins. Under prolonged force exertion, we observed fracture along well-defined lines of the 2D crystal lattice. The mechanically most stable building block of the shells was a trimer. Our approach of "reverse engineering" the virus shells thus made it possible to identify stable structural intermediates. Such stable intermediates point to a hierarchy of interactions among equal building blocks correlated with distinct next-neighbor interactions. The results also demonstrate that concepts from macroscopic materials science, such as fracture, can be usefully employed in molecular engineering. PMID:21768340

  3. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  4. Processing effects on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishi, Toshihito; German, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys exhibit significant mechanical property sensitivities to the fabrication variables. These sensitivities are illustrated in this examination of vacuum sintering and the effects of composition, sintering temperature, and sintering time on the mechanical properties of tungsten heavy alloys. Measurements were conducted to assess the density, strength, hardness, and elongation dependencies. A detrimental aspect of vacuum sintering is matrix phase evaporation, although vacuum sintering does eliminate the need for postsintering heat treatments.

  5. Mechanical Behaviour of Light Metal Alloys at High Strain Rates. Computer Simulation on Mesoscale Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnyak, Vladimir; Skripnyak, Evgeniya; Meyer, Lothar W.; Herzig, Norman; Skripnyak, Nataliya

    2012-02-01

    Researches of the last years have allowed to establish that the laws of deformation and fracture of bulk ultrafine-grained and coarse-grained materials are various both in static and in dynamic loading conditions. Development of adequate constitutive equations for the description of mechanical behavior of bulk ultrafine-grained materials at intensive dynamic influences is complicated in consequence of insufficient knowledge about general rules of inelastic deformation and nucleation and growth of cracks. Multi-scale computational model was used for the investigation of deformation and fracture of bulk structured aluminum and magnesium alloys under stress pulse loadings on mesoscale level. The increment of plastic deformation is defined by the sum of the increments caused by a nucleation and gliding of dislocations, the twinning, meso-blocks movement, and grain boundary sliding. The model takes into account the influence on mechanical properties of alloys an average grains size, grain sizes distribution of and concentration of precipitates. It was obtained the nucleation and gliding of dislocations caused the high attenuation rate of the elastic precursor of ultrafine-grained alloys than in coarse grained counterparts.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical properties of P/M (powder metallurgy) Fe sub 3 Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knibloe, J.R.; Wright, R.N. ); Sikka, V.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Alloys based on Fe{sub 3}Al have an equilibrium DO{sub 3} structure at low temperatures and transform to a B2 structure above about 550{degree}C. The influence of different rates of quenching from the B2 region to room temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (P/M) alloys with two different Cr contents has been examined. By optimizing the processing to maximize the amount of B2 order, room temperature ductility approaching 20% has been achieved although the fracture mode is primarily brittle cleavage. The refined microstructure resulting from P/M processing contributes to enhanced yield strength compared to ingot processed materials with similar ductility. Increasing the Cr content from 2 to 5% has little effect on mechanical properties. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Use of three-dimensional photoelasticity in fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    The philosophy of fracture mechanics is reviewed and utilized to formulate a simplified approach to the determination of the stress-intensity factor photoelastically for three-dimensional problems. The method involves a Taylor Series correction for the maximum in-plane shear stress (TSCM) and does not involve stress separation. The results are illustrated by applying the TSCM to surface flaws in bending fields. Other three-dimensional problems solved by the TSCM are cited.

  8. Non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics: A short discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerbst, Uwe; Heckel, Thomas; Carboni, Michele

    2016-02-01

    A short discussion is provided on the relationship between non-destructive testing and fracture mechanics. The basic tasks behind this are to guarantee the safety of a component at a potential hazard loading event, to specify inspection intervals or, alternatively, of demands on non-destructive testing for a fixed inspection regime, to plan accompanying actions for cases of temporary continued operation of structures in which cracks have been detected, and, finally, fatigue strength considerations which take into account initial defects.

  9. Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of As-Cast High-Entropy Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifi, Mohsen; Li, Dongyue; Yong, Zhang; Liaw, Peter K.; Lewandowski, John J.

    2015-08-01

    The fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth behavior of two as-vacuum arc cast high-entropy alloys (HEAs) (Al0.2CrFeNiTi0.2 and AlCrFeNi2Cu) were determined. A microstructure examination of both HEA alloys revealed a two-phase structure consisting of body-centered cubic (bcc) and face-centered cubic (fcc) phases. The notched and fatigue precracked toughness values were in the range of those reported in the literature for two-phase alloys but significantly less than recent reports on a single phase fcc-HEA that was deformation processed. Fatigue crack growth experiments revealed high fatigue thresholds that decreased significantly with an increase in load ratio, while Paris law slopes exhibited metallic-like behavior at low R with significant increases at high R. Fracture surface examinations revealed combinations of brittle and ductile/dimpled regions at overload, with some evidence of fatigue striations in the Paris law regime.

  10. Hydrogen storage characteristics of mechanically alloyed amorphous metals

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J.H.; Curtin, W.A.; Schultz, L.

    1988-09-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a series of mechanically alloyed (MA) amorphous Ni/sub 1//sub --//sub x/Zr/sub x/ alloys are studied, using both gas phase and electrochemical techniques, and are compared to H storage of rapidly quenched (RQ) amorphous Ni/sub 1-//sub x/Zr/sub x/. In the MA alloys, hydrogen resides in the Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ (n = 4,3,2) tetrahedral interstitial sites, with a maximum hydrogen-to-metal ratio of 1.9(/sup 4//sub n/)x/sup n/(1-x)/sup 4-//sup n/. These features are identical to those of the RQ alloys and indicate that the topological and chemical order of the MA and RQ materials are essentially the same. However, the typical binding energy of hydrogen in a Ni/sub 4-//sub n/Zr/sub n/ site, E/sub n/, is shifted in the MA alloys relative to the RQ alloys and the distribution of binding energies centered on E/sub n/ is significantly broader in the MA samples. Thus, the MA and RQ alloys are not identical and sample annealing does not alter this subtle distinction. The sensitivity of H storage to the presence of chemical order in binary alloys are analyzed theoretically and the data is found to be most consistent with little or no chemical order (random alloys).

  11. Fracture resistance of Zr-Nb alloys under low-cycle fatigue tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, S. A.; Rozhnov, A. B.; Gusev, A. Yu.; Nechaykina, T. A.; Rogachev, S. O.; Zadorozhnyy, M. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    Comparative low-cycle fatigue tests of small-scale specimens cut from the cladding tubes of E110, E125, E110opt zirconium alloys at temperatures of 25 and 350 °C using a dynamic mechanical analyzer have been carried out. It is shown that the limited cycles fatigue stress for all alloys is 50% less at temperature of 350 °C comparing to 25 °C. Besides it has been revealed that the limited cycles fatigue stress increases with increasing the strength of zirconium alloy.

  12. Wide-range displacement expressions for standard fracture mechanics specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapp, J. A.; Gross, B.; Leger, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    Wide-range algebraic expressions for the displacement of cracked fracture mechanics specimens are developed. For each specimen two equations are given: one for the displacement as a function of crack length, the other for crack length as a function of displacement. All the specimens that appear in ASTM Test for Plane-Strain Fracture Toughness of Metallic Materials (E 399) are represented in addition to the crack mouth displacement for a pure bending specimen. For the compact tension sample and the disk-shaped compact tension sample, the displacement at the crack mouth and at the load line are both considered. Only the crack mouth displacements for the arc-shaped tension samples are presented. The agreement between the displacements or crack lengths predicted by the various equations and the corresponding numerical data from which they were developed are nominally about 3 percent or better. These expressions should be useful in all types of fracture testing including fracture toughness, K-resistance, and fatigue crack growth.

  13. Results of fracture mechanics tests on PNC SUS 304 plate

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, W.J.; James, L.A.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1985-08-01

    PNC provided SUS 304 plate to be irradiated in FFTF at about 400/sup 0/C to a target fluence of 5 x 10/sup 21/ n/cm/sup 2/ (E > 0.1 MeV). The actual irradiation included two basically different exposure levels to assure that information would be available for the exposure of interest. After irradiation, tensile properties, fatigue-crack growth rates and J-integral fracture toughness response were determined. These same properties were also measured for the unirradiated material so radiation damage effects could be characterized. This report presents the results of this program. It is expected that these results would be applicable for detailed fracture analysis of reactor components. Recent advances in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics enable reasonably accurate predictions of failure conditions for flawed stainless steel components. Extensive research has focused on the development of J-integral-based engineering approach for assessing the load carrying capacity of low-strength, high-toughness structural materials. Furthermore, Kanninen, et al., have demonstrated that J-integral concepts can accurately predict the fracture response for full-scale cracked structures manufactured from Type 304 stainless steel.

  14. State-of-the-art report on piping fracture mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.M.; Olson, R.J.; Scott, P.M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an in-depth summary of the state-of-the-art in nuclear piping fracture mechanics. It represents the culmination of 20 years of work done primarily in the US, but also attempts to include important aspects from other international efforts. Although the focus of this work was for the nuclear industry, the technology is also applicable in many cases to fossil plants, petrochemical/refinery plants, and the oil and gas industry. In compiling this detailed summary report, all of the equations and details of the analysis procedure or experimental results are not necessarily included. Rather, the report describes the important aspects and limitations, tells the reader where he can go for further information, and more importantly, describes the accuracy of the models. Nevertheless, the report still contains over 150 equations and over 400 references. The main sections of this report describe: (1) the evolution of piping fracture mechanics history relative to the developments of the nuclear industry, (2) technical developments in stress analyses, material property aspects, and fracture mechanics analyses, (3) unresolved issues and technically evolving areas, and (4) a summary of conclusions of major developments to date.

  15. Fracture and Stress Evolution on Europa: New Insights Into Fracture Interpretation and Ice Thickness Estimates Using Fracture Mechanics Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon

    2004-01-01

    The work completed during the funding period has provided many important insights into fracturing behavior in Europa's ice shell. It has been determined that fracturing through time is likely to have been controlled by the effects of nonsynchronous rotation stresses and that as much as 720 deg of said rotation may have occurred during the visible geologic history. It has been determined that there are at least two distinct styles of strike-slip faulting and that their mutual evolutionary styles are likely to have been different, with one involving a significant dilational component during shear motion. It has been determined that secondary fracturing in perturbed stress fields adjacent to older structures such as faults is a prevalent process on Europa. It has been determined that cycloidal ridges are likely to experience shear stresses along the existing segment portions as they propagate, which affects propagation direction and ultimately induces tailcracking at the segment tip than then initiates a new cycle of cycloid segment growth. Finally, it has been established that mechanical methods (e.g., flexure analysis) can be used to determine the elastic thickness of the ice shell, which, although probably only several km thick, is likely to be spatially variable, being thinner under bands but thicker under ridged plains terrain.

  16. Fundamental Mechanisms of Tensile Fracture in Aluminum Sheet Unidirectionally Reinforced with Boron Filament. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental research effort to gain a more complete understanding of the physics of tensile fracture in unidirectionally reinforced B-Al composite sheet. By varying the degree of filament degradation resulting from fabrication, composite specimens were produced which failed in tension by the cumulative mode, the noncumulative mode, or by any desired combination of the two modes. Radiographic and acoustic emission techniques were combined to identify and physically describe a previously unrecognized fundamental fracture mechanism which was responsible for the noncumulative mode. The tensile strength of the composite was found to be severely limited by the noncumulative mechanism which involved the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level followed by ductile fracture of the matrix. The minimum average filament stress required for initiation of the fracture mechanism was shown to be approximately 170 ksi, and appeared to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the identity of the matrix alloy.

  17. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    A. MISRA; A. SHARIF; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the mechanical behavior of the following single-phase polycrystalline alloys with the MoSi{sub 2} body-center tetragonal structure: MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with {approximately}2.5 at.% Re, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 2 at.% Al, MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Nb, and MoSi{sub 2} alloyed with 1 at.% Re and 2 at.% Al. Several anomalies in the mechanical behavior of alloyed materials were observed. For example, (1) addition of only {approximately}2.5 at. % Re results in an order of magnitude increase in compressive strength at 1600 C, (2) additions of Nb and Al cause solution softening at near-ambient temperatures, and (3) quaternary MoSi{sub 2}-Re-Al alloys show strengthening at elevated temperatures and reduction in flow stress with enhanced plasticity at near-ambient temperatures in compression. The mechanisms of anomalous solution hardening and softening are discussed.

  18. Effect of V or Zr addition on the mechanical properties of the mechanically alloyed Al-8wt%Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, I.H.; Lee, J.H.; Lee, K.M. . Dept. of Materials Engineering); Kim, Y.D. . Div. of Metals)

    1995-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) of Al-Ti alloy, being a solid state process, offers the unique advantage of producing homogeneous and fine dispersions of thermally stable Al[sub 3]Ti phase, where the formation of the fine Al[sub 3]Ti phase by the other method is restricted from the thermodynamic viewpoint. The MA Al-Ti alloys show substantially higher strength than the conventional Al alloys at the elevated temperature due to the presence of Al[sub 3]Ti as well as Al[sub 4]C[sub 3] and Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], of which the last two phases were introduced during MA process. The addition of V or Zr to Al-Ti alloy was known to decrease the lattice mismatch between the intermetallic compound and the aluminum matrix, and such decrease in lattice mismatching can influence positively the high temperature mechanical strength of the MA Al-Ti by increasing the resistance to dispersoid coarsening at the elevated temperature. In the present study, therefore, the mechanical behavior of the MA Al-Ti-V and Al-Ti-Zr alloys were investigated in order to evaluate the effect of V or Zr addition on the mechanical properties of the MA Al-8Ti alloy at high temperature.

  19. Environment assisted degradation mechanisms in aluminum-lithium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Section 1 of this report records the progress achieved on NASA-LaRC Grant NAG-1-745 (Environment Assisted Degradation Mechanisms in Al-Li Alloys), and is based on research conducted during the period April 1 to November 30, 1987. A discussion of work proposed for the project's second year is included. Section 2 provides an overview of the need for research on the mechanisms of environmental-mechanical degradation of advanced aerospace alloys based on aluminum and lithium. This research is to provide NASA with the basis necessary to permit metallurgical optimization of alloy performance and engineering design with respect to damage tolerance, long term durability and reliability. Section 3 reports on damage localization mechanisms in aqueous chloride corrosion fatigue of aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 4 reports on progress made on measurements and mechanisms of localized aqueous corrosion in aluminum-lithium alloys. Section 5 provides a detailed technical proposal for research on environmental degradation of Al-Li alloys, and the effect of hydrogen in this.

  20. Mechanical and fracture behavior of calcium phosphate cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jew, Victoria Chou

    Apatite-based calcium phosphate cements are currently employed to a limited extent in the biomedical and dental fields. They present significant potential for a much broader range of applications, particularly as a bone mineral substitute for fracture fixation. Specifically, hydroxyapatite (HA) is known for its biocompatibility and non-immunogenicity, attributed to its similarity to the mineral phase of natural bone. The advantages of a cement-based HA include injectability, greater resorbability and osteoconductivity compared to sintered HA, and an isothermal cement-forming reaction that avoids necrosis during cement setting. Although apatite cements demonstrate good compressive strength, tensile properties are very weak compared to natural bone. Applications involving normal weight-bearing require better structural integrity than apatite cements currently provide. A more thorough understanding of fracture behavior can elucidate failure mechanisms and is essential for the design of targeted strengthening methods. This study investigated a hydroxyapatite cement using a fracture mechanics approach, focusing on subcritical crack growth properties. Subcritical crack growth can lead to much lower load-bearing ability than critical strength values predict. Experiments show that HA cement is susceptible to crack growth under both cyclic fatigue-crack growth and stress corrosion cracking conditions, but only environmental, not mechanical, mechanisms contribute to crack extension. This appears to be the first evidence ever presented of stress corrosion crack growth behavior in calcium phosphate cements. Stress corrosion cracking was examined for a range of environmental conditions. Variations in pH have surprisingly little effect. Behavior in water at elevated temperature (50°C) is altered compared to water at ambient temperature (22°C), but only for crack-growth velocities below 10-7 m/s. However, fracture resistance of dried HA cement in air increases significantly

  1. Structure and mechanical properties of as-cast Ti-5Nb-xFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan; Hsu, Shih-Kuang; Wu, Shih-Ching; Lee, Chih-Jhan; Ho, Wen-Fu

    2010-09-15

    In this study, as-cast Ti-5Nb and a series of Ti-5Nb-xFe alloys were investigated and compared with commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) in order to determine their structure and mechanical properties. The series of Ti-5Nb-xFe alloys contained an iron content ranging from 1 to 5 mass% and were prepared by using a commercial arc-melting vacuum-pressure casting system. Additionally, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for phase analysis was conducted with a diffractometer, and three-point bending tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of all specimens. The fractured surfaces were observed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The experimental results indicated that these alloys possessed a range of different structures and mechanical properties dependent upon the various additions of Fe. With an addition of 1 mass% Fe, retention of the metastable {beta} phase began. However, when 4 mass% Fe or greater was added, the {beta} phase was entirely retained with a bcc crystal structure. Moreover, the {omega} phase was only detected in the Ti-5Nb-2Fe, Ti-5Nb-3Fe and Ti-5Nb-4Fe alloys. The largest quantity of {omega} phase and the highest bending modulus were found in the Ti-5Nb-3Fe alloy. The Ti-5Nb-2Fe alloy had the lowest bending modulus, which was lower than that of c.p. Ti by 20%. This alloy exhibited the highest bending strength/modulus ratio of 26.7, which was higher than that of c.p. Ti by 214%, and of the Ti-5Nb alloy (14.4 ) by 85%. Additionally, the elastically recoverable angles of the ductile Ti-5Nb-1Fe (19.9{sup o}) and Ti-5Nb-5Fe (29.5{sup o}) alloys were greater than that of c.p. Ti (2.7{sup o}) by as much as 637% and 993%, respectively. Furthermore, the preliminary cell culturing results revealed that the Ti-5Nb-xFe alloys were not only biocompatible, but also supported cell attachment.

  2. Compensating Mechanisms That Minimize Flux Variability Through Unsaturated Fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Su, G. W.

    2001-12-01

    Fast flow in fractures and macropores is a major cause of discrepancy between measurements and unsaturated flow models. Most models treat preferential flow as diffuse Darcy-Richards flow, so it is important to ascertain whether the mechanisms of unsaturated fracture flow accord with Darcy's law. The key issue is whether water flux is directly proportional to driving force with a proportionality factor, the hydraulic conductivity (K), that is independent of flux and force. We consider flow in a partially water-filled fracture with continuously supplied (e.g. ponded) water, responding to a change in driving force such as a change in tilt angle with respect to gravity. Four general flow modes, alone or in combination, can account for the dominant portion of the flow for these conditions, as shown by the experimental studies of Su and others (1999) and Tokunaga and Wan (1997). (1) Film flow occurs within a sheet or film that contacts a wall of the fracture. (2) Connected rivulet flow occurs when a rivulet that bridges across the fracture aperture by capillary force is consistently connected across the domain of interest from the inflow point to the outflow point. (3) Snapping rivulet flow occurs if the rivulet sometimes but not always extends continuously across the domain. (4) Pulsating-blob flow occurs in isolated blobs that bridge across the fracture aperture and move across the domain of interest without ever extending completely between the inflow and outflow points. Where fractures are large enough that the air-water interfaces are free to change shape or position in response to an externally applied change, each flow mode has its own characteristic relation between force and flow rate. This contrasts with the air-water interfaces commonly visualized in fine-textured media, in which the interface is constrained to a particular shape and position by capillarity and adsorption, so that the consistent geometry of the effective flow conduits leads to Darcian flow. In

  3. Aging effects on the fracture toughness of SiC whisker reinforced 2XXX aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnaparkhi, P. L.; Rack, H. J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of aging (at 150 C) time on the fracture toughness behavior of a 2XXX alloy (Al-3.55Cu-1.29Mg-0.01Fe-trace Mn) reinforced with 5 vol pct F-8 SiC whiskers was investigated by measuring hardness and electrical conductivity followed by fracture toughness tests on center-cracked specimens. The ageing time-hardening response plots showed that, independent of whisker orientation, the initial rapid increase in hardness was followed by a more gradual increase, with a broad hardness peak between 32 and 128 hrs of aging. Coincident with the hardness changes, the electrical conductivity initially decreased, reached a minimum, and then increased at aging times beyond 32 hrs. Examination by SEM indicated that the initial increase in hardness and decrease in conductivity was due to the GPB zone formation, while the subsequent increase in electrical conductivity and decrease in hardness (overaging) was due to S nucleation and growth.

  4. Correlation of stress-wave-emission characteristics with fracture aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartbower, C. E.; Reuter, W. G.; Morais, C. F.; Crimmins, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    A study to correlate stress wave emission characteristics with fracture in welded and unwelded aluminum alloys tested at room and cryogenic temperature is reported. The stress wave emission characteristics investigated were those which serve to presage crack instability; viz., a marked increase in:(1) signal amplitude; (2) signal repetition rate; and (3) the slope of cumulative count plotted versus load. The alloys were 7075-T73, 2219-T87 and 2014-T651, welded with MIG and TIG using 2319 and 4043 filler wire. The testing was done with both unnotched and part-through-crack (PTC) tension specimens and with 18-in.-dia subscale pressure vessels. In the latter testing, a real time, acoustic emission, triangulation system was used to locate the source of each stress wave emission. With such a system, multiple emissions from a given location were correlated with defects found by conventional nondestructive inspection.

  5. Copper-rich invar by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donnell, K.; Qi, Qinian; Ilyushin, A. S.; Coey, J. M. D.

    1993-05-01

    An fcc alloy of composition Fe 64Cu 26Cr 7Ni 3 with a0 = 0.362 nm and an average crystalline size of 5 nm was produced by high-energy ball milling iron and copper powder in a stainless-steel container. The average number of electrons per atom is 8.7. The Curie temperature of the alloy is 410 K and the room-temperature magnetization is 48 JT -1 kg -1. The Mössbauer spectrum at 15 K shows a broad distribution of hyperfine field with an average of 15.6 T, which indicates coexistence of high and low moment states for iron. The alloy decomposes exothermically at 775 K to yield a mixture of bcc and fcc phases, but 50% of the iron remains in the fcc form with a low moment.

  6. The effect of electric discharge machined notches on the fracture toughness of several structural alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce, J.A.; Link, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Recent computational studies of the stress and strain fields at the tip of very sharp notches have shown that the stress and strain fields are very weakly dependent on the initial geometry of the notch once the notch has been blunted to a radius that is 6 to 10 times the initial root radius. It follows that if the fracture toughness of a material is sufficiently high so that fracture initiation does not occur in a specimen until the crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) reaches a value from 6 to 10 times the size of the initial notch tip diameter, then the fracture toughness will be independent of whether a fatigue crack or a machined notch served as the initial crack. In this experimental program the fracture toughness (J{sub Ic} and J resistance (J-R) curve, and CTOD) for several structure alloys was measured using specimens with conventional fatigue cracks and with EDM machined notches. The results of this program have shown, in fact, that most structural materials do not achieve initiation CTOD values on the order of 6 to 10 times the radius of even the smallest EDM notch tip presently achievable. It is found furthermore that tougher materials do not seem to be less dependent on the type of notch tip present. Some materials are shown to be much more dependent on the type of notch tip used, but no simple pattern is found that relates this observed dependence to the material strength toughness, or strain hardening rate.

  7. Study of mechanism of cleavage fracture at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Wang, G. Z.

    1992-02-01

    In this investigation, a series of crack opening displacement (COD) tests were carried out at several low temperatures for C-Mn weld steel. Some of the specimens were loaded until fracture, and the mechanical properties and microscopic parameters on fracture surfaces were measured. Other specimens were unloaded before fracture at different applied loads. The distributions of the elongated cavities and the cleavage microcracks ahead of fatigue crack tips were observed in detail. Based on the experimental results, the combined criterion of a critical strain ɛ p ≥ ɛc) for initiating a crack nucleus, a critical stress triaxiality (σ m/σ ≥ tc) for preventing it from blunting, and a critical normal stress (σ yy/σf) for the cleavage extension was proposed again, and the critical values of ɛp and σm/-σ for the C-Mn weld steel were measured. The reason why the minimum COD value could not be zero is explained. The mechanism of generation of the lower limit COD value on the lower shelf of the toughness transition curve is proposed.

  8. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2000-10-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed.

  9. A compendium of sources of fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data for metallic alloys. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, C. M.; Seward, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    A compendium is presented of sources for metallic alloy fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth data, which concentrates on technical reports as the primary source of references and updates the previous Hudson and Seward (1978) compendium references on technical journals. Where available, the accession numbers which are used as code numbers for the ordering of the reports from their publishers are given. The sources of these reports include the AIAA Technical Information Service, the Defense Technical Information Center, the National Technical Information Service, and NASA.

  10. Kinetics and fracture behavior under cycle loading of an Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, M. R.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of aluminum alloy AA2139 subjected to T6 treatment, including solution treatment and artificial aging, has been studied using cyclic loading with a constant total strain amplitude. Upon low-cyclic fatigue in the range of total strain amplitudes ɛac of 0.4-1.0%, the cyclic behavior of the AA2139-T6 alloy is determined by the processes that occur under the conditions of predominance of the elastic deformation over plastic deformation. The AA2139 alloy exhibits stability to cyclic loading without significant softening. The stress-strained state of the alloy upon cyclic loading can be described by the Hollomon equation with the cyclic strength coefficient K' and the cyclic strain-hardening exponent n' equal to 641 MPa and 0.066, respectively. The dependence of the number of cycles to fracture on the loading amplitude and its components (amplitudes of the plastic and elastic deformation) is described by a Basquin-Manson-Coffin equation with the parameters σ'/ E = 0.014, b =-0.123, ɛ'f= 178.65, and c =-1.677.

  11. Amorphous phase formation in mechanically alloyed iron-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Satyajeet

    Bulk metallic glasses have interesting combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and magnetic properties which make them attractive for a variety of applications. Consequently there has been a lot of interest in understanding the structure and properties of these materials. More varied applications can be sought if one understands the reasons for glass formation and the methods to control them. The glass-forming ability (GFA) of alloys can be substantially increased by a proper selection of alloying elements and the chemical composition of the alloy. High GFA will enable in obtaining large section thickness of amorphous alloys. Ability to produce glassy alloys in larger section thicknesses enables exploitation of these advanced materials for a variety of different applications. The technique of mechanical alloying (MA) is a powerful non-equilibrium processing technique and is known to produce glassy (or amorphous) alloys in several alloy systems. Metallic amorphous alloys have been produced by MA starting from either blended elemental metal powders or pre-alloyed powders. Subsequently, these amorphous alloy powders could be consolidated to full density in the temperature range between the glass transition and crystallization temperatures, where the amorphous phase has a very low viscosity. This Dissertation focuses on identifying the various Fe-based multicomponent alloy systems that can be amorphized using the MA technique, studying the GFA of alloys with emphasis on improving it, and also on analyzing the effect of extended milling time on the constitution of the amorphous alloy powder produced at earlier times. The Dissertation contains seven chapters, where the lead chapter deals with the background, history and introduction to bulk metallic glasses. The following four chapters are the published/to be published work, where the criterion for predicting glass formation, effect of Niobium addition on glass-forming ability (GFA), lattice contraction on

  12. Mechanical anisotropy of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy after hot extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Oehring, M.; Lorenz, U.; Niefanger, R.; Appel, F.; Brokmeier, H.G.; Wagner, R.; Clemens, H.; Eberhardt, N.

    1999-07-01

    By hot extrusion below and above the {alpha} transus temperature equiaxed and predominantly lamellar microstructures were obtained in a Ti aluminide alloy. In order to examine a possible orientation dependence of mechanical properties the flow stress, the activation parameters of plastic deformation and the fracture toughness were determined parallel and perpendicular to the extrusion direction at room temperature and 700 C. The observed anisotropy in these properties may be mainly attributed to anisotropies in the microstructures, in particular to a preferential alignment of lamellae in lamellar microstructures.

  13. Conference addresses thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling in fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kümpel, Hans-Joachim

    Various environmental problems and the use of certain energy resources are closely related to fluid flow in and the mechanical behavior of porous or fractured rock. Subjects of obvious socioeconomic relevance are the supply and protection of groundwater, the production of hydrocarbon reservoirs, land subsidence in coastal areas, exploitation of geothermal energy and the long-term disposal of critical wastes. Efficient management of such issues is often hampered by the fact that rocks and rock formations are inherently complex. Any rock sample is an aggregate of the myriad mineral particles forming its matrix and fluid molecules residing in voids. Any two rock samples differ in many aspects, including geochemical constituents, size and shape of grains, structure of pore space, and fracture networks.

  14. [Radius fractures in children--causes and mechanisms of injury].

    PubMed

    Antabak, Anko; Stanić, Lana; Matković, Nikša; Papeš, Dino; Romić, Ivan; Fuchs, Nino; Luetić, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    Radius fractures are the most common fractures in childhood. The main mechanism of injury is fall onto an outstretched hand. This retrospective study analyzed the data on 201 children admitted for radius fractures at KBC-Zagreb in the period 2011-2013. The study included 85 girls (42.3%) and 116 boys (57.7%) . The average age of the children was 9.6 years. Radius was injured in the distal segment in 79.1% of children. The sites of injuries were: park, campi and beach (24.9% of all children), playground, skate park and swimming pool (23.9%), kindergarten or school (20.9%), at home and around the house (17.9%), in the street (11.4%) and in the store or at a hotel (0.9%). The boys were mostly injured at playgrounds, during skating and at swimming pools (37.1% of all boys), while girls were mostly injured in parks, camps and at beach (42.4% girls). Fall was the major cause of the injury (49.3%), and children usually fell during ice skating and skating (32.3% of all falls). In 20.4% the injury was caused by pushing and hitting. The smallest percentage (9.5%) of children were injured in traffic accidents while riding a bike (only one child was hit by a car). Sport related activities caused injuries in 53.7% of the cases. Sport activities are the most important cause of the radial fractures in the pediatric population and falls during sports are the main mechanism of injury. The peak incidence is at 12 years for boys and at 10 years for girls, so intervention and/or prevention should be aimed at the age groups. Preventive actions should be focused on injuries that tend to occur in parks, schools and during sport activities. PMID:26065283

  15. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  16. Role of surfaces and interfaces in controlling the mechanical properties of metallic alloys.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Jong; Chia, Wen-Jui; Wang, Jinliu; Chen, Yanfeng; Vaynman, Semyon; Fine, Morris E; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2010-11-01

    This article explores the subtle effects of surfaces and interfaces on the mechanical properties of bulk metallic alloys using three examples: environmental effects on fatigue life, hydrogen embrittlement effects on the ductility of intermetallics, and the role of coherent precipitates in the toughness of steels. It is demonstrated that the marked degradation of the fatigue life of metals is due to the strong chemisorption of adsorbates on exposed slip steps that are formed during fatigue deformation. These adsorbates reduce the reversibility of slip, thus accelerating fatigue damage in a chemically active gas environment. For certain intermetallic alloys such as Ni(3)Al and Ni(3)Fe, the ductility depends on the ambient gas composition and the atomic ordering in these alloys, both of which govern the complex surface chemical reactions taking place in the vicinity of crack tips. Finally, it is shown that local stresses at a coherent precipitate-matrix interface can activate dislocation motion at low temperatures, thus improving the fracture toughness of bulk alloys such as steels at cryogenic temperatures. These examples illustrate the complex interplay between surface chemistry and mechanics, often yielding unexpected results. PMID:20527827

  17. Mechanical alloying processing with applications to structural materials. Final report, August 1994--March 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, T.H.

    1998-06-01

    Relationships among the synthesis, processing, structure and properties of materials generated through mechanical alloying (MA) or mechanosynthesis are described. Several materials classes: cermets, particulate metal matrix composites (MMC), and tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) have been produced, and their properties and structures evaluated. Niobium carbide and tungsten, carbide cermets can be conveniently generated either through room temperature synthesis (NbC cermets) or by room temperature milling followed by elevated temperature exposure (WC cermets). Cermet microstructures following consolidation are fine, and the materials demonstrate exceptional hardnesses albeit their fracture toughnesses are generally low. Al based MMC can be synthesized similarly. The composites they have studied utilize aluminum carbide as a reinforcement. The yield strengths of these MMC are approximately twice those of high strength aerospace Al alloys. Noncrystalline WHA can be generated via MA. During consolidation, these alloys are prone to crystallization. Nonetheless, because of their fine structure the crystalline products manifest high hardnesses relative to conventional WHA. Current efforts are focusing on retaining the noncrystalline phase during consolidation so as to produce materials having particularly desirable mechanical properties.

  18. The effects of artificial aging on the microstructure and fracture toughness of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2195

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.S.; Kuruvilla, A.K.; Malone, T.W.; Stanton, W.P.

    1998-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have shown promise for aerospace applications, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has selected the aluminum-lithium Alloy 2195 for the main structural alloy of the super light weight tank (SLWT) for the space shuttle. This alloy has significantly higher strength than conventional 2xxx alloys (such as 2219) at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. If properly processed and heat treated, this alloy can display higher fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature than at ambient temperature. However, the properties of production materials have shown greater variation than those of other established alloys, as is the case with any new alloy that is being transitioned to a demanding application. A multistep heating-rate controlled (MSRC) aging treatment has been developed that can improve the cryogenic fracture toughness of aluminum-lithium Alloy 2195. At the same levels of yield strength (YS), this treatment results in considerably higher fracture toughness than that found in Alloy 2195, which has received conventional (isothermal) aging. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the new treatment greatly reduces the size and density of subgrain-boundary T{sub 1} precipitates. In addition, it promotes T{sub 1} and {theta}{double_prime} nucleation, resulting in a fine and dense distribution of precipitate particles in the matrix. The MSRC aging treatment consists of (a) aging at 127 C (260 F) for 5 h, (b) heating continuously from 127 C (260 F) to 135 C (275 F) at a rate of 0.556 C/h (1 F/h), (c) holding at 135 C (275 F) for 5 h, (d) heating continuously from 135 to 143 C (275 to 290 F) at a rate of 0.556 C/h (1 F/h), and (e) holding at 143 C (290 F) for 25 h to obtain a near peak-aged condition.

  19. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness of a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hamilton, M.L.; Jones, R.H.

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and fracture toughness in the range of {minus}50 to 100{degrees}C for a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Fracture toughness and impact tests were performed on a V-5Cr-5Ti alloy. Specimens annealed at 1125{degree}C for 1 h and furnace cooled in a vacuum of 1.33 x 10{sup {minus}5} Pa were brittle at room temperature and experienced a mixture of intergranular and cleavage fracture. The ductile to brittle transition temperature was estimated to be about 20{degree}C. When some specimens were given an additional annealing at 890{degree}C for 24 h, they became very ductile at room temperature and fractured by microvoid coalescence.

  20. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Irradiated Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkle, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    The effects of neutron irradiation on the microstructural evolution of metals and alloys are reviewed, with an emphasis on the roles of crystal structure, neutron dose and temperature. The corresponding effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of metals and alloys are summarized, with particular attention on the phenomena of low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement. The prospects of developing improved high-performance structural materials with high resistance to radiation-induced property degradation are briefly discussed.

  1. Effect of mechanical alloying atmosphere on the microstructure and Charpy impact properties of an ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oksiuta, Z.; Baluc, N.

    2009-04-01

    Two types of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels, with the composition of Fe-14Cr-2W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 (in weight percent), have been produced by mechanically alloying elemental powders of Fe, Cr, W, and Ti with Y 2O 3 particles either in argon atmosphere or in hydrogen atmosphere, degassing at various temperatures, and compacting the mechanically alloyed powders by hot isostatic pressing. It was found in particular that mechanical alloying in hydrogen yields a significant reduction in oxygen content in the materials, a lower dislocation density, and a strong improvement in the fast fracture properties of the ODS ferritic steels, as measured by Charpy impact tests.

  2. Tungsten solution kinetics and amorphization of nickel in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aning, A. O.; Wang, Z.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of solution of W, and the subsequent amorphization of Ni, in mechanically alloyed Ni-W alloys has been investigated. As W is a highly abrasive material in the energy intensive devices used for mechanical alloying, we studied the above reactions in different mills. One used hardened steel balls as the grinding media, and the other Al2O3. Abrasion is common to both mills, but Fe wear debris from the hardened steel enters into solution in the Ni rich phases whereas Al2O3 debris is present as small dispersoids. The kinetics of W solution and those of subsequent amorphization do not appear strongly affected by the Fe in solution or the Al2O3 dispersoid. Tungsten dissolves in crystalline Ni in amounts in excess of the equilibrium solubility during alloying. Amorphization of the Ni phase occurs if the W content in this phase exceeds ca. 28 at. pct.

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the fracture behaviour of directionally solidified (gamma/gamma-prime)-alpha alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriramamurthy, A. M.; Tewari, S. N.

    1987-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the influence of various heat treatments on the work of fracture and its relation to microstructure for a directionally solidified Ni-33Mo-5.7Al (wt pct) (gamma/gamma-prime)-alpha alloy. The jagged crack propagation observed is due to delamination of the ligaments and associated plastic deformation. Fracture behavior is examined with respect to alloy microstructures and load-deflection curves. The four heat-treatment conditions considered are: (1) as-directionally solidified, (2) solutionized, (3) directionally solidified and thermally cycled, and (4) solutionized and thermally cycled.

  4. Investigations of mechanically alloyed nanocrystalline materials by microacoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubief, P.; Hunsinger, J. J.; Gaffet, E.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine whether yes or no, there is a difference between the physico-chemical properties of the nanocrystalline and the microcrystalline materials. This paper deals with the acoustical behavior of nanocrystalline materials which were prepared by ball- milling and mechanical alloying. Based on two specific techniques (acoustic microinterferometry and acoustic microechography), some of the mechanical properties (elastic ones) may be determined, related to a materials volume of about a few micrometers 3 (for the high frequency 600 MHz apparatus). Thus the mechanically alloyed powders (typically 200 micrometers in diameter), behave as massive materials in this range of frequency. The measurements are directly obtained on the grains and do not take into account the voids induced by further sinthering process. The result of such a micromechanical approach will be given for pure ball-milled elements (Fe) and for the supersaturated solid phase Fe(Si) obtained by mechanical alloying.

  5. Mechanical degradation of fuel cell membranes under fatigue fracture tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorasany, Ramin M. H.; Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza; Kjeang, Erik; Wang, G. G.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of cyclic stresses on the fatigue and mechanical stability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes are experimentally investigated under standard fuel cell conditions. The experiments are conducted ex-situ by subjecting membrane specimens to cyclic uniaxial tension at controlled temperature and relative humidity. The fatigue lifetime is measured in terms of the number of cycles until ultimate fracture. The results indicate that the membrane fatigue lifetime is a strong function of the applied stress, temperature, and relative humidity. The fatigue life increases exponentially with reduced stresses in all cases. The effect of temperature is found to be more significant than that of humidity, with reduced fatigue life at high temperatures. The maximum membrane strain at fracture is determined to decrease exponentially with increasing membrane lifetime. At a given fatigue life, a membrane exposed to fuel cell conditions is shown to accommodate more plastic strain before fracture than one exposed to room conditions. Overall, the proposed ex-situ membrane fatigue experiment can be utilized to benchmark the fatigue lifetime of new materials in a fraction of the time and cost associated with conventional in-situ accelerated stress testing methods.

  6. Dispersion strengthening of precipitation hardened Al-Cu-Mg alloys prepared by rapid solidification and mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, P. S.; Sankaran, K. K.

    1988-01-01

    Several Al-4Cu-1Mg-1.5Fe-0.75Ce alloys have been processed from either rapidly solidified or mechanically alloyed powder using various vacuum degassing parameters and consolidation techniques. Strengthening by the fine subgrains, grains, and the dispersoids individually or in combination is more effective when the alloys contain shearable precipitates; consequently, the strength of the alloys is higher in the naturally aged rather than the artificially aged condition. The strengths of the mechanically alloyed variants are greater than those produced from prealloyed powder. Properties and microstructural features of these dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in regards to their processing histories.

  7. Tests and analyses for fully plastic fracture mechanics of plane strain mode I crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, F.A.; Parks, D.M.; Kim, Y.J.

    1995-12-31

    Under monotonic loading, structures should ideally be ductile enough to provide continued resistance during crack growth. For fully plastic crack growth in low strength alloys, existing asymptotic solutions for elastic-plastic growing cracks are not applicable because they reach the fracture strain only in regions small compared to the inhomogeneities of the actual fracture process. For the limiting case of non-hardening fully-plastic plane strain crack growth, in a number of geometries and loadings the near-tip fields are characterized in terms of three parameters: an effective angle 2{theta}{sub s} between a pair of slip planes, and the normal stress {sigma}{sub s} and the increment of displacement {delta}u{sub s} across the planes. This three-parameter characterization is in contrast to the one- or two-parameter (K or J and T or Q) characterization in linear or non-linear elastic fracture mechanics. These {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and {delta}u{sub s} parameters are found form the far-field geometries and loadings through slip line fields or least upper bound analyses based on circular arcs. The resulting crack growth, in terms of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), is a function of {theta}{sub s}, {sigma}{sub s}, and the material. The geometry of the crack growing between two moving slip planes emanating from its tip reduces this function to the critical fracture shear strain left behind the slip planes, {gamma}f, as a function of {sigma}{sub s}. {gamma}f({sigma}{sub s}) is found theoretically from a hole initiation and growth model. It is also found from preliminary fully plastic crack growth experiments on unequally grooved specimens with fixed-grip extension or 4-point bending of a 1018 CF steel.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Characteristics of Thermally Aged Alloy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, R B; Crook, P

    2002-05-30

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is a candidate material for the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. In the mill-annealed (MA) condition, Alloy 22 is a single face centered cubic phase. When exposed to temperatures on the order of 600 C and above for times higher than 1 h, this alloy may develop secondary phases that reduce its mechanical toughness and corrosion resistance. The objective of this work was to age Alloy 22 at temperatures between 482 C and 760 C for times between 0.25 h and 6,000 h and to study the mechanical and corrosion performance of the resulting material. Aging was carried out using wrought specimens as well as gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) specimens. Mechanical and corrosion testing was carried out using ASTM standards. Results show-that the higher the aging temperature and the longer the aging time, the lower the impact toughness of the aged material and the lower its corrosion resistance. However, extrapolating both mechanical and corrosion laboratory data predicts that Alloy 22 will remain corrosion resistant and mechanically robust for the projected lifetime of the waste container.

  9. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Evaluation of an Investment Cast Al-Be Alloy for Structural Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamwell, W. R.; McGill, P. B.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum-Beryllium metal matrix composite materials are useful due to their desirable performance characteristics for aerospace applications. Desirable characteristics of this material includes light-weight, dimensional stability, stiffness, good vibration damping characteristics, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and workability, This material is 3.5 times stiffer and 22% lighter than conventional aluminum alloys. electro-optical systems, advanced sensor and guidance components for flight and satellite systems, components for light-weight high-performance aircraft engines, and structural components for helicopters. Aluminum-beryllium materials are now available in the form of near net shape investment castings. In this materials properties characterization study, the cryogenic tensile and fracture properties of an investment casting alloy, Beralcast 363, were determined. Tensile testing was performed at 21 C (70 F), -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F), and fracture (K(sub lc) and da/dN) testing was performed at -73.3 C (-100 F), -195.5 C (-320 F) and -252.8 C (-423 F). Their use is attractive for weight critical structural applications such as advanced

  10. Cryogenic Fracture Toughness Improvement for the Super Lightweight Tank's Main Structural Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, P. S.; Stanton, W. P.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a two-step (TS) artificial aging technique that can significantly enhance cryogenic fracture toughness and resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in aluminum-copper-lithium alloy 2195. The new TS aging treatment consists of exposures at 132 C (270 F)/20 hr + 138 C (280 F)/42 hr, which can be readily applied to flight hardware production. TS aging achieves the same yield strength levels as conventional aging, while providing much improved ductility in the short transverse direction. After TS aging, five previously rejected lots of alloy 2195 (lots 950M029B, 960M030F, 960M030J, 960M030K, and 960M030L) passed simulated service testing for use in the super lightweight tank program. Each lot exhibited higher fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature than at ambient temperature. Their SCC resistance was also enhanced. All SCC specimens passed the minimum 10-day requirement in 3.5-percent sodium chloride alternate immersion at a stress of 45 ksi. The SCC lives ranged from 57 to 83 days, with an average of 70 days.

  11. Master curve characterization of the fracture toughness behavior in SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Hyoung; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Bong-Sang; Wee, Dang-Moon

    2010-08-01

    The fracture toughness properties of the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Mo-Cr low alloy steel for reactor pressure vessels were investigated by using the master curve concept. These results were compared to those of the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel, which is a commercial RPV material. The fracture toughness tests were conducted by 3-point bending with pre-cracked charpy (PCVN) specimens according to the ASTM E1921-09c standard method. The temperature dependency of the fracture toughness was steeper than those predicted by the standard master curve, while the bainitic SA508 Gr.3 steel fitted well with the standard prediction. In order to properly evaluate the fracture toughness of the Gr.4N steels, the exponential coefficient of the master curve equation was changed and the modified curve was applied to the fracture toughness test results of model alloys that have various chemical compositions. It was found that the modified curve provided a better description for the overall fracture toughness behavior and adequate T0 determination for the tempered martensitic SA508 Gr.4N steels.

  12. Quantitative analysis of morphology of the fracture surface AlMg6 alloy with consecutive dynamic and gigacycle loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oborin, Vladimir; Sokovikov, Mikhail; Bilalov, Dmitry; Naimark, Oleg

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we investigated the influence of consecutive dynamic and gigacycle fatigue loads on the lifetime of aluminum-magnesium alloy AlMg6. Preloading of samples was achieved during dynamic tensile tests in the split-Hopkinson bar device. Fatigue tests were conducted on Shimadzu USF-2000 ultrasonic fatigue testing machine. The New-View 5010 interferometer-profiler of high structural resolution (resolution of 0.1 nm) was used for qualitative fracture surface analysis, which provided the data allowing us to find correlation between mechanical properties and scale-invariant characteristics of damage induced roughness formed under dynamic and gigacycle fatigue loading conditions. Original form of the kinetic equation was proposed, which links the rate of the fatigue crack growth and the stress intensity factor using the scale invariant parameters of fracture surface roughness. The scale invariance characterizes the correlated behavior of multiscale damage provides the link of crack growth kinetics and the power exponent of the modified Paris law.

  13. Probabilistic/Fracture-Mechanics Model For Service Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, T., Jr.; Annis, C. G., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program makes probabilistic estimates of lifetime of engine and components thereof. Developed to fill need for more accurate life-assessment technique that avoids errors in estimated lives and provides for statistical assessment of levels of risk created by engineering decisions in designing system. Implements mathematical model combining techniques of statistics, fatigue, fracture mechanics, nondestructive analysis, life-cycle cost analysis, and management of engine parts. Used to investigate effects of such engine-component life-controlling parameters as return-to-service intervals, stresses, capabilities for nondestructive evaluation, and qualities of materials.

  14. The method of lines in three dimensional fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, J.; Berke, L.

    1980-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the calculation of design parameters for fracture mechanics by the method of lines (MOL) is presented. Three dimensional elastic and elasto-plastic formulations are examined and results from previous and current research activities are reported. The application of MOL to the appropriate partial differential equations of equilibrium leads to coupled sets of simultaneous ordinary differential equations. Solutions of these equations are obtained by the Peano-Baker and by the recurrance relations methods. The advantages and limitations of both solution methods from the computational standpoint are summarized.

  15. Fracture mechanics analyses for skin-stiffener debonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Lotts, C. G.

    1993-01-01

    The debond configurations presently subjected to 3D FEM fracture mechanics analyses are respectively of the flange-skin strip and skin-stiffener configuration type. Two methods employing the virtual crack closure technique were used to evaluate the strain energy release rate, or 'G-value' distributions across the debond front. Both methods yielded nearly identical G-value distributions for the debond configurations studied; they were compared with plane strain and shell analyses results from the literature for the flange skin strip configuration, and found to be in good agreement. Mode II is dominant for the skin-stiffener debond configuration.

  16. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Twenty-first ASTM National Symposium, Annapolis, MD, June 28-30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Gudas, J.P.; Hackett, E.M.; Joyce, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The papers presented in this volume provide an overview of recent theoretical and experimental research in various areas of fracture mechanics and its applications. The papers are grouped under the following headings: elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, dynamic fracture, transition fracture, micromechanics of fracture, computational mechanics, fracture mechanics applications, and fracture mechanics testing. Specific topics discussed include dynamic fracture behavior of a structural steel; finite element meshing criteria for crack problems; method and models for R-curve instability calculations; and closure measurements via a generalized threshold concept.

  17. High-Temperature Mechanical Behavior and Fracture Analysis of a Low-Carbon Steel Related to Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillana, Begoña; Boom, Rob; Eskin, Dmitry; Mizukami, Hideo; Hanao, Masahito; Kawamoto, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    Cracking in continuously cast steel slabs has been one of the main problems in casting for decades. In recent years, the use of computational models has led to a significant improvement in caster performance and product quality. However, these models require accurate thermomechanical properties as input data, which are either unreliable or nonexistent for many alloys of commercial interest. A major reason for this lack of reliable data is that high-temperature mechanical properties are difficult to measure. Several methods have been developed to assess the material strength during solidification, especially for light alloys. The tensile strength during solidification of a low carbon aluminum-killed (LCAK; obtained from Tata Steel Mainland Europe cast at the DSP plant in IJmuiden, the Netherlands) has been studied by a technique for high-temperature tensile testing, which was developed at Sumitomo Metal Industries in Japan. The experimental technique enables a sample to melt and solidify without a crucible, making possible the accurate measurement of load over a small solidification temperature range. In the current study, the tensile test results are analyzed and the characteristic zero-ductility and zero-strength temperatures are determined for this particular LCAK steel grade. The fracture surfaces are investigated following tensile testing, which provides an invaluable insight into the fracture mechanism and a better understanding with respect to the behavior of the steel during solidification. The role of minor alloying elements, like sulfur, in hot cracking susceptibility is also discussed.

  18. Observation and prediction of the deformation and fracture of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creuziger, Adam

    This thesis explores the deformation and fracture behavior of two common shape memory alloys (SMAs), CuAlNi and NiTi. Millimeter, micrometer and nanometer scale features are observed and compared with crystallographic theory of martensite (CTM) predictions and finite element models. Observed fracture behavior, in conjunction with theory and modeling, shed light on the fracture behavior and deformation in shape memory materials. The in plane and out of plane deformations are quantitatively measured and compared with good agreement to predictions from the CTM. For deformation where the stress state was unknown, predicted martensite plates correlated well with observed features. When the stress state could be calculated using finite element analysis (FEA), an available work criterion was used to predict which type of martensite plate would form; with good agreement in arbitrarily oriented, notched CuAlNi samples. The out of plane deformation caused during transformation was quantitatively investigated and agrees well with the average strain of twinned martensite. Using a FEA model of a tapered martensite, the effect of boundary conditions on the out of plane deformation angle was explored. Some limitations on the available work criterion were found. The direction of the out of plane deformation near the notch is consistently such that the area directly ahead of the notch sinks downward. This effect, and the wide martensite plates observed after fracture occurs, indicate the role boundary conditions have on the transformation observed. These effects are not taken into account in the current available work criterion. In single crystal NiTi, the available work criterion was not predictive of the deformations observed in uniaxial tension or in notched samples. However, available work predictions were useful in predicting the fracture properties of notched single crystal NiTi samples, a capability not previously demonstrated. Investigation into the grain boundary fracture

  19. Mechanical Properties of Iron Alumininides Intermetallic Alloy with Molybdenum Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zuhailawati, H.; Fauzi, M. N. A.

    2010-03-11

    In this work, FeAl-based alloys with and without molybdenum addition were fabricated by sintering of mechanically alloyed powders in order to investigate the effect of molybdenum on iron aluminide mechanical properties. Bulk samples were prepared by mechanical alloying for 4 hours, pressing at 360 MPa and sintering at 1000 deg. C for 2 hours. The specimens were tested in compression at room temperature using Instron machine. The phase identification and microstructure of the consolidated material was examined by x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope correspondingly. Results show that 2.5 wt%Mo addition significantly increased the ultimate stress and ultimate strain in compressive mode due to solid solution hardening. However, the addition of Mo more than 2.5 wt% was accompanied by a reduction in both properties caused by the presence of Mo-rich precipitate particles.

  20. The physical metallurgy of mechanically-alloyed, dispersion-strengthened Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilman, P. S.

    1984-01-01

    Powder processing of Al-Li-Mg and Al-Li-Cu alloys by mechanical alloying (MA) is described, with a discussion of physical and mechanical properties of early experimental alloys of these compositions. The experimental samples were mechanically alloyed in a Szegvari attritor, extruded at 343 and 427 C, and some were solution-treated at 520 and 566 C and naturally, as well as artificially, aged at 170, 190, and 210 C for times of up to 1000 hours. All alloys exhibited maximum hardness after being aged at 170 C; lower hardness corresponds to the solution treatment at 566 C than to that at 520 C. A comparison with ingot metallurgy alloys of the same composition shows the MA material to be stronger and more ductile. It is also noted that properly aged MA alloys can develop a better combination of yield strength and notched toughness at lower alloying levels.

  1. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  2. Baseline Fracture Toughness and CGR testing of alloys X-750 and XM-19 (EPRI Phase I)

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Jackson; S. P. Teysseyre

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials as a pilot program toward establishing guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase I (of three phases) that entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and tensile testing of selected materials for comparison to similar tests conducted at GE Global Research. The intent of this Phase I research program is to determine baseline properties for the materials of interest prior to irradiation, and to ensure comparability between laboratories using similar testing techniques, prior to applying these techniques to the same materials after having been irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The materials chosen for this research are the nickel based super alloy X-750, and nitrogen strengthened austenitic stainless steel XM-19. A spare core shroud upper support bracket of alloy X-750 was purchased by EPRI from Southern Co. and a section of XM-19 plate was purchased by EPRI from GE-Hitachi. These materials were sectioned at GE Global Research and provided to INL.

  3. Role of Alloying Elements in the Mechanical Behaviors of An Mg-Zn-Zr-Er Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Min; Dou, Yuchen; Liu, Guobao

    2014-11-01

    The mechanical behavior of the as-extruded and heat-treated Mg-1.5Zn-0.6Zr and Mg-1.5Zn-0.6Zr-2Er alloys was investigated and correlated with microstructure evolution. Deformation mechanisms are detailed. No evidence of twinning was observed under compression in the Er-bearing alloy throughout the grain size range of ~5 to 27 μm at a strain rate of 0.001 or 1/s. The compressive yield strength followed a Hall-Petch relation with a slope of ~10.3 MPa/mm1/2. Er played a major role in the pyramidal < c+ a> slip that was identified as a dominant plastic deformation mechanism. The CRSS for < c+ a> slip system was greatly reduced and was 98 MPa in the as-extruded alloy. While it did not change the mechanical response of the Mg-1.5Zn-0.6Zr-2Er alloy, annealing was found to promote dissolution of Zn in the Mg matrix, leading to an increase in CRSS for extension twinning in the heat-treated Mg-1.5Zn-0.6Zr alloy. As a result, twinning was only observed under a higher strain rate of 1/s in compression. The CRSS for extension twinning for the heat-treated alloy with a grain size of ~28 μm was estimated to be 40 MPa, a bit lower than that for the Er-bearing alloy of the same grain size, which was 42 MPa.

  4. Application of probabilistic fracture mechanics to the PTS issue

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.; Ball, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the NRC effort to obtain a resolution to the PWR PTS issue, a probabilistic approach has been applied that includes a probabilistic fracture-mechanics (PFM) analysis. The PFM analysis is performed with OCA-P, a computer code that performs thermal, stress and fracture-mechanics analyses and estimates the conditional probability of vessel failure, P(F/E), using Monte Carlo techniques. The stress intensity factor (K/sub I/) is calculated for two- and three-dimensional surface flaws using superposition techniques and influence coefficients. Importance-sampling techniques are used, as necessary, to limit to a reasonable value the number of vessels actually calculated. Analyses of three PWR plants indicate that (1) the critical initial flaw depth is very small (5 to 15 mm), (2) the benefit of warm prestressing and the role of crack arrest are transient dependent, (3) crack arrest does not occur for the dominant transients, and (4) the single largest uncertainty in the overall probabilistic analysis is the number of surface flaws per vessel. 30 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. NbAl Intelligent Material Through Mechanical Alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chinniah, K.; Aikra, K.

    2010-03-11

    An intelligent material of Nb-Al composite, is expected to produce intermetallics phase instantaneously upon collision with hypervelocity space debris to stop the crack propagation. Intermetallics-free MA powder with Nb dispersion in Al matrix is targeted. Nb-Al powders are mechanically alloyed using agate media. Mechanical alloying (MA) with agate media produced fine intermetallics-free powder of Nb dispersion in Al matrix. Intermetallics-free critical MA powder curve for agate media were established. The optimum critical agate MA powder of 200 rpm 132 hours had intelligent properties.

  6. Aluminum Alloying Effects on Lattice Types, Microstructures, and Mechanical Behavior of High-Entropy Alloys Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhi; Gao, Michael C.; Diao, Haoyan; Yang, Tengfei; Liu, Junpeng; Zuo, Tingting; Zhang, Yong; Lu, Zhaoping; Cheng, Yongqiang; Zhang, Yanwen; Dahmen, Karin A.; Liaw, Peter K.; Egami, Takeshi

    2013-12-01

    The crystal lattice type is one of the dominant factors for controlling the mechanical behavior of high-entropy alloys (HEAs). For example, the yield strength at room temperature varies from 300 MPa for the face-centered-cubic (fcc) structured alloys, such as the CoCrCuFeNiTi x system, to about 3,000 MPa for the body-centered-cubic (bcc) structured alloys, such as the AlCoCrFeNiTi x system. The values of Vickers hardness range from 100 to 900, depending on lattice types and microstructures. As in conventional alloys with one or two principal elements, the addition of minor alloying elements to HEAs can further alter their mechanical properties, such as strength, plasticity, hardness, etc. Excessive alloying may even result in the change of lattice types of HEAs. In this report, we first review alloying effects on lattice types and properties of HEAs in five Al-containing HEA systems: Al x CoCrCuFeNi, Al x CoCrFeNi, Al x CrFe1.5MnNi0.5, Al x CoCrFeNiTi, and Al x CrCuFeNi2. It is found that Al acts as a strong bcc stabilizer, and its addition enhances the strength of the alloy at the cost of reduced ductility. The origins of such effects are then qualitatively discussed from the viewpoints of lattice-strain energies and electronic bonds. Quantification of the interaction between Al and 3 d transition metals in fcc, bcc, and intermetallic compounds is illustrated in the thermodynamic modeling using the CALculation of PHAse Diagram method.

  7. Coupled Flow and Mechanics in Porous and Fractured Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M. J.; Newell, P.; Bishop, J.

    2012-12-01

    Numerical models describing subsurface flow through deformable porous materials are important for understanding and enabling energy security and climate security. Some applications of current interest come from such diverse areas as geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, hydro-fracturing for stimulation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and modeling electrochemistry-induced swelling of fluid-filled porous electrodes. Induced stress fields in any of these applications can lead to structural failure and fracture. The ultimate goal of this research is to model evolving faults and fracture networks and flow within the networks while coupling to flow and mechanics within the intact porous structure. We report here on a new computational capability for coupling of multiphase porous flow with geomechanics including assessment of over-pressure-induced structural damage. The geomechanics is coupled to the flow via the variation in the fluid pore pressures, whereas the flow problem is coupled to mechanics by the concomitant material strains which alter the pore volume (porosity field) and hence the permeability field. For linear elastic solid mechanics a monolithic coupling strategy is utilized. For nonlinear elastic/plastic and fractured media, a segregated coupling is presented. To facilitate coupling with disparate flow and mechanics time scales, the coupling strategy allows for different time steps in the flow solve compared to the mechanics solve. If time steps are synchronized, the controller allows user-specified intra-time-step iterations. The iterative coupling is dynamically controlled based on a norm measuring the degree of variation in the deformed porosity. The model is applied for evaluation of the integrity of jointed caprock systems during CO2 sequestration operations. Creation or reactivation of joints can lead to enhanced pathways for leakage. Similarly, over-pressures can induce flow along faults. Fluid flow rates in fractures are strongly dependent on the

  8. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    PubMed

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables). PMID:23852924

  9. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  10. Re Effects on Phase Stability and Mechanical Properties of MoSS+Mo3Si+Mo5SiB2 alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Bei, Hongbin; George, Easo P; Tiley, Jaimie

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high melting points and good oxidation resistance Mo-Si-B alloys are of interest as potential ultrahigh-temperature structural materials. But their major drawbacks are poor ductility and fracture toughness at room temperature. Since alloying with Re has been suggested as a possible solution, we investigate here the effects of Re additions on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a ternary alloy with the composition Mo-12.5Si-8.5B (at.%). This alloy has a three-phase microstructure consisting of Mo solid-solution (MoSS), Mo3Si, and Mo5SiB2 and our results show that up to 8.4 at.% Re can be added to it without changing its microstructure or forming any brittle phase at 1600 C. Three-point bend tests using chevron-notched specimens showed that Re did not improve fracture toughness of the three-phase alloy. Nanoindentation performed on the MoSS phase in the three-phase alloy showed that Re increases Young s modulus, but does not lower hardness as in some Mo solid solution alloys. Based on our thermodynamic calculations and microstructural analyses, the lack of a Re softening effect is attributed to the increased Si levels in the Re-containing MoSS phase since Si is known to increase its hardness. This lack of softening is possibly why there is no Re-induced improvement in fracture toughness.

  11. Dynamic Fracture Initiation Toughness at Elevated Temperatures With Application to the New Generation of Titanium Aluminide Alloys. Chapter 8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shazly, Mostafa; Prakash, Vikas; Draper, Susan; Shukla, Arun (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a new generation of titanium aluminide alloy, named Gamma-Met PX, has been developed with better rolling and post-rolling characteristics. I'revious work on this alloy has shown the material to have higher strengths at room and elevated temperatures when compared with other gamma titanium aluminides. In particular, this new alloy has shown increased ductility at elevated temperatures under both quasi-static and high strain rate uniaxial compressive loading. However, its high strain rate tensile ductility at room and elevated temperatures is limited to approx. 1%. In the present chapter, results of a study to investigate the effects of loading rate and test temperature on the dynamic fracture initiation toughness in Gamma-Met PX are presented. Modified split Hopkinson pressure bar was used along with high-speed photography to determine the crack initiation time. Three-point bend dynamic fracture experiments were conducted at impact speeds of approx. 1 m/s and tests temperatures of up-to 1200 C. The results show that thc dynamic fracture initiation toughness decreases with increasing test temperatures beyond 600 C. Furthermore, thc effect of long time high temperature air exposure on the fracture toughness was investigated. The dynamic fracture initiation toughness was found to decrease with increasing exposure time. The reasons behind this drop are analyzed and discussed.

  12. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  13. Evaluation of hydrogen pressure vessels using slow strain rate testing and fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, S.H.; Desai, V.H.

    1998-12-31

    A total of 108 seamless, forged pressure vessels, fabricated from ASTM A372 type IV (UNS K14508) and type V low alloy steel, are currently in 4,200 psi (29 MPa) gaseous hydrogen (GH{sub 2}) service at the Kennedy Space Center`s (KSC) Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). The vessels were originally used in 6,000 psi (41 MPa) GH{sub 2} service during the Apollo program. NASA recently received a letter of warning from the manufacturer of the vessels stating that the subject vessels should be now be removed from GH{sub 2} service due to the fact that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of many of the vessels exceeds the maximum limit of 126 ksi (869 MPa) now imposed on A372 steel intended for GH{sub 2} service, and therefore are susceptible to hydrogen environment embrittlement. Due to the expense associated with vessel replacement, it was decided to determine by testing and analysis whether or not the vessels needed to be removed from GH{sub 2} service. Slow strain rate testing was performed under hydrogen charging conditions to determine the value of the threshold fracture toughness for sustained loading crack growth in GH{sub 2}, (K{sub H}) for the vessel material, this value was then used in a fracture mechanics safe-life analysis (a 20-year service life was modeled) that indicated the vessels are safe for continued use.

  14. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  15. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  16. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  17. NASGRO(registered trademark): Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue Crack Growth Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce; Shivakumar, V.; Mettu, Sambi; Beek, Joachim; Williams, Leonard; Yeh, Feng; McClung, Craig; Cardinal, Joe

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASGRO, which is a fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analysis software package that is used to reduce risk of fracture in Space Shuttles. The contents include: 1) Consequences of Fracture; 2) NASA Fracture Control Requirements; 3) NASGRO Reduces Risk; 4) NASGRO Use Inside NASA; 5) NASGRO Components: Crack Growth Module; 6) NASGRO Components:Material Property Module; 7) Typical NASGRO analysis: Crack growth or component life calculation; and 8) NASGRO Sample Application: Orbiter feedline flowliner crack analysis.

  18. Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis of Extruded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Processed by Backward Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.; Grünheid, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of an extruded AZ31B magnesium alloy profile at various strain rates from 0.001 to 375/s. The electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed that the profile has \\{ { 0 0 0 1} \\}< 1 0overline{1} 0 rangle and \\{ {1 0overline{1} 0 }\\}< { 1 1overline{2} 0}rangle textures. Due to the textures, the profile exhibits pronounced anisotropy in mechanical properties. In the extrusion direction (ED), the profile shows the highest yield strength (YS) but the lowest total elongation at fracture (TE) due to a hard activation of non-basal slip and \\{ { 1 0overline{1} 1} \\}< { 1 0overline{1} overline{2} } rangle twinning; in the diagonal direction (DD), it shows the lowest ultimate tensile strength (UTS) but the highest TE due to an easy activation of basal slip; in the transverse direction (TD), it shows the lowest YS due to an easy activation of \\{ {10overline{1} 2} \\}< {10overline{1} overline{1} } rangle twinning. Moreover, the number of twins increases with the increasing strain rate. This indicates that deformation twinning becomes prevalent to accommodate high-rate deformation. Due to the different deformation mechanisms, the profile exhibits an orientation-dependent effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties. A positive effect of strain rate on the YS and UTS was found in the ED, while the effect of strain rate on the YS is negligible in the DD and TD. The TE in the ED, DD, and TD decreases in general as the strain rate increases. Fractographic analysis under a scanning electron microscope revealed that the fracture is a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture, and the magnesium oxide inclusions could be the origins of the fracture.

  19. Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Analysis of Extruded AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Processed by Backward Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.; Grünheid, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the mechanical behavior of an extruded AZ31B magnesium alloy profile at various strain rates from 0.001 to 375/s. The electron backscatter diffraction analysis revealed that the profile has { { 0 0 0 1} }< 1 0overline{1} 0 rangle and { {1 0overline{1} 0 }}< { 1 1overline{2} 0}rangle textures. Due to the textures, the profile exhibits pronounced anisotropy in mechanical properties. In the extrusion direction (ED), the profile shows the highest yield strength (YS) but the lowest total elongation at fracture (TE) due to a hard activation of non-basal slip and { { 1 0overline{1} 1} }< { 1 0overline{1} overline{2} } rangle twinning; in the diagonal direction (DD), it shows the lowest ultimate tensile strength (UTS) but the highest TE due to an easy activation of basal slip; in the transverse direction (TD), it shows the lowest YS due to an easy activation of { {10overline{1} 2} }< {10overline{1} overline{1} } rangle twinning. Moreover, the number of twins increases with the increasing strain rate. This indicates that deformation twinning becomes prevalent to accommodate high-rate deformation. Due to the different deformation mechanisms, the profile exhibits an orientation-dependent effect of strain rate on the mechanical properties. A positive effect of strain rate on the YS and UTS was found in the ED, while the effect of strain rate on the YS is negligible in the DD and TD. The TE in the ED, DD, and TD decreases in general as the strain rate increases. Fractographic analysis under a scanning electron microscope revealed that the fracture is a mixed mode of ductile and brittle fracture, and the magnesium oxide inclusions could be the origins of the fracture.

  20. Mechanical stratigraphic controls on fracture patterns within carbonates and implications for groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Michele L.; Simo, J. A.; Underwood, Chad A.; Rijken, Peggy

    2006-02-01

    Groundwater flow in low matrix-permeability carbonate rocks is largely controlled by fracture networks. The stratigraphic features that control fracture initiation and termination within a sequence of sedimentary rock strata define the mechanical stratigraphy of the sequence. We investigate the effectiveness of various types of stratigraphic horizons in terminating opening-mode fractures in two different carbonate rock sequences: a relatively homogeneous dolomite sequence, in Door County, WI and an interbedded chalk and marl sequence within the Austin Chalk, TX. Additionally, we present analog and numerical modeling results that delineate the specific mechanisms that facilitate fracture termination. The combination of model results and empirical relationships between observed sedimentary features and mechanical stratigraphy shows: (1) fractures terminate at weak contacts (e.g. thin organic layers), shallowly buried contacts or thick fine-grained units adjacent to thin fractured beds, (2) fractures propagate across strong contacts (e.g. intracycle contacts between different lithology) and thin fine-grained units adjacent to thick fractured beds and (3) fractures step-over at moderate strength contacts. We use these guidelines to predict fracture network from sedimentary stratigraphy by qualitatively assessing the mechanical stratigraphy of a portion of the relatively complex Cretaceous shelf-margin sequence at Sant Corneli, Spain. This predictive demonstration illustrates the utility of assessing the mechanical stratigraphy of subsurface strata within which fractures are not directly observable. We conclude that for a variety of carbonate mechanical stratigraphic sequences, dominant fluid flow characteristics, such as horizontal high flow zones and flow compartmentalization, can be evaluated using fracture spacing and connectivity within fracture networks that is predicted from sedimentary stratigraphy. Although the resulting heterogeneous flow networks do not rely

  1. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics and Optimum Fracture Control Analytical Procedures for a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1977-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis is used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects of failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions are also considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure can be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different failure prevention plans.

  2. Fundamental mechanisms of tensile fracture in aluminum sheet undirectionally reinforced with boron filament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, H. W.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented from an experimental study of the tensile-fracture process in aluminum sheet unidirectionally reinforced with boron filament. The tensile strength of the material is severely limited by a noncumulative fracture mechanism which involves the initiation and sustenance of a chain reaction of filament fractures at a relatively low stress level. Matrix fracture follows in a completely ductile manner. The minimum filament stress for initiation of the fracture mechanism is shown to be approximately 1.17 GN/sq m (170 ksi), and appears to be independent of filament diameter, number of filament layers, and the strength of the filament-matrix bond. All the commonly observed features of tensile fracture surfaces are explained in terms of the observed noncumulative fracture mechanism.

  3. Elastic plastic fracture mechanics methodology for surface cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, Hugo A.; Boatwright, D. W.; Curtin, W. J.; Lambert, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The Elastic Plastic Fracture Mechanics (EPFM) Methodology has evolved significantly in the last several years. Nevertheless, some of these concepts need to be extended further before the whole methodology can be safely applied to structural parts. Specifically, there is a need to include the effect of constraint in the characterization of material resistance to crack growth and also to extend these methods to the case of 3D defects. As a consequence, this project was started as a 36 month research program with the general objective of developing an EPFM methodology to assess the structural reliability of pressure vessels and other parts of interest to NASA containing defects. This report covers a computer modelling algorithm used to simulate the growth of a semi-elliptical surface crack; the presentation of a finite element investigation that compared the theoretical (HRR) stress field to that produced by elastic and elastic-plastic models; and experimental efforts to characterize three dimensional aspects of fracture present in 'two dimensional', or planar configuration specimens.

  4. Fracture Mechanics Analysis of LH2 Feed Line Flow Liners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark A.; Dawicke, David S.; Brzowski, Matthew B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Harris, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Inspections of the Space Shuttle Main Engine revealed fatigue cracks growing from slots in the flow liner of the liquid hydrogen (LH2) feed lines. During flight, the flow liners experience complex loading induced by flow of LH2 and the resonance characteristics of the structure. The flow liners are made of Inconel 718 and had previously not been considered a fracture critical component. However, fatigue failure of a flow liner could have catastrophic effect on the Shuttle engines. A fracture mechanics study was performed to determine if a damage tolerance approach to life management was possible and to determine the sensitivity to the load spectra, material properties, and crack size. The load spectra were derived separately from ground tests and material properties were obtained from coupon tests. The stress-intensity factors for the fatigue cracks were determined from a shell-dynamics approach that simulated the dominant resonant frequencies. Life predictions were obtained using the NASGRO life prediction code. The results indicated that adequate life could not be demonstrated for initial crack lengths of the size that could be detected by traditional NDE techniques.

  5. An investigation of the fatigue and fracture behavior of a Nb-12Al-44Ti-1.5Mo intermetallic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Soboyejo, W.O.; Dipasquale, J.; Ye, F.; Mercer, C.; Srivatsan, T.S.; Konitzer, D.G.

    1999-04-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the fatigue and fracture behavior of a damage-tolerant Nb-12Al-44Ti-1.5Mo alloy. This partially ordered B2 + orthorhombic intermetallic alloy is shown to have attractive combinations of room-temperature ductility (11 to 14 pct), fracture toughness (60 to 92 MPa{radical}m), and comparable fatigue crack growth resistance to IN718, Ti-6Al-4V, and pure Nb at room temperature. The studies show that tensile deformation in the Nb-12Al-44Ti-1.5Mo alloy involves localized plastic deformation (microplasticity via slip-band formation) which initiates at stress levels that are significantly below the uniaxial yield stress ({approximately}9.6 pct of the 0.2 pct offset yield strength (YS)). The onset of bulk yielding is shown to correspond to the spread of microplasticity completely across the gage sections of the tensile specimen. Fatigue crack initiation is also postulated to occur by the accumulation of microplasticity (coarsening of slip bands). Subsequent fatigue crack growth then occurs by the unzipping of cracks along slip bands that form ahead of the dominant crack tip. The proposed mechanism of fatigue crack growth is analogous to the unzipping crack growth mechanism that was suggested originally by Neumann for crack growth in single-crystal copper. Slower near-threshold fatigue crack growth rates at 750 C are attributed to the shielding effects of oxide-induced crack closure. The fatigue and fracture behavior are also compared to those of pure Nb and emerging high-temperature niobium-based intermetallics.

  6. A fracture criterion for widespread cracking in thin-sheet aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Dawicke, D. S.; Sutton, M. A.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic finite-element analysis was used with a critical crack-tip-opening angle (CTOA) fracture criterion to model stable crack growth in thin-sheet 2024-T3 aluminum alloy panels with single and multiple-site damage (MSD) cracks. Comparisons were made between critical angles determined from the analyses and those measured with photographic methods. Calculated load against crack extension and load against crack-tip displacement on single crack specimens agreed well with test data even for large-scale plastic deformations. The analyses were also able to predict the stable tearing behavior of large lead cracks in the presence of stably tearing MSD cracks. Small MSD cracks significantly reduced the residual strength for large lead cracks.

  7. Microplasticity and fracture in a Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Rabeeh, B.M.; Rokhlin, S.I.; Soboyejo, W.O.

    1996-12-15

    Linear Elasticity is generally considered to occur in most standard textbooks by the strengthening of chemical bonds in the regime below the proportional limit in most materials. In some cases, however, a number of researchers have recognized the possible role of localized microplasticity (microplasticity in this paper refers to localized plasticity on a microstructural level at stresses below the so-called bulk yield stress) in the so-called elastic deformation regime. There is, therefore, a need for careful studies of the micromechanisms of microplasticity in the so-called elastic regime. Micromechanisms of microplasticity will be presented in this paper for a metastable {beta} Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn (Ti-15-3) alloy deformed in incremental stages to failure under monotonic loading. Micromechanisms of tensile deformation and fracture will be elucidated for a Ti-15-3 plate with single phase {beta} and Widmanstaetten {alpha}+{beta} microstructures.

  8. Fracture and mechanical stratigraphy for Mississippian-Pennsylvanian age carbonates, Ozark Dome, NW Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppers, M.; Burberry, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Identifying natural fracture patterns in an area gives a detailed look into the local tectonic history. Comparing those fractures to the mechanical properties of the rocks provides key insights into predicting fractures in the subsurface. The Ozark Dome is an ideal study area for fracture research due to multiple fracturing events resulting from the multi-stage deformation Ouachita Orogeny during the late Paleozoic. This study used field observations of lithology and fracture attributes over ~10 outcrops in the Mississppian-Pennsylvanian (360-298 ma) carbonate sequence of the Ozark Plateau. Outcrops were chosen having excellent lithological exposure up the sequence from the Boone to Atoka formations and with 3D representations of the fracture patterns. In all, the area investigated covered nearly 60 square miles. Fracture attributes collected included fracture intensity, length, and abutting relationships; and rock hardness data collected from a Schmidt Hammer. Data was analyzed using programs such as Stereonet and MOVE structural software that generated rose diagrams, structural cross sections, and products. Initial results indicate 4 main fracture orientations that resulted from at least 3 discrete phases of deformation during the Miss-Penn. Initial results also indicate that the present-day mechanical stratigraphy is not the same one that existed during the deformation phases. Work done at the Tiger Blvd. outcrops showed at least 2 distinct mechanical units. Fractures observed at the outcrop did not respect mechanical bed boundaries, and showed no relationship to the differences in mechanical properties observed. This study will aid in the interpretation of fractures in regards to mechanical stratigraphy, which allows for a better understanding of subsurface fracture prediction in carbonate sequences worldwide. Finally, the fracture work here will also help in elucidating the tectonic history of the field area during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian.

  9. Study on the Role of Stearic Acid and Ethylene-bis-stearamide on the Mechanical Alloying of a Biomedical Titanium Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, Alireza; Hodgson, Peter D.; Wen, Cui'e.

    2010-04-01

    The present study examines the influence of different contents and types of process control agent (PCA), i.e., stearic acid (SA) and ethylene-bis-stearamide (EBS), on the microstructural evolution and characteristics of Ti-16Sn-4Nb (wt pct) alloy powders and bulk samples. The characterization of the powders and bulk samples was carried out by using chemical analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray diffractometry. Results indicated that the powder recovered from the ball milling containers increased with increasing amounts of SA and EBS. Furthermore, adding more SA or EBS to the powder mixture resulted in a considerably smaller particle size, with a flaky-shaped morphology for the given ball milling time. Also, a slightly higher effectiveness was found for EBS when compared to SA. Meanwhile, the addition of both SA and EBS led to a delay in the alloy formation during mechanical alloying (MA) and caused contamination of the material with mainly carbon (C) and oxygen (O). An optimum amount of 1 wt pct PCA led to a good balance between cold welding and fracturing, and thus favored the formation of the titanium alloy. The microstructural observation of the bulk alloy showed a homogeneous distribution of fine Nb-rich β-phase colonies within the α-Ti matrix with the addition of PCA less than 1 wt pct.

  10. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  11. Fracture mechanics of hydroxyapatite single crystals under geometric confinement.

    PubMed

    Libonati, Flavia; Nair, Arun K; Vergani, Laura; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-04-01

    Geometric confinement to the nanoscale, a concept that refers to the characteristic dimensions of structural features of materials at this length scale, has been shown to control the mechanical behavior of many biological materials or their building blocks, and such effects have also been suggested to play a crucial role in enhancing the strength and toughness of bone. Here we study the effect of geometric confinement on the fracture mechanism of hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals that form the mineralized phase in bone. We report a series of molecular simulations of HAP crystals with an edge crack on the (001) plane under tensile loading, and we systematically vary the sample height whilst keeping the sample and the crack length constant. We find that by decreasing the sample height the stress concentration at the tip of the crack disappears for samples with a height smaller than 4.15nm, below which the material shows a different failure mode characterized by a more ductile mechanism with much larger failure strains, and the strength approaching that of a flaw-less crystal. This study directly confirms an earlier suggestion of a flaw-tolerant state that appears under geometric confinement and may explain the mechanical stability of the reinforcing HAP platelets in bone. PMID:23500480

  12. Fracture mechanics concepts in reliability analysis of monolithic ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manderscheid, Jane M.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1987-01-01

    Basic design concepts for high-performance, monolithic ceramic structural components are addressed. The design of brittle ceramics differs from that of ductile metals because of the inability of ceramic materials to redistribute high local stresses caused by inherent flaws. Random flaw size and orientation requires that a probabilistic analysis be performed in order to determine component reliability. The current trend in probabilistic analysis is to combine linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts with the two parameter Weibull distribution function to predict component reliability under multiaxial stress states. Nondestructive evaluation supports this analytical effort by supplying data during verification testing. It can also help to determine statistical parameters which describe the material strength variation, in particular the material threshold strength (the third Weibull parameter), which in the past was often taken as zero for simplicity.

  13. Mechanical Properties of a Partially Solidified Cu-Zn Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuya, Naoki; Nakazawa, Tomoaki; Matsushita, Akira; Okane, Toshimitsu; Yoshida, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    For predicting solidification cracking by thermal stress analysis, the mechanical properties in the partially solidified state based on the experimental results are the best hope. However, the Young's modulus has never been investigated for copper alloys. In this study, stress-strain curves of a Cu-Zn alloy in the partially solidified state for various solid fractions were obtained using a specially developed horizontal tensile test device. Furthermore, by removing the load during the tensile test, the spring-back (elastic behavior) was observed and the Young's modulus was obtained.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical properties of eutectic nickel alloy coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezborodov, V. P.; Saraev, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The paper discusses the peculiarities of a structure and a coating composition after reflow. It was established that the structure of coatings from nickel alloy is a solid solution based on nickel, the eutectic of γ-Ni+Ni3B composition and dispersed reinforcing particles. The content of alloying elements in the initial powder material determines the type of the coating structure and the formation of hypoeutectic or hypereutectic structures. The influence of formation conditions on the structure and physical-mechanical properties of the coatings is considered in this paper.

  15. Precise Analysis of Microstructural Effects on Mechanical Properties of Cast ADC12 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayasu, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Ochi, Toshihiro

    2015-04-01

    The effects of microstructural characteristics (secondary dendrite arm spacing, SDAS) and Si- and Fe-based eutectic structures on the mechanical properties and failure behavior of an Al-Si-Cu alloy are investigated. Cast Al alloy samples are produced using a special continuous-casting technique with which it is easy to control both the sizes of microstructures and the direction of crystal orientation. Dendrite cells appear to grow in the casting direction. There are linear correlations between SDAS and tensile properties (ultimate tensile strength σ UTS, 0.2 pct proof strength σ 0.2, and fracture strain ɛ f). These linear correlations, however, break down, especially for σ UTS vs SDAS and ɛ f vs SDAS, as the eutectic structures become more than 3 μm in diameter, when the strength and ductility ( σ UTS and ɛ f) decrease significantly. For eutectic structures larger than 3 μm, failure is dominated by the brittle eutectic phases, for which SDAS is no longer strongly correlated with σ UTS and ɛ f. In contrast, a linear correlation is obtained between σ 0.2 and SDAS, even for eutectic structures larger than 3 μm, and the eutectic structure does not have a strong effect on yield behavior. This is because failure in the eutectic phases occurs just before final fracture. In situ failure observation during tensile testing is performed using microstructural and lattice characteristics. From the experimental results obtained, models of failure during tensile loading are proposed.

  16. Chemical and Mechanical Alteration of Fractures: Micro-Scale Simulations and Comparison to Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, P.; Detwiler, R. L.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Morris, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Fractures are often the main pathways for subsurface fluid flow especially in rocks with low matrix porosity. Therefore, the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures are of fundamental concern for subsurface CO2 sequestration, enhanced geothermal energy production, enhanced oil recovery, and nuclear waste disposal. Chemical and mechanical stresses induced during these applications may lead to significant alteration of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the chemo-hydro-mechanical response of fractures have shown a range of results that contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability and fracture aperture, permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, it remains difficult to directly measure the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, which challenges our ability to predict the long-term evolution of the hydro-mechanical properties of fractures. Here, we present a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. Chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces is modeled using a depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow and reactive transport. Then, we deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. Nonuniform dissolution may cause the location of the resultant force between the two contacting

  17. A mechanism-based approach to modeling ductile fracture.

    SciTech Connect

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Hammi, Youssef; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Klein, Patrick A.; Foulk, James W., III; McFadden, Sam X.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile fracture in metals has been observed to result from the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids. The evolution of this damage is inherently history dependent, affected by how time-varying stresses drive the formation of defect structures in the material. At some critically damaged state, the softening response of the material leads to strain localization across a surface that, under continued loading, becomes the faces of a crack in the material. Modeling localization of strain requires introduction of a length scale to make the energy dissipated in the localized zone well-defined. In this work, a cohesive zone approach is used to describe the post-bifurcation evolution of material within the localized zone. The relations are developed within a thermodynamically consistent framework that incorporates temperature and rate-dependent evolution relationships motivated by dislocation mechanics. As such, we do not prescribe the evolution of tractions with opening displacements across the localized zone a priori. The evolution of tractions is itself an outcome of the solution of particular, initial boundary value problems. The stress and internal state of the material at the point of bifurcation provides the initial conditions for the subsequent evolution of the cohesive zone. The models we develop are motivated by in-situ scanning electron microscopy of three-point bending experiments using 6061-T6 aluminum and 304L stainless steel, The in situ observations of the initiation and evolution of fracture zones reveal the scale over which the failure mechanisms act. In addition, these observations are essential for motivating the micromechanically-based models of the decohesion process that incorporate the effects of loading mode mixity, temperature, and loading rate. The response of these new cohesive zone relations is demonstrated by modeling the three-point bending configuration used for the experiments. In addition, we survey other methods with the potential

  18. Understanding Plasticity and Fracture in Aluminum Alloys and their Composites by 3D X-ray Synchrotron Tomography and Microdiffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, Peter

    Aluminum alloys and their composites are attractive materials for applications requiring high strength-to-weight ratios and reasonable cost. Many of these applications, such as those in the aerospace industry, undergo fatigue loading. An understanding of the microstructural damage that occurs in these materials is critical in assessing their fatigue resistance. Two distinct experimental studies were performed to further the understanding of fatigue damage mechanisms in aluminum alloys and their composites, specifically fracture and plasticity. Fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs) depends on many aspects of composite microstructure. Fatigue crack growth behavior is particularly dependent on the reinforcement characteristics and matrix microstructure. The goal of this work was to obtain a fundamental understanding of fatigue crack growth behavior in SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composites. In situ X-ray synchrotron tomography was performed on two samples at low (R=0.1) and at high (R=0.6) R-ratios. The resulting reconstructed images were used to obtain three-dimensional (3D) rendering of the particles and fatigue crack. Behaviors of the particles and crack, as well as their interaction, were analyzed and quantified. Four-dimensional (4D) visual representations were constructed to aid in the overall understanding of damage evolution. During fatigue crack growth in ductile materials, a plastic zone is created in the region surrounding the crack tip. Knowledge of the plastic zone is important for the understanding of fatigue crack formation as well as subsequent growth behavior. The goal of this work was to quantify the 3D size and shape of the plastic zone in 7075 Al alloys. X-ray synchrotron tomography and Laue microdiffraction were used to non-destructively characterize the volume surrounding a fatigue crack tip. The precise 3D crack profile was segmented from the reconstructed tomography data. Depth-resolved Laue patterns were obtained using

  19. Mechanical rock properties, fracture propagation and permeability development in deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea

    2010-05-01

    Deep geothermal reservoirs are rock units at depths greater than 400 m from which the internal heat can be extracted using water as a transport means in an economically efficient manner. In many geothermal reservoirs, fluid flow is largely, and may be almost entirely, controlled by the permeability of the fracture network. No flow, however, takes place along a particular fracture network unless the fractures are interconnected. For fluid flow to occur from one site to another there must be at least one interconnected cluster of fractures that links these sites, that is, the percolation threshold must be reached. In "hydrothermal systems", only the natural fracture system (extension and shear fractures) creates the rock or reservoir permeability that commonly exceeds the matrix permeability by far; in "petrothermal systems", by contrast, interconnected fracture systems are formed by creating hydraulic fractures and massive hydraulic stimulation of the existing fracture system in the host rock. Propagation (or termination, that is, arrest) of both natural extension and shear fractures as well as man-made hydraulic fractures is mainly controlled by the mechanical rock properties, particularly rock toughness, stiffness and strengths, of the host rock. Most reservoir rocks are heterogeneous and anisotropic, in particular they are layered. For many layered rocks, the mechanical properties, particularly their Young's moduli (stiffnesses), change between layers, that is, the rocks are mechanically layered. Mechanical layering may coincide with changes in grain size, mineral content, fracture frequencies, or facies. For example, in sedimentary rocks, stiff limestone or sandstone layers commonly alternate with soft shale layers. In geothermal reservoirs fracture termination is important because non-stratabound fractures, that is, fractures not affected by layering, are more likely to form an interconnected fracture network than stratabound fractures, confined to single rock

  20. Fracture mechanics; Proceedings of the Seventeenth National Symposium, Albany, NY, August 7-9, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. M. (Editor); Chait, R. (Editor); Smith, C. W. (Editor); Wilhem, D. P. (Editor); Andrews, W. A. (Editor); Newman, J. C. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The present conference gives attention to topics in the application of fracture mechanics, subcritical crack growth phenomena, fracture testing methods, ductile fracture behavior, and fracture mechanisms and their analysis. Specific papers treat the resistance curve approach to composite materials characterization, fracture toughness in ductile iron and cast steel, hold-time effects in elevated temperature fatigue crack propagation, creep crack growth under nonsteady conditions, viscoplastic fatigue in a superalloy at elevated temperatures, fracture testing with arc bend specimens, one-point bend impact test application, and a compact mode II fracture specimen. Also discussed are the computation of stable crack growth using the J-integral, the use of plastic energy dissipation to characterize crack growth, the extension of surface cracks under cyclic loading, the minimum time criterion for crack instability in structural materials, dynamic crack propagation and branching under biaxial loading, and boundary layer effects in cracked bodies.

  1. Microstructural and Fracture Behavior of Phosphorus-Containing Fe-30Mn-9Al-1Si-0.9C-0.5Mo Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Ryan A.; Van Aken, David C.

    2015-08-01

    Five different phosphorus (P)-containing heat-treated Fe-Mn-Al-C alloys were tested in accordance with ASTM E 23 Charpy V-notch Energy (CVNE) standards. Room temperature CVNE of solution treated and quenched specimens revealed ductile fracture for 0.001 and 0.006 wt pct (pct P-containing alloys). Brittle cleavage fracture dominated the 0.043 and 0.07 pct P-containing alloys. A hard brittle P eutectic phase was observed in the 0.07 pct P-containing alloy.

  2. Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Behavior of Single Fractures in EGS Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Kelkar, S.; Yoshioka, K.; Rapaka, S.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) rely on the creation a connected fracture system or the enhancement of existing (natural) fractures by hydraulic and chemical treatments. EGS studies at Fenton Hill (New Mexico, USA) and Hijiori (Japan) have revealed that only a limited number of fractures contribute to the effective heat transfer surface area. Thus, the economic viability of EGS depends strongly on the creation and spacing of single fractures in order to efficiently mine heat from given volume of rock. Though there are many similarities between EGS and natural geothermal reservoirs, a major difference between the reservoir types is the (typically) high pumping pressures and induced thermal stresses at the injection wells of an EGS reservoir. These factors can be responsible for fracture dilation/extension and thermal short circuiting and depend strongly on the surrounding state of stress in the reservoir and mechanical properties. We will present results from our study of the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) behavior of a single fracture in a realistic subsurface stress field. We will show that fracture orientation, the stress environment, fracture permeability structure, and the relationship between permeability changes in a fracture resulting from mechanical displacement are all important when designing and managing an EGS reservoir. Lastly, we present a sensitivity analysis of the important parameters that govern fracture behavior with respect to field measurements. Temperature in high permeability fracture in an EGS reservoir

  3. Effective Hydro-Mechanical Properties of Fluid-Saturated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollmann, N.; Vinci, C.; Renner, J.; Steeb, H.

    2015-12-01

    Consideration of hydro-mechanical processes is essential for the characterization of liquid-resources as well as for many engineering applications. Furthermore, the modeling of seismic waves in fractured porous media finds application not only in geophysical exploration but also reservoir management. Fractures exhibit high-aspect-ratio geometries, i.e. they constitute thin and long hydraulic conduits. Motivated by this peculiar geometry, the investigation of the hydro-mechanically coupled processes is performed by means of a hybrid-dimensional modeling approach. The effective material behavior of domains including complex fracture patterns in a porous rock is assessed by investigating the fluid pressure and the solid displacement of the skeleton saturated by compressible fluids. Classical balance equations are combined with a Poiseuille-type flow in the dimensionally reduced fracture. In the porous surrounding rock, the classical Biot-theory is applied. For simple geometries, our findings show that two main fluid-flow processes occur, leak-off from fractures to the surrounding rock and fracture flow within and between the connected fractures. The separation of critical frequencies of the two flow processes is not straightforward, in particular for systems containing a large number of fractures. Our aim is to model three dimensional hydro-mechanically coupled processes within complex fracture patterns and in particular determine the frequency-dependent attenuation characteristics. Furthermore, the effect of asperities of the fracture surfaces on the fracture stiffness and on the hydraulic conductivity will be added to the approach.

  4. Superior Mechanical Properties of AlCoCrFeNiTi x High-Entropy Alloys upon Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Ma, S. G.; Chu, M. Y.; Yang, H. J.; Wang, Z. H.; Zhang, Y.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    High-entropy alloys with composition of AlCoCrFeNiTi x ( x: molar ratio; x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) under quasi-static and dynamic compression exhibit excellent mechanical properties. A positive strain-rate sensitivity of yield strength and the strong work-hardening behavior during plastic flows dominate upon dynamic loading in the present alloy system. The constitutive relationships are extracted to model flow behaviors by employing the Johnson-Cook constitutive model. Upon dynamic loading, the ultimate strength and fracture strain of AlCoCrFeNiTi x alloys are superior to most of bulk metallic glasses and in situ metallic glass matrix composites.

  5. Microstructure Evaluation and Mechanical Properties of Low Alloy Cryogenic Steel Processed by Normalizing Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zili; Liu, Xiqin; Hou, Zhiguo; Zhou, Shuangshuang; Tian, Qingchao

    2016-06-01

    Effects of the normalizing treatment on microstructural evolution, mechanical properties, and impact fracture behavior of 20MnV low alloy cryogenic as-rolled steel were evaluated. The results indicate that grain boundary carbide and acicular ferrite of the as-rolled steel were eliminated and a large amount of nanoscale VC precipitates were observed after 860 °C normalizing treatment. The as-normalized steel had lower strength, higher elongation, and impact absorbed energy than as-rolled steel. The optimal comprehensive mechanical property, especially the superior cryogenic toughness with impact absorbed energy values at -20 and -50 °C were 62 and 40 J, respectively, was obtained at 860 °C. The as-rolled steel contained shearing crack and necking crack simultaneously, while 860 °C as-normalized steel only contained deflecting necking crack, indicating the significant improvement of the toughness.

  6. Fatigue crack growth rates and fracture toughness of rapidly solidified Al-8. 5 pct Fe-1. 2 pct V-1. 7 pct Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hariprasad, S.; Sastry, S.M.L.; Jerina, K.L. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Lederich, R.J. )

    1994-05-01

    The room-temperature fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and fracture toughness were evaluated for different crack plane Orientations of an Al-8.5 pct Fe-1.2 pct V-1.7 pct Si alloy produced by planar flow casting (PFC) and atomized melt deposition (AMD) processes. For the alloy produced by the PFC process, properties were determined in six different orientations, including the short transverse directions S-T and S-L. Diffusion bonding and adhesive bonding methods were used to prepare specimens for determining FCGR and fracture toughness in the short transverse direction. Interparticle boundaries control fracture properties in the alloy produced by PFC. Fracture toughness of the PFC alloy varies from 13.4 MPa[radical][bar m] to 30.8 MPa[radical][bar m], depending on the orientation of the crack plane relative to the interparticle boundaries. Fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness are greater in the L-T, L-S, and T-S directions than in the T-L, S-T, and S-L orientations. The alloy produced by AMD does not exhibit anisotropy in fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth resistance in the as-deposited condition or in the extruded condition. The fracture toughness varies from 17.2 MPa[radical][bar m] to 18.5 MPa[radical][bar m] for the as-deposited condition and from 19.8 MPa[radical][bar m] to 21.0 MPa[radical][bar m] for the extruded condition. Fracture properties are controlled by intrinsic factors in the alloy produced by AMD. Fatigue crack growth rates of the AMD alloy are comparable to those of the PFC alloy in the L-T orientation. The crack propagation modes were studied by optical metallographic examination of crack-microstructure interactions and scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces.

  7. Fatigue crack growth rates and fracture toughness of rapidly solidified Al-8.5 pct Fe-1.2 pct V-1.7 pct Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariprasad, S.; Sastry, S. M. L.; Jerina, K. L.; Lederich, R. J.

    1994-05-01

    The room-temperature fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and fracture toughness were evaluated for different crack plane orientations of an Al-8.5 Pct Fe-1.2 Pct V-1.7 Pct Si alloy produced by planar flow casting (PFC) and atomized melt deposition (AMD) processes. For the alloy produced by the PFC process, properties were determined in six different orientations, including the short transverse directions S-T and S-L. Diffusion bonding and adhesive bonding methods were used to prepare specimens for determining FCGR and fracture toughness in the short transverse direction. Interparticle boundaries control fracture properties in the alloy produced by PFC. Fracture toughness of the PFC alloy varies from 13.4 MPa√m to 30.8 MPa√m, depending on the orientation of the crack plane relative to the interparticle boundaries. Fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness are greater in the L-T, L-S, and T-S directions than in the T-L, S-T, and S-L orientations. The alloy produced by AMD does not exhibit anisotropy in fracture toughness and fatigue crack growth resistance in the as-deposited condition or in the extruded condition. The fracture toughness varies from 17.2 MPa√m to 18.5 MPa√m for the as-deposited condition and from 19.8 MPa√m to 21.0 MPa√m for the extruded condition. Fracture properties are controlled by intrinsic factors in the alloy produced by AMD. Fatigue crack growth rates of the AMD alloy are comparable to those of the PFC alloy in the L-T orientation. The crack propagation modes were studied by optical metallographic examination of crack-microstructure interactions and scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution in Al 2014 Alloy Processed Through Multidirectional Cryoforging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Kumar, Nikhil; Yogesha, K. K.; Jayaganthan, R.; Nath, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of Al 2014 alloy subjected to cryoforging (MDF) to a cumulative strain of 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 were investigated in the present work. The deformed samples after 4 cycles at a cumulative strain of 2.4 shows the formation of ultrafine grain sizes in the range of 100-450 nm with high-angle grain boundaries as observed from TEM analysis. The tensile and hardness of the deformed sample were measured by Universal Testing machine and Vickers hardness Tester, respectively. The tests were also conducted for sample deformed at room temperature to compare with cryo-forged samples. The sample deformed at cryogenic temperature up to a cumulative strain 2.4 shows an improvement of tensile strength, hardness, and apparent fracture toughness (KQ) from 318 MPa to 470 MPa, 103HV to 171 HV, and 23.93 MPa √ m to 37.7 MPa √ m, respectively, with decrease in ductility from 18% to 6% as compared with solution-treated alloy. The cryo-forged Al 2014 alloy exhibits an increment of 7% in tensile strength, 3% in yield strength, and 3% in hardness up to cumulative true strain of 2.4 as compared to the samples forged at room temperature. The improvement in tensile properties of MDFed alloy is attributed to dislocation strengthening and grain boundary strengthening effect at both temperatures. The effective suppression of cross slip and climb at liquid nitrogen temperature improves the strength of cryo-forged sample better than that of room temperature-forged alloy.

  9. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution in Al 2014 Alloy Processed Through Multidirectional Cryoforging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Kumar, Nikhil; Yogesha, K. K.; Jayaganthan, R.; Nath, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    Mechanical properties and microstructure evolution of Al 2014 alloy subjected to cryoforging (MDF) to a cumulative strain of 1.2, 1.8, and 2.4 were investigated in the present work. The deformed samples after 4 cycles at a cumulative strain of 2.4 shows the formation of ultrafine grain sizes in the range of 100-450 nm with high-angle grain boundaries as observed from TEM analysis. The tensile and hardness of the deformed sample were measured by Universal Testing machine and Vickers hardness Tester, respectively. The tests were also conducted for sample deformed at room temperature to compare with cryo-forged samples. The sample deformed at cryogenic temperature up to a cumulative strain 2.4 shows an improvement of tensile strength, hardness, and apparent fracture toughness (KQ) from 318 MPa to 470 MPa, 103HV to 171 HV, and 23.93 MPa √ m to 37.7 MPa √ m, respectively, with decrease in ductility from 18% to 6% as compared with solution-treated alloy. The cryo-forged Al 2014 alloy exhibits an increment of 7% in tensile strength, 3% in yield strength, and 3% in hardness up to cumulative true strain of 2.4 as compared to the samples forged at room temperature. The improvement in tensile properties of MDFed alloy is attributed to dislocation strengthening and grain boundary strengthening effect at both temperatures. The effective suppression of cross slip and climb at liquid nitrogen temperature improves the strength of cryo-forged sample better than that of room temperature-forged alloy.

  10. Dose dependence of mechanical properties in tantalum and tantalum alloys after low temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang

    2008-01-01

    The dose dependence of mechanical properties was investigated for tantalum and tantalum alloys after low temperature irradiation. Miniature tensile specimens of three pure tantalum metals, ISIS Ta, Aesar Ta1, Aesar Ta2, and one tantalum alloy, Ta-1W, were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL to doses ranging from 0.00004 to 0.14 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range 60 C 100 oC. Also, two tantalum-tungsten alloys, Ta-1W and Ta-10W, were irradiated by protons and spallation neutrons in the LANSCE facility at LANL to doses ranging from 0.7 to 7.5 dpa and from 0.7 to 25.2 dpa, respectively, in the temperature range 50 C 160 oC. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature and at 250oC at nominal strain rates of about 10-3 s-1. All neutron-irradiated materials underwent progressive irradiation hardening and loss of ductility with increasing dose. The ISIS Ta experienced embrittlement at 0.14 dpa, while the other metals retained significant necking ductility. Such a premature embrittlement in ISIS Ta is believed to be because of high initial oxygen concentrations picked up during a pre-irradiation anneal. The Ta-1W and Ta-10W specimens irradiated in spallation condition experienced prompt necking at yield since irradiation doses for those specimens were high ( 0.7 dpa). At the highest dose, 25.2 dpa, the Ta-10W alloy specimen broke with little necking strain. Among the test materials, the Ta-1W alloy displayed the best combination of strength and ductility. The plastic instability stress and true fracture stress were nearly independent of dose. Increasing test temperature decreased strength and delayed the onset of necking at yield.

  11. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high Ti content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of Ti and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of Ti alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is presented.

  12. Nickel-Titanium Alloys: Corrosion "Proof" Alloys for Space Bearing, Components and Mechanism Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    An intermetallic nickel-titanium alloy, 60NiTi (60wt%Ni, 40wt%Ti), is shown to be a promising candidate tribological material for space mechanisms. 60NiTi offers a broad combination of physical properties that make it unique among bearing materials. 60NiTi is hard, electrically conductive, highly corrosion resistant, readily machined prior to final heat treatment, and is non-magnetic. Despite its high titanium content, 60NiTi is non-galling even under dry sliding. No other bearing alloy, metallic or ceramic, encompasses all of these attributes. Since 60NiTi contains such a high proportion of titanium and possesses many metallic properties, it was expected to exhibit poor tribological performance typical of titanium alloys, namely galling type behavior and rapid lubricant degradation. In this poster-paper, the oil-lubricated behavior of 60NiTi is studied.

  13. Design of experiment (DOE) study of biodegradable magnesium alloy synthesized by mechanical alloying using fractional factorial design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salleh, Emee Marina; Ramakrishnan, Sivakumar; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2014-06-01

    The biodegradable nature of magnesium (Mg) makes it a most highlighted and attractive to be used as implant materials. However, rapid corrosion rate of Mg alloys especially in electrolytic aqueous environment limits its performance. In this study, Mg alloy was mechanically milled by incorporating manganese (Mn) as alloying element. An attempt was made to study both effect of mechanical alloying and subsequent consolidation processes on the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. 2k-2 factorial design was employed to determine the significant factors in producing Mg alloy which has properties closes to that of human bones. The design considered six factors (i.e. milling time, milling speed, weight percentage of Mn, compaction pressure, sintering temperature and sintering time). Density and hardness were chosen as the responses for assessing the most significant parameters that affected the bulk properties of Mg-Mn alloys. The experimental variables were evaluated using ANOVA and regression model. The main parameter investigated was compaction pressure.

  14. Subtask 12F4: Effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of vanadium-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Loomis, B.A.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Up-to-date results on the effects of neutron irradiation on the impact properties and fracture behavior of V, V-Ti, V-Cr-Ti and V-Ti-Si alloys are presented in this paper, with an emphasis on the behavior of the U.S. reference alloys V-4Cr-4Ti containing 500-1000 wppm Si. Database on impact energy and cluctile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) has been established from Charpy impact tests of one-third-size specimens irradiated at 420{degrees}C-600{degrees}C up to {approx}50 dpa in lithium environment in fast fission reactors. To supplement the Charpy impact tests fracture behavior was also characterized by quantitative SEM fractography on miniature tensile and disk specimens that were irradiated to similar conditions and fractured at -196{degrees}C to 200{degrees}C by multiple bending. For similar irradiation conditions irradiation-induced increase in DBTT was influenced most significantly by Cr content, indicating that irradiation-induced clustering of Cr atoms takes place in high-Cr (Cr {ge} 7 wt.%) alloys. When combined contents of Cr and Ti were {le}10 wt.%, effects of neutron irradiation on impact properties and fracture behavior were negligible. For example, from the Charpy-impact and multiple-bend tests there was no indication of irradiation-induced embrittlement for V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si and the U.S. reference alloy V-4Cr-4Ti after irradiation to {approx}34 dpa at 420{degrees}C to 600{degrees}C, and only ductile fracture was observed for temperatures as low as -196{degrees}C. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Characterization and corrosion behaviour of CoNi alloys obtained by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Olvera, S.; Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Palomares, F.J.; Salas, E.; Arce, E.M.; Herrasti, P.

    2014-07-01

    CoNi alloys including Co{sub 30}Ni{sub 70}, Co{sub 50}Ni{sub 50} and Co{sub 70}Ni{sub 30} were prepared via mechanical alloying using Co and Ni powders. The crystallinity and short-range order were studied using X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the milling process increases the number of vacancies, especially around the Co atoms, while the milling time decreases the crystalline size and enhances the crystallinity. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterise the chemical composition of the samples surface. The magnetic properties were analysed using zero-field cooling, field cooling and a magnetic hysteresis loops. The magnetic saturation moment is approximately 1.05 μ{sub B}/atom; this value decreases with the mechanical alloying time, and it is proportional to the cobalt concentration. The polarization and impedance curves in different media (NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH) showed similar corrosion resistance values. The corrosion resistance increased in the order NaCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaOH. A good passivation layer was formed in NaOH due to the cobalt and nickel oxides on the particle surfaces. - Highlights: • Ni{sub x}Co{sub 100-x} alloys were synthesized by mechanical alloying • Milling time decrease size and enhances crystallinity. • Oxygen is not present in a significant percentage in bulk but is detected on the surface. • Magnetic saturation moment is 1.05 mB/atom and decrease with mechanical allowing time • Corrosion resistance is higher in NaOH than in NaCl or HCl solutions.

  16. Effect of high-temperature water and hydrogen on the fracture behavior of a low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, S.; Seifert, H.-P.; Spätig, P.; Que, Z.

    2016-09-01

    Structural integrity of reactor pressure vessels (RPV) is critical for safety and lifetime. Possible degradation of fracture resistance of RPV steel due to exposure to coolant and hydrogen is a concern. In this study tensile and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) tests in air (hydrogen pre-charged) and EFPM tests in hydrogenated/oxygenated high-temperature water (HTW) was done, using a low-alloy RPV steel. 2-5 wppm hydrogen caused embrittlement in air tensile tests at room temperature (25 °C) and at 288 °C, effects being more significant at 25 °C and in simulated weld coarse grain heat affected zone material. Embrittlement at 288 °C is strain rate dependent and is due to localized plastic deformation. Hydrogen pre-charging/HTW exposure did not deteriorate the fracture resistance at 288 °C in base metal, for investigated loading rate range. Clear change in fracture morphology and deformation structures was observed, similar to that after air tests with hydrogen.

  17. Influence of circumferential notch and fatigue crack on the mechanical integrity of biodegradable magnesium-based alloy in simulated body fluid.

    PubMed

    Bobby Kannan, M; Singh Raman, R K; Witte, F; Blawert, C; Dietzel, W

    2011-02-01

    Applications of magnesium alloys as biodegradable orthopaedic implants are critically dependent on the mechanical integrity of the implant during service. In this study, the mechanical integrity of an AZ91 magnesium alloy was studied using a constant extension rate tensile (CERT) method. The samples in two different geometries that is, circumferentially notched (CN), and circumferentially notched and fatigue cracked (CNFC), were tested in air and in simulated body fluid (SBF). The test results show that the mechanical integrity of the AZ91 magnesium alloy decreased substantially (∼50%) in both the CN and CNFC samples exposed to SBF. Fracture surface analysis revealed secondary cracks suggesting stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the alloy in SBF. PMID:21210510

  18. Effect of Grain Refinement on the Mechanical Behaviour of an Al6061 Alloy at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Valle, E.; Sabirov, I.; Murashkin, M. Yu.; Valiev, R. Z.; Bobruk, E. V.; Perez-Prado, M. T.

    2011-05-04

    A solution treated coarse grained (CG) Al6061 was subjected to high pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature resulting in the formation of a homogeneous ultra-fine grained (UFG) microstructure with an average grain size of 170 nm. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (RT) and liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT). The as-HPT UFG Al6061 alloy shows an increased strength at both RT and LNT. The decrease of testing temperature results in increased flow stress and in enhanced elongation to failure in both CG and UFG samples. The ratio {sigma}{sub y}{sup LNT}/{sigma}{sub y}{sup RT} was found to be larger for the CG Al6061 than for the UFG Al6061. Both surface relief and fracture surface observations were performed. The effect of the grain size and of the testing temperature on the mechanical behaviour of the Al6061 alloy is analyzed in detail. It is suggested that the solute atoms play an important role in the plastic deformation of the UFG Al6061 alloy.

  19. Synthesis of metastable aluminum-based intermetallics by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Srinivasan, S.; Desch, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    We have used mechanical alloying (MA) to prepare fine-grained powders of Al 25 at. % X (X = Ti, Zr, Hf) having the metastable cubic L1{sub 2} structure. Hexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 14}) is added to the milling media to avoid the agglomeration of the aluminum powder. Carbon from the decomposition of the hexane incorporates into the powder to form a fine dispersion of carbides. These carbides are beneficial because they limit grain growth during consolidation and add strength to the alloy. We have consolidated the mechanically alloyed powders using conventional hot-pressing and non-conventional dynamic pressing. We used hot pressing to consolidate mechanically alloyed L1{sub 2}-Al{sub 3}Ti powder in the presence of excess of Al. The compact has the DO{sub 22} structure. Its room-temperature compressive strength is 1.2 GPa (exceeding that of cast Al{sub 3}Ti by a factor of 10). At 400{degrees}C, the compressive strength decreases to 1 GPa. The ductility, which is negligible at room temperature, increases to 6% at 400{degrees}C. We used dynamic pressing to consolidate L1{sub 2}-Al{sub 5}CuZr{sub 2} powder. The compact, having the L1{sub 2} structure, has fine grains (44 nm) and a fine dispersion of ZrC precipitates (7 nm). Its hardness is in the range of 1030 kg mm{sup {minus}2}. Current efforts are to investigate ternary alloys based on fine-grained trialuminides which include a ductile second phase. 26 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  1. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.; Crews, John H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, theory avoiding fractional effects. A F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  2. Fracture mechanics analysis for various fiber/matrix interface loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber/matrix (F/M) cracking was analyzed to provide better understanding and guidance in developing F/M interface fracture toughness tests. Two configurations, corresponding to F/M cracking at a broken fiber and at the free edge, were investigated. The effects of mechanical loading, thermal cooldown, and friction were investigated. Each configuration was analyzed for two loadings: longitudinal and normal to the fiber. A nonlinear finite element analysis was performed to model friction and slip at the F/M interface. A new procedure for fitting a square-root singularity to calculated stresses was developed to determine stress intensity factors (K sub I and K sub II) for a bimaterial interface crack. For the case of F/M cracking at a broken fiber with longitudinal loading, crack tip conditions were strongly influenced by interface friction. As a result, an F/M interface toughness test based on this case was not recommended because nonlinear data analysis methods would be required. For the free edge crack configuration, both mechanical and thermal loading caused crack opening, thereby avoiding frictional effects. An F/M interface toughness test based on this configuration would provide data for K(sub I)/K(sub II) ratios of about 0.7 and 1.6 for fiber and radial normal loading, respectively. However, thermal effects must be accounted for in the data analysis.

  3. Effects of Aging Treatments on the Mechanical Behavior of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y.-K.; Tsay, L. W.; Chen, C.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of aging treatments on the mechanical properties and microstructures of Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al (Ti-15-3) alloy was evaluated using tensile, notched tensile, and J-integral tests. The properties for the one-step aged specimens (371 to 648 °C for 8 h) were compared with those for the two-step aged specimens (one-step aged + 426 °C/24 h). An increase in aging temperature of one-step aging resulted in increased notched tensile strength and fracture toughness of the Ti-15-3 alloy. The second-step aging at 426 °C for 24 h caused various degrees of hardening in the group of double aged specimens. Comparing to the one-step aged specimens, increased notch brittleness and decreased fracture toughness were observed in the two-step aged specimens. For the specimens subjected to aging at 648 °C, the formation of thick α layer at β grain boundaries resulted in lower tensile properties and fracture toughness. The fracture modes of the notch-brittle specimens were strongly affected by the distribution, size, and morphology of the α precipitates.

  4. Thermal mechanical modeling of cooling history and fracture development in inflationary basalt lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattenhorn, Simon A.; Schaefer, Conrad J.

    2008-03-01

    Thermal-mechanical analyses of isotherms in low-volume basalt flows having a range of aspect ratios agree with inferred isotherm patterns deduced from cooling fracture patterns in field examples on the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho, and highlight the caveats of analytical models of sheet flow cooling when considering low-volume flows. Our field observations show that low-volume lava flows have low aspect ratios (width divided by thickness), typically < 5. Four fracture types typically develop: column-bounding, column-normal, entablature (all of which are cooling fractures), and inflation fractures. Cooling fractures provide a proxy for isotherms during cooling and produce patterns that are strongly influenced by flow aspect ratio. Inflation fractures are induced by lava pressure-driven inflationary events and introduce a thermal perturbation to the flow interior that is clearly evidenced by fracture patterns around them. Inflation fracture growth occurs incrementally due to blunting of the lower tip within viscoelastic basalt, allowing the inflation fracture to pivot open. The final stage of growth involves propagation beyond the blunted tip towards the stress concentration at the tapered tip of a lava core, resulting in penetration of the core that causes quenching of the lava and the formation of a densely fractured entablature. We present numerical models that include the effects of inflation fractures on lava cooling and which support field-based inferences that inflation fractures depress the isotherms in the vicinity of the fracture, cause a subdivision of the lava core, control the location of the final portion of the lava flow to solidify, and cause significant changes in the local cooling fracture orientations. In addition to perturbing isotherms, inflation fractures cause a lava flow to completely solidify in a shorter amount of time than an identically shaped flow that does not contain an inflation fracture.

  5. Structural and Thermal Study of Nanocrystalline Fe-Al-B Alloy Prepared by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsallah, Hana Ibn; Sekri, Abderrahmen; Azabou, Myriam; Escoda, Luiza; Suñol, Joan Josep; Khitouni, Mohamed

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured iron-aluminum alloy of Fe-25 at. pct Al composition doped with 0.2 at. pct B was prepared by mechanical alloying. The phase transformations and structural changes occurring in the studied material during mechanical alloying and during subsequent heating were investigated by SEM, XRD, and DSC techniques. The patterns so obtained were analyzed using the Rietveld program. The alloyed powders were disordered Fe(Al) solid solutions and Fe2B boride phase. The Fe2B boride phase is formed after 4 hours of milling. The crystallite size reduction to the nanometer scale (5 to 8 nm) is accompanied by an increase in lattice strains. The powder milled for 40 hours was annealed at temperatures of 523 K, 823 K, 883 K, and 973 K (250 °C, 550 °C, 610 °C, and 700 °C) for 2 hours. Low temperatures annealing are responsible for the relaxation of the disordered structure, while high temperatures annealing enabled supersaturated Fe(Al) solid solutions to precipitate out fines Fe3Al, Fe2Al5, and Fe4Al13 intermetallics and, also the recrystallization and the grain growth phenomena.

  6. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: a rare injury mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Tosun, Haci Bayram; Kesgin, Engin; Karataş, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on brake pedal during collision in a traffic accident. Clinical evaluation is based on Ottawa Ankle Rules and a fracture is diagnosed; patient is started on daily activities at postoperative Week 8. This study aims to emphasize that Ottawa Ankle Rules are usually efficient for evaluating fractures of ankle, but clinicians should always make a detailed physical examination. PMID:26097627

  7. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture: a rare injury mechanism.

    PubMed

    Serbest, Sancar; Tiftikçi, Uğur; Tosun, Haci Bayram; Kesgin, Engin; Karataş, Metin

    2015-01-01

    Sprain of the ankle is undoubtedly a common injury during athletic activity, and the sprain can be also associated with fracture of the ankle. Isolated posterior malleolus fracture is a very rare condition, which is usually missed. Here, we are presenting a 37 years old female patient, who suffered injury secondary pressing on brake pedal during collision in a traffic accident. Clinical evaluation is based on Ottawa Ankle Rules and a fracture is diagnosed; patient is started on daily activities at postoperative Week 8. This study aims to emphasize that Ottawa Ankle Rules are usually efficient for evaluating fractures of ankle, but clinicians should always make a detailed physical examination. PMID:26097627

  8. Duplex precipitates and their effects on the room-temperature fracture behaviour of a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-03-23

    Duplex precipitates are presented in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy. They were characterized by the ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscope. Fine cooling precipitates with the size of several to tens of nanometres harden the matrix considerably at room temperature. Cracks are likely to initiate from precipitates, and coalesce and propagate quickly through the matrix due to the excessive hardening effect of cooling precipitates, which lead to the premature fracture of NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  9. Microstructure and Room Temperature Mechanical Properties of the Ni3Si-BASED Alloy with Titanium Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. K.; Fu, C. C.; Cai, Z. W.; Jian, S. R.; Jang, J. S. C.; Zhang, H. Z.; Hsu, H. C.

    2011-06-01

    The microstructure and room temperature (RT) mechanical properties of the Ni-15Si-2Nb-1Cr-3Ti-0.2B alloy were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and tensile test in air and vacuum. The results of tensile test revealed that the effect of Ti addition can significantly improve the elongation as well as ultimate tensile strength (UTS) (18.3% and 1320 MPa in air, 21% and 1600 MPa in vacuum) in comparison with the Ni-18Si-3Nb-1Cr-0.2B base alloy (10% and 1130 MPa in air, 14% and 1240 MPa in vacuum) at room temperature. In addition, the fracture surface of specimen after tensile test presents a typical transgranular ductile mode, with a fully dimpled fracture pattern. This indicates that the addition of Ti in the Ni-15Si-2Nb-1Cr-3Ti-0.2B alloy can effectively suppress the environmental embrittlement at room temperature. In addition, the Ni-15Si-2Nb-1Cr-3Ti-0.2B alloy exhibits insensitively to the strain rate both in air or vacuum at room temperature.

  10. Fracture behavior of a B2 Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr intermetallic alloy in the temperature range 300 to 1300 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raj, S. V.

    1992-01-01

    The fracture behavior of a B2 Ni-30Al-20Fe-0.05Zr (at. pct) alloy was investigated using results of tensile tests conducted in the temperature range 300-1300 K under initial strain rates that varied between 10 exp -6 and 10 exp -3/sec, together with results of deformation measurements reported by Raj et al. (1992). Microstructural observations revealed that the alloy had failed by transgranular cleavage fracture below 873 K and by ductile fracture, power-law cavitation, triple point cracking, and rupture above this temperautre. The fracture map constructed using fracture results is compared with those for other classes of materials, showing that the atomic bonding plays a significant role in the low-temperature ductility of NiAl-based alloys.

  11. A critical evaluation of the stress-corrosion cracking mechanism in high-strength aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Min; Pyun, Su-Il; Chun, Young-Gab

    1991-10-01

    Attempts have been made to elucidate the mechanism of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in high-strength Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys exposed to aqueous environments by considering the temperature dependence of SCC susceptibility based upon the anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement models. A quantitative correlation which involves the change of threshold stress intensity, K ISCC, with temperature on the basis of anodic dissolution has been developed with the aid of linear elastic fracture mechanics. From the derived correlation, it is concluded that the threshold stress intensity decreases as the test temperature increases. This suggestion is inconsistent with that predicted on the basis of hydrogen embrittlement. It is experimentally observed from the Al-Zn-Mg and Al-Li-Zr alloys that the threshold stress intensity, K,ISCC, decreases and the crack propagation rate, da/dt, over the stress intensity increases with increasing test temperature. From considering the change in SCC susceptibility with temperature, it is suggested that a gradual transition in the mechanism for the stress-corrosion crack propagation occurs from anodic dissolution in stage I, where the crack propagation rate increases sharply with stress intensity, to hydrogen embrittlement in stage II, where the crack propagation rate is independent of stress intensity.

  12. Cryogenic mechanical properties of low density superplastically formable Al-Li alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verzasconi, S. L.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The aerospace industry is considering the use of low density, superplastically formable (SPF) materials, such as Al-Li alloys in cryogenic tankage. SPF modifications of alloys 8090, 2090, and 2090+In were tested for strength and Kahn tear toughness. The results were compared to those of similar tests of 2219-T87, an alloy currently used in cryogenic tankage, and 2090-T81, a recently studied Al-Li alloy with exceptional cryogenic properties (1-9). With decreasing temperature, all materials showed an increase in strength, while most materials showed an increase in elongation and decrease in Kahn toughness. The indium addition to 2090 increased alloy strength, but did not improve the strength-toughness combination. The fracture mode was predominantly intergranular along small, recrystallized grains, with some transgranular fracture, some ductile rupture, and some delamination on large, unrecrystallized grains.

  13. Spinal cord injury-related bone impairment and fractures: an update on epidemiology and physiopathological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dionyssiotis, Y

    2011-09-01

    A sudden loss of motor function in segments of the spinal cord results in immobilisation and is complicated by bone loss and fractures in areas below the level of injury. Despite the acceptance of osteoporosis and fractures as two major public health problems, in people with spinal cord injuries, the mechanisms are not adequately investigated. Multiple risk factors for bone loss and fractures are present in this disabled population. This review is an update on the epidemiology and physiopathological mechanisms in spinal cord injury-related bone impairment and fractures. PMID:21885901

  14. Mechanical strength of laser-welded cobalt-chromium alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, N; Watanabe, I; Liu, J; Atsuta, M

    2004-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of the output energy of laser welding and welding methods on the joint strength of cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy. Two types of cast Co-Cr plates were prepared, and transverse sections were made at the center of the plate. The cut surfaces were butted against one another, and the joints welded with a laser-welding machine at several levels of output energy with the use of two methods. The fracture force required to break specimens was determined by means of tensile testing. For the 0.5-mm-thick specimens, the force required to break the 0.5-mm laser-welded specimens at currents of 270 and 300 A was not statistically different (p > 0.05) from the results for the nonwelded control specimens. The force required to break the 1.0-mm specimens double-welded at a current of 270 A was the highest value among the 1.0-mm laser-welded specimens. The results suggested that laser welding under the appropriate conditions improved the joint strength of cobalt- chromium alloy. PMID:15116400

  15. Microstructure/mechanical property relationships for various thermal treatments of Al-Cu-Mg-X PM aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal response and aging behavior of three 2XXX-series powder metallurgy aluminum alloys have been investigated, using Rockwell B hardness measurements, optical and electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive chemical analysis, in order to correlate microstructure with measured mechanical properties. Results of the thermal response study indicated that an increased solution heat treatment temperature was effective in resolutionizing large primary constituents in the alloy bearing more copper but had no apparent effect on the microconstituents of the other two. Aging studies conducted at room temperature and at 120, 150, and 180 C for times ranging up to 60 days indicated that classic aging response curves, as determined by hardness measurements, occurred at lower aging temperatures than were previously studied for these alloys, as well as at lower aging temperatures than are commonly used for ingot metallurgy alloys of similar compositions. Microstructural examination and fracture surface analysis of peak-aged tension specimens indicated that the highest tensile strengths are associated with extremely fine and homogeneous distributions of theta-prime or S-prime phases combined with low levels of both large constituent particles and dispersoids. Examination of the results suggest that refined solution heat treatments and lower aging temperatures may be necessary to achieve optimum mechanical properties for these 2XXX series alloys.

  16. Investigation of translaminar fracture in fibrereinforced composite laminates---applicability of linear elastic fracture mechanics and cohesive-zone model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Fang

    With the extensive application of fiber-reinforced composite laminates in industry, research on the fracture mechanisms of this type of materials have drawn more and more attentions. A variety of fracture theories and models have been developed. Among them, the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) and cohesive-zone model (CZM) are two widely-accepted fracture models, which have already shown applicability in the fracture analysis of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. However, there remain challenges which prevent further applications of the two fracture models, such as the experimental measurement of fracture resistance. This dissertation primarily focused on the study of the applicability of LEFM and CZM for the fracture analysis of translaminar fracture in fibre-reinforced composite laminates. The research for each fracture model consisted of two sections: the analytical characterization of crack-tip fields and the experimental measurement of fracture resistance parameters. In the study of LEFM, an experimental investigation based on full-field crack-tip displacement measurements was carried out as a way to characterize the subcritical and steady-state crack advances in translaminar fracture of fiber-reinforced composite laminates. Here, the fiber-reinforced composite laminates were approximated as anisotropic solids. The experimental investigation relied on the LEFM theory with a modification with respect to the material anisotropy. Firstly, the full-field crack-tip displacement fields were measured by Digital Image Correlation (DIC). Then two methods, separately based on the stress intensity approach and the energy approach, were developed to measure the crack-tip field parameters from crack-tip displacement fields. The studied crack-tip field parameters included the stress intensity factor, energy release rate and effective crack length. Moreover, the crack-growth resistance curves (R-curves) were constructed with the measured crack-tip field parameters

  17. Mechanical and petrophysical study of fractured shale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; David, C.; Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of shales are of major importance for upper crustal fault hydro-mechanical behavior. In particular, relationships between applied stress, textural anisotropy and transport properties. These relations can be investigated in the laboratory and here, was used shales from Tournemire (southern France). Triaxial tests were performed in order to determine the elasto-plastic yield envelope on 3 sets of samples with 3various bedding orientations (0°, 45°, and 90°). For each set, experiments were carried out at increasing confining pressures (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80MPa). They were performed under nominally drained conditions, at strain rates ranging between 5x10-7 s-1 - 1x10-5 s-1up to failure. During each experiment, P and S wave elastic velocities were continuously measured, in order to monitor the evolution of elastic anisotropy. Results show that the orientation of principal stress relative to bedding plays an important role on the brittle strength. Minimum strength is observed for samples deformed at 45° to bedding. Strength anisotropy increases both with confining pressure and strain rate. We interpret this result as the cohesive strength (and fracture toughness) being strain rate dependent. Although brittle failure and stress drops were systematically observed, deformation remained aseismic. This confirms that shales are good lithological candidates for shallow aseismic creep and slow slip events. Brittle failure was preceded by the development of P wave anisotropy, due to both crack growth and mineral re-orientation. Anisotropy variations were largest for samples deformed perpendicular to bedding, at the onset of rupture. Anisotropy reversal was observed at the highest confining pressures. For samples deformed parallel to bedding, the P wave anisotropy development is weaker. For both of these orientations, Thomsens parameters were inverted from the elastic wave data in order to quantify the evolution of elastic anisotropy. We

  18. Mechanical property determination of high conductivity metals and alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrod, D. L.; Vandergrift, E.; France, L.

    1973-01-01

    Pertinent mechanical properties of three high conductivity metals and alloys; namely, vacuum hot pressed grade S-200E beryllium, OFHC copper and beryllium-copper alloy no. 10 were determined. These materials were selected based on their possible use in rocket thrust chamber and nozzle hardware. They were procured in a form and condition similar to that which might be ordered for actual hardware fabrication. The mechanical properties measured include (1) tension and compression stress strain curves at constant strain rate (2) tensile and compressive creep, (3) tensile and compressive stress-relaxation behavior and (4) elastic properties. Tests were conducted over the temperature range of from 75 F to 1600 F. The resulting data is presented in both graphical and tabular form.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Highly Porous NiTi Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bram, Martin; Köhl, Manuel; Buchkremer, Hans Peter; Stöver, Detlev

    2011-07-01

    Highly porous NiTi alloys with pseudoelastic properties are attractive candidates for biomedical implants, energy absorbers, or damping elements. Recently, a new method was developed for net-shape manufacturing of such alloys combining metal injection molding with the application of suitable space-holder materials. A comprehensive study of mechanical properties was conducted on samples with a porosity of 51% and a pore size in the range of 300-500 μm. At low deformations <6%, fully pronounced pseudoelasticity was found. Even at higher strains, a shape recovery of maximum 6% took place, on which the onset of irreversible plastic deformation was superposed. Results of static compression tests were also used to calculate the energy-absorbing capacity. Fatigue of porous NiTi was investigated by cyclic loading up to 230,000 stress reversals. The failure mechanisms responsible for a reduction of shape recovery after an increased number of load cycles are discussed.

  20. Nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Due to a great combination of physical and mechanical properties, beta titanium alloys have become promising candidates in the field of chemical industry, aerospace and biomedical materials. The microstructure of beta titanium alloys is the governing factor that determines their properties and performances, especially the size scale, distribution and volume fraction of precipitate phase in parent phase matrix. Therefore in order to enhance the performance of beta titanium alloys, it is critical to obtain a thorough understanding of microstructural evolution in beta titanium alloys upon various thermal and/or mechanical processes. The present work is focusing on the study of nucleation mechanisms of refined alpha microstructure and super-refined alpha microstructure in beta titanium alloys in order to study the influence of instabilities within parent phase matrix on precipitates nucleation, including compositional instabilities and/or structural instabilities. The current study is primarily conducted in Ti-5Al-5Mo-5V-3Cr (wt%, Ti-5553), a commercial material for aerospace application. Refined and super-refined precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553 are obtained under specific accurate temperature controlled heat treatments. The characteristics of either microstructure are investigated in details using various characterization techniques, such as SEM, TEM, STEM, HRSTEM and 3D atom probe to describe the features of microstructure in the aspect of morphology, distribution, structure and composition. Nucleation mechanisms of refined and super-refined precipitates are proposed in order to fully explain the features of different precipitates microstructure in Ti-5553. The necessary thermodynamic conditions and detailed process of phase transformations are introduced. In order to verify the reliability of proposed nucleation mechanisms, thermodynamic calculation and phase field modeling simulation are accomplished using the database of simple binary Ti-Mo system

  1. Microstructures and mechanical properties of compositionally complex Co-free FeNiMnCr18 FCC solid solution alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Z.; Bei, H.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, a structurally-simple but compositionally-complex FeNiCoMnCr high entropy alloy was found to have excellent mechanical properties (e.g., high strength and ductility). To understand the potential of using high entropy alloys as structural materials for advanced nuclear reactor and power plants, it is necessary to have a thorough understanding of their structural stability and mechanical properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Furthermore, this requires us to develop a similar model alloy without Co because material with Co will make post-neutron-irradiation testing difficult due to the production of the 60Co radioisotope. In order to achieve this goal, a FCC-structured single-phase alloy with amore » composition of FeNiMnCr18 was successfully developed. This near-equiatomic FeNiMnCr18 alloy has good malleability and its microstructure can be controlled by thermomechanical processing. By rolling and annealing, the as-cast elongated-grained-microstructure is replaced by homogeneous equiaxed grains. The mechanical properties (e.g., strength and ductility) of the FeNiMnCr18 alloy are comparable to those of the equiatomic FeNiCoMnCr high entropy alloy. Both strength and ductility increase with decreasing deformation temperature, with the largest difference occurring between 293 and 77 K. Extensive twin-bands which are bundles of numerous individual twins are observed when it is tensile-fractured at 77 K. No twin bands are detected by EBSD for materials deformed at 293 K and higher. Ultimately the unusual temperature-dependencies of UTS and uniform elongation could be caused by the development of the dense twin substructure, twin-dislocation interactions and the interactions between primary and secondary twinning systems which result in a microstructure refinement and hence cause enhanced strain hardening and postponed necking.« less

  2. Tin oxidation mechanism in the Sn-Se alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duhalde, S.; Arcondo, B.; Nassif, E.; Sirkin, H.

    1988-06-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies performed on powdered samples of Sn-Se alloys allowed us to determine the influence of the chalcogenide bonds in the tin oxidation mechanism. The weak bonds present in the SnSe2 compound increase the tin oxidation kinetics, an effect which is not found in pure tin samples maintained in the same conditions.

  3. Effects of proof loads and combined mode loadings on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    This experimental program was undertaken to determine the effects of (1) combined tensile and bending loadings, (2) combined tensile and shear loadings, and (3) proof overloads on fracture and flaw growth characteristics of aerospace alloys. Tests were performed on four alloys: 2219-T87 aluminum, 5Al-2.5Sn (ELl) titanium, 6Al-4V beta STA titanium and high strength 4340 steel. Tests were conducted in room air, gaseous nitrogen at -200F (144K), liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen. Flat center cracked and surface flawed specimens, cracked tube specimens, circumferentially notched round bar and surface flawed cylindrical specimens were tested. The three-dimensional photoelastic technique of stress freezing and slicing was used to determine stress intensity factors for surface flawed cylindrical specimens subjected to tension or torsion. Results showed that proof load/temperature histories used in the tests have a small beneficial effect or no effect on subsequent fracture strength and flaw growth rates.

  4. About the Transformation Phase Zones of Shape Memory Alloys' Fracture Tests on Single Edge-Cracked Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillebot, V.; Lexcellent, C.; Vacher, P.

    2012-03-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloys is now well mastered. However, a hindrance to their sustainable use is the lack of knowledge of their fracture behavior. With the aim of filling this partial gap, fracture tests on edge-cracked specimens in NiTi have been made. Particular attention was paid to determine the phase transformation zones in the vicinity of the crack tip. In one hand, experimental kinematic fields are observed using digital image correlation showing strain localization around the crack tip. In the other hand, an analytical prediction, based on a modified equivalent stress criterion and taking into account the asymmetric behavior of shape memory alloys in tension-compression, provides shape and size of transformation outset zones. Experimental results are relatively in agreement with our analytical modeling.

  5. Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Michael C.

    1963-01-01

    Recent studies on the epidemiology and repair of fractures are reviewed. The type and severity of the fracture bears a relation to the age, sex and occupation of the patient. Bone tissue after fracture shows a process of inflammation and repair common to all members of the connective tissue family, but it repairs with specific tissue. Cartilage forms when the oxygen supply is outgrown. After a fracture, the vascular bed enlarges. The major blood supply to healing tissue is from medullary vessels and destruction of them will cause necrosis of the inner two-thirds of the cortex. Callus rapidly mineralizes, but full mineralization is achieved slowly; increased mineral metabolism lasts several years after fracture. PMID:13952119

  6. Spartan Release Engagement Mechanism (REM) stress and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marlowe, D. S.; West, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The revised stress and fracture analysis of the Spartan REM hardware for current load conditions and mass properties is presented. The stress analysis was performed using a NASTRAN math model of the Spartan REM adapter, base, and payload. Appendix A contains the material properties, loads, and stress analysis of the hardware. The computer output and model description are in Appendix B. Factors of safety used in the stress analysis were 1.4 on tested items and 2.0 on all other items. Fracture analysis of the items considered fracture critical was accomplished using the MSFC Crack Growth Analysis code. Loads and stresses were obtaind from the stress analysis. The fracture analysis notes are located in Appendix A and the computer output in Appendix B. All items analyzed met design and fracture criteria.

  7. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D.J.; Smith, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigate for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649/sup 0/C showed that the tensile, yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and is comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  8. Mechanical properties and microstructure of centrifugally cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, D. J.; Smith, H. H.

    1985-07-01

    The relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties of alloy 718 was investigated for two discs centrifugally cast at 50 and 200 rpm and given a duplex age heat treatment. The results of mechanical property tests at temperatures from 426 to 649 °C showed that the tensile yield and ultimate strength levels of both castings were similar. However, the creep-rupture properties were considerably enhanced for the casting produced at 200 rpm. Comparison of the radial and transverse creep properties of each disc indicated that creep life was generally independent of orientation, but ductility was greatest for specimens oriented transverse to the radial direction of the casting. Fatigue crack propagation performance was not greatly influenced by orientation or mold speed parameters and was comparable to wrought alloy 718 when compared on the basis of stress intensity factor range. The centrifugal casting process was found to produce a homogeneous microstructure free of porosity but with the expected segregation of solute alloying elements to Laves and carbide phases. The effect of the as-cast microstructure on the mechanical behavior and the potential influence of hot isostatic pressing to improve the microstructure are discussed.

  9. Determination of parameters of the Johnson-Cook model for the description of deformation and fracture of titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, A. E.; Gladky, I. L.; Kraus, E. I.

    2015-03-01

    Stress-strain curves of dynamic loading of VT6, OT4, and OT4-0 titanium-based alloys are constructed on the basis of experimental data, and the Johnson-Cook model parameters are determined. Results of LS-DYNA simulations of the processes of deformation and fracture of the fan casing after its high-velocity impact with a fan blade simulator are presented.

  10. Mechanical test and fractal analysis on anisotropic fracture of cortical bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Dagang; Chen, Bin; Ye, Wei; Gou, Jihua; Fan, Jinghong

    2015-12-01

    The mechanical properties of the cortical bone of fresh bovine femora along three different directions are tested through four-point bending experiments. It is indicated that the fracture energy along the transversal direction of the bone is distinctly larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture surfaces of the three different directions are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is shown that the roughness of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is obviously larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. It is also revealed that the osteons in the bone are perpendicular to the fracture surface of the transversal direction and parallel to the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. Based on these experimental results, the fractal dimensions of the fracture surfaces of different directions are calculated by box-counting method in MATLAB. The calculated results show that the fractal dimension of the fracture surface of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the fracture surfaces of the longitudinal and radial directions. The fracture energies of different directions are also calculated based on their fractal models. It is denoted that the fracture energy of the transversal direction is remarkably larger than those of the longitudinal and radial directions. The calculated results are in good agreement with the tested results.

  11. Deformation and fracture of a composite material based on a high-strength maraging steel covered with a melt-quenched Co69Fe4Cr4Si12B11 alloy layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevost'yanov, M. A.; Kolmakov, A. G.; Molokanov, V. V.; Zabolotnyi, V. T.; Umnov, P. P.; Umnova, N. V.

    2011-04-01

    Multifractal analysis is used to study the deformation and fracture of a promising composite material consisting of a wire base made of K17N9M14 maraging steel covered with a surface layer made from a Co69Fe4Cr4Si12B11 amorphous alloy. As compared to its components, this material has a substantially better set of the mechanical properties.

  12. Effects of Strain Rates on Mechanical Properties and Fracture Mechanism of DP780 Dual Phase Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengci; Kang, Yonglin; Zhu, Guoming; Kuang, Shuang

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of DP780 dual phase steel were measured by quasi-static and high-speed tensile tests at strain rates between 0.001 and 1000 s-1 at room temperature. The deformation and fracture mechanisms were analyzed by observation of the tensile fracture and microstructure near the fracture. Dynamic factor and feret ratio quantitative methods were applied to study the effect of strain rate on the microstructure and properties of DP780 steel. The constitutive relation was described by a modified Johnson-Cook and Zerilli-Armstrong model. The results showed that the strain rate sensitivity of yield strength is bigger than that of ultimate tensile strength; as strain rate increased, the formation of microcracks and voids at the ferrite/martensite interface can be alleviated; the strain rate effect is unevenly distributed in the plastic deformation region. Moreover, both models can effectively describe the experimental results, while the modified Zerilli-Armstrong model is more accurate because the strain-hardening rate of this model is independent of strain rate.

  13. Chemically- and mechanically-mediated influences on the transport and mechanical characteristics of rock fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Min, K.-B.; Rutqvist, J.; Elsworth, D.

    2009-02-01

    A model is presented to represent changes in the mechanical and transport characteristics of fractured rock that result from coupled mechanical and chemical effects. The specific influence is the elevation of dissolution rates on contacting asperities, which results in a stress- and temperature-dependent permanent closure. A model representing this pressure-dissolution-like behavior is adapted to define the threshold and resulting response in terms of fundamental thermodynamic properties of a contacting fracture. These relations are incorporated in a stress-stiffening model of fracture closure to define the stress- and temperature-dependency of aperture loss and behavior during stress and temperature cycling. These models compare well with laboratory and field experiments, representing both decoupled isobaric and isothermal responses. The model was applied to explore the impact of these responses on heated structures in rock. The result showed a reduction in ultimate induced stresses over the case where chemical effects were not incorporated, with permanent reduction in final stresses after cooling to ambient conditions. Similarly, permeabilities may be lower than they were in the case where chemical effects were not considered, with a net reduction apparent even after cooling to ambient temperature. These heretofore-neglected effects may have a correspondingly significant impact on the performance of heated structures in rock, such as repositories for the containment of radioactive wastes.

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of novel W80Ni10Nb10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, R.; Patra, A.; Karak, S. K.; Pattanaik, A.; Mishra, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured tungsten (W) based alloy with nominal composition of W80Ni10Nb10 (in wt. %) was synthesized by mechanical alloying of elemental powders of tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), niobium (Nb) in a high energy planetary ball-mill for 20 h using chrome steel as grinding media and toluene as process control agent followed by compaction at 500 MPa pressure for 5 mins and sintering at 1500°C for 2 h in Ar atmosphere. The phase evolution and the microstructure of the milled powder and consolidated product were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The crystallite size of W in W80Ni10Nb10 powder was reduced from 100 μm at 0 h to 45.6 nm at 10 h and 34.1 nm at 20 h of milling whereas lattice strain increases to 35% at 20 h of milling. The dislocation density shows sharp increase up to 5 h of milling and the rate of increase drops beyond 5 to 20 h of milling. The lattice parameter of tungsten in W80Ni10Nb10 expanded upto 0.04% at 10 h of milling and contracted upto 0.02% at 20 h of milling. The SEM micrograph revealed the presence of spherical and elongated particles in W80Ni10Nb10 powders at 20 h of milling. The particle size decreases from 100 μm to 2 μm with an increase in the milling time from 0 to 20 hours. The crystallite size of W in milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy as evident from bright field TEM image was in well agreement with the measured crystallite size from XRD. Structure of W in 20 h milled W80Ni10Nb10 alloy was identified by indexing of selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern. Formation of NbNi intermetallic was evident from XRD pattern and SEM micrograph of sintered alloy. Maximum sinterability of 90.8% was achieved in 20 h milled sintered alloy. Hardness and wear study was also conducted to investigate the mechanical behaviour of the sintered product. Hardness of W80Ni10Nb10 alloy reduces with increasing load whereas wear rate increases with increasing load. The evaluated

  15. Fracture mechanics parameters for cracks on a slightly undulating interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lin; Qu, Jianmin

    1993-11-01

    Typical bimaterial interfaces are nonplanar due to surface facets or roughness. Crack-tip stress fields of an interface crack must be influenced by nonplanarity of the interface. Consequently, interface toughness is affected. The crack-tip fields of a finite crack on an elastic/rigid interface with periodic undulation are studied. Particular emphasis is given to the fracture mechanics parameters, such as the stress intensity factors, crack-tip energy release rate, and crack-tip mode mixity. When the amplitude of interface undulation is very small relative to the crack length (which is the case for rough interfaces), asymptotic analysis is used to convert the nonplanarity effects into distributed dislocations located on the planar interface. Then, the resulting stress fields near the crack tip are obtained by using the Fourier integral transform method. It is found that the stress fields at the crack tip are strongly influenced by nonplanarity of the interface. Generally speaking, nonplanarity of the interface tends to shield the crack tip by reducing the crack-tip stress concentration.

  16. Fracture Mechanics Analyses for Interface Crack Problems - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Shivakumar, Kunigal; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in fracture mechanics analyses of the interfacial crack problem are reviewed. The intent of the review is to renew the awareness of the oscillatory singularity at the crack tip of a bimaterial interface and the problems that occur when calculating mode mixity using numerical methods such as the finite element method in conjunction with the virtual crack closure technique. Established approaches to overcome the nonconvergence issue of the individual mode strain energy release rates are reviewed. In the recent literature many attempts to overcome the nonconvergence issue have been developed. Among the many approaches found only a few methods hold the promise of providing practical solutions. These are the resin interlayer method, the method that chooses the crack tip element size greater than the oscillation zone, the crack tip element method that is based on plate theory and the crack surface displacement extrapolation method. Each of the methods is validated on a very limited set of simple interface crack problems. However, their utility for a wide range of interfacial crack problems is yet to be established.

  17. Creep and stress rupture of oxide dispersion strengthened mechanically alloyed Inconel alloy MA 754

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howson, T. E.; Tien, J. K.; Stulga, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The creep and stress rupture behavior of the mechanically alloyed oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base alloy MA 754 was studied at 760, 982 and 1093 C. Tensile specimens with a fine, highly elongated grain structure, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal grain direction were tested at various stresses in air under constant load. It was found that the apparent stress dependence was large, with power law exponents ranging from 19 to 33 over the temperature range studied. The creep activation energy, after correction for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, was close to but slightly larger than the activation energy for self diffusion. Rupture was intergranular and the rupture ductility as measured by percentage elongation was generally low, with values ranging from 0.5 to 16 pct. The creep properties are rationalized by describing the creep rates in terms of an effective stress which is the applied stress minus a resisting stress consistent with the alloy microstructure. Values of the resisting stress obtained through a curve fitting procedure are found to be close to the values of the particle by-pass stress for this oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, as calculated from the measured oxide particle distribution.

  18. The effects of artificial aging on the microstructure and fracture toughness of Al-Cu-Li alloy 2195

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. S.; Kuruvilla, A. K.; Malone, T. W.; Stanton, W. P.

    1998-10-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have shown promise for aerospace applications, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has selected the aluminum-lithium Alloy 2195 for the main structural alloy of the super light weight tank (SLWT) for the space shuttle. This alloy has significantly higher strength than conventional 2xxx alloys (such as 2219) at both ambient and cryogenic temperatures. If properly processed and heat treated, this alloy can display higher fracture toughness at cryogenic temperature than at ambient temperature. However, the properties of production materials have shown greater variation than those of other established alloys, as is the case with any new alloy that is being transitioned to a demanding application. Recently, some commercial 2195 plates for the SLWT program were rejected, mostly due to low CFT or FTR at ambient and cryogenic temperatures. Investigation of the microstructure property relationships of Al-Cu-Li based alloys indicates that the poor fracture toughness properties can be attributed to excessive T1 precipitation at subgrain boundaries. Lowering the aging temperature is one way to avoid excessive T1 precipitation at subgrain boundaries. However, this approach results in a significant drop in yield strength. In addition, low-temperature aging is associated with sluggish aging kinetics, which are not desirable for industrial mass production. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to develop an aging process that can improve fracture toughness without sacrificing yield and tensile strength. A multistep heating-rate controlled (MSRC) aging treatment has been developed that can improve the cryogenic fracture toughness of aluminum-lithium Alloy 2195. At the same levels of yield strength (YS), this treatment results in considerably higher fracture toughness than that found in Alloy 2195, which has received conventional (isothermal) aging. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the new treatment greatly reduces the

  19. Mechanical properties and microstructures of dental cast Ti-6Nb-4Cu, Ti-18Nb-2Cu, and Ti-24Nb-1Cu alloys.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takada, Yukyo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties -tensile strength, yield strength, elongation after fracture, and Vickers hardness- and alloy phases of the dental cast alloys Ti-6%Nb-4%Cu, Ti-18%Nb-2%Cu, and Ti-24%Nb-1%Cu were investigated. Ti-6%Nb-4%Cu consisted of a single α-phase, while Ti-18%Nb-2%Cu and Ti-24%Nb-1%Cu consisted of α- and β-phases. The tensile strengths, yield strengths, and hardnesses of these alloys were higher than those of Ti-5%Cu and Ti-30%Nb; however, their breaking elongations were smaller. These differences in the mechanical properties are attributable to solid-solution strengthening or to precipitation strengthening by the dual-phase (α+β) structure. Thus, Ti-Nb-Cu alloys are suitable for use in high-strength dental prostheses, such as implantretained superstructures and narrow-diameter implants. PMID:27477221

  20. Ductile Fracture Prediction in Rotational Incremental Forming for Magnesium Alloy Sheets Using Combined Kinematic/Isotropic Hardening Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc-Toan; Park, Jin-Gee; Kim, Young-Suk

    2010-08-01

    To predict the ductile fracture of a magnesium alloy sheet when using rotational incremental forming, a combined kinematic and isotropic hardening law is implemented and evaluated from the histories of the ductile fracture value ( I) using a finite element analysis. Here, the criterion for a ductile fracture, as developed by Oyane ( J. Mech. Work. Technol., 1980, vol. 4, pp. 65-81), is applied via a user material based on a finite element analysis. To simulate the effect of the large amount of heat generation at elements in the contact area due to the friction energy of the rotational tool-specimen interface on the equivalent stress-strain evolution in incremental forming, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model was applied and the results compared with equivalent stress-strain curves obtained from tensile tests at elevated temperatures. The finite element (FE) simulation results for a ductile fracture were compared with the experimental results for a (80 mm × 80 mm × 25 mm) square shape with a 45 and 60 deg wall angle, respectively, and a (80 mm × 80 mm × 20 mm) square shape with a 70 deg wall angle. The trends of the FE simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental results. Finally, the effects of the process parameters, i.e., the tool down-step and tool radius, on the ductile fracture value and FLC at fracture (FLCF) were also investigated using the FE simulation results.

  1. Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B. V.

    2002-12-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

  2. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Andrew Duncan, A; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2009-04-27

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  3. LITERATURE SURVEY OF GASEOUS HYDROGEN EFFECTS ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBON AND LOW ALLOY STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P; Robert Sindelar, R; Thad Adams, T

    2007-04-18

    Literature survey has been performed for a compendium of mechanical properties of carbon and low alloy steels following hydrogen exposure. The property sets include yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, uniform elongation, reduction of area, threshold stress intensity factor, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth. These properties are drawn from literature sources under a variety of test methods and conditions. However, the collection of literature data is by no means complete, but the diversity of data and dependency of results in test method is sufficient to warrant a design and implementation of a thorough test program. The program would be needed to enable a defensible demonstration of structural integrity of a pressurized hydrogen system. It is essential that the environmental variables be well-defined (e.g., the applicable hydrogen gas pressure range and the test strain rate) and the specimen preparation be realistically consistent (such as the techniques to charge hydrogen and to maintain the hydrogen concentration in the specimens).

  4. Mechanically alloyed Mo-Si-B alloys with a continuous a-Mo matrix and improved mechanical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, M.; Franz, S.; Heilmaier, M.; Schneibel, Joachim H; Jehanno, P.; Boening, Mike Boening; Kestler, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical alloying (MA) followed by cold isostatic pressing (CIPing), sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) was used to prepare Mo-base silicide alloys consisting of a Mo(Si) solid solution and the intermetallic phases Mo{sub 3}Si and Mo{sub 5}SiB{sub 2}. The microstructural development during milling of both binary Mo-Si and Mo-B and ternary Mo-Si-B powder mixtures was evaluated. While obtaining a supersaturated solid solution requires rather long milling times, domain size (which correlates with the grain size) is reduced to below 100 {angstrom} after about 10 h of milling. After heat treatment and consolidation the microstructure reveals a continuous {alpha}-Mo matrix with embedded, uniformly distributed intermetallic particles. The establishment of such a microstructure is beneficial for the mechanical properties since, as compared to a discontinuous {alpha}-Mo matrix, it decreases the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature (BDTT) by about 150 K.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Low Alloyed MnB Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kaishuang; Bai, Bingzhe

    2010-08-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of a low alloyed MnB cast steel designed for coupler castings of trucks were studied. The results show that the microstructure of the MnB cast steel after water quenching is lath martensite and a small amount of massive islands in the matrix of lath martensite. The average size of the martensite packets is about 10 μm in length. Carbides precipitated dispersively at the tempering temperature of 450 °C. The carbides are slender and fibrous, of which the microstructure was θ-phase (Fe, Mn)3C characterized by TEM. The MnB cast steel has good hardenability and tempering stability. Excellent combination of strength, ductility and low-temperature toughness were obtained after water-quenching and 450 °C tempering: Rm = 960-1040 MPa, ReL = 880-900 MPa, A = 19-21%, Z = 56-58%. Especially, the impact energy of the Charpy V-Notch (CVN) specimens reached 70-88 J at -40 °C. The fracture mechanism is transcrystalline fracture both for ambient temperature uniaxial tensile test specimens and for CVN impact test specimens broken at -40 °C, where the whole surfaces were manifested as voids and dimples.

  6. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF 9Cr-1MoV AND THERMALLY AGED ALLOY 617 FOR ADVANCED REACTOR APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K; Sokolov, Mikhail A; Chen, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Nickel-base Alloy 617 is being considered as a structural material for application in the secondary heat exchanger of the New Generation Nuclear Plant, a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Thermal aging of Alloy 617 plate and welds is being performed with tensile, Charpy impact, and fracture toughness tests conducted at temperatures to 950 C. Results of testing for thermal aging to 5,300 h have been obtained and are presented; varying effects of thermal aging temperature and time on fracture toughness are observed. The 9Cr-1MoV (Grade 91) ferritic steel is a candidate for structural applications in the sodium fast reactor. Fracture toughness testing of unaged Grade 91 steel has been performed to evaluate specimen size effects in preparation for future testing of the material in the thermally aged condition. Results for material in the mill-annealed and heat treated conditions are presented and show that this heat of Grade 91 steel does not indicate a small specimen bias on the fracture toughness Master Curve reference temperature.

  7. Comparative Study on Failure Prediction in Warm Forming Processes of Mg Alloy Sheet by the FEM and Ductile Fracture Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Young-Seon

    2014-04-01

    An important concern in metal forming is whether the desired deformation can be accomplished without any failure of the material, even at elevated temperatures. This paper describes the utilization of ductile fracture criteria in conjunction with the finite element (FE) method for predicting the onset of fracture in warm metal working processes of magnesium alloy sheets. The uniaxial tensile tests of AZ31 alloy sheets with a thickness of 3 mm and FE simulations were performed to calculate the critical damage values for three kinds of ductile fracture criteria. The critical damage values for each criterion were expressed as the function of strain rate at various temperatures. In order to find out the best criterion for failure prediction, Erichsen cupping tests under isothermal conditions were carried out at various temperatures and punch velocities. Based on the plastic deformation histories obtained from FE analysis of the Erichsen cupping tests and the critical damage value curves, the initiation time and location of fracture were predicted under bi-axial tensile conditions. As a result, Cockcroft-Latham's criterion showed good agreement with the experiments.

  8. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustion of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.

  9. Unraveling cyclic deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy using in situ neutron diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke; Liaw, Peter K.

    2014-12-23

    In the current study, the deformation mechanisms of a rolled magnesium alloy were investigated under cyclic loading using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. The relationship between the macroscopic cyclic deformation behavior and the microscopic response at the grain level was established. The neutron diffraction results indicate that more and more grains are involved in the twinning and detwinning deformation process with the increase of fatigue cycles. The residual twins appear in the early fatigue life, which is responsible for the cyclic hardening behavior. The asymmetric shape of the hysteresis loop is attributed to the early exhaustionmore » of the detwinning process during compression, which leads to the activation of dislocation slips and rapid strain-hardening. The critical resolved shear stress for the activation of tensile twinning closely depends on the residual strain developed during cyclic loading. In the cycle before the sample fractured, the dislocation slips became active in tension, although the sample was not fully twinned. The increased dislocation density leads to the rise of the stress concentration at weak spots, which is believed to be the main reason for the fatigue failure. Furthermore, the deformation history greatly influences the deformation mechanisms of hexagonal-close-packed-structured magnesium alloy during cyclic loading.« less

  10. Mechanical and petrophysical study of fractured shale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; David, C.; Henry, P.; Guglielmi, Y.; Gout, C.; Dick, P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding of the mechanical and physical properties of shales is of major importance in many fields such as faults hydro-mechanical behavior, cap-rock and unconventional reservoir studies or nuclear waste disposal. In particular, relationships between fluid transport properties, applied stress and textural anisotropy are critical both in intact and fractured shales. Therefore, these relations need to be investigated in the laboratory in order to have a better understanding on in-situ mechanisms. Hence, the mechanical behavior and the petrophysical properties of Toarcian shale of the Tournemire underground laboratory (France) have been investigated. The petrophysical properties have been measured along a 20 meters core drilled through a fault zone from the Tournemire tunnel. Along the core, P and S waves velocity and anisotropy, as well as magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured. In addition, conventional triaxial tests have been performed in order to determine the elasto-plastic yield envelope on three sets of samples with different orientations relative to bedding (0°, 45°, and 90° to the vertical axe). For each set, six experiments were carried out at increasing confining pressures (2.5, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80MPa). Experiments were performed in dry conditions, at a strain rate of 5x10-7 s-1 up to failure. During each experiment, P and S wave elastic velocities were continuously measured along different directions, in order to assess both P wave anisotropy and shear wave splitting and their evolutions with deformation. Our results show that brittle failure is preceded by the development of P wave anisotropy and shear wave splitting, due to crack re-opening and crack growth. However, the orientation of principal stress components relative to the bedding plane plays an important role on both the brittle strength, as well as on the magnitude of shear-enhanced P wave velocity anisotropy and S wave splitting. Our perspective is now to perform

  11. The effect of minor additions of titanium on the fracture toughness of Fe-12Ni alloys at 77K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, H.; Yin, C.; Sargent, G.

    1978-01-01

    Titanium additions ranging from 0.18 to 0.99 atomic percent and heat treatments of 2 hours at 550, 685 and 820 C respectively followed by a water quench were considered. Cubic and rectangular shaped inclusions were noted in the SEM fractographs of the alloys with the Ti additions. A fine precipitate was observed by TEM for the Fe-12Ni-0.18Ti alloys heat treated at 550 C; this precipitate was not observed for the 685 and 820 C heat treatments of the same alloy. Auger mappings of the fracture surfaces indicated a weak to moderate association of the interstitials C, N and O with Ti, the degree of which depended on the particular interstitial and the heat treatment temperature.

  12. Metastable phases in mechanically alloyed aluminum germanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Yvon, P.J.; Schwarz, R.B.

    1993-03-01

    Aluminum and germanium form a simple eutectic system with no stable intermetallic phase, and limited mutual solubility. We report the formation of a metastable rhombohedral,{gamma}{sub 1} phase by mechanically alloying aluminum and germanium powders. This phase, which appears for compositions between 20 and 50 at. % germanium, has also been observed in rapidly quenched alloys, but there is disagreement as to its composition. By measuring the heat of crystallization as a function of composition, we determined the composition of the {gamma}{sub 1} phase to be Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30}. We also produced Al{sub 70}Ge{sub 30} by arc melting the pure elements, followed by splat-quenching at a cooling rate in the range of 10{sup 8} K s{sup {minus}1}. This method produced two metastable phases, one of which was found to be the {gamma}{sub 1} phase obtained by mechanical alloying. The other was a monoclinic phase reported earlier in the literature as {gamma}{sub 2}.

  13. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    ... commonly happen because of car accidents, falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the bones. Overuse can cause stress fractures, which are very small cracks in the ...

  14. Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    A fracture is a break, usually in a bone. If the broken bone punctures the skin, it is called an open ... falls, or sports injuries. Other causes are low bone density and osteoporosis, which cause weakening of the ...

  15. Optimizing strength and fracture toughness of a cast titanium alloy through heat treatment and microstructure control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Amy C.

    of fracture controlled by a crack initiation and propagation process within a single grain that comprises a large fraction of the specimen cross-section. Thus, once a large crack initiated, minimal additional strain was required to propagate the crack. Both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms were apparent in the fracture toughness study of the castings. The fracture initiation toughness was enhanced by secondary cracking and significant blunting at the crack tip as evidenced by the presence of strain-induced void formation within a large process zone. Large alpha colonies located at the transition between the fatigue pre-crack and tensile crack growth regions limited the fracture initiation toughness by promoting easy crack growth along a significant fraction of the crack front. Thus, limiting the alpha colony size should enhance the fracture initiation toughness. The best crack propagation resistance (tearing modulus) was observed from specimens with large alpha colonies and large prior beta grains. Enhancing the size of these features increased the surface roughness, and consequently the tearing modulus, due to greater crack deflection, crack bifurcation, and shear ligament toughening from the larger alpha colonies and prior beta grains. Crack bridging by the ductile beta phase was also observed and should enhance the tearing modulus. When compared to the hot-rolled and annealed plate, the graphite mold castings exhibited better fracture initiation toughness and crack propagation resistance. However, the wrought plate maintained relatively good fracture initiation toughness and crack propagation resistance as a result of the continuous ductile beta matrix present in the microstructure.

  16. Neck fracture of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem following total hip arthroplasty: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Grivas, Theodoros B; Savvidou, Olga D; Psarakis, Spyridon A; Bernard, Pierre-Francois; Triantafyllopoulos, George; Kovanis, Ioannis; Alexandropoulos, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Fractures of the neck of the femoral component have been reported in uncemented total hip replacements, however, to our knowledge, no fractures of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy femoral stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite have been reported in the medical literature. Case presentation This case report describes a fracture of the neck of a cementless forged titanium alloy stem coated in the proximal third with hydroxy-apatite. Conclusion The neck of the femoral stem failed from fatigue probably because of a combination of factors described analytically below. PMID:18062807

  17. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  18. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects.

    PubMed

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  19. An extension of fracture mechanics/technology to larger and smaller cracks/defects

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Fracture mechanics/technology is a key science and technology for the design and integrity assessment of the engineering structures. However, the conventional fracture mechanics has mostly targeted a limited size of cracks/defects, say of from several hundred microns to several tens of centimeters. The author and his group has tried to extend that limited size and establish a new version of fracture technology for very large cracks used in geothermal energy extraction and for very small cracks/defects or damage often appearing in the combination of mechanical and electronic components of engineering structures. Those new versions are reviewed in this paper. PMID:19907123

  20. Mechanisms and Management of Stress Fractures in Physically Active Persons

    PubMed Central

    Romani, William A.; Gieck, Joe H.; Perrin, David H.; Saliba, Ethan N.; Kahler, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the anatomy of bone and the physiology of bone remodeling as a basis for the proper management of stress fractures in physically active people. Data Sources: We searched PubMed for the years 1965 through 2000 using the key words stress fracture, bone remodeling, epidemiology, and rehabilitation. Data Synthesis: Bone undergoes a normal remodeling process in physically active persons. Increased stress leads to an acceleration of this remodeling process, a subsequent weakening of bone, and a higher susceptibility to stress fracture. When a stress fracture is suspected, appropriate management of the injury should begin immediately. Effective management includes a cyclic process of activity and rest that is based on the remodeling process of bone. Conclusions/Recommendations: Bone continuously remodels itself to withstand the stresses involved with physical activity. Stress fractures occur as the result of increased remodeling and a subsequent weakening of the outer surface ofthe bone. Once a stress fracture is suspected, a cyclic management program that incorporates the physiology of bone remodeling should be initiated. The cyclic program should allow the physically active person to remove the source of the stress to the bone, maintain fitness, promote a safe return to activity, and permit the bone to heal properly. PMID:16558676

  1. A numerical model of hydro-thermo-mechanical coupling in a fractured rock mass

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, K.M.

    1996-06-01

    Coupled hydro-thermo-mechanical codes with the ability to model fractured materials are used for predicting groundwater flow behavior in fractured aquifers containing thermal sources. The potential applications of such a code include the analysis of groundwater behavior within a geothermal reservoir. The capability of modeling hydro-thermo systems with a dual porosity, fracture flow model has been previously developed in the finite element code, FEHM. FEHM has been modified to include stress coupling with the dual porosity feature. FEHM has been further developed to implicitly couple the dependence of fracture hydraulic conductivity on effective stress within two dimensional, saturated aquifers containing fracture systems. The cubic law for flow between parallel plates was used to model fracture permeability. The Bartin-Bandis relationship was used to determine the fracture aperture within the cubic law. The code used a Newton Raphson iteration to implicitly solve for six unknowns at each node. Results from a model of heat flow from a reservoir to the moving fluid in a single fracture compared well with analytic results. Results of a model showing the increase in fracture flow due to a single fracture opening under fluid pressure compared well with analytic results. A hot dry rock, geothermal reservoir was modeled with realistic time steps indicating that the modified FEHM code does successfully model coupled flow problems with no convergence problems.

  2. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL STRENGTH OF MATERIALS APPROACH TO DESIGN WITH THE FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Ceylan

    2002-04-30

    The objective of this activity is to show that the use of the traditional strength of materials approach to the drip shield and the waste package (WP) designs is bounding and appropriate when compared to the fracture mechanics approach. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the failure assessment diagrams for the two materials at issue: Ti-7 and Alloy 22. This calculation is intended for use in support of the license application design of the drip shield and the WP. This activity is associated with the drip shield and the WP designs. The activity evaluation for work package number P32 12234F2, included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 1, p. A-6), has determined that the development of this document is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' requirements. The control of the electronic management of data is accomplished in accordance with the methods specified in Reference 1, Section 10. AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analysis'' (Ref. 2), is used to develop and document the calculation.

  3. Analysis of seismic sources for different mechanisms of fracture growth for microseismic monitoring applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duchkov, A. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.

    2015-10-27

    We have developed and illustrated an approach for geomechanic modeling of elastic wave generation (microsiesmic event occurrence) during incremental fracture growth. We then derived properties of effective point seismic sources (radiation patterns) approximating obtained wavefields. These results establish connection between geomechanic models of hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. Thus, the results of the moment tensor inversion of microseismic data can be related to different geomechanic scenarios of hydraulic fracture growth. In future, the results can be used for calibrating hydrofrac models. We carried out a series of numerical simulations and made some observations about wave generation during fracture growth. In particular when the growing fracture hits pre-existing crack then it generates much stronger microseismic event compared to fracture growth in homogeneous medium (radiation pattern is very close to the theoretical dipole-type source mechanism)

  4. Analysis of seismic sources for different mechanisms of fracture growth for microseismic monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchkov, A. A.; Stefanov, Yu. P.

    2015-10-01

    We have developed and illustrated an approach for geomechanic modeling of elastic wave generation (microsiesmic event occurrence) during incremental fracture growth. We then derived properties of effective point seismic sources (radiation patterns) approximating obtained wavefields. These results establish connection between geomechanic models of hydraulic fracturing and microseismic monitoring. Thus, the results of the moment tensor inversion of microseismic data can be related to different geomechanic scenarios of hydraulic fracture growth. In future, the results can be used for calibrating hydrofrac models. We carried out a series of numerical simulations and made some observations about wave generation during fracture growth. In particular when the growing fracture hits pre-existing crack then it generates much stronger microseismic event compared to fracture growth in homogeneous medium (radiation pattern is very close to the theoretical dipole-type source mechanism).

  5. Borehole Breakouts in Berea Sandstone Reveal a New Fracture Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimson, B. C.

    - Vertical drilling experiments in high-porosity (22% and 25%) Berea sandstone subjected to critical true triaxial far-field stresses, in which σH (maximum horizontal stress) >σv (vertical stress) >σh (least horizontal stress), revealed a new and non-dilatant failure mechanism that results in thin and very long tabular borehole breakouts that have the appearance of fractures, and which counterintuitively develop orthogonally to σH. These breakouts are fundamentally different from those induced in crystalline rocks, as well as limestones and medium-porosity Berea sandstone. Breakouts in these rocks are typically dog-eared in shape, a result of dilatant multi-cracking tangential to the hole and subparallel to the maximum far-field horizontal stress σH, followed by progressive buckling and shearing of detached rock flakes created by the cracks. In the high-porosity sandstone a narrow layer of grains compacted normal to σH is observed just ahead of the breakout tip. This layer is nearly identical to ``compaction bands'' observed in the field. It is suggested that when a critical tangential stress concentration is reached along the σh spring line at the borehole wall, grain bonding breaks down and a compaction band is formed normal to σH. Debonded loose grains are expelled into the borehole, assisted by the circulating drilling fluid. As the breakout tip advances, the stress concentration ahead of it persists or may even increase, extending the compaction band, which in turn leads to breakout lengthening.

  6. Modeling of mechanical properties in alpha/beta-titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sujoy Kumar

    2005-11-01

    The accelerated insertion of titanium alloys in component application requires the development of predictive capabilities for various aspects of their behavior, for example, phase stability, microstructural evolution and property-microstructure relationships over a wide range of length and time scales. In this presentation some navel aspects of property-microstructure relationships and microstructural evolution in alpha/beta Ti alloys will be discussed. Neural Network (NN) Models based on a Bayesian framework have been developed to predict the mechanical properties of alpha/beta Ti alloys. The development of such rules-based model requires the population of extensive databases, which in the present case are microstructurally-based. The steps involved in database development include producing controlled variations of the microstructure using novel approaches to heat-treatments, the use of standardized stereology protocols to characterize and quantify microstructural features rapidly, and mechanical testing of the heat-treated specimens. These databases have been used to train and test NN Models for prediction of mechanical properties. In addition, these models have been used to identify the influence of individual microstructural features on the mechanical properties, consequently guiding the efforts towards development of more robust mechanistically based models. In order to understand the property-microstructure relationships, a detailed understanding of microstructure evolution is imperative. The crystallography of the microstructure developing as a result of the solid-state beta → beta+alpha transformation has been studied in detail by employing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Orientation Imaging Microscopy (in a high resolution SEM), site-specific TEM sample preparation using focused ion beam, and TEM based techniques. The influence of variant selection on the evolution of microstructure will be specifically addressed.

  7. Phase transformations during deformation of Fe-Ni and Fe-Mn alloys produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdyntsev, V. V.; Pustov, L. Yu.; Kaloshkin, S. D.; Tomilin, I. A.; Shelekhov, E. V.; Laptev, A. I.; Baldokhin, Yu. V.; Estrin, E. I.

    2007-10-01

    Compositions of Fe(100 - x)Mn x ( x = 10 and 12 at. %) and Fe(100 - y)Ni y ( y = 18 and 20 at. %) were produced by combined mechanical alloying of pure-metal powders and annealed in the austenitic field. After annealing and cooling to room temperature, the alloys had a single-phase austenitic structure. During deformation, the γ phase partially transforms into the α 2 phase (and/or ɛ phase in Fe-Mn alloys). The phase composition of the alloys after deformation depends on the amount of alloying elements and the predeformation annealing regime. The amount of martensite in the structure of a bulk alloy obtained by powder compacting grows proportionally to the degree of deformation of the sample.

  8. Fracture toughness of shape memory alloy actuators: effect of transformation-induced plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, Sameer; Solomou, Alexandros; Baxevanis, Theocharis; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2016-04-01

    Numerical analysis of static cracks in a plane strain center-cracked infinite medium shape memory alloy (SMA) panel subjected to cyclic thermal variations and a constant mechanical load is conducted using the finite element method. In solid-state SMA actuators, permanent changes in the material's microstructure in the form of dislocations are caused during cyclic thermomechanical loading, leading to macroscopic irreversible strains, known as transformation induced plastic (TRIP) strains. The influence of these accumulated TRIP strains on mechanical fields close to the crack tip is investigated in the present paper. Virtual crack growth technique (VCCT) in ABAQUS FEA suite is employed to calculate the crack tip energy release rate and crack is assumed to be stationary (or static) so that the crack tip energy release rate never reaches the material specific critical value. Increase in the crack tip energy release rate is observed during cooling and its relationship with accumulation of TRIP due to cyclic transformation is studied.

  9. Refinement performance and mechanism of an Al-50Si alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, H.S.; Liu, X.F.

    2008-11-15

    The microstructure and melt structure of primary silicon particles in an Al-50%Si (wt.%) alloy have been investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro-analysis and a high temperature X-ray diffractometer. The results show that the Al-50Si alloy can be effectively refined by a newly developed Si-20P master alloy, and the melting temperature is crucial to the refinement process. The minimal overheating degree {delta}T{sub min} ({delta}T{sub min} is the difference between the minimal overheating temperature T{sub min} and the liquidus temperature T{sub L}) for good refinement is about 260 deg. C. Primary silicon particles can be refined after adding 0.2 wt.% phosphorus amount at sufficient temperature, and their average size transforms from 2-4 mm to about 30 {mu}m. The X-ray diffraction data of the Al-50Si melt demonstrate that structural change occurs when the melting temperature varies from 1100 deg. C to 1300 deg. C. Additionally, the relationship between the refinement mechanism and the melt structure is discussed.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of nanometric cutting mechanisms of amorphous alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Peng-Zhe; Qiu, Chen; Fang, Feng-Zhou; Yuan, Dan-Dan; Shen, Xue-Cen

    2014-10-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to study the nanometric cutting process of Cu50Zr50 amorphous alloy. The effects of cutting depth, cutting speed and tool edge radius on the cutting force, workpiece pile-up and temperature of the cutting region are studied to investigate the mechanisms of the material removal and surface formation in the nanometric cutting process. It is found that the material removal of amorphous alloy workpiece is mainly based on extrusion at the nanoscale instead of shearing at the macroscale. The plastic deformation of amorphous alloy is mainly due to the formation of shear transformation zones during the nanometric cutting process. The results also suggest that bigger cutting depth and cutting speed will lead to larger tangential force and normal force. However, the tool edge radius has a negligible effect on the tangential force although the normal force increases with the increase of tool edge radius. The workpiece pile-up increases with an increase of the cutting depth, but decreases with an increase of the edge radius of the tool. The workpiece pile-up is not significantly affected by the cutting speed. It is also found that larger cutting depth and cutting speed will result in higher temperature in the cutting region of workpiece and the average Newtonian layer temperature of the tool. Tool edge radius has no significant effect on the temperature distribution of the workpiece and the average Newtonian layer temperature of the tool.

  11. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rock formations during a glacial advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Suvorov, A. P.; Selvadurai, P. A.

    2015-07-01

    The paper examines the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes that develop in a fractured rock region within a fluid-saturated rock mass due to loads imposed by an advancing glacier. This scenario needs to be examined in order to assess the suitability of potential sites for the location of deep geologic repositories for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The THM processes are examined using a computational multiphysics approach that takes into account thermo-poroelasticity of the intact geological formation and the presence of a system of sessile but hydraulically interacting fractures (fracture zones). The modelling considers coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical effects in both the intact rock and the fracture zones due to contact normal stresses and fluid pressure at the base of the advancing glacier. Computational modelling provides an assessment of the role of fractures in modifying the pore pressure generation within the entire rock mass.

  12. Thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in fractured rock formations during glacial advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.; Suvorov, A. P.; Selvadurai, P. A.

    2014-11-01

    The paper examines the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes that develop in a fractured rock region within a fluid-saturated rock mass due to loads imposed by an advancing glacier. This scenario needs to be examined in order to assess the suitability of potential sites for the location of deep geologic repositories for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The THM processes are examined using a computational multiphysics approach that takes into account thermo-poroelasticity of the intact geological formation and the presence of a system of sessile but hydraulically interacting fractures (fracture zones). The modeling considers coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical effects in both the intact rock and the fracture zones due to contact normal stresses and fluid pressure at the base of the advancing glacier. Computational modelling provides an assessment of the role of fractures that can modify the pore pressure generation within the entire rock mass.

  13. Subcritical fracture propagation in rocks: An examination using the methods of fracture mechanics and non-destructive testing. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, P. L.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental investigation of tensile rock fracture is presented with an emphasis on characterizing time dependent crack growth using the methods of fracture mechanics. Subcritical fracture experiments were performed in moist air on glass and five different rock types at crack velocities using the double torsion technique. The experimental results suggest that subcritical fracture resistance in polycrystals is dominated by microstructural effects. Evidence for gross violations of the assumptions of linear elastic fracture mechanics and double torsion theory was found in the tests on rocks. In an effort to obtain a better understanding of the physical breakdown processes associated with rock fracture, a series of nondestructive evaluation tests were performed during subcritical fracture experiments on glass and granite. Comparison of the observed process zone shape with that expected on the basis of a critical normal principal tensile stress criterion shows that the zone is much more elongated in the crack propagation direction than predicted by the continuum based microcracking model alone.

  14. Effect of Holding Time Before Solidification on Double-Oxide Film Defects and Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Mahmoud Ahmed; Salem, Hanadi A. G.; Kandeil, Abdelrazek Youssef; Griffiths, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    Double-oxide films (bifilms) have been held responsible for the variability in mechanical properties of aluminum castings. It has been suggested that the air entrapped inside a bifilm can react with the surrounding melt, leading to its consumption, which might improve the mechanical properties of the castings. In this work the effect of holding the melt before solidification on the distribution of mechanical properties, and by implication on entrained double oxide films, was investigated for several different aluminum alloys. The Weibull moduli of plate castings were determined under tensile conditions, and their fracture surfaces were examined for evidence of oxide films. The results suggested the occurrence of two competing mechanisms during the holding treatment: (1) the consumption of air inside the bifilms by reaction with the surrounding molten metal that may lead to improvements in mechanical properties and (2) the accompanying diffusion of hydrogen into the bifilms, which would be expected to have a deleterious effect on properties.

  15. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  16. High temperature mechanical properties of a zirconium-modified, precipitation- strengthened nickel, 30 percent copper alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A precipitation-strengthened Monel-type alloy has been developed through minor alloying additions of zirconium to a base Ni-30Cu alloy. The results of this exploratory study indicate that thermomechanical processing of a solution-treated Ni-30Cu-0.2Zr alloy produced a dispersion of precipitates. The precipitates have been tentatively identified as a Ni5Zr compound. A comparison of the mechanical properties, as determined by testing in air, of the zirconium-modified alloy to those of a Ni-30Cu alloy reveals that the precipitation-strengthened alloy has improved tensile properties to 1200 K and improved stress-rupture properties to 1100 K. The oxidation characteristics of the modified alloy appeared to be equivalent to those of the base Ni-30Cu alloy.

  17. Characterization of shape memory alloys for safety mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Jarred T.; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2008-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are metals that exhibit large recoverable strains and exert large forces with tremendous energy densities. The behavior of SMAs is thermomechanically coupled. Their response to temperature is sensitive to their loading condition and their response to loading is sensitive to their thermal condition. This coupled behavior is not to be circumvented, but to be confronted and understood, since it is what manifests SMA's superior clamping performance. To reasonably characterize the coupled behavior of SMA clamping rings used in safety mechanisms, we conduct a series of experiments on SMA samples. The results of the tests will allow increased fidelity in modeling and failure analysis of parts.

  18. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  19. Process Mechanics of Low Plasticity Burnishing of Nitinol Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. H.; Guo, Y. B.; McKinney, J.; Wei, X. T.

    2012-12-01

    Nitinol alloys have received considerable attention in biomedical and aerospace applications. Surface integrity of Nitinol devices by various manufacturing processes is crucial for their functionality. Low plasticity burnishing (LPB) is very promising to modify surface integrity due to its unique capability to adjust material properties down to the deep subsurface on the order of a few millimeters. Burnishing mechanics is essential to understand its effect on surface properties. The depth and width of burnished surface materials are characterized. A three-dimensional finite element simulation has been developed to incorporate the superelastic mechanical behavior of Nitinol. The simulation predictions are validated with the experimental results. The contact stresses, residual stresses, and strain profiles are investigated to better understand burnishing mechanics.

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Tensile Properties of a VT6 Alloy Manufactured by Selective Laser Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarova, T. I.; Imayev, V. M.; Imayev, R. M.; Pavlinich, S. P.

    2015-10-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of a material manufactured from the VT6 titanium alloy by the method of selective laser melting (SLM) are investigated. In the initial state, the microstructure of the SLMmaterial consists of columnar β-grains elongated in the direction of heat sink, which were transformed during cooling into the acicular martensite α'-phase. A heat treatment, including two-stage annealing at 900 and 700°C, transfers the microstructure into equilibrium, two-phase state, with the elongation of β-grains being retained. Mechanical tensile tests were performed in the direction normal to the layer packing formed during SLM. It is found that strength properties of the workpiece manufactured by the SLM process are similar to those of the VT6 alloy manufactured by conventional casting, while its room-temperature ductility is noticeably higher. Deformation-relief studies of the specimen surface demonstrated that the layers formed during SLM affect neither the development of deformation nor fracture of the material.

  1. Mechanical properties of tungsten alloys with Y 2O 3 and titanium additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, M. V.; Martín, A.; Pastor, J. Y.; LLorca, J.; Monge, M. A.; Pareja, R.

    2011-10-01

    In this research the mechanical behaviour of pure tungsten (W) and its alloys (2 wt.% Ti-0.47 wt.% Y 2O 3 and 4 wt.% Ti-0.5 wt.% Y 2O 3) is compared. These tungsten alloys, have been obtained by powder metallurgy. The yield strength, fracture toughness and elastic modulus have been studied in the temperature interval of 25 °C to 1000 °C. The results have shown that the addition of Ti substantially improves the bending strength and toughness of W, but it also dramatically increases the DBTT. On the other hand, the addition of 0.5% Y 2O 3, is enough to improve noticeably the oxidation behaviour at the higher temperatures. The grain size, fractography and microstructure are studied in these materials. Titanium is a good grain growth inhibitor and effective precursor of liquid phase in HIP. The simultaneous presence of Y 2O 3 and Ti permits to obtain materials with low pores presence.

  2. Enhancement of the fracture strength and glass-forming ability of CoFeTaB bulk glassy alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baolong; Inoue, Akihisa

    2005-09-01

    Co43Fe20Ta5.5B31.5 bulk glassy alloy has the best glass-forming ability (GFA) among the Co-based glassy alloys, and the highest strength (the compressive true strength σf = 5185 MPa) among all known bulk crystalline and glassy alloys. With the aim of synthesizing new Co-based bulk glassy alloys with much higher strength and much larger GFA, we investigated the effect of Mo and Si additions on the enhancement of σf and GFA in the Co-(Fe, Mo, Ta)-(B, Si) system. The small amount of 2 at.% Mo added to the Co-Fe-Ta-B glassy alloy resulted in obtaining an ultrahigh true fracture strength of 5545 MPa and high Young's modulus (E) of 282 GPa. By further adding 1 and 2 at.% Si, Co-(Fe, Mo, Ta)-(B, Si) bulk glassy alloys were synthesized in the diameter range up to 3 mm, and they exhibited σf of over 4450 MPa and E of over 227 GPa. In addition, the ultrahigh-strength glassy alloys simultaneously exhibited excellent soft magnetic properties, i.e., saturation magnetization of 0.32-0.35 T, low coercive force of 0.7-1.1 A m-1, and high effective permeability of 3.9-4.77 × 104 at 1 kHz. The improvement of GFA and σf is interpreted to result from the enhanced atomic bonding nature by adding Mo and Si.

  3. Mechanical behavior and fracture characteristics of off-axis fiber composites. 2: Theory and comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical behavior and stresses inducing fracture modes of unidirectional high-modulus graphite-fiber/epoxy composites subjected to off-axis tensile loads were investigated theoretically. The investigation included the use of composite mechanics, combined-stress failure criteria, and finite-element stress analysis. The results are compared with experimental data and led to the formulation of criteria and convenient plotting procedures for identifying, characterizing, and quantifying these fracture modes.

  4. Fracture Mechanics Analyses of the Slip-Side Joggle Regions of Wing-Leading-Edge Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Phillips, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle wing-leading edge consists of panels that are made of reinforced carbon-carbon. Coating spallation was observed near the slip-side region of the panels that experience extreme heating. To understand this phenomenon, a root-cause investigation was conducted. As part of that investigation, fracture mechanics analyses of the slip-side joggle regions of the hot panels were conducted. This paper presents an overview of the fracture mechanics analyses.

  5. The improvement of cryogenic mechanical properties of Fe-12 Mn and Fe-8 Mn alloy steels through thermal/mechanical treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. K.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation has been made to improve the low temperature mechanical properties of Fe-8Mn and Fe-12Mn-0.2 Ti alloy steels. A reversion annealing heat treatment in the two-phase (alpha + gamma) region following cold working has been identified as an effective treatment. In an Fe-12Mn-0.2Ti alloy a promising combination of low temperature (-196 C) fracture toughness and yield strength was obtained by this method. The improvement of properties was attributed to the refinement of grain size and to the introduction of a uniform distribution of retained austenite (gamma). It was also shown that an Fe-8Mn steel could be grain-refined by a purely thermal treatment because of its dislocated alpha-prime martensitic structure and absence of epsilon martensite. As a result, a significant reduction of ductile to brittle transition temperature was obtained.

  6. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  7. Influence of Nano-Alumina and Micro-Size Copper on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnesium Alloys AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau Bosley Nguyen, Quy; Khin Tun, Sandar; Gupta, Manoj

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, magnesium composites are synthesized through the addition of nano-alumina and micron size copper particulates in AZ31 magnesium alloy using the technique of disintegrated melt deposition. The simultaneous addition of Cu and nano-alumina particulates led to an overall improvement in physical, microstructural characteristics and mechanical response of AZ31. Small size and reasonably distributed second phases were formed. The 0.2% yield strength increased from 180 to 300 MPa (67%), while the ductility increased by almost 24%. The overall tensile properties assessed in terms of work of fracture improved by 66%. An attempt is made to correlate the tensile response of composites with their microstructural characteristics. The results suggest that these alloy composites have significant potential in diverse and wider engineering applications.

  8. Relationships between fracture patterns, geodynamics and mechanical stratigraphy in Carbonates (South-East Basin, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarche, Juliette; Lavenu, Arthur P. C.; Gauthier, Bertrand D. M.; Guglielmi, Yves; Jayet, Océane

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at improving the understanding of fracture genesis in layered carbonate sedimentary sequences, focusing on field analysis of Jurassic to Maastrichtian age carbonates of Provence (France). Fracture patterns of 9 outcrops were characterized in 3D: 6 of Urgonian, 1 of Tithonian and 2 of Campanian-Late Maastrichtian ages. Seven sites are located in relatively weakly deformed areas away from larges fault and fold zones where strain partitioning and stress localization effects may take place. Two sites are located in fold flanks for the purpose of relative dating and for comparison with the sites in the weakly deformed areas. Patterns and detailed fracture attributes were compared to host rock sedimentary facies, porosity and P-wave velocities. Fracture chronology was determined with cross-cutting relationships and compared to burial/uplift history reconstructed from subsidence curves and from a regional structural analysis. Our results show that fractures are clustered in two perpendicular joint sets whatever the host rock age. We observe an average spacing of 20 cm and no control of strike, age, facies, or bed thickness on fracture size. There is no mechanical stratigraphy. The fracture sequence compared to subsidence curves indicates that fractures occurred before tectonic inversion, during early and rapid burial, whatever the host rock age and facies. The abundance of burial stylolites does not correlate with maximum burial depth but with fracture frequency, host rock porosity and P-wave velocity. We conclude that the studied carbonates had early brittle properties controlled by their geographic position rather than by depositional facies types and undergone early diagenesis. The porosity loss/gain and the mechanical differentiation in carbonates of Provence could have been acquired during very early burial and diagenesis and have preserved through time. This study also demonstrates that regional fracturing is not necessarily driven by large scale

  9. Effect of strain rate on shear properties and fracture characteristics of DP600 and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmaan, Taamjeed; Butcher, Cliff; Abedini, Armin; Worswick, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Shear tests were performed at strain rates ranging from quasi-static (.01 s-1) to 600 s-1 for DP600 steel and AA5182-O sheet metal alloys at room temperature. A miniature sized shear specimen was modified and validated in this work to perform high strain rate shear testing. Digital image correlation (DIC) techniques were employed to measure the strains in the experiments, and a criterion to detect the onset of fracture based on the hardening rate of the materials is proposed. At equivalent strains greater than 20%, the DP600 and AA5182 alloys demonstrated a reduced work hardening rate at elevated strain rates. At lower strains, the DP600 shows positive rate sensitivity while the AA5182 was not sensitive to strain rate. For both alloys, the equivalent fracture strain and elongation to failure decreased with strain rate. A conversion of the shear stress to an equivalent stress using the von Mises yield criterion provided excellent agreement with the results from tensile tests at elevated strain rates. Unlike the tensile test, the shear test is not limited by the onset of necking so the equivalent stress can be determined over a larger range of strain.

  10. Variations in Fracturing Mechanisms Observed by Broadband Microseismic Monitoring of Hydraulic Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Niu, F.; Chen, H.; Zuo, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is the key stimulation technology to improve unconventional hydrocarbon recovery nowadays. Stimulation increases permeability of tight formations by causing fractures at depth. It involves pumping high-pressure fluid into reservoir rocks to force the opening of cracks, which could allow oil and gas to flow freely. The progress of a fracturing operation must be monitored carefully as fracturing could activate existing faults, leading the fluid mixed with chemicals to propagate beyond the targeted treatment zone. In order to study dynamic processes involved in hydraulic fracturing, we deployed a small-scale seismic array consisting of 22 broadband seismographs at the surface above a hydraulic fracturing area to monitor the whole fracturing progress. We made continuous recording for 20 days, and detected a total of 961 microseismic events with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) recordings. We found that these events occurred either during the fracturing operation or after the fluid pumping. Some of the events also do not seem to be directly induced by the pumping, based on their locations and sizes. We determined the focal mechanisms of all events using the P-wave polarity data, and found that both the microseismicity and their focal mechanisms exhibit significant spatial and temporal variations. This variability can be associated with the hydraulic treatment, pre-existing faults, as well as the evolving stress field during the treatment. We computed the Coulomb stress changes of the observed seismicity to seek its contribution to the observed seismic variability.

  11. Data Sheet Program and Mechanical Properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Ono, Y.; Matsuoka, S.; Okita, K.

    2004-06-28

    In the development of Japan's self-developed H-IIA launch vehicle, it is important to sufficiently comprehend the properties of materials under conditions in which the materials are used in the system for its design and the improvement of its reliability. Through the process of failure analysis of the LE-7 engine of H-II No. 8 in 1999, detailed materials data and photographs of the fracture surface were required as reference data to determine in terms of fracture morphology and to analyze the fracture stress. A series of mechanical properties tests, such as tensile tests, impact tests, fracture toughness tests, and fatigue tests, on Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 at room temperature to 4K were mainly conducted by NIMS and NASDA. The obtained tensile and fracture toughness properties were a little bit smaller than those reported by NASA and NRIM, however, the fatigue properties were relatively lower than the data reported so far. Data resulting from the tests were reviewed in detail and published in the form of data sheets. This paper will introduce the data sheet program on space use materials and discuss an effect of microstructure of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 on their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures.

  12. Data Sheet Program and Mechanical Properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogata, T.; Yuri, T.; Sumiyoshi, H.; Ono, Y.; Matsuoka, S.; Okita, K.

    2004-06-01

    In the development of Japan's self-developed H-IIA launch vehicle, it is important to sufficiently comprehend the properties of materials under conditions in which the materials are used in the system for its design and the improvement of its reliability. Through the process of failure analysis of the LE-7 engine of H-II No. 8 in 1999, detailed materials data and photographs of the fracture surface were required as reference data to determine in terms of fracture morphology and to analyze the fracture stress. A series of mechanical properties tests, such as tensile tests, impact tests, fracture toughness tests, and fatigue tests, on Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 at room temperature to 4K were mainly conducted by NIMS and NASDA. The obtained tensile and fracture toughness properties were a little bit smaller than those reported by NASA and NRIM, however, the fatigue properties were relatively lower than the data reported so far. Data resulting from the tests were reviewed in detail and published in the form of data sheets. This paper will introduce the data sheet program on space use materials and discuss an effect of microstructure of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI and Alloy 718 on their mechanical properties at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Mechanical properties and fracture behavior of single-layer phosphorene at finite temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, Zhen-Dong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Ding, Zhiwei; Jiang, Jin-Wu; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorene, a new two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene, has attracted great attention in recent years due to its superior physical and electrical properties. However, compared to graphene and other 2D materials, phosphorene has a relatively low Young’s modulus and fracture strength, which may limit its applications due to possible structure failures. For the mechanical reliability of future phosphorene-based nanodevices, it is necessary to have a deep understanding of the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene. Previous studies on the mechanical properties of phosphorene were based on first principles calculations at 0 K. In this work, we employ molecular dynamics simulations to explore the mechanical properties and fracture behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures. It is found that temperature has a significant effect on the mechanical properties of phosphorene. The fracture strength and strain reduce by more than 65% when the temperature increases from 0 K to 450 K. Moreover, the fracture strength and strain in the zigzag direction is more sensitive to the temperature rise than that in the armchair direction. More interestingly, the failure crack propagates preferably along the groove in the puckered structure when uniaxial tension is applied in the armchair direction. In contrast, when the uniaxial tension is applied in the zigzag direction, multiple cracks are observed with rough fracture surfaces. Our present work provides useful information about the mechanical properties and failure behaviors of phosphorene at finite temperatures.

  14. A Fracture-Mechanical Model of Crack Growth and Interaction: Application to Pre-eruptive Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, C.; Sammonds, P.; Kilburn, C.

    2007-12-01

    A greater understanding of the physical processes occurring within a volcano is a key aspect in the success of eruption forecasting. By considering the role of fracture growth, interaction and coalescence in the formation of dykes and conduits as well as the source mechanism for observed seismicity we can create a more general, more applicable model for precursory seismicity. The frequency of volcano-tectonic earthquakes, created by fracturing of volcanic rock, often shows a short-term increase prior to eruption. Using fracture mechanics, the model presented here aims to determine the conditions necessary for the acceleration in fracture events which produces the observed pre-eruptive seismicity. By focusing on the cause of seismic events rather than simply the acceleration patterns observed, the model also highlights the distinction between an accelerating seismic sequence ending with an eruption and a short-term increase which returns to background levels with no activity occurring, an event also observed in the field and an important capability if false alarms are to be avoided. This 1-D model explores the effects of a surrounding stress field and the distribution of multi-scale cracks on the interaction and coalescence of these cracks to form an open pathway for magma ascent. Similarly to seismic observations in the field, and acoustic emissions data from the laboratory, exponential and hyperbolic accelerations in fracturing events are recorded. Crack distribution and inter-crack distance appears to be a significant controlling factor on the evolution of the fracture network, dominating over the effects of a remote stress field. The generality of the model and its basis on fundamental fracture mechanics results makes it applicable to studies of fracture networks in numerous situations. For example looking at the differences between high temperature fracture processes and purely brittle failure the model can be similarly applied to fracture dynamics in the

  15. Mechanical Responses of Superlight β-Based Mg-Li-Al-Zn Wrought Alloys under Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jenn-Ming; Lin, Yi-Hua; Su, Chien-Wei; Wang, Jian-Yih

    2009-05-01

    To extend the application of lightweight Mg alloys in the automotive industry, this study suggests a β-based Mg-Li alloy (LAZ1110) with superior vibration fracture resistance by means of material design. In the cold-rolled state, a strengthened β matrix by the additions of Al and Zn, as well as intergranular platelike α precipitates, which are able to stunt the crack growth, contributes to a comparable vibration life with commercial Mg-Al-Zn alloys under a similar strain condition.

  16. Mechanical properties and the electronic structure of transition of metal alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arsenault, R. J.; Drew, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    This interdiscipline research program was undertaken in an effort to investigate the relationship between the mechanical strength of Mo based alloys with their electronic structure. Electronic properties of these alloys were examined through optical studies, and the classical solid solution strengthening mechanisms were considered, based on size and molecular differences to determine if these mechanisms could explain the hardness data.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of osteoporotic hip fractures in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Föger-Samwald, Ursula; Vekszler, György; Hörz-Schuch, Edith; Salem, Sylvia; Wipperich, Markus; Ritschl, Peter; Mousavi, Mehdi; Pietschmann, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A common manifestation of age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis are fractures of the hip. Age-related osteoporosis is thought to be determined by a number of intrinsic factors including genetics, hormonal changes, changes in levels of oxidative stress, or an inflammatory status associated with the aging process. The aim of this study was to investigate gene expression and bone architecture in bone samples derived from elderly osteoporotic women with hip fractures (OP) in comparison to bone samples from age matched women with osteoarthritis of the hip (OA). Femoral heads and adjacent neck tissue were collected from 10 women with low-trauma hip fractures (mean age 83±6) and consecutive surgical hip replacement. Ten bone samples from patients undergoing hip replacement due to osteoarthritis (mean age 80±5) served as controls. One half of each bone sample was subjected to gene expression analysis. The second half of each bone sample was analyzed by microcomputed tomography. From each half, samples from four different regions, the central and subcortical region of the femoral head and neck, were analyzed. We could show a significantly decreased expression of the osteoblast related genes RUNX2, Osterix, Sclerostin, WNT10B, and Osteocalcin, a significantly increased ratio of RANKL to Osteoprotegerin, and a significantly increased expression of the enzymes superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and glutathione peroxidase GPX3, and of the inflammatory cytokine IL6 in bone samples from hip fracture patients compared to controls. Major microstructural changes in OP bone were seen in the neck and were characterized by a significant decrease of bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and a significant increase of trabecular separation. In conclusion, our data give evidence for a decreased expression of osteoblast related genes and increased expression of osteoclast related genes. Furthermore, increased expression of SOD2 and GPX3 suggest increased

  18. Characterization of exposure dependent fatigue crack growth kinetics and damage mechanisms for aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ro, Yunjo

    The effect of environmental exposure [given by the ratio of water vapor pressure to the loading frequency (PH2O/f)] on fatigue crack growth rates (FCGR) and damage mechanisms has been investigated for Al-Cu-Li/Mg alloys tested at constant stress intensity range (DeltaK = KMAX - KMIN). Different exposure dependences of the FCGR are explained by H-embrittlement and 3 rate-limiting processes that are similar for each alloy and aging condition. It is shown that the dislocation slip character (heterogeneous planar vs. wavy) controls FCGR at low to moderate exposures, rather than alloy composition and strengthening precipitate reactivity. However, the benefit of planar slip is significantly reduced at higher exposures. An SEM-based electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/stereology method was used to successfully quantify changes in fatigue fracture surface crystallography as a function of exposure for a peak aged Al-Cu-Li alloy and an under-aged Al-Cu-Mg alloy. Near-{111} slip band cracking (SBC) observed under high vacuum conditions is gradually replaced by near-{001}/{011} and high index, {hkl}, cracking planes as PH2O/f is increased. The complete absence of near-{111} SBC at higher exposures suggests H enhanced decohesion rather than slip based damage process enhanced by H. This conclusion was substantiated by direct TEM observation. Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling was used to produce thin foils for TEM, which successfully revealed the underlying dislocation structure at the crack surface and within surrounding materials in under-aged Al-Cu-Mg tested at exposure conditions of ˜10 -8 and 50 Pa·sec. Both conditions exhibit a similar layer of dislocation cells just below the fracture surface which abruptly changes to localized slip bands away from the fracture surface, confirming the presence of a strain gradient at the crack tip. However, the thickness of the substructure layer and slip band width observed at ˜10-8 Pa·sec was larger than those observed at 50 Pa

  19. Formation of tetragonal hydrogen tungsten bronze by reactive mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Urretavizcaya, G. Tonus, F.; Gaudin, E.; Bobet, J.-L.; Castro, F.J.

    2007-10-15

    Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying monoclinic tungsten (VI) oxide under hydrogen atmosphere. Two milling devices with different energy ranges were used. Regardless of the distinct reaction times, a similar phase evolution was observed with both apparatus. The characterization of the materials was performed by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. - Graphical abstract: Hydrogen tungsten bronzes have been synthesized by reactive mechanical alloying (RMA) monoclinic WO{sub 3} under H{sub 2} atmosphere. By using two milling devices with different energy ranges a similar phase evolution with distinct reaction times was observed. The materials were characterized by XRD, SEM, DSC and total hydrogen content determination. The final product obtained was a mixture of tetragonal H{sub 0.33}WO{sub 3} and H{sub 0.23}WO{sub 3} bronzes. Display Omitted.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of W80Ni10Mo10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, A.; Karak, S. K.; Pal, S.

    2015-02-01

    The present study aims at synthesis and characterization of nanostructured W80Ni10Mo10 (wt. %) alloy produced by mechanical alloying (MA). Elemental powders of tungsten (W), nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo) were subjected to mechanical attrition in a high energy planetary ball-mill using chrome steel as grinding media and toluene as a process control agent. The crystallite size and lattice strain of the nanostructured powders at different stages of milling (0 h to 20h) was calculated from the X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD). The crystallite size of W in W80Ni10Mo10 powder was reduced from 100 μm to 55 nm at 10 h and farther reduction to 40 nm at 20 h of milling with increase in lattice strain of 0.25% at 20 h of milling. The lattice parameter of tungsten showed initial expansion upto 0.03% at 10 h of milling and then contraction upto 0.04% at 20 h of milling. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed mixed morphology of W80Ni10Mo10 powders consisting spherical and elongated particles after 20 h of milling. SEM analysis also revealed that particle size reduced from 100 μm to 2 μm with an increase in the milling time from 0 to 20 hours. The dark-field Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) observations revealed that the crystallite size of W in milled W80Ni10Mo10 alloy is in good agreement with calculated crystallite size from XRD.